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MAUI GUESTBOOK is part of a series of four books that Where® Hawai‘i will release on all the major Hawaiian Islands in 2019-2020, including O‘ahu, Kaua‘i and Hawai‘i Island. Each island will be represented with its own unique, iconic landmark as the cover art. These books are designed to entertain and educate visitors about each respective island, and to tell the stories of Hawai‘i in an engaging and

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artistic manner. We hope you enjoy the book as much as we took pleasure in writing about Hawai‘i’s Hawaiʻi

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treasures, places and people.


MAUI MORRIS VISITOR PUBLICATIONS MVP I EDITORIAL & DESIGN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Margaret Martin MANAGING EDITOR Jennifer McKee

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MVP MAUI SALES OFFICE 677 Ala Moana Blvd., Suite 700, Honolulu, HI 96813 Phone: 808.955.2378; Fax: 808.955.2379 www.wheretraveler.com Where GuestBook® publishes editions for the following U.S. cities and regions: Arizona, Atlanta, Boston, Charlotte, Chicago, Colorado, Dallas, Florida Gold Coast (Fort Lauderdale & Palm Beach), Fort Worth, Island of Hawai‘i, Houston, Jacksonville/St. Augustine/Amelia Island, Kansas City, Kaua‘i, Los Angeles, Maui, Miami, Nashville, New Orleans, New York, Northern Arizona, O‘ahu, Orange County (CA), Orlando, Philadelphia, Reno/Lake Tahoe, San Antonio, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle/The Eastside/Tacoma, Southwest Florida (Naples), Tampa Bay, Tucson, Washington D.C. ©2019 by Morris Visitor Publications. All rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, in whole or in part, without the express prior written permission of the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility to any party for the content of any advertisement in this publication, including any errors and omissions therein. By placing an order for an advertisement, the advertiser agrees to indemnify the publisher against any claims relating to the advertisement. Where GuestBook® is produced by Morris Visitor Publications (MVP), a division of Morris Communications, Co., LLC. 725 Broad St., Augusta, GA 30901, morrismedianetwork.com. Where® magazine and the where® logo are registered trademarks of Morris Visitor Publications. MVP publishes Where magazine, Where® QuickGuide, IN New York, and IN London magazines, and a host of other maps, guides, and directories for business and leisure travelers, and is the publisher for the Hospitality Industry Association.

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Our Waterfall collection comes in several styles and sizes and is available in 14K Yellow, White or Rose Gold.

An incomparable collection of Hawaiian and Island lifestyle jewelry MAUI

LI: Whalers Village • Hyatt Regency Maui LAHAINA: 858 Front Street, across from Bubba Gump • 744 Front Street, across from the seawall • Lah WAILEA: The Shops at Wailea, Upper level • Grand Wailea Resort KAHULUI: Queen Ka‘ahumanu Center OAHU • KAUAI • BIG ISLAND OF HAWAII • NCL PRIDE OF AMERICA

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NTENTS

MAUI MAP ISLAND OVERVIEW

A quick tour of Maui shows the different regions and various points of interest that are not to be missed.

FIRST LOOK MUST-SEE SIGHTS WHILE VISITING THE ISLAND

Beyond its award-winning beaches, Maui is home to an award-winning Ocean Center, ‘Īao Needle, Molokini, Ha‘ikū Mill and Mount Haleakalā.

SAFE HAVEN BLUE SHIELD

NOAA’s National Marine Sanctuary system protects a network of underwater parks spanning more than 600,000 square miles. BY SIMPLICIO PARAGAS

POETRY IN MOTION CULTURAL PRACTICE

Hawai‘i’s collective history and traditions are kept alive by chanted words (oli) and accompanying gestures. BY ALLAN SEIDEN

ISLAND VIEWS FROM VERDANT VALLEYS TO MOONLIKE CRATERS

Affectionately called the “Valley Isle,” Maui’s landscape is a beauty to behold at every turn, from east to west and north to south.

OFF ISLAND NEIGHBOR ISLES

Accessible by a ferry ride, nearby Lāna‘i and Moloka‘i offer serene retreats from the hustle and bustle of resorts.

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ISLAND SONG TWIN FALLS

The road to Hāna leads to many spectacular sights, including cascading waterfalls.

SPECIAL SECTION DINING IN PARADISE

Maui’s agritourism continues to take root, giving visitors access to the source of their food. Also, learn about the cultural significance of Hawaiian sea salt.

ON THE COVER: THE WEST MAUI MOUNTAINS OR MAU KAHALEWAI, WHICH MEAN “HOLDING HOUSE OF WAT CONSTITUTES THE WESTER ONE-QUARTER OF MAUI. ©GREG BALFOUR EVANS/ ALAMY STOCK PHOTO


Our Wave collection comes in several styles and sizes and is available in 14K Yellow, White or Rose Gold.

An incomparable collection of Hawaiian and Island lifestyle jewelry MAUI

LI: Whalers Village • Hyatt Regency Maui LAHAINA: 858 Front Street, across from Bubba Gump • 744 Front Street, across from the seawall • Lah WAILEA: The Shops at Wailea, Upper level • Grand Wailea Resort KAHULUI: Queen Ka‘ahumanu Center OAHU • KAUAI • BIG ISLAND OF HAWAII • NCL PRIDE OF AMERICA

NaHoku.com • 1-800-260-3912 Best of HONOLULU MAGAZINE 2018

HAWAII’S BEST

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GATE

e Island of Maui

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MAUI, THE SECOND LARGEST of the Hawaiian Islands, was named for the demigod Maui, the superman of

Polynesian myth. He is known as Maui tiki-tiki—Maui the Wonder Worker. The wonders of Maui are many, from the historic town of Lahaina, once the major whaling center of the Pacific, to the royal resort of Kā‘anapali and the fabulous shopping and dining in West and South Maui. From the summit of Haleakalā to the beaches of Nāpili and Kapalua, from the charming towns of Upcountry to the beautiful curves of the road to Hāna, the Valley Isle offers the visitor much to explore, experience and discover.


