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VOL. 12 NO. 6

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2007

50 cents

NEWS HEADLINES

WOODLAND FERRY FESTIVAL - The public is invited to join local residents for a festival to celebrate historic Woodland Ferry by sharing great food, arts and crafts, live entertainment and children’s activities on Saturday, Sept. 8, from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Pages 18 through 23 HOUSING SALES - Despite a downturn in housing sales nationwide, some pockets of the country haven’t felt the pinch yet, including western Sussex County. Page 2 PREVENTING TEEN PREGNANCY - Federal grant will help middle school help teens. Page 5 VOLUNTEERS - In 1988, Wendy Lowe became the Laurel Volunteer Fire Department’s first female firefighter. She has been active ever since. Page 8 PROPERTY RIGHTS - Two state representatives are working on legislation that they say will protect the property rights of all Delawareans. Page 9 SOCCER SEASON - The Laurel and Delmar varsity soccer teams prepare to kick off the 2007 season under new head coaches. See preview stories pages 49, 54 POP WARNER - The Laurel Pop Warner Mitey Mite and Pee Wee football teams open the season with a pair of wins at home last Saturday. Coverage begins on page 49. DELMAR VOLLEYBALL - The Delmar varsity volleyball team looks for continued improvement through the guidance of its new head coach. Page 52

INSIDE THE STAR BUSINESS BULLETIN BOARD CHURCH CLASSIFIEDS EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT FRANK CALIO GOURMET HEALTH LETTERS LOOKING BACK LYNN PARKS MIKE BARTON MOVIES

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30 26 38 - 46 10 34 59 25 14, 15 58 12 13 65 7

OBITUARIES 28 ON THE RECORD 24 OPINION 66 PAT MURPHY 61 POLICE JOURNAL 36 SNAPSHOTS 64 SOCIALS 65 SPORTS 49 - 57 TIDES/WEATHER 67 TODD CROFFORD 27 TONY WINDSOR 58 VOLUNTEERS 8

Phil’s pitcher Geff Geary with Laurel native and Phillies trainer Scott Sheridan at Citizens Bank Park before a recent game. Geary is one of the few pitchers that Sheridan has not treated. Photo by Pat Murphy.

As Phillies chase playoff berth, LHS grad tends to their injuries By Pat Murphy In case you do not know it, 1987 Laurel High graduate Scott Sheridan is having a summer of memories most of us can only dream about. Sheridan is the trainer of the Philadelphia Phillies, currently three games out of the division lead in the National League East. The baseball team has done this despite a rash of injuries unheard of in professional sports — and that’s where this Laurel High School graduate comes in. He has become the team’s “MVT” —

most valuable trainer. Scott played Little League baseball and other sports while growing up in Laurel and on the high school team was a curve-balling, left-handed pitcher. He also played on the Bulldogs 1986 championship football team, under coach Mike Norton, a memory Sheridan cherishes. It was during those football days, particularly in 1985, that the foundation for Sheridan’s career in sports medicine was launched. Chip Venables had a wrist fracture and Sheridan was very interested in the treatment of the

injury and the rehab that followed, to get the player back on the field. He even visited A.I. DuPont Hospital for children, Wilmington, where many sports injuries are treated, with Venables. “That’s pretty cool,” thought Sheridan, not knowing that a career in sports medicine was to follow. But follow it did, as Sheridan graduated from West Chester University in 1991, with a bachelor of science degree in athletic training. He went to work at Chester County Continued on page 4


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Despite a downturn in housing sales nationwide, some pockets of the country haven’t felt the pinch yet, including western Sussex County. George Farnell, real estate broker with Callaway, Farnell and Moore, Inc., has seen good times come and go over the years but he said that published regional or national sales figures don’t necessarily reflect the local market. “It’s still a good time to buy property.” Gordon-Ramey of Tull Ramey Century 21 agreed, “We’re down 2 percent,” he said, “August is a notoriously slow time – same thing in December – for sales but it won’t slow down in settlements.” People who have purchased a property are eager to settle and move in. “The market's been steady and will continue to be steady. There is pent-up demand,” he said. He acknowledged that the national trends might be affecting out-oftowners who face some difficulty getting their equity out of property in urban markets hit by the market downturn, but said these folks still want to buy in Sussex. “We sense a little pick up in the market,” Farnell said, reeling off sales figures for the past few months. “People who work in the area still need homes to live in.” In fact, he predicted that sales at the beach will pick up in the next six to nine months, but even sooner on the western side of the county. Western Sussex is a growing area attracting businesses as well as homebuyers. Rob Harmon, president of the Sussex County Association of Realtors and a partner in Home Team Realty, told Morning Star Publications recently that while residential sales did drop a bit in the winter, this is seasonal and expected. It was just exaggerated by the hot market the previous year. Harmon called it “a market correction.” “Commercial real estate,” Harmon said, “just continued to pick up steam. Western Sussex is going through an explosion in commercial development following a boom in residential sales,” he said, pointing to the opening of Big Lots, which took over the vacant Ames building. There’s also a Lowe’s and a Super Wal-Mart. He’s also noticed that, over time, what makes a prime commercial location has changed. Not all that long ago, entrepre-

