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WELCOME TO KAUA‘I

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KAUA‘I GUESTBOOK is part of a series of four books that Where® Hawaii will release on all the major Hawaiian Islands in 2016-2017, including O‘ahu, Maui and Hawai‘i Island. Each island will be represented with its own unique, iconic landmark image as the cover art. These books are designed to ®

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entertain and educate visitors about each respective island, and to tell the stories of Hawai‘i in an engaging

O‘AHU 2017

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and artistic manner. We hope you enjoy the book as

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much as we took pleasure in writing about Hawai‘i’s ISLAND

KAUA‘I 2017

HAWAI‘I ISLAND 2017

HAWAI‘I

KAUA‘I

treasures, places and people.

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Fun for the Entire Family • Snorkeling • Beach Landing -Tour Ancient Sites • Dolphins • Seasonal Whale Watching

“Best trip I have ever had here on Kauai!” - Sean & Christel, Granada Hills, CA

RAFT ADVENTURES

Beach Landing ( )* Waterfalls • Sea Caves* Dolphins • Turtles View Historic Sites Picnic Lunch Sightsee Snorkel Tours Gear & Instruction provided Fun Experienced Crew CONDITIONS PERMITTING

DELUXE LUCKY LADY

Upper Viewing Deck Waterslide ~ Swim Platform Spacious seating Inside Cabin and Out on Both Decks! Snorkel Gear & Instruction Clean Restrooms & Showers Cont. Breakfast, Buffet Lunch Sunset Dinner Cruise Soft Drinks ~ Mai Tai’s And Lots More Fun

Since 1986

Seating is Limited!

Call Us: 826-PALI

Built for your Comfort, Safety & Fun! Snorkel, Sightsee, Sunset Dinner Cruises Daily. 115975-AD-19.indd 1 KAUGB_161200_0c2-007.indd 3

For “The Best Day of Your Vacation” Port Allen Office: 808-335-5309 Toll Free: 800-733-7997 • www.kauaiseatours.com *Tours may vary due to ocean conditions and seasonal changes Whale Watching Dec.-April, 24 hr. cancellation / reschedule policy applies

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KAUA‘I CONTENTS

ISLAND ESSENCE 24 PHOTO ESSAY LIFE AQUATIC A talented photographer turns his lens toward the ocean. BY MIKE COOTS

32 SEAL OF APPROVAL SAVING THE HAWAIIAN MONK SEAL NOAA scientists and community volunteers collaborate to help protect Hawai‘i’s rarest mammal. BY SIMPLICIO PARAGAS

ON THE COVER An aerial view of Waipo‘o Falls, which flows 800 feet into Waimea Canyon, as dark storm clouds loom in the background. ©BOB POOL/GETTY IMAGES INSIDE FRONT COVER Also known as the Makana Mountain, Bali Hai is part of a National Tropical Botanical Garden at the beginning of the Nāpali Coast. ©MONICA & MICHAEL/AURORA PHOTOS

38 THE SONG OF MANA MUSICAL IMPLEMENTS Traditional Hawaiian instruments harken back to the lilting sounds of old Hawai‘i. BY KRISTEN NEMOTO

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The Original Waterfall Collection

An incomparable collection of Hawaiian and Island lifestyle jewelry KAUAI Poipu Shopping Village • Grand Hyatt Kauai OAHU • MAUI • BIG ISLAND OF HAWAII • NCL PRIDE OF AMERICA NaHoku.com • 1-800-260-3912 Best of HONOLULU MAGAZINE 2016

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HAWAII’S BEST

People’s Choice Awards The Star Advertiser 2016

HAWAII MAGAZINE Readers’ Choice Award 2016

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KAUA‘I CONTENTS

ISLAND ESSENTIAL 12 NAVIGATE

PARTING SHOT

KAUA‘I’S REGIONS

E KIPA HOU MAI

An overview of the island.

No two parts of Kaua‘i are alike. PRINCEVILLE: The picturesque area is a popular resort destination. HANAPĒPĒ: Kaua‘i’s “Biggest Little Town” possesses rustic charm. ANAHOLA: “Gilligan’s Island” was filmed at this cozy community. KŌLOA: Home to Hawai‘i’s first commercial sugar plantation. KĪLAUEA POINT: The 52-foot lighthouse was erected in 1913. WAI‘ALE‘ALE CRATER: This area is known for its “weeping” waterfalls. PO‘IPŪ: This is the island’s shrine to sun worshipping.

Hawai‘i’s green sea turtle is a symbol of good luck in the form of a guardian spirit.

16 DATEBOOK HOT DATES A challenging marathon, a parade fit for a king and a series of special events throughout the year.

18 FIRST LOOK KAUA‘I’S SIGNATURE ATTRACTIONS The Garden Isle offers some spectacular scenes that include cascading waterfalls, azure-tinted grottoes and aerial views.

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48 ISLAND VIEWS

KAUA‘I MAP

SPECIAL SECTION DINING IN PARADISE From casual to elegant, a guide to finding your way through Kaua‘i’s dining options.

