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InsideOu

THE RESOURCE GUIDE TO OUR ISLAND

OAHU

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In Full Swing 50th State Fair marks the beginning of summer


Contents D E PA RT M E N TS I SL AN D L I F E

8 Built with Aloha Honolulu Habitat for Humanity offers constructive help. M OR S EL S

10 Modern Concepts Two new restaurants add contemporary twists to traditional cuisines.

30 O U T A N D A BO U T

14 Liquid Assets Is it whisky? Or, is it whiskey, with an “e?” Alison Kent shares her answer. MUSINGS

16 Mele Mei Award-winning artists will perform at various venues during May and June.

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18 La La Land Dana Land animates her alter ego, Hula Rosie, at the Doris Duke Theatre stage.

20 Events and Celebrations Ethnic festivals, lanterns and a “Biggest Little” show mark the beginning of summer. MA U K A T O MA K A I

30 Homecoming After sailing the globe for three-and-a-half years, Hōkūle‘a and Hikianalia return to Hawaiian waters. INS AND OUTS

32 Not to Miss The Hawai‘i Book & Music Festival sets up a new pavilion while the PanPacific Festival returns with its colorful pageantry.

F E AT U R E S 22 Lord of the Ring Giovanni Anastasini brings his “Amazing Circus” to town during the 50th State Fair, which again will be held on the grounds of Aloha Stadium. by Simplicio Paragas 26 A Century of Kaimukī Once dry and sparsely populated, this East O‘ahu neighborhood’s main thoroughfare is Wai‘alae Avenue, which is lined with shops and eateries. by James Charisma 4

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(CLOCKWISE, FROM LEFT) ©EDWARD LINSMIER; ©’ŌIWI TV/KAIPO KĪ’A HA; CO U R T ES Y TS U K A DA NO JO

12 Culinary Journey The Hawai‘i Food & Wine Festival kicks off with a “Connoisseur” adventure.


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InsideOut Magazine (ISSN 2158-494X) is produced by Morris Visitor Publications (MVP), a division of Morris Communications Co., LLC, 725 Broad St. Augusta, GA 30901. Annual subscription rate is $18 or $32 for two years. To subscribe, email: miao@insideouthawaii.com. Copyright 2017. All rights reserved. Reproduction of the whole or any part of content prohibited without written permission. InsideOut Hawaii will not accept responsibility for submitted materials that are lost or stolen.

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ED ITOR’S L ETTER

The Greater Good

COURTESY OCEANELDERS.ORG

As a pillar of the community, Nainoa Thompson leads by example and personal fortitude. And when sister ships Hōkūle‘a and Hikianalia sail into Hawaiian waters, the pwo navigator and president of the Polynesian Voyaging Society will be there to pass on the hoe (paddle) to the next generation of wayfinders. Speaking of lineage, Giovanni Anastasini learned about acrobatics from his dad who was taught by his father, and so on and so forth. Today, nine generations of Anastasinis have gone into show business, more specifically the circus, which will come to town during the 50th State Fair in May and June. During this same period, island musicians will perform at various venues during Mele Mei, a celebration of Hawaiian music and hula. Jazz chanteuse Dana Land offers her own form of entertainment, assuming

In May 2014, Polynesian Voyaging Society crewmembers set sail for a circumnavigational journey aboard sister wa‘a Hōkūle‘a and Hikianalia.

the no-barriers persona of Hula Rosie, a fun-loving character Land describes as an amalgamation of Carmen Miranda, Bette Midler, Ella Fitzgerald and Hilo Hattie. Kaimukī, meanwhile, has its own multiple personalities. Once dusty, dry and sparsely populated, the East O‘ahu community has thrived over the years, maturing from its “New Suburb” status in 1898 to a bustling multicultural neighborhood with various ethnic restaurants and quaint mom-and-pop shops in 2017. This year also marks the first time that Honolulu Habitat for Humanity will hold a “Build Aloha” gala fundraiser. The event will afford attendees a chance to learn more about this nonprofit’s belief that “everyone deserves a decent place to live.”

ON THE COVER An iconic ride at the 50th State Fair, the Wave Swinger was originally imported to Hawai‘i from Zierer of Germany. As the ride begins to spin with an oscillating motion, the seats sway outward. ©Joey Libby

Simplicio Paragas SENIOR EDITOR M AY+ J U NE 2 0 1 7

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IS LA ND L I F E

Built with Aloha

Honolulu Habitat for Humanity offers constructive help. by Kristen Nemoto Jay

The pristine beaches and optimal summer-like, year-round weather may be a couple of reasons why people from abroad gravitate towards living in Hawai‘i, but it’s definitely not the #1 factor. Locals 8

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and visitors alike can agree that life on the islands is filled with the “aloha spirit” and no matter who you are or where you come from, your surrounding community will be behind you every step of the way. |

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The only downside about life here on the islands is that the price for paradise is expensive. And as Hawai‘i tops out every year as the #1 most expensive state to live in the U.S., more and more families

are being ostracized from becoming homeowners. Jim Murphy, Honolulu Habitat for Humanity’s executive director, says it’s one dream to want to live in Hawai‘i but it’s another to want to do so at an affordable price. “[Honolulu Habitat for Humanity] is addressing what is arguably the greatest need here in Hawai‘i and that is affordable