Pink Mother-of-Pearl and Rose Gold Collection Na Hoku is Hawaii’s only authorized retailer of KABANA jewelry

An incomparable collection of Hawaiian and Island lifestyle jewelry MAUI

LI: Whalers Village • Hyatt Regency Maui LAHAINA: 858 Front Street, across from Bubba Gump • 744 Front Street, across from the seawall • Lah WAILEA: The Shops at Wailea, Upper level • Grand Wailea Resort KAHULUI: Queen Ka‘ahumanu Center OAHU • KAUAI • BIG ISLAND OF HAWAII • NCL PRIDE OF AMERICA

NaHoku.com • 1-800-260-3912 Best of HONOLULU MAGAZINE 2018

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People’s Choice Awards The Star-Advertiser 2018

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GATE

awaiian Islands

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Ni‘ihau The “forbidden” island is known for exquisite shell jewelry. Kaua‘i Magnificent sea cliffs and canyons distinguish the Garden Isle. O‘ahu Known for Waikīkī beach, the state capital, shopping, Pearl Harbor and more. Moloka‘i You’ll find Old Hawai‘i charm, mule rides and famous Moloka‘i sweet bread. Lāna‘i Lovely Mānele Bay has posh resorts and pine-studded uplands. Maui Come to the Valley Isle for whale watching, art, Mount Haleakalā and the 54-bridge Hāna Highway. Kaho‘olawe Once a Navy firing range, the island is now dedicated to the preservation of Hawaiian culture. Hawai‘i The Island of Hawai‘i (also known as the Big Island) has four active volcanoes and diverse scenery.


Collection available exclusively at Na Hoku

An incomparable collection of Hawaiian and Island lifestyle jewelry MAUI

LI: Whalers Village • Hyatt Regency Maui LAHAINA: 858 Front Street, across from Bubba Gump • 744 Front Street, across from the seawall • Lah WAILEA: The Shops at Wailea, Upper level • Grand Wailea Resort KAHULUI: Queen Ka‘ahumanu Center OAHU • KAUAI • BIG ISLAND OF HAWAII • NCL PRIDE OF AMERICA

NaHoku.com • 1-800-260-3912 Best of HONOLULU MAGAZINE 2018

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FIRST LOOK

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©DAVID FLEETHAM/ALAMY

Maui’s natural landscape comes in many shapes and forms, from the crater-like surface at the summit of Mount Haleakalā to the lush vegetation inside ‘Īao Valley.


Molokini

Snorkeling is rarely better than at Molokini, less than three miles from South Maui’s Mā‘ Harbor, where most Molokini tours begin. A marine sanctuary below water and a bird san above, this 23-acre volcanic tuff cone is famous for its crystal-clear water and visibility o than 100 feet nearly every day. The water teems with thousands of colorful fish, turtles, r and scurrying crustaceans—numbering 250 species in all. Many of these critters are the d water variety you will find only on Molokini but not on near-shore snorkel sites.

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ng Ho Temple Museum

inese immigrants arrived on Maui aboard trading ng ships, destined to build tunnels and irrigation through the mountains. They formed the Wo Hing o nurture the ex-pat community, providing social , support in times of crisis and housing for retired It also supported the revolutionary activities of Yat-sen, renowned as the Father of Modern China provisional president of the Republic of China. nt St., Lahaina, www.lahainarestoration.org

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Maui Ocean Center

The largest aquarium in Hawai‘i, this indoor/outdoor marine park at Mā‘alaea Harbor boasts more than 60 exhibits dedicated to the conservation of the Islands’ indigenous sea life. The Center’s new Humpbacks of Hawai‘i Exhibit & Sphere breaks the barrier to do what has never been done before: bring guests eye-to-eye wit Maui’s humpback whales in their realm beneath the wa As the first-of-its-kind in Hawai‘i, the Sphere marks a new era in the confluence of technology and marine observation. The new experience will allow guests to connect with humpbacks in their world through the integration of 4k imagery, 3D active glasses and a 7.1 surround sound system. Open daily between 10am a 4pm. Showings run every half hour. 192 Mā‘alaea Roa Wailuku, 808.270.7000, www.mauioceancenter.com


Our Horizon collection comes in several styles and sizes and is available in 14K Yellow, White or Rose Gold.

An incomparable collection of Hawaiian and Island lifestyle jewelry MAUI

LI: Whalers Village • Hyatt Regency Maui LAHAINA: 858 Front Street, across from Bubba Gump • 744 Front Street, across from the seawall • Lah WAILEA: The Shops at Wailea, Upper level • Grand Wailea Resort KAHULUI: Queen Ka‘ahumanu Center OAHU • KAUAI • BIG ISLAND OF HAWAII • NCL PRIDE OF AMERICA

NaHoku.com • 1-800-260-3912 Best of HONOLULU MAGAZINE 2018

HAWAII’S BEST

People’s Choice Awards The Star-Advertiser 2018

HAWAII MAGAZINE Readers’ Choice Award 2019


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Needle

in green foliage, the iconic ‘Īao Needle is a asalt pinnacle that looms over the ‘Īao stream rrounded by the walls of the Pu‘u Kukui, r of a dormant volcano in the West Maui ns. The Needle rises out of a dramatic tableau ms and sharp cliffs in thick vegetation, often d in mist. ‘Īao Stream (fed by up to 400 inches er year) cuts through the valley, and there are hiking trails with varying degrees of difficulty, ure to challenging. It is said that the bones of eftains are buried in the vicinity of the needle. cave containing the remains of royal elders, is to be hidden somewhere in the valley. The state park is located just west of Wailuku. of ‘Īao Valley Road (Hwy. 32)

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Hui No‘eau Visual Art Museum

The exhibition program and galleries of Hui No‘eau Visual Arts Center play an integral role in Maui’s art community and feature the works of local artists and creative minds from around the world. The unique gallery shop showcases the art of Hui No‘eau member artists, as well as a wide variety of handcrafted and museum-quality gift items. 2841 Baldwin Ave., Makawao, 808.572.6560, www.huinoeau.com

Seven Sacred Pools

A series of cascading waterfal and tranquil pools flow throu the ‘Ohe‘o Gulch, which is the official name for this attractio The terraced cold springs in East Maui rival any natural da spa. Trickling water spills ove tiers of lava beds, creating up 24 distinct pools that flow fro the mountains all the way to the ocean. Kīpahulu section o Haleakalā National Park.


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Beaches

e stunning black sands of Wai‘ānapanapa rk in East Maui to the dramatic red granules at u in Hāna, Maui’s 30 miles of beaches consistently ome of “America’s Best.” No one beach is alike with Kapalua’s DT Fleming Beach, Kā‘anapali Wailea Beach, Mākena Beach, Kama‘ole Beach d Kapalua Bay Beach among the most popular.

