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WELCOME TO BOSTON

WHERE GUEST B OOK

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CONTENTS 14

FIRST LOOK With so much to see in this city, you can start your journey here. BY CHERYL FENTON

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EPIC GLORIES John Singer Sargent’s only three decorative mural cycles paint local cultural buildings dramatic. PHOTOS BY BRUCE MARTIN

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THE NEW DRAMATISTS Talented playwrights heat up Boston’s theater scene. BY JEREMY D. GOODWIN PHOTOS BY SCOTT NOBLES

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A LOBSTER TALE Fun facts and the regional culinary history of this savory New England specialty. BY ADAM ERACE

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SO TO SPEAK Pop singer JoJo topped charts in the 2000s. Now, the Boston native is set to debut her first album in a decade. BY JIM SULLIVAN

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DOWN ON THE POINT And just like that, Columbia Point is hot. Locals and travelers alike flock here to explore its cultural institutions and spectacular waterfront panoramas. BY MARK MURPHY

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ALL ABOUT TOWN From Back Bay to the Theater District, Boston’s neighborhoods boast character and charm.

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MUSEUMS & GALLERIES A curated guide to browsing and/or buying local art. Plus, special interest museums.

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DINING A curated guide to the city’s most tantalizing tables, because you’ve got to eat.

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ENTERTAINMENT A curated guide to performing arts, attractions and other places to have fun.

SHOPPING A curated guide on local retail, from designer labels to niche goods.

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PARTING SHOT

ON THE COVER: GEORGE WASHINGTON COMMANDS THE PUBLIC GARDEN; ©NATUREWOLRD/ALAMY INSIDE COVER: THE FINANCIAL DISTRICT PERCHED ON BOSTON HARBOR; ©GETTY IMAGES


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The lobster

is

everything it’s cracked up to be.

www.legalseafoods.com


CONTRIBUTORS Adam Erace

Bruce Martin

I had vaguely known that lobsters weren’t considered a delicacy back in the day, but didn’t realize quite the extent to which that was true. I mean starving pilgrims didn’t want to eat them! I was also amazed to learn that lobster popularity fluctuated with the American economy; during the world wars, soldiers were eating lobster in the trenches in Europe. adamerace.com

Photographing in Boston is a privilege with many important, wonderful details to observe. Everywhere, one find’s unique settings to experience the symbiotic relationship between the historic and new architecture that reveals much about America and our perceptions of who we believe we are. brucemartin.com

A Lobster Tale, page 30

Cheryl Fenton First Look, page 14

I always love writing about Boston sights that I sometimes overlook as a local. Rediscovering my city and its cultural and historical nuances is like seeing them all again for the first time. cherylfenton.com

Jeremy D. Goodwin

The New Dramatists, page 26

I enjoy heading out for whatever big, flashy musical is in town as much as the next avid theatergoer—but there’s a special energy on the opening night of a brandnew play. It was fascinating to talk to playwrights who are making it work in a famously difficult profession. jeremydgoodwin.com

Ian MacLellan

Down on the Point, page 36

I photographed the Columbia Point neighborhood of Boston, a region I had never before explored. I soaked up history in the JFK library, Edward M. Kennedy Institute, and Commonwealth Museum, and I saw my city with a new perspective from the HarborWalk. maclellanimages.com 12

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Epic Glories, page 20

Cheryl Fenton

Mark Murphy

Down on the Point, page 36

My father graduated from Boston College High in 1938. All that time, until the early 1970s, the beautiful stretch of seaside landscape known as Columbia Point was going to waste. I’m glad it has changed. Today, there can’t be a presidential library in this country with a more breathtaking backdrop. @murf56

Adam Erace

Scott Nobles

The New Dramatists, page 26

Surprises are inevitable on a photo shoot. Sometimes it’s a technical mishap, or inclement weather, or difficult models (none on this one!). For this shoot it was hilariously surprising when playwright John Kuntz walked out dressed as a panda, along with a wonderfully playful grin! scottnobles.com

Scott Nobles

Mark Murphy

Jim Sullivan

So to Speak, page 34

I thought of 1990s Chumbawamba song “Tubthumping” when I was interviewing JoJo, who had this meteoric rise as a teen singer and then ran headlong into the maw of the record industry. She sure got up again! jimsullivanink.com

Ian MacLellan

Bruce Martin


Handmade pasta, perfectly cooked steaks and fresh seafood expertly prepared using the finest ingredients.

w w w. d a v i o s . c o m | @ S t e v e D i F i l l i p p o | @ D a v i o s B o s t o n


FIRST LOOK

©STEVE DUNWELL

Sights, sensations and icons that touch on all of Boston’s favorite interests. By Cheryl Fenton

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“Boston is what I would like the whole United States to be.” CHARLES DICKENS, Writer

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Built to evoke a 15th-century Venetian palace, the Gardner was created by its eponymous collector and philanthropist. Home to more than 2,500 art objects by artists such as Rembrandt, Botticelli, Raphael and Matisse, the works are a who’s who of paintings, sculpture, textiles and silver. Art and nature commingle in the intimate, indoor courtyard, lush with tropical plants. 25 Evans Way, 617.566.1401

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Fenway Park

Built in 1912, Fenway Park is America’s oldest active ballpark and, without a doubt, one of its most beloved. Red Sox stadium is full of character including neighborly seating, the Green Monster, a manual scoreboard, and the lone red seat in right field where the longest home run was ever hit—502 feet by Ted Williams. 4 Yawkey Way, 877.733.7699

Newbury Street

Despite its surprisingly humble start (as waterlogged tidal flats until the mid-1800s), today the eight-block stretch of Newbury Street enjoys prestige as Boston’s high-end designer shopping destination. Storefronts are nestled into historic brownstones, taking a cue from early European architecture. Newbury Street, between Arlington Street and Massachusetts Avenue 16

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(FROM TOP) ©BILLIE WEISS/BOSTON RED SOX/GETTY IMAGES CONTRIBUTOR; ©MASSACHUSETTS OFFICE OF TRAVEL & TOURISM (OPPOSITE) ©JORGE SALCEDO/SHUTTERSTOCK

FIRST LOOK


“I was a very shy girl who led an insulated life; it was only when I came to Oxford, and to Harvard before that, that suddenly I saw the power of people. I didn’t know such a power existed. I saw people criticizing their own president; you couldn’t do that in Pakistan—you’d be thrown in prison.” BENAZIR BHUTTO, Former Prime Minister of Pakistan

Harvard University

Founded in 1636, Harvard University is not only the nation’s oldest higher learning institution but is a notable place for the arts. Among the elite school’s network of galleries is Harvard Art Museums and the popular Harvard Museum of Natural History. Not to mention that the accomplished American Repertory Theater and zany, legendary Hasty Pudding Theatricals keep theatergoers coming back for more. Harvard Square, Cambridge WHERE GUEST B OOK

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Boston Public Market

Opened in early 2015, this is the only locally sourced market of its kind in the country. Translation: Everything sold at this year-round market by its 35-plus vendors is produced in New England. Local farmers and fishermen offer everything under the sun, including organic produce; meat, poultry, and eggs; cheese and dairy; fish and shellfish; bread and baked goods; plants and flowers; and specialty foods. 100 Hanover St.

Public Garden

Faneuil Hall

Built in 1743 in the style of an English country market, Faneuil Hall became the unlikely and unofficial town hall of colonial Boston. When the city was heading down a path to revolution, orators such as Samuel Adams gave speeches within its halls that became the footstool for our independence from Britain. Today’s waterfront landmark is now a place of thriving commerce as part of a larger festival marketplace. 1 Faneuil Hall Square, 617.635.4500 18

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Created two centuries after the Boston Common (America’s first park) in 1837, the Public Garden is the country’s oldest public botanical garden. It affords quiet times among monuments, fountains and a quaint bridge. Its beloved Swan Boats have glided around the serpentine lagoon for over a century. Twenty-four acres showcase classic Victorian garden technique and exotic imported trees. Charles Street South to Arlington Street, between Beacon and Boylston

(CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) ©KIMBERLY VARDEMAN/FLICKR, CREATIVE COMMONS; ©CHUCK CHOI; ©DAVID FOX (OPPOSITE) ©SEAN PAVONE/SHUTTERSTOCK

FIRST LOOK


PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

“New England has a harsh climate, a barren soil, a rough and stormy coast, and yet we love it, even with a love passing that of dwellers in more favored regions.” HENRY CABOT LODGE, Former American Senator

Boston Harborwalk

Currently 38 miles long (with another 10 in development), Boston Harborwalk is a public walking path that traces the coastline around piers, wharves, buildings, beaches and shore, connecting Boston’s neighborhoods to its harbor. Charlestown, North End, Waterfront, Seaport and South Boston districts WHERE GUEST B OOK

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EPIC GLORIES Turn-of-the-century society portraitist John Singer Sargent also created three decorative mural cycles, all bold, brilliant dramas. Art lovers rejoice—one must be in Boston to experience them. PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRUCE MARTIN

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PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT


Sargent considered his “Triumph of Religion” at Boston Public Library, which heralds the American ideal of religious liberty, a personal masterpiece.

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The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, commissioned Sargent to decorate its rotunda and grand staircase. Classical mythology informed these incredible allegorical bas-reliefs.

Opening spread: In 1918, Sargent was appointed an official war artist of WWI. Two years later Harvard commissioned two memorial paintings that now hang in Widener Library.

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PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

Ronan Noone and Melinda Lopez, standing; John Greiner-Ferris, Kirsten Greenidge and John Kuntz, seated. Photographed at B.U. Theater.


THE NEW DRAMATISTS Talented, 21st-century playwrights grow Boston’s theater scene to rival the best in New York and beyond BY JEREMY D. GOODWIN

Boston’s erudite, enthusiastic audiences have long made the city a favorite spot for Broadway producers trying out new material. But as its vibrant network of homegrown theater companies gets busier and busier, Boston has become a fertile source of new playwrights, whose soon-to-be-acclaimed work can be seen on stages all over town before migrating to New York and beyond. Within the past 15 years, innovative fellowship programs at established theaters have aligned with plucky, upstart troupes and a supportive academic culture to nurture a community of playwrights that aims to write the new, great stage works of the 21st century. “My hope is that we are able to continue to grow our audiences as well as our talent pool and head into a theater renaissance,” says playwright Melinda Lopez, herself a leading light of the scene. Her voice rising in enthusiasm, she cites the heralded Chicago theater world of the 1980s as a precedent. “That’s Boston in the 2020s—people saying ‘That was a heyday of new plays in Boston, that’s when it was all happening.’ I feel like that could be where we’re going.” If so, it’s folks like Lopez who lead the charge. In 2003 she was one of four young writers selected for the first playwriting fellowship offered by the long-established

PHOTOS BY SCOTT NOBLES

Huntington Theatre Company. Fellow participant John Kuntz says he remembers watching her write a play called “Sonia Flew” on “napkins and scraps of paper.” It was the first play performed at the Stanford Calderwood Pavilion the next year, when the shiny new center for performance and rehearsal opened up and became an anchor for the burgeoning South End neighborhood. “Sonia Flew” won Boston’s top theater awards, the first of several on Lopez’s shelf, and has since been performed around the country. The Huntington is one of the city’s larger theaters. But small-and-midsize troupes including Company One and New Repertory Theatre have launched playwright-support initiatives in recent years. Local playwright Kirsten Greenidge won a prestigious Obie Award for the offBroadway production of her play “Milk Like Sugar,” which she developed in part at Company One. The theater made her its Playwright-in-Residence, and she says the trend toward more institutional support like that is invaluable. “It gives you a home, so you’re able to develop your work and know it will be read,” she says. “I definitely think the culture is changing in terms of looking at playwriting as a collaborative art.” WHERE GUEST B OOK

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Closer to the fringe, Fresh Ink Theatre, Boston Public Works, Happy Medium Theatre and Bad Habit Productions are among the troupes that have sprung up with a focus on new work. Some local playwrights perform a juggling act among theaters. Ginger Lazarus premiered her new play “The Housekeeper” at Fresh Ink in early 2016, immediately before the off-Broadway run of another of her plays, “Burning.” And “Burning” first took the stage at Boston Playwrights’ Theatre, which—you guessed it— exclusively produces the work of Boston-based writers. Even with so many theaters catching on, local playwrights are also taking matters into their own hands. “I think a lot of these theaters are tribes of playwrights who have come together and decided to produce for themselves,” says Ronan Noone, also part of that inaugural group of Huntington playwriting fellows, “rather than relying on going to well-established theater companies. That is how they are now finding their niche. The playwright is more entrepreneurial than ever.” 28

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One of those playwright-entrepreneurs is John Greiner-Ferris, co-founder of Boston Public Works, which is run entirely by playwrights. “Somewhere along the line,” he says, “playwrights in the American theater were relegated to this place on the edge. All I’m asking is that we get our place at the table back.” It’s working. There’s no city in the world where it’s easy to make a living as a playwright. But Boston’s famed constellation of colleges and universities provides another vital support system. Beyond offering intellectually nutritious day jobs for playwrights—no small thing—academia plays an active role in the theater community. Boston Playwrights’ Theatre, founded by Nobel laureate Derek Walcott in 1981, is an extension of the playwriting MFA program at Boston University. The highly competitive program includes alumni (like Walt McGough) who stick around after graduation and advocate for their peers. McGough spearheads the new Boston Project at

From left with props from their works: Noone, Greenidge, Greiner-Ferris. Next page: Kuntz, Lopez.


