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NEW YORK TINY TITANS SMALL AND UNFORGETABLE RESTAURANTS SPORTS BARS, REINVENTED

CLIVE OWEN HIS POWERFUL NEW BROADWAY SHOW NOVEMBER 2017 INNEWYORK.COM


NOVEMBER 2017

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departments 6

SKYLINE Big happenings around town

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IN STORE What’s exciting in retail

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FOOTLIGHTS Theater news

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ON EXHIBIT

On the Cover

Superior art auctions this month

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NIGHT SPOTS

What cool neighborhood is Clive Owen currently staying in? To find out, see p. 20.

The after-dark scene

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OUT & ABOUT Events around the city with our favorite hotel people

features 20

Mr. Owen Spreads His Wings

Clive Owen tackles the controversial and touching Broadway revival, “M. Butterfly.”

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Little Gems

These restaurants and lounges are small, designed for intimacy and spectacular.

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A Sporting Life

Say good-bye to sawdust floors and mediocre pizza: These are not your father’s sports bars.

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Borough Beat

Must-visit spots in Brooklyn and Queens.

listings

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54 SHOPS+SERVICES | 58 MUSEUMS+ATTRACTIONS 62 GALLERIES+ANTIQUES | 66 TRANSPORTATION+TOURS

information 68 72

NYC STREET MAP SNEAK PEEK: Special dates of note in December

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Treat yourself luxuriously Available at Macy’s Herald Square, 5th Floor Call 212-494-1227 or visit macys.com/furvault


November skyline

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HOT HAPPENINGS AROUND TOWN by Francis Lewis

The terms “rare” and “important” are tossed about freely in the art and antiques world. Sometimes too freely. But this 1960s wood and steel desk by abstract painter Mauro Reggiani surely deserves them. Beautiful and functional, it’s a knockout among knockouts at The Salon Art + Design fair at the Park Avenue Armory, where historical, modern and contemporary furniture, decorative arts and fine art are on show and up for sale. | thesalonny.com, thru Nov. 13

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM


PHOTOS: DESK BY MAURO REGGIANI, ITALY, CA. 1960, COURTESY NICHOLAS KILNER; MACY’S THANKSGIVING DAY PARADE, KENT MILLER; CHRIS HARDWICK, MJ KIM; JOSEF ALBERS, “STUDY FOR HOMAGE TO THE SQUARE: CONSENT,” 1971, SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, NEW YORK, GIFT OF THE JOSEF ALBERS FOUNDATION, INC., ©THE JOSEF AND ANNI ALBERS FOUNDATION/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK; JILLIAN DAVIS OF COMPLEXIONS CONTEMPORARY BALLET, RACHEL NEVILLE

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Merry elves Charlie (blue), Kit (red) and C.J. (yellow) fly high— on helium—in Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Can Santa Claus be far behind them? macys.com/ social/parade

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(THRU NOV. 12) The Big Apple busts a gut when stand-up comedians, like self-proclaimed nerd Chris Hardwick (below), tickle the humerus (aka funny bone) at the 14th annual New York Comedy Festival. nycomedyfestival.com

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(THRU FEB. 18) An exhibition at the Guggenheim Museum fetes the love affair between painter Josef Albers, whose “Homage to the Square” (below) is a 20th-century art icon, and Mexico. guggenheim.org

(THRU NOV. 26) The point is, Jillian Davis (right) is always on point. See her during Complexions Contemporary Ballet’s season at the Joyce Theater. “Star Dust,” a dance set to the music of David Bowie, is on the bill. joyce.org

INNEWYORK.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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holiday gift guide 3. Mikimoto Splash Collection earrings

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2.

Mont Blanc Marilyn Monroe fountain pen

2. Original Grain MLB Watch Series

1. Gucci bomber jacket

Holiday Cheer! From an urban fragrance to a Yankee fan’s watch, check out these giftables, designed to wow your loved ones. 1. Gucci red and olive reversible satin bomber jacket, $2,490. | Barneys New York, 660 Madison Ave., 212.826.8900; and various other retail outlets 2. New York Yankees limited-edition watch, crafted with reclaimed 1923 New York Yankee Stadium™ wooden seats, $1,850. | originalgrain.com 3. Mikimoto Splash earrings with Akoya cultured pearls with 2.44tcw diamonds in 18-karat white gold, $19,000. | Mikimoto, 730 Fifth Ave., 212-457-4600 4. Muses Marilyn Monroe special edition fountain pen, $920. | Mont Blanc, Westfield World Trade Center, 185 Greenwich St., 212.381.7430

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IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

(continued on p. 10)


holiday gift guide 7. Iittala X Issey Miyake bag

6. Sony’s RX10 IV camera

5. Casana 100% cashmere scarf

5. Casana 100 percent cashmere scarves in various colors (this one is teal), made in Nepal, $540 each. | casanadesigns.com; and various retail outlets 6. Sony Cyber-shot camera, with high-density tracking technology, allowing even fast-moving subjects to be captured in image, $1,700. | sony.com; and various retail outlets 7. Iittala X Issey Miyake bag in emerald (also comes in ivory and dark grey), part of a unique collaborative collection, $185. | Bloomingdale’s, 100 Third Ave., 212.705.2000 8. Bond No. 9 New York Nights Perfume (unisex), limited-edition holiday bottle made with Swarovski baguettes, $425. | bondno9.com; and various retail outlets

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8. Bond No. 9 New York Nights Perfume


footlights

THEATER NEWS by Francis Lewis

Records are made to be broken, and these three long-running shows keep doing so, year after year after year.

21 YEARS

Ask Steve Cohen, aka the “Millionaires’ Magician,” what his favorite trick in “Chamber Magic” is, and he’ll say ”Any Drink Called For.” That’s when he takes requests from the audience and conjures up their favorite libations in a tea kettle (right). We won’t give away any secrets of Cohen’s trade, but the Lotte New York Palace, the host venue, has created the Think-a-Drink cocktail in honor of the show’s 5,000th performance. You can imbibe at the hotel’s Trouble’s Trust bar afterward or make it at home (Bulleit bourbon, Nolet’s Silver Gin, Earl Grey syrup, lemon juice, crème de violette, blackberries and a dash of angostura bitters). The essential ingredient? A pinch of magic. | “Chamber Magic,” Lotte New York Palace, 455 Madison Ave., 866.811.4111

Coming of Age

”Chicago,” the musical, has legs. And not just because twotime Tony Award nominee and dancer extraordinaire Charlotte d’Amboise (above) heads the cast as femme fatale Roxie Hart. With 8,683 performances and counting (as IN went to press), the show already holds the record as Broadway’s longestrunning American musical—ever. On Nov. 14, it hits another milestone and blows out the candles on its 21st-birthday cake. To put the anniversary in perspective, “Chicago” has reached the legal drinking age in New York—no small irony for a show set in Prohibition-era Chi-Town, where drinking at any age was anything but legal. | “Chicago,” Ambassador Theatre, 219 W. 49th St., 212.362.6000

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IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

5,000+ SHOWS

Built to Last

“The Lion King” chalks up 20 years on Broadway on Nov. 13, and so does Kjeld 1 As Production Costume Supervisor since 1997, she makes sure all Andersen. costumes are, in her words, “up to standard.” Some last six to nine months, others one to four years. “But I do believe we may have a Broadway record onstage,” she says. “[Ensemble member] Lindiwe Dlamini is still wearing her original lioness corset and necklace. That’s 20 years on Broadway worn by the same performer.” | “The Lion King,” Minskoff Theatre, 200 W. 45th St., 866.870.2717

20 YEARS

PHOTOS: CHARLOTTE D’AMBOISE AS ROXIE HART IN “CHICAGO,” JEREMY DANIEL; STEVE COHEN, CLAY PATRICK MCBRIDE, COURTESY “CHAMBER MAGIC;” “THE LION KING,” BRINKHOFF/MÖGENBURG

Mix Master


on exhibit 1

Auction season revs up this month with a variety of somethingfor-almost-everyone sales. To see up close what’s on offer, head to a preview (check auction house websites for dates). (1) Marilyn Monroe didn’t own the sleek pair of Vladimir Kagan upholstered walnut “Contour Lounge Chairs” (1950s, est. $12,000-$18,000) that highlight the Doyle + Design auction of furniture, design and art by 20th- and 21st- century makers (Nov. 21). But she was a fan of Kagan, who was famous for reimagining everyday objects as art. Doyle, 175 E. 87th St., 212.427.2730 (2) Besotted by his beautiful paramour Jacqueline Roque, Pablo Picasso painted three powerful portraits of her on Oct. 8, 1954 including “Femme accroupie (Jacqueline)” (est. $20-$30 million). Tucked away for years in Picasso’s private collection, the rarely seen painting is the glamorous centerpiece of Christie’s Evening

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Sale of Impressionist and Modern Art (Nov. 13). Christie’s, 20 Rockefeller Plz., 212.636.2000 (3) Back when flying was a dangerous business, pilots signed and exchanged banknotes, carrying them as lucky charms known as short snorters. When civilians flying together took up the practice, Marlene Dietrich embraced it, assembling an 83note snorter autographed by Ernest Hemingway, George S. Patton and over 1,000 other luminaries (1940s, est. $3,500-$5,000). Dietrich’s not-so-short snorter headlines Swann’s Autographs sale (Nov. 7). Swann Galleries, 104 E. 25th St., 212.254.4710 (4) Though Swiss sculptor and painter Alberto Giacometti worked with live models, his psychologically charged sculptures mirror his personal reality and brim with mystery. Consider “Figurine (Femme debout au chignon)” (ca. 1953-54, cast 1980, est. $500,000-$700,000), a focal point of Bonhams Impressionist and Modern Art Sale (Nov. 14). Bonhams, 580 Madison Ave., 212.644.9001

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PHOTOS: VLADIMIR KAGAN CHAIRS, COURTESY DOYLE; PABLO PICASSO, “FEMME ACCROUPIE (JACQUELINE),” 1954, ©2017 ESTATE OF PABLO PICASSO/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK; MARLENE DIETRICH’S “SHORT SNORTER,” 1940S, WITH OVER 1,000 SIGNATURES, COURTESY SWANN AUCTION GALLERIES; ALBERT GIACOMETTI, “FIGURINE (FEMME DEBOUT AU CHIGNON),” COURTESY BONHAMS, ©2017 BONHAMS 1793 LTD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Going, Going, Gone

FASCINATING ART DISPLAYS by Terry Trucco


night spots

THE AFTER-DARK SCENE by Daniel Fridman

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Rain, Shine, Sleet or Snow

The owners of these snazzy rooftop bars know that you can’t plan your trip to the Big Apple around unpredictable weather reports, so they’ve got you covered—literally—for any curveballs the season might throw your way. (1) Two outdoor terraces complement an indoor loft, with floorto-ceiling windows boasting views of Downtown Manhattan and Brooklyn, One World Trade Center and the Empire State Building. Cocktails are king here, but don’t write off the venue’s own beer, an IPA brewed specifically for Mr. Purple by Captain Lawrence Brewing Co. from the Hudson Valley. | Mr. Purple, Hotel Indigo, 180 Orchard St., 212.237.1790 (2) Transparent, full-service communal igloos offer guests heated seating on the outdoor deck of this rooftop bar, which also has a sleek, expansive and enclosed penthouse floor below the roof.

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IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

Each igloo hosts up to 12 guests on a first-come, first-served, no reservations basis, and small parties are encouraged to mingle with potential new friends within the bubbles. A lengthy cocktail menu—both hot and cold—is on offer, and complimentary red robes toast chilly customers waiting to claim igloo seating. There are no drink minimums and no entrance fees, and both floors offer startling close-up views of the neighboring Empire State Building. | 230 FIFTH Rooftop Bar, 230 Fifth Ave., 212.725.4300 (3) Scenery is second to none at this bi-level cocktail house on the 18th floor of The James New York hotel in SoHo. Inside an intimate, elegant lounge with a working fireplace, 14-foot-tall windows provide panoramic views of Midtown, FiDi, the Hudson River and bridges spanning the East River. Walk up a flight of stairs to an airy poolside space facing One World Trade Center, ideal for unpredictably warm autumn NYC nights. | Jimmy at The James, 15 Thompson St., hotel phone: 212.465.2000

PHOTOS: MR. PURPLE INTERIOR, NOAH FECKS; 230 FIFTH ROOFTOP BAR EXTERIOR AND COCKTAIL, ERIC VASQUEZ; JIMMY AT THE JAMES NEW YORK HOTEL EXTERIOR, COURTESY @FOHNYC

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GIFT GUIDE

We present you with the best the city has to offer this season, all unique treasures sure to please every person on your list.

TOURNEAU Inspired by the vibrant city of New York, the architectural design elements take this timepiece to new heights. The signature over-sized dial is combined with an ultra-slim bezel to provide a sensation of lightness. A trusted companion, the TNY 40 Chrono Automatic is provocative, tough and timely. Price: $6400. Tourneau TimeMachine 57th St. and Madison Ave.; 3 Bryant Park; 510 Madison Ave., tourneau.com

DOWN TO BASICS

BROADWAYHD This holiday, give the gift of Broadway anytime, anywhere with BroadwayHD. A subscription to this streaming service includes access to exclusive live content and an on-demand library of more than 200 stage shows, including some of Broadway’s biggest hits. Watch your favorites on BroadwayHD.com, iOS, Android, or your streaming-enabled device. Price: Starts at $8.99/month. Visit broadwayhd.com

MARTINIQUE JEWELERS Shop the new Pandora Winter Rose Collection at third-generation family business Martinique Jewelers in the heart of Times Square, carrier of the largest selection of Pandora charms and bracelets. Give a loved one a touch of rose to feel radiant from the inside and out with PANDORA Rose, an exclusive metal blend fashioned into pavé style rings, earrings, and necklaces. Price: Starting at $80. 750 7th Ave (Btw. 49th & 50th St.), 212.262.7600, MartiniqueJewelers.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

Give the gift of comfort with a down travel comforter that folds into its pocket to transform into a travel pillow. This 3 piece set— the little down comforter, a white-striped cover with pocket, and a travel bag is the perfect accessory for that on-the-go loved one. Price: Reg. $176, sale price $99. 2 Bridge Ave., Red Bank, N.J., 800.822.2135, downtobasics.com


MR. OWEN SPREADS HIS WINGS

Clive Owen comes back to Broadway in a provocative new role. BY BRIAN SCOTT LIPTON 20

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

Clive Owen and Jin Ha in “M. Butterfly.”


FEW ACTORS have conquered the three major entertainment mediums with such panache and versatility as the ruggedly handsome 53-year-old British star Clive Owen. His London stage work has ranged from such seminal plays as “Design for Living” and “A Day in the Death of Joe Egg.” In 2015, he starred in the Broadway revival of Harold Pinter’s “Old Times” (which was also Owen’s Broadway debut). His films have varied from such prestige projects as “Gosford Park” and “Closer” (the latter earned him an Oscar nomination) to more commercial movies such as the recent “Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets.” Elsewhere, TV audiences and critics alike have applauded his work in the HBO movie “Hemingway & Gellhorn,” where he portrayed Ernest Hemingway, as well as the highly praised Cinemax series “The Knick.” Owen, who grew up in a working-class town in Coventry, England, now lives in London with his wife, Sarah-Jane Fenton, and their two daughters, Hannah and Eve, has returned to New York to take on one of the stage’s most complex roles: Rene Gallimard, a diplomat who embarks on a very unusual love affair, in the Broadway revival of David Henry Hwang’s award-winning 1988 play, “M. Butterfly” at the Cort Theatre. IN New York recently spoke to Owen about the play and returning to the city across the pond. What made you decide to do “M. Butterfly” at this point in your life?

I didn’t know the play before I got the script, and as soon as I read it, I loved the writing. I was also happy that everyone involved seemed just as excited about the project as me, and it was great that David was willing to do some rewriting. This script is going to be a bit more about the two real-life people the play is based on. Did you have the same initial reaction that many people do about their relationship?

Of course, one immediately thinks, “How could Rene not know what was going on?” But what I find so fascinating about the play is that it is ultimately about two people who create a world for themselves that works for them, and then the real world comes in to ruin it. At the end of the day, every couple creates their own world that works for them. So, yes, their relationship is a fascinating extreme, but ultimately, I also think, what’s the big deal?

cinating now as it did then. The whole idea of gender has changed so much over the past three decades, so to speak to people about this subject now, the work has to be more refined. In many ways, the play is much more in a gray area in our current climate than it was in the 1980s, and that was a huge attraction for me. So much of the success of the play depends on the chemistry between you and your co-star. Were you involved in the casting of Jin Ha?

I was consulted as casting went on. I saw his audition and was really impressed. Jin is not out very long from NYU [New York University], but he has such sensitivity and strength. And you’re right, the chemistry is hugely important; these are very complex roles in this very tragic love story. Gallimard has to fall in love quickly, but then the balance of strength changes between them. I think having a young actor like Jin lead you can be thrilling. What’s it like working with your director, Julie Taymor?

Having Julie at the helm was a big part of my decision to do this play. I am a director’s actor, which means I like to be directed, and Julie does that. She is ferociously smart and specific about the acting choices she wants. On the other hand, the play has to have an exciting visual aspect; we have to change worlds quickly and dramatically, and no one does that better than her. Still, if the core relationship isn’t affecting, there’s nothing onstage really worth watching, and she gets that. We are in great hands! You’ve been alternating stage, television and film work in recent years. How do they differ for you?

First, I don’t think I would have done this play if I hadn’t done “Old Times” two years ago, which allowed me to get over my long absence from the stage. As it happened, I couldn’t do that play as soon as I wanted to, but that gave me enough time to sit with the play and really think about it. I think it’s such a delicate piece that I needed time to calibrate my choices. With stage, it’s always good that I couldn’t—and can’t—make quick decisions. Film and TV don’t always work that way. Would you ever consider doing another TV series?

It would be hard to top “The Knick” and working with Steven Soderbergh. I was spoiled. That was not a normal experience. But for the right project, absolutely! I love the scope of traveling with one character for that length of time.

You never saw the play, but did you ever watch the movie?

PHOTO: JOSEF ASTOR

I have to admit I did watch the film after I was cast. I was curious what Jeremy Irons did with my role. But I hesitated, because I am a very instinctive actor, so if I don’t know the piece at all, it’s very freeing when I have no strong memory or influence to affect me. This is your second revival on Broadway. Do you prefer doing

Are you excited about being back in New York this fall?

I am very excited. I’ve worked in New York more than any other place other than England, and I love that I can spend a long time here, leave, and then come back and it feels like home. This time, I am staying in the East Village, which has a very different vibe from other parts of Downtown and Midtown. It’s been fun finding new go-to spots. But, ultimately, it’s all about the work.

established plays?

Not necessarily, but I am hugely excited by the idea that I can bring this particular show to new people. It’s actually quite striking how the work has evolved over the years, yet it feels as fas-

Do you have firm plans after “M. Butterfly” closes?

Yes, rest! I think I’ll need to sleep for a while and take it easy, but otherwise I haven’t really thought about what comes next! IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

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PHOTOS: THE OFFICE INTERIOR, DAVID LEWIS TAYLOR; VEGETABLE CRUDITÉS, SARAH AND ALLEN HEMBERGER

Interior of The Office and (facing page) a plate of its colorful vegetable crudités.


little

gems

by Robert Haynes-Peterson

Sometimes good things come in small packages, even in the vast metropolis known as New York City. And while there are plenty of sprawling restaurants and cocktail lounges to visit in this town, you may have a hankering for something a little more intimate. With that in mind, we invite you into these lovely establishments, where square footage may not be generous, but flavors and hospitality most certainly are.