COURTESY HONOLULU HABITAT FOR HUMANITY


COURTESY HONOLULU HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

housing,” Murphy says. Unlike other Habitat for Humanity organizations on the mainland, Hawai‘i’s major challenge in providing affordable housing — in general — is due to the lack of livable land space. “With little land available,” Murphy says, “the astronomical pricing of land, condominiums, townhouses and single-family homes skyrocket to the hefty price tag of paying $400-$500 per square foot. “It’s not at all feasible for our families here on O‘ahu,” he adds. “Our goal here at Habitat is to be able to provide a decent place to live for those who are in great need, and bring the community together while doing it.” This is when the “aloha spirit” is especially recognized, says Murphy, as he recalls many Saturday mornings when neighbors would come over to help the Honolulu Habitat for Humanity crew while they would be working on a house, just because they heard the “hammering.” “Prior to us building, we go out into the community to let them know that we’re building a home for one of their neighbors and that volunteers are welcome,” Murphy says. “But most of the volunteers learn by

word of mouth because it’s Aunty Darlene’s house so people come to help pitch in. Whether it be a church organization bringing lunches for everyone or a local business helping out on one of their work days, it’s just nice to see everyone come over to help.” A great way for the public to help or learn more about Honolulu Habitat for Humanity is to attend its inaugural benefit fundraiser: “Build Aloha.” The event will be held on Saturday, June 10, from 6 to 8:30 p.m., at Kō Hana Rum in Kunia. There will be a private tour of the distillery, food stations from such acclaimed restaurants as The Pig and the Lady and the Fish House at Ko Olina, special Kō Hana Rum cocktails, live music

fundraiser is a perfect name for the occasion since the Honolulu Habitat for Humanity strives to do more than just build houses. “We hope to bring communities together,” Murphy says. “We have all the resources now to help more families, we’re just so grateful for the public’s support.” For more information about Build Aloha or Honolulu Habitat for Humanity, visit honoluluhabitat.org ✽

and a silent auction. All proceeds will benefit Honolulu Habitat for Humanity. Murphy says the “Build Aloha” title for their

“Our goal here at Habitat is to be able to provide a decent place to live for those who are in great need, and bring the community together while doing it.”

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M O R SE L S

Modern Concepts Two new eateries offer contemporary twists on classic cuisines. by Simplicio Paragas

prepare such house specialties as jasmine-tea-smoked pork ribs, Kona kampachi in homemade soy sauce and the tableside-shredded crispy aromatic duck served with homemade pancakes. Desserts here are edible art pieces, from the roseshaped strawberry délice to the Tropical Dome. Take home some macarons for an added treat. International Market Place, Third Floor, Grand Lānai, 739-9318

Tsukada Nojo

The grand opening of new restaurants is nothing like we’ve seen in decades. And there is no slowing as more eateries come on line. Yauatcha and Tsukada Nojo are the latest to open their doors, welcoming diners to experience a modern Hong Kong-style tea house and contemporary izakaya, respectively.

room, which has a Feng Shui vibe with tall columns of blue glass juxtaposed by brick walls and pendant lighting. No detail has been spared on the décor and the same could be said about the cuisine and, of course, the variety of teas, including the calming tender branch hibiscus. Dim sum baskets filled with venison puffs, prawn-and-chive dumplings, Shagnhai siew long buns and roast duck in a pumpkin-shaped puff release aromatic plumes as the lids are removed. In the open kitchen, staff members — currently led by Michelin-starred chef Ho

TEA HOUSE

One of the most anticipated openings this year, Yauatcha (pronounced Yaow-ah-cha) redefines the traditional Chinese teahouse. Stainless steel carts are absent from the 10

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Chee Boon of Hakkasan Group, which founded the first Yauatcha in SoHo, London — can be seen hand stretching noodles and performing a choreographed dance as they

The izakaya to the Japanese is what the gastropub is to Americans. Dishes are meant to be shared in a communal setting, a point well made at Tsukada Nojo, a popular chain from Japan that opened on Kalākaua Avenue next to the Micronesia Mart. Named after a region in Miyazaki, Kyushu, Tsukada aims to source its

Yauatcha

(FROM TOP) ©COURTESY TSUKADA NOJO; COURTESY YAUATCHA

GREEN IZAKAYA


ingredients from local nojo (farms), having already established relationships with Aloun Farms, Maui Farmers’ Cooperative Exchange and Kaneshiro Farms. Almost all the dishes here will have some green component, whether it’s as minor as the green onions atop the hamachi jalapeno or the main star as is with the slices of saikyo-miso avocado. A few of the must-tries include

“We want to bring a new perspective to the popular Japanese izakaya concept by infusing freshness and natural ingredients.” the Nojo chicken nanban, tender chicken fritters dipped in a soy vinaigrette then topped with a house tartar sauce; “tacos” stuffed with chicken-curry and wrapped in sliced radish; Nikumaki rice ball, a pork belly-wrapped rice ball; and the house-special bijin nabe, a collagen-rich — hence the dish’s nickname “beauty pot” — chickenbased broth with garland chrysanthemum, zucchini, watermelon radish, tofu, enoki mushroom, maitake mushroom, aburaage and tsukune meatball. 1731 Kalākaua Ave., 951-4444 ✽

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M O R SE L S

Culinary Journey So the adventure begins. As a lead-up to the seventh annual Hawai‘i Food & Wine Festival (HFWF), organizers will once again hold their Connoisseur’s Culinary Journey from May 29-June 2. The immersive five-day exploration of farming, food and cuisine in the Islands will be hosted by some of Hawai‘i’s top chefs and will end with an exquisite dinner and fireworks under the stars at The Kahala Hotel & Resort. “It’s exciting to return to our roots with another

CULINARY JOURNEY The Kahala Hotel & Resort’s executive chef Wayne Hirabayashi, below, will be among the participating chefs. To view the complete itinerary and to purchase tickets, visit hawaiifoodandwinefestival.com.