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Genuine Hawaiian Koa Wood Watch Collection from $395

An incomparable collection of Hawaiian and Island lifestyle jewelry KAUAI Poipu Shopping Village • Grand Hyatt Kauai OAHU • MAUI • BIG ISLAND OF HAWAII • NCL PRIDE OF AMERICA NaHoku.com • 1-800-260-3912 Best of HONOLULU MAGAZINE 2016

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HAWAII’S BEST

People’s Choice Awards The Star Advertiser 2016

HAWAII MAGAZINE Readers’ Choice Award 2016

10/20/16 9/29/16 10:58:36 1:31:42 PM AM 9/27/16 11:41 AM


› Kayak Adventures ‹ › Ancient River Kayak ‹ › Rainbow Kayak Tours ‹ Kayak 2 miles along the tropical waterways of the Wailua River. Hike 1 mile through a lush forest. Learn Hawaiian history, flora & fauna. Enjoy lunch & experience a secluded 120 ft waterfall.

KAUA‘I ADVERTISING & CIRCULATION HAWAI‘I DIRECTOR Buddy Moore 808.955.2378 ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Glenn Kobayashi ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Bob Kowal, Donna Kowalczyk, Chris Snipes INDEPENDENT SALES CONTRACTOR Danial Garven ADVERTISING COORDINATOR

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Where GuestBook® is produced by Morris Visitor Publications (MVP), a division of Morris Communications, Co., LLC. 725 Broad St., Augusta, GA 30901, morrismedianetwork.com. Where® magazine and the where® logo are registered trademarks of Morris Visitor Publications. MVP publishes Where magazine, Where® QuickGuide, IN New York, and IN London magazines, and a host of other maps, guides, and directories for business and leisure travelers, and is the publisher for the Hospitality Industry Association. Kaua‘i Where Guestbook is pleased to be a member of the list of associations below. MVP IS A PROUD SPONSOR OF LES CLEFS D’OR USA

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The Original Wave Collection

An incomparable collection of Hawaiian and Island lifestyle jewelry KAUAI Poipu Shopping Village • Grand Hyatt Kauai OAHU • MAUI • BIG ISLAND OF HAWAII • NCL PRIDE OF AMERICA NaHoku.com • 1-800-260-3912 Best of HONOLULU MAGAZINE 2016

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HAWAII’S BEST

People’s Choice Awards The Star Advertiser 2016

HAWAII MAGAZINE Readers’ Choice Award 2016

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KAUA‘I EDITORIAL SENIOR EDITOR Simplicio Paragas EDITOR Kristen Nemoto ART DIRECTORS Chris Cardelli, Veronica Montesdeoca CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Mike Coots, Daniel Lane, Linny Morris MORRIS VISITOR PUBLICATIONS

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MVP KAUA‘I EDITORIAL OFFICE 1833 Kalākaua Ave., Suite 810 Honolulu, HI 96815 Phone: 808.955.2378; Fax: 808.955.2379 wheretraveler.com Where GuestBook® publishes editions for the following U.S. cities and regions: Arizona, Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Charlotte, Chicago, Colorado, Dallas, Florida Gold Coast (Fort Lauderdale & Palm Beach), Fort Worth, Hawai‘i Island (the Big Island), Houston, Jacksonville/St. Augustine/Amelia Island, Kansas City, Kaua‘i, Los Angeles, Maui, Miami, Nashville, New Orleans, New York, Northern Arizona, O‘ahu, Orange County (CA), Orlando, Philadelphia, Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill/Reno/Lake Tahoe, SanAntonio, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle/The Eastside/Tacoma, Southwest Florida (Naples), Tampa Bay, Tucson, Washington D.C. ©2017 by Morris Visitor Publications. All rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, in whole or in part, without the express prior written permission of the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility to any party for the content of any advertisement in this publication, including any errors and omissions therein. By placing an order for an advertisement, the advertiser agrees to indemnify the publisher against any claims relating to the advertisement. Printed in the United States of America.

Poipu Beach , Kauai 808.742.9595 www.kiahunagolf.com

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NAVIGATE

THE NORTHERNMOST OF THE EIGHT MAJOR ISLANDS in the Hawaiian chain, Kaua‘i is also

the oldest. The island is nearly circular in shape, 32 miles in diameter and covers an area of 550 square miles. Mt. Wai‘ale‘ale, once the volcanic heart of Kaua‘i, stands more than 5,000 feet high in the center of the island. A series of peaks and valleys fans out around this point, creating some of the most spectacular scenery in the Pacific. Most of the island’s population lives in towns close to the coast or in one of the lush valleys a 12

few miles inland. The major road is designated Highway 56 (Kūhiō Highway) north of Līhu‘e, the county seat and business center. To the south and west, it is Highway 50 (Kaumuali‘i Highway). The north shore, with picturesque Nāpali Coast, is Kaua‘i’s beauty spot. On the east side are the Wailua River and the busy tourist center of Kapa‘a. Po‘ipū, on the sunny south shore, is home to resorts and great beaches. On the west side of the island is the geologic wonder of Waimea Canyon.