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

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A

mong the 45,000 or so bars and restaurants peppered around New York City, it seems as if finding the perfect tiny spot for a date, closing a business deal or celebrating a special occasion is harder than it should be. You don’t want another run-of-the-mill trattoria, nor shoulder-to-shoulder dining at a soulless brunch joint. Most after-work bars involve jostling through noisy clusters of tired souls, and neighborhood restaurants are too often sterile and over-lit. It takes hard work to design a true gem of a tiny establishment. “When we opened L’Appart (225 Liberty St., 212.981.8577), the space was here, and the partners knew they wanted to do a concept of some kind,” says Nico Abello, executive chef for the 28-seat “bespoke” fine dining experience. Nestled inside the French-themed food hall Le District (itself located in the vast, shimmering shopping complex at Brookfield Place), everyone knew L’Appart had to stand out. “It was a long process: There were lots of meetings with everyone involved.” After more than six months of intense planning, the team—including Abello—settled on fine dining influenced by the popular “secret” chef’s tables that have dominated the New York food scene for the past few years: fixed-price, multicourse menus that change every two weeks (with seasonal produce “harvested” from Le District’s market stalls and regional farmers markets). The open kitchen is in full view of diners, who are encouraged to meet and interact with the staff. But it isn’t just the delicately prepared and plated tasting menu (recent examples include langoustine prepared with fennel and red rice, or stewed rabbit with fresh apple chutney) that garnered Abello and his staff a Michelin star: The atmosphere is deliberately homey, with eclectic, upholstered furnishings, knickknack display shelves and flowers in mason jars. “It’s like a home dining room and kitchen,” says Abello. “The thing is, we don’t want to stress people. It’s very important people leave the room at peace after having spent time with us.” Sometimes the perfect gem of a restaurant is one where you take a few joyful risks, both in terms of cuisine and your fellow diners. At Decoy (529 1/2 Hudson St., 212.691.9700)—already a NYC institution at just four years old—conviviality is on the menu, despite subdued lighting, rustic decor and a subterranean vibe. Tucked beneath sister restaurant RedFarm, the 22-seater is rightfully famous for its succulent, crispy Peking Duck, served alongside inventive appetizers like sweet potato noodles topped with uni (sea urchin) or shrimp-stuffed shishito peppers presented on teardrop-shaped plates. Sit at the small bar or alongside strangers at the communal table for your feast. “Dining at Decoy is not only a delicious experience,

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but a fun one,” says Operating Partner Ed Schoenfeld. “Our guests often start talking with their neighbors, because they don’t recognize the little dumplings with “faces” on them that just got delivered.” Craving a little social lubricant? Beverage Manager Shawn Chen’s inventive cocktail menu highlights Asian influences. The Kyushiki Old Fashioned features nori-infused Hibiki Harmony Japanese whisky and muddled ginger. While there are now dozens of tiny “speakeasy” bars offering craft cocktails amid wood-paneled, taxidermyadorned comfort, sometimes you seek just a bit more atmosphere than bartenders stirring drinks beneath Edison bulbs. On two equally appealing ends of the atmosphere spectrum are the Japanese-influenced Bar Goto (245 Eldridge St., 212.475.4411) and Brooklyn’s lush Frenchthemed Le Boudoir (135 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn Heights, 347.227.8337), each equally appropriate for date nights and entertaining out-of-town visitors. Bar Goto’s guests sit at an elegant, contemporary wood bar (or at small tables lining one wall), while owner Kento Goto and his team present upscale, immaculately presented small bites and cocktails influenced by both Japan and Goto’s long tenure in the New York craft cocktail scene. Drinks and food are updated regularly. Favorites include streetfood-inspired okonomi-yaki (cabbage pancakes) filled with pork belly, shrimp and other goodies. Recent additions include kombu celery (celery sticks, salted kombu, red shisho) and unusual chips and


PHOTOS: OYSTER GUACAMOLE, COURTESY GRAFFITI EARTH; SHOCHU, DANIEL KRIEGER

Oyster guacamole at Graffiti Earth and (facing facing page) shochu, a Japanese distilled drink at Bar Goto.

dips, complementing drinks like the Sakura Martini (sake, gin, maraschino liqueur, cherry blossom). To access Le Boudoir, you enter via a secret bookshelf panel inside the street-level French bistro Chez Moi. Your host winds you down through stairs and hallways until you reach the Versailles-inspired bar. Here, mirrors, velvet and gold-leaf decoration, along with weekly live music, whisk you to a forgotten, romantic era. “It’s a very comfortable, enveloping jewel box of a space, where you can hide from the outside world,” says Bar Director Franky Marshall. “The most common reaction is, ‘Wow, this space is amazing!’” Sip from silver coupes and crystal goblets while snacking on frog’s legs and foie gras. A wide range of cocktail styles ensure everyone at the table will find something they like, be it sweet, savory and light or heavy on the alcohol. the Du Barry is a refreshing Manhattan riff, featuring bourbon, vermouth, apricot and lemon. Unusual glassware is only part of the sustainable puzzle at TriBeCa’s new Graffiti Earth (190 Church St., 212.542.9440), where Chef Jehengar Mehta presents Earth-friendly international cuisine in a relaxed atmosphere reminiscent of a rustic French château. “One of our goals was to ensure we took sustainability to the greatest extent we could,” says Mehta. “All of our cutlery and plates are ‘hand-me-downs,’ extending the life of the product. Our napkins are smaller (requiring less wa-

ter to clean) and stitched from reclaimed cloth. We exhibit art for sale, where 90 percnt of the proceeds go to charity.” The food—a modern pastiche of global influences—is responsibly sourced and prepared. Where resource-intensive beef is used, for example, Mehta says he tries to use less of it in a dish, enhancing it with mushrooms and other water-friendly savory flavors. Though the menu changes seasonally, recent offerings have included braised pork buns, a watermelon feta salad with mint sorbet, and house-made banana ice cream with a baked chocolate sauce. Up in Harlem, there’s been an extensive culinary renaissance going on for a couple of years now. While most of the new spots are quite large, Clay (553 Manhattan Ave., 212.729.1850) is more intimate, with a 10-seat bar and another 20 or so spots at inviting black-and-white bistro seating (there’s more space downstairs for private events). “Having a smaller space, and a split-level space at that, makes Clay feel cozy and allows us to get to know our guests,“ says Bar Director Andrea NeedellMatteliano. The focus here is on farm-to-table dining, highlighting local and regional producers and seasonal dishes (Clay even lists current farm sources on its website). Needell-Matteliano says diners are responding well to the fresh ingredients, casual friendly service and inventive fare like confit duck leg with celeriac, smoked faro, collard greens and a blueberry gastrique. Drinks change IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

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PHOTOS

Peking duck with all the trimmings at Decoy, and (facing page) an interior shot at Le Boudoir.

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IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM


PHOTOS: PEKING DUCK, COURTESY DECOY; LE BOUDOIR, NICOLE FRANZEN

seasonally, but focus on refreshing, fruit-forward concoctions like the Lazy Bird (tequila, honeydew, lime, jalapeño and lemon verbena). If adventurous, bucket-list dining and drinking are in your sights, you can’t do much better than hitting up recent Chicago import The Office (80 Columbus Cir., 212.805.8800), a small, dark-wood speakeasy tucked off to the side of the new Aviary restaurant (still set to open as of press time) on the 35th floor of the Mandarin Oriental New York hotel. Book online at the in-demand spot and dive deep into the creative minds of molecular gastronomy pioneers Grant Achatz and Nick Kokonas, and Beverage Director Micah Melton. Original cocktails are presented in traditional glassware, while the food arrives eye-poppingly stacked and tiered, or served up in French crockery. The crudité dish arrives with sliced and julienned raw fruits and veggies artfully arranged vertically from a “bucket” of crushed ice. Chilled oysters comes in an elaborate silver server shaped like a snail. The widely Instagrammed ice cream sundae for two sits amid an embarrassment of garnish riches, including gummy bears, red hots, macerated fruit and sprinkles (all house-made). Drinks and food are pricey (cocktails clock in at around $23, and there are a whole host of vintage spirits dating back almost a century that run significantly higher per pour), but you’re here for the whole package. Buckle down and enjoy; it’s going to be a very pleasant ride.

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

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At The Ainsworth, feast on burrata caprese hamburgers and short ribs sandwiches while watching a game on one of the bar’s many flat screens.

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IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM


LIFE

A SPORTING

A new breed of Manhattan sports bar lifts their customers out of the bleachers and into the private

PHOTOS: SANDWICHES AND SCENE AT AINSWORTH BAR, COURTESY THE AINSWORTH

boxes. With gigantic flat-screens, designer cocktails and an upscale atmosphere, these are luxury destinations that are adding a touch of Gotham glitz to the games. by Bob Cannon

THE TRADITIONAL AMERICAN “sports bar” is as much a clubhouse as a tavern. Even before the Highlanders became the Yankees, the image of the sports bar was one of a dimly lit watering hole made of worn walnut and the sound of televisions being drowned out by arguments. The kind of place where men of a certain age tossed back suds and talked longingly of the time they walked this close to Joe DiMaggio or touched Walt Frazier’s towel. No more. The city is now full of upscale digs for sports fanatics that are part fan palace and part nightclub—places where the beautiful people mingle with the bleacher bums, and everyone is royalty as long as the games are on a wall of HDTVs that put you closer to the NBA than the refs. Their style is as glittery as the games. Here are six places, where the action never stops and where everyone’s a player.

THE 40/40 CLUB You want to be a player? The 40/40 Club (6 W. 25th St., 212.832.4040) can make you feel like one. The place is as much nightclub as sports bar, opened in the Flatiron District in 2003 by hip-hop mogul Jay-Z and his partner, Juan Perez. The name comes from baseball’s exclusive “40-40 club,” that rare breed of player (there are only four) who has had 40 home runs and 40 steals in a season. After a recent $10 million renovation, the multilevel space includes an 18-foot illuminated champagne tower surrounded by a resin-top bar. An arena-style seating area with marble steps offers a great view of the four state-of-the-art 165-inch video walls. For private parties, the upstairs boasts five sumptuous VIP lounges, with amenities including custom billiard tables and chandeliers, and 55-inch HD televisions. The exclusive Jay-Z Lounge holds up to 100 guests, who can check out the game action on any of four 75-inch screens. The club’s decor includes a museum-style display of signed jerseys and memorabilia, including wrestler Kurt Angle’s WWF championship belt and autographed gloves from the 1974 Ali-Frazier boxing match. Top off the celebrations with delectable desserts, including house-made banoffee pie and warm pineapple upside-down cake. If you want an outing that’s equal parts party time and game time, this place has flash to spare.

BOUNCE SPORTING CLUB With a bright neon motif and a healthy list of creative cocktails, Bounce Sporting Club (55 W. 21st St., 212.675.8007) leans more toward the nightclub end of the sports club spectrum, with mixology and culinary competitions also dotting the calendar. There’s enough buzz about Bounce that it’s become the place for that flashy party your company or crew might be planning. The Fox network show, “Empire,” held a seasonIN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

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ending cast party there, and hip-hop hitmaker Ja Rule gave a surprise performance on another night. The menu features a sumptuous brunch, whose meatlaced egg dishes are to die for; and the dinner menu is a protein-rich series of steaks, tortillas and gourmet burgers, with a long list of toppings à la carte. Though the emphasis is on sporting events, the venue’s popularity means a reservation is recommended, or at least demands that you get there well before game time. But beware: This is no ball-caps-and-cutoffs joint. Dress shirts, dress shoes and jackets are the order of the day. VIP tables and bottle service are available through the Tablelist app or the club’s website. Champagne bottles go as high as $395. Doors open at noon on the weekend, and the club often fills up by 3 pm, well before the late NFL game. Bounce is most certainly not cheap, but you’ll get plenty of bang for your buck.

THE AINSWORTH It may be situated on the edge of the Fashion District, but make no mistake: The Ainsworth (122 W. 26th St., 212.741.0645) has style to burn, as well as being one of the city’s favorite spots for fantasy footballers. With 40 flat screens spread over 6,000 square feet, The Ainsworth draws a high-energy, thirtysomething crowd. So much so that on the weekends it’s essential to make a reservation for a table, which will come with a food and drink minimum. And if you want to belly up to the bar for the game, get there early. For diners, there’s plenty of highfalutin bar food, such as pizzas, sweet tea wings and an impressive array of gourmet burgers. If you want more substantial fare, go for the filet, New York strip or rib eye steaks. And when you cast a glance around, you may spot celebs like Giants legend Michael Strahan or “Smallville” star Tom Welling. And its Midtown location at 45 E. 33rd St. is the perfect outdoor venue for warm-weather game nights, with a 2,500-squarefoot terrace that offers luxury lounge seating, HD TVs and, naturally, a full-service bar.

Irresistible and brightly colored cocktails at Bounce Sporting Club include the Red Monkey (above) and the Jam (right). Below: The interior of The 40/40 Club.

Besides being a cool hangout for game night, Bodega 88 (573 Columbus Ave., 212.799.1602) has a backstory that rivals its Latin-flavored menu and classy ambience. As the name indicates, this fashionable Upper West Side bar was a bodega named the New Day Market for more than 50 years. But as gentrification overtook the neighborhood, owner David Arias, who grew up in an apartment above the club, shut it down in 2015 and reopened it as a trendy nightspot. The result is a small-scale, upscale establishment that serves double duty as a tantalizing tapas-and-cocktails bar and a game-time destination with a friendly neighborhood feel. The place has a distinctly Latin feel, with a tempting menu that includes pork tacos, chicken empanadas and chicken lollipops, along with small plates, such as chorizo a

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IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

PHOTOS

BODEGA 88


la plancha and ropa vieja sloppy Joes. The bar serves up beers from Spain, Costa Rica and Mexico as well as more conventional brews. For more adventurous drinkers, the house features classy cocktails like a mescal-and-ginger shandy and a pomegranate mojito—just right for game time. Deportes de larga vida! (Long live sports!)

ASHTON’S ALLEY SPORTS BAR The city’s upscale sports bars aren’t all on the West Side. Ashton’s Alley Sports Bar (825 Third Ave., 212.688.8625) fills the East Side’s need for high-energy event watching. With 60-, 70- and 80-inch flat screens strewn about the place, there’s not a bad seat in the house. Moreover, it’s a handsome, well-lit place for getting into the game. Ashton’s Alley makes a point of not being your typical testosterone-heavy bar scene, but one where women and families can enjoy the action of the games as well. In addition, there’s a good-size outdoor patio for people watching and taking in the city sights. The menu features a top-notch array of flatbreads, burgers, sliders, of course, but also sports a tempting array of Cajun, Asian and seafood dishes, along with a choice of daily specials. Also, Ashton’s Alley can host private events for up to 200 guests, with a custom menu and activities like karaoke, bingo, auctions or live entertainment. Meanwhile, the bar keeps jumping Tuesdays thru Saturdays till 4 am.

PHOTOS: COCKTAILS, COURTESY BOUNCE SPORTING CLUB; INTERIOR OF THE 40/40 CLUB, COURTESY THE 40/40 CLUB

PROPER WEST For fans of fine dining and sports events, especially those involving Penn State, Proper West (54 W. 39th St., 212.997.9000) is a slice of heaven for Nittany Lions fans. But this is not your grandfather’s sports joint. This sleek establishment is a two-story marvel, with a long marble bar decorated with globe lights and elaborate floral arrangements, and 5,000 square feet of space for any kind of fan, Penn State or otherwise. With tufted leather booths and HD TVs suspended above, this is a place to watch the action in comfort and luxury. For diners, the menu features high-grade American cuisine like ponzu salmon, Cajun brick chicken, truffled mac ’n’ cheese and grilled New York strip steak. It doesn’t end with dinner, though. For the post-dinner crowd looking to catch a West Coast game (or the end of an East Coast one), there are half-price appetizers every day from 10 pm till closing. And stick around—after the game, a DJ spins music into the night. Proper also has a location in Fi-Di (6 Murray St., 646.559.4445), where high ceilings and 70-inch screens make for another big-time game experience in sophisticated style. In short, for men and women who love to gather for the games, catching the action at a bar no longer means a downmarket, no-frills bar. In this spectacular new world of upscale sports bars, the kitchen is open, the gang’s all here and any game can become a social event to savor. IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

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Out & About CONCIERGES MIXED & MINGLED AT SEVERAL POSH EVENTS AROUND NEW YORK CITY!

MORRISON HOTEL GALLERY hosted a VIP concierge event in its SoHo gallery catered by Davio’s Northern Italian Steakhouse. Concierges viewed the fine art music photography that the gallery offers.

Left, from left to right: Morrison Hotel Gallery staffer; Robert Rozko, Loews Regency New York. Center, from left to right: Ana Jankovic, Night Hotel Times Square; Renee Mafaro, Sherry Netherland; Brittany Sage, Seton Hotel. Right, from left to right: Andrew Goodard, Bryant Park Hotel; Guest of Andrew Goodard.

GUIDE TO NEW YORK TOURNEAU welcomed concierges into its Madison Avenue boutique for the opening night of The Watch Event. Concierges had the chance to see the world’s most prestigious watch brands with a cocktail reception featuring the finest selections of timepieces.

Left, from left to right: Vladimir Kushnarenko, Trump International Hotel & Towers; Josephine Danielson, Four Seasons Hotel New York; Johannes Schaafsma, Four Seasons Hotel New York. Right: Tourneau TimeMachine storefront.

DISCOVER

EDITOR’S FAVES

EXPLORE

ALL ABOUT TIMES SQUARE

THE FUR VAULT hosted a concierge event at its location inside Macy’s Herald Square catered by Coffeemania. Concierges got to try on the different furs and were able to view the new collection. Left, from left to right: Johnny Benitez, The Quin Hotel; Kellie Palladino, 212 Fifth Avenue. Center: Interior of The Fur Vault. Right, from left to right: Nicole Longchamp, 1 Hotel Central Park; Asimina Mitilineos, Viceroy New York.

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IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

PLAY

YOUR OCTOBER MUST-DO LIST

最佳之地 潇洒购物游览名胜

PROMOTION

Tourneau TimeMachine, the world’s largest watch store at E. 57th Street and Madison Avenue OCTOBER 2017

wheretraveler.com


BOROUGH BEAT Check out these exciting neighborhoods for top-shelf eats, shops, art and more.

brooklyn bound WILLIAMSBURG

Music Hall of Williamsburg (66

Williamsburg was once a gritty

N. 6th St., 718.456.5400). Beer

corner of NYC known for its cheap

enthusiasts won’t want to miss

rents and indie leanings. Today, the

Brooklyn Brewery (79 N. 11th St.,

area is dominated by luxury high-rise

718.486.7422). Another great spot is

complexes and trendy boutiques.

Maison Premiere (298 Bedford Ave.,

There are plenty of new eateries to

347.335.0446), which trades in

choose from, but one of the neigh-

oysters and absinthe, among other

borhood’s most storied restaurant

things. Finally, shop at Catbird (219

institutions, Peter Luger Steak

Bedford Ave., 718.599.3457) for fine

House (178 Broadway, 718.387.7400),

jewelry from independent designers.

has been serving up its famous porterhouse for over 130 years.

PROSPECT HEIGHTS

Music buffs should check out Rough

Prospect Heights is one of Brooklyn’s

Trade (64 N. 9th St., 718.388.4111), a

tiniest neighborhoods, but don’t let

record store/concert venue, or the

its size fool you. The neighborhood

34

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

Above: The Conservatory at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Top: An event at Barclays Center.

PHOTOS: BROOKLYN BOTANIC GARDEN, COURTESY BROOKLYN BOTANIC GARDEN; BARCLAYS CENTER, BRUCE DAMONTE; BEER FLIGHT AT CIRCA BREWING CO., ALEX WELSH

By Daniel Fridman, Kate Hooker and Pamela Mitchell


Above: A flight of beers at Circa Brewing Co.

packs a serious punch in terms of shopping, sights and great food. The Brooklyn Museum (200 Eastern Pkwy., 718.638.5000) is both a grand and diverse cultural institution, with a gift shop stocked with unusual souvenirs to bring back home. For more small gifts, and cards by local designers, check out Planet Cute (704 Washington Ave., 347.425.8464). A fun collection of vintage wear is at 1 of a Find Vintage (633 Vanderbilt Ave., 718.789.2008). For a massive 52-acre swath of meticulously maintained gardens, visit the Brooklyn Botanic Garden (990 Washington Ave., 718.623.7200). Barclays Center (620 Atlantic Ave., 917.618.6100) hosts Brooklyn Nets basketball and New York Islanders hockey games as well as entertainment events. As far as eats go, Tom’s Restaurant (782 Washington Ave., 718.636.9738), a diner beloved for its killer pancakes and egg creams, has been a neighborhood staple since 1936. At Chuko Ramen (565 Vanderbilt Ave., 347.425.9570), dig into the great ramen bowls, beer and sake. INNEWYORK.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK

35


brooklyn bound BUSHWICK

BROOKLYN HEIGHTS

Williamsburg’s skyrocketing rents have

With its proximity to Manhattan, expan-

driven a lot of the demographic to

sive New York Harbor views and magnifi-

Bushwick. Explore this vibrant community,

cent Victorian-era brownstones, it’s no

and you’ll see why Vogue deemed it one of

wonder that notables from Walt Whitman

the top 15 coolest neighborhoods in the

to Truman Capote have called Brooklyn

world. Stroll around Bushwick’s Troutman

Heights home. First stop is the Promenade, a stretch of boardwalk overlook-

will find the outdoor art gallery, Bush-

ing the Statue of Liberty and Downtown

wick Collective, with bright murals

Manhattan. Enjoy a flight of beers, dinner,

covering every wall and roll-up garage

brunch or lunch at the functioning

door in sight. Shoppers interested in deals

brewery/restaurant, Circa Brewing Co.

on vintage wear should explore Urban

(141 Lawrence St., 718.858.0055). Men

Jungle (120 Knickerbocker Ave.,

will find sophisticated clothing and shoes

718.381.85110), with endless racks of $5

at Goose Barnacle (91 Atlantic Ave.,

flannel shirts. Bushwick’s SHOPS at the

718.855.2694). At Colonie (127 Atlantic

Loom (1087 Flushing Ave., 718.417.1616)

Ave., 718.855.7500), have a first-class

has a skateboard shop, espresso bar and

dinner in an open-kitchen space with a

tattoo shop. Your trip to Bushwick should

lush vertical garden wall. Those interest-

include a stop at Roberta’s (261 Moore

ed in trains and engineering love the NYC

St., 718.417.1118), one of the most

Transit Museum (Boerum Pl.,

buzzed-about restaurants around (check

718.694.1600). Learn about how the city’s

out the wood-fired pizza). For down-home

subway system was built and climb

Southern eats, its Montana’s Trail

aboard vintage cars from the early 1900s,

House (445 Troutman St., 917.966.1666).

still festooned with period advertising.