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culinary journey that honors our deep connection to everything that’s grown, raised and caught locally,” says HFWF chief executive officer Denise Yamaguchi in a released statement. “This is an opportunity to show in a meaningful way our mission to ‘Taste Our Love for the Land.’” Since its inception in 2011, HFWF’s goal has been to expose Hawai‘i’s efforts to be sustainable and more food secure. Farmers, ranchers, fishermen interact with chefs and the public to open a

dialogue about our farms and waters, and to embrace the idea of “Grown Here, Not Flown Here.” “This is a privilege for us to highlight the abundant and rich cultural and community resources on the Wai‘anae Coast,” says Kalei Kailihiwa, regional director for Wai‘anae, Kamehameha Schools. “We’ve witnessed the successful results of community coming together to share resources and promote sustainable practices, including food production. Community success and how it affects the wellbeing of those who live on this coast is an important story to tell.” The Connoisseur’s Culinary Journey is priced at $6,995 per couple, and includes a five-night stay in an oceanview room at The Kahala Hotel & Resort, chef-guided tours, ground transportation and airfare to Kaua‘i. Participating chefs include Kahala Hotel & Resort executive chef Wayne Hirabayashi, Pili Group’s Mark “Gooch” Noguchi, Koko Head Café’s Lee Anne Wong and Roy Yamaguchi.✽

©DAVID MURPHEY

Take a five-day gastronomic adventure with chefs. by Simplicio Paragas


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Open daily from 5:00 to 10:00pm.


LIQUI D A SSE T S

Whisky Tipples In praise of parents with a quintessential dad drink | by Alison Kent A classic top-ranked gift worthy of any occasion, a bottle of Scotch whisky* is a tasteful way to show just how much you care. This Father’s Day, go one better with a whisky-themed barbecue complete with cocktails dedicated to dad. (On the flipside, if you are the proud papa, drop a hint by leaving this page open for family to find). With rich honeyed sweetness and a touch of peat smoke, vanilla and 14

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oak, Dewar’s White Label is a blended scotch whisky that, along with sipping over ice or mixing in cocktails, is also tailor-suited for creating dad-worthy dishes. Whisky Walnut Cheese Spread In a food processor,

blend 2 cups shredded aged cheddar cheese with 1/4 cup softened butter, 1 oz blended whisky, 2 tbsp cream and 1/2 tsp each dry mustard, salt and pepper. Stir in 1/2 cup finely chopped toasted |

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chopped walnuts, then chill at least one hour. Serve with oat cakes or any type of cracker for spreading.

Trusty Nail

Whisky Butter To 1 cup softened butter, stir in 1 oz blended whisky, 1 tbsp finely chopped fresh chives or parsley, 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce and 1/2 tsp each salt and pepper. Spoon onto a large piece of plastic wrap, then roll to form a log, twisting ends to close. Chill until firm. When ready to use, remove plastic wrap and slice into rounds. Top each hot, grilled steak or chop with one or two butter “coins.”

brandy and the French liqueur

Whisky Maple BBQ Sauce To each 1 cup of

your favorite thick and smoky tomato-based barbecue sauce, stir in 1 oz blended whisky and 1 tbsp pure maple syrup; simmer for 5 minutes. Brush on pork or beef ribs when just about ready to take off the grill. Or, brush on grilled chicken wings and use to top burgers. While each has its own unique characteristics, in general, the nuanced flavors of smoke, spice and butterscotch found in blended or single malt scotch whiskies work well in many cocktails. Or, serve neat, naturally. ✽

Makes: 1 cocktail A spin on the classic Rusty Nail, this cocktail uses a blend of Bénédictine (B&B). 1-1/2 oz Dewar’s 12 Year Old

1/2 oz B&B Liqueur 2 dashes Angostura bitters Garnish: Orange Twist Stir and pour all ingredients together over ice in a rocks glass. Garnish with orange twist.

Rob Roy 2.0 Makes: 1 cocktail Another cocktail classic given an updated twist, this time, with the addition of spiced cocoa-flavored bitters. If unavailable, another bitters with notes of spice or coffee would also work. If Aberfeldy 12 is unavailable, replace with another favorite whisky. 2 oz Aberfeldy 12 1 oz Martini & Rossi Sweet Vermouth Red 3 dashes Bittercube Corazón Bitters Garnish: Lemon Twist Stir and pour all ingredients together over ice in a rocks glass. Garnish with lemon twist. * “Whisky” without the “e” denotes Scotch whisky and Canadian-made whisky, while “whiskey” refers to Americanmade and Irish whiskeys.

FOOD RECIPES BY ALISON KENT. COCKTAIL RECIPES BY DEWAR’S AND ADAPTED BY ALISON KENT. PHOTO COURTESY OF DEWAR’S


NEW LOCATION OPENING IN JUNE! KAHALA MALL NEW LOCATION � SAME GREAT MENU � TAKE-OUT ONLY Crepes No Ka ‘Oi is proud to announce its second location at Kahala mall slated to open in the beginning of June! The take-out only location will serve the same amazing flavors you have come to love in Kailua.

in Kailua and they quickly outgrew that location. In 2014 they moved to a new building next door to a space with over double the capacity at 70. Business is still popping and after numerous requests from folks that drive from across the island to enjoy their crepes, they decided that it was the right time to expand.