That’s Boston in the 2020s— people saying ‘That was a heyday of new plays …that’s when it was all happening.’

SpeakEasy Stage Company, developing new plays about life here. Boston is often described, with a whiff of irony, as a “small town.” Part of its charm is the way it offers so much, but on a manageable scale. In geographic terms, this means you can walk from Fenway Park to Chinatown without necessarily breaking a sweat. But in the theater world, opportunities for cross-pollination are also more accessible. Kuntz is among the many playwrights who were recruited into that Boston University MFA program by Kate Snodgrass, artistic director of Boston Playwrights’ Theatre. He has his own collection of awards as a playwright and actor, and he teaches at the Boston Conservatory. “What’s really nice about Boston is that everyone knows each other, and all the actors and directors usually teach, so you bump into them that way, too,”

he says. “I don’t think I would have any of the opportunities that I’ve had if I lived in New York.” He personally writes plays every year for his acting students to perform. He says SpeakEasy’s 2014 production of his “Necessary Monsters” came about because that company’s producing artistic director, Paul Daigneault, is also on faculty at the Conservatory. Daigneault came to see his students in Kuntz’s play and liked the material. Snodgrass, herself, is a playwright and also founded the Boston Theater Marathon—an annual, gluttonous delight for those with a taste for new plays. She says recent years have indeed seen a marked increase in the opportunities available for local playwrights to shine. “There’s many more chances now,” she says. “It’s rife with possibilities.” And that place at the table is waiting.


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PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

First timers should eat lobster fresh and undressed.


A LOBSTER TALE How the once-humble crustacean clawed its way to the top of New England’s food culture

©BON APPETIT/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

BY ADAM ERACE

Consider the lobster. The venerated, desired, luxurious lobster, a creature as red and regal as the King of Hearts. Must be nice to be a lobster, right? (Except for the whole boiled-to-death thing, of course.) But these beloved-in-Boston crustaceans didn’t always have it so good. “Lobsters were considered low-class fare for a long time,” explains Trevor Corson, author of the book, “The Secret Life of Lobsters.” “Even the Pilgrims didn’t want to eat them.” The crustaceans were so common in New England that historical accounts say they would wash up on the beach of Plymouth, Massachusetts, in piles two feet high. Imagine that clambake. “Settlers approached the creatures with less than gustatory enthusiasm, but the lobsters’ abundance made them fit for the tables of the poor,” food, wine and travel writer John F. Mariani pens in the “Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink.” “In 1622 Governor William Bradford of the Plymouth Plantation apologized to a new arrival of settlers that the only dish he ‘could present their friends with was a lobster ... without bread or anything else but a cup of fair water.’” North of the Massachusetts colony, in Maine, lobsters were also plentiful, and by the 1800s, canneries dotted the shoreline. Up until the completion of the railroads in the

mid-century, most Americans’ taste of lobster was canned. The new link between the Pine Tree State and Boston changed that. “[This] meant fresh lobster on ice could then be transported further afield and inland from Boston […] but the culinary reputation of lobsters didn’t really start to improve until the first half of the 20th century,” Corson says. It would take a group colloquially known as the ‘rusticators’ to champion lobster as a delicacy. According to the Maine Historical Society, rusticators are “Maine’s wealthy summer visitors of yesteryear who helped establish the state as a tourist mecca.” They came from big cities like Boston, New York and Philadelphia to fish, hunt, swim and experience the kind of unadulterated nature hardly available in their respective turn-of-the-century metropolises. “For the elite urbanites privileged enough to vacation in Maine, a live lobster purchased straight from the wharf and boiled in the kitchen represented a kind of communion with the beauty of nature, which was itself a sort of privilege,” says Corson. “These rusticators and tourists helped popularize fresh whole lobster as a desirable meal, which ended up making it something of a luxury throughout much of the United States.” WHERE GUEST B OOK

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Tie do conulla consendre ero odignit alit num vel irilit ipisi tis ad magnisl ip et lutem ing eraesto commodo lobore del iliquissim essequis Lobster is a New augiam Englandvel signature.

©NORTH WIND PICTURE ARCHIVES/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

had a positive effect on lobsters. “Bad times made it easier to get fishermen to abide by conservation laws and the dwindling lobster population was allowed to recover slowly in step with the U.S. economy.” After World War II, lobster regained the status it has maintained ever since, despite fluctuations in price and (sometimes catastrophic) population swings. “The southern end of the New England lobster industry has seen some hard times, including a terrible and somewhat mysterious lobster die-off in Long Island Sound in the 1990s,” Corson says. But the lobster industry in Maine is solid. “In large part New England lobstermen should be commended for an exemplary set of conservation practices that has helped the fishery to be not only healthy and sustainable but astonishingly productive.” Corson should know. A native son of Boston who grew up in the District of Columbia, he spent summers visiting his grandparents in the Cranberry Isles off the coast of

(FROM LEFT) ©TETRA IMAGES/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO;

Commercial fisheries and canneries began springing up in Maine in the mid-1800s, “thereby giving rise to the fame of the Maine lobster, which was being shipped around the world a decade later,” Mariani writes. “In 1842 the first lobster shipments reached Chicago, and Americans enjoyed them both at home and in the cities’ new lobster palaces. By 1885 the American lobster industry was providing 130 million pounds of lobster per year. So afterward the population of the lobster beds decreased rapidly.” Lobster’s place in the pantheon of luxury foods was cemented by the 1900s, and over the next century its populations would rise and fall, often in sync with the American economy. “Lobster prices hit their first peak in the 1920s,” author April Demobsky writes in “Mother Jones.” “But with the Depression, the luxury lobster market took a dive. No one could afford the dish in restaurants, so the lobster was demoted back to the canneries to provide a cheap source of protein for American military troops.” This crashing market


This king of the American dinner menu was once considered

(FROM LEFT) ©IMAGE SOURCE/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; ©BRENT HOFACKER/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

trash barely fit for prisoners.

Maine and dreaming of growing up to become, as he puts it, “a kind of combination lobsterman and marine biologist.” When he was five years old, he built a lobster boat of out of cardboard. By his 20s, he had traded that in for an actual boat, working year-round as a sternman on a lobster boat for a few years. “I got up every morning at 4:30 am, and by the time normal people were sitting at the breakfast table with their morning coffee and newspaper, I was already miles offshore getting thrown around by cold wind and smashing waves in a small boat, up to my elbows in putrid herring guts,” Corson remembers. These experiences would eventually inform his book, which he wrote after returning to Boston for an editorial job at The Atlantic. “It was quite an education. Needless to say I was quickly disabused of the romantic notions about lobstering I’d had as a kid. But I also quickly came to appreciate that lobstermen were not just tough, but extremely observant, thoughtful, and knowledgeable about the creatures they pursued and the natural environment they worked in. This is why, as I began to notice, and as I ended up writing about in the book, marine biologists who were studying lobsters started asking for help from the fishermen to better understand lobster behavior.” They are tricky creatures to figure out, with idiosyncratic mating rituals and social hierarchies that make them interesting as well as delicious. Lobsters being served today in Boston come from as far south as New York and as far north as Canada, depending on the time of year, but the most esteemed, whether legit or perceived, are from Maine. You don’t have to go far to find them in Boston. Just remember, when you’re about to dig in to the expensive treat, this king of the American dinner menu was once considered trash barely fit for prisoners. Now that’s climbing the ladder, one claw at a time.

6 WAYS TO COOK A LOBSTER

P

urists argue there’s only one way to cook a lobster: boiled and served with drawn

butter and lemon. No disrespect to that, but Boston chefs are nothing if not creative. Here are six other ways you can find the crustacean prepared in local restaurants.

ROLL • At white-hot oyster bar Row 34, lobster rolls tucked into traditional top-split buns are available in both the mayo-slicked and buttered styles. 383 Congress St., 617.553.5900 PIZZA • Pies are served till midnight at Scampo in the ground floor of the Liberty hotel, including the $27 version topped with nuggets of fresh lobster meat. 215 Charles St., 617.536.2100 WOK • At the Dumpling House in Cambridge, live lobsters are hauled from tanks in the dining room, wok-fried and dressed with ginger and scallion. 950 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, 617.661.8066 BURGER • The Nor’Easter Burger at Café Fleuri features an Angus patty topped with butter-glossed, tarragon-flecked lobster. 250 Franklin St., 617.451.1900 FRIED RICE • The lobster fried rice at Red Lantern is mined with chunks of tail and claw, plus smoky bacon and sweet pineapple. 39 Stanhope St., 617.262.3900 TACO • The Sunday blue plate special at the North End’s Neptune Oyster Bar is crispy fried lobster tacos garnished with avocado crema, jicama and micro-cilantro. 63 Salem St., 617.742.3474


Q&A

SO TO SPEAK Millennial pop star Joanna “JoJo” Levesque reemerges with a more mature identity and a new album INTERVIEW BY JIM SULLIVAN

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Can you give us the short version of your absence from the spotlight?

I signed to an independent company that was distributed through a major company when I was 12 years old, and I was locked into a contract with no time expiration. The company no longer had means to distribute me and really wasn’t interested in being in the music industry anymore, but they wouldn’t let me go. A lot of things contributed to me having to sue them, to find a loophole in the New York law that said that you couldn’t hold someone to a personal services contract for more than seven years, and I was with them from [age] 12 to 22, 10 years of my life.

I had no idea what to expect. I knew there would be a certain base that came out for me, but the overwhelming love and support definitely surprised me in an amazing way. The ‘tringle’ was a standalone introduction for me. I can’t wait to put out [more] content and get on with the rest of my life. [My 2016 album release] is looking more toward the fall. You must have had quite a backlog of songs from which to choose.

I’ve recorded 70 songs in the past year-and-a-half. I started fresh when I signed to Atlantic and that feels like a new chapter. What’s the upside of being away from the spotlight?

Your recent release “III” is a collective of three singles, each with about 4 million hits. Did you expect that kind of traffic?

Whenever you put your music out there’s always that ‘what-if ’ how it’s going to be received, so

I think it gave me the opportunity to develop into a young woman without having to make that often-uncomfortable transition of being an innocent teen star into being a more actualized adult. I got to do that in my own

time, and I feel very comfortable with who I am. When you were approaching your new music, did you consider the pop landscape of 2016 and how it has changed since 2006?

I guess we considered what was going on with music … but, the thing is, I’ve been in the studio for the past seven years. I never stopped. It’s not like I’m getting comfortable in the studio again. With the album, I’m very focused on asserting my identity and telling my story in my way. What can you say about that identity now?

I’ve always been a little rough around the edges. I’m a smalltown girl, and I have big dreams, and I’m still going after them. The sound reflects that. I’m a soul singer who’s making pop music, and you can hear more hard-hitting beats under it. I’m excited to sing about love of all kinds. That’s what really moves me: love.