Bottom: The Promenade in Brooklyn Heights. Below: The popular paparizza pizza from Roberta’s.

PHOTOS: BROOKLYN HEIGHTS PROMENADE, ISTOCK; ROBERTA’S PAPARIZZA PIZZA, DEIDRE SCHOO

Street and St. Nicolas Avenue. There, you

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IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM


queens bound

PHOTOS: NEW YORK HALL OF SCIENCE, COURTESY NEW YORK HALL OF SCIENCE; UNI AND IKURA DONBURI FROM GAIJIN, JASON GREENSPAN

Left: Outdoor, interactive exhibits at the New York Hall of Science. Below: Uni and ikura donburi (quail egg, uni, salmon roe, rice and mushrooms) from Gaijin.

LONG ISLAND CITY

ASTORIA

CORONA

LIC’s commercial warehouses have been

The lively, diverse neighborhood of

Corona borders Flushing Meadows Park,

repurposed as art galleries, studio spaces

Astoria, Queens has ethnic eats, a

the site of the 1939 and 1964 World’s

and great spots to eat and shop. One of

bustling bar scene and fine arts attrac-

Fairs. The park houses the New York Hall

the area’s highest-profile restaurants is

tions. Anyone with a love of film, TV or

of Science (718.699.0005), with 450

funky, cavernous M. Wells Steakhouse

digital media should peruse the Museum

permanent and rotating exhibits; the

(43-15 Crescent St., 718.786.9060). Or,

of the Moving Image (36-01 35th Ave.,

Queens Museum (718.592.9700), which

chow down on top-flight sushi at Hibino

718.777.6800). Socrates Sculpture Park

includes the Panorama, a scale model of

(10-70 Jackson Ave., 718.392.5190) or

(32-01 Vernon Blvd., 718.956.1819),

New York City featuring all 895,000

hand-pulled noodles at Mu Ramen (1209

located on the waterfront, is an outdoor

buildings constructed before 1992; Citi

Jackson Ave., 917.868.8903). The Brick-

museum, open studio and rotating

Field, home of the New York Mets

house Ceramic Art Center (10-34 44th

exhibition space. Astoria is known for its

(718.507.8499); and the USTA Billie Jean

Dr., 718.784.4907) houses studio spaces

Greek cuisine, and one of the best-loved

King National Tennis Center

and classes for potters and ceramicists.

places is Taverna Kyclades (33-07

(718.760.6200), where the US Tennis Open

LIC is also known for its world-class art,

Ditmars Blvd., 718.545.8666). Gaijin

is played. Many musicians have called

like MoMA PS1 (22-25 Jackson Ave.,

(37-12 31st Ave., 929.328.2890) is genuine

Corona home, from Louis Armstrong to

718.784.2084). The edgier, younger sibling

Japanese, where cooked foods are

Madonna. Fans can pay homage to the

of the Museum of Modern Art in Midtown

slow-grilled with Japanese charcoal and

former at the Louis Armstrong House

Manhattan is in the vanguard of the

the sushi is divine. Beer lovers should

Museum (34-56 107th St., 718.478.8274).

contemporary art scene. Elsewhere, visit

check out The Beer Garden at Bohe-

For one of the best Cubano sandwiches

The Noguchi Museum (9-01 33rd Rd.,

mian Hall (2919 24th Ave., 718.274.4925),

north of Miami, check out Rincon Criollo

718.204.7088), created by Japanese-

an authentic beer garden with equally

(40-09 Junction Blvd., 718.458.0236); and

American sculptor/designer Isamu

authentic Czech food. In a shopping state

stop by family-run Lemon Ice King of

Noguchi to display his most representa-

of mind? Lockwood Shop (32-15 33rd St.,

Corona (52-02 108th St., 718.699.5133),

tive works. The museum includes 10

718.626.6030) has curated jewelry, gifts

which has been making Italian ices for

galleries and a sculpture garden.

and Queens-themed merchandise.

over 60 years. INNEWYORK.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK

37


entertainment

FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC

2

3

1

5 1 Unopened cans of food make beautiful sculptures, all in the name of charity. | Canstruction New York, p. 46 2 Giacomo Puccini’s “Madama Butterfly,” a staple of the repertoire, receives six performances this month. | Metropolitan Opera, p. 44 3 The lighting of this tree on Nov. 29 is an indispensable New York holiday tradition. | Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree, p. 46 4 The five-borough, 26.2-mile race is to the swift—and hardy—on Nov. 5. | TCS New York City Marathon, p. 46 5 Tori Amos brings her Native Invader Tour to the Big Apple for two performances. | Beacon Theatre, p. 45

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BROADWAY OPENINGS The Band’s Visit Ethel Barrymore Theatre, 243 W. 47th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. thebandsvisitmusical.com. (In previews, opens Nov. 9) (1 hr 30 mins, no intermission) An Egyptian police band is in Israel to give a concert, when, through a mix-up at the border, it is sent to an isolated village in the desert. Tony Shalhoub leads the band in the new musical, which is based on the 2007 movie of the same name. H14

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

4

The Children Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, 261 W. 47th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. manhattantheatreclub.com. (Previews begin Nov. 28, opens Dec. 12, closes Feb. 4) Following a power-plant disaster brought on by an earthquake, a married couple, both retired nuclear engineers, are living in a country cottage when a former colleague turns up with a surprising request. H14 Junk Vivian Beaumont Theater at Lincoln Center, 150 W. 65th St., btw Broadway & Amsterdam

PHOTOS: HOK, “TWIST AND SHOUT,” 2016, ZACHARY TYLER NEWTON; “MADAMA BUTTERFLY,” MARTY SOHL/METROPOLITAN OPERA; ROCKEFELLER CENTER CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTING CEREMONY, COURTESY DIANE BONDAREFF/INVISION FOR TISHMAN SPEYER/AP IMAGES; TCS NEW YORK CITY MARATHON, COURTESY NYRR; TORI AMOS, ©PAULINA OTYLIE SURYS

The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 68-70).


WINNER 6 TONY AWARDS

Meteor Shower Booth Theatre, 222 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. meteoronbroadway.com. (Previews begin Nov. 1, opens Nov. 29) (1 hr 30 mins, no intermission) When space rocks streak across the California sky in Steve Martin’s comedy, a quiet dinner between two diametrically opposed married couples turns on anything but small talk. Amy Schumer makes her Broadway debut. H14

BEST MUSICAL

@DearEvanHansen

Music Box Theatre, 239 W. 45th St. • Telecharge.com • 212-239-6200 • DearEvanHansen.com

Once on This Island Circle in the Square Theatre, 235 W. 50th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. onceonthisisland.com. (Previews begin Nov. 9, opens Dec. 3) (1 hr 30 mins, no intermission) The revival of the 1990 musical by Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty is set on an idyllic Caribbean island devastated by a great storm. A peasant girl from one side of Path: Studio:DEAR EVAN HANSEN:ADS:POST TONYS:133547_DEH_INNYMag_4.6x4.75_August2017:133547_DEH_INNYMag_4.6x4.75_August2017.indd the island falls in love Document with a wealthy boy from the other side of the island. Will true love win Pg Specs Job # 131916 Sprd Specs Print / User Info Fonts out over cultural differences? I13

133547_DEH_INNYMag_4.6x4.75_August2017.indd Client Stacey Mindich Description Magazine

Bleed None Trim 4.625” x 4.75” Safety None

Bleed Sprd 4.625” x 4.75” Trim Sprd 4.625” x 4.75” Safety Sprd 4.625” x 4.75”

Printed at None

Shubert (Regular), Berthold Akzidenz Grotesk (Condensed, Bold)

The Parisian Woman Hudson Theatre, 139-141 Pub NY Mag W. 44th St., btw Sixth &Run Seventh aves. parisian Date 8/1/2017 Visual Artist Jesse Eisenberg Gutter None womanbroadway.com. Release (Previews Nov. 9, Date begin 6/23/2017 Previous Artist Jesse Eisenburg opens Nov. 30) Set in Washington, D.C., after Images the 2016 election, socialite Chloe (Uma DEH BROADWAY ART FINAL-Evan_4C.psd (CMYK; 5297 ppi; Studio:DEAR EVAN HANSEN:ART:BROADWAY:4C:DEH BROADWAY ART FINAL-Evan_4C.psd) Thurman) maneuvers her way through a DEH-logo changing political landscape, vector_LB.MB.WH.ai her past, her (Studio:DEAR EVAN HANSEN:ART:BROADWAY:4C:Title Treatment:3Line:DEH-logo vector_LB.MB.WH.ai) DEH_Social_Icons.eps (Studio:DEAR EVAN HANSEN:ART:BROADWAY:4C:Social:DEH_Social_Icons.eps) marriage and an uncertain future. Josh Lucas mc_vrt_spot_pos_WH.ai (studio:DEAR EVAN HANSEN:ADS:POST-OP:131916_DEH_INNYMag_4.6x4.75_Feb2017:mc_vrt_spot_pos_WH.ai) and Blair Brown co-star in the timely new play by Beau Willimon (“House of Cards”). H14 Print/Export Time 6-26-2017 1:20 PM

Approvals CD Jay CW None AD Gerri Studio Jesse Acct Kara Proofrd Joe F. Prod Steve

SpongeBob SquarePants Palace Theatre, 1564 Broadway, at W. 47th St., 877.250.2929. spongebobbroadway.com. (Previews begin Nov. 6, opens Dec. 4) When the undersea world of Bikini Bottom is threatened with extinction, SpongeBob SquarePants comes to its rescue in the family-friendly musical comedy based on the Nickelodeon TV program. H14

BROADWAY Aladdin C0L46N 7 ew Amsterdam Theatre, 214 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 866.870.2717. aladdinthemusical.com. (2 hrs 20 mins) The musical comedy is an exotic magic carpet ride, filled with romance, special effects and the Academy Award-winning songs from Disney’s 1992 animated feature. H14 INNEWYORK.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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Latin History for Morons Studio 54, 254 W. 54th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. latinhistorybroadway.com. (In previews, opens Nov. 15, closes Feb. 4) (1 hr 35 mins, no intermission) When his son needs to find a Latin hero for a school project, writer/ actor John Leguizamo, the ever-helpful parent, does some research, embarking on a journey through 3,000 years of Latino history in the Americas. H13

INCLUDING

entertainment

®

Ave., 212.239.6200. lct.org. (In previews, opens Nov. 2) (2 hrs 30 mins) Money makes the world go ’round in Ayad Akhtar’s play about a charismatic investment banker and his hostile take over of an iconic American manufacturing company. The time is 1985. I12


entertainment Anastasia Broadhurst Theatre, 235 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. anastasiabroadway.com. (2 hrs 25 mins) A young woman with amnesia travels from Russia to 1920s Paris in search of her family and identity. Is she the sole surviving daughter of the slain czar? Or is she an imposter? Two Twentieth Century Fox movies inspired the musical. H14 Beautiful–The Carole King Musical C0L421Stephen Sondheim Theatre, 124 W. 43rd St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.239.6200. beautifulonbroad way.com. (2 hrs 20 mins) The long-running hit musical traces the rise of the singer/songwriter, from her early days as Carole Klein, an aspiring composer from Brooklyn, to her international success as Carole King, charttopping sensation. H14 The Book of Mormon C0L97231Eugene O’Neill Theatre, 230 W. 49th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. bookofmormonthemusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Two Mormon boys are on a mission to save souls in Africa in an irreverent, politically incorrect, Tony Award-winning musical comedy that only Trey Parker and Matt Stone, the creators of Comedy Central’s “South Park,” could dream up. H13 A Bronx Tale Longacre Theatre, 220 W. 48th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. abronxtalethemusical.com. (2 hrs 10 mins) In the 1960s Bronx, a gangster takes a young boy under his wing and introduces him to the mob life, much to the disapproval of his loving, hard-working father. Chazz Palminteri has written the book for the musical, while the original doo-wop score is by Alan Menken and Glenn Slater. H13

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Cats Neil Simon Theatre, 250 W. 52nd St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. catsbroad way.com. (Closes Dec. 30) (2 hrs 15 mins) The family-friendly musical juggernaut is revived on Broadway. Based on T.S. Eliot’s “Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats” and composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber, the show first opened in 1982 on Broadway, where it played for 18 years and 7,485 performances. H13

L E T YOUR F A N TA S I E S U N W I ND

Photo: Matt Crockett

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Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Lunt-Fontanne Theatre, 205 W. 46th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. charlieon broadway.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Roald Dahl’s classic semi-dark children’s book is now a family-friendly musical. When Willy Wonka, inventor of the Everlasting Gobstopper, opens his candy factory to five lucky Golden Ticket winners, young Charlie Bucket goes on a life-changing journey that turns his world from sour to sweet. H14

O MAJESTIC THEATRE | 247 West 44 th St. Telecharge.com | 212.239.6200 | phantombroadway.com

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Chicago Ambassador Theatre, 219 W. 49th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. chicagothemusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) In the Tony Award-winning revival of the vaudeville musical, two alluring jailbirds named Roxie Hart and Velma Kelly attain stardom while singing about sex and corruption. “Chicago” is the longest-running American musical in Broadway history. H13 Come From Away Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, 236 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. comefromaway.com. (1 hr 40 mins,


BEAUTIFULLY VISUALIZED,

DELICIOUSLY QUIRKY. CHRIS JONES, CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Hamilton Richard Rodgers Theatre, 226 W. 46th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. hamiltonbroadway.com. (2 hrs 45 mins) Lin-Manuel Miranda has written the book, music and lyrics for the 2016 Pulitzer Prize-winning musical about political mastermind Alexander Hamilton. Expect the unexpected when America’s past is told through the hip-hop sounds of today. H14

PREVIEWS BEGIN NOVEMBER 6 PALACE THEATRE, 47TH & BROADWAY SpongeBobBroadway.com @SpongeBobBway

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Dear Evan Hansen Music Box Theatre, 239 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. dearevanhansen.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) In the Tony Award-winning musical, a socially awkward high-school senior goes from outsider to cool guy when he comforts the parents of a troubled teenager who commits suicide. Although the boys did not know each other well, Evan, the titular hero, takes to social media and fabricates emails between them that idealize their friendship. Will the lie eventually undo him? H14

entertainment

IT MIGHT JUST BE THE YELLOW TONIC THAT BROADWAY NEEDS.

©2017 Viacom. Created by Stephen Hillenburg.

no intermission) On Sept. 11, 2001, following the terrorist attacks in New York City, Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C., 38 commercial airplanes were diverted to Gander, Newfoundland; when the 6,579 passengers landed, they found themselves stranded in a small town with a population half their size. How they and the town adjusted to a changed world on Sept. 12 is the basis of the upbeat musical. H14

Hello, Dolly! Shubert Theatre, 225 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. hellodollyonbroadway.com. (2 hrs 35 mins) The first new production of the musical comedy since its premiere on Broadway in 1964 stars Tony Award winner Bette Midler. H14

134483_SBSP_Tour_InNYMag_Nov2017.indd

Kinky Boots C0L4751Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 302 W. 45th Path: studio:SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS:BROADWAY:ADS:134483_SBSP_Tour_InNYMag_Nov2017:134483_SBSP_Tour_InNYMag_Nov2017.indd St., btw Eighth & Ninth Document aves., 877.250.2929. kinkybootsthemusical.com. (2 hrs Job # 13448320 mins) Cyndi Pg Specs Sprd Specs Print / User Info Fonts Lauper has written the music and lyrics and Gotham (Bold, Bold Italic, Book), Client Showpants LLC Printed at None Bleed Sprd 4.625” x 4.75” Harvey Fierstein the book for the musical about Bleed None Minion Pro (Regular), Kenyan Description Magazine Trim 4.625” x 4.75” Trim Sprd 4.625” x 4.75” Print/Export Time 9-26-2017 4:08 PM Coffee (Regular) a down-on-its-heels shoe factory given a Safety None Safety Sprd 4.625” x 4.75” Pub In NY Magazine transfusion of style, thanks to None a drag queen. I14 Run Date Visual Artist Heather Troy Release Date 9/26/2017

Gutter None

Previous Artist Miles Freyberger

Approvals CD Jay/Vinny CW None AD Gerri Studio Jesse Acct Kara/EriK Proofrd Joe F Prod Steve

The Lion King C0L41896Minskoff Theatre, 200 W. 45th Images St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 866.870.2717. (CMYK; 908 ppi; Studio:SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS:BROADWAY:ADS:134483_SBSP_Tour_InNYMag_Nov2017:ART:134483_SBSP_Tour_InNYMag_Nov2017_4C lionking.com. (2 hrs 30 134483_SBSP_Tour_InNYMag_Nov2017_4C.psd mins) Theatergoers sing SBSP_LOGO_DIMENSION_BOUNCE_FINAL_4C_TRANS_TBM4E.psd (CMYK; 1361 ppi; Studio:SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS:BROADWAY:ART:TITLE:CMYK:SBSP_LOGO_DIMENSION_BOUNCE_FINAL_4C_TRAN along at the runaway hit stage version of TBM4E.psd) Disney’s beloved animated movie, enjoying Citi_WH.eps (Studio:LOGOS:Financial COs_Banks:BANKS:CitiBank:Citi Logo:Citi_WH.eps) such songs by multiple Grammy winner Elton John as “Circle of Life,” “Can You Feel the Love Tonight” and “Hakuna Matata,” as well as spectacular masks and dazzling puppets. H14 M. Butterfly Cort Theatre, 138 W. 48th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.239.6200. mbutterfly broadway.com. (2 hrs) Clive Owen stars in this story of a 20-year love affair between a married French diplomat and a Chinese opera singer. Full of intrigue, espionage, betrayal and scandal, this is the first Broadway revival of David Henry Hwang’s gender-bending 1988 Tony Award-winning play. H13 Miss Saigon Broadway Theatre, 1681 Broadway, btw W. 52nd & W. 53rd sts., 212.239.6200. saigonbroadway.com. (Closes Jan. 14) (2 hrs 40 mins) During the last days of the Vietnam War, a Saigon bar girl falls in love with an American GI in the new production of the tragic musical INNEWYORK.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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entertainment

YOUR HOLIDAY WISH IS GRANTED

that first opened on Broadway in 1991. As the city falls and American personnel are hastily evacuated, the lovers are torn apart. When they reunite three years later, their lives have irrevocably changed. H13

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The Phantom of the Opera C0L64M 187 ajestic Theatre, 247 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. phantombroadway.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Broadway’s longest-running show, featuring a score by Andrew Lloyd Webber, tells the tragic story of a disfigured composer who falls in love with a young soprano, whisking her away to his mysterious chambers beneath the Paris Opera House. H14 The Play That Goes Wrong Lyceum Theatre, 149 W. 45th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.239.6200. broadwaygoeswrong.com. (2 hrs) Everything that could comically go wrong does when the Cornley Polytechnic Drama Society puts on a 1920s murder mystery. H14

New Amsterdam Theatre, Broadway & 42nd Street • 866-870-27 17 AladdinTheMusical.com

©Disney

T H E H I T B R O A D WAY M U S I C A L T:4.625”

_NYC_INNYMagazine_Nov2017.indd

IN:ADS:MAGAZINE:2017:134575_ALDN_NYC_INNYMagazine_Nov2017:134575_ALDN_NYC_INNYMagazine_Nov2017.indd

Pg Specs

Sprd Specs

Print / User Info

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Bleed None Trim 4.625” x 4.75” Safety None

Bleed Sprd 4.625” x 4.75” Trim Sprd 4.625” x 4.75” Safety Sprd 4.625” x 4.75”

Printed at None

Gotham (Light, Book), Gotham Narrow (Book), Ocean Sans MT Std (Semi Cond), Ocean Sans Std (Book SemiExtended)

Gutter None

Print/Export Time 9-29-2017 2:29 PM Visual Artist Steve Gordon Previous Artist Jesse Eisenberg

School of Rock Winter Garden Theatre, 1634 Broadway, btw W. 50th & W. 51st sts., 212.239.6200. schoolofrockthemusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) It’s only rock ‘n’ roll, but the kids at a prestigious prep school love it when their wannabe rock star substitute teacher turns them into a rock band in the musical with a score written by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Glenn Slater. H13 Springsteen on Broadway Walter Kerr Theatre, 219 W. 48th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave. brucespringsteen.net/broadway. (Closes Feb. 3) (2 hrs, no intermission) “The Boss” makes his Broadway debut in a solo acoustic show. H13

Time and the Conways American Airlines Page 1 Theatre, 227 W.#42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.719.1300. roundabouttheatre.org. (Closes Nov. Inks26) (2 hrs 20 mins) J.B. Priestley’s Approvals play charts 20 years in the life of a British Cyan CD Jay/Vinny family, from Magenta the euphoria and optimism of 1919 CW None AD Christy to the harsh Yellow realities and changing fortunes of Black Studio Jesse 1937. Elizabeth McGovern heads the cast. H14 Used Swatches Acct Jackie/Jeff/Michael Black C=100 M=0 Y=0 K=0