It’s been a lot of hard work and tens of thousands of crepes served since Chris and Rosario “Kakay” Tarvyd first had the idea for crepes at a Farmer’s Market in 2007. Back then, they didn’t know that they would open a restaurant. They just loved to cook…and eat! When they saw the success of several plate lunch vendors, they thought it looked hard, but certainly fun and rewarding, so they sought out an idea of their own. They’re not quite sure who came up with the idea of crepes as some of their first dates were in a creperie in Manila, Philippines, but they knew it would be a hit. At the time, nobody else was selling crepes at fairs and festivals on Oahu and at their first event they were met with an overwhelming response. Less than a year later, they opened their first store

Customers at Kahala will get to enjoy the same menu as Kailua with crepes such as: the Tiki Torch, made with homemade pesto, roasted chicken, spinach, tomatoes and sautéed onions, and the Ultimate Breakfast Crepe, with cheddar, potatoes, bacon, onions, a poached egg and homemade hollandaise. Roasted garlic butter, made in-house, adds a delicious touch to the Vegetarian and Get Mushy (full of mushrooms, cheese, and your choice of Black Forest ham or roasted turkey). The Banana Split Crepe, with bananas, macadamia nuts and dark chocolate, topped with a generous drizzle of housemade Hawaiian sea salt caramel is a perfect option to satisfy that sweet tooth!

808 263 4088 143 HEKILI ST, KAILUA, HI 96734

KAHALA MALL SPACE G-19, NEXT TO JAMBA JUICE

@crepesnokaoikailua | www.crepesnokaoi.com | crepesnokaoi@yahoo.com


MUSI N G S

Mele Mei The lead-up to Mele Mei started in earnest in Los Angeles when a contingent of Hawai‘i artists were invited to unveil, “We Are Friends: A Lifetime Party of ’70s Music,” during a pre-Grammy Award event. The occasion marked the second consecutive year that the Hawai‘i Academy of Recording Arts has partnered with the Grammy Museum

MELE MEI (Above) A group of island musicians attended a preGrammy Award event to kick off Mele Mei in Los Angeles. (Opposite page) Waipuna hula dancers at the Nā Hōkū Hanohano Awards. 16

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to curate an exhibit focused on Hawaiian music. “Today, Hawaiian music is inspired by some of our legendary masters and carried forward by a new generation of artists,” says Henry Kapono, who was joined on stage by legendary artists Malani Bilyeu, Gaylord Holomalia, Johnny Valentine, Alx Kawakami, Blayne Asing

and 2017 Grammy winner Kalani Pe‘a at the Grammy Museum. “The beautiful thing about it is the music is getting back to melody and the heart. There’s a rumble starting up again with guys like Blayne Asing and Alx Kawakami and others who have their roots deeply grounded here in the Islands, but dream beyond the reef. It’s exciting.”

©JENNIFER WHALEN

Musicians from across the state will play at various venues during the months of May and June. By Simplicio Paragas


Now in its eighth year, Mele Mei features an expanded lineup of culturally rich, Hawaiian musical performances and concerts statewide. More than 70 events are scheduled, featuring globally recognized musicians — including multiple Nā Hōkū Hanohano award-winning and Grammy-nominated artists — who will perform at various venues around Hawai‘i, Los Angeles and throughout Japan. “The idea was to support musicians and artists, and to form a united front. This is a music and huladriven event,” says Pali Ka‘aihue, Hawai‘i Academy of Recording Arts president and co-creator of Mele Mei. “We have about

9,800 participants and half were from out of state, and of that half, about half came from Japan so we’re spreading Hawaiian music beyond Hawai‘i.” Highlights of Mele Mei 2017 include the Mele Mei Hotel Concert Series held at the Hilton Hawaiian Village, Outrigger Reef Waikīkī Beach Resort’s Kani Ka Pila Grille, Halekulani’s House Without A Key and Hyatt Regency

“Today, Hawaiian music is inspired by some of our legendary masters and carried forward by a new generation of talented artists. It’s exciting and I love it all.”

Waikīkī Beach Resort & Spa; 37th Annual Pan Pacific Festival’s Matsuri in Hawai‘i; and Hō‘ike Lanakila 2017 Festival across Japan. It all culminates with the highly anticipated 40th Annual Nā Hōkū Hanohano Awards ceremony and dinner show on Saturday, May 20 at the Hawai‘i Convention Center. “The growth of Mele Mei over the last eight years is a true testament to the unwavering interest in and support for Hawai‘i’s music, not just throughout the islands, but across the world,” Ka‘aihue says. “We’re grateful for the opportunity to share Hawai‘i’s culture through music and spread that aloha spirit with others.”✽

A partial list of Mele Mei’s 2017 schedule of events includes:

JAPAN June 18 - 24: Hō‘ike

Lanakila.The last event of Mele Mei 2017 goes to Japan. Hō‘ike Lanakila features a concert series of Nā Hōkū Hanohano awardwinning artists, hula hālau and their nā kumu. O`AHU Monday, May 1: Hawaiian Music Hall of Fame — Lei of Stars at the Hyatt Regency Waikīkī Beach Resort and Spa Sunday, May 7, 14, 21 & 28: Mele Mei Brunch at

Halekulani Sunday, May 7, 14, 21 & 28; 5 – 9 p.m.: Outrigger

Kani Ka Pila Grille Mele Mei Concert Series at the Outrigger Reef Waikīkī Beach Resort Sunday, May 21: Hō‘ike Lanakila at the Hawai‘i Convention Center Friday, June 9: Pan Pacific

