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NEW ORLEANS


PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

WELCOME TO NEW ORLEANS


BEVOLO GAS & ELECTRIC LIGHTS 304, 316 & 318 ROYAL STREET

ROYAL ANTIQUES 309 ROYAL STREET

THE BRASS MONKEY 407 ROYAL STREET

MOSS ANTIQUES 411 ROYAL STREET

Maker of the Original French Quarter Lantern and Bevolo Collection – Since 1945. www.bevolo.com • 504-522-9485.

Unusual gifts and collectibles, including Limoges boxes, Halcyon days enamels, Jay Strongwater, antique walking sticks, medical instruments, French and English antique reproductions. 504-561-0688

Specializing in 17th -19th century English, French and Continental furniture, decorative accessories and estate jewelry. 504.524.7033

Our beloved jewel of the French Quarter’s historical charm. From antique furniture to fine jewelry, we offer an assortment of treasures. 504.522.398


KEIL’S ANTIQUES 325 ROYAL STREET

Family-owned and -operated antiques store in the heart of the French Quarter since 1899. 504.522.4552

MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERIES, 433 ROYAL STREET

New Orleans’ premier gallery of fine art. (504) 299-9055 martinlawrence.com, Marc Chagall, Lovers in Bouquet of Dahlias mixed media on vellum

VINTAGE 329 329 ROYAL STREET

New Orleans premier vintage gallery with lithographs, costume jewelry including Chanel®, barware, sunglasses and Bakelite. 504.525.2262

M.S. RAU ANTIQUES 630 ROYAL STREET

Important fine art, rare antiques and breathtaking jewelry since 1912. 504.523.5660


CONTENTS

NOLA ESSENCE OYSTERS AREN’T JUST APHRODISIACS Gulf waters produce 70 percent of the nation’s bivalves, yet— like Louisiana’s coastline—the area oyster industry is in danger of disappearing. Here’s how you can help. BY LORIN GAUDIN

28 A TOAST TO GO-CUP CULTURE DRINKING IT IN Over the past decade there has been much discussion and heated debate (usually over cocktails) about the tidal wave of change that followed in Hurricane Katrina’s wake. One thing that remains: locals’ love for a good, strong drink. BY ELIZABETH PEARCE

showmanship? A salute to the magnificent Mardi Gras Indians. BY TERRI COLEMAN

36 THROUGH THE LENS OF JAZZFEST MUSIC TO OUR EYES Photographer Michael P. Smith was one of only 350 people to witness the inaugural New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival; he wouldn’t miss one for the next 34 years. PHOTOS BY MICHAEL P. SMITH

32 HAIL TO THE CHIEFS ON THE COVER Dining alfresco on the balcony at Tableau overlooking Jackson Square. ©CHRISTIAN RESTREPO INSIDE FRONT COVER Jackson Square and St. Louis Cathedral at sunset, ©F11PHOTO/ SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

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FINE FEATHERED FRIENDS It’s hard to miss their brilliant plummage and elaborate, handbeaded costumes as they parade along Claiborne Avenue on Fat Tuesday. But what’s the meaning behind all the pagentry and

72 PARTING SHOT COLORFUL CULTURE Bead town.

(FROM LEFT) ©MICHAEL P. SMITH; ©SHAWN FINK; ©SHAWN FINK

24 SHELL GAINS


FISCHER-GAMBINO magnificent Melanie (Melanie not for sale)

1995-2013

Superb Furnishings

637 Royal Street, New Orleans, LA 504.524.9067 / 888.524.9067 www.lightingneworleans.com


CONTENTS

NOLA ESSENTIALS THIRTEEN GREAT STOPS Must-visit destinations— from the French Quarter to the Garden District.

44 SHOPPING RETAIL ROLODEX Whether you’re in the market for national chains or unique boutiques, New Orleans has a retailer for you. 48 SHOPPING LOOK BOOK

50 DINING FOOD FOR THOUGHT From haute cuisine to down-home fare, a taste of New Orleans’ most appetizing restaurants.

59 GALLERIES+ ANTIQUES ART & COMMERCE A guide to the city’s celebrated antiques shops and cutting-edge art galleries. 62 GALLERY LOOK BOOK

63 NIGHTLIFE CLUBS & PUBS A little night music with your after-dinner drink? Right this way.

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66 ATTRACTIONS SIGHTS, TOURS AND MUSEUMS The best things to see, do and experience.

71 ADVERTISER INDEX

(FROM LEFT) ©SHAWN FINK; ©PAUL BROUSSARD/NOCVB; ©ZACK SMITH/NOCVB

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WELLINGTON & CO. Fine Jewelry

••

Antique & Estate Jewelry

505 ROYAL ROYAL STREET STREET || FRENCH FRENCH QUARTER QUARTER || 504.525.4855 504.525.4855 505

www.wcjewelry.com www.wcjewelry.com


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Contemporary Coastal Cuisine

Your haven’t experienced New Orleans until you have dined at New Orleans Creole Cookery.

510 Toulouse St. 504.524.9632 NEWORLEANSCREOLECOOKERY.COM

701 S. Peters St. 504-302-7496 www.briquette-nola.com Now Serving Lunch


CONTRIBUTORS

Lorin Gaudin

Terri Coleman is a public humanities hustler whose work is as multifaceted as her city and includes writing, stand-up comedy and storytelling. Her recent and forthcoming work appears in an anthology of American writers of color, a conceptual nudie mag and StyleLikeU’s “What’s Underneath” project. You can catch her at area comedy and storytelling shows or hosting Too Trill Trivia, New Orleans’ only trivia night centered on black history and pop culture.

Lorin Gaudin is passionate about all things food and drink related. With a theater degree from Loyola University and a culinary diploma from the Ritz-Escoffier in Paris, she has established herself as “New Orleans’ food goddess” and a contributing writer/editor for a number of national, regional and local publications, including Where New Orleans. Gaudin is also author of “New Orleans Chef’s Table: Recipes From the French Quarter to the Garden District.”

Hail to the Chiefs, page 32

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Shell Gains, page 24

Elizabeth Pearce

Michael P. Smith

Elizabeth Pearce has had a lifelong love of food and drinks, coupled with a knack for good, old-fashioned storytelling. As a cocktail historian, writer and guide, she shares the rich and decadent history of New Orleans through engaging presentations and walking tours (drinkandlearn. com). Cofounder of the Southern Food and Beverage Museum, Pearce is the author of two books, “The French Quarter Drinking Companion” and “Drink Dat New Orleans.”

Late local photographer Michael P. Smith grew up in New Orleans’ affluent Metairie suburb, but it was in the city’s African-American neighborhoods that he was most at home. As a staff photographer for Tulane University’s jazz archives in the late 1960s, Smith began documenting working-class black communities and their vibrant music culture. He would go on to garner two National Endowment of the Arts fellowships, publish five books and cofound Tipitina’s music club.

A Toast Go-Cup Culture, page 28

Through the Lens of Jazzfest, page 36

FROM LEFT: ©SHAWN FINK; ©LORIN GAUDIN; ©ELIZABETH PEARCE; ©TOM JIMISON

Terri Coleman


FIRST LOOK

©PAUL BROUSSARD/NOCVB

The city’s top attractions and destinations, in no particular order—from the French Quarter and annual music fests to Uptown and must-stop shops.

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Marigny/Bywater

Named one of the city’s hippest ’hoods by Travel + Leisure, the French Quarter-adjacent Marigny ( just across Esplanade Avenue) is largely comprised of historic Creole cottages and colorful double shotguns. Its central strip, Frenchmen Street, is loaded with cool music venues and funky clubs. Further downriver, the Marigny-adjacent Bywater attracts artists, musicians and other creative types. Though primarily residential, the area is also home trendy eateries, offbeat watering holes and the burgeoning St. Claude Arts District. Crescent Park, a 1.4-mile riverfront promenade, links the two neighborhoods to the French Quarter.

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Garden District/Uptown

New Orleans’ second-most well-known neighborhood is about a mile from the French Quarter, but in spirit it’s a world apart. Conceived as the city’s “American sector,” the area (technically bound by Louisiana Avenue to Carondelet Street and Josephine and Magazine streets) is famous for its stately homes surrounded by expansive gardens. The Uptown area, filled with Greek Revival, Gothic and Queen Anne mansions, is concentrated around St. Charles Avenue. The St. Charles streetcar runs the full length of the oak-canopied boulevard, an ideal way to view the area’s antebellum masterpieces.

French Quarter

When most people think of New Orleans, they first envision the French Quarter, and rightly so. When New Orleans was originally laid out in 1721, the Vieux Carré was the city—all 13 blocks of it. The district is now on the National Register of Historic Places, and its trademark Creole townhouses, Spanish-influenced courtyards and iconic ironwork balconies are synonymous with Southern style. Bourbon Street, bustling with bars and nightclubs, is known worldwide for its nonstop party atmosphere, while tony Royal Street is an antiquing epicenter. Chartres Street offers chic boutiques and many of the Quarter’s most historic sites. 16

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Shopping Centers

New Orleans has long been a Southern shopping destination. Royal Street rules with its art and antiques, while brand-name national retailers are found in the Shops at Canal Place and the Outlet Collection at Riverwalk, the nation’s first urban outlet mall. Magazine Street, aka “the street of dreams,” lives up to its moniker with six miles of boutiques and galleries housed in revamped Victorian homes.

(LEFT) ©TRAVELVIEW/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; (TOP RIGHT) ©PAUL BROUSSARD/NOCVB; (BOTTOM RIGHT) ©SHAWN FINK; (OPPOSITE PAGE) ©ST. TAMMANY TOURIST COMMISSION

FIRST LOOK


Bike Rentals

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

With more than 100 miles of designated paths, New Orleans ranks among the top cities in the U.S. for urban biking—hence the number of bicycle vendors that have opened in recent years. From guided tours and hourly rentals to the new Blue Bikes municipal sharing program, the city offers a variety of two-wheel alternatives to Uber. Take a spin along the riverfront Crescent Park or set off on the Lafitte Greenway from the French Quarter to MidCity. More a nature lover than city cyclist? Explore the Tammany Trace, which spans 31 miles through five Northshore communities.

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Tricentennial Celebrations

New Orleans is always up for a party, but 2018 promises to be even more celebratory than usual, with the city commemorating its big 3-0-0 birthday throughout the year. From fireworks displays and free concerts to exhibits and symposiums, anniversary-related events are slated all year long. Tall Ships® and Navy vessels from around the globe dock in April, accompanied by international dignitaries. Additional highlights include a daily tolling of bells in the French Quarter, tricentennial-themed artworks dotting the local landscape and special menus at area eateries. For a full lineup, visit 2018nola.com.

Tremé Mississippi Riverfront

Due to the city’s below-sea-level positioning, many visitors leave New Orleans without ever catching a glimpse of the Mississippi River. Woldenberg Park and Crescent Park, grassy tracts that run along the riverfront, offer the perfect opportunity. Grab an afternoon go-cup and watch the sunset from along the Moonwalk, or board the Creole Queen paddlewheeler or the steamboat Natchez, both of which offer river cruises. The Algiers ferry, which shuttles passengers to and from New Orleans’ Westbank, has been crossing the mighty Mississippi since 1827. 18

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Long before the HBO series made it a household name the Faubourg Tremé was known locally as a hot bed for jazz and a gravity center of Crescent City culture. Just north of the Quarter, the nation’s oldest African-American neighborhood claims a number of historic sites, including the the circa-1841 St. Augustine Church. Armstrong Park, home to Congo Square where people of color would gather during the 1800s to drum, dance and sing, features statues of New Orleans music legends.

(LEFT) ©ZACK SMITH/NOCVB; (TOP RIGHT) ©DOUG BRANTLEY; (BOTTOM RIGHT) ©PAUL BROUSSARD/NOCVB; (OPPOSITE PAGE) ©CAMBRIA HARKEY

FIRST LOOK


PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

Music Festivals

New Orleans is known for music—and not just jazz. Throughout the year the Crescent City plays host to a number of music fests that cover a range of genres. Two of the largest and most popular—the French Quarter Festival and the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival—take place each April and spotlight both traditional jazz and contemporary musicians. In July the Essence Festival imports big-name African-American performers, while October brings the Voodoo Music + Arts Experience and leading rock and alternative acts and the Buku Music + Art Project makes a big noise in March. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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FIRST LOOK

Central Business District

Mid-City

With access to Bayou St. John, City Park and long sections of both Canal Street and Carrollton Avenue, the Mid-City neighborhood, once referred to as “backatown,” really is in the middle of it all. Built around the New Basin Canal (now Interstate 10), the area rose from swampland to become an industrial center, before morphing into today’s thriving city center. Culture vultures flock to the New Orleans Museum of Art, while outdoor adventurists gravitate to the park and adjacent bayou. The Canal streetcar line links Mid-City to downtown; the Lafitte Greenway, a 2.6-mile bike and pedestrian trail, connects to the French Quarter. 20

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(TOP) ©MEINZAHN/ISTOCK.COM; (BOTTOM) ©BARBERSTOCK/NOCVB

Canal Street, laid out in mid 1800s, originally served as a “neutral ground” between the Creole-populated French Quarter and Uptown’s “American sector.” Cross Canal from the Quarter, and you enter the Central Business District, or CDB, which is defined by Poydras Street, its main artery stretching from the river to the MercedesBenz Superdome. As its name suggests, the CBD is the hub of Crescent City commerce but also includes the Morial Convention Center, Harrah’s Casino, high-end hotels and massive Mardi Gras World.


FIRST LOOK

Warehouse Arts District

Second-line Parades

Each year over the course of Carnival season dozens of parades pass through New Orleans’ neighborhoods. But it’s not only during Mardi Gras that you’ll find celebration in the city’s streets. Here, everyday events get elevated to full-on fêtes. Weddings, anniversaries, birthdays—even funerals— provide a purpose to party and an easy excuse for a second line. That blue-suited group with the umbrellas and hankies following the Tremé Brass Band through the Quarter? They’re not even from here, but a corporate contingent kicking off its convention. Don’t let the parade pass you by; step away from the sidelines and join in the fun. 22

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(TOP) ©PAUL BROUSSARD/NOCVB; (BOTTOM) ©SHAWN FINK

Prior to the 1984 World’s Fair, this area, bounded by Poydras and Howard avenues between St. Charles Avenue and the river, was devoted to crumbling 19th-century warehouses. Today it’s a thriving arts district with dozens of galleries and museums, including the award-winning National WWII Museum, the Confederate Museum, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, the Louisiana Children’s Museum and the Contemporary Arts Center. Julia Street’s identical red-brick townhouses, known as the “Thirteen Sisters,” are a great example of mid-1800s Federal-style architecture.