Proofrd Joe F Prod Steve

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C=0 M=100Atkinson Y=0 K=0 Waitress Brooks Theatre, 256 W. 47th C=0 M=0 Y=100 K=0 St., btw Broadway &Y=100 Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. C=15 M=100 K=0 C=75 M=5 Y=100 K=0 (2 hrs 30 mins) A HiRez4C.tif (CMYK; 2104 ppi; Studio:ALADDIN:ART:NEW YORK:ART MACHINE 2016:CHARACTERS:ALDN.ArtMachine2016.Telly-HiRez4C.tif) waitressthemusical.com. C=100 M=90 Y=10 K=0 16.BaseFade-HiRez4C.psd (CMYK; 1496 ppi; Studio:ALADDIN:ART:NEW YORK:HOLIDAY 2016:BOKEH:ALDN.ArtMachine-Holiday2016.BaseFade-HiRez4C.psd) waitress, with exceptional talent for baking, GRAYan @ 60% 6-CMYK-Flat-wTexture.psd (CMYK; 2350 ppi; Studio:ALADDIN:ART:NEW YORK:ART MACHINE 2016:TITLE TREATMENT:ALDN.NewLogo.Summer2016-CMYK-Flat-wTexture.psd) PMS 178 C 4 dreams of opening her own pie shop, but a ALDN Purple (87.100.0.0) ps (Studio:ALADDIN:ART:NEW YORK:POST-OPENING ART:NEW SOCIAL LOGOS:ALDN_Social_Icons_0.0.0.0.eps) ALDN Gold (0.17.98.0) loveless marriage and unexpected pregnancy ne-4C.psd (CMYK; 1885 ppi, -1886 ppi; Studio:ALADDIN:ART:NEW YORK:ART MACHINE 2016:ADDTL ELEMENTS:ALDN.ArtMachine2016.FireLine-4C.psd) threaten to hold her back. Sara Bareilles has written the songs for the musical. H14

“A magical Broadway musical with BRAINS, HEART and COURAGE.” Time Magazine

GERSHWIN THEATRE, 222 West 51st St. WickedtheMusical.com

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IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

War Paint Nederlander Theatre, 208 W. 41st St., Print Ad Slug btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 877.250.2929. warpaintmusical.com. (Closes Dec. 30) 2 hrs 30 mins) Masters of self-invention and mistresses of lipstick and rouge, Helena Rubinstein (Patti LuPone) and Elizabeth Arden (Christine Ebersole) defined beauty and the cosmetics industry in the 20th century. But did these savvy competitors like each other? The claws come out in the musical. H14 Wicked C0L418Gershwin Theatre, 222 W. 51st St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. wickedthe musical.com. (2 hrs 45 mins) Based on the book by Gregory Maguire, this hit musical with a score by Stephen Schwartz—a prequel to “The Wizard of Oz”—imagines Oz as a land of strife,


where a young, green-hued girl named Elphaba is branded the Wicked Witch of the West. I13

OFF-BROADWAY+BEYOND

entertainment

A Clockwork Orange New World Stages, Stage 4, 340 W. 50th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.239.6200. aclockworkorangeplay.com. (Closes Jan. 6) (1 hr 30 mins, no intermission) Anthony Burgess’ 1962 novel about a dystopian future—in which rebellious young thugs, called Droogs, run rampant—has been adapted for the stage. The production includes stylized but intense violence and sexuality. I13 Jersey Boys New World Stages, Stage 1, 340 W. 50th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.239.6200. jerseyboysnewyork.com. (Performances begin Nov. 22) (2 hrs 30 mins) The Tony Award-winning Best Musical of 2006 tells the behind-thescenes story of pop sensations, Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons, and includes the group’s greatest hits, such as “Sherry,” “Big Girls Don’t Cry” and “Oh What a Night.” I13 Stomp C0L94O 1 rpheum Theatre, 126 Second Ave., at E. 8th St., 800.982.2787. stomponline.com. (1 hr 40 mins) In a dazzling percussive performance, the cast conjures rhythm out of brooms, dustbins, hubcaps and more. E18 Stuffed Westside Theatre Downstairs, 407 W. 43rd St.,, btw Ninth & 10th aves., 212.239.6200. stuffedplay.com. (1 hr 30 mins, no intermission) Comedian Lisa Lampanelli takes a witty, insightful, often irreverent look at the relationship women have to food in her new play, which she wrote (with additional material contributed by Ashley Austin Morris) and in which she stars. I14 Torch Song Tony Kiser Theatre at Second Stage, 305 W. 43rd St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.245.4422. 2st.com. (Closes Dec. 3) (2 hrs 40 mins) Can the drag-queen son of a domineering Jewish mother find romance and a family in 1979 New York? Michael Urie and Mercedes Ruehl star in the new production of Harvey Fierstein’s play. I14

WINNER! BEST MUSICAL ALL ACROSS NORTH AMERICA

CABARETS+COMEDY CLUBS Café Carlyle C0L9431The Carlyle, A Rosewood Hotel New York, 35 E. 76th St., at Madison Ave., 212.744.1600. rosewoodhotels.com/en/carlyle/ dining/cafe_carlyle. One of the swankiest supper clubs in town. Oct. 24-Nov. 4: Mandy Gonzalez. Nov. 7-18: John Pizzarelli & Jessica Molaskey. Nov. 28-Dec. 31: Steve Tyrell. Every Monday thru Dec. 11: Woody Allen & the Eddy Davis New Orleans Jazz Band. F10 Carolines on Broadway C0L941 318 626 Broadway, btw W. 49th & W. 50th sts., 212.757.4100. carolines .com. Performances by some of the nation’s hottest headliners and up-and-coming comics. Highlights: Nov. 2-5: Omid Djalili. Nov. 8-10: Chris Hardwick. Nov. 16-18: Ron Funches. Nov. 22-25: D.L. Hughley. Nov. 30-Dec. 2: Kevin Nealon. H13 Feinstein’s/54 Below C0L52138254 W. 54th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 646.476.3551. 54below .com. The Theater District’s subterranean nightclub, restaurant and cocktail lounge underneath the former Studio 54 disco. Several

COME FROM AWAY Book, Music and Lyrics by Irene Sankoff and David Hein Directed by Christopher Ashley

THE REMARKABLE TRUE STORY NOW ON BROADWAY

TELECHARGE.COM (212) 239-6200 O Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, 236 W. 45 TH STREET I COMEFROMAWAY.COM

OFFICIAL AIRLINE

INNEWYORK.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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ON BROADWAY THROUGH

DECEMBER 30 ONLY!

entertainment shows nightly. Highlights: Nov. 3-4: Linda Eder. Nov. 11: Anna Bergman. Nov. 13: Christine Ebersole. Nov. 17-18: Melissa Errico Sings Sondheim. Nov. 21-25: Ben Vereen. Nov. 28: Alice Ripley & Emily Skinner. H13

Gotham Comedy Club 208 W. 23rd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.367.9000. gotham comedyclub.com. Jerry Seinfeld, Dave Chappelle, Louis CK and Amy Schumer are among the big-name stand-ups who have performed in the 10,000-square-foot space, known for its Art Deco ambience. In addition to headliners, New Talent Showcases are a staple of the club’s calendar. Food and drink menus available. Highlights: Nov. 9-11: Joey CoCo Diaz. Nov. 17-18: Bryan Callen. Nov. 24-25: Jamie Kennedy. I16 Joe’s Pub C0L9431425 Lafayette St., at Astor Pl., 212.539.8778. publictheater.org. This performance space boasts eclectic entertainment. Highlights: Nov. 10, 17: Nellie McKay: “The Big Molinsky: Considering Joan Rivers.” Nov. 21-22, 24-25, 27-30: Judy Collins: “A Love Letter to Stephen Sondheim.” E18

DANCE+MUSIC

CATSBROADWAY.COM

Neil Simon Theatre · 250 W. 52nd St.

ORIGINALLY PRODUCED BY CAMERON MACKINTOSH AND THE REALLY USEFUL GROUP LIMITED PHOTO OF GEORGINA PAZCOGUIN BY MATTHEW MURPHY

TM © 1981 RUG LTD

Carnegie Hall C0L9541Seventh Ave., at W. 57th St., 212.247.7800. carnegiehall.org. The 2017–2018 season is the concert hall’s 127th. Highlights: Nov. 1: Marc-André Hamelin, piano. Nov. 7-9: Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Zubin Mehta. Nov. 14-15: Mariinsky Orchestra, conducted by Valery Gergiev with pianist Denis Matsuev (Nov. 14) and pianist Danil Trifonov (Nov. 15). Nov. 17: New York Pops. Nov. 25: Arlo Guthrie’s Annual Thanksgiving Concert. H13 Joyce Theater C0L1 9541 75 Eighth Ave., at W. 19th St., 212.242.0800. joyce.org. The respected venue welcomes renowned modern-dance companies from the U.S. and abroad. Oct. 31-Nov. 4: Dresden Semperoper Ballett. Nov. 7-12: Garth Fagan Dance. Nov. 14-26: Complexions Contemporary Ballet. Nov. 30-Dec. 3: Liz Gerring Dance Company: “Horizon.” H17 Metropolitan Opera C0L3572Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., btw W. 63rd & W. 64th sts., 212.362.6000. metopera.org. The world-famous opera company presents its 2017–2018 season, featuring new productions as well as repertory favorites. Nov. 1, 4 (evening): “La Bohème.” Nov. 2, 6, 9, 13, 17, 20: “Madama Butterfly.” Nov. 3, 7, 10, 14, 18 (matinee), 21: “The Exterminating Angel.” Nov. 4 (matinee), 8, 11 (evening), 16: “Turandot.” Nov. 11 (matinee), 15, 18 (evening), 22, 25 (evening), 28: “Thaïs.” Nov. 24, 27, 29: “Verdi’s Requiem.” Nov. 25 (matinee), 30: “The Magic Flute.” I12 New York City Ballet: George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker C0L467David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., at W. 63rd St., 212.496.0600. nycballet.com. (Nov. 24-Dec. 31) Toy soldiers, sugar plum fairies and more dance their way across the stage in the holiday favorite, choreographed by George Balanchine to music by Tchaikovsky. I12 New York City Center C0L1 9541 31 W. 55th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.581.1212. nycitycenter .org. This performing arts venue hosts music, dance and theater events. Oct. 26-Nov. 5: “The

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Red Shoes,” directed/choreographed by Matthew Bourne. Nov. 15-19: Lerner & Loewe’s “Brigadoon” in concert, directed/choreographed by Christopher Wheeldon. H13

entertainment

New York Philharmonic C0LD 1964 avid Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., at W. 64th St., 212.875.5656. nyphil.org. The 2017–2018 season is a momentous one, as New York’s preeminent orchestra honors Leonard Bernstein, its former Music Director and Laureate Conductor, on the occasion of the centennial of his birth. Concerts: Nov. 2-4, 9, 11, 14, 22, 24, 25, 30. I12

JAZZ CLUBS Birdland C0L9641315 W. 44th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.581.3080. birdlandjazz.com. “The jazz corner of the world” is how Charlie Parker described this club. Highlights: Oct. 31-Nov. 4: Ann Hampton Callaway. Nov. 7-12: Django Reinhardt NY Festival Allstars. Nov. 14-18: Diane Schuur. Nov. 21-25: Veronica Swift with the Benny Green Trio. Nov. 28-Dec. 2: Marcus Roberts Trio. Dinner served nightly. I14 Blue Note Jazz Club C0L1 79641 31 W. 3rd St., btw MacDougal St. & Sixth Ave., 212.475.8592. bluenote.net. The best and brightest perform here. Highlights: Oct. 31-Nov. 5: Dizzy Gillespie All-Stars. Nov. 9-11: Talib Kweli with Live Band Residency. Nov. 14-19: Stanley Clarke Band. Nov. 21-26: Dee Dee Bridgewater. Nov. 28-Dec. 3: Fourplay. G18 Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola C0L96418Jazz at Lincoln Center, 10 Columbus Cir., Broadway & W. 60th St., 212.258.9595. jazz.org/dizzys. This intimate club boasts a stunning stage backdrop: the glittering Manhattan skyline. Highlights: Nov. 3-5: Vinicius Cantuaria. Nov. 10-12: Warren Wolf & the Wolfpack. Nov. 17-19: Bobby Sanabria Multiverse Big Band: “West Side Story” at 60 Reimagined. Nov. 22-26: Wycliffe Gordon & His International All-Stars. Dinner served nightly. I12 Village Vanguard C0L1 9471 78 Seventh Ave. So., btw Perry & W. 11th sts., 212.255.4037. villagevan guard.com. Since 1935, one of New York’s most prestigious jazz clubs. Highlights: Oct. 31-Nov. 2: Fred Hersch Solo. Nov. 3-5: Fred Hersch Trio. Nov. 7-12: Ravi Coltrane Quartet. Nov. 14-19: John Zorn’s Masada: Book Three. H18

POP/ROCK CLUBS+VENUES Barclays Center C0L46 7 20 Atlantic Ave., at Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn, 800.745.3000. barclayscenter .com. A state-of-the-art entertainment/sports arena. Highlights: Nov. 2: A Perfect Circle. Nov. 3: Masters of Ceremony: 50 Cents, Busta Rhymes, Jeezy and more. Nov. 9-12: Disney on Ice: “Dare to Dream.” Nov. 15: Janet Jackson. Nov. 18: Mayday. Nov. 26-27: Jay-Z: 4:44 Tour. AA24 Beacon Theatre C0L2 941 124 Broadway, at W. 74th St., 866.858.0008. beacontheatre.com. Pop-music concerts and other acts. Highlights: Nov. 1: Courtney Barnett & Kurt Vile (and The Sea Lice). Nov. 2: Jerry Seinfeld. Nov. 3: Jethro Tull by Ian Anderson. Nov. 4: The Fab Faux. Nov. 7-8: Tori Amos. Nov. 12: Lyle Lovett & John Hiatt. Nov. 14: Lindsey Stirling. Nov. 15: Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band. Nov. 16: Dream Theater. Nov. 17-18: King Crimson. Nov. 19: Squeeze. J11 INNEWYORK.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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Madison Square Garden C0L95461Seventh Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 866.858.0008. thegarden .com. Concerts and live events in the arena and The Theater. Highlights in the Arena: Nov. 10: La Salsa Vive. Nov. 12 & 14: Dead & Company. Nov. 18: Billy Joel. Highlight in The Theater: Nov. 3: Joe Rogan: Strange Times 2017. H15

SPECIAL EVENTS Big Apple Circus Damrosch Park, Lincoln Center, W. 62nd St., at Amsterdam Ave., 646.793.9313. bigapplecircus.com. (Thru Jan. 7) NYC’s very own intimate one-ring circus—no seat is more than 50 feet away from the action—marks its 40th anniversary season with a new ringmaster, Nik Wallenda and The Fabulous Wallendas, and the return of fan-favorite clown Grandma. I12 Canstruction New York Brookfield Place, 230 Vesey St., btw Liberty & West sts. newyork .canstruction.org. (Nov. 2-15) Teams of architects, engineers and contractors build large-scale sculptures made entirely out of unopened cans of food. Following the display, the cans are donated to City Harvest for distribution to those in need. Nov. 2-11: 10 am-8 pm, Nov. 15: 10 am-6 pm. Free. G22 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade C0L65134social .macys.com/parade. (Nov. 23) Almost 3 million people line the streets for the 91st annual event, which features giant balloons, marching bands, celebrities riding on elaborate floats and performances from Broadway shows and pop sensations. The parade kicks off at 9 am at W. 77th St. & Central Park West and continues south to Columbus Circle, where it turns east onto Central Park South, marches to Sixth Ave., where it heads south to W. 34th St. and ends at noon at Macy’s Herald Square. On Nov. 22, 2017, from 3 to 10 pm, visitors are invited to watch as balloons are inflated around the American Museum of Natural History (beginning at Columbus Ave. & W. 79th St.). G15 New York Comedy Festival C0L6n 134 ycomedyfesti val.com. (Nov. 7-12) Up-and-coming comedians, as well as seasoned veterans perform in various venues around town. Radio City Christmas Spectacular C0L49Radio City Music Hall, 1260 Sixth Ave., at W. 50th St., 866.858.0007. radiocitychristmas.com. (Nov. 10-Jan. 1) (1 hr 30 mins) The family-friendly holiday variety show features the high-kicking Rockettes, the world-famous precision dance team. G13 Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree C0L623Rockefeller Plz., btw W. 49th & W. 50th sts., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.632.3975. rockefellercent er.com. (Nov. 29-Jan. 7) Arguably the world’s most famous holiday tree has lit up Midtown Manhattan since 1931. G13 TCS New York City Marathon C0L637t4 csnycmara thon.org. (Nov. 5) As many as 50,000 runners from home and abroad compete to complete the 26.2-mile course in the world’s largest marathon. The path takes racers through all five boroughs, starting in Staten Island at the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge and finishing in Manhattan’s Central Park.

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IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM


entertainment

THE VOICE MUST BE HEARD

Winter’s Eve at Lincoln Square C0L3574Dante Park, Broadway, at W. 63rd St., 212.581.3774. winterseve.nyc. (Nov. 27) New York City’s largest outdoor holiday festival salutes the holiday season when it transforms Broadway, btw W. 60th and W. 68th sts., into a familyfriendly winter wonderland, featuring live musical entertainment, dancing, in-store activities, ice sculpting and food tastings from more than 30 neighborhood restaurants. 5:30-9 pm—rain, snow or shine. Free. I12

SPORTS Brooklyn Nets C0L47Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Ave., at Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn, 800.745.3000. nba.com/nets. The professional basketball team has the home-court advantage. Nov. 14: Boston Celtics. Nov. 19: Golden State Warriors. Nov. 24: Portland Trail Blazers. AA24 New York Giants C0L513M 4 etLife Stadium, East Rutherford, New Jersey, 800.745.3000. giants .com. The Giants, 2012 Super Bowl champions, play home games at MetLife Stadium. Nov. 5: Los Angeles Rams. Nov. 19: Kansas City Chiefs. New York Islanders Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Ave., at Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn, 917.618.6700. newyorkislanders.com. The NHL franchise plays home games in Brooklyn. Nov. 5: Colorado Avalanche. Nov. 7: Edmonton Oilers. Nov. 16: Carolina Hurricanes. Nov. 22: Philadelphia Flyers. Nov. 28: Vancouver Canucks. AA24

An Unforgettable New York Experience Tickets start at $25

metopera.org

Photo: Jonathan Tichler/Metropolitan Opera

New York Jets C0L5143MetLife Stadium, East Rutherford, New Jersey, 800.745.3000. newyork jets.com. New York’s Men in Green tackle the opposition on their home turf. Nov. 2: Buffalo Bills. Nov. 26: Carolina Panthers. New York Knicks C0L6M 9471 adison Square Garden, Seventh Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 877.465.6425. nba.com/knicks. Hometown hoop action. Nov. 1: Houston Rockets. Nov. 3: Phoenix Suns. Nov. 5: Indiana Pacers. Nov. 7: Charlotte Hornets. Nov. 11: Sacramento Kings. Nov. 13: Cleveland Cavaliers. Nov. 15: Utah Jazz. Nov. 20: Los Angeles Clippers. Nov. 22: Toronto Raptors. Nov. 27: Portland Trail Blazers. Nov. 29: Miami Heat. H15 New York Rangers C0L395Madison Square Garden, Seventh Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 212.465.6741. nyrangers.com. The hockey team laces up its skates. Nov. 6: Columbus Blue Jackets. Nov. 8: Boston Bruins. Nov. 11: Edmonton Oilers. Nov. 19: Ottawa Senators. Nov. 24: Detroit Red Wings. Nov. 26: Vancouver Canucks. Nov. 28: Florida Panthers. H15

SERVICES BroadwayHD broadwayhd.com. The streaming service brings live theater—more than 150 recent as well as classic musicals, plays and comedies from Broadway, London and other entertainment centers—to the internet to watch online, on Apple TV or Roku. Access is via a monthly package, yearly subscription or on a per-show basis.

ESTABLISHED IN 1994 NYC

or 800-982-2787 · ORPHEUM THEATRE, 2nd Ave. at 8th St. #StompNYC

/StompOnline

@StompNYC

@StompNYC

StompOnline.com

INNEWYORK.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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dining+drinking

FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC

The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 68-70).