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Ha‘ikū Mill

With its unmatched beauty and elegance, unique past a lush, tropical location, Ha‘ikū Mill is one of Maui’s cove landmarks. Steeped in more than 150 years of history, w roots in the island’s sugar cane industry, the Mill boasts breathtaking mix of French-inspired décor, vine-drape ruins and spectacular flora. From historical botanical tours and displays of relics to farm-to-table dinners and tropical fruits, Ha‘ikū Mill belongs on your itinerary. 250 Ha‘ikū Road., Ha‘ikū, www.haikumill.com


Be Original. Be


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eakalā

nd’s dominant geological presence is the 10,023-foot-high Haleakalā, the world’s largest dormant Its most magnificent feature is the crater itself: 3,000 feet deep, 2.5 miles across and a circumference es. Haleakalā National Park encompasses 34,000 acres, including dry forests, rain forests, deserts ropical beaches. Summit sunrise viewing reservations are now required. rvations, visit www.recreation.gov.

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SAFE HAVENS NOAA’s National Marine Sanctuary system protects a network of underwater parks encompassing more than 600,000 square miles, which includes 13 national marine sanctuaries, and Papahānaumokuākea and Rose Atoll marine national monuments. BY SIMPLICIO PARAGAS


the early ’60s to late 1970s, a shift in paradigms o emerge across the country. The gay rights nt gained momentum. Public concern over mental issues led to Earth Day. And an oil spill off arbara, Calif., in 1969, prompted Congress to pass ine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act in own today as the National Marine Sanctuaries Act, ortant piece of legislation was signed into law by t Richard Nixon and directed the National Oceanic mospheric Administration (NOAA) to lay the ork for the National Marine Sanctuary system, now comprised of 13 sanctuaries and two marine monuments. he past 40 years, our national marine sanctuaries rked to protect special places in America’s ocean at Lakes waters,” says John Armor, director of Office of National Marine Sanctuaries. “A healthy the basis for thriving recreation, tourism and comactivities, and national marine sanctuaries work rtners and stakeholders to promote responsible, ble ocean uses.” mpassing more than 600,000 square miles of U.S. nd Great Lakes waters from Washington State lorida Keys and from New England to American national marine sanctuaries are special areas ed for long-term protection and conservation, part of our nation’s legacy to future generations. ai‘i, the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale Marine Sanctuary was created by Congress in protect humpback whales and their habitat, which pproximately 1,370 square miles of federal and ters in the main Hawaiian Islands. nistered by a partnership between NOAA’s Office nal Marine Sanctuaries and the state of Hawai‘i the Department of Land and Natural Resources, tuary is a vital component for the protection of

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the humpback whale population, as it is the only place in the United States where humpback whales reproduce. Scientists estimate that two-thirds (approximately 12,000 whales) of the entire North Pacific humpback whale population migrates to Hawaiian waters to breed, calve and nurse their young each year between November and May. “The Sanctuary has done extraordinarily well with humpback whales for over 20 years,” said DLNR Chair Suzanne Case in a released statement. “We look forward to building upon its accomplishments, as well as highlighting its successes, particularly the Sanctuary’s world-renowned entanglement response program.” The Hawaiian Islands Disentanglement Network works with the community and partners to track and respond to entangled or otherwise distressed humpback whales. Since its establishment in 2002, the network has freed more than 22 entangled whales and recovered almost two miles of fishing gear. This network involves more than 300 trained responders across the main Hawaiian Islands and is world renowned for designing innovative methods and tools for safely freeing whales. The Sanctuary’s other signature outreach and awareness program, Ocean Count, celebrated its 23rd anniversary in 2019. The program recruits volunteers on O‘ahu, Kaua‘i and Hawai‘i islands to conduct shoreline observations of humpback whales on one day each January, February and March during peak whale season. Both locals and tourists alike flock to the shoreline to participate in this awardwinning volunteer program. Ocean Count has grown from 150 volunteers participating in 1996 on O‘ahu to more than 2,000 volunteers across the four main Hawaiian Islands. Further up the archipelago, the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands consists of 10 islands and atolls that stretch across 1,200 miles northwest of Ni‘ihau. This region is rich in biological diversity and steeped in ancient lore. On June 15, 2006, the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Marine National

“For the past 40 years, our

national mari sanctuaries ha worked to prot special places America’s ocea and Great Lak waters.” –John A

NOAA’s National Marine Sanctuary system protects a network of underwater parks which encompass more than 600,00 square miles.


nument was founded by Presidential Proclamation 8031, blishing not only the largest marine protected area he world at the time, but also a site created expressly to ect both natural and cultural heritage. A year later, it given its Hawaiian name, Papahānaumokuākea, which esents the union of two mythological Hawaiian deities— ahānaumoku (Earth Mother) and Wākea (Sky Father)— together gave rise to the Hawaiian Archipelago, the plant and the Hawaiian people. The remote region is considered a sacred place as enced by the many ancestral sites on two islands in icular, Nihoa and Mokumanamana, both on the U.S. onal Register of Historic Places. Papahānaumokuākea so home to a variety of post-Western-contact historic urces, such as those associated with World War II’s ous Battle of Midway and the 19th century commercial ling industry. apahānaumokuākea provides a safe habitat and nesting unds for 7,000 species, including the threatened green turtle and the critically endangered Hawaiian monk as well as the 14 million seabirds representing 22 cies, including the oldest known living bird in the wild, ysan albatross named Wisdom, who is at least 68 years and has raised as many as 36 chicks in her lifetime.

The coral reefs of Papahānaumokuākea are among the most pristine on earth. Large apex predators, such as sharks, giant trevally and large groupers, dominate the waters, indicating a thriving and intact ecosystem. Nearly every research expedition to the Monument yields discoveries of new marine species and features never before seen. Encompassing 582,578 square miles of the Pacific Ocean, Papahānaumokuākea remains the largest contiguous fully protected conservation area under the U.S. flag, and one of the largest in the world, bigger than the nations of Greece, Cuba and the United Arab Emirates combined. On July 30, 2010, Papahānaumokuākea was inscribed as a mixed (natural and cultural) UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is the first—and still only—mixed World Heritage Site in the United States and the second World Heritage Site in Hawai‘i. In July 2016, researchers celebrated the achievements made in bringing nature and culture to the global conservation scene with Papahānaumokuākea’s sixth anniversary as the nation’s first (and still only) “mixed” (natural and cultural) UNESCO World Heritage Site. In June 2019, Papahānaumokuākea will mark more than a decade of accomplishments in management, protection and discovery as the nation’s first National Marine Monument.