A New Orleans Tradition

600 Decatur • 334 Royal • 311 Bourbon

www.cafebeignet.com


SHELL GAINS An ode to Louisiana’s oyster industry and its environmental importance TEXT BY LORIN GAUDIN

PHOTOS BY SHAWN FINK

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

In New Orleans, seasons tend to lean culinary. Casamento’s seasonal reopening in mid-September, for instance, signals two things: Fall and oysters. Having almost nothing to do with the myth about eating oysters only during months with an “r” (oysters are actually available yearround), autumn is particularly special, as chillier, saltier Gulf waters mean more flavorful, larger bivalves to slurp straight from the shell.

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PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT


OYSTERS WERE THE PASSION OF LOUISIANA’S CROATIAN-SLAVONIAN IMMIGRANTS, WHO IN THE MID 1840S BEGAN MOVING OYSTERS FROM OVERCROWDED REEFS TO SECTIONS ALONG THE WESTERN PORTION OF THE STATE’S COASTLINE, WHERE THE WATERS ADDED MORE SALINITY. SEEDING OF ESTUARIES ALONG THE ENTIRE COASTLINE HAS CREATED “OYSTER AREAS,” EACH OF WHICH ARE NOTABLE FOR DISTINCT WATER AND OYSTER DIFFERENCES—SALTINESS, SIZE AND FLAVOR. CURRENTLY, THERE ARE APPROXIMATELY 28 HARVEST AREAS THAT OPEN AND CLOSE SEASONALLY.

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The oyster—shell and all—is a miracle, a thing of beauty and importance, not only for the role it plays in Louisiana’s culinary canon, but as an essential part of protecting our coastline and supporting seafood-industry jobs. The world’s largest wild oyster harvest comes by way of the Gulf of Mexico, which produces 70 percent of the shrimp and oysters caught in the U.S., and equates to 30 percent of the nation’s recreational fishing. Recently I took an oyster-fishing excursion out of Buras; a tangible way to connect and indulge in a food often lustily eaten without a lot of thought. Riding out a ways—and between contemplative moments watching the sky, the birds and the shore—there was chatter about favorite oysters dishes (family dressing recipes, “best” po’boys, whether true oysters Rockefeller includes spinach) and oysters’ environmental impact on Louisiana’s disappearing coastline. Slowing our vessel, the crew dropped a large net into the water, and just as quickly, heavy chains dragged up a catch from the Gulf. Deckhands deftly tipped the haul onto a large table, then grabbed clusters and began hammering off rocks and other bits to separate oysters from detritus. One of the fishermen cracked open an oyster, smoothly detaching it from the shell, and offered it to me like a shiny jewel. The experience was soulful and special. There was taste of place, a slurp and sip of grass and sea, and a minerality reminiscent of faded shells. Oysters are delicious and romantic, but not all is well in bivalve world. Pointing out anemone-like protrusions as oyster predators and placing them in direct sun to die, the boat’s captain, Mitch Jurisich, a third-generation oyster fisherman, pondered the future of his family business. “This is hard work with long hours,” he confided, “and it’s not glamorous. Young people have other things they want to do to make money.” In his way, Jurisich alluded to the media-hungry, modern world as a powerful lure away from tough work that has him, and many in the seafood industry, worried. In the last 25-plus years, Louisiana has lost the equivalent of one football field of land per hour to coastal erosion. Commercial and recreational fishing relies on the health of the ecosystem, which in turn is affected by the health of the oyster reefs. Oyster reefs provide

unmatched coastline protection because they are selfsustaining and can reduce the energy of high-power waves associated with tropical storms and hurricanes. Each year worldwide oyster production yields about 7.4 billion pounds of shell. Yet a massive number of shells still end up in landfills, while fisherman buy and move tons of crushed stone into estuaries to build the foundations for new reefs. Enter 1.7 million pounds of oyster shells collected from New Orleans restaurants and the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana Oyster Shell Recycling Program, which, in partnership with the Nature Conservancy, completed a half-mile of oyster reef in 2016. Last year a major grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and Shell Oil Company, along with more of those restaurant oyster shells, helped produce a second reef on the western edge of Barataria Bay. It boils down to this: The best way we can help is to eat more oysters—ice-cold trays of raw oysters with freshsqueezed lemon; fried oyster po’boys; luscious Parmesanand butter-laced char-grilled oysters…get the drift? Because, while it is true that “the world is our oyster,” in Louisiana it is also true that the oyster is our world.

Tools of the trade: “This is hard work with long hours,” says third-generation oysterman Mitch Jurisich, “and it’s not glamorous.”

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PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

Since the 1940s, Bourbon Street has been drawing visitors with its 24/7 party atmosphere; the Sazerac was named “the Official Cocktail of New Orleans” by the Louisiana legislature in 2007.


A TOAST TO GO-CUP CULTURE Welcome to party central. Grab a cocktail and hit the streets. BY ELIZABETH PEARCE

New Orleans is known for beautiful, historic architecture, amazing restaurants and top-notch music. It is also a place where you can let your hair down, loosen your tie and discard—albeit temporarily—your morals and judgment. A place where you can (to quote our own slogan) “Let the good times roll!” This “rolling” is almost always accompanied by alcohol. There is certainly some truth in the portrayal of New Orleans as a city that emphasizes pleasure, though for residents, our good times are less about drinking to excess on Bourbon Street and more about drinking with friends and family. But still, our city’s designation as party central has remained a prime reason that millions of visitors make the journey down here every year. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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Our city’s designation as party central has remained a prime reason that millions of visitors make the journey down here every year. Katrina brought many changes to the city, and some fear that New Orleans has lost some of what made it so distinctive. But when it comes to how we drink and the role that drinking plays in our lives, not much has changed. Like our ancestors, we continue to be defined by what and how and where we drink. What we consume makes us who we are, whom we consume it with shapes our relationships, and the places where we do it remain places of conviviality that only close when the last patron goes home. Excerpted from Drink Dat New Orleans: A Guide to the Best Cocktail Bars, Dives & Speakeasies, ©2017 by Elizabeth Pearce. Reprinted by permission of The Countryman Press.

In most cities, there are strict laws in place in regard to where and when you can imbibe; this isn’t one of them.

(ABOVE) ©CHUCK WAGNER/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; (OPENING SPREAD, LEFT) ©CRACKERCLIPS STOCK MEDIA/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; (OPENING SPREAD, RIGHT) ©ROOSEVELT HOTEL

By the 20th century New Orleans had become a traveler’s destination. Two key municipal decisions anchored New Orleans’ reputation as a place to cut loose: The first was a lack of closing times for bars, and the second was the legalization of open containers. Most cities require the party to end, but in New Orleans the lights can stay on all night. Furthermore, you don’t even have to be inside to do your drinking, which means the good times could literally roll up and down the street all night. But the truth is, while these laws certainly enhance a visitor’s pleasure, ultimately they were not created for tourists. They were implemented in response to the citizens and the kind of life we want to create here. For example, most visitors think that open containers are permitted only on Bourbon Street, or in the French Quarter, but that is not the case. Unlike other cities that have created “entertainment districts” that permit open containers for a segmented portion of the city, New Orleanians can take their go-cups with them throughout the entire city. One of the pleasures of living in New Orleans is being able to come home after work, take your dog for a walk and visit with your neighbors, all while sipping on the beer/wine/cocktail of your choice. The go-cup is ubiquitous across the city; it is one of our defining artifacts. For me and many New Orleanians, it took Hurricane Katrina to make us fully appreciate the drinking freedoms New Orleans afforded us and how those liberties were an integral part of our experience in our city. We missed having a bottle of wine with our picnic at a park. We forgot about Sunday blue laws and showed up emptyhanded to dinner parties. We puzzled at friends who downed three shots of whiskey in the ten minutes before last call, and we chafed at bartenders who would turn on all the lights just when the conversation was getting good. We wondered if we would ever again be able to take our drink outside a bar and savor the last few sips on our walk home. These may all seem petty, trivial moments, but their sum represents a way of drinking here that informs how we live the rest of our lives. And when we returned to New Orleans, we all talked about how much we missed them. And we did so, of course, over a drink in a bar.


VINTAGE CHANEL Miriam Haskell • Dior • Hermes • YSL • Bakelite • Trifari • Taxco Sterling Silver • Vintage Barware • Original Lithograph Posters • Vintage Sunglasses

329 Royal St, New Orleans

504.525.2262

info@vintage329.com


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HAIL TO THE CHIEFS The history and mystery behind the Mardi Gras Indians BY TERRI COLEMAN

Intricatedly beaded and feathered Mardi Gras Indian suits can weigh more than 150 pounds and take up to a year to construct.

Until actually reading “A Christmas Carol” in 7th grade, I was sure that Ebenezer Scrooge was from New Orleans. No one had ever told me that the famously cold-hearted miser was from my hometown. I’d come to that conclusion because all I knew about Scrooge was his catchphrase, “Bah humbug!” And I knew what a humbug was. A humbug is a battle. Two men, covered from head to toe in heavy, hand-sewn suits of brightly dyed plumes and beaded patches, meet in the street. They stomp and dance. A crowd of onlookers gathers as they call back and forth. “I’m the prettiest chief! Humbah!,” yells one. “I’m the prettiest,” responds the other, “and you best bow down!” The masked men are Mardi Gras Indians, members of tribes like the Yellow Pocahontas, the Flaming Arrows, and the Fi-Yi-Yi. The roots of the Mardi Gras Indians, like much of the history of New Orleans, can be traced back to the city’s brutal beginnings. In 1718 Jean Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville directed the establishment of the city on land occupied by the Chitimacha, whom the French had been waging war against for over a decade. The establishment of the city signaled the defeat of the Chitimacha, as the French government forcibly resettled them upriver in St.

Mary Parish, where their tribal land is now found. Some who refused to leave their homeland remained, living in small settlements in the swamps and bayous. A few native people, mostly women, stayed on in the new colony, intermarrying with newly arrived Europeans. The removal of the indigenous population made room for an influx of rough-and-tumble newcomers—merchants, military men, criminals—searching for fortune and adventure at what was the edge of the European world. And, as the city’s port grew to be one of the most important in the Western Hemisphere, there was also an influx of West African slaves. Unlike their counterparts in Anglo America, enslaved Africans and Native Americans in French colonies like Louisiana were able to maintain some aspects of their own rich cultural heritage, passing down pieces of their home languages, religions and music to their children. The cultural stew was also constantly refreshed by the arrival of more Africanborn people, whose knowledge helped to preserve African traditions in the New World. At that early time, when New Orleans was equal parts Wild West and laissez le bon ton rouler, African traditions weren’t only maintained inside the city itself, where people of color, enslaved and free, gathered at Congo Square WHERE GUEST B OOK

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each week to meet, mingle, dance and sell their wares; they were also maintained in the mosquito-infested swamps to which slaves escaped. There some escaped Africans joined with bands of Chitimacha, Choctaw and Houma rebels. Many people believe that it was in those swamps and through the mixing of enslaved African men and indigenous women—in those unions of oppressed peoples— that the Mardi Gras Indians were born, citing as evidence comparable traditions (like junkanoo parades) throughout the Caribbean, where West African and native worlds merged. Others trace the Indians to the 1885 Carnival season, when a group of Plains Indians from Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West Show joined a Mardi Gras parade. No one is certain. What is certain is that, from the late 1800s through the 20th century, the Mardi Gras Indian tradition not only survived, it flourished. In fact, the Indians have been a central ingredient in the gumbo that is New Orleans culture. Their contributions to that gumbo are perhaps most evident in the city’s music. In 1938 jazz great and NOLA native Jelly Roll Morton shared his memories of seeing the Indians as a boy with

©SHAWN FINK; (OPENING PAGE) ©SHAWN FINK

The Indians became a rallying point for all New Orleanians— a symbol of our unique heritage and culture.

folklorist Alan Lomax: “They would be dancing. They’d form a ring and one would get in the center and he’d start his kind of a Indian dance. And they would say, ‘T’ouwais bas q’ouwais... Hou tendais...” The Mardi Gras Indian language Morton recounted is, like the Indians themselves, of uncertain origins. Historians and linguists have attributed them to Creole and French as well as Native American and African languages. Regardless of their etymological roots, Indian phrases have found their way into many of the most popular Mardi Gras anthems, songs like The Dixie Cups’ “Iko Iko” and The Meters’ “Hey Pocky-Way.” “Jock-a-mo,” another Mardi Gras Indian phrase, is not only a famous Sugar Boy Crawford song, it’s also the name of a popular beer by Louisiana’s own Abita Brewing Company. An Indian, surrounded by electric-blue feathers, appears on the label. But the history of the Mardi Gras Indians hasn’t been all song, dance and costume. It is also a history of violence. Especially during the first half of the 20th century, “masking” was a time to settle grudges, and the beautiful, hand-beaded costumes were often stained with blood. Even after Allison “Tootie” Montana, Big Chief of the Yellow Pocahontas and, later, the Chief of Chiefs who represented all of the tribes, pushed to move from knifeand gun-battles to contests of pageantry and showmanship—“fighting with the needle and thread”—the association of Mardi Gras Indians with violence remained for many New Orleanians. Members of the black middle class, like my father, avoided the Indians. My father wasn’t only avoiding violence committed by Indians themselves; he was also avoiding violence committed against the Indians by city officials and the New Orleans Police Department. Throughout the 20th century, NOPD cracked down on Indians—and cracked skulls—regularly, including the St. Joseph’s Day parade in 2005, when officers blocked the streets through which the Indians marched. Big Chief Montana, who’d experienced brutality at the hands of the NOPD since he began masking in the 1940s, suffered a fatal heart attack months later as he addressed New Orleans’ City Council, imploring them to hold the NOPD accountable for targeting of Indians. Montana’s work—and his death—marked a change


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in how many locals viewed the Mardi Gras Indians. Hurricane Katrina, which struck just under two months later, cemented that change. The Indians became a rallying point for all New Orleanians—a symbol of our unique heritage and history as well as of our ability to survive in the face of abuse at the hands of nature and society. Just as, more than two centuries earlier, these bands of masked men had preserved African and Native American traditions by mixing and morphing them, Indians became, after the storm, the carriers of New Orleans’ culture and heart. The renewed affection for and connection with Mardi Gras Indians is seen not only in the larger, more diverse crowds at post-Katrina parades and events or the importance of Indians in the story lines and graphics associated with HBO’s “Treme.” It’s also evident in the growth of two museums, the Backstreet Cultural Museum and the House of Dance and Feathers. Though both predate the storm (the Backstreet Museum was founded in 1999, while the House of Dance and Feathers opened in 2003), they have experienced exponential growth and greatly increased interest in the years since Katrina. The Backstreet Museum has appeared in numerous publica-

tions, including National Geographic; the House of Dance and Feathers inspired a namesake book released in 2009. With increased recognition has come increased funding and expansion of both collections. In contemporary New Orleans, Mardi Gras Indians are prized not only by the communities that have birthed them, but by the population at large, especially those displaced by Katrina who haven’t been able to return to the city. As one self-described “NOLA Dawlin’,” who since the storm has bounced between Louisiana, Minnesota and Georgia explains, she never understood the importance of the Indians as a child. “I thought the colors were so pretty,” she recalls. “I didn’t really get it, though. I was kinda scared and intrigued. Now I do [feel personally connected] because I’m away.” Now the Indians are part of her understanding of “home.” Another New Orleanian, whose 7th Ward neighborhood is home of the Creole Hard Headers tribe, summed it up this way: “When they say they won’t bow down, they not just talking about them, you know? They talking about all of us. Hurricane. Flood. Oil spill. Poverty. Whatever the world bring, we don’t care. We stay. We won’t bow down.”