4

1 1 A seven-course prix fixe izakaya menu is served twice-nightly and soundtracked by songs chosen by dining guests perusing a collection of 500-plus records. | Tokyo Reord Bar, p. 50 2 Traditional Austrian fare in an old-world setting by a restaurant team with an outpost of the same name in Kansas City, Missouri. | Grünauer Bistro, p. 52 3 Don’t let the elaborate, dazzling bar and its surroundings make you forget to order a drink. | Oscar Wilde, p. 53 4 Admire the meat locker while you wait for cuts of steak and slurp East and West Coast oysters. | Royal 35 Steakhouse, p. 51

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Pricing Legend: $=inexpensive (average meal under $25) $$=moderate ($25-$50) $$$=expensive ($50-$80) $$$$=luxe ($80+)

specialties such as crispy duck confi t and the “original db burger” (sirloin meat filled with braised short ribs, foie gras and black truffl e on a Parmesan bun). B (daily), L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$$ G14

CENTRAL PARK SOUTH+

HB Burger —American 127 W. 43rd St., btw Sixth Ave. & Broadway, 212.575.5848. heartland brewery.com. Diners enjoy specialty burgers, housemade sodas, milk shakes and egg creams. L & D (daily). $$ H14

THEATER DISTRICT+HELL’S KITCHEN db Bistro Moderne—Contemporary French 0L64C 31 ity Club Hotel, 55 W. 44th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.391.2400. dbbistro.com. American dishes are fused with French fl air for

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

Heartland Brewery & Chophouse— American 127 W. 43rd St., btw Broadway &

PHOTOS: TOKYO RECORD BAR INTERIOR, NOAH FECKS; CLASSIC WIENER SCHNITZEL, CYNTHIA PRADO; OSCAR WILDE BAR INTERIOR, COURTESY SIMMER GROUP; SEAFOOD TOWER, COURTESY ROYAL 35 STEAKHOUSE

3

2


CHELSEA+MEATPACKING DISTRICT

Crif Dogs—American 113 St. Mark’s Pl., btw Ave. A & First Ave., 212.614.2728. crifdogs .com. Late-night eaters indulge in hot dogs topped with guacamole, sauerkraut, avocado, chili, egg and pineapple, with fries, tater tots and beer to accompany. A speakeasy cocktail lounge is hidden on the other side of a phone booth in the dining room. L & D (daily). $$ D18

aRoqa—Contemporary Indian 206 Ninth Ave., btw W. 22nd & W. 23rd sts., 646.678.5471. aroqanyc.com. Eclectic flavors form inventive plates meant for sharing on a menu that also features chef’s specialties (kataifi mushrooms: wild mushrooms, saffron croquettes, goat cheese relish). L & D (daily). $$$ I16 Kola House—Contemporary American 408 W. 15th St., btw Ninth & 10th aves., 646.869.8873. kolahouse.com. This sleek haunt near the High Line was designed by rock icon Lenny Kravitz and offers a short but wide-ranging food menu (e.g., smoked eggplant, tuna crudo), in a space with specialty cocktails and live music regularly. D (M-Sa). $$$ J17

Sixth Ave., 646.366.0235, H14; 350 Fifth Ave., at 34th St., 212.563.3433, G15; 625 Eighth Ave., at W. 41st St., 646.214.1000, I14. heartlandbrewery .com. Handcrafted beers, housemade sodas and a hearty steakhouse menu, including bison burgers and certified Black Angus New York strip steak. L & D (daily). $$

Le Bernardin—French 155 W. 51st St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.554.1515. le-bernardin .com. This internationally acclaimed restaurant—a leader in New York City’s French cuisine landscape, with a menu crafted by Chef Eric Ripert—serves fresh, simply prepared fish dishes in an elegant space. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). Jackets required, ties optional. $$$$ G13 Planet Hollywood—Contemporary American C0L631 52 540 Broadway, at W. 45th St., 212.333.7827. planethollywoodintl.com. Huge sandwiches, burgers, pizza and salads are the main attractions at this Times Square staple, with decor and a menu devoted to film and television history. L & D (daily). $$ H14 Sardi’s—Continental 234 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.221.8440. sardis .com. A Theater District staple since 1921, this restaurant has been catering to pre- and post-theater crowds for almost a century, and is famous for its walls, lined with celebrity caricatures. L & D (Tu-Su), Brunch (Su). $$$ H14 Utsav Indian Bar & Grill—Indian 1185 Sixth Ave., entrance on W. 46th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.575.2525. utsavny.com. There is a cozy bar and outdoor seating on the lower level and, on the upper level, elegant decor and floor-to-ceiling windows, where you can enjoy savory traditional Indian flavors during a lunch

spot’s most popular dish: the steakhouse burger, topped with caramelized onions and American cheese. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$ D18

Famous Sammy’s Roumanian—Jewish/ Steak House 157 Chrystie St., at Delancey St., 212.673.0330. sammysromanian.com. A subterranean dining room zealously decorated with balloons, streamers and photographs recalls a midcentury bar mitzvah and old-time service provides Jewish delicacies: stuffed cabbage, breaded veal cutlet, broiled chicken liver, housemade pickles and potato pancakes. D (nightly). $$$ E20

Rouge Tomate Chelsea—Contemporary American C0L5321 97 26 W. 18th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 646.395.3978. rougetomatechelsea.com. Locally sourced and health-oriented culinary offerings, as well as more than 200 wines, including biodynamic, international and certified organic bottles. L (Tu-F), D (Tu-Su), Brunch (Sa & Su) $$$$ G17

Fish Cheeks—Thai 55 Bond St., btw Bowery & Lafayette St., 212.677.2223. fishcheeksnyc.com. Thai seafood—shrimp in three-crab sauce, crispy garlic branzino, seafood pad cha—in a colorful NoHo space with a happy hour offering $1 oysters noon-4 pm and 5-7 pm daily. L & D (daily). $$$ E19

CHINATOWN+LITTLE ITALY La Mela—Italian 167 Mulberry St., btw Grand & Broome sts., 212.431.9493. lamelarestaurant.com. Traditional family-style meals of shrimp marinara, rigatoni pomodoro, cannoli and more. L & D (daily). $$ E20 Lombardi’s—Italian C0L52133 6 2 Spring St., at Mott St., 212.941.7994. firstpizza.com. America’s first pizzeria has been serving New Yorkers and tourists with its New York-style, coal-oven-fired pizza pies for more than 100 years. L & D (daily). Cash only. $$ E20 Spicy Village—Chinese 68 Forsyth St., #B, btw Hester & Grand sts., 212.625.8299. spicy villageny.com. Flavors from the Henan province—from signature hand-pulled wheat noodles to spicy chicken—served in a casual, no-frills dining room. B, L & D (M-Sa). $$ D20 Taiwan Pork Chop House—Taiwanese C0L7843 31 Doyers St., btw Bowery & Pell St., 212.791.7007. taiwanporkchophouse.com. This casual Taiwanese-style Chinese hideaway serves a wide variety of rice dishes, including braised spare ribs soup with vegetable rice and pork with pickled mustard greens and egg fried rice. B, L & D (daily). $ D21

EAST VILLAGE+LOWER EAST SIDE Brindle Room—American 277 E. 10th St., btw Ave. A & First Ave., 212.529.9702. brindleroom .com. Duck confit poutine can start a meal of pan-roasted salmon, blackened pork loin or the

Katz’s Delicatessen—Jewish-American 205 E. Houston St., at Ludlow St., 212.254.2246. katzsdelicatessen.com. This iconic spot has been serving pastrami, corned beef, knishes, housemade pickles and other classics since 1888. Tickets are given for purchase and seating; don’t lose them! L & D (daily). $$ D19

FINANCIAL DISTRICT+TRIBECA Cipriani Club 55—Contemporary Italian C0L81742 55 Wall St., btw William & Hanover sts., 212.699.4099; and three other NYC locations. cipriani.com. Inside a building with monolithic Greek columns, guests dine on Italian classics such as spinach sage ravioli and veal milanese while sipping on signature bellinis. B, L & D (M-F). $$$$ E22 Jung Sik—Contemporary Korean C0L2 147 Harrison St., at Hudson St., 212.219.0900. jungsik.com. French and Spanish influences shape the cutting-edge cooking techniques of Michelinstarred, Seoul-born Chef Yim Jung Sik, on a menu with a range of omakase experiences. D (M-Sa). $$$$ G21 Nobu Downtown—Japanese 195 Broadway, btw Vesey & Fulton sts., 212.219.0500. nobu restaurants.com. Celebrated dishes on Chef Nobu Matsuhisa’s menu include yellowtail with jalapeño and black cod with miso, while newer menu additions include bigeye tuna tataki with truffle eryngii mushrooms. L (M-F), D (nightly). $$$ G22 Nobu Fifty Seven—Japanese 40 W. 57th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.757.3000.

INNEWYORK.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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buffet, on a prix fixe dinner menu, or à la carte. Convenient for pre-theater dining. L & D (daily). $$$ G14


dining+drinking noburestaurants.com/fifty-seven. The flagship’s grandiose Uptown sister. L & D (daily). $$$ G12

FLATIRON+UNION SQUARE+GRAMERCY Barn Joo—Korean 35 Union Square W., btw E. 16th & E. 17th sts., 646.398.9663, F17; 34 W. 35th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.564.4430, F15 barnjoo.com. Classic Korean plates—bulgogi mushroom hot pot; vegetable, beef or seafood japchae—alongside house specialties like Korean-style corn dog and wagyu beef paella. L & D (daily). $$ Cosme—Contemporary Mexican 35 E. 21st St., btw Park Ave. So & Broadway, 212.913.9659. cosmenyc.com. Chef Enrique Olvera crafts small dishes using avant-garde ingredients, such as uni and hazlenut mole. Entrées include black-garlic-rubbed New York strip steak tacos with shishito peppers and avocado-tarragon puree. D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$ F17 Cote—Korean Steak House 16 W. 22nd St., btw Broadway & Fifth Ave., 212.401.7986. cotenyc .com. A wide array of prime and specialty cuts are served as part of a daily rotating “butcher’s feast,” alongside seasonal ban-chan and housemade stews, at this Korean steak house led by the team from Michelin-starred West Village fixture, Piora. D (M-Sa). $$ F16

Union Square Cafe—Contemporary American 101 E. 19th St., at Park Ave. So., 212.243.4020. unionsquarecafe.com. Danny Meyer’s hot spot is known for such classics as ricotta gnocchi, tagliarini with summer squash and mushrooms, and olive-oil-poached halibut with squash ribbons, chanterelles and sungold tomatoes. L & D (daily). $$$ F17

GREENWICH+WEST VILLAGE Casa—Brazilian C07 L4871 2 Bedford St., at Commerce St., 212.366.9410. casarestaurant.com. A simple dining room has a six-seat bar, behind which a bartender whips up housemade specialty cocktails and delivers them to dining guests at their tables. Rich, traditional Brazilian flavors run the gamut on a menu that includes Brazil’s national dish, feijoada: black bean stew with prime meats, served with white rice, fresh oranges, collard greens, farofa and vinaigrette sauce. D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$$ H19 Coco & Cru—Australian 643 Broadway, at Bleecker St., 212.614.3170. cocoandcru.com. This café serves breakfast all day and salads and sandwiches after noon. “The Aussie” burger—a burger with beets and a fried egg—can be topped with “The Lot,” which is pineapple and bacon. Brunch & D (daily). $$ F19 Cotenna—Italian 21 Bedford St., btw Downing & W. Houston sts., 646.861.0175. cotenna.nyc.

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This cozy hideaway stays bustling late and offers hearty pasta dishes to pair with unusual wines by the glass. Housemade specialty cocktails are made by a waitstaff that also runs the floor inside this tiny, romantic spot. Pro tip: Wait for the window. L & D (daily). $$ I19

John’s of Bleecker Street—Pizzeria 278 Bleecker St., at Jones St., 212.243.1680. johnsbrickovenpizza.com. This no-frills, no-slices Greenwich Village institution has been serving brick-oven pizza since 1929. High ceilings, wooden booths, housemade fountain sodas and lines typically out the door round out the walk-in-only experience. L & D (daily). $$ H19 Kiin Thai—Contemporary Thai 36 E. 8th St., btw Greene St. & University Pl., 212.529.2363. kiinthaieatery.com. An expansive menu is highlighted by an appetizer of Thai pandan wings, served with honey-chili sauce. A small bar tucked away complements this fast-casual restaurant, which also offers a hefty cocktail list. L & D (daily). $$ F18 Tokyo Record Bar—Contemporary Japanese 127 MacDougal St., btw W. 3rd & W. 4th sts., 212.420.4777. tokyorecordbar.com. This sake cocktail bar and Japanese resto has 16 seats, all tucked under a low ceiling decorated with hanging paper cherry blossoms. Dinner seating is at 6:30 and 8:30 pm, and the menu is offered à la carte after 10:30 pm, to the tune of a resident DJ spinning vinyl from owner Ariel Arce’s collection. D (Tu-Sa). $$$ G18

HARLEM Barawine—French 200 Lenox Ave., at W. 120th St., 646.756.4154. barawine.com. French bistro classics, from hanger steak with mushrooms and fingerling potatoes to branzino Provençal, can be paired with international or

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

domestic wines selected by sommelier Fabrice Warin. D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$$ G5

Le Baobab Restaurant—Senegalese 120 W. 116th St., btw Malcolm X Blvd. & Seventh Ave., 212.864.4700. lebaobabrestaurant.com. Thick stews of fish, lamb and vegetables are ladled over rice at this cozy locale. L & D (daily). $$ H5 Streetbird Rotisserie—Soul Food 2149 Frederick Douglass Blvd., btw W. 115th & W. 116th sts., 212.206.2557. streetbirdnyc.com. Celebrity chef Marcus Samuelsson cooks up soul food (red velvet waffles with chicken and bourbon maple syrup) in an open space accented with vibrant art by Cey Adams, Anthony Vasquez and others. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$ I5 Sushi Inoue—Japanese 381 Lenox Ave., at W. 129th St., 646.706.0555. sushiinoue.com. Simple plates of sushi, sashimi and other varieties of fish, in a space with traditional Japanese decor and authentic fare, at Harlem’s only Michelinstarred restaurant. D (Tu-Su). $$$ G3

MIDTOWN EAST+WEST+ MURRAY HILL+TURTLE BAY Ai Fiori—French/Italian C0L814 7 00 Fifth Ave., 2nd fl., btw 36th & 37th sts., 212.613.8660. aifiorinyc .com. Chef/owner Michael White serves French and Italian Riviera-inspired dishes such as pan-seared sea scallops with smoked eggplant, olives and radishes at his Michelin-starred restaurant inside the Langham Place Hotel. B & D (daily), L (M-F). $$$$ G15 Benjamin Steakhouse—Steak House Dylan Hotel, 52 E. 41st St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.297.9177. benjaminsteakhouse.com. Executive Chef Arturo McLeod prepares six

PHOTO: MOTORCYCLE DIARIES COCKTAIL, TSILL PRESS

Eleven Madison Park—American C 094211 Madison Ave., btw E. 24th & E. 25th sts., 212.889.0905. elevenmadisonpark.com. Seasonal, refined dishes on a customizable tasting menu are enhanced by a lengthy international wine list at this Gramercy Park gem, which was named the greatest resto in the world by The World’s 50 Best Restaurants Organization in 2017. L (F-Su), D (nightly). $$$$ F16

Every Thursday at this self-declared “beer hall and whiskey den” features a cocktail challenge focused on the use of a random ingredient. Guests are encouraged to try new cocktails thought up and whipped up by competing bartenders. Motorcycle Diaries (pictured) is made with Macchu Pisco, honey, lemon, egg white, orange bitters, basil blossom and olive oil, and infused with lavender. | Forest Hills Station House, p. 53


Delegates Dining Room—Various C0L61United Nations Building, visitors’ entrance at E. 46th St. & First Ave. Lunch reservations: call 917.367.3314. For special event info, call 212.963.7029. delegatesdiningroom-un.com. Dine alongside delegates and dignitaries at an international prix fixe buffet with wide views of the East River. L (M-F). $$$ D14 Nerai—Greek 55 E. 54th St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.759.5554. nerainyc.com. In a chic, all-white space with a sleek, intimate bar, Executive Chef Chris Christou crafts a contemporary Greek menu with such dishes as Alaskan king crab linguine with Neapolitan cream sauce, roasted red peppers and moschofilero. B & L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$$ F13 P.S. Kitchen—Vegan 246 W. 48th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.651.7247. ps-kitchen .com. This plant-based eatery serves gourmet vegan fare in a brick-walled space, and donates all of its profits to charities—The Bowery

Mission, The Doe Fund— devoted to providing resources for marginalized communities. Specialties include ginger rice congee with sautéed oyster mushroom, spinach and crispy yuba. $$ H13

ROCKEFELLER CENTER

Royal 35 Steakhouse—Steak House 1 E. 35th St., btw Madison & Fifth aves., 212.804.7276. royal35steakhouse.com. Mahogany, wine-bottlecovered wood walls set the scene for this 130-seat dining room, where USDA prime, dry-aged cuts of porterhouse steak, racks of lamb and conventional steakhouse favorites are served. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). $$$$ F15 Sen Sakana—Peruvian-Japanese 28 W. 44th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.221.9560. sensakana.com. This 190-seat Nikkei-style hot spot fuses Japanese and Peruvian cooking techniques to form novelty offerings, such as tiradito (labeled “sashimi meets ceviche”), black feather chicken skewers of neck, liver and tail, and plates of sashimi, nigiri and nikkei makimono. L (M-F), D (nightly). $$$ F14 Turntable Chicken Jazz—Korean 20 W. 33rd St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.714.9700. turntablenyc.com. This newly renovated Midtown fixture known for wings and drumsticks—soy garlic or hot—also has a variety of house specialties on offer, including a burger of thinly sliced marinated beef (bulgogi), pork fat edamame and a savory kimchi and scallion pancake. L & D (daily). $$ G15

Il Gattopardo—Italian 13-15 W. 54th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves.,, 212.246.0412. ilgattopardonyc .com. Southern Italian fare—pan-seared veal loin scented with wild fennel pollen from Felitto, with porcini mushrooms and fingerling potatoes—on a menu offering housemade pastas, more than 10 dessert items and a lengthy rotating wine list. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$$ G13 Morrell Wine Bar & Café—Contemporary American 1 Rockefeller Plz., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.262.7700. morellwinebar.com. More than 150 wines offered by the glass and a 52-page, 1,000-plus bottle list complement a food menu of coconut curry mussels, classic or country charcuterie, and crab and avocado salad. L (daily), D (M-Sa). $$ G13 NYY Steak—Steak House C0L57 89 W. 51st St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 646.307.7910, G13; 1 E. 161st St., at River Ave., Bronx, 646.977.8325. nyysteak .com. The upscale restaurant owned by the New York Yankees has three locations—including a location inside the Yankees’ ballpark open on New York Yankees and New York City Football Club game days—and features USDA prime dry-aged beef, fresh seafood and other dishes by Executive Chef John Schafer, served alongside an impressive list of by-the-glass wines. Business attire recommended. L & D (daily). $$$

NOVEMBER 1 - JANUARY 1, 2018

• OVER-THE-TOP DECORATIONS • HOLIDAY MOVIE MEMORABILIA • SPECIAL HOLIDAY MENU ITEMS

NOVEMBER 1 - JANUARY 1, 2018

Entrance on 45th between Broadway & 6th open daily for lunch + dinner • 212.333.7827 INNEWYORK.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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dining

cuts of USDA prime steaks—dry-aged on the premises—at this classic chophouse. B (M-F), L & D (daily). $$$ F14 Benjamin Steakhouse Prime—Steak House 23 E. 40th St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.338.0818. benjaminsteak house.com. Sister restaurant of Benjamin Steakhouse, this Midtown restaurant serves up USDA prime steaks, succulent seafood and more from the grill. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). $$$ F14


dining+drinking SOHO+NOLITA

UPPER WEST SIDE

Ba’al Cafe and Falafel—Middle Eastern C0L7948171 Sullivan St., btw Broome & Spring sts., 646.368.9957. baalfalafel.com. This café makes Middle Eastern fare fresh daily using local, organic and fair-trade ingredients whenever possible. B, L & D (M-Sa). $ G20

Awash—Ethiopian 947 Amsterdam Ave., btw W. 106th & W. 107th sts., 212.961.1416; and two other NYC locations. awashny.com. Authentic Ethiopian dishes at this restaurant named after a river in Ethiopia include kitfo (steak tartare seasoned in Ethiopian butter and mitmita), doro wat (chicken simmered in berbere sauce) and yabeg alicha (lamb cooked in butter with onions and green peppers). L & D (daily). $$ J6

Bistro Les Amis—French C0L1 418 80 Spring St., at Thompson St., 212.226.8645. bistrolesamis.com. Traditional French and Mediterranean menu offerings, including herb-buttered steak frites, cassoulet and homemade fried gnocchi with pesto. L & D (daily), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$$ G19 Ed’s Lobster Bar—Seafood C0L42 189 22 Lafayette St., at Spring St., 212.343.3236. lobsterbarnyc.com. Traditional American seafood dishes are served, from jumbo shrimp cocktails to New England clam chowder. The emphasis, of course, is on lobster, which comes in many variations such as lobster rolls, lobster meatballs, lobster potpie and classic whole lobster. L & D (daily). $$ F20 Lupe’s East L.A. Kitchen —Contemporary Mexican 110 Sixth Ave., at Watts St., 212.966.1326. lupeskitchen.com. A menu of California-style Mexican fare, with dishes such as chicken enchiladas mole poblano and chilis relienos. A traditional dark mole sauce is made with 20 ingredients. B, L & D (daily). $$ G20