COURTESY MELE MEI

Festival and Ho‘olaulea along Kalākaua Avenue Additional events may be added at a later date. Visit melemei.com for further details, as well as an up-todate schedule of events. M AY+ J U NE 2 0 1 7

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MUSI N G S

La La ‘Land’

Hula Rosie entertains with song and humor. By Simplicio Paragas

Take a fresh peel from Carmen Miranda, add a schemer from Bette Midler, pull a scat from Ella Fitzgerald and a hop from Hilo Hattie, and the multiple-personality persona emerges as Hula Rosie. Described as the “Hostess of Aloha,” Hula Rosie is the alter ego of jazz chanteuse Dana Land who created the amiable character 15 years ago when she was living in Northern California. “I draw my inspiration from all those women,”

TROPICAL REVUE Tickets cost $20 for Honolulu Museum of Art members and $25 for nonmembers, and can be purchased online at Honolulumuseum. org or by calling 532.6097.

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Land says. “I’ve always loved to sing, I’ve always loved to dance, and I’ve always loved to entertain.” Since moving back to O‘ahu three-and-a-half years ago, Land has dusted off her Hula Rosie props —including her coconut shell bra, tacky faux lei and over-the-top bouffant wig— and collaborated with local musicians to create a new “Tropical Revue,” which will be staged on May 21 at the Doris Duke Theatre. According to Land, the show is 80 percent music, and 20 percent dance and comedy. “The show features a quintet made up of some of the island’s most hip and talented cats,” Land says. “We’ve got pianist

Ethan Capone, bassist Ian Sheridan, drummer Mark Lindberg, woodwindist Rockford Holmes and trumpeter Mike Lewis, along with two adorable and talented Cabana Boys —Sterling Beair and Gabriel Giasolli who compete for Hula Rosie’s attention.” The tongue-and-cheek show’s music will include such rhythms as calypso, samba, cha-cha, American swing and Hawaiian swing. Think Harry Belafonte, Carmen Miranda and Land’s own original music. “Dana brings a most positively infectious spirit and energy to the bandstand and to the audience,” writes legendary jazz pianist Larry Vuckovich, who collaborated with Land on her CD “All the Cats Join In.” “The musicians, as well as the audience, are immediately affected by her strong rhythmic and melodic phrasing and her soulful vocal sound. The enjoyment that she has while performing has a lasting effect on everyone who hears her.” And Land plans to bring that infectious sound and presence to the Doris Duke stage as Hula Rosie. “If I had no barriers, I would be Hula Rosie,” Land quips. “I don’t think its her who has the multiple-personality disorder, it’s probably Dana.”✽

COURTESY DANA LAND


FUN FOR EVERYONE!

May 26 - June 25

(weekends only) Information at www.ekfernandez.com

PORK CHOP REVUE

©2017 MARVEL


OUT A ND A B O U T

Events and Celebrations We truly are a melting pot of cultures as evidenced by two heritage ceremonies: the Filipino Fiesta and We Are Samoa. And no other event quite captures our multiculturalism than the Lantern Floating Hawai‘i.

Sea Life Park’s Makapu‘u Twilight Concert Series is held under the stars at the Makapu‘u Meadows. Paula Fuga, Kapena, Makaha Sons and Anuhea are scheduled to perform. sealifeparkhawaii.com WE ARE SAMOA May 11-13

Filipino Fiesta

May 6 The Filipino Community Center will celebrate its 25th Annual Filipino Fiesta, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Kapiolani Park. This year’s theme, “And the Fun Continues...,” will showcase an array of authentic Filipino traditions, including cuisine, entertainment, and indigenous arts and crafts. Entertainers will feature local talent, artists from the mainland, and high-profile celebrity personalities from the Philippines. For more information, visit filcom.org

The Polynesian Cultural Center features Hawai‘i’s largest Samoan cultural gathering and premier showcase of Samoa’s traditions. Polynesia.com “POPS” PAHINUI May 27

As part of its 10th anniversary this year, the Waikīkī Beach Walk will unveil a statue of Gabby Pahinui to recognize his achievements and contributions. waikikibeach walk.com 20

Solemn Symbol

May 29 Themed “Many Rivers, One Ocean—Interconnectedness,” the annual Lantern Floating Hawai‘i ceremony is expected to draw more than 50,000 residents and visitors alike to Ala Moana Beach Park. Approximately 7,000 candlelit lanterns will be set afloat to honor the military’s fallen, loved ones who have passed, and as a symbolic, collective vow to work toward a peaceful future. lanternfloatinghawaii.com

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Big Time

June 3-4 Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor’s popular “Biggest Little Airshow in Hawai‘i” buzzes in for its 10th year. A family favorite, the Airshow features locally and nationally acclaimed remote-control pilots and their award winning Giant Scale aircraft. Other attractions include open cockpits, hangar tours and the return of “Snow Fields in June” for keiki. PacificAviationMuseum.org

Concert on the Lawn June 15 and 29 The Waikīkī Aquarium’s popular annual summer concert series offers an evening of live entertainment and food under the stars. Bring your lawn chair. waikikiaquarium.org

(CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) COURTESY FILCOM CENTER; COURTESY PACIFIC AVIATION MUSEUM; COURTESY WAIKIKI AQUARIUM; ©SHINNYO-EN HAWAII

UNDER THE TWINKLING STARS May 6


g a b by ‘p o p s ’ pa h i n u i

honoring a legend remembering a legacy The late Gabby ‘Pops’ Pahinui was one of the great 20th century masters of Hawaiian vocal, slack key and steel guitar music. He endeared himself to millions, not just with his charisma and talent, but with his humility and kindness. Waikiki Beach Walk pays tribute to our maestro of the South Seas. Tribute Statue of Philip Kunia “Gabby” Pahinui (1921-1980) will be presented late May 2017.