(This page) T Hawaiian mo is one of the endangered s (Opposite pa The Hawaiian sea turtle is t indigenous re found in Haw

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POETRY IN MOTION Hula’s evolution as a storytelling art continues to thrive

ries ago when mythical gods and people shared these Islands, and time sured by the waxing and waning of the moon, the hula was born. The ces were linked to Pele, goddess of volcanic fires, who asked her younger ‘iaka, to dance and sing for her. The Pele cycle provided the hula with oire that was both religious and entertaining. Rhythmic and poetic mele) combined with disciplined motion to tell stories of love and passion, d revenge, and loyalty and betrayal, all part of Pele’s tempestuous nature. e the hula was distinctively Hawaiian, it evolved from the rhythmic rought to Hawai‘i by settlers from the Tahitian islands more than

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©CULTURA CREATIVE/ALAMY

BY ALLAN SEIDEN


s the art waiian

It es all hear, ell, taste, nd feel. life.”

Maiki Aiu Lake

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a thousand years ago. When contact between Tahiti and Hawai‘i was lost, the Hawaiian culture evolved in isolation. Hula was part of that evolution, with dancers inspired by poetic chants and paced by shark-skin-covered drums (pahu), gourd rattles (‘uli‘uli), slit-bamboo sticks (pu‘ili), tapping sticks (kala‘au), clapping stones (‘ili‘ili) and dogtooth anklets (kupe‘e niho‘ilio). A well-performed hula brought honor to the gods, ancestors, chiefs, kumu (teachers) and dancers. The most renowned dancers were trained on Kaua‘i at a halau hula (hula school) at Ha‘ena, on a hillside at the base of the Nāpali coast’s easternmost cliffs where, it is told, Hi‘iaka had once danced for Pele. Although Pele and Hi‘iaka were closely linked to hula’s origins, it was the goddess Laka, niece or sister to Pele (legends vary), who became the spiritual patroness of the dance and the dancers. One chant attributes the birth of the hula not to Hi‘iaka, but to Laka, who is said to have performed the first hula on Moloka‘i. In addition to the Pele cycle, there were hula that honored the genealogies of powerful chiefs who maintained dancers as part of their court. Both men and women danced

the hula, men wearing a simple kapa malo (loinclot pounded bark). Women wore short kapa skirts. Haku (head garlands) brought Laka’s presence to the danc Anklets of dog teeth rattled as the dancers moved in uni the chanter directing the dancers’ movements and draw their vocal participation. Dancers were trained in movements that could reconfigured in a wide number of storytelling form Hand gestures expressed such ideas as love or ange objects like the moon, rain or a fragrant flower. While t were standards and rituals attached to the dance, the differed island-to-island, each halau influenced by the s of its kumu. Oli (chants), mele and hula were treasu possessions, and passed on from generation to generati In “Shoal of Time: A History of the Hawaiian Islan historian Gavan Daws writes: “The natives would practic the hot sun for days on end. Drums pounded, gourds rat singers chanted, and hundreds of dancers wearing garla of green leaves and flowers and dog-tooth anklets mo endlessly to and fro in lines, their brown skin gliste with sweat, with no sign of boredom or tiredness.”


Discipline and sensuality are equally vital components he hula’s storytelling style, with movements seeking e and perfection, offering spiritual harmony between cers and the subjects of their dance. Since dances could for hours, performing the hula required athleticism, anding strength and stamina. There were also seated (hula noho) with its own difficult stylistic motions. The Hawaiians were far less inhibited about suality than the Christian missionaries who came 820 to teach them a more acceptable New England estant way of life. For these early American pioneers,

the hula was of the devil’s making. Everything about it, from the lightly clad dancers to their sensual energy to the theme of other gods, offended missionary morality. Missing the spiritual message and mistaking the sensual for sin, the missionaries sought to repress it, nearly eliminating its practice in the process, particularly as the Native Hawaiian population fell into steep decline and the generation with an understanding of traditional ways died off with few knowledgeable practitioners to replace them. Luckily, in more remote places, where primordial customs lingered, the hula was saved and taught. The few

(This page) H differs from i island, each h influenced by style of its ku (Opposite pa Hula halau m hold hands a symbol of un

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e) Dancers mselves with ear kupe‘e, orate their d ankles. e page) A cer competes nual Merrie Festival.

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kumu who knew the chants and dances safeguarded what was on the verge of being lost and helped pave the way to hula’s restoration. It was King Kalākaua, the “Merrie Monarch”—the same name of an annual event that features an acclaimed hula competition on the Island of Hawai‘i—who is credited with having rescued the hula from oblivion, sponsoring performances at his coronation (1883) and birthday jubilee (1886), supporting its practice and expanding the repertoire with new chants and dances in keeping with Victorian-era sensibilities. Well trained in customary rituals, Kalākaua’s actions were in accordance with chiefly tradition, providing an example and investing his people with a pride in their past, with hula being a powerful symbol of continuity. Hula’s evolution as a storytelling art has enduringly secured a powerful place in contemporary Hawaiian

culture. Presently, two styles of hula are danced, each w its own variations. Hula kahiko follows a more traditi path in terms of costume and theme that are reminiscen the Kalākaua restoration, while hula ‘auana moves tow the present from Kalākaua’s time. Today, hundreds of halau and thousands of dan from around the globe perform hula, learning not only movements but also its spiritual and aesthetic messa A cultural treasure once on the brink of vanishing i wlonger endangered. Kumu and dancers perform to the h est of standards, adapting stylistically in ways that keep hula a living art and a cultural signature that defines w is appealingly unique about Hawai‘i. As legendary kumu hula Maiki Aiu Lake would often “Hula is the art of Hawaiian dance. It expresses all tha hear, see, smell, taste, touch and feel. Hula is life.”


WHERE GUE


ISLAND VIEWS From the posh resorts on the west coast to tropical southern beaches and the rugged charm of Upcountry, no two parts of Maui are alike.