UPPER EAST SIDE Anassa Taverna—Greek C0L4376200 E. 60th St., btw Third & Lexington aves., 212.371.5200. anassa taverna.com. Fresh fish highlight a menu of authentic Greek specialties that include grilled vegetables and lamb chops, in a rustic space with hanging Greek worry beads. L & D (daily), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$$ E12 Antonucci—Italian C0L651 82 70 E. 81st St., btw Third & Lexington aves., 212.570.5100. Traditional Italian fare includes soups, salads and homemade pastas, alongside a respectable list of wines by the glass. L & D (daily). $$$ E9 Areppas—Venezuelan 954 Third Ave., at E. 57th St., 212.355.3901. areppas.com. Corn patties, fluffy and made fresh daily, are stuffed with herbs and spices and varietals of meat, vegetables and cheeses, or served on their own with housemade salsa and garlic sauce offerings. L (M-F). $$ D12 Daniel—French 60 E. 65th St., btw Madison & Park aves., 212.288.0033. danielnyc.com. Chef Daniel Boulud’s contemporary take on Gallic cuisine—chorizo-wrapped monkfish tail and vodka-flambéed foie gras—is served in a regal space with neoclassical accents. Jackets required, ties preferred, and a four course prix fixe dinner menu is available. D (M-Sa). $$$$ F12 Grünauer Bistro—Austrian 1578 First Ave., at E. 82nd St., 212.988.1077. grunauernyc.com. Traditional Austrian and Viennese dishes such as Tafelspitz (root vegetables, creamed spinach, rösti potato, apple horseradish) are complemented by a lengthy by-the-glass Austrian wine list and live piano music Th-Sa 9 pm. D (M-Sa). $$$ D9

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Barney Greengrass—Jewish/American 541 Amsterdam Ave., btw W. 86th & W. 87th sts., 212.724.4707. barneygreengrass.com. Founded in 1908, this timeless, traditonal “New Yawk” deli specializes in smoked and fresh fish, creative omelets and halvah. It’s casual, and there are no frills, but it’s a favorite of locals of all stripes nonetheless. Cash only. B & L (Tu-Su). $$ J9 Bustan—Israeli C0L453487 Amsterdam Ave., btw W. 83rd & W. 84th sts., 212.595.5050. bustannyc .com. Eclectic dishes from Israel with a contemporary Mediterranean twist—many of which are cooked in the restaurant’s domeshaped wood-fired taboon oven. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$$ J9 Gari—Japanese C0L6743370 Columbus Ave., btw W. 77th & W. 78th sts., 212.362.4816. sushiofgari .com. Masatoshi Sugio, aka Gari, is one of New York City’s most respected sushi masters. Mishima beef is his specialty. The omakase (tasting menu) is an esteemed tradition. D (nightly). $$$$ I10 Nice Matin—French C0L642 18 01 W. 79th St., at Amsterdam Ave., 212.873.6423. nicematinnyc .com. Provençal specialties include soupe à pistou and herb-crusted Atlantic cod. B, L & D (daily), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$$ J10

THE OUTER BOROUGHS Dominick’s—Italian 2335 Arthur Ave., btw Crescent Ave. & E. 186th St., Belmont, Bronx, 718.733.2807. There are no menus at this NYC institution with casual, communal tables and a familial vibe—just heaping portions of daily specials. Cash only. L & D (W-M). $$ Enoteca Maria—Italian 27 Hyatt St., at Stuyvesant Pl., St. George, Staten Island, 718.447.2777. enotecamaria.com. A daily rotation of female chefs, the “Grandmas,” each from a different region of Italy, ensure a handmade menu of total freshness, variety and authenticity. Free one-on-one afternoon cooking classes taught by the rotating women are held W-Su. D (W-Su). $$$ Freek’s Mill—American 285 Nevins St., at Sackett St., Gowanus, Brooklyn, 718.852.3000. freeksmill.com. Specialties (lobster fettuccine; dry-aged duck) served in a homey, brick-walled setting with an open kitchen, a year-round outdoor garden and a full bar offering specialty cocktails and a lengthy list of by-the-glass wines. D (Tu-Su), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$$ Gumbo Bros—Cajun & Creole 224 Atlantic Ave., btw Boerum Pl. & Court St., Park Slope, Brooklyn, 917.909.1471. thegumbobros.com. Three variations of gumbo—Cajun chicken and


sausage; fresh shrimp and blue crab; local spinach, kale, collards and mustard greens— from two LSU alums who moved to NYC to pursue their passion for Cajun and Creole cooking. Po’boys—roast beef with debris gravy; shrimp; catfish—are also on offer, as is draft beer from Louisiana. L & D (daily). $$ A23

HAUTE GREEK CUISINE

dining

Karczma—Polish 136 Greenpoint Ave., btw Franklin St. & Manhattan Ave., Greenpoint, Brooklyn, 718.349.1744. karczmabrooklyn.com. Hearty portions of authentic Polish cuisine are on offer, including white borscht, served in a bread bowl alongside mashed potatoes with bacon. L & D (daily). $$ BB16

BARS+LOUNGES Alphabet City Brewing Company 96 Ave. C, btw E. 6th & E. 7th sts., 646.422.7103. acbcnyc .com. One of the few NYC breweries actually based within the confines of Manhattan, ACBC pours its own draft beers straight from the source alongside a full food menu, in a cozy, brick-walled space also offering canned specialty brews and growlers to go. B18 The Aviary 80 Columbus Cir., at W. 60th St., 212.805.8800. aviarynyc.com. This Chicagobased specialty cocktail penthouse atop the Mandarin Oriental New York hotel offers innovative cocktail inventions, such as the Wake and Bake: a mix of rye, coffee-and-orangeinfused vermouth and coffee liqueur, served in a glass inside a clear plastic bag filled with an everything-bagel aroma. $$$$ I12 Doux Supperclub 59 W. 21st St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.359.4200. douxsupperclub.com. A Parisian-style café offers guests custom liquor-infused chocolates and craft cocktails, while a supper club in the back hosts themed dinner parties with live jazz performances and burlesque shows. F17 Fat Cat C0L727 85 5 Christopher St., btw Seventh Ave. So. & Bleecker St., 212.675.6056. fatcatmusic.org. Jazz bands energize this underground beer-and-soju bar and table-tennis hall, which also offers 10 billiards tables, shuffleboard, massive chess tables, checkers and backgammon, and stays open until 5 am daily. H18

55 East 54th Street New York, NY 10022

212.759.5554 www.nerainyc.com

LUNCH & DINNER DAILY

Forest Hills Station House 106-11 71st Ave., btw Austin St. & Station Sq., Forest Hills, Queens, 718.544.5000. fhstationhouse.com. A 14-minute ride from Penn Station to the Forest Hills Long Island Railroad station, this cocktail bar carries an extensive selection of whiskey—bourbon, rye, malt—and offers a list of housemade specialty and whiskey cocktails alongside a full gastropub food menu and 16 taps pouring rotating craft brews from local producers. Oscar Wilde 45 W. 27th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.213.3066. oscarwildenyc.com. NYC’s longest bar (118.5 feet) is housed inside an elegant and intricately curated space named after the famed Irish writer, and offers 20 housemade cocktails. Twenty-six antique clocks, a fireplace inlay from 1700s Hope Castle, Ireland, and other original furnishings decorate the extravagant space. G16

RESTAURANT. BAR. PRIVATE EVENTS.

SINCE 1995

TIMES SQ

127 43 ST AT B’WAY MIDTOWN W

625 8TH AVE AT 41 ST

EMPIRE STATE

7 W 51st Street, New York, 10019

350 5TH AVE AT 34 ST

www.nyysteak.com

HB BURGER

@nyysteak

127 43 ST AT B’WAY

646.307.7910

INNEWYORK.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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shops+services

FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC

The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 68-70).

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1 1 Moncler’s first step into the world of petwear— the Moncler x Poldo collection—is available exclusively at the Italian lifestyle brand’s Madison Avenue outpost. | Moncler moncler.com 2 The Italian coffee and homeware gurus at illy collaborate with legendary Florentine fashion brand Emilio Pucci to create these exclusive mugs featuring Pucci’s “Cities of the World” pattern. | illy illy.com 3 The London and Los Angeles-based brand celebrates its five-year anniversary in November, two months after opening a brick-and-mortar store in SoHo, its second location in the U.S. | Frame frame-store.com 4 An ideal gift for a high-standard watch collector, this watch winder provides premium care for a watch’s mechanics. | Boca Do Lobo bocadolobo.com

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ACCESSORIES+FOOTWEAR Adidas Originals C0L1 5147 15 Spring St., btw Mercer & Greene sts., 212.966.0954. adidas.com/us /originals. The Adidas offshoot specializes in streetwear and fashionable variations of the brand’s classic looks. F19 Barton Perreira 42 E. 66th St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.628.2013. bartonperreira.com. This California-based brand creates designdriven optical eyewear and sunglasses. F11 Citishoes C0L4 17945 45 Park Ave., btw E. 56th & E. 57th sts., 212.751.3200. citishoes.com. Casual and

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

dress shoes for men from such brands as Alden, Cole Haan, Mephisto and Rockport. F12

Galeria Melissa NY C0L31 15 02 Greene St., btw Spring & Prince sts., 212.775.1950. melissa.com.br. The Brazilian footwear line is known for creating jelly plastic shoes like loafers, heels and flats in various colors for women and girls. F19 NYC Sole C0L4257384 Fifth Ave., btw 35th & 36th sts., 917.351.1484, E15; 738 Broadway, at Waverly Pl., 212.229.4790, F18. nycsole.com. For more than 30 years, this shoe store—formerly known as David Z—has provided the latest kicks from top footwear brands, including Adidas and Asics.


APPAREL Alexander Wang C0L411 38 03 Grand St., at Mercer St., 212.977.9683. alexanderwang.com. The CFDA Fashion Award-winning designer’s flagship store offers his coveted collection of everyday wear for men and women. F20 Cockpit USA C0L3281 5 5 W. 39th St., 12th fl., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.575.1616. cockpitusa.com. Classic American clothing for men, women and children inspired by military and aviation garb is available at the line’s showroom. Appointments are advised. G14 Guess C0L4136575 Fifth Ave., at 47th St., 212.922.9792; and various other NYC locations. shop.guess .com/en. An on-trend collection for men, women and children features bold shirts, slim-fit denim, athletic footwear and statement-making accessories. G14 John Varvatos C0L784765 Madison Ave., btw E. 65th & E. 66th sts. 212.760.2414; and four other NYC locations. johnvarvatos.com. This famous designer offers men luxurious and sporty apparel, plus accessories, shoes and cologne, as well as wardrobe services, made-to-measure clothes and on-site tailoring. F11 rag & bone C0L1 3871 19 Mercer St., btw Spring & Prince sts., 212.219.2204; and various other NYC locations. rag-bone.com. Rooted in Kentucky, but influenced by British tailoring, the designer duo behind this emerging label creates classic yet modern collections for men and women, as well as footwear and accessories. F19 Rigby & Peller 1252 Madison Ave., at E. 90th St., 212.860.8366, F8; 1051 Third Ave., at E. 62nd St., 646.395.3885, F11; 104 Fifth Ave., btw 15th & 16th sts., G17. rigbyandpeller.com. This British lingerie and swimwear brand has been a leader in luxury women’s undergarments since 1939. Fitting and styling available by appointment. Uniqlo C0L5 6913 46 Broadway, btw Spring & Prince sts., F20; 31 W. 34th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., G12; 666 Fifth Ave., at 53rd St., F13. Telephone number for all locations: 877.486.4756. uniqlo.com. Chic, casual basics in bold and vibrant hues, including T-shirts, jeans, coats, sweaters and accessories by the Japanese brand. Free same-day alterations are also available.

BEAUTY+HEALTH Fresh C0L27315 5 7 Spring St., btw Mulberry & Lafayette sts., 212.925.0099; and three other NYC locations. fresh.com/US. Combining natural ingredients

and modern alchemy, this beauty line offers skin, body and hair-care products, as well as fragrances and makeup. E19

goodman.com. Designer labels, accessories and cosmetics for men and women in this iconic New York department store. G12

Linhart Dentistry C0L52 8731 30 Park Ave., Ste. 1164, at E. 46th St., 212.682.5180. drlinhart.com. A favorite among celebrities, Dr. Linhart specializes in cosmetic and restorative procedures and offers his own Pearlinbrite™ laser tooth whitening. Other treatments include Invisalign, color restorations, veneers, crowns, bridges, implants and iBraces. F14

Bloomingdale’s C0L421 5 000 Third Ave., at E. 59th St., 212.705.2000; and two other NYC locations. bloomingdales.com. A fashion hub since the late-19th century, carrying designer clothes, shoes, handbags, accessories and more. E12

Marie-Lou & D 345 W. Broadway, btw Grand & Broome sts., 212.390.8666, 917.400.5207. mldnewyork.com. This Parisian-style salon offers services that beautify clients from head to toe. The menu includes hairstyling, cuts, coloring, manicures, pedicures, waxing, massages and more. G20 Osswald 311 W. Broadway, btw Canal & Grand sts., 212.625.3111. osswaldnyc.com. With a brand that dates back to 1921, this family-owned shop boasts an array of high-end fragrances, skin-care products and makeup for men and women. F20

BOOKS Amazon The Shops at Columbus Circle, 10 Columbus Cir., btw W. 58th & W. 60th sts., I12; 7 W. 34th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., F15. Phone number for both locations: 206.266.2992. amazon.com. Amazon’s brick-and-mortar locations in NYC sell books exclusively, which are categorized by customer ratings, popularity and curators’ assessments. Tech products, including the electronic personal assistant, Alexa, are also available. Barnes & Noble C0L3 961 3 E. 17th St., btw Park Ave. So. & Broadway, 212.253.0810; and various other NYC locations. bn.com. Thousands of titles are housed in a New York City landmark building, suited for reading and browsing, with events such as lectures by authors and storytelling hours for children. F17 Printed Matter 231 11th Ave., btw W. 25th & W. 26th sts., 212.925.0325. printedmatter.org. A nonprofit bookstore offering a wide range of books, zines and objects—all written and designed by artists—as well as education services, publishing opportunities, fairs and other programming. J16

DEPT. STORES+CENTERS Barneys New York C0L32496660 Madison Ave., btw E. 60th & E. 61st sts., 212.826.8900; and three other NYC locations. barneys.com. Luxe couture for men and women from top designers, such as Marc Jacobs, Givenchy and Fendi; also shoes, accessories, cosmetics and housewares. F12 Bergdorf Goodman C0L7 32749 54 Fifth Ave., btw 57th & 58th sts., 212.753.7300, 888.774.2424. bergdorf

Brookfield Place 230 Vesey St., btw Liberty & West sts., 212.978.1698. brookfieldplaceny.com. The shopping center brings apparel brands for men, women and kids, along with bookstores, beauty shops and dining options. G22 Century 21 C0L962 87 2 Cortlandt St., btw Broadway & Church sts., 212.227.9092, 877.350.2121; and various other NYC locations. c21stores.com. Deep discounts on everything, from designer apparel for men, women and children, to cosmetics, shoes and electronics. F22 Lord & Taylor C0L964 1 24 Fifth Ave., btw 38th & 39th sts., 212.391.3344. lordandtaylor.com. Classic and contemporary clothing and accessories for all ages from over 400 designer brands are at the oldest specialty store in the U.S. G15 Macy’s Herald Square C0L961 3 51 W. 34th St., btw Broadway & Seventh Ave., 212.695.4400. macys .com. This flagship department store spans a city block with designer clothing, shoes, accessories, beauty items and cookware. G15 Fur Vault at Macy’s 151 W. 34th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.494.1227. macys.com /furvault. Furs for every occasion can be found at this elegant fur salon. G15 Saks Fifth Avenue C0L48156611 Fifth Ave., btw 49th & 50th sts., 212.753.4000. saksfifthavenue.com. A luxury department store carrying designer apparel, cosmetics and fragrances. G13 The Shops at Columbus Circle C0L36Time Warner Center, 10 Columbus Cir., btw W. 58th & W. 60th sts., 212.823.6300. theshopsatcolumbuscircle .com. This high-end retail and dining complex features more than 40 stores, the world-class Restaurant and Bar Collection, a park-view atrium and art installations. I12 Westfield World Trade Center 185 Greenwich St., btw Vesey & Barclay sts., 212.284.9982. westfield.com/westfieldworldtrade center. This shopping center features well over 125 retail shops, including Breitling, Cole Haan, John Varvatos and Roberto Coin. G22

GIFTS+HOME Davidoff of Geneva C0L675 94 15 Madison Ave., at E. 53rd St., 212.751.9060, F13; 1390 Sixth Ave., btw W. 56th & W 57th sts., 212.757.3167, F13; Brookfield Place, 225 Liberty St., at West St., 212.897.2866, G22. davidoffmadison.com. Premium lighters, cigars and other smoking accessories fill this store and cigar lounge. INNEWYORK.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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Vans DQM General 93 Grand St., btw Mercer & Greene sts, 212.226.7776. vansdqm.com. NYC contemporary streetwear, skateboarding and fashion brand DQM teams up with the Californian skatewear professionals at Vans to open this surfing, skateboarding and casualwear boutique in SoHo. E20


shops+services Museum of Arts and Design Store 2 Columbus Cir., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.299.7700. thestore.madmuseum.org. Reflecting its arts and crafts exhibitions, this museum store sells jewelry, gifts and small sculptures, many from NYC makers. I12 Zazen Bear 497 Broome St., at W. Broadway, 888.936.2327, G20; 30 Rockefeller Plz., Concourse Level, btw W. 49th & W. 50th sts., 888.936.2327, F13. zazenbear.com. This lifestyle brand aims to promote a sense of tranquillity with its array of jewelry, children’s items and ceramic gifts— many bearing the signature teddy bear logo.

JEWELRY Martinique Jewelers C0L727 6 50 Seventh Ave., btw W. 49th & W. 50th sts., 212.262.7600. martinique jewelers.com. In Times Square since 1963, this fine jeweler offers a vast selection of jewelry, including Alex and Ani bangles, a full Pandora boutique with exclusive NYC charms, the Thomas Sabo collection, and timeless diamond and 18-karat gold pieces. Watch battery replacement and jewelry repair are also available. H13 Maurice Badler Fine Jewelry C0L4 72 85 Park Ave., btw E. 58th & E. 59th sts., 800.622.3537. badler .com. Fine jewelry from famous designers fill this established jewelry shop. F12 Tiffany & Co. C0L727 6 27 Fifth Ave., at 57th St., 212.755.8000; and two other NYC locations. tiffany.com. The world-famous jewelry store carries diamonds, pearls, gold, silver, timepieces, crystal and more—all wrapped in signature robin’s-egg blue boxes. G13 Wempe Jewelers C0L347 15 00 Fifth Ave., at 55th St., 212.397.9000. wempe.com. Fifth Avenue’s only official Rolex dealer also carries other prestigious brands such as Jaeger-LeCoultre, Patek Philippe, Chopard and Baume & Mercier, plus jewelry that includes 18-karat gold earrings, brilliant diamond rings, silver charms, pearl necklaces, classic cameos and precious gemstones. G13

SPORTING GOODS+FAN APPAREL Burton Flagship Store C0L63269 Greene St., btw Broome & Spring sts., 212.966.8070. burton.com. The hip and trusted snowboard apparel company provides warm layers and accessories, as well as tools and tuning. F20 Lululemon Athletica C0L5492139 Broadway, btw W. 75th & W. 76th sts., 212.362.5294; and various other NYC locations. lululemon.com. This popular yoga-focused exercise and athleisure apparel company also offers weekly community yoga classes and workout accessories. J10 NBA Store C0L3575 1 45 Fifth Ave., at 45th St., 212.515.6221. nba.com/nycstore. Team jerseys, basketballs, gifts and footwear fill this sports emporium of National Basketball Association merchandise and memorabilia. G14 Paragon Sporting Goods C0L48 317 67 Broadway, at E. 18th St., 212.255.8889. paragonsports.com. This only-in-New-York sports mecca carries equipment and clothing from major brands,

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IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM


including Timberland, Patagonia, Nike and Reebok. E17

Adorama C0L51242 W. 18th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.741.0063. adorama.com. Shop for electronics and equipment, including lenses, 3-D stereo cameras and darkroom accessories—then sign up for a class to learn how to use them. G17 B&H Photo, Video & Pro Audio C0L79468420 Ninth Ave., at W. 34th St., 800.606.6969, 800.221.5743. bhphotovideo.com. One-stop shopping for the newest technology at discount prices, including cutting-edge cameras, hard drives, audio and video equipment, laptops and accessories. I15 42nd Street Photo C0L33 21 78 Fifth Ave., btw 35th & 36th sts., 888.810.4242. 42photo.com. This electronics hub specializes in digital cameras and videography equipment like camcorders, microphones, lenses and flashes. G15 Halcyon C0L45 6127 7 Pearl St., at Water St., DUMBO, Brooklyn, 718.260.9299. halcyontheshop.com. A music store/gallery offering current electronica, soul, funk and avant-garde. Second Hand Rose Music C0L63848 E. 12th St., btw Broadway & University Pl., 212.675.3735. shrosemusic.com. This Union Square shop’s expansive inventory includes used, vintage and rare vinyl in fine condition. F18

Cosmetic Dentistry Veneers (2 days) LINHARTTM Laser Whitening IN PRACT IC FOR O E VE 30 YEA R RS

Implants Crowns Invisalign® Root Canals

ONE-S TOP DENTA L PERFE CTION TM

Periodontics 24-Hour Emergency Services Multilingual Services Available

2 3 0 P a r k Av e . a t 4 6 t h S t . , S u i t e 1 1 6 4 | 2 1 2 . 6 8 2 . 5 1 8 0 | d r l i n h a r t . c o m

T-Mobile C0L6451 82 535 Broadway, at W. 46th St., 646.350.4645. t-mobile.com. The wireless provider’s flagship store in Times Square sells internet devices, tablets, accessories and cellphones powered by iOS, Android, Windows and other operating systems. H14

TOYS+GAMES kidding around C0L486260 W. 15th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.645.6337, G17; Grand Central Terminal, 42nd St. Passage, E. 42nd St., at Park Ave., 212.972.8697, F14. kiddingaroundtoys.com. This family-owned store specializes in toys and board games, costumes, clothes and gifts for children of all ages. The 15th St. location boasts a Victorian design and mobile toy train traveling throughout the shop. Kidrobot C0L461 73 18 Prince St., btw Greene & Wooster sts., 212.966.6688. kidrobot.com. Collectible and limited-edition toys, art and apparel reflect urban culture and street fashion. Midtown Comics 200 W. 40th St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.302.8192; and two other NYC locations. midtowncomics.com. Graphic novels, trade paperbacks and back issues are offered at this retailer, which also carries paraphernalia ranging from action figurines to storage supplies. H14 Nintendo® World C0L5110 Rockefeller Plz., at W. 48th St., 646.459.0800. nintendoworldstore.com. A 10,000-square-foot interactive gaming paradise that features Nintendo Wii kiosks, branded merchandise, exclusive items and all the latest Nintendo video games.