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT ©OHRANGUTANG

Joanna Levesque grew up in Foxboro, Massachusetts, with her mother in a one-bedroom apartment. Her friends call her Jo or Joanna, but the world knows her as JoJo. She hit it big back in 2004, at the tender age of 13, the youngest solo artist in history to have a No. 1 single on Billboard’s pop singles chart with “Leave (Get Out)” from her eponymous debut album, and followed that up with the hit “Too Little Too Late.” After that, JoJo went dark because of a dispute with her record company. A decade and two lawsuits later, JoJo is on the eve of an album release. She speaks to us from Los Angeles, where she moved six years ago. She deflects a question about her “former roots” with riposte. “Former roots? Forever roots honey! I’m definitely an East Coast girl,” she says. “Just because I live on the West Coast, does not make me a West Coast girl. I bleed [Celtics] green, for sure.”


PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

JoJo prepares to drop a new album and re-enter the limelight.

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DOWN ON THE POINT Columbia Point is poised to become Boston’s next “it” destination for culture and history

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum overlooks Dorchester Bay from its perch on Columbia Point.

©MARCIO SILVA/ISTOCKPHOTO

BY MARK MURPHY

At the time of John F. Kennedy’s presidency, Boston’s Columbia Point peninsula was one of the most overlooked and underdeveloped pieces of real estate in the city, and always had been. Today, that’s changing. People have caught wind of the incredible ocean views. Look right, and Dorchester Bay gives way to the Atlantic and the South Shore coast. Straight ahead is a staggered network of tiny harbor islands, and to the left, the emerging Boston skyline. Columbia Point is situated to the south, cut off from downtown by Interstate 93, the Massachusetts Turnpike and the landmass of South Boston. In the 1960s, a large housing project, Boston College High School, and a big landfill that was mainly a haven for seagulls occupied Columbia Point. In colonial times, the area was an enormous cow pasture. “It was isolated,” says Jean MacCormack, the former Chancellor of UMass Dartmouth who grew up in Dorchester and later devoted her career to supporting the peninsula’s institutions. “It was a dump, so it was a place your mother always told you not to go.” A relocation of University of Massachusetts’ Boston campus was just over a decade away, and Jacqueline Kennedy’s own plans for her late husband’s presidential library at the tip of the peninsula wouldn’t take shape until 1979. But in 1964, an eye-blink after her husband’s assassination, Jackie already knew of the peninsula’s grand location, even if plans at the time dictated to build the presidential library in Cambridge under the wing of the President’s alma mater, Harvard University. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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After logistical issues doomed the Cambridge plans, focus shifted to the Columbia Point site in 1975, roughly the same time that the even larger UMass Boston project began. The university now has the most expansive presence on the point, including recent construction projects and landscaping that are part of a 25-year master improvement plan that kicked off in 2009. Another revitalization project, known as the HarborWalk, has made the peninsula’s shoreline one of the most inviting stretches of pedestrian-friendly waterfront in the entire city. Columbia Point’s portion was completed in 2015; the total HarborWalk stretches 47 miles long. A causeway-type path begins at Harbor Point—a mixed income/luxury development that replaced the old Columbia Point Housing Project—winds through the former calf pastures, past the Kennedy Library and around the university’s campus. Approximately 3,200 tons of stone, much of it unearthed from the Big Dig, was trucked in to bolster the land and build the causeway. 38

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Paul Tucker, an internationally renowned scholar and art history professor at UMass Boston, enhanced the HarborWalk with his Arts on the Point, an outdoor sculpture park that, in the past, has featured pieces by Willem de Kooning, Sol Lewitt and Dennis Oppenheim. Thanks to such developments, walkers and students, residents and museumgoers easily enjoy one of the most commanding views of the city. But when KennedyOnassis looked out on the harbor during the JFK Library’s early stages, she simply thought of the president’s love of the ocean. Kennedy-Onassis, whose great sense of art and style had defined the JFK White House, hired a young New York architect named I.M. Pei to design the new library even though, he protested, he didn’t have experience with big projects. Nevertheless, the concrete, glass and steel building he created stunned visitors when it opened on a 9.5-acre plot in 1979. The uniqueness of the building outside was matched by its interior mission as an archive of the President’s papers and documents, a museum and an educational institute.

Top, from left: exhibits at the JFK Library, Commonwealth Museum and EMK Institute. Above: The HarborWalk affords scenic skyline views.


©IAN MACLELLAN

Boston’s HarborWalk has made Columbia Point’s shoreline one of the most inviting stretches of pedestrianfriendly waterfront in the entire city.

A current exhibit focused on Kennedy’s younger years and his famous exploits during World War II entitled “Young Jack” shows off another side to JFK, including the portrait of a prep school student who wasn’t particularly dedicated to his studies. “It shows his days at Choate and highlights some of his battles in academia. He was disorganized,” says Kennedy Library spokesperson Rachel Day Flor. “It shows young students that the process of becoming a president isn’t always a straight trajectory.” Kennedy’s library-museum has inspired millions and has helped put Columbia Point on the map. It has also drawn attention to its oft-overlooked neighbor, the Commonwealth Museum, which features four exhibit halls documenting the history of Massachusetts from colonial times. Commonwealth Museum moved to Columbia Point in 1984 and houses the Massachusetts Archives. A number of rare historical documents can be found within, including one of 14 original copies of the Declaration of Independence authorized by the Continental Congress in 1777, and one of 14 copies of the Bill of Rights from the same period.

Enter Columbia Point’s most recent addition: the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate, opened and dedicated by President Obama in 2015. Ted Kennedy’s dream, like his brother Jack, was to inspire public service by educating the public about the chamber where he served for almost 47 years. “Sen. Kennedy was very direct,” says MacCormack. “He didn’t want a monument to himself. He didn’t want it bigger than the library. He wanted something that would be about the Senate.” The Institute carries on the mission of the Kennedy Library in an especially interactive way, starting with a full-sized replica of the U.S. Senate chamber. Visitors are encouraged to attend and take part in a program known as “Vote of the Day,” of which, vigorous debate and voting, is a part. “It’s impressive, we’ll have people from [ages] 8 to 80 stand up and give their opinion,” says MacCormack, who is now the Institute’s president. “The topic you get comes from what is being discussed in the Senate that day.” U.S. Senators visit frequently to speak about the process, but the slate isn’t restricted to politics alone. Red Sox Hall of Famer Pedro Martinez has also been a featured guest. This summer, the Institute is a particularly intriguing destination thanks to its Senate Election Wall. In addition to 2016 being a presidential election year, there are 34 senate seats up for grabs—10 currently held by Democrats and 24 by Republicans. Seven of those Democrats and 21 Republicans are seeking reelection. The Senate Election Wall charts the progress in all of these races. Boston anticipates an increase in visitors to Columbia Point now and in years to come. Anyone wanting to take in the sights can pick up the MBTA’s Red Line in town and take it to the JFK/UMass stop. From there, a free shuttle brings both students and culture seekers out to the point. MacCormack can’t believe the transformation of the ocean-kissed peninsula since her Dorchester childhood. “It was always kind of a mysterious place,” she says. “But [today] it’s so active and alive.” WHERE GUEST B OOK

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ALL ABOUT TOWN With trappings both colonial and modern, Boston’s neighborhoods are each different and all wonderful.

BACK BAY Elegant and tidy, the Back Bay is one posh place to spend some leisure time. Upmarket, one-off specialty stores on Newbury Street and tony designer boutiques in Copley Place provide ample options for lavish shoppers. Outdoor green spaces like the Public Garden and the Charles River Esplanade offer serene spots to sit or play. Architecture from different eras make for a stunning show—think Copley Square’s Richardsonian Romanesque Trinity Church contrasted with the mirrored stretch of windows of the city’s tallest skyscraper.

BEACON HILL Travelers conjure images of this charming, brick-faced neighborhood when they think “Boston.” Violet-tinted windowpanes, iron boot scrapers, and cobblestone streets create a quaint mystique that is rich in history, as well as just plain rich. For centuries, Beacon Hill has been known for blue-blood residents, from Henry Cabot Lodge to U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry. Shoppers stroll Charles Street, popping in at independently owned boutiques and lunching at quiet cafes. The Hill is also home to the Black Heritage Trail and the Massachusetts State House. 40

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the Charles River from Boston. A variety of squares cluster along Massachusetts Avenue or nearby, and each has its own personality, from geek-chic, modern Kendall Square to alterna-smart Harvard Square, home to the venerable university and its yard, book stores galore, edgy entertainment, world-class museums and a ton of restaurants.

CHARLESTOWN Follow The Freedom Trail to its finish line at the Bunker Hill Monument, and you’ll find yourself in Charlestown. Marked by Federal-style architecture and gas lanterns, this place north of the North End was actually settled by the English before they settled the Shawmut Peninsula (Boston proper). A prominent destination is Charlestown Navy Yard where the still-commissioned, oak-hulled USS Constitution warship is berthed. CHINATOWN Tucked between the Theater District and the Financial District, this enclave may be diminutive, but there is no limit on the abundance of authentic culinary delights prepared by its residents. Bánh mì, dim sum, bubble tea—find it here. Asian food fans can select among Cantonese, Taiwanese and Shanghainese, Thai, Malaysian, Japanese and Vietnamese specialties at the many family-owned cafés, bakeries, and restaurants.

©JORGE SALCEDO/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Boston

CAMBRIDGE Cambridge is a city in its own right, located across


DOWNTOWN Travelers find themselves at the historic heart

(FROM LEFT) ©SUNNY CHANRUANGVANICH; ©F11PHOTO

of Boston here. The Freedom Trail begins at Boston Common, the nation’s first and oldest public park, and continues past sights like the Granary Burying Ground, Old South Meeting House and Old State House. Nearby, the Washington Street corridor, known as Downtown Crossing, was once a beacon of department store shopping; it is currently being revitalized with new hotels, high-end residences and upmarket retail ventures.

FENWAY People hear “Fenway” and immediately evoke visions of the MLB’s MVD (Most Valuable Diamond), Fenway Park. But actually, this neighborhood is named for its former life as fens, low-laying marshland that was later filled during the 19th century. Attractions include the Museum of Fine Arts, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, and a portion of Frederick Law Olmsted’s Emerald Necklace park system. Music clubs, bars and restaurants congregate in Kenmore Square and along Lansdowne and Boylston streets, and cater to college students and music fans.

At left, Downtown stretches into the Theater District. Beacon Hill’s quaint Acorn Street. The Mother Church, a beautiful Back Bay site.

FINANCIAL DISTRICT The Financial District is as calm after dark as it is buzzing with the comings, goings and business dealings of suited workers during the day. Travelers in the area head to destinations like Faneuil Hall Marketplace, New England Aquarium and Boston Tea Party Ships and Museum. In fair weather, a stretch of Boston Harbor waterfront offers wharf after wharf aka launching pads for adventures by sea.

Brick homes populate tiny, tree-lined streets. In fact, the South End is on the National Register as the largest intact Victorian row house district in the U.S.

NORTH END Red sauce bubbles in kitchens throughout this very old sector that is awash in Italian heritage, although it has not always been this way. It was the city’s original posh neighborhood, back when Thomas Hutchinson and Paul Revere lived here. Revere’s home still stands in North Square, and Old North Church is where the revolutionary lanterns were hung. As for its 20th-century legacy, the North End is home to dozens of Italian restaurants, momand-pop shops and jovial saints’ festivals. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

hood that’s on the rise, the Seaport is it. Three characteristics predominate: art, food and water views. There’s a robust creative community of artists and artisans. Restaurants—from big brands to tasty, chef-driven places—make up a growing dining scene. Amazing panoramas of the skyline set the mood along the HarborWalk and at landmarks like the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston.

SOUTH BOSTON Compared to Beacon Hill or the North End, South Boston is mega-sized. The neighborhood sits directly to the south and east of downtown and includes sub ’hoods such as the Seaport District, Telegraph Hill, West Broadway and City Point. A scenic stretch of Boston Harbor coastline contrasts with triple-deckers, churches and gritty watering holes. Over the last decade, affluent young professionals have infiltrated South Boston, scooping up renovated waterfront multi-families and new luxury condos. But, there’s also a healthy mix of lifers—Southie is famously Irish and blue collar.