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©MNSTUDIO/ALAMY

Hāna

The road to Hāna is long and winding, hugging Maui’s northeastern shore where unspoiled terrain is reminiscent of yesteryear. The thre hour drive—if you’re leaving from Lahaina or Kīhei—stretches along miles past taro patches, over single-lane bridges, waterfall pools and lush rainforests. You’ll find some of the island’s most striking beach here: the black sand beach of Wai‘ānapanapa State Park, the red san at Kaihalulu and Hāmoa Beach, ranked as one of the best beaches on Ma


AND VIEWS

ountry Maui

away from beach resorts, the bucolic in this part of the island reflects its ural and paniolo (cowboy) roots. On es of Haleakalā, you’ll drive by and farms in the communities wao and Kula. Climbing toward 23-foot Haleakalā summit, you’ll tock, lavender and fruit farms on ng, verdant green farmland. Breathe ent of eucalyptus and pine.

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Kapalua

Surrounded by the protected West Maui Rainforest, Kapalua Resort is nestled between two prominent sanctuaries: Pu‘u Kukui Watershed Preserve and Honolua-Mokulē‘ia Marine Life Conservation District, the shoreline jewel of the 22,000-acre resort. Loosely translated to “arms embracing the sea,” Kapalua is lined with five bays and three white-sand beaches.


AND VIEWS

lea

pular South Maui destination is a uxurious resorts, manicured golf upscale retail, fine dining and one land’s best beaches. Here, expanses culate golden sand, azure waters y swaying palm trees are the stuff proverbial “get away from it all” The area also boasts unrivalled the neighboring islands of Lāna‘i, awe and Molokini Islet.

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Wailuku

Tucked into the foothills of the West Maui Mountains, Wailuku is the island’s municipal center and is a gorgeous landscape of lush vegetation, exotic botanicals and postcardperfect settings. Situated among the streams of the Nā Wai ‘Ehā (four waters) and the lo‘i (irrigated terraces), Wailuku is also the island’s center of taro cultivation—the main ingredient in poi—and the site of the sprawling, 60-acre Maui Tropical Plantation.


F ISLAND

a‘i

has it that hundreds of years ago, man-eating ghosts inhabited this mysterious island. Today, the le Island is home to only approximately 3,000 residents and not a single stoplight to be found. wo cars, a carriage-drawn horse, a tractor and a few pedestrians are considered traffic on this Bordered by 1,000-foot sea cliffs and populated by spotted deer, big horn sheep, Rio Grande and a spectacular variety of rare flora and fauna, Lāna‘i is the place to visit if you want to veer eaten track. Book your passage on Trilogy or Expeditions, the U.S. Coast Guard-certified vessel sses the 15 miles of glittering Pacific Ocean.

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G U I D E TO LO C A L C U I S I N E

Maui

201 9 – 2 02 0

FARM FRESH SALT OF THE EARTH DINING GUIDE


Frommer’s Maui “Its authenticity, intimacy, hospitality, cultural integrity and sheer romantic beauty have made this Maui’s top lū‘au.”

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where GUESTBOOK

®

MAUI

DINING IN PARADISE CONTENTS

ADVERTISING JAMES G. ELLIOTT CO., INC GROUP PUBLISHER William A. Moore III INDEPENDENT SALES CONTRACTOR Debbie De Mello ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Donna Kowalczyk, Nicholas Riopelle SALES COORDINATOR Alice Gustave SALES AND MARKETING SPECIALIST Kimberly Jacks MORRIS VISITOR PUBLICATIONS EDITORIAL | DESIGN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Margaret Martin SENIOR EDITOR Simplicio Paragas CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jennifer Vaz ART DIRECTOR Veronica Montesdeoca PHOTO EDITOR Vincent Hobbs

EDITORIAL | DESIGN MANAGER OF HOSPITALITY RELATIONS, DISTRIBUTION & EVENTS

Sherry Mae Ravago

D6 FARM FRESH

MVP I EXECUTIVE

AGRITOURISM TAKES ROOT Take a tour of various farms—from Kula Country Farms and Ali‘i Kula Lavender Farm to O‘o Farm and Surfing Goat Dairy— which are all located in Maui’s Upcountry.

PRESIDENT Donna W. Kessler CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Dennis Kelly VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS Angela E. Allen HEAD OF DIGITAL Richard H. Brashear II REGIONAL VICE PRESIDENT, SALES

Courtney Fuhrmann

DIRECTOR OF CIRCULATION Scott Ferguson

BY GINA J. BAILEY

MVP I PRODUCTION

D10 SALT OF THE EARTH INDIGENOUS INGREDIENT Maui county, which includes Moloka‘i and Lāna‘i, has its own array of multi-hued Hawaiian salts, available in different varieties and in limited supply.

E-MAIL FOR ALL OF THE ABOVE: FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME@MORRIS.COM

MORRIS COMMUNICATIONS CHAIRMAN William

S. Morris III S. Morris IV

BY SIMPLICIO PARAGAS

PRESIDENT & CEO William

D14 DINING GUIDE RESTAURANT LISTINGS Discover an international array of cuisines around the island.

677 Ala Moana Blvd., Ste. 700 Honolulu, HI 96813 Phone: 808-955-2378; Fax: 808-955-2379 www.wheretraveler.com DINING IN PARADISE® is produced by Morris Visitor Publications (MVP), a division of Morris Communications, Co., LLC. 725 Broad St., Augusta, GA 30901. Where® magazine and the where® logo are registered trademarks of Morris Visitor Publications. MVP publishes Where magazine, Where® QuickGuide, IN New York, and IN London magazines, and a host of other maps, guides, and directories for business and leisure travelers, and is the publisher for the Hospitality Industry Association.

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Maui

ON THE COVER

2019– 2020

MVP IS A PROUD SPONSOR OF LES CLEFS D’OR USA

FARM FRESH SALT OF THE EARTH DINING GUIDE

E~MAUDP_190700_01_Cover.indd 1

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Maui’s culinary scene offers a wide diversity of flavors, from regional to Mediterranean. (©Isaac Arjonilla)

©DAEJA FALLAS/HAWAII TOURISM AUTHORITY (HTA)

DIRECTOR OF MANUFACTURING Donald Horton PUBLICATION SERVICES DIRECTOR Karen Fralick PUBLICATION SERVICES MANAGER Cher Wheeler DIGITAL IMAGING & RETOUCH Erik Lewis


FARM FRESH Agritourism has grown on Maui, giving visitors the opportunity to meet the farmers BY GINA J. BAILEY