©EUREKA CARTOGRAPHY, BERKELEY, CA; (WATERCOLOR BACKGROUND AND EDGE PATTERN) ©MIKE REAGAN

The Island of Kaua‘i

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Collection available exclusively at Na Hoku

An incomparable collection of Hawaiian and Island lifestyle jewelry KAUAI Poipu Shopping Village • Grand Hyatt Kauai OAHU • MAUI • BIG ISLAND OF HAWAII • NCL PRIDE OF AMERICA NaHoku.com • 1-800-260-3912 Best of HONOLULU MAGAZINE 2016

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HAWAII’S BEST

People’s Choice Awards The Star Advertiser 2016

HAWAII MAGAZINE Readers’ Choice Award 2016

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NAVIGATE

Ni‘ihau The “forbidden” island is known for exquisite shell jewelry. Kaua‘i Magnificent sea cliffs and canyons distinguish the Garden Isle. O‘ahu Known for Waikīkī beach, the state capital, shopping, Pearl Harbor and more. Moloka‘i You’ll find Old Hawai‘i charm, mule rides and famous Moloka‘i bread. Lāna‘i Lovely Mānele Bay has posh resorts and pine-studded uplands. Maui Come to the Valley Isle for whale-watching, art, Mt. Haleakalā and the 54-bridge Hāna Highway. Kaho‘olawe Once a Navy firing range, the island is now dedicated to the preservation of Hawaiian culture. Hawai‘i Hawai’i Island has an active volcano and wonderfully diverse scenery.

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Hawaiian Islands

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DATEBOOK TOWN PRIDE

THE ULTIMATE BRUNCH

Marking its 40th anniversary in 2017, the

Hawai‘i’s longest-running tasting event has

Waimea Town Celebration puts the word

been evolving since 1988 and will celebrate

“unity” in “community.” The eight-day event

its 29th year in 2017. Held on the pristine

will include hula and Hawaiian music;

grounds of Smith’s Tropical Paradise, Taste of

Kaua‘i-inspired cocktails and cuisine; the

Hawai‘i will help fund scholarships for high

largest Hawaiian rodeo among all of the

school and community college students.

islands; a long-distance canoe race; a

More than 40 chefs from across the state

celebration to honor King Kaumuali‘i; a

participate in this “Ultimate Brunch,” which

film festival; softball and 3-on-3 basketball

also features live entertainment, a silent

tournaments; a deconstructed triathlon;

auction, and beer and wine booths.

paniolo hat lei, ice cream eating and

June 4, 2017. For more information,

‘ukulele contests; and cultural exhibits, all

visit tasteofhawaii.com.

culminating in a two-day ho‘olaule‘a with continuous live entertainment, local food

BERRIES JUBILEE

booths, craft vendors, games, rides and a

Named after the rare anise-scented berry

beer garden. February 18-25, 2017.

unique to Kaua‘i, the Mokihana Festival travels across the island in a celebra-

ECO-FRIENDLY EVENT

tion of Native Hawaiian arts and crafts.

Held on Memorial Day Sunday in

Competitions in Hawaiian instrument mak-

Kanaloahuluhulu Meadow, the Banana

ing, music composition and hula engage

Poka Roundup features basket making, live

people of all ages. This Kaua’i signature festi-

music, exhibits by organizations and agen-

val ends with a three-day hula competition.

cies that work to save the environment,

September 2017. maliefoundation.org.

keiki (children), a crowing contest, flower

HOLIDAY CHEERS

arranging, lei making, a variety of ono

Started in 1997, The Festival of Lights is a

(tasty) snacks and a silent auction.

Garden Isle tradition with folk art, decora-

May 21, 2017. Kōke‘e State Park. kokee.org.

tions, caroling, parade and the island’s favorite Christmas light show. Teen elves greet

THE RUN STUFF

MARATHONERS RACE TO THE FINISH LINE

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FIT FOR A KING

attendees with aloha and a candy cane as

With all the pomp and circumstance

they enter the display at Līhu‘e’s Historic

befitting royalty, The King’s Celebration

County Building in Līhu‘e. December 2017.

and Parade features a procession of regal

For more information, visit kauaifesti-

horses and their beautiful pa‘u riders, each

valoflights.com.

representing one of the eight islands. The parade begins at Vidinha Stadium near the airport and travels along Rice Street to the County’s Historical Building Lawn,

Ranked as the sixth fastest course in Hawai‘i, the Ninth Annual Kaua‘i Marathon offers a challenging terrain but a scenic one. Starting in the southern resort town of Po‘ipū, the marathon and half marathon courses run together for the first 11 miles. As dawn breaks, runners will experience lush green vistas as they approach the shade of the century old Tunnel of Trees. The courses follow the contour of the picturesque coastline, revealing magnificent views of the island’s beaches, rugged volcanic peaks and green tropical rain forests.

where there will be entertainment, crafts,

September 3, 2017. For more information, visit thekauaimarathon.com.

kauaifestivals.com.

demonstrations and an array of food. The parade starts at 9 a.m. Kamehameha Day was created to honor the memory of Kamehameha the Great, who united the Hawaiian Islands in 1810. June 10, 2017. For more information, visit

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along with lots of activities and games for

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Trust is their most valuable asset!

Robert’s and Robert’s Jewelry have reputations for NOT trying to make a sale. Since the business began more than 60 years ago in quaint Hanapepe town, their primary objective has been to have anyone who walks through their doors leave with a satisfying experience, not to make a sale. A second store in Lihue, difficult to find but worth looking for, carried that same tradition. Their prices and selection of Hawaiian heirloom jewelry are unmatched. But the true worth in finding Robert’s Jewelry is discovering their genuine attitude of placing customers’ needs beyond their desire to sell.