SOUTH END Arts and culture thrive in the South End. Many artists live and work in the neighborhood, particularly in SoWa (south of Washington Street), where dilapidated mills have been/are being reworked to house 42

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South End rowhouses are known for their ornate front stoops. Above, take in a view of Boston’s waterfront from the Seaport District.

art galleries and studios, apartments, small design businesses and restaurants. Brick rowhouses populate tiny, tree-lined streets. In fact, the South End is on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places as the largest intact Victorian row house district in the country. Residents are a mix of creative types, yuppie families, LGBTQs and a small but vibrant Latino community, and the neighborhood attracts art lovers and others looking for design inspiration. Restaurants are a big draw and reservations are often hard to come by. The South End’s gay culture means some restaurant bars and a few devoted clubs bring in LGBTQs from around the city.

THEATER DISTRICT Judging by its name, there should be no mystery to the history of this diminutive but oft-visited neighborhood—it’s where many of Boston’s theaters reside along Tremont and Washington streets. The Citi Wang hosts international headliners, while the Citi Shubert focuses on local companies. The Emerson/Cutler Majestic and the Paramount cater to ArtsEmerson, while most Broadway tours pass through the gorgeous Opera House. And there’s more at The Modern, The Wilbur, The Charles Playhouse and The Colonial.

(FROM LEFT) ©JORGE SALCEDO; ©MARCIO JOSE BASTOS SILVA

SEAPORT DISTRICT & FORT POINT If Boston has a neighbor-


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BOOKSTORES BOOKSTORES OF HARVARD SQUARE

OF HARVARD SQUARE Harvard COOP – est. 1882 Harvard COOP – est. 1882 Grolier Poetry Book Shop – est. 1927 Grolier Poetry Book Shop – est. 1927 Harvard Book Store – est. 1932 Harvard Book Store – est. 1932 Schoenhof’s Foreign Books – est. Schoenhof’s Foreign Books – est. 1945 1945 Bentley Publishers – est. 1950 Bentley Publishers – est. 1950 Out of Town News – est. 1955 Out of Town News – est. 1955 The Crimson Corner – est. 1962 The Crimson Corner – est. 1962 The Million Year Picnic – est. 1974 The Million Year Picnic – est. 1974 Newbury Comics – est. 1978 Newbury Comics – est. 1978 Revolution Books – est. 1986 Revolution Books – est. 1986 Raven Used Books – est. 2005 Raven Used Books – est. 2005 The World’s Only Curious The World’s Only Curious George Store – est. 2012 George Store – est. 2012

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SHOPPING

In The Bag Boston's shopping scene is a study of contrasts: brand name and independent, designer and homegrown, glam mall and boutique avenue, artful, posh and preppy. Back Bay's Newbury Street and Beacon Hill skews upmarket, while the South End's neighborhood shops infuse design into everything, from baby clothes to home accessories. North End boutiques carry a European aesthetic. ARITZIA The innovative design house and fashion boutique develops its own on-trend fashion brands that include TNA, Talula, Babaton, Wilfred, Le Fou, La Notte, Sunday Best, Paradise Mine, and Auxiliary. Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St. H BOSTON OLIVE OIL COMPANYCL007346 This family owned store seasonally imports and bottles on site more than 60 varieties of the highest quality unfiltered, extra virgin olive oil and finest aged balsamic vinegar. Venture around the vast room to try a few samples or ask for suggestions from the friendly staff. While visiting the store, check out their new exclusive giftline from Tuscany. Open daily. 253 Newbury St., 857.277.0007.

BRATTLE BOOK SHOPCL004762 Since 1825. The longest continuously operating antiquarian book store in Boston, and known nationwide. The Brattle houses every conceivable used and rare book, from antique tomes to the season’s bestsellers, as well as maps and prints, across three floors. 9 West St., 617.542.0210. H BRICCO PANETTERIA Hungry for a fresh, crusty loaf made right in Boston? Stop in at this teeny North End bread counter. Selection includes but is not limited to: ciabatta, baguette, batard and raisin loaf. 241 Hanover St., Rear, 617.248.9859. H BRICCO’S SALUMERIA & PASTA SHOPCL00568 Tucked down an alley near sister restaurant Bricco, this locally owned

gourmet grocer features a nice selection of olive oil, balsamic vinegar, imported cheese, fresh baked breads and more. Onsite, a pasta specialist makes a number of varieties of durum wheat semolina pasta and artisan ravioli, by hand, daily. 11 Board Alley, 617.248.9629. H BROMFIELD PEN SHOPCL004957 Since 1948. This tiny pen shop in Downtown Crossing harkens a time when businesses were family-owned. It stocks thousands of pens, from inexpensive disposables to limited editions and rare collectibles, including Montblanc, Pelikan, Omas, Aurora, Parker and Waterman. Filofax boutique with binders and refills. Pen engravings and repairs are done inhouse by a specialist. 5 Bromfield St., 617.482.9053.

CAMBRIDGE ARTISTS COOPERATIVECL0048 Located in the heart of Harvard Square, this artist-owned gallery features two floors of fine American craft work created by 250 professional artists from all over the U.S. Customers can browse jewelry, ceramics, photography, glass, fiber art, metal, wood, paper, sculpture. 59A Church St., Cambridge, 617.868.4434. CAMBRIDGESIDECL0049 This urban shopping center with a waterfront location boasts more than 120 brand-name stores and restaurants, including The Apple Store, Forever 21, Best Buy, Macy’s, H&M, T.J. Maxx, American Eagle and A|X Armani Exchange. Enjoy casual dining at The Cheesecake Factory, P.F. Chang’s and World of Beer or grab a

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SHOPPING bite at the food court. 100 CambridgeSide Place, Cambridge, 617.621.8666. H CATALDO INTERIORS HOME BOUTIQUE At her North End shop, interior designer Jeanette Cataldo offers a selection of items that ranges from organic baby clothing, women's clothing and jewelry to home decor, gift items and custom pieces. 42 Prince St., 857.317.6115. THE COOPCL00476 Opened by Harvard University students in 1882, The Coop is a Harvard Square institution. The store sprawls across multiple levels and offers an unbeatable selection of books—from fiction and art tomes to academic anthologies and magazines. 1400 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, 617.499.2000. 3 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, 617.499.3200.

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COPLEY PLACECL0050 Only the most posh of Boston’s fashion denizens have pockets deep enough to shop at this luxury designer mall that features 75 distinctive brand boutiques including Neiman Marcus, Barneys New York, Thomas Pink, Louis Vuitton, and more. Complimentary package check. 100 Huntington Ave., 617.369.5000. H CRAFT BEER CELLAR This store stocks beer from small breweries in different markets throughout the U.S., including the extremely limited and the highly sought after. Frequent tastings on whim and at will. Educated staff is “in the know” and ready to share knowledge with customers. 98 Van Ness St., 857.250.2967.

H EUROPEAN WATCH CO.CL005710 European Watch offers a selection of new, pre-owned and vintage timepieces from the most prestigious of watch manufacturers, including Panerai, Breguet, IWC, Jaeger LeCoultre and Rolex. Inquire about full restoration and repair services, preowned trade-ins and more. 232 Newbury St., 617.262.9798. FANEUIL HALL MARKETPLACECL00501 This early American marketplace has been a vendor market since Colonial days, when it stood right at Boston Harbor’s original shoreline. Today, find numerous stores, both local independents and national chains, pushcart vendors and historic and modern restaurants. Financial District, 617.523.1300. FRANK & OAK This Montreal-based creative lifestyle brand for men opened its first U.S. store in Boston. Smart designs, high quality fabrics and 12 original collections annually make for an ongoing freshness of style, and at a price point that won’t break the bank. 220 Newbury St., 617.778.2373. GOORIN BROS.CL0041329 Established 1895. Originally based in San Francisco, this family owned hat company now has a few East Coast outposts. Customers can expect a personal shopping experience as they check out all types of hip head wear, including flat caps, fedoras, schoolboy, cloche and cadet styles. 130 Newbury St., 617.247.4287. 43 Brattle St., Cambridge, 617.868.4287.

THOUSANDS OF PENS WATCHES, FILOFAX ORGANIZERS & MANY UNIQUE GIFTS On Premises Engraving & Repair Service

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SHOPPING M0851 This Montreal design house now has one of its two-dozen international boutiques in the Boston market. m0851 emphasizes craftsmanship in its sleek, modern accessories, outerwear and small goods, using high-end raw materials like silk, cashmere, wood and leather. 134 Newbury St., 617.236.5921. MAGPIECL003754 Take the Red Line to Davis Square and this whimsical boutique that offers hip and retro handmade crafts and goodies designed by independent, local artists. Find such items as stationery by Gehweiler, stuffed toys by Pepperberry and wall art by Katie Muth. 416 Highland Ave., Somerville, 617.623.3330. MARGARET O’LEARY Based in San Francisco, this clothing company is renowned for its cutting-edge knitwear and California chic aesthetic. Irish-born O’Leary began the business more than two decades ago in her tiny apartment, and it has evolved from a hand-loomed knit line into a collection of innovative, casual-chic luxury knitwear. 49 Charles St., 617.535.9144. NEIMAN MARCUSCL004798 High-end Texas flash and haute couture are what’s in store at this heralded shopping destination where exclusive makes dress you best. Natick Collection, Route 9, Natick, 508.620.5700. 5 Copley Place, 617.536.3660. H PAWSH DOG BOUTIQUECL004735 Dogs living the high life adore this preppy puppy boutique that pampers man’s best friend. Organic food items

are a great way to keep meals healthy, while fancy leads, leashes and collars, coats, fragrance sprays and spa products have Fido primed for the playground. Grooming boutique and salon available. 31 Gloucester St., 617.391.0880. PRUDENTIAL CENTERCL00507 Beneath one of Boston’s tallest skyscapers, The Prudential Center’s retail shops offer a lighthearted retreat in the heart of the Back Bay. The bustling center is anchored by Saks Fifth Avenue, Lord & Taylor and Barnes & Noble, and also features over 75 additional shops including Aritzia, Club Monaco, Kate Spade New York, Sephora and Sugarfina. Grab a bite at restaurants like 5 Napkin Burger, Wagamama, Top of the Hub or the much-anticipated Eataly Boston open in Winter 2016. 800 Boylston St., 800.Shop.Pru. RED SOX TEAM STORECL004169 This is the city’s—and the MLB’s— original souvenir store. Family-run ‘47 Brand purveys officially licensed professional and collegiate sporting apparel and is notably known for its near-perfect fit caps. Red Sox gear is in the house, naturally, but the vast inventory includes everything from autographed Fenway seats to limited-edition Alex and Ani bracelets. 19 Yawkey Way, 617.421.8686. SAKS FIFTH AVENUECL00480 Saks achieves new heights with apparel collections from Prada, Jason Wu and Roberto Cavalli. Find individual handbag boutiques from Dolce & Gabbana, and Fendi, jewelry from Carrera, shoes and accessories from Christian Dior. Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St., 617.262.8500.

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H SALT & OLIVE Among the delectable items at this gourmet food store, find northern and southern hemisphere premium olive oils, balsamic and flavored vinegars, flavored artisan salts, spices, teas, jams, and a nice selection of small-batch, locally produced specialty foods. 1160 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, 857.242.4118. SCHOENHOF’S FOREIGN BOOKSCL0047 Since 1856. If you speak another language or want to learn one, Schoenhof’s stacks its shelves with piles of classic and contemporary titles in French, German, Italian and Russian, as well as lesser spoken languages like Esperanto, Afrikaans, Norwegian and Turkish. An unparalleled selection of learning materials in 700 languages. 76A Mt. Auburn St., Cambridge, 617.547.8855. H SEDURRECL006730 Browse European and contemporary womenswear, accessories, lingerie and swimwear in an intimate, independent boutique environment. 28 1/2 Prince St., 617.720.4400. SHREVE, CRUMP & LOWCL004936 Since 1796. Shreve’s has been high society’s favorite stop for diamonds and other glittering essentials. An elegant showroom displays treasures ranging from the finest jewelry and watches to giftware, estate pieces, Boston-themed gifts and more. 39 Newbury St., 617.267.9100. H SIDNEY THOMAS JEWELERSCL002563 Sidney Thomas Jewelers delves further into the luxury market than its predecessor Ross-Simons, offering clients a concierge-style experience

and a broader range of brands, including Roberto Coin and Charriol. Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St., 617.262.0935. H SMALL PLEASURESCL004937 With a background at Christie’s Auction House, the owner of Small Pleasures certainly knows jewelry. This shop takes a big interest in fine vintage, antique and estate jewelry, from gem-studded earrings to cameo pins to elegant necklaces. Award-winning watch repairman on-site. 142 Newbury St., 617.267.7371. VINEYARD VINESCL0054128 Brothers started this small Martha’s Vineyard company in 1998, creating top-quality ties for fun-loving guys. Today, you recognize the smiling pink whale logo on offerings that extend to men’s, women’s and children’s casual clothing and accessories. Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St., 617.927.0490.