In addition to Fat Tuesday, Mardi Gras Indians also parade the third weekend in March on “Super Sunday,” when thousands gather at A.L. Davis Park to take in their visual splendor.

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THROUGH THE LENS OF JAZZFEST Four decades of chronicling New Orleans jazz and heritage PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL P. SMITH

Gospel great Mahalia Jackson attended the first Jazz & Heritage Festival in 1970 to see her friend Duke Ellington perform, then picked up a mic and joined in.

From the late 1960s to the early 21st century, photographer Michael P. Smith immersed himself in New Orleans’ AfricanAmerican community and culture, capturing everything from Sunday church services and second-line parades to brass bands and Mardi Gras Indian traditions. “Follow the music” was his philosophy, Smith said in a 1993 interview, and it was that which led him to Armstrong Park in April 1970, where 350 people gathered for the inaugural New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. He would continue to document every Jazzfest, which now draws hundreds of thousands each year, until his retirement in 2004. Ella Fitzgerald, Danny Barker, Cab Calloway, Etta James, Fats Domino, Allen Toussaint: Smith’s many subjects read like a music royalty roll call. Prior to his death in 2008, The Historic New Orleans Collection (THNOC) acquired Smith’s archive of images. Prints of his works are available in its gift shop, along with books by Smith and “In the Spirit,” a career overview published by THNOC in 2009. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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Ella Fitgerald, Danny Barker, Cab Calloway, Etta James, Fats Domino, Allen Toussaint: Smith’s many subjects read like a music royalty roll call.

Harry Connick Jr. tickling the ivories with James Carroll Booker III in 1982. Left: George Porter, Professor Longhair, B.B. King, Roosevelt Skyes and Bukka White in 1973.

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Troy “Trombone Shorty� Andrews at age 4, making his 1990 Jazzfest debut with Bo Diddley. Right: Stevie Wonder performing in 1973 with 2018 Grammy Lifetime Achievment awardees The Meters.

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PROMOTION

FACES OF NEW ORLEANS Excellence is required to exceed expectations and provide visitors with a unique experience during their stay—as well as wow locals, for that matter. Those profiled here are in the know and the movers and shakers who go above and beyond to provide the exemplary experiences and destinations that make New Orleans great. FACE OF TRANSPORTATION

NICOLL’S LIMOUSINE SERVICE Celebrating 30 years in business, Mike Nicoll is the premiere provider of excellence in transportation. A native New Orleanian, Mike offers the ultimate experience in chauffeurdriven limousines. Nicoll’s will pamper you with the care that only the tradition of Southern hospitality has to offer. If you are in town for Mardi Gras, Jazzfest or a New Orleans-style wedding, Mike can provide you with first-class transportation at affordable rates. Nicoll’s makes transportation easy! 504.454.7722, nicolls.com


“If New Orleans were an art gallery.�

Terrance Osborne Gallery 504.232.7530 terranceosborne.com 3029 Magazine St. New Orleans


SHOPPING

Louisiana Purchases New Orleans isn't only about spicy food and hot jazz; it's also one of the South's premier shopping meccas. From trendy couture to homemade pralines, leading national chains to charming mom-and-pop shops, Crescent City retailers offer something for everyone and every budget. It's not a matter of what to buy so much as where to begin.

AIDAN GILL FOR MEN A fab store, filled with barbershop memorabilia and top-of-the-line men's grooming products. The shop specializes in hot-towel shaves and gifts for that hard-to-surprise guy in your life. 2026 Magazine St., 504.587.9090. 550 Fulton St., 504.566.4903. www.aidangillformen.com. H ART & EYES The eyes have it at this hip eyewear boutique, which specializes in hand-

picked frames, both new and vintage, to fit just about any face or budget. Wearable art by designer Starr Hagenbring and jewelry is featured. 3708 Magazine St., 504.891.4494. www.artandeyesneworleansla.com. AVERY FINE PERFUMERY This artisanal fragrance “smell gallery” is one of only four in the world and the Italian-based InterTrade Europe group’s sole stateside location. 527 St. Joseph St., 504.522.7102. www.averyfineperfumeries.com. BILLY REID Designer Reed’s chic boutiques are found all over the country—and now in his home state as well. Women’s and men’s fashions are featured, along with shoes and accessories. 3927 Magazine St., 504.208.1200. www.billyreid.com.

H BUNGALOWS This shop mixes jewelry (including designs by Pandora, Brighton and other popular lines) and women’s accessories (hats, handbags) with cool home accents and great gift items. 719 Royal St., 504.522.9222. www.shopbungalows.com. H CIGAR FACTORY NEW ORLEANS & MUSEUM Watch master cigar makers at work in the Crescent City’s oldest and only cigar factory and museum. Among the specialty styles made here are Plantation Reserve and Vieux Carré. 415 Decatur St., 504.568.1003. www.cigarfactoryneworleans.com DERBY POTTERY & TILE Former Newcomb College pottery instructor Mark Derby’s elegant hand-pressed Victorian reproduction

tile, featuring historically authentic patterns and finishes, can be found in showrooms nationwide. But you’ll see it being made here. 2029 Magazine St., 504.586.9003. www.derbypottery.com. DIRTY COASTCL003672 Another T-shirt shop? You won’t find your standard Bourbon Street garb here. Catering to locals and in-theknow visitors, Dirty Caost's slick designs feature funky graphics with cool Crescent City-inspired slogans. 713 Royal St., 504.324.6730. 5631 Magazine St., 504.324.3745. www.dirtycoast.com. ELLEN MACOMBER FINE ART & TEXTILESCL003672 Searching for cool collectibles? Set the GPS for this shop, where artist Ellen Macomber’s street map-in-

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H ADORN & CONQUER Metalsmith Maria Fomich creates handmade jewelry at this space in the Rink shopping center. New Orleans elements (shotgun houses, streetcars) and bits of nature are featured. 2727 Prytania St., 504.702.8036. www.adornandconquer.com.


spired designs are offered on everything from clothing to housewares. 1720 St. Charles Ave, 504.314.9414. www.ellenmacomber.com. FAULKNER HOUSE BOOKSCL0026148 In 1925 William Faulkner lived at this address, and it was here he penned his novel "Soldiers’ Pay." First editions of his works are sold, as well as contemporary fiction. 624 Pirate’s Alley (behind St. Louis Cathedral), 504.524.2940. www.faulknerhousebooks.net. FLEUR DE PARIS You’re guaranteed to turn heads when sporting one of this store’s handcrafted chapeaux. Choose from over 800 original designs accented with European ribbons and veiling. 523 Royal St., 504.525.1899. www.fleurdeparis.net. GOORIN BROS. HATSCL0062431 New Orleans’ newest hat shop dates to 1895, when master milliner Cassel Goorin first began plying his wares from Pittsburgh street carts. Today Goorin’s chic chapeaux and stylish shops are found nationwide. 709 Royal St., 504.523.4287. 2127 Magazine St., 504.522.1890. www.goorin.com. HEMLINECL0026159 Fashion-forward clothing accessories and such sought-after lines as Diesel and Laundry are found here. 609 Chartres St., 504.592.0242. 3310 Magazine St., 504.702.8009. www.shophemline.com. HOVÉCL002619 Hové is a European-style parfumeur that has been in business for more than 70 years. Among the fragrant perfumes and colognes are New

Orleans-inspired scents. 434 Chartres St., 504.525.7827. www.hoveparfumeur.com. HUNDRED ACRECL002619 At this friendly design studio and shop the well-curated stock runs the gamut, from New Orleans-themed collectibles and fun gift items to cool jewelry and hip home accents. 519 Wilkinson St., Suite 101, 504.313.3050. www.hundredacredesign.com JOHN FLUEVOGCL002 "Unique soles for unique souls." This forward-thinking footwear shop is a "shoe-in" among French Quarter fashionistas and trendy travelers. 321 Chartres St., 504.523.7296. www.fluevog.com.

3807 Magazine Street New Orleans, LA 70115 5 0 4 . 8 9 1 . 8 8 4 8 marioncage.com

KEIFE & CO.CL00271 A charming, beautifully curated wine and spirits shop in the Warehouse District. There’s a hushed library feel to the place, with floor-to-ceiling shelving stocked deep with wines, booze, liqueurs and unique quaffs. Gourmet food items are also offered. 801 Howard Ave., 504.523.7272. www.keifeandco.com. KENDRA SCOTT JEWELRYCL00271 In addition to its signature line of go-anywhere and with-anything designs, this innovative jewelry shop lets you customize pieces to fit your own taste. 5757 Magazine St., 504.613.4227. www.kendrascott.com KREWE 2 Eyewear-maker Stirling Barrett has garnered a national following with his locally designed line of sunglasses. Each is named for a New Orleans street and features handmade frames

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SHOPPING with gold hardware. 809 Royal St., 504.407.2945. www.krewe.com. H LA PETIT FLEUR06431 Specializing in estate and contemporary jewelry, La Petit Fleur is well known for its own line of pendants based on the fleur de lis, widely embraced as the symbol of New Orleans’ rebirth. The shop also offers Crescent City-themed charms. 534 Royal St., 504.522.1305. www.lapetitfleur.com. LA RIVIÈRE CONFISERIE CL0026184CONSFEIRCO A taste for handcrafted, high-quality French confections? This artisanal sweets boutique offers imported indulgences, such as Henri Le Roux chocolates and Despinoy tinned candies. 3719 Magazine St., 504.891.1026. www.lariviereconfiserie.com. LAKESIDE SHOPPING CENTERCL007341 A favorite shopping stop of New Orleanians for more than 30 years, Lakeside houses more than 120 shops, including Coach, J. Crew, Macy’s and Sephora. 3301 Veterans Blvd., Metairie, 504.835.8000. www.lakesideshopping.com. LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORYCL0026150 There’s no better place in town to stock up on new or used CDs by local artists. Select posters, books, and videos also offered. 421 Frenchmen St., 504.586.1094. www.louisianamusicfactory.com. H MADAME AUCOIN PERFUME06431 “The oldest perfumer in the South” lives on thanks to her great-grandnephew, who recently reopened shop in her former residence. Artisanal

fragrance lines, such as Ormond Jayne, Memo and Eight & Bob, are featured. 608 Bienville St., 504.259.5975. www.madameaucoinperfume.com. H MARION CAGECL001564 “Jewelry is a form of architecture, and the body is its landscape” is the motto of Marion Cage McCollam, whose elegant, minimalist creations reflect her industrial-design training. Cool home accents and hardware are also featured. 3807 Magazine St., 504.891.8848. www.marioncage.com. MEYER THE HATTERCL002618 The oldest hat store in the South stocks one of the largest inventories of quality headwear in the country. 120 St. Charles Ave., 504.525.1048. www.meyerthehatter.com. MIGNON FAGETCL002718 Designer Faget has created extraordinary jewelry, using semiprecious stones and precious metals, for four decades. New Orleans icons and images figure prominently in her work. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., 1st fl., 504.524.2973. 3801 Magazine St., 504.891.7545. www.mignonfaget.com. H NICOLL'S LIMOUSINE SERVICE In addition to chauffeured limo service, this company offers limo buses, shuttle buses, luxury sedans and stretch utility vehicles. Airport pickups/drop-offs are also available. 4305 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 504.454.7722. 717 S. Claiborne Ave., 504.522.5656; 800.783.9944. www.nicolls.com. NOLA BOARDS Add a dash of Crescent City flavor

to your home kitchen with this shop’s handcrafted cutting boards. Wooden cheese boards, magnetic knife holders and other locally made culinary products are also offered. 519 Wilkinson St., Suite 105, 504.516.2601. www.nolaboards.com. NOLA KIDSCL002618 This French Quarter children’s boutique offers select apparel for both girls and boys, from infant to youth. Locally made accessories are also featured, along with toys, books and great gift items. 526 Royal St., 504.533.9853. 333 Chartres St., 504.566.1340. www.shopnolakids.com. H OSCAR RAJO PHOTOGRAPHY One of the city’s leading wedding photographers, Rajo excels in “capturing the human experience”—and capturing the beauty of New Orleans in the process. 504.837.6611. www.oscarrajo.com. THE OUTLET COLLECTION AT RIVERWALKCL002731 Located along the Mississippi River at the foot of Canal Street, Riverwalk is home to the nation’s first urban outlet center. Neiman Marcus Last Call Studio and Coach are among the 70-plus retailers featured. 500 Port of New Orleans Pl., 504.522.1555. www.riverwalkmarketplace.com. PAPIER PLUMECL0026174 It’s only fitting that the French Quarter, with its rich literary history, would be home to a store devoted to fine writing instruments. Imported stationery, Florentine journals and other desk accessories are featured.

842 Royal St., 504.988.7265. www.papierplume.com. H PLANET BEACHCL001564 This French Quarter spa provides a variety of services, from massages and facials to spray tanning and teeth whitening. 301 Burgundy St., 504.525.8266. www.planetbeach.com. H PROMENADE FINE FABRICSCL003248 Popped a button on the plane? Promenade stocks the largest selection of quality ribbon and buttons in the South. The shop features a large inventory of elegant and unusual fabrics from the couture houses, including velvets, silks, taffetas and more. 1520 St. Charles Ave., 504.522.1488. H QUEORKL001564 Cork is the big draw at this sleek shop, where the resilient material is fashioned into chic handbags, belts, phone cases, pet collars and more. 838 Chartres St., 504.899.9299. www.queork.com. PORTER LYONS Jewelry designer Ashley Lyons is a hit in Hollywood, but it’s her New Orleans roots that inspire her creations and made the French Quarter her first choice for her first brickand-mortar space. 631 Toulouse St., 800.5850348. www.porterlyons.com. ROUX ROYALECL001564 Catering to foodies, this shop stocks serving ware and kitchen-related accessories, many featuring a Crescent City flavor. Cookbooks by local chefs are also offered. 600 Royal St., 504.565.5252. www.shoprouxroyale.com.