In 1991, when a dozen celebrated chefs decided to promote Hawai‘i produce and seafood through a burgeoning movement known as Hawai‘i Regional Cuisine (HRC), it was seen as a monumental shift in the local culinary paradigm. Although such terms as sustainability and food security had not yet become part of the daily lexicon, these forward-thinking leaders of the restaurant industry were already championing the mantra of “Fresh First. Local Always.” Nowadays, the farm-to-table philosophy is already a given and solidly rooted on Maui, leading to a growing trend: agritourism. Where chefs source their ingredients has become just as important as the finished dish. Guests no longer just want to eat good food, they also want to understand its connection with the ‘āina (land). “We respect the land. We respect the sea and we respect everything in between,” says Roy Yamaguchi, one of the founders of HRC and cofounder of the annual Hawai‘i Food & Wine Festival. “Of course Hawai‘i has beauty; but it’s the agriculture, it’s the fishermen and it’s the ranchers who give (Hawai‘i) more meaning than just its beauty.” Perched within the forest of Waipoli in Upcountry, Maui, O‘o Farm welcomes those willing to open their minds and palates to a new concept in the farm-to-table movement. Created by the owners of Maui’s Pacific’O and The Feast at Lele, Louis Coulombe and Stephan Bel-Robert purchased the 8.5-acre Upcountry land with a few coffee trees, and a citrus and stone fruit orchard. Today, the farm produces 60 different crop items for Pacific’O and its own agritourism operation. From leafy vegetables of spicy arugula and colorful rainbow

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origins in the Mediterranean and North African regions—thrived on the chronic drought conditions of Kula, sipping mostly from the sprinkled mist that settles along the mountainside in the late afternoon. “My passion has always been in the earth,” said the late Chang before his passing in 2011. “I didn’t know much about lavender; I didn’t even know it was an herb. I think the lavender chose me. Lavender won’t grow just anywhere. It happens that we’re right here under a lucky star.” After graduating with a degree in finance from the University of Hawai‘i, Chanucy Monden decided to return to Maui to take over the fourth-generation-owned Kula Country Farms. Monden’s family has been the stewards of this land since the 1940s, growing strawberries, papayas, onions, beets, Chinese peas, leafy greens and a pumpkin patch during the fall.

(PREVIOUS SPREAD) ©DARREN MCDANIEL/ALII KULA LAVENDER FARMS; (THIS PAGE FROM TOP) ©DAEJA FALLAS/HAWAII TOURISM AUTHORITY (HTA); ©KATYAPULINA/SHUTTERSTOCK

Plan a visit to Upcountry Maui and sample a variety of fresh produce, including Kula Country Farms' fresh strawberries then pet the baby goats at Surfing Goat Dairy.

chard to fresh herbs, fruits and coffee, O‘o Farm creates an interactive and memorable experience of the farm as you end with a sit-down gourmet lunch prepared with the ingredients that you just harvested. “We like to think of O‘o Farm as more of a table-to-farm place,” says Ancil Clancy, the orchard manager and tour guide of O‘o Farm, as he addresses a group of farm visitors. “Our food is literally picked right here by you, so it’s like we bring the table to the farm and enjoy its harvests.” In 2001, a lavender plant was given as a gift to agricultural artist and horticultural master, Ali‘i Chang. With previous experience in farming— namely a 50-acre tropical flower farm that exported flowers to various parts of the globe—Chang decided to try and cultivate the fragrant herb, which soon developed and flourished into Ali‘i Kula Lavender Farm. As it turned out, lavender—which has


©ISAAC ARJONILLA (2)

“So long as my kids can make a living at farming, I’ll encourage them to farm,” said Monden in an interview with the University of Hawai‘i’s College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources. “I am concerned with encroachment by development onto farmland. The land that we’re farming isn’t the same land my family farmed 40 years ago. To make a living we farmers need to have access to land.” Visitors and locals now reap from Monden’s and his spouse Teena’s efforts. Instead of containers of soggy strawberries that have traveled thousands of miles to arrive here, guests can take a drive to Kula Country Farms’ produce stand, where bright plump strawberries, avocados and Maui coffee beans are available during different times of the year. (Strawberry picking happens from February through early summer.) The shelves are also stocked with Kula Onion BBQ Sauce and, of course, the original Kula Strawberry Jam and Strawberry Syrup. More than 100 dairy goats roam the bucolic pastures of Surfing Goat Dairy, which was established and operated by Thomas and Eva Kafsack. The German expatriates moved to Maui in 1999 and purchased a 42-acre

parcel on the slopes of Haleakalā in Kula with the intent to practice the art of gourmet cheese production. Successfully turning the once-brush land into verdant pastures, the Kafsacks built a 10-stall barn for boarding horses and a 100-squarefoot dairy. “The dairy with its three working rooms (Milk Room, Ripening Room, Cheese Room) together with the adjacent retail shop, works perfectly for us,” notes Eva Kafsack on the company’s website. “No long distances to cover and everything is close at hand.” Visitors can take a two-hour, hands-on grand tour that offers a chance to herd goats, feed and milk the animals, play with the baby goats, observe and learn about the cheese-making process, and sample some of the dairy’s award-winning cheeses. You can also drop in for more casual daily tours that include a walkthrough of the farm and a chance to help out with evening chores. The farm’s store sells a wide selection of goat cheeses to take home or enjoy on site, including award-winners “Rolling Green,” made with fresh garlic chives; horseradishinfused “Men’s Challenge;” and “Mandalay,” made with apple bananas and curry spices.

Ali‘i Kula Lavender Farm Ali‘i Kula Lavender Farm offers guided walking or cart tours, a treasure hunt, craft making classes or a gourmet picnic lunch. Open everyday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. General admission is $3. Kama‘aina, military and senior discounts apply. 1100 Waipoli Rd., 808.878.3004, www.aklmaui.com Kula Country Farms Famous for its Annual Fall Pumpkin Patch in October and strawberry picking starting in February. Located on Kula Highway across from Rice Park. 808.878.8381, www.kulacountryfarmsmaui.com O‘o Farm For reservations call 808.667.4341. O‘o Farm recommends visitors to wear comfortable walking shoes, sunscreen and a light jacket. You’re also welcome to bring your favorite bottle of wine to enjoy with your meal. Gourmet lunch and farm tours run Monday through Friday from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. www.oofarm.com Surfing Goat Dairy Casual Tour: Twenty minutes long, held every 30 minutes and includes a visit with all the farm’s animals, and an explanation of the milking process and a stop at the cheese-making facility. Cost: $10, $7 for ages 2 to 12. Evening Chores and Milking Tour: Sixty minutes, starting at 3:15 p.m. daily except Sunday. Reservations suggested. Cost: $15, $12 children. Grand Dairy Tour: Two hours, held at 9 a.m. Saturdays. Lead a herd from the pasture, feed, milk, play with the baby goats and learn about making cheese. Cost: $25. Reservations required. 3651 Omaopio Road, 808.878.2870, www.surfinggoatdairy.com