Cataldo Interiors inc.

Known for stretching the boundaries of color & design Cataldo Interiors Home offers a treasure chest of Home Décor-Accessories Unique Giftware and Custom pieces Hand crafted Jewelry and a Select line of clothing Visit Cataldo Interiors Home 42 Prince Street • Boston’s North End • Email: design@cataldointeriors.com

www.cataldointeriors.com • 857-317-6115 We offer shipping

WOOLRICH JOHN RICH & BROS. Venerable American heritage outdoor brand Woolrich features men’s and women’s outerwear, ready-towear lifestyle apparel and accessories, and signature items like Woolrich wool blankets. 299 Newbury St., 857.263.7554. WRENTHAM VILLAGE PREMIUM OUTLETSCL004806 Find discounts of 25 to 65 percent off at this outdoor village-style outlet center 35 miles from Boston. 170 stores include Michael Kors, Salvatore Ferragamo, and Saks Fifth Avenue Off 5th. 1 Premium Outlets Blvd., Wrentham (exit 15 off I-495), 508.384.0600.

European Shopping Experience in the Heart of Boston.

Unique Handmade Gifts, Pottery and House Wares.

Taste the Freshest Extra Virgin Olive Oil and the Finest Aged Balsamic Vinegar. Exclusive Gift Line from Tuscany. Come in, Taste, Compare, Enjoy Open 7 days a week bostonoliveoilcompany.com

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MUSEUMS & GALLERIES

Best In Show

ART GALLERIES BARBARA KRAKOW GALLERYCL003547 In operation for more than 25 years, this gallery focuses on minimal and conceptually based work from international artists, including Sol LeWitt, Julian Opie and Saul Steinberg, as well as many based in Boston. 10 Newbury St., 617.262.4490. BSA SPACECL004514 Boston Society of Architects’ posh waterfront gallery offers exhibitions that focus on architecture, construction and design. 290 Congress St., 617.951.1433. CARPENTER CENTER FOR THE VISUAL ARTS/SERT GALLERY AND MAIN GALLERYCL00610 Famed French architect Le Corbusier

chose to design his only North American building as a receptacle for visual art. The Sert Gallery features contemporary art, while the Main Gallery hosts exhibitions that support Harvard curriculum. 24 Quincy St., Cambridge, 617.495.3251. COPLEY SOCIETY OF ARTCL00359 America’s oldest nonprofit art association, Co|So shows more than 500 living member artists who range in ability from student to world-renowned. 158 Newbury St., 617.536.5049. DTR MODERN GALLERIESCL003560 DTR specializes in 20th-century masters and boasts a significant privately-held collection of works by artists including Picasso, Chagall, Basquiat, Dali, Botero and Warhol. 167 Newbury St., 617.424.9700.

THE FPAC GALLERYCL00471 The stunning, seven-story, artistowned cooperative features 48 livework studios in the Fort Point neighborhood. Before going inside, peek through the gallery’s giant glass wall at museum-quality solo exhibitions by Boston-based artists. 300 Summer St., 617.423.4299. H GALERIE D’ORSAYCL003561 Galerie d’Orsay represents the finest international art masters including Rembrandt, Pissarro, Matisse, Dali, Picasso and Corot, as well as highly recognized contemporary painters and sculptors, like Erdman and Tolla. 33 Newbury St., 617.266.8001. GOLD GALLERY Photography, painting and mixed media are what’s on display at this contemporary art project founded by

Adam Gold in the South End. Gallery artists include Jeff Cohen, Christie Scheele, David Gyscek, Miriam Shenitzer and Louise LeBourgeois. 655 Tremont St., 857.239.8972. GRAND CIRCLE GALLERYCL007496 Grand Circle Corporation—provider of international travel, adventure and discovery for Americans over 50—offers this inviting Fort Point exhibition space and features vintage travel poster and photography exhibits. 347 Congress St., 617.346.6459. H THE GUILD OF BOSTON ARTISTSCL003567 Founded in 1914, the Guild focuses on contemporary realism, and has for more than a century, exhibiting top painters from all over New England. The gallery also offers work in a variety of media and often runs its “Living

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QUENTIN GAREL, "GIRAFE," 2014, BRONZE/COURTESY M FINE ARTS GALERIE

Science, history, archaeology and technology challenge the mind. Fine art museums explore all facets of the visual world, while galleries make contemporary impressions with existential, mod, modern and classic pieces.


Three Hundred Years. One Destination.

Columbia Point, Boston

COMMONWEALTH MUSEUM The first public schools, the first battles for American independence, the first abolitionist newspaper - Massachusetts has always been a leader in the quest for equal rights and opportunities. The Commonwealth Museum brings the story to life with state-of-the-art, interactive exhibits. Its dramatic “treasures gallery” holds the great historic documents that protect our liberties. Spend an hour or an af ternoon and share our common heritage. Admission is free. commonwealthmuseum.org

The Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate offers a dynamic, interactive experience in democracy. Visit our full-scale representation of the United States Senate Chamber, where you can vote on a current piece of legislation and listen to live debates on historical issues. See a replica of Senator Kennedy’s Washington office and get a glimpse into his career and personality. Use digital tablets to engage with our unique exhibits for a high-tech, high-touch learning experience. emkinstitute.org

Columbia Point, Boston

Experience how the power of President John F. Kennedy’s words and actions inspired Americans to great achievements. See monumental moments in American History through remastered films of iconic speeches and debates, large screen projections and interactive displays. JFK’s ideals and vision are on full view every day from 9-5 pm at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum. Ideas. Courage. Inspiration. Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. jfklibrary.org

Driving: Exit 15 from 93N or 93S MBTA: Take the Red Line to JFK/UMass station and take Bus #2


MUSEUMS & GALLERIES Masters Series.” 162 Newbury St., 617.536.7660. INTERNATIONAL POSTER GALLERYCL003570 Globally recognized for its collection of 10,000 original vintage posters ranging from the 1890s to the postwar era. It also boasts the world’s largest collection of Italian posters, a series of 20th-century Swiss posters and one of the world’s finest arrays of Soviet posters. 205 Newbury St., 617.375.0076. M. FINE ARTS GALERIE This SoWa arts district gallery features international contemporary artists, including Marc Chalmé, Michel Delacroix, Quentin Garel, and Xavier Rodés, many of whom are only represented in the U.S. here. 61 Thayer St., 617.450.0700. MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERIES Celebrating 40-plus years of fine art. Featuring the largest collection of works in the U.S. by Picasso, Chagall, Warhol, Murakami, Erté, Hallam and Kostabi, among others. 77 Newbury St., 617.369.4800. ROBERT KLEIN GALLERYCL003589 This gallery specializes in fine art photography by established and critically acclaimed masters of the 19th and 20th centuries, including Herb Ritts, Henri Cartier Bresson, Man Ray, Ansel Adams, Yousuf Karsh, Alfred Stieglitz and Walker Evans. 38 Newbury St., 617.267.7997. THE VOSE GALLERIES OF BOSTONCL00359 The oldest family-owned art gallery in the country, Vose Galleries specializes in high-quality 18th, 19th and early

20th century American Realist paintings and works on paper, but also features space for the work of contemporary living artists. Commissioned portraits available. 238 Newbury St., 617.536.6176. H SOWA ARTISTS GUILDCL0041857 Visitors encounter a world rife with art here at this flagship building where more than 60 professional working studios and 15 galleries occupy space. With most open to the public, these studios offer a glimpse at contemporary local artists working in all types of mediums. Artists’ hours vary, but sign in lobby indicates open spaces. 450 Harrison Ave.

to the Commonwealth. Great permanent exhibits as well as temporary lobby exhibits. 220 William T. Morrissey Blvd., Columbia Point, 617.727.9268. DECORDOVA SCULPTURE PARK AND MUSEUMCL006230 This former mansion, now acclaimed art destination, showcases rotating exhibitions of contemporary art and sculpture by international, national and New England artists. Encompassing 30 acres just 20 miles from Boston, the outdoor Sculpture Park provides a constantly changing landscape of more than 60 largescale sculptures. 51 Sandy Pond Road, Lincoln, 781.259.8355.

MUSEUMS BOSTON ATHENAEUMCL00437 This landmark is one of the city’s largest and oldest membership libraries and its first museum of fine arts. Its collections include the personal library of George Washington and art by John Singer Sargent. Art and architecture tours, reservations required. 10 1/2 Beacon St., 617.227.0270. BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARYCL00438 America’s first municipally-funded public library houses millions of books, manuscripts, music scores and art and boasts a scenic courtyard, events, readings and exhibits. Free, one-hour art and architecture tours are a must. Copley Square, 617.536.5400. H COMMONWEALTH MUSEUM OF MASSACHUSETTS HISTORYCL004280 This museum has collections and exhibits that are based on artifacts from the state archives and issues related

H EDWARD M. KENNEDY INSTITUTE FOR THE UNITED STATES SENATE The Edward M. Kennedy Institute offers a dynamic, interactive experience in democracy. Visit a full-scale representation of the United States Senate Chamber, see a replica of Senator Kennedy’s Washington office, and use digital tablets to engage with unique exhibits. 210 Morrissey Blvd., 617.740.7000. FULLER CRAFT MUSEUMCL07051 The region’s only museum dedicated to contemporary craft, the Fuller showcases one-of-a-kind works of art created in glass, metal, wood, ceramics and fiber and mounts everchanging exhibitions of today’s distinguished craftspeople. 455 Oak St., Brockton, 508.588.6000. H HARVARD ART MUSEUMSCL004293 Harvard Art Museums comprise three institutions—Fogg, Busch-Reisinger

and Arthur M. Sackler museums— plus four research centers and possesses some of the nation’s foremost art collections, with holdings of Western art dating from antiquity, Islamic and Asian art, and European and American art since 1900. 32 Quincy St., Cambridge, 617.495.9400. H HARVARD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORYCL00429 Part of Harvard University’s Harvard Museums of Science & Culture, this natural history museum offers a look at fascinating objects, including meteorites, 1,500 mammal and bird specimens, and the dazzling “Glass Flowers”—a collection of 3,000 incredible handcrafted models of flowering plants. 26 Oxford St., Cambridge, 617.495.3045. HARVARD SEMITIC MUSEUMCL0043754 Part of the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture, this institution houses Harvard University’s collections of Near Eastern archaeological artifacts, many that have come from museum-sponsored excavations in Israel, Jordan, Iraq, Egypt, Cyprus, and Tunisia. Founded in 1889, the collection holds over 40,000 artifacts that run the gamut from pottery and sculpture to coins and cuneiform tablets, and there are currently five exhibitions on display. 6 Divinity Ave., Cambridge, 617.495.4631. THE INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART/BOSTONCL004295 This landmark fosters contemporary artists working in multidisciplinary forms. Permanent collections include 21st-century sculpture, painting, video, photography and drawing. Also

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SoWa Art & Design District

ART GALLERIES

DESIGN SHOWROOMS

450 & 460 Harrison Avenue www.sowaboston.com/galleries www.sowaboston.com/shops-boutiques

UNIQUE BOUTIQUES

The South End’s SoWa neighborhood, a former mill and warehouse district, is now Boston’s leading creative arts destination. The block-long buildings at 450 & 460 Harrison Avenue are the epicenter of the SoWa Art & Design District, and are home to more than 140 contemporary art galleries, design showrooms, one-of-a-kind boutiques, and artist studios. Visitors to the area will enjoy a distinctive array of paintings, sculpture, photography and objects d’art from both regional and international artists. Home furnishings, fashion, wearables, textiles, hand-made jewelry and more offer a shopping experience unlike any other. Ample parking available on site. Short walk from Broadway, Tufts or Back Bay T stations or Silver Line bus stop. VISIT US AT #450 HARRISON AVE

VISIT US AT #460 HARRISON AVE

CASA Outdoor Molteni & C GALVIN-ized Headwear Goosefish Press Matter & Light Fine Art M Fine Arts Galerie Gallery Kayafas Lanoue Gallery SoWa Artists Guild Carroll and Sons Gallery

Amisha Imports Rafius Fane Gallery Yve YANG Gallery Alternative Art Space L’Attitude Gallery Abigail Ogilvy Gallery T+H Gallery Ash & Rose Gold Gallery A Street Frames Giardini di Sole Diseño Beth Urdang Gallery Crane & Lion Alpha Gallery Galatea Fine Art CASA Design Miller Yezerski Gallery Galería Cubana Bead + Fiber Mohr & McPherson


MUSEUMS & GALLERIES OF

BOSTON ARTISTS

162 Newbury Street Boston, MA 02116 617 536 7660 guildofbostonartists.org

Founded in 1914 A nonprofit art gallery promoting representational painting and sculpture of enduring beauty by leading New England artists.