During its first 40 years, Robert’s used to be in Kauai’s busiest shopping areas following the formula of “location, location, and location.” But they learned busy locations weren’t necessarily the best. Having too many customers at once prevented giving the level of service they wanted. Moving to less accessible locations meant less customer traffic, but actually resulted in increased sales. Robert’s customers seek them out after hearing of its reputation. During enjoyable, no-pressure visits, customers sense the staff ’s desires to inform rather than to sell. There are no commissions on sales, because that would be counterproductive to Robert’s belief that an attitude of good service ultimately brings more sales. Robert’s prices lower than its competition partly because they own the buildings and avoid high rents. They also get lower product costs from many vendors because of their steady sales volume. But the biggest reason for their reasonable prices is their belief that providing good value is an integral part of providing good service ... the same low price that everyone else has paid. Customers may also be understandably apprehensive about paying for jewelry and returning home empty-handed. Because much of what Robert’s sells is customer-made requiring weeks to manufacture, customers often first see their jewelry when the mailman arrives and are relieved and happy to find their jewelry more beautiful than expected. Receiving emails and letters of appreciation is a regular event, but Robert’s is still thrilled each time to learn another is happy. Gaining another customer’s trust is what Robert’s is about. Winner of the Hawaii Business Magazine Small Biz Success Award - Family Business category Finalist in Retail Merchants of Hawaii Retail Business of the Year - Kauai award Voted Best of the Best Tuxedo - Formalwear shop in Kauai People magazine polls Voted Best of Kauai Jewelry Store in Garden Island Newspaper’s reader poll Voted Kauai’s Best by Midweek Kauai Magazine’s People’s Choice Rated A+ by The Better Business Bureau Elite Retailer of Jim’s Formalwear KIHUE 2976 Kress St. Lihue, HI 96766 Ph 808-246-4653

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Toll Free: 1-877-GOLD-LEI (4653-534

email: info@robertsjewelry.com

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FIRST LOOK Also known as Hawai‘i’s Garden Isle, Kaua‘i’s dramatic landscape and diverse terrains enchant all the senses, creating memories that will last a lifetime.

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“O Hawai‘i no ka ‘aina maikai” HAWAIIAN PROVERB that translates into “After all, Hawai‘i is the best land.”

Waterfalls

Called wailele in Hawaiian (leaping water) and praised in song, chant and hula, Hawai‘i’s numerous waterfalls are classic images of paradise. Wailua Falls is just five minutes away from Līhu‘e, near a roadside lookout point, while ‘Ōpaeka‘a Falls can be safely viewed from nearby Kuamo‘o Road. The island’s more dramatic waterfalls include the famous Manawaiopuna, popularly known as “Jurassic Falls” since it appeared in the film’s opening scene. In the heart of Mt. Wai‘ale‘ale, waterfalls streak the crater walls like weeping tears. This view can only be seen via helicopter.

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Beaches

Like its mountains, Kaua‘i’s beaches are dramatic and diverse. Perhaps the most notable is Hanalei Bay with its curve of white sand enveloped by mountains. At the end of Highway 56, where the Nāpali Coast begins, the waters off Kē‘ē Beach teem with fish and corals that dazzle snorkelers and beachgoers alike. Po‘ipū Beach is known for its idyllic snorkeling, while in Hanapēpē, Salt Pond Beach Park is calm and popular year-round.

Wailua River

The Wailua River is sacred to Native Hawaiians as it was once kapu (taboo) for anyone except for royalty to enter. Nowadays, the river can be explored by kayak or via a cruise aboard an open-air boat. Most boat excursions end at Fern Grotto, which is known as the most romantic spot on the island. This natural lava-rock grotto is lush with hanging ferns, cooled by the mists of a waterfall. In this serene setting, the grotto acts like a natural amphitheater. Taking advantage of the incredible natural acoustics, visitors are often treated to musicians playing beautiful Hawaiian music. 20

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Waimea Canyon

Every year, thousands of visitors come up to the Waimea Canyon’s edge to peer out and down at the mile-wide and 3,600-foot-deep valley. Known to many as the “Grand Canyon of the Pacific,” Waimea Canyon was formed by the Waimea River, which rose from heavy rainfall on the island’s Mount Wai‘ale‘ale. If you look closely, you can see the history of gradual erosion as the west side is thin while the east side is thick with flat-lying lavas.

Koke‘e State Park Spouting Horn

Legends of the spouting horn tell a story of a large mo‘o, or lizard, caught in this blowhole, which was formed when waves eroded softer, underlying rock and wore through the harder top rock. The blowhole, known in Hawaiian as a puhi, is located near Po‘ipū Beach on the island’s south coast. Tourists visit to witness water rush into the hole then forced through its narrow opening, shooting water skyward up to 50 feet in the air. Lawai Road, South Shore, Kōloa near Po‘ipū. 22

Situated on a plateau between 3,200 feet and 4,200 feet, much of Kōke‘e is a mesic forest lined with koa and ‘ōhi‘a lehua trees. It offers views of the lush Kalalau Valley, a picture-perfect landscape of native vegetation and indigenous forest birds. Picnicking, camping and lodging are available, including seasonal plum picking and trout fishing. www.dlnr.hawaii.gov/dsp/ parks/kauai/kokee-state-park

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LIFE AQUATIC The story of Hawai‘i is the story of water. Our history and culture are intimately linked to the sea. We ride its waves and delve into its depths, we fish its waters and cultivate its plants. It is life itself. Hawai‘i photographer Michael Coots explores this captivating world.