Open 365 Days, 10am–10pm Located on Lewers Street between Kalakaua Avenue and Kalia Road +1 808.931.3591 Some photos courtesy of Panini Records, Inc. All rights reserved.

WA I K I K I B E AC H WA L K .C o m |


All in the Family The 50th State Fair continues to attract generations of ohana. By Simplicio Paragas

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(THIS PAGE) ©EDWARD LINSMIER; (OPPOSITE PAGE) ©ANDY PAYNE

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ife’s one big circus for the Anastasini family. They travel together. They play together. And they share the love for acrobats and showmanship. For nine generations, this Italian-Mexican-American family has entertained people from around the world with their gravity-defying feats, Risley acts and “Diablo” juggling. Now in their sixth year at the 50th State Fair, the Anastasinis will bring a new variety show under the big top, featuring former “America’s Got Talent” contestant and slack wire acrobat Evgeny Vasilenko, a hand-balancing performance by Melanie Chy, a Chinese pole act by Seattle-based Duo Straight Up, dancer and circus performer Rachel Randall, trapezist Nick Lowery, and Giuliano and Fabio Anastasini performing their Risley act, named after Richard Risley Carlisle, an American gymnast and acrobat who developed a circus act in which an acrobat lying prone on his back juggles barrels or fellow acrobats — brothers in this case — with his feet. “It was an act my brother Luciano and I did for more than 25 years,” says family patriarch Giovanni Anastasini. “I didn’t want to teach it to them [Giuliano and Fabio] at first because I thought it was too difficult, but they picked up on some of the tricks fairly quickly.” An institution for many island residents, the 50th State Fair got its start in 1930 when the Chamber of Commerce produced the Hawaiian Products Show in an effort to shore up business during the Depression era. It would eventually expand in 1948 with rides, games and food concessions operated by E.K. Fernandez Shows, and rebranded as the

“49th State Fair,” a gesture in anticipation that Hawai‘i would indeed become the 49th state. Congress, however, passed the Alaskan Statehood Bill on July 1, 1958. “When Hawai‘i was granted statehood in 1959, the fair’s name officially changed,” says Donna Smith, vice president of E.K. Fernandez Shows, which started in 1903 when 20-year-old “Eddie” Fernandez began traveling to O‘ahu plantation camps at night and entertaining workers by projecting scenic silent films onto bed sheets. “There was a photo that appeared in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin showing Kane [Fernandez] holding a 50th sign over the 49 on the show’s marquee.”

FAMILY TIES (Opposite page) Giuliano and Fabio Anastasini perform their Risley act. (Above) Dad Giovanni Anastasini is the show’s producer and ring master.

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THE FAIR The Pork Chop Revue features a cast of barnyard buddies (Opposite page) Chandra and Daniel Lucariello pose for a “trash the dress” photo shoot, a day after saying their “I dos.”

“It’s always amazing when I hear ‘my father was here; my grandfather was here,’” says Smith, referring to the younger generation of entertainers who have followed in the footsteps of their parents. “It’s all about smiles and memories that are created during the Fair.” With Memorial Day around the corner, the 50th State Fair will be up and going, signaling the start of summer and another carnival run for E.K. Fernandez Shows, which has been the exclusive producer of the Fair since 1988. “Once you pay your admission ticket, you get free access to a lot of different entertainment,” Smith says. “This an affordable family outing with lots to do and lots of smiles.” And those glees of laughter and gasps of breath are the ultimate reward for the Anastasini family. “You’ll see acts that you will only see on YouTube or television,” Giovanni Anastasini says. “We put so many hours into the shows and the reward is seeing people’s reactions.” ✽ 50TH STATE FAIR May 26-29, June 2-4, June 8-11, June 16-18 and June 23-25 Fridays: 6 p.m.-midnight Saturdays: 4p.m.-midnight Sundays except June 11: noon-midnight Monday, May 29: noon-midnight Thursday, June 8: 6 p.m.-midnight Sunday, June 11: 4 p.m.-midnight A Fun Pass is required for admission, rides, games, food & beverages, novelties and some attractions. Purchase and reload Fun Passes at card dispensers located at the entrance to the Fair and throughout the fairgrounds, including the dining tents and game tent. Admission-only passes cost $3 and $5, depending on the time. ekfernandezshows.com

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(THIS PAGE) COURTESY PORK CHOP REVUE; ©RACHEL ROBERTSON

FUN AT

Chandra Lucariello has many fond memories of the Fair, calling it her “Disneyland” when she was growing up and anticipating its opening every year. “My dad would hype it up,” recalls Lucariello. “It was awesome — the rollercoaster, the Wild Cat, the cotton candy — I just loved it all.” Enough so that years later, she and her husband, Daniel Lucariello, would have a lively “trash the dress at the Hawai‘i State Fair” photo shoot a day after their wedding nuptials. “Our photographer, Rachel Robertson, suggested it,” Chandra Lucariello laughs. “We were like two little kids at the Fair … but all dressed up in our wedding clothes. We had a great time doing it and it was my Disneyland fairytale.” In addition to the circus, the Fair also showcases other genres of live entertainment, including this year’s “Pork Chop Revue,” which stars Cousin Grumpy and a cast of talented and intelligent swine. The show has been on tour throughout the U.S. for more than 50 years. It also once came to Hawai‘i with “Pork Chop Revue” late founder Boyd “Uncle Heavy” Kines, whose son, Les, now fronts the family-produced show.