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H SHOE BE DOL001564 “New Orleans' greatest addiction” offers a large selection of high-fashion women’s shoes from around the globe. Get a step ahead with cutting-edge footwear from up-and-coming designers.. 324 Chartres St., 504.523.SHOE. www.shoebedousa.com. THE SHOPS AT CANAL PLACECL002741 Canal Place features some of the world’s finest retailers in an elegant setting. Stores include Saks Fifth Avenue, Tiffany & Co., Michael Kors, Coach and Brooks Brothers. 333 Canal St., 504.522.9200. www.theshopsatcanalplace.com. THE SPA AT THE RITZ-CARLTONCL0026193 This award-winning spa—named the best hotel spa in the nation by Travel + Leisure—features 22 treatment rooms, two couples suites and a separate esthetician wing. 921 Canal St., 504.670.2929. www.ritzcarlton.com. H SYMMETRY JEWELERSCL003248 This full-service jewelry shop, located in the Riverbend neighborhood, features contemporary designs by local, national, and international artists, along with custom-made creations by in-house craftsman Tom Mathis. A large selection of gemstones is offered, in addition to estate pieces. 8138 Hampson St., 504.861.9925. www.symmetryjewelers.com. TRASHY DIVACL00153 Featured in such publications as Elle and Lucky, Candice Gwinn’s NOLAbased clothing company features original and vintage-inspired designs with a modern sensibility. The stylish

shop offers women’s clothing, shoes, lingerie, jewelry and accessories, along with numerous locations. 537 Royal St., 504.522.4233. 712 Royal St., 504.522.8861. 829 Chartres St., 504.581.4555. 2044 Magazine St., 504.522.5686. 2048 Magazine St., 504.299.8777. 2050 Magazine St., 504.265.0973. www.trashydiva.com. VIEUX CARRÉ WINE & SPIRITSCL0026184 The French Quarter’s most popular spot for fine wines, top-shelf liquors, and imported and domestic beer. 422 Chartres St., 504.568.WINE. WALDORF ASTORIA SPACL0026184 This luxe spa offers 10 private treatment rooms and a full menu of body treatments and services, including indulgent therapies that incorporate diamond and 24-carat gold products. 123 Baronne St., 504.335.3190. www.rooseveltneworleans.com. H WELLINGTON & COMPANYCL007893 This shop is devoted to antique and estate jewelry, with an emphasis on Victorian, Edwardian and art deco designs. A large selection of diamond engagement rings is also featured, along with new designer lines. 505 Royal St., 504.525.4855. www.wcjewelry.com. WEINSTEIN'SCL0026184 Elegant European women's wear, from casual to formal, is the specialty at this store, which features the latest looks by leading designers. 4011 Magazine St., 504.895.6278. www.weinsteinsinc.com.

BRING NEW ORLEANS HOME S T E R L I N G S I LV E R J E W E L R Y INSPIRED BY NEW ORLE ANS

719 Royal Street New Orleans, LA 70116 504.522.9222 © 2018 Pandora Jewelry, LLC • All rights reserved

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

LOOK BOOK An array of must-have items—both decorative and functional, indulgent and essential, trendy and traditional— for your shopping pleasure.

N AG HI’S LA PE T IT FLE U R

La Petit Fleur Joan Slifka has been designing her sterling silver pieces for La Petit Fleur for more than 30 years. Her designs are striking, but even more impressive when you see the work on the reverse sides! Her work is done in a variety of stone combinations, styles, and sizes. 534 Royal St., (504) 522-1305; www.lapetitfleur.com.

Naghi’s Find one of the largest selections of silver and gold Judaica in the South as well as many more intriguing, one-of-a-kind items at Naghi’s. 633 Royal St., (504) 586-8373; 800 Royal St., (504) 654-1940; 637 Canal St., (504) 585-5700; www.naghis.com. QUEORK

Wellington & Company, Wellington & Co is proud to present a beautiful selection of fine diamonds and colored stones. Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ WellingtonAndCo; Fan us on Facebook: www.facebook. com/WellingtonAndCo. Wellington & Company, 505 Royal Street, (504) 525-4855; www. wcjewelry.com.

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WE L L I NGTON & COMPANY

Queork Queork is based in New Orleans, where we design all of our cork products. We are the only non-import based cork boutique in the USA. Lightweight, Scratch Resistant, Hypoallergenic, Waterproof, Mildew Resistant, Stain Resistant. 838 Chartres Street, 3005 Magazine Street, 504-481-4910. www.queork.com


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Porter Lyons Porter Lyons, Written in the stars. Solid 14K Gold & Kimberly Certified (Conflict Free) diamonds float creating each Zodiac constellation, a unique and personal present for a special someone. Available in yellow, white and rose gold, necklaces & earrings. Custom fine jewelry also available. Shop at 631 Toulouse Street (800.585.0348) in the French Quarter or at www.porterlyons.com

PO RT E R LYO N S

Adorn & Conquer

WELLI NGTON & COMPANY

Wellington & Company is proud to present a large selection of Time Pieces including vintage Rolex and Cartier watches. Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/WellingtonAndCo; Fan us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ WellingtonAnd Co. Wellington & Company, 505 Royal Street, (504) 525-4855; www.wcjewelry.com

Adorn & Conquer, local and national artists. There’s something unique for everyone, ranging from $10-$600. Jewelry Artists are working in house, stop by and say hello! 2727 Prytania St, inside The Rink Shopping Center, Suite 6, 504.702.8036, www.adornandconquer.com ‘Iko, Iko’ - by Maria Fomich Cuffs $125-$550 Silver and brass cuff, featuring the sound wave of ‘Iko Iko’. The piece is a part of a series called ‘Heart Beat of the City’ showcasing our favorite New Orleans music.

A D O R N & CO N Q U E R

ART & EYES

Vintage 329 This Rare Fred Press Martini Set, from our Vintage Barware Collection, features 22kt gold. 329 Royal St., 504-525-2262 info@vintage329.com

VINTAGE 329

Art & Eyes

Art & Eyes carries over 1500 handmade frames, optical and suns, starting from $85. In addition, some of the finest accessory artisans are featured here. 3708 Magazine Street, (504)891-4494, www.artandeyesneworleansla.com WHERE GUEST B OOK

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DINING

Food for Thought An ever-changing landscape of sauces, seasonings and some of the greatest examples of culinary artistry in the nation, the New Orleans restaurant scene continues to nourish new talent and generate applause. From old-line Creole fare to cutting-edge contemporary cuisine, there's something for every palate.

H THE AMERICAN SECTOR006721 American. A nostalgic homage to wartime classics with gourmet twists, the menu at this National WWII Museum eatery features such kicked-up throwbacks as “Victory Garden” salads, open-face pot roast sandwiches and s'mores pie. L, D (daily). 945 Magazine St., 504.528.1940. www.american-sector.com.

are three of its many famous dishes. D (daily); Su jazz brunch. 813 Bienville St., 504.523.5433. www.arnauds.com.

H ANTOINE’SCL002714 Creole. Established in 1840, Antoine’s is New Orleans’ oldest restaurant and a living treasure. The great-great-great-grandchildren of founder Antoine Alciatore run the place as he wanted, which means rich French-Creole food, courtly waiters and an atmosphere of hospitality and tradition. L, D (M-Sa); Su jazz brunch. Antoine’s Annex (513 Royal St.) serves pastries and light fare daily. 713 St. Louis St., 504.581.4422. www.antoines.com.

AVOCL007293 Italian. Chef Nick Lama does his fourth-generation Sicilian ancestry proud with such standouts as charred octopus with eggplant and cranberries, gnocchi with wild mushrooms and lasagna with short rib ragout. D (M-Sa); Br (Sa-Su). 5908 Magazine St., 504.509.6550. www.restaurantavo.com.

H ARNAUD'SCL002714 Creole. Arnaud’s continues a tradition begun in 1918. The restaurant was assembled piecemeal over the decades, which is part of its charm. Shrimp Arnaud, oysters Bienville and café brulot

BAYONACL00271 American. Chef Susan Spicer’s menu continually surprises with fresh specials, but still includes her signature must-have: grilled shrimp with black-bean cakes and coriander

sauce. L (W-Sa), D (M-Sa). 430 Dauphine St., 504.525.4455. www.bayona.com.

CL002718

BOURBON HOUSE Seafood. A standout addition to Dickie Brennan’s restaurant empire. Stylish seafood dishes are complemented with outstanding filets and sides—don’t miss the redfish on the half shell with jumbo lump crab or the bourbon-glazed shrimp, a unique twist on the classic barbecued version. L, D (daily). 144 Bourbon St., 504.522.0111. www.bourbonhouse.com.

H BRENNAN'S02714 Creole. Breakfast at Brennan’s is back on the New Orleans menu. Now under the helm of new owner Ralph Brennan and executive chef

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ANGELINECL00271 Southern. Chef Alex Harrell’s Alabama upbringing informs the menu at his casually elegant eatery. Consider the black-eyed pea and collard green soup and the country hamwrapped rabbit leg. D (W-Su); Br (F-Su). 1032 Chartres St., 504.308.3106. www.angelinenola.com.


DINING Slade Rushing, the legendary eatery continues more than six decades of tradition with long-popular classics (turtle soup, eggs Hussarde, bananas Foster) coupled with fresh, contemporary takes on Creole cuisine. B, L, D (daily). 417 Royal St., 504.525.9711. www.brennansneworleans.com. BRIGTSEN’SCL00174 Creole. Secluded in the Riverbend neighborhood, Brigtsen’s has a lower profile than many other first-rank local restaurants. A protegé of Paul Prudhomme, Frank Brigtsen serves up food that is rooted in Louisiana tradition, but moves into a sphere of its own with his genius for combining tastes and ingredients. D (Tu-Sa). 723 Dante St., 504.861.7610. www.brigtsens.com. H BRIQUETTECL04 Seafood. Contemporary coastal is the catch at this sprawling Warehouse District space. Follow the lobster-andouille tamale with a lump crab-and-pickled mirliton salad then dive into broiled sea scallops with cheddar grits or a grilled whole redfish. D (nightly). 701 S. Peters St., 504.302.7496. www.briquettenola.com.

SUNDAY JAZZ BRUNCH | LUNCH FRIDAYS | DINNER NIGHTLY

777 BIENVILLE STREET | REVOLUTIONNOLA.COM

H CAFÉ BEIGNET Coffee. Light fare, café drinks, and delicious beignets are the draw at these comfy French Quarter coffeehouses. Traditional jazz performances at the Bourbon Street location begin at 8 am. B, L, D (daily). 311 Bourbon St., 504.525.2611. 334-B Royal St., 504.524.5530. 600 Decatur St., 504.581.6554. www.cafebeignet.com.

CAFÉ DU MONDECL002718 Coffee. No visit to the Crescent City is complete without a stop at Café Du Monde, in operation since 1862. On the menu: café au lait (made with ground chicory root) and beignets, the unofficial doughnuts of New Orleans. 24h (daily). 800 Decatur St., 504.525.4544. www.cafedumonde.com. CARROLLTON MARKETCL0028137 Louisiana. Chef Jason Goodenough’s market-driven menu spins both modern and traditional with dishes such as crispy pork “tail tots” and New Orleans-style cassoulet. No one can get enough of oysters Goodenough—flash-fried oysters with smoky bacon, creamed leeks and béarnaise. L (Th-F), D (Tu-Sa); Br (Sa-Su). 8132 Hampson St., 504.252.9928. www.carrolltonmarket.com. CENTRAL GROCERYCL002719 Deli. This Italian deli-grocery is a shrine to old New Orleans, and is the place to acquaint yourself with the classic muffuletta sandwich: layers of provolone cheese, olive salad, mortadella, salami and ham. L (Tu-Sa). 923 Decatur St., 504.523.1620. www.centralgrocery.com. H CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS CL0027194Steaks. Forget the standard sauces and heavy sides; the focus at this upscale-casual steakhouse is on its top-quality, USDA prime-only meats. An uncomplicated menu, easygoing atmosphere and live entertainment make the Chophouse a cut above. D (nightly). 322 Magazine St., 504.522.7902. www.chophousenola.com.

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Nightly Magic COCHONCL001635 Louisiana. Many restaurants profess to be “better than your mama’s,” but chefs Donald Link and Stephen Stryjewski’s lives up to the claim with haute twists on simple standards, such as deep-fried hog head cheese with field peas or rabbit and dumplings. The adjacent Cochon Butcher offers sandwiches and house-cured meats. L, D (daily). 930 Tchoupitoulas St., 504.588.2123. www.cochonrestaurant.com. COMMANDER’S PALACECL0028137 Creole. A shrine for food worshippers. Chef Tory McPhail carries on the Brennan family tradition of adventurous food based on Creole principles, served in a courtly atmosphere. L (M-F), D (nightly); jazz brunch (Sa-Su). 1403 Washington Ave., 504.899.8221. www.commanderspalace.com. COMPANY BURGERCL0028137 American. Adam Biderman’s award-winning burger joint sticks to the basics, which makes it all the better. Hand-ground beef, turkey or lamb patties topped with American cheese, house-made mayo, pickles and fresh-baked buns. $ L, D (daily). 611 O’Keefe St., 504.309.9422. www.thecompanyburger.com. COMPÈRE LAPINCL0028137 Caribbean. A native of St. Lucia, chef Nina Compton’s island upbringing is evident in dishes such as conch croquettes, roasted jerk corn and curried goat with plantain gnocchi. L, (M-F); D (nightly); Br (Sa-Su). 1535 Tchoupitoulas St., 504.599.2119. www.comperelapin.com.

born in New Orleans

COQUETTECL005781 French. What do you get when you mix traditional Louisiana cooking with spicy Italian and refined French? Coquette, where the menu changes daily but is always stellar with standouts like the must-have crab cakes making repeat appearances. D (nightly); Br (Sa-Su). 2800 Magazine St., 504.265.0421. www.coquette-nola.com. H COURT OF TWO SISTERSCL0027194 Creole. No French Quarter visit would be complete without a meal at this romantic restaurant, which features a daily jazz brunch and a nightly a la carte menu. Creole and Cajun cuisine, combined with southern hospitality and a magical patio setting make for a memorable dining experience. L, D (daily). 613 Royal St., 504.522.7261. www.courtoftwosisters.com. CURIOCL005786 American. Curious what “American cuisine with Creole soul” tastes like? Think grit tots with roasted red pepper coulis, black-eyed pea-and-duck gumbo and “pastrami shrimp” Reuben sandwiches. L (M-F), D (nightly); Br (Sa-Su). 301 Royal St., 504.717.4198. www.curionola.com. DORIS METROPOLITANCL006507 Steaks. A stunning steakhouse featuring superior quality dry-aged meats. The space is alone worth a visit, though the hunger-inducing menu also impresses with an eclectic collection of specialty cuts and an extensive wine list. D (nightly). 620 Chartres St., 504.267.3500. www.dorismetropolitan.com.

at Ace Hotel New Orleans 600 Carondelet St threekeysnola.com acehotel.com/neworleans

@threekeysnola @aceneworleans

Josephine Estelle Family Suppers every Monday, plus weekend brunch and daily Pasta Happy Hour. By James Beard Award nominees Chefs Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman

504.930.3070 @josephineestelle josephineestelle.com

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DINING DTBCL006507 Cajun. Short for “down the bayou,” DTB pays homage to chef Carl Schaubhut’s Cajun country roots with mod twists on Louisiana coastal cuisine. Think gumbo with crab fat potato salad and crispy duck confit with charred cabbage and sweet potatoes. D (nightly); Br (F-Su). 8201 Oak St., 504.518.6889. www.dtbnola.com. EMERIL’SCL001638 Louisiana. Emeril Lagasse’s flagship sets the course for the Lagasse empire. Opened in 1990, this is where the celebrated chef created many of his classic dishes, including barbecued shrimp, andouille-crusted drum, banana cream pie and more. L (M-F), D (nightly). 800 Tchoupitoulas St., 504.528.9393. www.emerils.com. EMERIL’S DELMONICOCL002813 Creole. This elegant circa-1895 restaurant now serves chef Emeril Lagasse’s modern takes on Creole classics. Start with the house charcuterie, before moving on to dry-aged steaks or drum meunière. D (nightly). 1300 St. Charles Ave., 504.525.4937. www.emerils.com.