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PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

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Photographer Mike Coots’ love affair with the ocean has remained constant—even after losing a leg at the age of 18 to a shark. Undeterred and fitted with a specially designed prosthetic leg, the avid surfer returned to the waves to enjoy—and photograph—his favorite sport and environment. His respect for the ocean and its inhabitants extends even to sharks. As an activist, Coots campaigns to end shark finning and culling and to make people aware of the dangers of polluting the ocean. One of his most rewarding causes is helping children who have lost limbs, inspiring them to pursue their dreams—as he has done.

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PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

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SEAL OF APPROVAL NOAA scientists and community volunteers strive to protect one of the world’s rarest marine mammals

(OPPOSITE PAGE) ©DAVID FLEETHAM/ALAMY; (THIS PAGE) MARK SULLIVAN/NOAA FISHERIES

BY SIMPLICIO PARAGAS

Monk seals are primarily “benthic” foragers, feeding on a variety of prey, including fish, cephalopods and crustaceans.

Ewa Girl likes to cruise the west side of the island. Benny is a promiscuous strapping male. And Rocky likes to hang around the fringes of Waikīkī. These three monk seals are among the rarest marine mammals in the world. Isolated from their closest relative 15 million years ago, Hawaiian monk seals are considered a “living fossil” because of their distinct evolutionary lineage. “Their decline is stabilizing and while there may be some growth, it’s hardly a trend,” says Angela Amlin, acting Hawaiian monk seal recovery coordinator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). “The greatest threats to monk seals are disease, interactions with hooks and nets, and habituation with humans.” With a life span of between 25 and 30 years, the ‘īlioholo-i-kauaua (in Hawaiian, “dog that runs in rough water”) belongs to the “true seal” family (Phocidae), of which there is only one other similar genus in the world — the Mediterranean monk seal. A third monk seal species

— the Caribbean monk seal — has long been extinct, a fate that NOAA scientists and volunteers are vigorously working to avoid in Hawai‘i. “Right now we have a vaccination program in order to prevent the morbillivirus, which has caused the deaths of thousands of dolphins and seals in other parts of the world,” Amlin asserts. “Currently, we’ve managed to vaccinate 200 monk seals in the main Hawaiian Islands and 1,100 in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.” If left unchecked, the morbillivirus can potentially enter the Hawaiian marine system and become widespread with outbreaks of the disease leading to devastating losses of marine life. According to NOAA scientists, most people are familiar with morbilliviruses already: this virus family includes measles, against which children are routinely immunized; and distemper, which is part of a core vaccination series for pet dogs. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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“Recovering a species on the brink of extinction is not an easy task, especially factoring in the logistics of working across an expansive and remote archipelago spanning thousands of miles,” the report’s authors note. “Biologists must be present in those remote areas to intervene and save seals’ lives, as well as to research and monitor the population. The growth of a small population of monk seals in the main Hawaiian Islands, while encouraging, has also meant increasing numbers of interactions with fisheries and other ocean users.” The report further points out that monk seals have been victims of intentional killings, and the deaths of these seals, including a pregnant female, jeopardize recovery and are a clarion call for enhanced local community engagement in the conservation and recovery

Monk seals live in warm subtropical waters and spend two-thirds of their time at sea. They also use waters surrounding atolls and submerged banks.

©FLIP NICKLIN

For the monk seal, morbillivirus can be lethal. According to a NOAA report, concerns about the decreasing monk seal population are compounded by their risk of disease. Decades of population health monitoring indicate that monk seals do not carry antibodies against morbillivirus, so their immune systems are unlikely to protect them from contracting the disease. While proactive measures, such as vaccinations, can reduce the risk of a decreasing population, Hawaiian monk seal recovery still faces many challenges that will require additional resources and commitment. In NOAA Fisheries’ Species in the Spotlight five-year Priority Action Plan, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) identifies the Hawaiian monk seal as one of eight species that is among the most at-risk of extinction. W H E R E G UESTBO O K

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©JONATHAN BLAIR

When on land, monk seals breed and “haul-out” on sand, corals and volcanic rock. During the day, they can often be seen peacefully resting on beaches.

of this endemic Hawaiian marine mammal. To combat misinformation and misconceptions, NMFS officials are actively engaging local stakeholders and working with communities to build capacity, ownership, knowledge and trust. They believe that through strong partnerships they can develop effective solutions to the challenges of monk seal recovery. Meanwhile, there is some good news. NOAA recently completed the 2015 population census for seals across the archipelago and according to Dr. Charles Littnan, lead scientist for NOAA’s Hawaiian Monk Seal Research Program, the future look positive. “There were at least 184 pups born across the range, which is up from 156 pups in 2014,” he says. “Across sites and age classes, monk seal survival from 2014 to 2015 was remarkable; the best that

has been in the NWHI in many years — in some cases the best observed in three decades.” This increase in survival, particularly for juveniles, is critical for the recovery of the species. On Kaua‘i, three baby pups were born in early 2016, buoying hopes that the uptick in population will successfully continue into the years to come. “Too many young seals were dying, which meant too few females were growing up to be mothers,” Littnan explains. “The species was in a downward spiral. Over the last few years we have seen juvenile survival jump pretty dramatically, giving hope for the future.” One of the most exciting outcomes of the complete census of the island chain is a new total population estimate for Hawai‘i’s native seal. Past estimates relied on separate counts from the NWHI and the main Hawaiian WHERE GUEST B OOK