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A Century of Kaimukī East O‘ahu neighborhood offers rich history and tales of menehune.

COURTESY HAWAI'I STATE ARCHIVES

By James Charisma On a hill overlooking Honolulu, the neighborhood of Kaimukī is best known for an eclectic mix of restaurants, cafes and bakeshops. Yet, this community wasn’t always the chic urban hotspot it is today. In the Hawaiian language, Ka-imu-ki translates to “the ti oven,” a reference to folklore legend about the menehune, a mischievous race of dwarf-like pixies, who cooked the roots of the ti plant in this area. In pre-contact times, Kaimukī was dusty and dry and sparsely populated. But it was still an important place; there were up to four heiau (ancient Hawaiian temples) located here. During the Battle of Nu‘uanu, one of the last great battles for the unification of the Hawaiian Islands in 1795, King Kamehameha I stationed his troops on Waikīkī Beach and had lookouts at Pu‘u o Kaimukī (Kaimukī Hill) to watch for enemies arriving by sea. When Honolulu became a major port city years later, this spot became known as “Telegraph Hill” when a semaphore machine with large moving arms was reportedly attached atop a 60-foot pole and used flags for signaling in 1857. This vantage point allowed for a broad view of the Pacific Ocean to spot approaching ships — and a clear line-of-sight to a building on Merchant Street, which could receive a message and relay it across downtown Honolulu.

“I remember the demolition of the bunkers on top of Menehune Hill [Pu‘u o Kaimukī] when the city said the rebars were rusted out and dangerous,” recalls longtime Kaimukī resident Gerry DeBenedetti. “Then when they went to knock them down, they couldn,t. They beat, whacked and pounded on the bunker rebars, and it took forever to remove the cement and the rubble.” Through the years, the owners of Kaimukī became a who’s who of Hawai‘i rulers and business leaders: the area first transferred from King Kamehameha III to William Lunalilo in the 1850s; then sold at auction in 1884 for $2,325 to Dr. Georges Phillipe Trousseau, a physician in the Royal Court of King Kalākaua, who used the lands as an ostrich farm and for grazing cattle. Trousseau would later gift Kaimukī to sugarcane developer Paul Isenberg, who then sold the 520 acres of land to business partners Theodore Lansing and Albert van Clief Gear in 1898 for $20,000. Their goal was to develop the rocky, red-dirt hillside into high-class residential suburbs — if they could build it. Lansing and Gear contracted a giant water reservoir built atop Kaimukī Hill, water main pipes along the streets, and the lands surveyed and subdivided into 600-by-500-square-foot lots, selling for between $400 and $600. Prefabricated M AY+ J U NE 2 0 1 7

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(Above) The Honolulu electric streetcar started service to Koko Head Avenue and Kapahulu in 1903, prompting more home sales. (Opposite page) The 850-seat Queen Theater was an entertainment hub for local residents when it opened in 1936.

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homes could be ordered from the mainland for as little as $700. To attract potential buyers, the business partners set up a country fair, shooting gallery and a zoo where they showed off a variety of animals, including two brown bears and a “Hawaiian Zebra” — a donkey imported from the Island of Hawai‘i painted in black zebra stripes. (Their hoax was revealed one afternoon when the rains came and washed away the paint.) Lansing and Gear later offered $50 to the family of every baby born in the neighborhood and promised to run roads to every house in Kaimukī. Hawaiian newspaper “The Independent” announced Kaimukī as “A New Suburb” in 1898: “The gentle slope of the land prevents any resident from shutting off the scenery from his neighbor and the cool fresh breeze will always be felt and enjoyed in every nook and corner of the tract … The roads mentioned are in excellent condition and will be pronounced so by riders, drivers, bicyclists and pedestrians.” Sales were slow until 1903 when the Honolulu electric streetcar, which had been introduced in November 1900, expanded its route from downtown and began service to Koko Head Avenue and Kapahulu. The Academy of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary (today known as Sacred Hearts Academy) was established as a boarding school in 1909. Next door, Saint Patrick Catholic

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(THIS PAGE, FROM TOP) ©ERIC BRODER VAN DYKE; ©ALOYSIUS PATACSIL; (OPPOSITE PAGE) COURTESY HAWAI'I STATE ARCHIVES

(Above) An aerial view of Kaimukī shows a mix of commercial and residential properties. (Below) St. Patrick’s Catholic Church features Romanesque architecture. (Opposite page, from top) Fort Ruger; a heiau atop Koko Head Avenue.