INNEWYORK.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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shops+services

TECH+MUSIC


museums+attractions

FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC

2

3

1

5 1 Featured in “Drawn to Greatness: Master Drawings From the Thaw Collection,” on view thru Jan. 7, is Paul Cézanne’s watercolor, “The Bathers.” | The Morgan Library & Museum, p. 59 2 This museum marks the centenary of Auguste Rodin’s death with a display of 58 of the sculptor’s bronzes, including this portrait bust of Eustache de Saint-Pierre. | Brooklyn Museum, this page 3 One hundred and fifty of Michelangelo’s drawings are on loan Nov. 13–Feb. 12. | The Metropolitan Museum of Art, p. 59 4 The first exhibition in the United States in more than two decades, thru June 23, showcases Italian avant-garde artist Alberto Savinio. | Center for Italian Modern Art, p. 59 5 Portraits by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo are the focus of a major exhibition devoted to the artist, Nov. 1–Feb. 4. | The Frick Collection, p. 59

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MUSEUMS American Folk Art Museum C0L5482 Lincoln Sq., Columbus Ave., at W. 66th St., 212.595.9533. folkartmuseum.org. The museum specializes in works created by self-taught (as opposed to formally trained) artists working in a variety of mediums and dating from the 18th century to today. Tu-Th, Sa 11:30 am-7 pm, F noon-7:30 pm, Su noon-6 pm. Free. I11 American Museum of Natural History C0L365Central Park West, at W. 79th St., 212.769.5100. amnh.org. Guests explore halls filled with full-scale dinosaur skeletons, fossils, dioramas,

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

artifacts, gems and minerals, meteorites and more. The Hayden Planetarium’s immersive space show is here, too. Daily 10 am-5:45 pm. General admission: $23 adults, $18 seniors (60+)/students (with ID), $13 ages 2-12. I10

Brooklyn Museum C0L5948200 Eastern Pkwy., at Washington Ave., Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, 718.638.5000. brooklynmuseum.org. Ancient Egyptian artifacts, photography and European, Asian and American art are housed in a grand Beaux Arts building. W 11 am-6 pm, Th 11 am-10 pm, F-Su 11 am-6 pm. Suggested admission: $16 adults, $10 seniors (62+)/ students, age 19 and under free.

PHOTOS: PAUL CÉZANNE, “THE BATHERS,” CA. 1900, STEVEN H. CROSSOT, 2014; AUGUSTE RODIN, “EUSTACHE DE SAINT-PIERRE WITH ROPE AROUND THE NECK (EUSTACHE DE SAINT-PIERRE, TÊTE DÉFINITIVE, AVEC CORDE AUTOUR DE COU),” CA. 1886, CAST CA. 1983, JUSTIN VAN SOEST; MICHELANGELO BUONARROTI, “ARCHERS SHOOTING AT A HERM,” 1530–33, ROYAL COLLECTION TRUST ©HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II 2017, WWW.ROYALCOLLECTION.ORG.UK; ALBERTO SAVINIO, “FAMILLE DE LIONS (FAMILY OF LIONS),” 1927, ©2017 ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS)/SIAE, ROME; BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO, “TWO WOMEN AT A WINDOW,” CA. 1655–60, COURTESY NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, WASHINGTON

The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 68-70).


$13 seniors (65+)/students/ages 13-16, under 12 with adult and F 7-9 pm free. F15

Guggenheim MuseumC0L136 1071 Fifth Ave., at 89th St., 212.423.3500. guggenheim.org. A major architectural icon of the 20th century, Frank Lloyd Wright’s spiraling landmark building houses a collection of modern and contemporary art, as well as temporary exhibitions. Su-W & F 10 am-5:45 pm, Sa 10 am-7:45 pm. $25 adults, $18 seniors (65+)/students (with ID), under 12 free, pay what you wish Sa 5:45-7:45 pm. G8

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Center for Italian Modern Art 421 Broome St., 4th fl., btw Lafayette & Crosby sts., 646.370.3596. italianmodernart.org. The nonprofit organization, founded in 2013, seeks to advance public understanding and promote scholarly research on modern and contemporary Italian art through annual exhibitions and cultural programs. F & Sa 1-6 pm, guided tours at 11 am and 2 pm. $10. F20 Cooper Hewitt 2 E. 91st St., at Fifth Ave., 212.849.8400. cooperhewitt.org. Located in the former residence of Andrew Carnegie, this Smithsonian museum uses groundbreaking technology to create interactive exhibits on historic and contemporary design. Su-F 10 am-6 pm, Sa 10 am-9 pm. $18 adults, $12 seniors (62+), $9 students, under 18 free, pay what you wish Sa 6-9 pm. F9 El Museo del Barrio C0L1 15 230 Fifth Ave., at 104th St., 212.831.7272. elmuseo.org. The art and cultural heritage of the Caribbean and Latin America are celebrated at this center of Latin pride. W-Sa 11 am-6 pm, Su noon-5 pm. Suggested admission: $9 adults, $5 seniors/ students, children under 12 free. G7 Ellis Island National Museum of Immigration05 libertyellisfoundation.org. Visitors seeking their immigrant heritage are welcomed on this historic island in New York Harbor, adjacent to the Statue of Liberty, to view exhibits and search archives. Open daily. Free. Fraunces Tavern Museum 0316 54 Pearl St., at Broad St., 212.425.1778. frauncestavern museum.org. Built in 1719, the building showcases Revolutionary War-era manuscripts, art, memorabilia and meticulously recreated period rooms. M-F noon-5 pm, Sa-Su 11 am-5 pm. $7 adults, $4 seniors (65+)/children 6-18/students, children 5 and under free. F23

Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum C0L3276Pier 86, 12th Ave., at W. 46th St., 212.245.0072. intrepid museum.org. A national historic landmark, the USS Intrepid aircraft carrier offers access to several decks featuring historic aircraft, multimedia presentations, interactive exhibits and flight simulators, plus the guided missile submarine USS Growler, the British Airways Concorde and the space shuttle Enterprise. Daily 10 am-5 pm. General admission: $33 adults, $31 seniors (65+), $24 children 5-12, children 4 and under, veterans and active-duty personnel free. K14

The Museum at FIT C0L531S 6 eventh Ave., at W. 27th St., 212.217.4558. fitnyc.edu/museum. Fashion is celebrated through public programs and exhibitions of contemporary and historic clothing, avant-garde accessories, textiles and other visual materials. Tu-F noon-8 pm, Sa 10 am-5 pm. Free. H16 The Museum of Modern Art 11 W. 53rd St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.708.9400. moma.org. World-renowned modern and contemporary works, including masterpieces of sculpture, drawing, painting, photography and film, are in the permanent collection. M-Th, Su 10:30 am-5:30 pm, F-Sa 10:30 am-9 pm. $25 adults, $18 seniors (65+), $14 students, children under 16 and F 4-9 pm free. G13 Museum of Sex C0L52 76 33 Fifth Ave., at 27th St., 212.689.6337. museumofsex.com. This museum’s exhibits are dedicated to the history, evolution and cultural significance of human sexuality. M-Th 10 am-9 pm, F-Sa 10 am-11 pm, Su 11 am-9 pm. $17.50 M-F before 1 pm; $20.50 all other times. G16 Museum of the City of New YorkC0L5914 1220 Fifth Ave., at 103rd St., 212.534.1672. mcny.org. NYC is on display in paintings, photographs and artifacts. The permanent exhibition, “New York at Its Core,” is a three-gallery, high-tech look at the city’s 400-year history. Daily 10 am-6 pm. Suggested admission: $18 adults, $12 seniors/students, under 19 free. F7

The Jewish Museum 1109 Fifth Ave., at 92nd St., 212.423.3200. thejewishmuseum.org. Art and artifacts, from antiquities to folk art to media, showcase Jewish culture and identity. M-Tu, F-Su 11 am-5:45 pm, Th 11 am-8 pm. $15 adults, $12 seniors (65+), $7.50 students, under 18 and Sa free, pay what you wish Th 5-8 pm. G8 The Metropolitan Museum of Art 1000 Fifth Ave., at 82nd St., 212.535.7710. metmuseum.org. Renowned for its encyclopedic collections of American, European, Oriental, Oceanic, Islamic and ancient arts. Su-Th 10 am-5:30 pm, F-Sa 10 am-9 pm. Suggested admission (which includes same-day admission to the museum’s two satellites: The Met Breuer and The Met Cloisters): $25 adults, $17 seniors (65+), $12 students, children under 12 with an adult free. G9 Mmuseumm 4 Cortlandt Alley, btw Franklin & White sts., 888.763.8839. mmuseumm.com. Founded in 2012, Mmuseumm is a new kind of museum: It collects and displays everyday objects (as opposed to art), which tell stories about the world today. Sa-Su noon-6 pm. Visible 24/7 through viewing windows and calling into the audio guide. Suggested admission: $5. F21 The Morgan Library & Museum 225 Madison Ave., at E. 36th St., 212.685.0008. themorgan.org. An Italian Renaissance-style palazzo, once the library of financier Pierpont Morgan, contains rare books, manuscripts, drawings, prints and other treasures. Tu-Th 10:30 am-5 pm, F 10:30 am-9 pm, Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. $20 adults,

Museum of the Moving Image C0L52913 4 6-01 35th Ave., at 37th St., Astoria, Queens, 718.777.6888. movingimage.us. The art, history, technique and technology of film, television and digital media are explored through exhibitions, programs and the nation’s largest permanent collection of moving-image artifacts. Tu-Th 10:30 am-5 pm, F 10:30 am-8 pm, Sa-Su 10:30 am-6 pm. $15 adults, $11 seniors (65+)/students, $7 ages 3-17, children under 3 and F 4-8 pm free. AA10 National Museum of the American Indian C0L561 2 Bowling Green, at Broadway, 212.514.3700. nmai.si.edu. A branch of the Smithsonian Institution, this museum in the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House promotes Native American history, culture and arts. Su-W, F-Sa 10 am-5 pm, Th 10 am-8 pm. Free. F23 National September 11 Memorial & MuseumC0L415879 Museum entrance at 180 Greenwich St., btw Liberty & Fulton sts., 212.312.8800. 911memorial.org. The memorial features waterfalls set within the footprints of the Twin Towers, which were destroyed in terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. Memorial: Daily 7:30 am-9 pm. Free. Museum: Su-Th 9 am-8 pm (last entry 6 pm), F-Sa 9 am-9 pm (last entry 7 pm). Museum admission: $24 adults, $18 seniors (65+), U.S. veterans, college students, $15 children 7-17, children under 6 and Tu 5-8 pm free. G22

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museums+attractions museums+attractions

The Frick Collection 1 E. 70th St., btw Madison & Fifth aves., 212.288.0700. frick.org. Paintings by old masters are on display in the palatial former home of industrialist Henry Clay Frick. Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. $22 adults, $17 seniors (65+), $12 students, pay what you wish W 2-6 pm. Children under 10 are not admitted. G11


museums+attractions New Museum C0L57235 Bowery, btw Rivington & Stanton sts., 212.219.1222. newmuseum.org. Contemporary cutting-edge art in a variety of mediums by American and international artists. Tu-W, F-Su 11 am-6 pm, Th 11 am-9 pm. $18 adults, $15 seniors (65+), $12 students, under 18 free, pay what you wish Th 7-9 pm. D20 New-York Historical Society Museum & Library C0L51 8 70 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder Way (W. 77th St.), 212.873.3400. nyhistory.org. Objects and works of art with a focus on the rich history of New York. Tu-Th, Sa 10 am-6 pm, F 10 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. $21 adults, $16 seniors/educators/active military, $13 students, $6 children 5-13, children under 4 free, pay what you wish F 6-8 pm. I10 9/11 Tribute Museum C0L9419 2 2 Greenwich St., at Rector St., 866.737.1184. tributewtc.org. Recovered objects, photographs, oral stories, films and personal effects—such as a tattered lamb stuffed animal, a fireman’s jacket and a diner receipt—displayed in the museum’s galleries offer visitors the chance to pay their respects to the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, NYC terrorist attacks. M-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 10 am-5 pm. Gallery admission: $15 adults, $10 seniors/students/military, $5 children 8-12. Gallery admission and guided walking tour of the 9/11 Memorial: $25 adults/seniors/ students/military, $10 children 8-12. F23

LaPlacaCohen Publication: Insertion date: Size:

THE MET BREUER

212-675-4106 WHERE/IN NY MAGAZINE NOVEMBER, 2017 4.625” x 4.75” 4C MAG

THE MET DOES MODERN ON MADISON

Whitney Museum of American Art 99 Gansevoort St., btw Greenwich & West sts., 212.570.3600. whitney.org. More than 50,000 square feet of indoor galleries and 13,000 square feet of outdoor exhibition space are devoted to American art and artists. M, W-Th, Su 10:30 am-6 pm, F-Sa 10:30 am-10 pm. $25 adults, $18 seniors (65+)/students, children under 18 free, pay what you wish F 7-10 pm. I18

ATTRACTIONS Downton Abbey: The Exhibition 218 W. 57th, btw Seventh Ave. & Broadway, 866.811.4111. downtonexhibition.com. (Opens Nov. 18) The Emmy Award-winning television show comes alive in an exhibition that transports fans to post-Edwardian England and the iconic country house. Featured are memorable moments from the show’s six seasons and displays devoted to the characters, their clothes and way of life, as well as the social history and culture of the period. Daily 10 am-8 pm. $30 adults, $28 seniors (65+), $15 children 4-12. H12

EDVARD MUNCH BETWEEN THE CLOCK AND THE BED NOV 15, 2017–FEB 4, 2018

metmuseum.org #MetMunch 945 Madison Ave. at 75th St. The exhibition is made possible by Leonard A. Lauder.

It is supported by an Indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. It is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and The Munch Museum, Oslo. Image (detail) © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo © Munch Museum.

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Empire State Building ExperienceC0L3487 350 Fifth Ave., btw 33rd & 34th sts., 212.736.3100. esbnyc .com. Views of New York City and beyond from the 86th- and 102nd-floor indoor and outdoor observatories. Daily 8 am-2 am. Main deck (86th floor) admission: $34 adults, $31 seniors (62+), $27 children 6-12, children under 5 free. Main & top decks (86th floor & 102nd floor) admission: $54 adults, $51 seniors (62+), $47 children 6-12, children under 5 free. G15 Encounter: Ocean Odyssey 226 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 646.308.1337. natgeoencounter.com. National Geographic’s immersive experience is an underwater walk-through adventure that takes explorers

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museums+attractions

into the depths of the Pacific Ocean, where they encounter humpback whales, great white sharks, sea lions and other creatures. The journey, using state-of-the-art digital technology, animation and projections, lasts approximately 90 minutes. Su-Th 10 am-10:30 pm, F-Sa 10 am-midnight (last ticket sold one hour before closing). Reserved tickets (buy in advance and choose guaranteed entry time): $39.50 adults, $36.50 seniors (65+), $32.50 children (12 and under). H14

Gulliver’s Gate 216 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave. gulliversgate.com. The interactive, miniature world display features more than 300 built-to-scale models of well-known landscapes and monuments, as well as hundreds of moving model trains, planes and people. Among the landmarks on view are the Hoover Dam, the pyramids, the Panama Canal and the Great Wall of China. Daily 10 am-8 pm (last entry at 6:30 pm). $36 adults, $27 seniors (65+)/children 12 and under. H14 The High Line C0L568G 1 ansevoort to W. 34th sts., btw 10th & 12th aves., 212.500.6035. thehighline.org. The 1.45-mile-long elevated park and promenade, reclaimed from derelict freight railway tracks, offers views of the skyline, plus perennial gardens and art displays. Daily 7 am-10 pm. Free. J15-J18 New York Botanical Garden C0L48572900 Southern Blvd., Bronx, 718.817.8700. nybg.org. Miles of impressively lush gardens and walking trails, educational programs, free tours and a hands-on children’s adventure garden offer an escape from the city. Tu-Su 10 am-6 pm. All-garden pass (grounds plus exhibitions): M-F $23 adults, $20 seniors (65+)/students, $10 children 2-12, children under 2 free. Sa & Su $28 adults, $25 seniors (65+)/students, $12 children 2-12, children under 2 free. One World Observatory One World Trade Center, 285 Fulton St., entrance to the observatory is on West St., at Vesey St., 844.696.1776. oneworldobservatory.com. The indoor observatory is located on the 100th, 101st and 102nd floors of the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere—1,250 feet above street level. Dining options available, plus a gift shop. Daily 9 am-8 pm (last ticket sold at 7:15 pm). $34 adults, $32 seniors (65+), $28 children 6-12, children 5 and under free. G22 Statue of Liberty libertyellisfoundation.org. The copper-clad neoclassical statue in New York Harbor, designed by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and a gift from France to the United States in 1886, is a symbol of freedom and democracy. Open daily. Free. Top of the Rock C30 0L57 Rockefeller Plz., W. 50th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.698.2000. topofthe rocknyc.com. Panoramic vistas of the city some 70 floors above the ground. Daily 8 am-midnight (last elevator ascends at 11:15 pm). $34 adults, $32 seniors (62+), $28 children 6-12. The “Sun & Stars” combination ticket allows visitors to enjoy Top of the Rock twice in one day: $49 adults, $47 seniors, $43 children 6-12. G13

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FOR MORE ART, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC

The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 68-70).

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1 1 An exhibition of Bombay street images by one of India’s foremost photographers, Raghubir Singh (1942–1999), concludes Dec. 9. | Howard Greenberg Gallery, p. 63 2 New paintings by Icelandic-born artist Thordis Adalsteinsdottir, on view thru Nov. 24, inaugurate this new Uptown gallery space. | Salon STUX West, p. 63 3 “THE BEARD PICTURES,” monumental new mixed-media works by Gilbert & George, fill this gallery’s two Manhattan locations thru Dec. 22. | Lehmann Maupin, p. 63 4 Fine art photographer and printmaker Michael Massaia’s first solo show at the Chelsea gallery, “Deep in a Dream: New York City,” runs thru Nov. 25. | ClampArt, p. 63

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ANTIQUES Bauman Rare Books C0L5 91357 35 Madison Ave., btw E. 54th & E. 55th sts., 212.751.0011. baumanrare books.com. Extensive collections of rare books from the 15th to 20th centuries are available from one of the city’s largest antiquarian booksellers. The wide array of genres includes Americana, literature, music, history, photography, fine bindings and sets, and children’s books. M-Sa 10 am-6 pm. F13 Dalva Brothers, Inc. C0L3167453 E. 77th St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.717.6600. dalvabrothers.com.