AN EXPERIENCE THAT DEFINES NEW ORLEANS JAZZ BRUNCH DAILY 9AM-3PM

OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK Reservations Encouraged

DINNER NIGHTLY 5:30-10PM

613 Royal Street in the French Quarter 504.522.7261 • A Fein Family Restaurant menu available online: www.CourtofTwoSisters.com

H FELIX’S RESTAURANT & OYSTER BARCL0027169 Seafood. Endearingly down-home, even after its renovation, Felix’s has an extensive menu that offers nofrills seafood, including oysters both on the half shell and char-grilled, grilled Gulf fish, gumbo, seafood po’ boys, fresh lobster, a variety of breakfast items and more. B, L, D (daily). 739 Iberville St., 504.522.4440. www.felixs.com.

GALATOIRE’S Creole. Since 1905, Galatoire’s has been a gravity center of New Orleans, where political careers are made, engagements pledged, rumors spread and business deals won and lost. Happily, the food is as good as the party atmosphere. L, D (Tu-Su). 209 Bourbon St., 504.525.2021. www.galatoires.com. GRILL ROOM Contemporary. The Mobile fourstar fine dining room at the Windsor Court Hotel is a favorite of both locals and visitors. Refined yet relaxed, the Grill Room features innovative American cuisine that’s strong on Southern influences and local ingredients. Excellent wine program. B, L, D (daily); Br (Su). 300 Gravier St., 504.522.1994. www.windsorcourthotel.com H GUMBO SHOPCL0028105 Creole. Housed in a circa-1794 building, the Gumbo Shop features traditional and contemporary Creole cuisine, including several types of gumbos, étouffée, jambalaya and other Louisiana favorites. A variety of fresh fish, from amberjack to tuna, is offered, as are more than 30 wines by the glass. L, D (daily). 630 St. Peter St., 504.525.1486. www.gumboshop.com. GW FINSCL0028103 Seafood. At this hot restaurant, the local obsession with seafood reaches global heights: fresh fish is flown in daily from around the world. Irish salmon and New Zealand lobster rub shoulders with Gulf shrimp and Louisiana duck on the menu, all exquisitely prepared. D (nightly). 808 Bienville St., 504.581.3467. www.gwfins.com.

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HERBSAINTCL001640 French. James Beard Award-winning chef Donald Link’s entrées range from confit of Muscovy duck leg with dirty rice and citrus gastrique to chili-glazed pork belly with Beluga lentils. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). 701 St. Charles Ave., 504.524.4114. www.herbsaint.com. H JOSEPHINE ESTELLECL001640 Italian. At this casual eatery, snapper crudo with browned butter dances elegantly between raw and cooked, the pastas are toothy, and each dish has some beautifully surprising element that lingers long after the meal. B (M-F); L, D (daily); Br (Sa-Su). 600 Carondelet St., 504.930.3070. www.josephineestelle.com. K-PAUL’S LOUISIANA KITCHENCL0028109 Louisiana. Chef-personality Paul Prudhomme was one of the first to introduce Cajun cuisine to a global audience. His restaurant is an ideal spot to sample some K-Paul classics, including okra gumbo, jambalaya and blackened beef tenders. Deli L (Th-Sa), D (M-Sa). 416 Chartres St., 504.524.7394. www.kpauls.com. H KRYSTALCL00281 American. Since 1932 Krystal has been satisfying big appetites with its small, square burgers, making it the oldest quick-service chain in the Southeast. Open 24h (daily). 116 Bourbon St., 504.523.4030. www.krystal.com. LA PETITE GROCERYCL001753 French. What once was a corner grocery has been transformed into an intimate French bistro with gas lighting and pressed-tin ceilings, where lo-

cal specialties share menu space with French favorites. L, D (Tu-Sa). 4238 Magazine St., 504.891.3377. www.lapetitegrocery.com. H LANDRY'S SEAFOOD0281 Seafood. Landry’s locations fittingly offer sweeping views of the Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain. The menu is loaded with a wide array of Louisiana coastal cuisine, from shrimp po’ boys to trout meunière, in addition to other specialties. L, D (daily). 620 Decatur St., 504.581.9825. 8000 Lakeshore Dr., 504.283.1010. www.landrysseafood.com. MAYPOPCL002861 Vietnamese. Chef Michael Gulotta expands on his Asian-fusion food theme in a bright, open space with an industrial-terrarium vibe. Tear pieces of warm roti bread to scoop roasted pumpkin, apple and house coppa, or go spicy with vindaloo chicken with crispy sticky rice cubes and pickled mirliton. L, D (daily); Br (Sa-Su). 611 O’Keefe St., 504.518.6345. www.maypoprestaurant.com. MERILCL002861 International. Emeril Lagasse’s new casual dining venue is reflective of the celebrity chef’s world travels, with a globetrotting menu featuring everything from Japanese-style barbecue to pork rib tamales. L, D (daily). 424 Girod St., 504.526.3745. www.emerils.com. H MIYAKO SUSHI BAR & HIBACHICL002714 Japanese. Hibachis are the draw here, but sushi lovers will be just as happy. Dexterous hibachi chefs wow guests, preparing lobster, prime rib, scallops and more. Sushi, sashimi

Breakfast at

4 1 7 R O YA L S T R E E T, F R E N C H Q UA R T E R • d i N N E R • p R i vAT E Ev E N TS

b R EAkFAST/LU NC H

Reservations 504.525.9711 www.brennansneworleans.com PROPRIETORS terry white • ralph brennan, EXECUTIVE CHEF slade rushing

Top 10 Seafood Restaurant - U.S.A Today A Best Seafood Restaurant in U.S.A. - Travel & Leisure

FROM DOCK TO POT... no one does

SEAFOOD better!

BBQ Oysters

local flash fried oysters tossed in buttery Crystal hot sauce, housemade blue cheese dressing owned & operated by ralph brennan

115 Bourbon St • French Quarter 504-598-1200 • www.redfishgrill.com

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DINING and tempura are also on the menu. L (Su-F), D (nightly). 1403 St. Charles Ave., 504.410.9997. www.miyakonola.com.

SINCE 1913

Home of the Original

BBQ SHRIMP & FAMOUS OYSTER BAR Serving the finest in Fresh Seafood, Italian Specialties, and Delicious Steak

MR. B’S BISTROCL002861 Louisiana. Bustling Mr. B’s is another outstanding Brennan family restaurant, famed for its deceptively casual power-lunch scene. Don't miss the barbecued shrimp. L (M-Sa), D (nightly); Su jazz brunch. 201 Royal St., 504.523.2078. www.mrbsbistro.com.

A Pleasureable Dining Experience is Waiting for You. Private Rooms Available Open Lunch & Dinner • Monday - Friday • Dinner only Saturday Ample Off-Street Parking

1838 Napoleon Ave. • 504.895-4877 (3 Blocks from St. Charles)

www.pascalsmanale.com

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

H NAPOLEON HOUSECL002891 Louisiana. Napoleon never slept here, but this historic café and bar, with its peeling walls and worn charm, has its share of French ambiance. The café serves soups, seafood gumbo, sandwiches and warm muffulettas; the bar serves its famous Pimm’s Cups. L (M-Sa), D (Tu-Sa). 500 Chartres St., 504.524.9752. www.napoleonhouse.com. H NEW ORLEANS CREOLE COOKERYCL0027194 Creole. Creole standards (gumbo, shrimp Creole) are coupled with fresh fish, seafood, char-grilled oysters and a raw bar. L, D (daily). 510 Toulouse St., 504.524.9632. www.neworleanscreolecookery. com.

7 Days A Week

NOLACL002810 American. Emeril Lagasse’s French Quarter bistro is a perennial hot spot. The menu is filled with Emeril creations such as oyster-and-brie pot pie and a grilled double-cut pork chop with caramalized sweet potatoes. L (Th-Su), D (nightly). 534 St. Louis St., 504.522.6652. www.emerils.com.

PALACE CAFÉCL00379 Creole. Part of the Brennan restaurant empire, menu sandouts here include the savory crabmeat cheesecake, andouille-crusted Gulf fish and white chocolate bread pudding. L (M-Sa), D (nightly); Su jazz brunch. 605 Canal St., 504.523.1661. www.palacecafe.com. PALADAR 511CL00379 Contemporary. California cooking New Orleans-style means lots of frilly salads and fish left au naturel. Pizzas, smartly topped with farm eggs, summer squash and the like, take center stage on the menu. D (W-M); Br (Sa-Su). 511 Marigny St., 504.509.6782. www.paladar511.com. H PASCAL’S MANALECL00175 Louisiana. A New Orleans landmark since 1913, Pascal’s is famous for inventing barbecued shrimp (a must-get) and eternally popular for its traditional Italian food. Pascal’s has an army of regulars who devour the gumbo, steaks and those succulent barbecued shrimp. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). 1838 Napoleon Ave., 504.895.4877. www.pascalsmanale.com. PATOISCL00173 Louisiana. Aaron Burgau has earned all of the praise heaped on him in recent years as a chef “to watch.” Patois is one of the city’s hottest venues, combining Burgau’s inventive French cooking with a cool neighborhood bar scene. L (F), D (W-Sa); Br (Su). 6078 Laurel St., 504.895.9441. www.patoisnola.com. PÊCHECL00379 Seafood. Donald Link and Stephen Stryjewski (the award-winning team

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behind pork-centric Cochon) have another winner on their hands. The focus here is on chef Ryan Prewitt's simple seafood grilled over hardwood coals...and it couldn’t be better. From the raw bar to the smoky mussels to the whole grilled fish, you can’t go wrong. L, D (daily). 800 Magazine St., 504.522.1744. www.pecherestaurant.com. POKE LOACL00379 Hawaiian. This bright spot offers build-your-own poke bowls of tuna, yellowtail, salmon and/or tofu cubes atop fresh greens and rice, veggies and array of garnishes (edamame, fish roe, etc.). L, D (daily). 3341 Magazine St., 504.5309.9993. 939 Girod St., #140, 504.571.5174. www.eatpokeloa.com. H RALPH'S ON THE PARK Louisiana. Veteran restaurateur Ralph Brennan serves up globally inspired local cuisine in this beautifully restored historic building overlooking scenic City Park. One of the most romantic locations in town. L (W-F), D (nightly); Br (Su). 900 City Park Ave., 504.488.1000. www.ralphsonthepark.com. H RED FISH GRILLCL00281 Seafood. Grilled fish too plain? Not here. The hickory-grilled redfish topped with crab or crawfish is a modern classic, and the other specialties (barbecued oysters, doublechocolate bread pudding) are all exceptional. L, D (daily). 115 Bourbon St., 504.598.1200. www.redfishgrill.com.

H REMOULADE CL002819 Louisiana. Arnaud’s operates this très casual bistro spin-off of its adjacent restaurant, serving favorites such as po’ boys, spicy boiled seafood and jambalaya. The young waiters may wear T-shirts, but much of the food is surprisingly sophisticated; try the turtle soup and shrimp remoulade. L, D (daily). 309 Bourbon St., 504.523.0377. www.remoulade.com. H RESTAURANT R'EVOLUTION Louisiana. Award-winning chefs Rick Tramonto and John Folse are the tour de force behind this elegant-yetrelaxed fine dining venue. The rooms are gorgeously appointed and finely detailed, while the menu is made up of modern reinterpretations of classic Cajun and Creole cuisine. L (M-F), D (nightly); Br (Su). 777 Bienville St. (inside the Royal Sonesta Hotel), 504.486.0300. www.revolutionnola.com. SAC-A-LAITCL00173 Louisiana. Chefs Cody and Samantha Carroll bring country dishes with a city spin. Proof: smothered duck hearts with goat cheese grits, pig's ear with caviar and crème fraiche or tuna tartare with venison sweetbreads. D (Tu-Sa). 1051 Annunciation St., 504.324.3658. www.sac-a-laitrestaurant.com. SAFFRON NOLACL00173 Indian. Chic Indian fare with contemporary flair. Top picks include the pakoda choti, roti sathi and any of the crispy dosa on the brunch menu. D (Tu-Sa); Br (Su). 4128 Magazine St., 504.323.2626. www.saffronola.com.

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Unique Dining Experience For All Occasions

Japanese Seafood & Steak house

1403 St. Charles Ave. (504).410.9997 www.miyakonola.com

DINNER

Mon - Thu 5 - 10p • Fri 5 - 10:30p Sat 3:30 - 10:30p Sun noon - 10p

Mon - Fri Lunch Specials Party Room Available

LUNCH

Mon - Fri 11:00a - 2:30p

Reservations Accepted Order Online: MiyakoNola.com

DINING offers two bars, balcony and courtyard dining and applause-worthy French-Creole fare. B (M-F), L, D (daily); Br (Sa-Su). 616 St. Peter St., 504.934.3463. www.tableaufrenchquarter.com.