Jean Lightman “Italian Vase,” o/c, 29 x 25in

features lectures, family programs, dance and music, and film. 25 Harbor Shore Drive, 617.478.3100. H ISABELLA STEWART GARDNER MUSEUMCL004296 Originally modeled after a 15th-century Venetian palazzo with a four-story interior courtyard garden and a modern wing in 2012, this museum gem showcases Isabella Stewart Gardner’s vast collection of more than 2,500 fine and decorative art objects, paintings, tapestries and furnishings with a venue for contemporary artists and concerts. 25 Evans Way, 617.566.1401. H JOHN F. KENNEDY PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUMCL008167 Dedicated to JFK and the legacy of Camelot, spotlighting such subjects as JFK as a child, the 1960 campaign, Vietnam, the Peace Corps, and civil rights. In 2015, new renovations feature remastered historic film footage and a number of interactive displays. Columbia Point, 617.514.1600 or 866.JFK.1960. H THE MARY BAKER EDDY LIBRARYCL004301 Explore the achievements of Mary Baker Eddy, a 19th-century writer, leader, teacher and businesswoman who founded the Christian Science religion, The Church of Christ, Scientist, and international newspaper The Christian Science Monitor. Within this museum that holds her research and artifacts, visit the Mapparium, a three-story painted-glass globe you can walk through. 200 Massachusetts Ave., 888.222.3711.

MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETYCL00435 This independent research library holds millions of unique documents on American history, including John Winthrop’s journal of the founding of Massachusetts Bay in 1630 and correspondences between John and Abigail Adams. 1154 Boylston St., 617.536.1608. MCMULLEN MUSEUM OF ARTCL004305 This campus-set museum dates to the 19th century and features an amazing art collection, including 19th- and 20th-century American landscape and portrait paintings; sacred Italian paintings from the 1500s; classical Flemish tapestries from the 1500s; and many works by John LaFarge and William Trost Richards. Boston College, Devlin Hall, 140 Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill, 617.552.8100. MIT LIST VISUAL ARTS CENTERCL004306 This modern arts center is dedicated to the pursuit of contemporary art in all media as it ranges from the traditional (painting, sculpture) to new forms such as video installation. Guided tours available with advance registration. Wiesner Building, 20 Ames St., Cambridge, 617.253.4680. MIT MUSEUMCL004307 This microcosm of technological, engineering and scientific strides attracts visitors from around the world. Exhibitions change frequently, and focus on subjects like emerging technologies, holograms, gestural sculptures, and artifacts from the Polaroid Collection. 265 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, 617.253.4444.

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MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORYCL004309 New England’s largest African-American history museum is dedicated to the preservation, conservation and accurate interpretation of the contributions of African Americans. Exhibits offer the stories of leaders, activists and citizens of this region who have impacted history from the Colonial period through the 19th century. 46 Joy St., 617.725.0022. MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTONCL00413 The MFA’s encyclopedic collection culls some of the world’s finest treasures, including international and contemporary art, instruments, photographs and textiles. Free guided tours, gallery talks and activities. 465 Huntington Ave., 617.267.9300. H MUSEUM OF SCIENCECL004231 The Museum of Science is a compelling technology and science-based destination. Permanent exhibits study the weather, mathematics, bird species, dinosaurs, space and the human body, among other “minds-on” topics. Make sure to visit the Theater of Electricity. Bonus experiences include the Butterfly Garden, the Planetarium, the 4-D Theater and the Mugar Omni Theater. Science Park, 617.723.2500. PAUL S. RUSSELL, MD MUSEUM OF MEDICAL HISTORY AND INNOVATION This medical museum tells the rich story of Massachusetts General Hospital’s two centuries of history. Learn about the hospital’s important contributions to the medical field and see how these discoveries and advancements have shaped the present, and

how the hospital continues to shape the future of medicine. Massachusetts General Hospital, 2 North Grove St., 617.724.8009. THE PEABODY MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY AND ETHNOLOGYCL00432 Part of Harvard University’s Harvard Museums of Science & Culture, this is one of the oldest museums of its kind, offering collections of human cultural history from Africa, ancient Europe, North America, Mesoamerica, Oceania and South America. Great programming and lecture series. 11 Divinity Ave., Cambridge, 617.496.1027. PEABODY ESSEX MUSEUMCL00432 Collections include American art and architecture, American decorative art, maritime art and culture, Native American art, Asian, Asian export, African, Oceanic and contemporary art, photography and the fascinating Yin Yu Tang house. Great hands-on activities, tours, concerts, classes and family programs. 161 Essex St., Salem, 866.745.1876. H SALEM WITCH MUSEUMCL00432 This popular museum brings the Witch Trials of 1692 to life, recreating the drama of accusers and accused, court proceedings and the execution of 20 victims. On exhibit: “Witches: Evolving Perceptions.” Multilingual translations available. 19 1/2 Washington Square North, Salem, 978.744.1692.

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DINING

Feast On This Boston may be famous for baked beans and a signature pie (that is really a cake), but these are things of the past. Today, the dining scene is a hot stop for foodie nation. World-famous chefs run restaurants here. Local waters serve up some of the freshest seafood you'll find. And flavors span the globe.

★ BACK DECKCL00531290 With an atmosphere reminiscent of a neighbor’s backyard barbecue, this casual eatery aims to be a comfortable oasis where friends can meet, drink and bite into different meats prepared on the open kitchen’s three hardwood charcoal grills. 2 West St., 617.670.0320. BANYAN BAR & REFUGE This “modern Asian gastropub” in the South End offers a menu made up

largely of sharing plates. The bar features sake, wine and specialty cocktails with southeast Asian flair. 553 Tremont St., 617.556.4211. BAR BOULUD Daniel Boulud’s French-inspired bistro and wine bar resides at the Mandarin Oriental hotel. A menu of traditional Parisian bistro fare includes coq au vin, decadent burgers, and charcuterie, terrines and pâtés. At the bar, craft beer and cocktails are a highlight, while the wine list focuses on Burgundy and the Rhone Valley. 776 Boylston St., 617.535.8800. ★ BRICCO RISTORANTE & ENOTECACL00340 This upscale bistro and wine bar overlooks Hanover Street through large picture windows. Chef Gianni Caruso whips up modern interpretations

of classic Italian cuisine and tempts diners with house-made pasta, risotto and the signature veal Valdostana. All-Italian wine list. 241 Hanover St., 617.248.6800. CAFÉ ARTSCIENCE No surprise this place in within the bounds of MIT. Café ArtScience explores innovations within the culinary world and shows off products being developed onsite. Inhale a cocktail or a flavor cloud; then munch on chef Patrick Campbell’s refined, innovative cuisine. 650 E. Kendall St., Cambridge, 857.999.2193. ★ THE CAFE AT TAJ BOSTONCL00231 A favorite spot for power breakfasts, lively luncheons and fine dining, The Cafe features a wall of windows that faces Newbury Street, so while you

enjoy the view, you can savor your meal. Afternoon tea, a roof-top Sunday brunch. 15 Arlington St., 617.598.5255. ★ CANTINA ITALIANACL00341 First opened in 1931, Cantina Italiana’s current owner Fiore Colella has been serving up Southern Italian-inspired cooking for the last three decades. Executive chef Charles Colella’s menu features fresh flavors in dishes like hearty eggplant parmesan and the restaurant’s signature homemade Bombolotti pasta. 346 Hanover St., 617.723.4577. ★ COBBLESTONE CAFE It’s one of the first places you’ll see entering the North End via Hanover Street, so if you’re thirsting for an iced coffee, stop here. The combo coffee shop/burger joint/seafood shack

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COURTESY OF PARSNIP RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

★ ANTICO FORNOCL0036 The namesake of this inviting trattoria means “old stove” in Italian, and it pleases with authentic Neapolitan offerings all cooked within. Savor the brick-oven roasted chicken in natural juices with garlic and herbs or seriously delicious pizza. 93 Salem St., 617.723.6733.


DINING is particularly known for its Angus burgers, but it features a really big menu—note that all food is to-go. 227 Hanover St., 857.263.8057. H DAVIO’S NORTHERN ITALIAN STEAKHOUSECL00347 Grand and sophisticated, this restaurant is amenable to dates, business dinners, or even a simple glass of wine at the bar. Lengthy menu features regional dishes from northern Italy, as well as grilled meat a la carte; entrees run the gamut from lamb loin chops to tagliatelle Bolognese. 75 Arlington St., 617.357.4810.

The Café Breakfast: M-F 6:30-11a, Wknd 7-11a Lunch: Mon-Sun 11:30am-2:30pm Dinner: Mon-Sun 5:30pm-10:30pm Brunch: Sat & Sun 11am-2:30pm

Rooftop Brunch Seatings every Sunday: 11am, 11:30am, 1pm & 1:30pm

The Bar Sun-Thurs: 2:30pm-11:30pm Fri: 2:30pm-12:30am Sat: Noon-12:30am

A LANDMARK HOTEL RICH IN TRADITION, SOPHISTICATION & STYLE Reservations: 617-536-5700 | Opentable.com 15 Arlington Street | Boston, MA 02116 | 617.536.5700 tajhotels.com/boston

DORETTA TAVERNA Top Boston chef Michael Schlow focuses on Greek cuisine here. Menu features Mediterranean fish and meat dishes, as well as spreads and small plates, and a beautiful raw bar. 79 Park Plaza. H FAJITAS & ‘RITASCL003485 Established in 1989, Fajitas & ‘Ritas is an easygoing restaurant and bar, featuring fresh, healthy southwestern barbecue and Texan fare at bargain prices. An all-around fun place to eat, drink and hang out, the walls are decorated with colorful murals and the bar boasts some of Boston’s best—and sturdiest—margaritas. 25 West St., 617.426.1222. GRILL 23 & BARCL003492 Jacket preferred. The old Salada Tea Company building with its mahogany and brass accents provides a clubby setting for Chef Jay Murray’s all-natural, prime, dry-aged beef. Order farm-raised cuts a la carte. Excellent service and outstanding wine list that features more than 1,000 French, Italian and Spanish varieties. 161 Berkeley St., 617.542.2255.