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“They may be cute but

Islands and omitted a few key subpopulations. For the first time ever, the monk seal program has estimated the entire population of seals. The total number, 1,272 seals, is higher than previous estimates of around 1,100. “This is a great step forward for our work with monk seals,” Littnan says. “For the first time and with a lot of effort by our field teams and volunteers, we were able to incorporate every location where seals are found. We will need to continue to utilize this method of calculating the population for a few additional years before we can definitively identify a trend. Regardless, this is a better estimate and there are more seals than were estimated.” 36

Though they look friendly, the Hawaiian monk seal would rather be watched from a distance. There are well documented cases of people being bitten or injured during interactions with adult monk seals. They are unlike their cousins in the pinniped group, as they rarely travel together, preferring to live a life of solitude, like a monk (one of the reasons they are thought to have that name). “They may be cute but don’t feed them and stay away from them,” Amlin warns. “They are federally protected under the Endangered Species Act, and the law requires that onlookers remain at a safe distance of at least 100 feet.”

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don’t feed them and stay away from them. They are federally protected under the Endangered Species Act, and the law requires that onlookers remain at a safe distance of at least 100 feet.”

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Adult monk seals can grow to over 7 feet long and weigh more then 400 pounds.

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The details of an ‘ulā‘ulā (feathered gourd rattle); and ‘ili‘ili (stone pebbles) and pāpā shells.

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THE SONG OF MANA Remembering the sounds of old Hawai‘i BY KRISTEN NEMOTO PHOTOGRAPHY BY LINNY MORRIS

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Before the popularization of the diminutive “jumping flea” known as the ‘ukulele or Bing Crosby’s holiday classic “Mele Kalikimaka,” there was a single beat—a distinct rhythmic sound that transcended from one Hawaiian lineage to another. Unlike a written score by Mozart or a tale within a history book, ancient Native Hawaiians expressed themselves in the form of storytelling, otherwise known as the tradition of mo‘olelo, an oral account of a person, place, thing or event that’s communicated from generation to generation. Unabashedly personal and emotionally charged, mo‘olelo is steeped in thousands of years worth of mele (song), oli (chant) and hula (dance). Native Hawaiians excelled at the art of mele, conveying songs and stories from former leaders who stressed the importance of the past as a guide for defining what was pono (proper, true). Without these teachings, many Native Hawaiians would not have the proper knowledge of their own traditions, which today remains pivotal to the survival and perpetuation of Hawaiian beliefs and culture. To enhance the expression of Native Hawaiian poetry, single or combined implements and hula would accompany the lyrics of a song. Except for the ‘ili‘ili (stone pebbles) used as percussion and the pū (conchshell trumpet), most ancient implements were made, at least in part, from plant materials and required days, months and even years of laborious work. One of The Merrie Monarch Festival’s (known as the Olympics of hula) most revered teachers, Kumu Hula (hula teacher) Kaleo Trinidad appreciates Native Hawaiian ancestors’ ability to be completely “utilitarian” and precise in their craft. It’s an art form that he strives to re-create in his hula practice. “Native Hawaiian implements are shaped exactly the way they’re needed,” Trinidad says. “If you notice, there are not many ornamentations on it. Why? Because to keep that instrument strong, you don’t carve into it.” 40

(Previous page) ‘Ili‘ili (stone pebbles) and pūpū shells. (This spread, clockwise, from top left) A hula dancer holds two kāla‘au (beating sticks); the ends of two kā‘eke‘eke (bamboo pipes); an assortment of kāla‘au; dancers using pā‘ili (split bamboo) rattles; and a dancer holding ‘ili‘ili in between her fingers.

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Additional photography: (page 42, top left) ©joe carini/getty images; (page 42, bottom left) ©joe carini/pacificstock; (Page 42, middle left) ©Philip rosenberg/pacificstock; (page 44, bottom right) ©ron dahlquist/getty images; (page 48, left) ©allan seiden/getty images

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(From left) A hula dancer holds the ends of two ‘ulā'ulā; a trio of ‘ūlili (chord) rattles.

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The implements need to be thoughtful and sound, according to Trinidad. During the 2014 Merrie Monarch, his hālau (hula school) Ka Leo O Laka I Ka Hikina O Ka Lā (the voice of Laka at the rising of the sun) demonstrated such virility and strength while using Hawaiian implements in the hula kahiko (ancient form of hula) division that they took home the coveted overall winner title. As rows of his mountainous men stood with kāla‘au (beating sticks) in each hand, they stomped to the beat of “Aia I Ni‘ihau Ku‘u Pāwehe”— a dedicatory dance to the island of Ni‘ihau. With a vertical and longer kāla‘au in their left hands and a horizontal and shorter kāla‘au in their right, the men of Ka Leo rhythmically banged the sticks to create loud, pulsating percussions of stomp, stomp, stomp … tap, tap; stomp, stomp, stomp … tap, tap. Using ancient implements, the young dancers performed to the beat of the sacred mele, just the way their ancestors had done before them.