SEAWORTHYCL00173 Seafood. This chic offshoot of New York’s Grand Banks oyster bar casts a wide net, serving up fresh bivalves from the Gulf, along with East and West coast varieties and other sustainably sourced seafood. Caviar, creative cocktails and a wide wine selection round out the menu. D (nightly); Br (Sa-Su). 630 Carondelet St., 504.930.3071. www.seaworthynola.com.

TOUPS’ MEATERYCL0028134 Louisiana. Chef Isaac Toups is known for his masterful charcuterie. Start with the “Meatery Board,” a selection of house-cured meats and condiments, before moving on to the lamb neck with fennel and blackeyed pea salad. L, D (Tu-Sa). 845 N. Decatur St., 504.252.4999. www.toupsmeatery.com.

SOBOUCL00173 Contemporary. The focus at this “south of Bourbon” hot spot is on creative cocktails and chef Juan Carlos Gonzalez’s amazing selection of small plates (order the shrimp-and-tasso pinchos with grilled pineapple). B (daily), L (M-Sa), D (nightly); Br (Su). 310 Chartres St. (in the “W” French Quarter Hotel), 504.552.4095. www.sobounola.com.

TRINITYCL0028134 Louisiana. The menu here pays homage to the “trinity” of flavors, elements and techniques in New Orleans cuisine. Hush puppies get richness from duck fat, while the cucumber salad refreshes with crisp apples and pairs perfectly with the citrusy seared snapper. D (Tu-Su); Br (Sa-Su). 1117 Decatur St., 504.325.5789. www.trinityneworleans.com.

ST. ROCH MARKETCL004705 Eclectic. Dating to 1875, this longshuttered marketplace recently received a massive makeover while retaining its historic character and 24 steel columns. The bright space features 13 food vendors, along with a bar. L, D (daily). 2381 St. Claude Ave., 504.609.3813. www.strochmarket.com. SYLVAINCL007513 Contemporary. Chandeliers dangle overhead at this hip gastro pub as diners sip hand-crafted cocktails and nibble refined comfort classics, such as pan-roasted scallops and pasta Bolognese. D (nightly); Br (F-Su). 625 Chartres St., 504.265.8123. www.sylvainnola.com. TABLEAUCL0TH0E281 Creole. Housed in historic Le Petit Theatre, this Jackson Square bistro

TURKEY AND THE WOLFCL0028134 Eclectic. Sandwiches are the menu mainstay at this casual café: Try the fried baloney with American cheese and hot mustard. Don’t miss the wedge salad with “everything bagel” crunchies. L, D (W-Su). 739 Jackson Ave., 504.218.7428. www.turkeyandthewolf.com.

28134

TUJAGUE’SCL00 Creole. One of the city’s oldest eateries. The restaurant serves a traditional Creole prix fixe menu, along with contemporary a la carte offerings. L, D (daily); Sa-Su brunch. 823 Decatur St., 504.525.8676. www.tujaguesrestaurant.com.

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GALLERIES+ ANTIQUES

The Art of the City Royal Street has long reigned as an antiquing avenue, and in recent years has established itself as a hot spot for emerging artists. But don't limit your gallery-hopping to the French Quarter; explore the numerous art and antiques offerings along Julia and Magazine streets as well.

©ANTIEAU GALLERY

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHYCL006481 The city’s most extensive collection of fine photographs for sale. Artists represented here include Ansel Adams, Henri Cartier-Bresson and Herman Leonard, among others. 241 Chartres St., 504.568.1313. www.agallery.com. ANGELA KING GALLERYCL001257 One of the French Quarter’s leading contemporary art galleries. Sculptors and painters represented include Peter Max, Woodrow Nash and Patterson & Barnes. 241 Royal St., 504.524.8211. www.angelakinggallery.com. H ANTIEAU GALLERY Folk artist Chris Roberts-Antieau’s offbeat textile appliqué works are

found in the American Visionary Art Museum and at her New Orleans galleries. Each of her one-of-a-kind stitched and quilted “fabric pictures” feature hand-painted frames. 927 Royal St., 504.304.0849. 4532 Magazine St., 504.510.4148. www.antieaugallery.com.

photographs and works on paper. 432-434 Julia St., 504.522.1999. www.arthurrogergallery.com.

French Quarter, along with antique walking sticks and other collectibles. 407 Royal St., 504.581.0688.

H ANTIQUES DE PROVENCE A bit of southern France on Royal Street, featuring 17th- and 18thcentury antiques, including armoires, chandeliers, limestone fountains and a huge selection of olive jars. 623 Royal St., 504.529.4342. www.antiquesdeprovencellc.com.

H BEVOLO GAS & ELECTRIC LIGHTS00135 The vast majority of copper and brass gas lanterns adorning French Quarter shops, restaurants, and homes are made at Bevolo. Choose from a selection of available styles, or have fixtures custom-built on site. 521 Conti St., 504.522.9485. 304 Royal St., 504.552.4311. 316 Royal St., 504.552.4311. 318 Royal St., 504.522.4311. www.bevolo.com.

CALLAN CONTEMPORARYCL001257 Contemporary works by American and international artists with an emphasis on abstract and figurative paintings and sculpture. 518 Julia St., 504.525.0518. www.callancontemporary.com.

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERYCL001257 One of New Orleans’ leading modern art galleries, featuring an extensive collection of paintings, sculpture,

H BRASS MONKEY Don't be fooled by its size: This tiny storefront offers one of the largest selections of Limoges boxes in the

H CRAIG TRACY GALLERYL00130CL0013 The bulk of artist Craig Tracy’s body of work is devoted to the human form, which the award-winning bodypainter enhances with intricate imagery then captures on film. Limited-edition photographs and giclée prints are offered. 827 Royal St., 504.592.9886. www.craigtracy.com.

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GALLERIES + ANTIQUES

ANTIQUES DE PROVENCE, llc FRENCH INTÉRIEURS & JARDINS

H ELLIOTT GALLERYCL0032604 Fine contemporary and modern art from world-renowned artists is the standard here. Artists represented include Theo Tobiasse, James Coignard, Max Papart, Nissan Engel, Garrick Yrondi, David Schneuer, Petra Seipel, Picasso, Miró and Chagall. 540 Royal St., 504.523.3554. www.elliottgallery.com. H FISCHER-GAMBINO283 An eclectic shop specializing in fine lighting fixtures, as well as works by artists including Doug Anderson and Laney Oxman, whose creations have have been displayed at the White House. 637 Royal St., 504.524.9067. 602 Metairie Rd., Metairie, 504.833.7757. www.fischergambinoneworleans. com; www.lightingneworleans.com.

FRENCH ANTIQUES • MIRRORS • GARDEN & LIGHTING FRENCH CONTEMPORARY ART • VERELLEN UPHOLSTERY

VINTAGE CHANEL JEWELRY Paris 623 ROYAL STREET FRENCH QUARTER NEW ORLEANS

504.529.4342 ANTIQUESDEPROVENCE.COM

FRANK RELLE PHOTOGRAPHY Award-winning photographer Relle’s moody “nightscapes” are counted among the permanent collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of History and the private holdings of Brad Pitt, Wynton Marsalis and others. 910 Royal St., 504.388.7601. www.frankrelle.com. GALLERY 2CL0 Part animal/part human, Betsy Youngquist’s stunning beaded sculptures will draw you into this shared gallery space, which also features Ann Marie Cianciolo’s whimsical sculptural jewelry. 831 Royal St., 504.8312. www.gallerytwonola.com. HAROUNI GALLERYCL001308 David Harouni has an eye for heads, as evidenced by the paintings that

populate his gallery. Harouni’s expressionistic oilworks and sculptures have been exhibited worldwide, but you’ll find them—along with the artist—at his French Quarter studio. 933 Royal St., 504.299.4393. www.harouni.com. IDA MANHEIM GALLERYCL001308 This impressive showroom features 17th-, 18th- and 19th-century French, English, Dutch and Continental furniture, fine paintings, porcelain and statuary. 409 Royal St., 504.620.4114. www.idamanheimantiques.com. H KEIL'S ANTIQUESCL001308 Founded in 1899, Keil’s established its reputation with rare 18th- and 19th-century French and English furniture. The shop also specializes in chandeliers, mantels, mirrors and fine jewelry. 325 Royal St., 504.522.4552. www.keilsantiques.com. LUCKY ROSE GALLERY00136 Devoted to the stunning porcelain sculpture of artist-owner Cathy Rose, who often incorporates pieces of New Orleans into her works. 840 Royal St., 504.309.8000. www.cathyrose.com. LUCULLUSCL007250 An antique shop specializing in objects for almost every culinary passion. Fine dining tables, porcelain, silver, 19th-century glassware, rustic farmhouse implements and bistro equipment are among the offerings. 610 Chartres St., 504.528.9620. www.lucullusantiques.com. H M.S. RAU INC.00136 This third-generation family business is one of the country’s oldest

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dealing in 19th-century antiques. M.S. Rau is known for its American, French and English furniture, fine silver, glass, porcelain, clocks, watches and quality jewelry. 630 Royal St., 504.5660. www.rauantiques.com. H MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERYCL001304 This branch of the nationwide Martin Lawrence galleries features contemporary paintings, sculpture and limited-edition graphics by such renowned artists as Picasso, Chagall, Dali, Miró, Warhol, Haring and Erté, among others. 433 Royal St., 504.299.9055. www.martinlawrence.com. MICHALOPOULOSCL00 0136The off-kilter architectural renderings of James Michalopoulos are instantly recognizable. You’ll find them here, along with his figurative paintings, still lifes and landscapes. 617 Bienville St., 504.558.0505. www.michalopoulos.com. H MOSS ANTIQUESCL001306 Fine art objects fill this gallery, which offers jewelry, porcelain, humidors and cigar accessories. Merchandise is primarily from England and France. 411 Royal St., 504.522.3981. www.mossantiques.com. H NAGHI’SCL002613 From rare objects gathered from around the world to original jewelry crafted on site, Naghi’s showroom is full of fascinating items. Specializing in Judaica, the shop has an extensive collection of antique silver and family heirlooms. 633 Royal St., 504.586.8373. 800 Royal St., 504.654.1940. 637 Canal St., 504.585.5700.

H ROYAL ANTIQUESCL001CL0000012645 English, French and Continental furniture from the 17th through 19th centuries is the specialty of this fourth-generation dealer. Antique and estate jewelry is also featured. 309 Royal St., 504.524.7033. www.royalantiques.com. SARAH ASHLEY LONGSHORECL001308 Step into this Uptown gallery/studio, with its pop art paintings, giant lipstick sculptures and statement-making furniture, and you’ll understand why Elle magazine calls Longshore “New Orleans’ most badass artist.” 4537 Magazine St., 504.333.6951. www.ashleylongshore.com.CL00130 H TERRANCE OSBORNE GALLERYL001308 Artist Osborne has garnered a growing national following with his vibrant architectural works and reflections on Crescent City life, which have been commissioned by Nike, the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival and others. 3029 Magazine St., 504.232.7530. www.terranceosborne.com. H VINTAGE 329CL001306 A mecca for vintage jewelry buffs, this hip shop is filled with Chanel, Memento Mori and Christian Lacroix. Vintage sunglasses, French-, Shag- and fashion-inspired posters, plus vintage barware are among the offerings. 329 Royal St., 504.525.2262. www.vintage329.com.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

LOOK BOOK From Academic to edgy, oil paintings to watercolors, one-of-a-kind originals to limited-edition prints—a showcase of accessible art. Antieau Gallery showcases the work of nationally recognized, New Orleans fabric-appliqué artist Chris RobertsAntieau. As a self-taught Visionary artist, Antieau’s work tells stories of nature, perception, and above all, the human experience. See her impeccably stitched works at her gallery in the French Quarter at 927 Royal Street (open daily, 10am to 8pm) or Uptown at 4532 Magazine Street (open Mon-Sat, 10am to 6pm). (504) 304-0849 • antieaugallery.com

ANTIEAU GALLERY

THE HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION

Discover the area’s rich history through original art and artifacts on view at The Historic New Orleans Collection. With changing exhibitions and a house museum, this facility provides an insightful introduction to the city on its 300th anniversary. Free admission; tours $5. Open Tues.-Sun. 533 Royal Street, (504) 523-4662, www.hnoc.org

Fischer-Gambino At Fischer-Gambino you will find a unique selection of high-quality lighting and furniture items, like the monkeys below, each holding a penshell umbrella. 637 Royal St. (504) 524-9067; 1-888-524-9067 www.lightingneworleans.com

FISCHER-GAMBINO

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NIGHTLIFE

Party Central You would think the city in which the first cocktail is alleged to have been poured would have its fair share of nightlife...and you'd be right. From Bourbon Street to Frenchmen Street, classy clubs to dingy dives, jazz to rock, sunup to sundown—you'll find it all (and then some) in New Orleans.

ARNAUD’S FRENCH 75CL001456 Fine libations and classic cocktails in a clubby atmosphere, adjacent to Arnaud’s restaurant. Cigar-friendly. 813 Bienville St., 504.523.5433. www.arnauds.com. AVENUE PUB The NOLA go-to for craft beers, offering the city’s largest available selection of locally produced brews. 1732 St. Charles Ave., 504.586.9243. www.theavenuepub.com.

BAR TONIQUE This sleek space brings a welcome air of sophistication to North Rampart Street. Dark woods and candlelight set the mood for top-shelf cocktails, house-made tonics and an extensive selection of wines by the glass. 820 N. Rampart St., 504.324.6045. www.bartonique.com. BARREL PROOF From Japanese Yamazaki to Kentucky-aged Old Grand-Dad, the top shelf at this hip Lower Garden District spot holds more than 150 brands of whiskey from around the globe. 1201 Magazine St., 504.299.1888. www.barrelproofnola.com. BAYOU BAR This cozy, upscale tavern in the Pontchartrain Hotel is where Frank Sina-

tra and Truman Capote would tipple when they were in town. Creative cocktails are coupled with lite bites. 2031 St. Charles Ave., 504.323.1456. www.bayoubarneworleans.com. BLUE NILECL001456 This lively Frenchmen Street venue is simultaneously funky and stylish, with oodles of ambiance. Local and national acts are featured. 532 Frenchmen St., 504.948.2583. www.bluenilelive.com. THE BULLDOGCL001456 The patio is the way to go at this British-themed pub, where the fountain is fashioned from dozens of old beer taps. Only fitting given the dogfriendly tavern’s 50-plus draft beers and additional 100 varieties offered by the bottle.