L’ESPALIERCL003271 Artisanal and seasonal describes James Beard Award-winning chef Frank McClelland’s haute FrenchNew England fare served at one of the city’s most elegant eateries. Prix-fixe and tasting menus available. L’Espalier Salon open daily at 5:30 pm for beverages and small bites with butler service. 774 Boylston St., 617.262.3023. H LEGAL SEA FOODSCL00345 Legal Sea Foods has served only the freshest ocean fare for 60 years. USA Today names Legal “Best Seafood Restaurant in America.” Discover award-winning chowder, pristine oysters, succulent Maine lobster, and more than 40 varieties of delicious fish and shellfish. Excellent wine list. 100 Huntington Ave., 617.266.7775. 255 State St., 617.742.5300. 26 Park Plaza, 617.426.4444. 20 University Road, Cambridge, 617.491.9400. 5 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, 617.864.3400. LIQUID ART HOUSE The large, central bar is a hot gathering place for area professionals. Douglas Rodrigues runs the kitchen, orchestrating modern American dishes served by waiters wearing custom-tailored suits. Notably, there’s a focus on art: Works on canvas and video installation, most by local artists, rotate in and out of exhibitions. The Arlington, 100 Arlington St., 617.457.8130. H MARE OYSTER CRUDO AND SEAFOOD BARCL00358 Mare’s kitchen focuses on fresh, locally sourced oysters and other fresh seafood served raw, as well as other

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ON THE FREEDOM TRAIL IN BOSTON’S HISTORIC NORTH END

135 RICHMOND STREET 857.350.3105 WWW.SFIZITAPAS.COM


DINING simple fish dishes. The signature lobster roll remains a favorite staple of the menu. Outdoor patio has firepits and skyline views. 223 Hanover St./3 Mechanic St., 617.723.6273. H MCCORMICK & SCHMICK’SCL003456 Recognized for its great food and atmosphere, this national restaurant’s menu changes twice daily to showcase the freshest catch. Excellent wine list and hand-shaken cocktails, and a fantastic raw bar. North Market, Faneuil Hall Marketplace, 617.720.5522. MENTONCL006491 Chef Barbara Lynch’s Menton has been named a Grand Chef Relais & Chateaux property. Diners can choose among a four-course prix-fixe and a seven-course chef’s tasting menu. For foodies, it’s money well spent; Lynch’s signature talent for French technique employed on Italian cooking yields amazing flavors. Jackets suggested. 354 Congress St., 617.737.0099. MISTRALCL003481 This sophisticated dining room boasts high ceilings and a clientele that is equally as elegant, making it a sizzling rendezvous for the well-todo. Uncomplicated French Mediterranean dishes. Named Wine Spectator’s Best of Award of Excellence. 223 Columbus Ave., 617.867.9300. H MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSECL003495 Panoramic views of the Harbor and an extensive wine selection are bonus features of this Chicago steak house experience. Wet-aged prime beef broiled Midwestern-style makes for hearty portions, but also try pork, lamb and veal chops and seafood. 2 Seaport Lane, 617.526.0410.

H THE OCEANAIRE SEAFOOD ROOMCL008153 This elegant dining room means business, which is obvious from the cherry-wood paneling and high-vaulted ceilings you see as soon as you walk in. Still, the electric atmosphere won’t deter fish lovers outside the power crowd from sitting down and ordering up a feast. Menu changes daily to accommodate the freshest catch. 40 Court St., 617.742.2277. PARSNIP RESTAURANT & LOUNGE Quiet and refined, this new Harvard Square dining room occupies the space once run by Upstairs on the Square. Chef Peter Quinion serves modern European dishes that use fresh local ingredients and change with the season. In the upstairs lounge, Harvard faculty conduct business over classic cocktails. 91 Winthrop St., Cambridge, 617.714.3206. H QUATTROCL004290 Italian homestyle comfort food cooked in a wood-burning brick oven, including rotisserie meats, artisan pasta, and Neapolitan-style pizza. Great panini menu at lunch. 264 Hanover St., 617.720.0444. H RISTORANTE FIORECL00372 Fiore Colella’s restaurant brings the farm-to-table sensibilities of his native Avellino to his North End kitchen with its emphasis on seasonal ingredients and fresh-made pastas. Fiore has a heated, covered rooftop deck and a full bar. 250 Hanover St., 617.371.1176. SELECT OYSTER BAR You really have to like seafood to eat at Michael Serpa’s cool spot in Back

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® Bay—there’s only a single non-fishy item on the menu. An oyster and raw bar program puts forth incredibly fresh crudo options, or try bouillabaisse and pan-roasted lobster. This place is small, but worth the wait. 50 Gloucester St., 857.239.8064. H SERAFINA Boston restaurateur Seth Greenberg brings New York’s legendary Italian restaurant a few hundred miles north. Chef Brendan Burke’s menu includes Italian-inspired fare like seafood antipasti and gourmet thin-crust pizza. Private dining available. 10 High St., 617.426.1234. H SFIZI TAPAS BAR Sfizi’s name says it all, meaning “snack” in Italian, and that’s what you’ll find on the menu at this place. Bites are inspired by the regional cooking of Italy, Portugal, Greece, Turkey, France and other Mediterranean countries. Regional wine list and a neighborhood vibe. 135 Richmond St., 857.350.3105. H TERRAMIA RISTORANTECL00386 This tiny North End neighborhood restaurant puts a contemporary spin on old-world Italian cuisine. The dining room can get a bit noisy, but the menu makes up for it with tasty dishes like Sicilian-spiced pork chop and open-faced shellfish ravioli. 98 Salem St., 617.523.3112. TIGER MAMA Lauded chef Tiffani Faison takes on Southeast Asia with this spot that explores flavors and culinary traditions from Thailand, Vietnam and Malaysia. To be sure, preparations—some 50 of them—are Faison’s creative interpretations of traditional dishes. 1363 Boylston St., 617.425.6262.

H TOP OF THE HUBCL007381 Expect modern, eclectic takes on regional New England cuisine with a focus on seafood from Executive Chef Stefan Jarausch. Top of the Hub also stands 52 stories above the city, so diners get a stunning view. Two wine cellars are the winners of Wine Spectator’s Award of Excellence. Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St., 617.536.1775. TOWNSMAN Matt Jennings’ brasserie-inspired menu presents sophisticated cooking rooted in New England. Things like deviled eggs with crispy chicken skins, chicken-fried sweetbreads and hazelnut-fed pork and apple vinegar. Cocktail connoisseurs appreciate the dry martini service. 120 Kingston St., 617.993.0750.

Great.... Simply Great

SEAFOOD AND STEAKS

Adjacent to Faneuil Hall 1 Faneuil Hall Market PI / North Market Building Boston, MA 02109 / 617.720.5522

mccormickandschmicks.com

H TRATTORIA IL PANINOCL0038 For near on three decades, Trattoria Il Panino has brought the Amalfi Coast to New England with a Mediterranean menu that is heavy on seafood and fresh pasta; Neapolitan-style pizza is cooked in an authentic oven. In nice weather, patrons can enjoy a meal in an outdoor garden. 280 Hanover St. and 11 Parmenter St., 617.720.1336. H UNION OYSTER HOUSECL003461 Opened in 1826, this National Historic Landmark is the nation’s oldest continuously operating restaurant. Fresh seafood is the main attraction and always has been, and the menu is heavy-handed on shellfish and oysters, fried and broiled fish, baked, boiled and broiled lobster and local Yankee favorites. 41 Union St., 617.227.2750.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

COBBLESTONE CAFÉ

TERRAMIA RISTORANTE

ANTICO FORNO PIZZA - RESTAURANT

BOSTON’S BEST BURGER

BOSTON BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT

Located in Boston’s North End, we are one of the area’s most unique eateries. By combining a coffee shop and burger spot, into one. Cobblestone’s menu offers a diverse list of dishes, all made with quality and fresh ingredients. Although we have so much to offer, 12 different burgers continue to be hailed as some of Boston’s best. What separates us from other restaurants devoted to burgers? It is our commitment to freshness and the unique flavor combinations. Each burger is made with 100% 8oz. Prime Angus Beef, and are all cooked to medium on a grilled bun.

UPSCALE ITALIAN FOOD Since opening in 1993, Terramia has aimed to convince North End diners that there was always more to Italian food than red sauce. Over the Years, the inventive and beloved restaurant has done a great deal of convincing. You’ll find creative interpretations of seasonallybased classics here. OPTIONS FOR EVERYONE Vegan, vegetarian, gluten free, child friendly options available

Entrees like Saltimbocca di Pollo and Linguine al Frutti di Mare hearken back to the old country, but Antico Forno is best known for its brickoven pizzas. The oven was built by a Neapolitan craftsman, and is the oldest brick oven, wood fired pizzas in Boston. The wood fired pizzas are piled high with house made ingredients and mozzarella.

227 Hanover Street, Boston, MA 02113

98 Salem St, North End, Boston, MA 02113

98 Salem St, North End, Boston, MA 02113

857.263.8079 617.606.5010

www.terramiaristorante.com

617.523.3112

Antico Forno is billed as “The Most Authentic Italian Restaurant,” and we’re hard pressed to argue. This mainstay in Boston’s North End manages a cozy mom-and-pop atmosphere with world-class traditional cuisine.

617.723.6733

www.anticofornoboston.com

www.cobblestonene.com

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CRAFT BEER CELLAR We are a family of independently owned craft beer retail stores. We are committed to driving the growth and awareness of craft beer through hospitality, education, and the support of exceptional beer. Craft beer isn’t just a section of the store for us, it’s what we are all about! Whether you’re just beginning to explore craft beer or a hardcore Beer Geek, we’re here to help you find a beer that you’ll enjoy. We’re constantly working to find the best beers, whether local, US, or international, that we can get our hands on. Come in and experience a better way to buy beer. We have various locations across the country, with more than ten throughout MA, including our flagship store in Belmont!

BACK DECK

FAJITAS & ‘RITAS

Drawing inspiration from a New England back yard and featuring a menu of grill-focused favorites and patio sipping cocktails, Back Deck is an urban oasis in downtown Boston. With such details as floor to ceiling open windows, carriage lighting, glazed brick, and slate and deck flooring as well as an open kitchen that invites guests to watch the flame-licking fun, Back Deck brings the outdoors inside and provides the perfect setting to enjoy the fun and flavor of hardwood charcoal grilling year round.

Established in 1989, Fajitas & ‘Ritas is an award winning, good-vibe, “unabashedly fun” restaurant and bar featuring fresh Texas and barbecue cuisine. Its namesake specialties include a variety of sizzling fajitas and frosty margaritas at Cheap Eats prices. Enjoy generous portions of fresh and healthy food while your relax in this down-toearth and funky spot…or… kick back at the bar and sip some “honest margaritas”. Conveniently located downtown near the Boston Common, Downtown Crossing, the Freedom Trail and the Theater District. So stop by and eat, drink, party and experience the vibe. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

2 West Street(Corner of Washington), Boston, MA 02111

617.670.0320 www.backdeckboston.com

25 West Street, Boston, MA 02111

617.426.1222 www.fajitasandritas.com

Craft Beer Cellar

617.993.3214

www.craftbeercellar.com

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WHERE GUESTBOOK

You’re So Fresh


ENTERTAINMENT

Places You'll Go

World-class theater, music and dance performances offer a taste of the arts. Revolutionary voices resonate on the Freedom Trail, exotic sea life is easy to spot both in and out of Boston Harbor, and monuments, meeting houses and map rooms tickle your intellect.

©S. CHENG/NEW ENGLAND AQUARIUM

CITY SIGHTS AFRICAN MEETING HOUSECL0067413 The oldest black church edifice still standing in the U.S. has often been referred to as the black Faneuil Hall. Built in 1806 almost exclusively with black labor, it served as a forum for the Abolitionist movement. Frederick Douglass gave his famous antislavery speech at the site in 1860. 46 Joy St. 617.725.0022.

CHARLESTOWN NAVY YARDCL004206 Located where the Charles River meets Boston Harbor, this 30-acre Boston National Historical Park served the Navy for 174 years and was integral in military engagements from the War of 1812 to WWII. In the Navy Yard, you’ll find the USS Constitution, USS Constitution Museum, the destroyer USS Cassin Young and the National Park Service Center. Charlestown, 617.242.5601.