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SALT OF THE EARTH Hawaiian sea salt is linked to cultural tradition and healthy living BY SIMPLICIO PARAGAS


(OPPOSITE PAGE) ©ANNA HOYCHUK/SHUTTERSTOCK. ©SEA SALTS OF HAWAII

Cupping his hands as if he was holding grains of salt and raising them close to his nose, chef Norman Berg demonstrates how to appreciate the aroma of Hawaiian sea salt. He then makes the same gesture but, this time gently rubbing his hands, explaining that this is how to wake up your herbs. Since 2012, Berg has worked with Sandra Gibson of Sea Salts of Hawai‘i to develop a gourmet line of flavored all-natural sea salt, from garlic and fresh herbs to sweet Maui onion and spicy seaweed. “You don’t need a lot of salt,” Berg asserts. “You just need to use a high quality product. And this is true with salt … or any ingredient for that matter.” Indeed, Sea Salts of Hawai‘i’s Kona Pure is as unadulterated as the waters from where they derive. From depths exceeding 2,000 feet, the deep

waters are pumped through a pipeline then brought to shore and stored in “hot houses.” After four weeks of slow evaporation, the natural sunlight transforms the pond of seawater into pure white, sea-salt crystals. “The word salt in Hawaiian is pa‘akai,” Gibson explains. “Pa‘a means solid or hardened and kai means ocean water. So when you’re gifting pa‘akai, you’re wishing that person good wishes and you’re solidifying your relationships.” In Hawaiian mythology, a fisherwoman named Hi‘iaka set off to the shores of ‘Ukula in Hanapēpē and caught far too much fish. Crying with guilt for catching more than she needed, Pele, the volcano goddess came to her with a solution and led her to a patch of land near the beach. As she dug a pit into the earth, it filled with ocean water that had emerged

Chef Norman Berg pinches grains of Hawaiian sea salt, which he describes as superior to any other salt.

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in Hawaiian is pa‘akai. Pa‘a means solid or hardened and kai means ocean water. So when you’re gifting pa‘akai, you’re wishing that person good wishes.” —Sandra Gibson

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from the ground. “Put your fish in here for a little while, then dry it out in the sun,” Pele instructed her. Hi‘iaka quickly learned that the tiny crystals from the ocean water would work to preserve her bountiful catch. This ancient story of Pele’s gift of salt sparked a tradition among families who made it their kuleana (responsibility) to preserve Hi‘iaka’s ways of salt harvesting. Varied in color and more crystal-like than its storebought counterpart, Hawaiian sea salt assumes many roles beyond the kitchen. And, as it turns out, salt is the only rock that humans consume. “Hawaiian sea salt is much healthier than regular table salt,” Gibson says. “It contains trace minerals, as well as magnesium and potassium, which help maintain the body’s electrolyte levels.” While living on Kaua‘i, Gibson experienced the meaningfulness of traditional Hawaiian salt and its cultural significance, which inspired her to establish Sea Salts of Hawai‘i. “We were fortunate enough to be gifted some Hawaiian sea salt when we were living on Kaua‘i so I thought it would be great to share the story of gifting salt,” Gibson says. “It has such symbolic meaning in the Hawaiian culture.”

©OTTMAR DIEZ/MEDIA BAKERY

“The word salt

And if we’re hearing more and more about Hawaiian sea salt these days, it’s for good reason. It’s a big deal in the culinary world and even at spas. So says Mark Kurlansky in his definitive book, “Salt: a world history.” So important is this cherished substance that he relates it to the origins of agriculture, sexual desire, the American Revolution, the domestication of animals, the independence movement of India, Egyptian mummification, the invention of gunpowder, the establishment of cities and trade routes, and other countless events large and small. Even Captain James Cook, writes Kurlansky, commented on the excellence of Kaua‘i salt in the late 18th century. Fortunately for us, Hawai‘i has a prominent place in the global salt hierarchy. How could we not? We are surrounded by ocean, our islands bathed in salt air. The trade winds that sweep in from the northeast have come a long way to reach us, over briny water all the way. And, for culinary and ceremonial purposes, the ingenious Hawaiians have a rich history of making and harvesting salt from evaporated sea water in depressions they carved in lava rock or in shallow ponds by the ocean. Their sea salt, was an article of equivalent value to the fish hooks and artifacts they so arduously crafted. Maui county, which includes Moloka‘i and Lāna‘i, has its own array of multi-hued Hawaiian salts, available in different varieties and in limited supply. Black salts may be treated with charcoal, pink salts with the mineralrich clay called ‘alaea and even green salts are often infused with bamboo leaf and other extracts. “Salt has more smell than taste,” says Berg, once again cupping his hands and bringing them close to his nose. “A pinch of Hawaiian sea salt goes a long way.”


RESTAURANT GUIDE KĀ‘ANAPALI

Auntie’s Kitchen The Westin Kā‘anapali Ocean Resort Villas 2365 Kā‘anapali Pkwy. 808.667.2525 Hawai‘i Regional B,L,D Hula Grill Kā‘anapali Whalers Village 2435 Kā‘anapali Hwy. 808.667.6636 Pacific Rim L,D,C/E Island Vintage Coffee Whalers Village 2435 Kā‘anapali Pkwy. 808.868.4081 American B,L Legends of Kā‘anapali Lū’au Kā‘anapali Beach Hotel 2525 Kā‘anapali Pkwy. 808.667.0128 Mondays only Leilani’s on the Beach Whalers Village 2435 Kā‘anapali Pkwy. 808.661.4495 American B,L,D,C/E ‘Ohana Bar & Grill Kā‘anapali Beach Club 104 Kā‘anapali Shores Place 808.667.1337 Regional B,L,D,C,B/W

Pulehu The Westin Kā‘anapali Ocean Resort Villas 6 Kai Ala Drive 808.667.3200 Italian D,B/W Roy’s Kā‘anapali 2290 Kā‘anapali Pkwy. 808.669.6999 Hawai‘i Regional D,C Son’z Steakhouse Hyatt Regency Maui 200 Nohea Kai Drive 808.667.4506 Regional D,C Teppan-Yaki Dan Sheraton Maui Resort & Spa 2605 Kā‘anapali Pkwy. 808.921.4600 Japanese D,C