3236 Magazine St., 504.891.1516. 5135 Canal Blvd., 504.488.4191. www.draftfreak.com. CAROUSEL BARCL001456 Located in the Hotel Monteleone, this bar is an authentic revolving carousel (worth a peek even for teetotalers) and was a favorite of such literary lights as Tennessee Williams and Truman Capote. The recently revamped venue now features live music. 214 Royal St., 504.523.3341. www.hotelmonteleone.com. ©RANDY SCHMIDT/BAYOU BAR

ALTOCL001456 Get above it all at the Ace Hotel’s way-cool rooftop bar, which offers amazing views and poolside dining. Open daily. 600 Carondelet St., 504.900.1180. www.acehotel.com/neworleans/ alto.

CHICKIE WAH WAH This hot venue keeps the Mid-City music scene at a steady boil with sets by leading jazz and funk acts. 2828 Canal St., 504.844.244.2543. www.chickiewahwah.com.

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NIGHTLIFE COLUMNS BARCL001456 This stately Victorian on St. Charles Avenue is a choice hangout for Uptowners. Watch the streetcar roll past while sipping a cocktail on the front porch, or relax in the 19th-century splendor of the indoor bar. Live music nightly. 3811 St. Charles Ave., 504.899.9308. www.thecolumns.com. CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSECL001456 The French Quarter’s only brewpub. Microbrews, nightly live music, local art and sophisticated cuisine make the Brewhouse a winner. 527 Decatur St., 504.522.0571. www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com. CURECL001456 This cutting-edge cocktail lounge, housed in a former fire station, has one foot in the 19th century and one in the 21st. The cocktail menu is also half old fashioned and half modern, making Cure one of the hippest places in town to imbibe and socialize. 4905 Freret St., 504.302.2357. www.curenola.com. D.B.A.CL001456 This club features 20 premium draught beers, fine tequilas and single-malts and live music nightly. 618 Frenchmen St., 504.942.3731. www.dbaneworleans.com.

tles of sparkling wine, along with reds, whites and a variety of small plates, ranging from grilled octopus to caviar and potato chips. 1036 N. Rampart St., 504.509.7644. www.nolabubbles.com.

cover charges and low attitude. Acts include both local favorites and big names; the music ranges from punk to straight-ahead rock. 907 S. Peters St., 504.529.5844. www.thehowlinwolf.com.

FRITZEL’SCL001456 A German jazz club? Only in New Orleans. Traditional jazz by local musicians as well as visiting European bands is featured nightly. 733 Bourbon St., 504.586.4800. www.fritzelsjazz.net.

H THE JAZZ PLAYHOUSECL001456 This stylish spot inside the Royal Sonesta New Orleans recreates the tony jazz clubs of Bourbon Street’s 1950s heyday. The club features nightly performances by a rotating roster of top-tier local talent. 300 Bourbon St., 504.533.2299. www.sonesta.com/jazzplayhouse.

H HERMES BAR This sophisticated hideaway, tucked inside Antoine’s restaurant, offers quiet respite from the din on nearby Bourbon Street, great ambiance and access to the historic eatery’s menu. Live entertainment on weekends. 713 St. Louis St., 504.581.4422. www.antoines.com. HOT TINCL001456 Named after a Tennessee Williams play—the author once stayed here— this Garden District hot spot is located on the roof of the Pontchartrain Hotel. Modeled after an artist’s loft, the sophisticated space offers creative cocktails and sweeping views. 2031 St. Charles Ave., 504.323.1453. www.hottinbar.com.

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOPCL00143 This historic cottage dates to the late 1700s. The legends surrounding Lafitte’s are vast; it’s easy to sit in the dark, watching the carriages pass, and imagine yourself back in a den of pirates and privateers. 941 Bourbon St., 504.593.9761. LITTLE GEM SALOON CLThis long-neglected jazz landmark has received a new lease on life, and is once again a player on the city’s live-music scene. The supper club offers two stages and performances most nights of the week. 445 S. Rampart St., 504.267.4863. www.littlegemsaloon.com. MAPLE LEAF tin roof, a sweaty dance floor, a quintessential experience: fueled by funk, the crowd goes till dawn. 8316 Oak St., 504.866.9359. www.mapleleafbar.com. C456A

THE DAVENPORT LOUNGECL001456 An elegant escape inside the RitzCarlton Hotel offering classic New Orleans cocktails, along with entertainment by celebrity trumpeter/ crooner Jeremy Davenport. 921 Canal St., 504.524.1331. www.ritzcarlton.com.

HOUSE OF BLUESCL001456 The local branch of this national chain consistently tops local best-of lists by mixing national touring acts with New Orleans favorites. 225 Decatur St., 504.529.2583. www.hob.com.

EFFERVESCENCECL001456 This bubbly spot features 90-plus bot-

HOWLIN’ WOLFCL001456 This locally owned club features low

NAPOLEON HOUSE C456Offered to the emperor if he could escape exile (so the tale goes), this is a legendary French Quarter watering hole. An hour spent enjoying

a muffuletta and a Pimm’s Cup in the courtyard is a classic N’awlins experience. 500 Chartres St., 504.524.9752. www.napoleonhouse.com. NOLA BREWINGCL001456 Weekly brewery tours, a massive tap room and in-house barbecue make this a must-stop for beer fans. Check out the many seasonal beers. 3001 Tchoupitoulas St., 504.896.9996. www.nolabrewing.com. OLD ABSINTHE HOUSE A favored tavern of such bon vivants as Oscar Wilde, Mark Twain and Walt Whitman, this historic bar continues to draw absinthe enthusiasts and those thirsty for a taste of authentic New Orleans as it has since 1806. 240 Bourbon St., 504.523.3181. www.oldabsinthehouse.com. ONE EYED JACKS C456Rockabilly, retro, rock, neo-burlesque: this French Quarter swankdive serves it all up in a vintage bordello atmosphere. 615 Toulouse St., 504.569.8361. www.oneeyedjacks.net. PALM COURT JAZZ CAFÉ This excellent venue for traditional live jazz is a favorite of locals in the know and well-informed visitors. 1204 Decatur St., 504.525.0200. www.palmcourtjazzcafe.com. H PAT O’BRIEN’SCL0014 Birthplace of the Hurricane cocktail, this complex features four bars, a full menu and its famous courtyard and fountain. A Crescent City must-do. 718 St. Peter St., 504.525.4823. www.patobriens.com.

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PATRICK’S BAR VIN Krewe of Cork founder and allaround grape guy Patrick Van Hoorebeek’s namesake wine bar offers dozens of vintages by the glass and even more by the the bottle. 730 Bienville St., 504.581.7300. www.patricksbarvin.com. PRESERVATION HALLCL001467 Home to traditional jazz since 1961, this no-frills nightspot still packs ’em in despite not serving liquor. Drunks and yakkers: go elsewhere. 726 St. Peter St., 504.522.2841. www.preservationhall.com. REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANSCL0068915 One of downtown’s hottest spots. Bands, touring and local, share the stage with a late-night dance club. 828 S. Peters St., 504.528.8282. www.republicnola.com. ROCK ’N’ BOWLCL0068915 A legendary local favorite now in a new, larger location, Rock ’n’ Bowl still features the winning combination of bowling lanes and live music from the region’s top zydeco, R&B and rock acts. 3000 S. Carrollton Ave., 504.861.1700. www.rockandbowl.com. SAZERAC BARCL001456 1930s elegance and classic cocktails in the beautifully restored Roosevelt Hotel. The perfect place to sample a Sazerac—the official cocktail of New Orleans. 123 Baronne St., 504.648.1200. www.therooseveltneworleans.com. L005794SNUG

HARBORCL001470 An elegant, intimate mainstay of Frenchmen Street’s music row, Snug

Harbor was rated the city’s best jazz club by Esquire. Ellis Marsalis and Charmaine Neville are regulars. 626 Frenchmen St., 504.949.0696. www.snugjazz.com.

PIANO LOUNGE • PATIO • RESTAURANT

EAT, DRINK &

THE SPOTTED CATCL001470 This tiny club has a casual, laid-back vibe and a large, loyal following among locals and visitors alike. Live music starts at 4 pm on weekdays (3 pm on weekends) and continues way into the wee hours. 623 Frenchmen St., no phone. www.spottedcatmusicclub.com. H STAGE DOOR CANTEENCL001456 Swing back to a bygone era at this retro-themed WWII Museum venue, which features live musical productions reminiscent of 1940s USO shows. 945 Magazine St., 504.528.1943. www.stagedoorcanteen.org. H THREE KEYSCL0068915 This hip venue in the Ace Hotel mixes things up with live performances by local music acts, swing dance lessons and guest speakers discussing New Orleans history and culture. 600 Carondelet St., 504.900.1180. www.threekeysnola.com. THREE MUSESCL0068915 This Frenchmen Street venue offers a veritable nightlife trifecta: cool handcrafted cocktails, gourmet small plates and live local music. 536 Frenchmen St., 504.298.8746. www.thethreemuses.com. TIPITINA’S6 TCLhe legendary Tip’s offers an eclectic, always-entertaining lineup, killer acoustics and multiple bars. 501 Napoleon Ave., 504.895.8477. www.tipitinas.com.

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ATTRACTIONS

On the Town There is more to New Orleans than Bourbon Street, and visitors don't have to look far to find it. Culture lovers will be drawn to the city's many museums, while outdoor types will gravitate toward area parks and river excursions. From Audubon Zoo to the steamboat Natchez, there's something to do 24/7.

AUDUBON AQUARIUM From its perch on the banks of the Mississippi, New Orleans’ aquarium is home to marine life and birds from all across the globe. Highlights include the Caribbean reef tunnel, rare white alligators, sea otters, penguins and the “Parakeet Pointe” exhibit. 1 Canal St., 504.581.4629. www.auduboninstitute.org. AUDUBON PARKCL001359 Walk, jog, golf or picnic among the

oaks in this beautiful glade. On the St. Charles streetcar line (stop 36). St. Charles Ave. at Walnut St., 504.212.5237. www.auduboninstitute.org. AUDUBON ZOOCL001360 New Orleans’ world-renowned zoo is an award-winning showcase of creatures great and small, and a destination for endless exploration and family fun. Highlights include the “Louisiana Swamp” exhibit, white tigers, sea lions and southern white rhinos. 6500 Magazine St., 504.581.4629 or 800.774.7394. www.auduboninstitute.org. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUMCL001360 Located in a former funeral parlor, this offbeat museum seeks “to keep jazz

funerals alive” with memorabilia from famous send-offs, in addition to archival items and photos from second-line parades. Elaborate Mardi Gras Indian costumes are also on display. 1116 Henriette Delille St., 504.522.4806. www.backstreetculturalmuseum.org H CITY PARKCL001360 Nearly double the size of Central Park, 1,300-acre City Park dates to 1854 and is home to the world’s largest stand of mature live oaks. Numerous activities are offered, from biking and boating to golf and tennis. Carousel Gardens, an old-fashioned amusement park built to small children’s scale, features a century-old wooden carousel. 1 Dreyfous Ave., 877.482.4888. www.neworleanscitypark.com.

CIVIC THEATRECL001360 New Orleans’ oldest theater, dating to 1906, has hosted everything from vaudeville shows to discos. Shuttered during the 1990s, the 1,200-seat venue received a $10 million overhaul in 2013, and now features concerts by top national touring acts. 510 O'Keefe St., 504.272.0865. www.civicnola.com. CONFEDERACY OF CRUISERS These guided bicycle tours take visitors out of the French Quarter and into some of the city’s most vibrant yet oft-overlooked neighborhoods. Cocktail and culinary excursions are also offered, along with customized tours. 634 Eylsian Fileds Ave., 504.400.5468. www.confederacyofcruisers.com.

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©HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION

ARMSTRONG PARKCL001359 Named for the late jazz great Louis Armstrong, this 34-acre green space is also home to the Mahalia Jackson Center for the Performing Arts and Congo Square, where jazz is said to have first taken root. N. Rampart and St. Ann streets.


CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER The city’s premier modern art exhibit space features rotating exhibits and also hosts performance. 900 Camp St., 504.528.3800. www.cacno.org. CREOLE QUEEN PADDLEWHEELER Take a spin on the mighty Mississippi aboard this riverboat powered by a 24-foot paddlewheel. Chalmette Battlefield and dinner jazz tours are featured. 1 Poydras St., 504.529.4567. www.creolequeen.com. CRESCENT PARK Looking for a unique view of the city? Hop on the Elysian Fields Avenue elevator or climb the “rusted rainbow” footbridge at Piety and Chartres, and stroll this 1.4-mile riverfront promenade, which stretches from the French Quarter to the Bywater neighborhood. www.crescentparknola.org. DEGAS HOUSE The home where Edgar Degas lived during his time in the city is filled with prints of the French impressionist’s works. Tours of the 1852 property are offered. 2306 Esplanade Ave., 504.821.5009. www.degashouse.com. DESTREHAN PLANTATIONCL001360 A 45-minute drive from New Orleans, Destrehan was built in 1787 by a sugar planter and is the oldest plantation home in the lower Mississippi Valley. Tours are offered daily, 9 am-4 pm. Advance group rates available. Closed all major holidays. 13034 River Rd., Destrehan, 877.453.2095. www.destrehanplantation.org.