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

Eighteenth-century Continental and French furniture, decorative arts and old master paintings presented in period paneled rooms. M-F 10 am-5:30 pm. F10

1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex. C0L4165New York Design Center, 200 Lexington Ave., 10th fl., btw E. 32nd & E. 33rd sts., 646.293.6633. nydc.com/antiques. The first physical presence in the marketplace of the popular shopping website, 1stdibs.com, is a 33,000-square-foot space featuring 54 antiques and 20th-century design dealers from the United States and abroad. M-F 9:30 am-5:30 pm. E15

PHOTOS: RAGHUBIR SINGH, “MUSLIM GIRL, NAGPADA, BOMBAY,” CA. 1990–93, ©2017 SUCCESSION RAGHUBIR SINGH, COURTESY HOWARD GREENBERG GALLERY; THORDIS ADALSTEINSDOTTIR, “GETTING OUT,” 2017, COURTESY SALON STUX WEST, STUX GALLERY, NEW YORK; “GILBERT & GEORGE BEARD HONOR,” 2017, ©GILBERT & GEORGE, COURTESY THE ARTISTS AND LEHMANN MAUPIN, NEW YORK AND HONG KONG; MICHAEL MASSAIA, “COUPLE #1,” CENTRAL PARK, NEW YORK CITY, 2015, ©MICHAEL MASSAIA, COURTESY CLAMPART, NEW YORK CITY

galleries+antiques


Olde Good Things C0L962302 Bowery, btw E. Houston & Bleecker sts., 212.498.9922; and two other NYC locations. ogtstore.com. A cornucopia of doorknobs, chandeliers, mantels and reclaimed glass acquired from late-19th-century and pre-Depression-era buildings. M, W-F 10 am-7 pm, Tu 10 am-6:30 pm, Sa-Su 11 am-7 pm. E19 Pageant Print Shop C0L426569 E 4th St., btw Second Ave. & Bowery, 212.674.5296. pageantprintshop .com. More than 10,000 antique and one-of-akind prints and maps fill this tiny store, with enough stacks to sift through for hours. M-Sa noon-8 pm, Su 1-7 pm. E18 White Trash C0L9243 1 04 E. 5th St., btw First & Second aves., 212.598.5956. whitetrashnyc.com. The ever-changing inventory emphasizes midcentury modern designs from the 1940s–1970s, such as industrial cabinets and Scandinavian desks, plus cocktail shakers, globes, 1960 California skateboards and pull-down teaching charts. M-Sa 2-8:30 pm. D18

ART GALLERIES ClampArt C0L522 9 47 W. 29th St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 646.230.0020. clampart.com. The gallery represents emerging and midcareer artists working in all mediums, with a specialization in photography. Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm. H16 Denise Bibro Fine Art C0L548529 W. 20th St., 4th fl., btw 10th & 11th aves., 212.647.7030. denisebibro fineart.com. Paintings, works on paper, sculpture and multimedia works by established and emerging contemporary artists. Tu-Sa 11 am-6 pm. J17 Hammer Galleries C0L52932 E. 67th St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.644.4400. hammergalleries .com. Nineteenth- and 20th-century European and American masters, such as Alexander Calder, Grandma Moses, Pablo Picasso and Wassily Kandinsky. M-F 9:30 am-5:30 pm, Sa by appointment. F11 Howard Greenberg Gallery C0L53641 E. 57th St., Ste. 1406, at Madison Ave., 212.334.0010. howardgreenberg.com. Important photographs, from Pictorialism to Modernism, contemporary photographs, as well as images for industry, advertising and fashion. The gallery exclusively

Jill Newhouse Gallery C0L531 2 2 E. 81st St., btw Madison & Fifth aves., 212.249.9216. jillnewhouse .com. Nineteenth- and 20th-century European and American works on paper. M-F 10 am-5 pm. F10 Lehmann Maupin C0L538201 Chrystie St., btw Rivington & Stanton sts., 212.254.0054, D19; 536 W. 22nd St., btw 10th & 11th aves., 212.255.2923, J16 lehmannmaupin.com. New and established American and international contemporary artists working in all mediums, including video. Artists who have exhibited at the gallery include Catherine Opie, Teresita Fernández, Kader Attia, David Salle and Do Ho Suh. Both locations: Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm. LMAKgallery C0L6932 7 98 Grand St., btw Allen & Eldridge sts., 212.255.9707. lmakgallery.com. Contemporary works in all mediums, including drawings, painting, photography, video/film and sculpture, by artists from around the world. W-Su 11 am-6 pm, and by appointment. D20 Nohra Haime Gallery 500 W. 21st St., at 10th Ave., 212.888.3550. nohrahaimegallery.com. International contemporary artists active in painting, sculpture, photography, conceptual art and multimedia installation. Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm. J17 Opera Gallery C0L67 5741 91 Madison Ave., at E. 67th St., 646.707.3299. operagallery.com. The international gallery, with branches in New York, Miami, London, Dubai, Hong Kong and other capitals, showcases 19th- and 20th-century masterworks by Picasso, Dubuffet, Warhol and Chagall, as well as works by emerging contemporary artists. M-Sa 10 am-7 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. F11 Salon STUX West 520 West End Ave., 2nd fl., at W. 85th St., 212.352.1600. stuxgallery.com. The contemporary art space, on the parlor floor of a historic landmarked building, presents solo art exhibitions as well as cultural events, including performance, music, lectures and curated conversations. W-F noon-6 pm. J9

galleries+antiques

The Manhattan Art & Antiques Center C0L51 9 050 Second Ave., at E. 55th St., 212.355.4400. the-maac.com. More than 100 established galleries on three levels offer an encyclopedic selection of antiques, fine art, decorative accessories, silver and jewelry from the Americas, Europe, Africa and Asia. M-Sa 10:30 am-6 pm, Su noon-6 pm. E13

represents the estates of Berenice Abbott and Arnold Newman. Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm. F12

Jewelry from Botier Inc., Gallery #15, 212-371-2424 | Cartier Onyx, Emerald, Diamond & Gold Giraffe Brooch

Lillian Nassau C0L59220 E. 57th St., btw Second & Third aves., 212.759.6062. lilliannassau.com. Specialist in Tiffany Studios lamps, favrile glass, pottery, mosaics, desk pieces and Louis Comfort Tiffany paintings, as well as American sculpture and Art Nouveau decorative arts. M-F 10:30 am-6 pm, Sa 10:30 am-5 pm. E12

Historical Design Fine Art | Jewelry Silver Contemporary Art Antiques and more...

AUCTION HOUSES Christie’s C0L5724120 Rockefeller Plz., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.636.2000. christies.com. A prestigious auctioneer of fine art and antiques since the 18th century. Included in the evening sale on Nov. 15 is Leonardo da Vinci’s “Salvator Mundi (Savior of the World),” one of fewer than 20 works in existence accepted as being from the artist’s own hand; the painting is expected to fetch as much as $100 million. Highlights: Nov. 13-14: Impressionist & Modern Art. Nov. 15-16: Postwar & Contemporary Art. Nov. 21-22 Latin American Art. Nov. 21: American Art. G13 Doyle New York C0L51 7431 75 E. 87th St., btw Third & Lexington aves., 212.427.2730. doylenewyork .com. The highest bid takes home fine art,

1050 2nd Ave b/t 55th St & 56th St New York | NY 10022 212.355.4400 info@the-maac.com

www.the-maac.com

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galleries+antiques jewelry, furniture and more. Highlights: Nov. 1: Prints & Multiples. Nov. 7: Rare Books, Autographs & Maps; Coins, Bank Notes & Postage Stamps. Nov. 8: Provident Loan Society: Jewelry, Watches, Silverware & Coins. Nov. 15: Postwar & Contemporary Art; Impressionist & Modern Art; Nov. 21: Doyle+Design. E9

Sotheby’s C0L1 2315 334 York Ave., at E. 72nd St., 212.606.7000. sothebys.com. Fine art and collectibles go on the block. Highlights: Nov. 11: Magnificent Wines From the Park B. Smith Collection. Nov. 13: The Collection of Edwin & Cherie Silver; American Art. Nov. 14-15: Impressionist & Modern Art. Nov. 16-17: Contemporary Art. Nov. 21: Latin America: Modern Art; Art Treasures of America: the Collection of John F. Eulich; European Art. C8 Swann Auction Galleries C0L1 4687 04 E. 25th St., btw Lexington & Park aves., 212.254.4710. swanngal leries.com. A family-owned auction house specializing in rare and antiquarian books and works on paper. Highlights: Nov. 2: Old Master Through Modern Prints. Nov. 7: Autographs. Nov. 14: 19th- & 20th-Century Literature. Nov. 16: Contemporary Art. F16

SPECIAL SHOWS Holiday House NYC Academy Mansion, 2 E. 63rd St., btw Madison & Fifth aves. holidayhouse nyc.com. (Nov. 15-Dec. 6) More than 15 interior designers, inspired by holiday themes, transform a four-story limestone mansion and its 20 rooms into a luxuriously appointed showcase. The show benefits The Breast Cancer Research Foundation. Daily 11 am-5 pm, Th 11 am-8 pm. $40. F12 McDermott & McGough: The Oscar Wilde Temple The Church of the Village, 201 W. 13th St., at Seventh Ave. oscarwildetemple.org. (Thru Dec. 2) The public installation by collaborative artists David McDermott and Peter McGough honors one of the earliest heroes of gay liberation and equal rights. Included are paintings, sculptures and site-specific elements that recall the Aesthetic Movement championed by Wilde. Tu-Sa noon-7 pm. Free. H17 The Other Art Fair Brooklyn Expo Center, 72 Noble St., at Franklin St., Greenpoint, Brooklyn. nyc.theotherartfair.com. (Nov. 9-12) This artist-driven fair provides a platform for 120 emerging artists to show and sell their works to a new generation of art buyers. Artists are selected by a committee of art world experts. Th 6-9:30 pm, F noon-9 pm, Sa 11 am-7 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. $30 (private view, Nov. 9), $15 daily admission, $13.50 seniors/students. BB16 The Salon Art + Design C0L489Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Ave., btw E. 66th & E. 67th sts., 212.777.5218. thesalonny.com. (Nov. 9-13) Leading international dealers exhibit historical, modern and contemporary furniture and decorative arts, as well as fine art from 1890 to the present day. Specialties include Art Deco and Midcentury Modern from France, Italy, Scandinavia and the United States. Th 7-9 pm (vernissage party), F 11 am-8 pm, Sa-Su 11 am-7 pm, M 11 am-5 pm. $25 daily tickets. F11


transportation+tours

FOR MORE ON WHAT TO DO, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC

The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 68-70).

Go Airlink NYC C0L212.812.9000. 6154 goairlinkshuttle .com. Door-to-door shuttles and rides in late-model vans, SUVs and sedans to and from JFK, LaGuardia and Newark terminals for individuals, groups and charters. For reservations, call 877.599.8200. Lincoln Limousine 718.728.5466. lincolnlimou sine.com. Pick from a fleet of vehicles that include luxury sedans, stretch and superstretch limos, chauffeured SUVs and more for trips to various tristate area destinations. Long Island Rail Road mta.info/lirr. Operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week (including all holidays), taking visitors from Penn Station or Jamaica, Queens, to more than 100 destinations throughout Long Island. For pricing and schedules, go online or call 511 and say “LIRR” at any time. M & V Limousines 631.543.0908, 800.498.5788. mvlimo.com. This limousine company offers transportation for weddings, nights on the town, airports and more. Choose from a variety of vehicles, including antique cars and luxury buses. Metro-North Railroad C0L52 18 12.532.4900. mta .info/mnr. Commuter trains operate daily from 4 am to 2 am, arriving and departing from Grand Central Terminal. F14 New Jersey Transit C0L4851 973.275.5555. njtransit .com. Trains, buses and airport connections, all with online ticketing options to various cities and towns throughout New Jersey, including most cities on the Jersey Shore. New York Water Taxi C0L2 \5246 12.742.1969. nywatertaxi.com. Commuter taxis cruise the Hudson and East rivers daily. All-Day Access Pass: $31 adults, $19 children 3-12. Routes/ times vary.

John D. Rockefeller Jr.’s dream of creating a “city within a city”—a hub of art, style, entertainment and business—was realized in 1933 when Rockefeller Center officially opened. Today, you can take a tour of this historic complex in Midtown. | Rockefeller Center Tours, p. 67 .

TRANSPORTATION Amtrak C0L800.872.7245. amtrak.com. Penn Station, Eighth Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 212.630.6400. Guests travel in comfort on these passenger trains, stopping at stations throughout the country. Refreshments are available on most trains. I15 Carmel Car & Limousine Service C0L5234 212.666.6666. carmellimo.com. Luxury sedans (late-model Lincoln Town Cars), limos, minivans

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and large passenger vans are all available by the hour and for airport transportation.

Charge & Ride, Inc. C0L4137 8 18.392.5200. charge andride.com. Passengers can ride in luxury sedans, SUVs, limos and buses to any destination in the New York metro area. Services are available 24/7. Commonwealth Limo C0L48 7162 00.558.5466. commonwealthlimo.com. Luxury chauffeured transportation throughout the NYC metro area offering a variety of vehicles, such as stretch limousines and executive vans. Empire CLS C0L419 888.826.3431. empirecls.com. Uniformed drivers chauffeur executives, dignitaries and celebrities around town and to and from airports. The fleet includes the latest models of Lincoln Town Cars, Navigators, Mercedes-Benz sedans, stretch limos, buses and minivans, many of which are hybrid and alternative fuel vehicles.

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

NYC Ferry ferry.nyc. This ferry service, operated by Hornblower, offers transportation along the East River to and from Lower Manhattan and Midtown and also parts of Brooklyn and Queens, with more routes being developed. Vessels offer charging stations, Wi-Fi and concessions. Adult one-way ticket, $2.75. Tickets can be bought through the NYC Ferry app, the website or at a ticket vending machine, available at all of the ferry landings. Penn Station C0L5E 213 ighth Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 212.630.6401. amtrak.com. Subways converge with commuter rail and bus services to New Jersey and Long Island and national rail services. I15 Port Authority Bus Terminal C0L526 13 25 Eighth Ave., btw W. 40th & W. 42nd sts., 800.221.9903. panynj .gov/bus-terminals/port-authority-bus-terminal .html. Bus carriers available at this terminal include New Jersey Transit, Greyhound and ShortLine Bus. Three levels also include shops and restaurants. H14


TOURS Big Apple Greeter C0L9b 518 igapplegreeter.org. Local volunteers highlight the ins and outs of New York City when they lead free two-to-four-hour jaunts tailored to your interests. Tours must be booked three weeks in advance. For more information, call 212.669.8159. Citysightseeing Cruises New York Pier 78, 455 12th Ave., at W. 38th St., 212.445.7599. citysightseeingnewyork.com. Sightseeing cruises include a twilight sail, a skyline cruise and a hop-on, hop-off sightseeing ferry. Times/prices/ packages vary. K15 Gray Line New York C0L516Buses leave from the Gray Line New York Visitor Center, 777 Eighth Ave., btw W. 47th & W. 48th sts., 212.445.0848. newyorksightseeing.com. Sightseeing tours by bus, boat and helicopter let visitors discover NYC’s iconic sites. Prices vary. H14 Ground Zero Tour 646.801.9113. 911ground zero.com. Guided, two-hour walking tours offer a deeper understanding of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The stroll includes skip-theline access to the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. Daily tours at 10:30 am and 2 pm. Prices vary. G22 Harlem Gospel and Jazz Tours C0L4835690 Eighth Ave., btw W. 43rd & W. 44th sts., 212.391.0900. harlemspirituals.com. Visitors take in Manhattan’s largest neighborhood, touring a Baptist church and hearing inspiring spirituals. Times/ prices vary. I14 Lincoln Center Tours C0L68942David Rubenstein Atrium, Broadway, btw W. 62nd & W. 63rd sts., 212.875.5350. lincolncenter.org/tours. Guided excursions offer visitors an inside look at Lincoln Center. Daily; times vary. $25 adults, $20 students under 30. I12 Madison Square Garden All-Access Tour C0L64589Seventh Ave., at W. 33rd St., 212.465.6080. thegarden.com. This tour goes behind the scenes of the revamped arena, including the locker rooms and a gallery of famous photos from the Garden’s photo archives. Check website for varied hours and prices. H15 Metro Tour Service C0L917.558.0089 5846 metrotour service.blogspot.com. Licensed tour guide Mauricio Lorence leads walking tours of Fort Greene and Clinton Hill, Brooklyn. $25. Tours depart from Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Peter Jay Sharp Building, 30 Lafayette Ave., btw Ashland Pl. & Felix St., Clinton Hill, Brooklyn. Call for tour dates/lengths/times.

New York Holiday Lights and Movie Sites Bus Tour 10 Columbus Cir., btw W. 58th & W. 60th sts. getyourguide.com. Take a two-and-ahalf-hour guided bus tour of New York to see its spectacular holiday lights and movie sites. See the apartment where Buddy the Elf stayed in “Elf;” relive a “Home Alone Christmas” moment outside Rockefeller Center, plus lots more. Meet your tour guide at 10 Columbus Cir., right above the Williams Sonoma store on the 2nd floor, facing the main entrance windows overlooking the Visitor’s Desk on the left side. Prices/times vary. I12

transportation+tours

Statue Cruises C0L511 4 .877.523.9849. statuecruises .com. Ferries carry visitors to the Statue of Liberty National Monument 100 times a week. Daily departure times from Battery Park vary. Crown reserve tickets: $21 adults, $17 seniors (62+), $12 children ages 4-12. Audio tour included. F24

Onboard New York Sightseeing Tours Seventh Ave. & Broadway at W. 53rd St., 212.852.4821. newyorktours.onboardtours.com. Guests and guides explore Central Park, Wall Street, Times Square and other areas, both on the tour bus and off. Times/schedules/prices vary. H13 Rockefeller Center Tours C0L586430 Rockefeller Plz., at W. 50th St., 212.698.2000. rockefeller center.com The skating rink, statue of Prometheus and more are featured on this 75-minute walking tour of the historic venue. Opt for a scheduled or unscheduled tour. $25. Times vary. Shady Ladies Tours 1000 Fifth Ave., at 82nd St., 646.201.4848. shadyladiestours.com. This tour group offers several tours, including the Shady Ladies Tours and the Nasty Women Tour. Tours take in a number of collections at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and meet in the lobby of the museum. For prices, meeting times and more information, visit the website. G9 Style Room C0L4326225 W. 34th St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 646.245.5316. styleroom.com. Fashion expert Karen Parker O’Brien creates personalized shopping tours that include VIP access to designer showrooms. H15 Turnstile Tours 347.903.8687. turnstiletours .com. Two-hour walking tours of Manhattan’s Financial District or Midtown include some of the finest street food the city has to offer. Each tour includes 5-6 tastings from trucks and carts. Prices, schedules and locations vary. Viator Tours 888.651.9785. viator.com. This huge tour company offers a wide variety of tours. Choose from such tours as Mornings at MoMA and EmptyMet Tour at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC Evening Helicopter Flight and Statue of Liberty Cruise, and many others. Woolworth Building 233 Broadway, 203.966.9663. woolworthtours.com. Designed by architect Cass Gilbert between 1910 and 1912 as Frank W. Woolworth’s NYC headquarters, the landmarked Woolworth Building was once the tallest building in the world. Tours of the vintage lobby are available. Prices for timed tours $20-$45. E21

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About Buses THE GOOD: If you are looking to get a view of NYC street life and are not in a rush, buses are a great way to travel. THE BAD: Traffic is highly unpredictable, and a bus ride can wind up taking much longer than anticipated. THE FACTS: There are approximately 5,900 air-conditioned buses on over 300 routes. Look for signposts marked with a bus emblem and route number. Most buses operate btw 5 am and 2 am; some buses run 24 hours a day. For Select Bus Service on First and Second aves. (btw South Ferry & E. 126th St.), as well as 34th St. (from the FDR Dr. to the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center), pay your fares prior to boarding and enter through any of three doors.

About Subways THE GOOD: The fastest, cheapest and most reliable way around town. THE BAD: Subways can get packed, sardine-style, during rush hours, can be hot in the summer and might have a “colorful character� or two. THE FACTS: There are 24 subway lines designated by either a route number or letter, serving 469 stations. Round-theclock, air-conditioned service is provided seven days a week. Subways run every 2-5 mins. during rush hours, 10-15 mins. during the day and about every 20 mins. btw midnight and 5 am. Stops are clearly posted and subway maps are on view at stations and in every car.

Cost of Ride The cost of a subway and bus trip can vary, from $3 for a single fare to $2.75 if you are buying more than one ride (in which case, various discounts are available). For buses (if you are not using a MetroCard), you need exact change (no bills or pennies). You can purchase MetroCards at subway station booths, vending machines, train terminals and select stores throughout NYC. Pay for Select Bus Service with a MetroCard or coins (exact change only) at fare collection machines at designated bus stops. For assistance, call 718.330.1234, or log onto web.mta.info.

Getting Around

The maps indicate MTA bus and subway routes. Each line is in a different color.


DECEMBER’17 HIGHLIGHTS

21

Musíca Sacra Chorus and Orchestra: Handel’s “Messiah” Carnegie Hall, carnegiehall.org

17

44th Annual Merry Tuba Christmas at Rockefeller Center 30 Rockefeller Plz., rockefellercenter.com

31 8

iHeartRadio Jingle Ball with Ed Sheeran, Sam Smith and more Madison Square Garden, ticketmaster.com

72

9

SantaCon, various locations, text “follow santacon” to 40404 Dec. 8 for venue info, santacon.nyc

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

12

Largest Menorah Lighting, (thru Dec. 19) Grand Army Plaza, Prospect Park, Brooklyn, largestmenorah.com

New Year’s Eve Ball Drop in Times Square Times Square, timessquarenyc.com

14

Paul Winter’s Winter Solstice (thru Dec. 16), Cathedral of St. John the Divine, paulwinter.com

PHOTOS: NEW YEAR’S EVE TIMES SQUARE BALL DROP, AMY HART FOR TIMES SQUARE ALLIANCE; ROCKEFELLER CENTER MERRY TUBA CHRISTMAS, COURTESY TISHMAN SPEYER/RACHAEL WRIGHT; MUSICA SACRA PERFORMING HANDEL’S “MESSIAH” AT CARNEGIE HALL, RICHARD TEN DYKE FOR MUSICA SACRA

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Profile for Morris Media Network

In New York Magazine Oct 2017  

In New York Magazine Oct 2017  

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