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“How a particular object conveys its mana or spiritual essence is what’s happening to the implements.”

(Clockwise, from top left) Two variations of an ipu (gourd drum); a hula dancer prepares to beat an ipu drum; a pu (conch-shell trumpet) that’s usually blown prior to a hula performance or other special ceremony as a way to mark an official beginning.

“What we don’t realize enough today is that Hawaiians were so meticulous,” Trinidad continues. “(There’s the) ‘ulī‘ulī (gourd rattle, with usually dyed red and yellow duck feathers along the brim) that has a lot of parts to it … Who would think to make something like that? It’s just so interesting.” Another rattle instrument includes the pū‘ili – a fringed or split bamboo that’s often played by dancers seated cross-legged. The predecessor to the ‘ukulele, the ‘ūkēkē, was the only stringed instrument in Hawai‘i, made of fine two-ply dried fibers and sandalwood. In the percussion family are the ipu pa‘i, a large double-gourd; the pūniu known as the coconut knee drum; and the hula pahu, a bass drum that’s traditionally made from the base of a coconut trunk and sealed with a piece of stretched and fitted shark belly skin. Today, ancient Hawaiian implements can still be seen in local museums or at hālau performances throughout the Islands, on the mainland and abroad. In the hands of 44

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Additional photography: (page 42, top left) ©Joe Carini/Getty Images; (page 42, bottom left) ©Joe Carini/Pacificstock; (Page 42, middle left) ©Philip Rosenberg/Pacificstock; (page 44, left) ©2016 Tor Johnson; (page 46, bottom right) ©Ron Dahlquist/Getty Images; (page 48, right) ©Allan Seiden/Getty Images. (From left) a pahu; a hula dancer beats a pahu.

talented artists such as the late Gabby “Pops” Pahinui or Jake Shimabukuro, modern implements such as the slack key guitar and the ‘ukulele have revolutionized Hawaiian music. In the spring of 2015, Governor of Hawai‘i David Ige declared the ‘ukulele and the pahu as official state musical implements. When it comes to using any implements in his hālau performances, Trinidad appreciates them all equally, as each represents a special piece of his ancestors’ lineage. It’s a ritual he hopes to pass down to each of his students and anyone interested in Hawai‘i’s unique connection to its past. “You have to keep the culture alive,” he says. “How a particular object conveys its mana or spiritual essence is what’s happening to the implements. It’s a beautiful and amazing reflection upon Hawaiian people and Hawaiian culture.” 46

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the s c ienc e of s t y l e

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Shop the Vionic Collection while in Hawaii on maui Elephant Walk The Shops at Wailea 808.891.8684 Elephant Walk 855 Front Street, Lahaina 808.661.6129 Soul~lei Whalers Village 808.661.6663

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on kauai Elephant Walk Anchor Cove Shopping 808.245.5676 Elephant Walk Coconut Marketplace 808.822.2651 Elephant Walk Poipu Shopping Village 808.742.9634

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ISLAND VIEWS Kaua‘i’s landscape offers contrasting views and textures, from the golden beach at Hanalei Bay to the jagged bluffs along the Nāpali Coast and the velvety greens of luxurious Princeville.

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Princeville

Sugar plantation owner Robert Crichton Wyllie named the area “Princeville” in 1860 to honor the visit of Prince Albert Kamehameha. The landscape was transformed into a sprawling cattle ranch and kalo (taro) farm. Today, the area is one of Kaua‘i’s most popular resort destinations, offering panoramic mountain and ocean views. Down a steep rocky path is Pali Ke Kua Beach, also known as Hideaways Beach, a golden crescent of sand, perfect for spotting green sea turtles and other marine life. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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Hanapēpē

A haven for enterprising immigrant plantation workers in the early 20th century, Hanapēpē was dubbed “Kaua‘i’s Biggest Little Town” by the Hanapēpē Merchants Association. The wooden architecture and jutted awnings of rustic storefronts will make you feel like you’ve just been transported to a town in the Midwest. This is no surprise since many of the skilled laborers came from the outskirts of Asia, where many of the states on the Mainland once sourced their hirees to build a bustling city. 50

Anahola

Part Hawaiian homestead land for those from Hawaiian lineage and part public lands, Anahola is a small community on the island’s northeastern side. Anahola Beach Park is a family-friendly stop, perfect for swimming or relaxing under the shade of ironwood trees. The shore break near the Anahola River is often ideal for boogie boarding and makes the beach popular among local residents during the weekend. Nearby at Moloa‘a Bay, fans of “Gilligan’s Island” may recognize familiar shoreline views from the opening credits of the classic 1960s TV show.