DRINK & LEARN Cocktail historian Elizabeth Pearce leads these fun and informative tippling tours through the Quarter. 504.578.8280. www.drinkandlearn.com GALLIER HOUSE The 1857 home of renowned New Orleans architect James Gallier Jr. is decorated and furnished in the style of the 1860s. 1132 Royal St., 504.525.5661. www.hgghh.org. H GRAY LINE TOURSCL001379 Gray Line has been showcasing New Orleans to visitors since 1924, whether by motor coach, on foot or aboard an authentic riverboat. Tour options feature nearby swamps and bayous, plantations, city highlights, riverboat cruises, French Quarter and Garden District walking tours, a cocktail and historic bar tour and evening outings. 400 Toulouse St., 504.569.1401. www.graylineneworleans.com. HARRAH'S CASINOCL001359 The South’s largest casino features 2,100 slots and 104 table games. 8 Canal St., 504.533.6000. www.harrahsneworleans.com. HERMANN-GRIMA HOUSECL001359 Built in 1831, this house/museum offers visitors a glimpse into New Orleans’ Creole past. The house features the Quarter’s only horse stable and functioning outdoor kitchen. 820 St. Louis St., 504.525.5661. www.hgghh.org. H HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTIONCL00140 Combining a museum, research center and publishing house, the Historic New Orleans Collection

is dedicated to studying, preserving and sharing the Gulf South region’s history and culture. The museum offers changing exhibitions and its Louisiana History Galleries, with 10 permanent displays tracing the area’s multilayered past. 533 Royal St., 504.523.4662. www.hnoc.org. HOUMAS HOUSE PLANTATION AND GARDENSCL003807 This stunning plantation home is famous for its imposing Greek Revival architecture and lush grounds. The in-house restaurant, Latil’s Landing, features fine dining fit for a sugar baron. Tours are offered daily. 40136 Hwy. 942, Darrow, 225.473.9380. www.houmashouse.com. JACKSON SQUARECL001359 The heart of the French Quarter was originally known as Place d’Armes, and was renamed to honor President Andrew Jackson, whose statue anchors the square. Decatur and St. Ann streets. LE PETIT THÉATRE DU VIEUX CARRÉCL001359 This historic space houses one the nation’s longest-running community playhouses. Step into the adjacent Tableau restaurant for pre- and posttheater cocktails. 616 St. Peters St., 504.522.2081. www.lepetittheatre.com. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUMSCL001359 The Louisiana State Museum operates five venues in the French Quarter: the Cabildo, where the signing of the Louisiana Purchase took place; the Presbytère, home to a permanent Mardi Gras exhibit; the circa-1789 Madame John’s Legacy; the 1850

House, which explores antebellum life; and the Old U.S. Mint, home to the New Orleans Jazz Museum. Various locations, 504.568.6968. www.louisianastatemuseum.org. MAHALIA JACKSON THEATRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTSCL001359 This 2,100 seat theater, located in scenic Armstrong Park, received a multimillion-dollar, post-Katrina overhaul. The venue is home to performances by the New Orleans Opera and the New Orleans Ballet, as well as national touring acts. N. Rampart and St. Ann streets, 504.525.1052. www.mahaliajacksontheatre.com. MARDI GRAS WORLDCL001359 It’s Carnival time all year long inside the workshops of Kern Studios, the world’s largest float builder. Tours are offered daily. 1380 Port of New Orleans Pl., 504.361.7821. www.mardigrasworld.com. MERCEDES-BENZ SUPERDOME AND SMOOTHIE KING CENTERCL001359 Home of the New Orleans Saints, the Superdome is the largest covered arena in the world. Its smaller cousin, the Smoothie King Center, is home to the Pelicans, the city’s NBA team, as well as the site of major concerts. 11500 Poydras St., 504.587.3663. www.mbsuperdome.com. 1501 Dave Dixon Dr., 504.587.3663. www.smoothiekingcenter.com. H NATIONAL WWWII MUSEUMCL001408 Designated by Congress as America’s official World War II museum, this rapidly expanding facility explores the nation’s experience during warWHERE GUEST B OOK

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time. From the Normandy invasion to the Pacific campaign to life on the home front, this award-winning museum pays homage to those who fought and lived through the titanic global struggle. The U.S. Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Center spotlights wartime aircraft, while the Victory Theater showcases the 4-D film “Beyond All Boundaries” and the new Campaigns of Courage pavilion houses the “Road to Berlin” and “Road to Tokyo” exhibits. 945 Magazine St., 504.527.6012. www.nationalww2museum.org. NEW ORLEANS FAIR GROUNDS RACE COURSECL001359 In operation since 1872, this ranks as the nation’s third-oldest Thoroughbred race course. The site serves as home base for the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. 1751 Gentilly Blvd., 504.944.5515. www.fairgroundsneworleans.com. H NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ARTCL00142 One of the South’s finest museums, featuring an extensive collection from the 15th through 20th centuries, with a special focus on European and American paintings, along with rotating touring exhibits. The free Besthoff Sculpture Garden offers more than 60 sculptures by major 20th-century artists spread over five acres. 1 Collins C. Diboll Circle (City Park) 504.658.4100. www.noma.org. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUMCL001359 This former apothecary housed the nation’s first licensed pharmacist. See 19th-century “miracle” drugs. 514 Chartres St., 504.565.8027. www.pharmacymuseum.org. 68

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H NEW ORLEANS PLANTATION COUNTRY CL003807 This nonprofit helps visitors navigate the area’s various plantation tours. Ten historic homes, each with its own architectural style and interesting backstory, in three separate parishes are represented. Itineraries, events, activities, dining options and additional attractions are also highlighted. 985.359.2562. www.neworleansplantationcountry. com. H NEW ORLEANS STEAMBOAT COMPANYCL003807 The grandeur of the Mississippi River and the mystique of New Orleans history and heritage combine for memorable experiences aboard the steamboat Natchez. Choose from harbor cruises or a dinner jazz cruise. Cruises depart from behind Jax Brewery. 2 Canal St., 504.569.1401. www.steamboatnatchez.com. NOTTOWAY PLANTATION CL003807 The famed “White Castle of Louisiana,” resting on 37 acres of land, is one of the largest antebellum homes in the South. Tours are offered daily. Overnight accommodations available. 30970 Louisiana Hwy. 405, White Castle, 225.545.2730. www.nottoway.com. OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ARTCL001359 The most comprehensive collection of its kind, this Smithsonian Institution affiliate offers a fresh, new look at four centuries of the American South with emphasis on photography, outsider art and the richness of the region’s cultural diversity. 925 Camp St., 504.539.9600. www.ogdenmuseum.org.

OLD URSULINES CONVENTCL001359 Dating to 1727, this is the oldest edifice in the Mississippi River Valley and the sole surviving building from the French Colonial period in the U.S. Tours are given M-Sa. 1100 Chartres St., 504.529.3040. www.stlouiscathedral.org. ORPHEUM THEATERCL001359 Reopened following a floor-to-ceiling renovation, this jaw-dropping 1,500 seat theater (home of the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra) features two balcony levels, VIP box seating, six bars—some located in the stairwells. 129 Roosevelt Way, 504.274.4870. www.orpheumnola.com. PITOT HOUSE MUSEUMCL001359 Located along Bayou St. John, this circa-1799 home, built for New Orleans’ first mayor, is an excellent example of a Creole plantation house. Open W-Sa. 1440 Moss St., 504.4820312. www.louisianalandmarks.org. H PORT OF NEW ORLEANS CL003807 More than one million passengers pass through the Crescent City’s cruise terminal each year, making it one of the most popular destinations in the nation to embark/disembark. 1350 Port of New Orleans Pl., 504.522.2551. www.portno.com. PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTERCL001359 An essential stop for fans of New Orelans architecture, the PRC contains a wealth of information on the city’s buildings and neighborhoods. 923 Tchoupitoulas St., 504.581.7032. www.prcno.org.

SAENGER THEATRECL001359 This circa-1927 baroque beauty plays host to the popular Broadway Across America series, in addition to major music and comedy acts. 1111 Canal St., 504.287.0351. www.saengernola.com. ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC CHURCHCL001359 Founded by free people of color in 1841, St. Augustine, located in the historic Tremé neighborhood, is the second-oldest African-American Catholic church in the nation. 1210 Gov. Nicolls St., 504.525.5934. www.staugchurch.org. ST. LOUIS CATHEDRALCL001359 Established as a parish in 1720, this magnificent circa-1849 cathedral was designated a minor basilica in 1964 by Pope Paul VI, and visited by Pope John Paul II in 1987. Mass said daily. 615 Pere Antoine Alley (Jackson Square), 504.525.9585. www.stlouiscathedral.org. SOUTHERN FOOD AND BEVERAGE MUSEUMCL001359 Devoted to “the understanding and celebration of food, drink and culture of the South,” SoFAB features rotating and permanent exhibits. 1507 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 504.569.0405. www.southernfood.org. WHITNEY PLANTATIONCL001359 Recently opened to the public for the first time in its 262-year history, this plantation explores slavery through a variety of exhibits, historic structures and moving first-person accounts. Guided tours are offered. 5099 Hwy. 18, Wallace, 225.265.3300. www.whitneyplantation.com.


ADVERTISER INDEX SHOPPING

DINING

GALLERIES & ANTIQUES

NIGHTLIFE

Adorn & Conquer ...................................... 49

Antoine’s Restaurant................................. 5 1

Antieau Gallery.......................................... 62

Pat O’Brien’s .............................................. 65

Art & Eyes ............................................8 & 49

Arnaud’s .......................................................52

Antiques de Provence.. ............................60

Three Keys ...................................................53

Bungalows ...................................................47

Brennan’s .....................................................55

Bevolo Gas & Electric Lights ....................2

Cigar Factory New Orleans

Briquette ....................................................... 11

Brass Monkey ................................................2

ATTRACTIONS

& Museum.. .................................................i9

Café Beignet.................................................23

Craig Tracy Gallery ................................... 2 1

City Park .......................................................i 5

La Petit Fleur ...................................... 5 & 48

Chophouse New Orleans ............................1

Elliott Gallery .............................................. 6 1

Gray Line Tours ......................................... 69

Madame Aucoin Perfume .........................i5

Court of Two Sisters ................................ 54

Fischer-Gambino................................ 5 & 62

Historic New Orleans Collection ............62

Marion Cage ....................................... 45 & i5

The Gumbo Shop .......................................5 7

Keil’s Antiques ......................................i2 & 3

National WWII Museum .............................9

Nicoll’s Limousine Service ..............42 & i9

Josephine Estelle .......................................53

M. S. Rau Inc .................................................3

New Orleans Museum of Art. .................. 10

Oscar Rajo Photography......................... i10

Krystal.......................................................... 56

Martin Lawrence Gallery ....................3 & 13

New Orleans Plantation Country ..........C4

Planet Beach ................................................i9

Landry’s Seafood ....................................... 51

Moss Antiques .............................................. 2

New Orleans Steamboat Co.. ................. C3

Porter Lyons ............................................... 49

Miyako Sushi Bar & Hibachi.....................58

Naghi’s ..........................................................48

Nottoway Plantation.. ................................i7

Promenade Fine Fabrics ......................... 45

New Orleans Creole Cookery .................. 11

Royal Antiques ............................................. 2

Port of New Orleans. ............................... 70

Queork ......................................................... 48

Pascal’s Manale...........................................56

Terrance Osborne Gallery ........................ 43

Shoe Be Do ................................................ 45

Red Fish Grill...............................................5 5

Vintage 329 .............................3, 31, 47 & 49

Wellington & Company ............. 7, 48 & 49

Remoulade...................................................54

©MIGNON FAGET

Restaurant R’evolution .............................52

WHERE GUEST B OOK

71


Colorful Culture LONG AFTER THE MARDI GRAS PARADES HAVE PASSED, NEW ORLEANS’ GOOD TIMES SPIRIT LINGERS ON. WHERE’S THE PARTY? WHERE YOU MAKE IT.

72

W H E R E G U E ST B O O K

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT ©DLEWIS33/ISTOCK.COM

PARTING SHOT


PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT


325 ROYAL STREET • NEW ORLEANS, LA 70130 • (504) 522-4552 www.keilsantiques.com


I do THE NEW ORLEANS WEDDING GUIDE

The I DoP Book 3 ROMOTION


THE I DO WEDDING GUIDE

Your Wedding Day Wedding venues are in high demand all year round. Sometimes, the more creative you get, the more obstacles you'll need to handle. From the start, match the venue to what style of wedding you would like to have. One of the biggest setbacks can be “no music after 10 pm”—so check the rules and work backwards. Happily ever after begins at the venue.

 101

metropolitan New Orleans area run the gamut, from the most traditional hotel weddings to weddings at historic homes, City Park, Audubon Park, the racetrack, spaces overlooking the Mississippi River, beautiful churches, restaurants with lush courtyards, plantations, jazz clubs and so much more. 4

The I Do Book

PROMOTION

©ANNA KIM PHOTOGRAPHY; (OPENING PAGE) ©OSCAR RAJO PHOTOGRAPHY

Venue choices in the


Your Eccentric Scent Destination 608 Rue Bienville, New Orleans www.madameaucoinperfume.com

New Orleans’ premier destination for alternative bridal contemporary handmade jewelry 3807 Magazine Street, New Orleans, LA 70115 504.891.8848

PROMOTION

The I Do Book

5


Tradition The second-line parade and handkerchief originated with New Orleans' famous jazz funerals, and, either due to the heat or just the ŠOSCAR RAJO PHOTOGRAPHY

spirit of the occasion, the umbrella followed. This tradition has carried over into Southern weddings, signifying the beginning of a new life for the bride and groom. Permits are necessary to second line in the streets; check with New Orleans City Hall.

6

The I Do Book

PROMOTION


PROMOTION

The I Do Book

7


Celebrate Black and white photos are timeless. Give each other gifts on your wedding night. Preserve your gown professionally. Be as creative as you'd like. Pick a song for your first dance that you both love. Buy the gown that fits now. Involve the groom; it's his wedding too. Hire a pro to do your wedding website. Smile when you walk down the aisle. Store your mementos carefully. Wear waterproof mascara. Be in the moment; you'll want to remember this day. Make it personal, make it your own.

(FACING PAGE) ŠSOUBRETTE/ISTOCK PHOTO

Remember to say "I do!"

PROMOTION


CIGAR FACTORY NEW ORLEANS COME

WATCH THE

MASTERS AT WORK!

HAND-ROLLING CIGARS IN THE FRENCH QUARTER SINCE 1999. RESERVE A CIGAR MAKER FOR YOUR

NEXT SPECIAL EVENT.

WE’RE OPEN, WE’RE ROLLIN 7 DAYS A WEEK Visit our Cigar Museum, walk in humidor & lounge 415 Decatur St 10-10 pm 206 Bourbon St. 11 am- midnight

101437-XX-115.indd 1

Visit Our New 10/28/16 Cigar Social Clubs

9:14:04 AM

Pensacola, FL 850-495-3308 Destin, FL 850-650-2235 www.cigarfactoryneworleans.com Mail Order: 1-800-500-0775

PROMOTION

The I Do Book

9


 101

Offering a charging station is a considerate gesture to show your guests you care about their personal needs. Plus you want to see tons of Instragram photos of your wonderful reception! Be sure to include a sign with your hashtag.

Wedding Day Wonderful Curating a specialty cocktail can provide color, flavor and excitement to your reception. Serving one or two custom beverages will give the party a personal feel Š ARTEMZ/SHUTTERSTOCK

and won't break your budget. Try nicknames, favorite places or something else that tells your story to name your drinks.

PROMOTION


STEAMBOAT

Cruise. Dine. Dance. Last authentic steamboat on the Mississippi River Three cruises a day from the French Quarter Day & Evening Jazz cruises; Dinner, Lunch & Brunch options

Calliope Concerts & Engine Room Visits Inside and outside seating Live Jazz on all cruises

‡6WHDPERDW1DWFKH]FRP


Guestbook New Orleans 2018  
Guestbook New Orleans 2018