Church opened first as a convent chapel in 1917, then as a full Romanesque cruciform structure in 1929. Kaimukī Hill became a lookout point once again when the University of Hawai‘i placed an observatory here, the perfect place to catch Haley’s Comet when it appeared in 1910. At the base of the hill, a Spanish mission-style fire station was built in 1924. Businesses began popping up along the main thoroughfare of Wai‘alae Avenue, such as Kaimukī Dry Goods in 1926 and Harry’s Music Store in 1946. At the center of this new neighborhood was the 850-seat Queen Theater, which distributed statuette busts of Queen Lili‘uokalani to every lady in attendance when it opened on June 29, 1936. Kaimukī’s growth slowed in the late 1950s and ’60s. The development of Ala Moana Shopping Center and Wai‘alae Shopping Center (Kāhala Mall today) hurt neighborhood businesses, as did the construction of the H-1 Freeway that stretched to Kaimukī by the mid1960s, diverting commuters away from Wai‘alae Avenue. New housing codes and regulations saw many of the classic historic homes swapped with genericlooking replacements. Even the regal Queen Theater fell into decline, with its blockbuster film premieres, Broadway revivals and Vaudeville shows replaced by adult movies in the 1970s. Today, the Queen sits empty but the neighborhood has undergone a revitalization. Tourists, along with a new generation of locals who walk, bicycle, go to farmers’ markets and prefer small businesses over shopping malls, have made Kaimukī busier than ever. Coffee shops, boutique stores, craft pubs and fine-dining restaurants have given this neighborhood new life. Who knows what shape Kaimukī will take in the next hundred years? ✽


M AUK A T O M A K AI

Homecoming Hōkūle‘a and Hikianalia conclude worldwide voyage.

When Hōkūle‘a and sister ship Hikianalia return to O‘ahu in June, Nainoa Thompson will be on the beach waving a palm frond to welcome members of the wa‘a (canoes), fulfilling a vow he made when this worldwide journey began in 2014. “I made a personal promise that only young people would bring [Hōkūle‘a] in,” says Thompson, president of Polynesian Voyaging Society (PVS) and Hōkūle‘a master navigator. “Our ancestors gave us the canoe and it’s my job to now hand it off.” After sailing more than 60,000 nautical miles with 150 ports of calls, and visiting 23 countries and 30

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territories, crew members will tie the knot on their “Lei of Hope,” concluding PVS’ “Malama Honua” (“Care for the Earth”) circumnavigational journey, which has crisscrossed the waters of the South Pacific, Indian Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, Tasman Sea, the waterways of Canada and the Panama Canal. The historic journey has inspired a new generation of seafarers who are determined and committed to perpetuating their ancestors’ way of sailing, forgoing modern navigational equipment — no compass, sextant or GPS devices, not even an iPhone — in favor of wayfinding, a traditional |

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navigational technique that relies on gauging the position of the sun, moon and stars, taking into account variations in ocean currents and wave patterns and even the behavior of fish and birds. “When you make landfall, there is a certain sadness that overcomes you and you just want to get back on

The historic journey has inspired a new generation of seafarers who are committed to perpetuating their ancestors’ way of sailing, forgoing modern navigational equipment in favor of wayfinding.

deck,” Thompson says. “But there’s always a constant need for meaningful, educational and compassionate opportunities and you don’t have to do it on deck.” Thompson says another year (from July 2017-June 2018) has been added to this journey, but this time it will be limited to Hawaiian waters. “This worldwide voyage created a platform to join in the community,” says Thompson, who recently received the 2017 Explorers Club Medal, the most prestigious recognition in exploration. “It has given us a chance to see what’s happening in other communities, and to connect with individual teachers and students.”✽

©’ŌIWI TV/KAIPO KĪ’A HA

by Simplicio Paragas


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INS A ND O U T S

Not to Miss

Mark your calendars and enjoy an exciting block party in Waikīkī; a two-day event filled with books, music and food; an honorary tribute to Duke Kahanamoku; and the rhythms of a band that formed in the ’60s.

COMING SOON FIREWORKS SHOW July 4 Patriotic Kailua residents will fire up their grills once again as the annual Fourth of July parade marches down Kainalu Drive. kailuafireworks.net

ROYAL HULA July 15-16 The 40th Annual Prince Lot Hula Festival is the largest noncompetitive hula event in Hawai‘i. Check out performances from various halau from across the state. moanalua gardensfoundation.org

Foodcentric Pavilion

Duke Ocean Challenge

Pan-Pacific Festival

May 7 As a way to honor

festival, a ho‘olaulea (block party) and a parade that

whom many consider

features colorful performers, lively dancers, high-

the best in the pantheon

school marching bands and ethnic cultural groups

of great watermen, the

throughout the Pacific Rim. pan-pacific-festival.com

June 9-11 This three-day event is a celebration of Hawai‘i’s multicultural traditions. Events include a hula

Waikīkī Community Center will host the 32nd Annual MADE IN HAWAI’I

Duke Kahanamoku Beach

August 18-20 From SPAM musubi to intricate weavings of a lauhala mat, the 23rd Annual Made in Hawai’i Festival showcases the artistry of island residents. madeinhawaiifestival.com

Challenge, a fun-filled community event that features a friendly competition among ocean enthusiasts, makahiki games, a craft marketplace and live entertainment. waikikicommunitycenter.org

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War & Peace

May 18-21 With a career that dates back to the peace-loving days of 1969, WAR has been an enduring symbol of Afro, Cuban, Jazz, Rock and Blues music. Check them out at Blue Note Hawai‘i. war.com

(CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP) COURTESY HAWAII BOOK & MUSIC FESTIVAL; COURTESY WAR; ©RANDY T. FUJIMORI

May 6-7 The 12th annual Hawai‘i Book & Music Festival will feature a new “Food & Cookbook” pavilion, which will showcase Hawai‘i foods, sustainability and food systems through cooking demonstrations and presentations. HawaiiBookAndMusicFestival.org


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Hawaii Inside Out Magazine May-June 2017  

Summer in Oahu is in full swing with the 50th State Fair and other exciting events on island, including Mele Mei's concerts and festivities....

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