(PREVIOUS SPREAD) ©MONICA/MICHAEL SWEET/MEDIABAKERY; (THIS PAGE, FROM LEFT) ©DOUGLAS PEEBLES PHOTOGRAPHY/ALAMY; ©DESIGN PICS INC/ALAMY

ISLAND VIEWS

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Kōloa

To arrive in Kōloa, you must pass through Highway 520 where a canopy of hundreds of eucalyptus trees line the road known as the “Tree Tunnel,” which makes for a scenic and fragrant drive. Once you arrive in town, you’ll be taken back to the old plantation days. Hawai‘i’s first commercial sugar plantation was in Kōloa, now better known as Old Kōloa Town. The town’s history center is awash in plantation memorabilia. Pick up a map of the Historic Kōloa Trail and take a self-guided tour of the area. 52

Kīlauea Point

Once a company town for sugar plantation workers, the fieldstone buildings of Kīlauea are reminiscent of the town’s agricultural history. Today, the northeastern town is an intimate community, home to iconic landmarks and golden sandy beaches. Located 200 feet above sea level, the Daniel K. Inouye Kīlauea Lighthouse — named after Hawai‘i’s late senior senator — was built on Kaua‘i’s northernmost point, atop a former volcanic vent on a steep 500-foot bluff. Built in 1913, the historic landmark also doubles as the location of the Kīlauea Point National Wildlife Refuge.

(FROM LEFT) ©DESIGN PICS INC/ALAMY; ©LEE FOSTER/ALAMY

ISLAND VIEWS

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Poipu Bay Golf Course

P

oipu Bay Golf Course’s 210 oceanfront acres meander along rugged coastline, featuring spectacular vistas and cooling trade winds that will test all levels of play and yet fun for novices as well. Host of the PGA Grand Slam of golf from 1994—2006, Poipu Bay features an award-winning golf shop. Adjacent to the course is the Grand Hyatt Resort & Spa.

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Wai‘ale‘ale Crater Its name meaning “ripping water,” Wai‘ale‘ale Crater is known for its mesmerizing sights and plummeting waterfalls. More than just remnants of a shield volcano, the crater stands at 5,148 feet tall and averages more than 426 inches of rain per year. The heart of the extinct volcano can be explored via helicopter, revealing breathtaking aerial views of the Weeping Wall, a portion of the crater where a series of waterfalls coat the 3,000-foot cliff walls creating an illusion of weeping. 54

Po‘ipū

The postcard-perfect south shore of Kaua‘i is home to the resort area of Po‘ipū, the site of some of America’s best beaches. Nearby, Spouting Horn features a blowhole that shoots a mist of water up to 50 feet into the air. Discover why Kaua‘i is known as “The Garden Isle” at two national tropical botanical gardens: McBryde Garden sprawls across 259 acres and is filled with the world’s largest collection of Hawaiian plants; and Allerton Garden in Lawa‘i Valley is an 80-acre gem with sophisticated garden design and the former summer home of Queen Emma.

(FROM LEFT) ©TERRY SMITH IMAGES/ALAMY; ©MICHELE FALZONE/GETTYIMAGES

ISLAND VIEWS

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Some fairwayS are fairer than otherS.

WAILUA KAYAK ADVENTURE Travel with Wailua Kayak Adventure down the Wailua River, them “River of Dreams.” Let Wailua Kayak take you exploring the ancient pathway of the gods into the valley of the Royal Ali‘i. Travel at your own pace while your guide fills you in on the historical and religious significance of this spectacular river valley. Paddle its glassy waters between flower-enshrouded banks, with Mt. Wai‘ale‘ale rising beyond in all its magnificence. Journey into the ancient rain forest where they tie up and begin a jungle trek along a pristine mountain stream, explore ruins and terraces, and swim below a 120-foot waterfall. Plenty of organic snacks are provided. Ask about half-price specials. 1347 Ulu Street, Kapaa Hi. 96746

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The Makai Golf Club at The St. Regis Princeville Resort has long been considered one of Hawaii’s premier golf activities. The newly renovated course by original architect Robert Trent Jones II features a challenging layout that winds around serene lakes and native woodlands, while capitalizing on spectacular coastline views.

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E Kipa Hou Mai (Come Visit Again) THE HAWAIIAN HONU, OR GREEN SEA TURTLE, IS THE ONLY INDIGENOUS REPTILE FOUND IN HAWAI‘I. FOR HAWAIIANS, THE HONU IS A SYMBOL OF GOOD LUCK IN THE FORM OF A GUARDIAN SPIRIT. IT REPRESENTS THE NAVIGATOR, THE ETERNAL LINK BETWEEN HUMANS, THE LAND AND THE SEA.

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PARTING SHOT

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NAPALI COAST HANALEI TOURS

Na Pali Coast Hanalei Tours has been exploring the Na Pali since 1974. We have the best riding Power catamaran in the entire north shore fleet! With our high speed Power Catamaran combined with our unique North Shore departure we are at the start of the Napali Coast in just minutes after we leave Hanalei Bay—no one gets to the coast faster and smoother down the coast and back up to hanalei in the best riding boat period!

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7:30am, Returns at 12:30pm | Afternoon Tours Departs at 1:00pm, Returns at 6:00pm Come experience the adventure of a lifetime with an action-packed day on the majestic Napali Coast of Kauai and come ride the UFO. Your cruise departs at Kikiaola Small Boat Harbor at 0730am near mile marker 24 on hwy 50. We will meet you in the parking area on the right and get the vessel loaded prior to launching. We will make our way down the coast from Waimea heading west to Polihale. From there we will head north to the cliffs of Na Pali on the northwest coast of Kauai.

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Kauai Where GuestBook 2016-2017  

The island of Kaua’i comes alive within the pages of the Where Kaua’i GuestBook. This annual travel guide delves into the rich history of Na...