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Tiki Terrace Restaurant Kā‘anapali Beach Hotel 2525 Kā‘anapali Pkwy. 808.667.0124 Hawai‘i Regional B,Br,D,C/E

Maui Tacos Queen Ka‘ahumanu Center 275 Kaahumanu Ave. 808.871.7726 Mexican B,L,D

‘Ūmalu Hyatt Regency Maui Resort & Spa 200 Nohea Kai Drive 808.661.1234 Hawai‘i Regional L,D

Original Maui Coffee Roasters 444 Hāna Hwy. 800.645.2877 American B,L

KAHULUI/WAILUKU Aria’s 2062 W. Vineyard St. 808.242.2742 Hawai‘i Regional B,L,D Bistro Casanova 33 Lono Ave. 808.873.3650 Mediterranean L,D,C Da Kitchen Triangle Square 425 Koloa St. 808.871.7782 Hawaiian L,D

A Saigon Cafe 1792 Main St. 808.243.9560 Vietnamese B,L,D Seascape Ma‘alaea Maui Ocean Center 192 Ma‘alaea Road 808.270.7068 Hawai‘i Regional L,D Stillwell’s Bakery & Cafe 1740 Ka‘ahumanu Ave. 808.243.2243 Dessert/Coffee B,L Tinroof 360 Papa Place 808.868.0753 Hawai‘i Regional L

KAPALUA/NĀPILI/ KAHANA Banyan Tree, The The Ritz-Carlton 1 Ritz-Carlton Drive 808.665.7096 Regional D,C

Cane & Canoe Montage Kapalua Bay 1 Bay Drive 808.662.6600 Regional B,Br L,D China Boat 4474 Lower Honoapi‘ilani Road 808.669.5089 Asian L,D Merriman’s Kapalua 1 Bay Club Place 808.669.6400 Hawai‘i Regional Br,D,C,B/W

KEY TO DINING ABBREVIATIONS: Service: (B) Breakfast; (Br) Brunch; (L) Lunch; (D) Dinner. Cocktails/ Entertainment: (C) Cocktails; (E) Entertainment; (B/W) Beer & Wine.

©TOR JOHNSON/HAWAII TOURISM AUTHORITY

Pailolo Bar & Grill The Westin Kā‘anapali Ocean Resort Villas 6 Kai Ala Drive 808.667.3200 American B,L,D,C,B/W


Pineapple Grill Kapalua Resort 200 Kapalua Drive 808.669.9600 Hawai‘i Regional B,L,D,C,B/W Sea House Restaurant Nāpili Kai Beach Resort 5900 Lower Honoapi‘ilani Road 808.669.1500 Regional B,L,D,C,B/W Plantation House Kapalua Resort 2000 Plantation Club Drive 808.669.6299 Hawai‘i Regional B,L,D,C Sansei Seafood Restaurant & Sushi Bar Kapalua Resort 600 Office Road 808.669.6286 Regional Japanese D,C,B/W The Terrace Restaurant The Ritz-Carlton, Kapalua One Ritz-Carlton Drive 808.669.6200 American B

KĪHEI/WAILEA

Humble Market Kitchen Wailea Beach Resort— Marriott 3700 Wailea Alanui Drive 808.879.4655 B,D,C,B/W Lineage The Shops at Wailea 3750 Wailea Alanui Drive Italian B,L,D,C Longhi’s The Shops at Wailea 3750 Wailea Alanui Drive 808.891.8883 Italian B,L,D,C Nalu’s South Shore Grill 1280 South Kīhei Road 808.891.8650 American B,L,D,C,B/W Shearwater Tavern 1279 South Kīhei Road 808.793.2324 American D,C,B/W Tommy Bahama The Shops at Wailea 808.875.9983 American L,D,C,B/W

LĀHAINĀ

Aloha Mixed Plate 1285 Front St. 808.661.3322 Pacific Rim L,D,C/E,B/W Down the Hatch 658 Front St. 808.731.2386 Italian B,L,D,C Duke’s Beach House 130 Kai Malina Pkwy. 808.662.2900 Regional B,L,D,C/E,B/W Fleetwood’s on Front St. 744 Front St. 808.669.6425 American L,D,C/E Frida’s Beach House 1287 Front St. 808.661.1287 Mexican L,D Kimo’s Restaurant 845 Front St. 808.661.4811 Regional L,D,C,B/W

Leoda’s Kitchen & Pie Shop 820 Olowalu VIllage 808.662.3600 Hawai‘i Regional B,L,D Old Lahaina Lū‘au 1251 Front St. 808.667.0700 Hawaiian D Star Noodle 286 Kupuohi St. 808.667.5400 Pacific Rim L,D

UPCOUNTRY

Surfing Goat Dairy 3651 Omaopio Rd. 808.878.2870 Hāli‘imaile General Store 900 Hāli‘imale Road 808.572.2666 Hawai‘i Regional L,D

KEY TO DINING ABBREVIATIONS: Service: (B) Breakfast; (Br) Brunch; (L) Lunch; (D) Dinner. Cocktails/ Entertainment: (C) Cocktails; (E) Entertainment; (B/W) Beer & Wine.

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A recipe for authenticity in a legendary setting.

Maui’s Premier Steak and Seafood Restaurant The signature restaurant at Montage Kapalua Bay is where every meal becomes an unforgettable memory you will cherish long after the evening ends. Led by Chef de Cuisine Robert Barrera, this breathtaking ocean view venue offers classic favorites with a distinctively modern flair. For dinner, this haven for beef and seafood connoisseurs features the finest cuts and freshest fish available.

D A I LY B R E A K FA S T & D I N N E R O n e Bay Dr i v e , K a pa lua (808) 662-6681 caneandcanoe.com

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NEW ON MAUI! A contemporary casual setting offering local fare and island inspired cocktails. We invite you to experience this intimate retreat, where seasonal favorites are served, and personalized service awaits. Located at Montage Kapalua Bay.

O P E N T O A L L D A I LY F R O M 4 : 30 P M T O 10 P M

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(808) 662 -6690

4/25/19 1:43 PM


AMAZE The experience of a lifetime, every time.

Reservations call 808.875.1234 ext. 51 WWW.GRANDWAILEA.COM

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@grandwailea

LOCATED AT GRAND WAILEA, A WALDORF ASTORIA RESORT 3850 WAILEA ALANUI, WAILEA, HI 96753


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Guestbook Maui July 2019  

Guestbook Maui July 2019