BUNKER HILL MONUMENTCL0052896 One of Boston’s most iconic sights is, ironically, a misnomer: the Bunker Hill Monument sits atop Breed’s Hill, where the American Revolution’s Battle of Bunker Hill took place in 1775. The towering, 221-foot obelisk offers terrific views from the top. Monument Square, Charlestown, 617.242.5641.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTISTCL00412 The First Church of Christ, Scientist is actually two connected structures: the original 1894 Romanesque-style building, and its larger Renaissance and Byzantine-style expansion, completed in 1906. Situated on a 14-acre plaza, the complex features beautiful stained glass windows and a magnif-

icent 13,295-pipe organ. 210 Massachusetts Ave., 617.450.3790. FORT WARREN & GEORGES ISLAND VISITOR CENTERCL0041382 This Civil War-era fort occupies the majority of Georges Island and is completely open to visitors. Explore the deserted caverns, rooms and (sometimes hidden) passageways of the historic landmark at your leisure. Daily ranger tours offer facts about the fort, the Confederate soldiers and political prisoners who were exiled here. Visitor center features exhibits, personal recollections of soldiers and prisoners, and a short film. Georges Island, 617.223.8666. THE FREEDOM TRAILCL00423 Focused on the American Revolution, from the Colonial period to the War

of 1812, this 2.5-mile, red-painted and bricked path connects 16 historic sites, each of which has its own story. Visitors can walk the trail at any hour, but accessibility to each site varies, with most open daily. Freedom Trail Foundation, 617.357.8300. THE MAPPARIUMCL0048156 The Mary Baker Eddy Library’s main claim to fame is this beautiful, three-story glass globe created by Chester Lindsay Churchill that allows patrons to view the world as it was in 1935. Stand on the 30-foot glass bridge at the center of this three-dimensional world and ponder the geographic changes that have transpired since that time. 200 Massachusetts Ave., 617.450.7000.

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ENTERTAINMENT NEW ENGLAND AQUARIUMCL004731 Explore the world’s waters from the Amazon rain forest to Pacific reefs to the Gulf of Maine, and the creatures living there. Come see the Giant Ocean Tank, a Caribbean coral reef environment boasting 2,000 sea creatures! Other main exhibits include a shark and ray touch tank and a sea lion and seal center. Central Wharf, 617.973.5200.

SWAN BOATS OF BOSTONCL00427 Located on the lagoon in the center of Boston’s idyllic Public Garden, the historic Swan Boats are a legendary local tradition. Owned by the Paget family since 1877, the elegant, pedal-powered vessels feature scenic, 15-minute rides past weeping willows, gardens in bloom and mallard duck families. Public Garden, 617.522.1966.

OLD CITY HALLCL004721 This decadent structure was built 1862-1865 as one of the first buildings in the French Second Empire architectural style in the U.S and is now one of the only ones that survives. This is actually Boston’s third city hall, and it saw the service of 38 mayors through 1969, including Josiah Quincy and James M. Curley. 45 School St., 617.523.8678.

TRINITY CHURCHCL00429 Completed in 1877, Trinity Church is considered a masterpiece of church architecture for its Richardsonian Romanesque design, its incredible murals by John LaFarge and Augustus Saint-Gaudens, and its museum-quality stained glass windows. 206 Clarendon St., 617.536.0944.

OLD NORTH CHURCHCL0052908 Built in 1723, Old North is Boston’s oldest church building. While it played a pivotal role at the onset of the American Revolution, it is interesting to note that at the time the church was highly Loyalist. Its bells, which still ring, are the oldest church bells in North America. Learn more on indepth “Behind the Scenes” tours that visit the steeple and the crypt. 193 Salem St., 617.523.6676.

ACTORS’ SHAKESPEARE PROJECTCL006721 This resident theater company offers fresh, modern and thought-provoking stagings of Shakespearean plays in nontraditional spaces, as well as a smattering of new works by local playwrights. 866.811.4111.

H SKYWALK OBSERVATORY AT PRUDENTIAL CENTERCL00425 Located on the 50th floor of the Prudential Center, Skywalk features striking, 360-degree views of Boston and beyond. Exhibits include the Dreams of Freedom Immigration Museum and “Wings Over Boston,” an aerial video tour. 800 Boylston St., 617.859.0648.

PERFORMING ARTS

AMERICAN REPERTORY THEATERCL004168 Led by artistic director Diane Paulus, this professional nonprofit that has won many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize and the Tony Award. Oberon, 2 Arrow St., Cambridge. Loeb Drama Center, 64 Brattle St., Cambridge, 617.547.8300. ARTSEMERSONCL007031 Emerson College presents a season that features legendary and pioneering artists and arts companies in the

disciplines of theater, film and music from around the globe. Emerson/Paramount Center, 559 Washington St., 617.824.8400. BOSTON BALLETCL00380 Led by artistic director Mikko Nissinen, Boston’s premier professional dance company presents fully-staged classical and contemporary works. Boston Opera House, 539 Washington St., 617.695.6950. BOSTON LYRIC OPERACL003842 Fully staged operas that spotlight serious emerging talent. The repertoire of this renowned resident company ranges from world premieres to classics by Puccini, Britten and Mozart. Citi Shubert Theatre, 265 Tremont St., 866.348.9738. BOSTON PLAYWRIGHTS’ THEATRECL00516 Boston Playwrights’ Theater, founded in 1981 by Nobel Laureate Derek Walcott, is locally known as the city’s home of new plays. Boston Playwrights’ Theatre, 949 Commonwealth Ave., 866.811.4111. BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRACL003851 Maestro Andris Nelsons leads this acclaimed, world-class orchestra that is a true local gem. Its musicians are among the finest in the world. Symphony Hall, 301 Massachusetts Ave., 888.266.1200. BROADWAY IN BOSTONCL0048921 Broadway in Boston presents the official touring productions of hit Broadway plays and musicals. Boston Opera House, 539 Washington St., 866.870.2717.

CELEBRITY SERIES OF BOSTONCL003860 Highly acclaimed performers from around the globe make special appearances in Boston. 617.482.6661. HANDEL AND HAYDN SOCIETYCL003896 Founded in 1815, this 200-year-old Grammy-winning period orchestra and chorus is one of the oldest continuously run period orchestras in the U.S. and even presented the American premieres of Handel’s “Messiah” and Haydn’s “The Creation.” Symphony Hall, 301 Massachusetts Ave., 617.266.1200. COMPANY ONECL005162 This fringe theater group is a resident company of the BCA and develops and produces plays that are socially relevant and appealing to all of Boston’s diverse community. Boston Center for the Arts, 539 Tremont St., 617.292.7110. HUNTINGTON THEATRE COMPANYCL00416 Boston University’s professional theater company produces both classic and new works, and, under the tutelage of artistic director Peter DuBois, consistently attracts internationally renowned actors and directors. Boston University Theater, 264 Huntington Ave., 617.266.0800 SPEAKEASY STAGE COMPANYCL004810 One of the Boston Center for the Arts’ resident companies, Speakeasy Stage premieres socially relevant plays and musicals that tackle contemporary and cutting-edge issues. Calderwood Pavilion, 527 Tremont St., 617.933.8600.

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ADVERTISER INDEX ATTRACTIONS

RESTAURANTS

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Edward M. Kennedy Institute (pictured) 210 Morrissey Blvd. 617.740.7000 www.emkinstitute.org

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Antico Forno 93 Salem St. 617.723.6733 www.anticofornoboston.com

68 10

Harvard Art Museums 32 Quincy St., Cambridge 617.495.9400 www.harvardartmuseums.org

Back Deck 2 West St. 617.670.0320 www.backdeckboston.com

55 43

Harvard Museum of Natural History 26 Oxford St., Cambridge 617.495.3045 www.hmnh.harvard.edu

Bricco Ristorante 241 Hanover St. 617.248.6800 www.urlname.com

62

The Cafe at Taj Boston 15 Arlington St. 617.598.5255 www.tajhotels.com

56

Cantina Italiana 346 Hanover St. 617.723.4577 www.cantinaitaliana.com

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Cobblestone Cafe 227 Hanover St. 857.263.8057 www.cobblestonene.com

13

Davio’s Northern Italian Steakhouse 75 Arlington St. 617.357.4810 www.davios.com

08

C3

53

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Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum 25 Evans Way 617.566.1401 www.gardnermuseum.org Mary Baker Eddy Library 200 Massachusetts Ave. 888.222.3711 www.marybakereddylibrary.org Museum of Science Science Park 617.723.2500 www.mos.org Salem Witch Museum 19 1/2 Washington Square North, Salem 978.744.1692 www.salemwitch museum.com SkyWalk Observatory Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St. 617.859.0648 www.prudentialcenter.com

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GALLERIES 05

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Galerie d’Orsay 33 Newbury St. 617.266.8001 www.galerie-dorsay.com The Guild of Boston Artists 162 Newbury St. 617.536.7660 www.guildofboston artists.com SoWa Artists Guild 450 Harrison Ave. www.sowaartists.com

57

Harvard Square Business Association 18 Brattle St., Cambridge 617491.3434 www.harvardsquare.com

Legal Sea Foods Multiple Boston and Cambridge locations 617.530.9000 www.legalseafoods.com Mare Oyster Bar 3 Mechanic St./ 223 Hanover St. 617.723.6273 www.mareoysterbar.com

Quattro 264 Hanover St. 617.720.0444 www.quattro-boston.com

06

56

Ristorante Fiore 250 Hanover St. 617.371.1176 www.ristorantefiore.com

SHOPS

09

63

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McCormick & Schmick’s North Market, Faneuil Hall Marketplace, 617.720.5522 www.mccormickand schmick.com

64

Morton’s The Steakhouse 2 Seaport Lane 617.526.0410 www.mortons.com

65

The Oceanaire Seafood Room 40 Court St. 617.742.2277 www.theoceanaire.com

INFORMATION 43

Fajitas & ‘Ritas 25 West St. 617.426.1222 www.fajitasandritas.com

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Serafina 10 High St. 617.426.1234 www.serafinaboston.com

47

Union Oyster House 41 Union St. 617.227.2750 www.unionoysterhouse.com

Boston Olive Oil Co. 253 Newbury St. 857.277.0007 www.bostonoliveoil company.com

66

Bricco Panetteria 241 Hanover St., Rear 617.248.9859 www.bricco.com

61

Bricco Salumeria 11 Board Alley 617.248.9629 www.briccosalumeria.com

45

Top of the Hub Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St. 617.536.1775 www.topofthehub.net

Bromfield Pen 5 Bromfield St. 617.482.9053 www.bromfieldpenshop.com

47

Trattoria Il Panino 11 Parmenter St./ 280 Hanover St., 617.720.1336 www.trattoriailpanino.com

Cataldo Home Design Boutique 42 Prince St. 857.317.6115 www.cataldointeriors.com

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Craft Beer Cellar 98 Van Ness St. 857.250.2967 www.craftbeercellar.com

Sfizi Tapas Bar 135 Richmond St. 857.350.3105 www.sfizitapas.com Terramia Ristorante 98 Salem St. 617.523.3112 www.terramia.com

02

European Watch Co. 232 Newbury St. 617.262.9798 www.europeanwatch.com

46

Pawsh Dog Boutique 31 Gloucester St. 617.391.0880 www.pawshboston.com

43

Salt & Olive 1160 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge 857.242.4118 www.saltandolive.com

45

Sedurre 28 1/2 Prince St. 617.720.4400 www.sedurreboston.com

C4

Sidney Thomas Jewelers Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St. 617.262.0935 www.sidneythomas.com

46

Small Pleasures 142 Newbury St. 617.267.7371 www.small-pleasures.com

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Sturdy and strong. THIS BRONZED SYMBOL OF THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY GUARDS THE COURTYARD OF BOSTON’S OLD CITY HALL, A BUILDING WHERE 20 DEMOCRATIC MAYORS SERVED IN OFFICE FROM 1865 TO 1969. IT’S NO SECRET THAT MASSACHUSETTS IS FIERCELY LIBERAL—DON’T STAND IN OPPOSITION.

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©JULESHO/FOTER.COM

PARTING SHOT


THE DAY-DATE 40 The international symbol of performance and success, reinterpreted with a modernized design and a new-generation mechanical movement. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

OYSTER PERPETUAL DAY-DATE 40

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Profile for Morris Media Network

Boston Where Guestbook 2016-2017  

The annual guestbook for Boston that provides what to do and where to go for visitors and locals alike. It included articles on John Singer...

Boston Where Guestbook 2016-2017  

The annual guestbook for Boston that provides what to do and where to go for visitors and locals alike. It included articles on John Singer...