neurs shied away from U.S. 13 fearing that customers would not want to fight the traffic. But the American love affair with the automobile has changed that – now the availability of free, convenient parking pulls retail customers away from traditional commercial centers. Still, smaller venues such as Starbucks and other storefront enterprises are popping up in Sussex County because “now we have the rooftops to qualify.” Harmon explained, “we have always had good traffic going through,” which supports particular businesses such as food, gas and lodging. Other businesses require a resident customer base and must locate close to customers – sometimes that’s downtown. Farnell said that the western side of the county is a very different market from the resort area because of factors that have moderated the effects of major swings in the market. For one thing, developers built a very small number of investment properties as compared to the resort area where building boomed in anticipation of rising property prices. Local builder/developers tend to build one or a few properties at a time. Developers in resort areas up and down the coast got caught up in the housing boom and now may have to sit on their inventory until consumer confidence returns. High priced resort properties attracted speculators who anticipated properties to appreciate quickly. “Those who got in early enjoyed very nice profits,” he said. Some who jumped in late have lost their equity as prices dropped. Farnell said that buyers looking for a house to live in should feel confident. Because they are not purchasing a property to rent or re-sell quickly and plan to live there for a while, they will see their investment appreciate. Starter homes are now priced in the $190,000 range. Retirement buyers attracted to the western side would like to retire where they are “within striking distance of the beach” but also remain in an area not too far from relatives and friends in Baltimore or Philadelphia. Harmon said residential sales have shifted from new construction stage into a “better value” stage. Whether new or existing houses – in all price ranges – the sale depends on whether the property has that “something special” the prospective home buyer is looking for.

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STAR • SEPT. 6 - 12, 2007 Right now, baby boomers are major real estate customers. In fact, baby boomers are major consumers of almost everything from automobiles to health care because there are more of them and they are at or near retirement age. That translates into a preference for houses with a first floor bedroom suite. He said that buyers who find a house they just love always think that this is the last home they’ll buy. With baby boomers it may be. Homebuyers who fit this demographic have future health considerations in mind, for aging parents or themselves. Those with impaired mobility may consider new construction to obtain a residence with handicapped accessible features such as a shower that works for someone in a wheel chair – something to keep in mind when building or remodeling. Western Sussex remains attractive to retirement buyers coming from nearby geographic regions with higher wages, property values and taxes. They have more purchasing power here. They can get more house for their dollar and lower taxes. Their purchasing power can also force prices up for local buyers. “There’s no economic reason why the market is not stronger than it is,” he said. But at the present, residential sales reflect more of a local market and that has selling prices down. First-time homebuyers in this area don’t generally have an income that will support purchasing a property that costs more than $200,000, slightly below the national average of $230,000 for a first-time buyer. “We need affordable housing – good housing – new homes in the $130,000-$160,000 range,” said Ramey. But they are not available because the land values have driven up the price. “If you look at prices across the bay, it looks like the Shore still has inexpensive land. Developers from across the Bay snap it up. But people who live and work here think a building lot is expensive.” Ramey said the secondary market issue would affect some buyers who were marginal borrowers to begin with because wages are lower here but he predicted that the federal government would eventually step up to the plate to keep these people in the market. If you’re looking to buy, you’ll be happy to know that the large inventory of

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properties available make it a buyer’s market. Sellers may have to crank down expectations from a few months ago. But they can take comfort in knowing that the chance of a sale falling through for lack of financing is also low. Interest rates are at or near a 30-year low. It’s hard to argue with the evidence. Ramey points out that his firm has continued to grow, expanding from one to three offices and 10 to 40 agents and recently affiliated with Century 21. “We’re confident in this market.” Both owners of the firm are from Sussex County and intimately familiar with the local market. Ramey said, “As long as the interest rates remain good, the market will continue to remain steady.”

Janosik charity golf tournament will benefit Hope House

A special Golf Tournament and Gala event will be held to honor Johnny Janosik and support the Laurel Community Foundation’s “Hope House” project. The Johnny Janosik Charitable Golf Tournament and Gala will be held at the Heritage Shores Golf and Country Club in Bridgeville on September 14 and 15. On Friday, Sept. 14, a Gala Dinner will feature food, entertainment, live and silent auctions and guest celebrities. The silent auction will be held from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., with dinner starting at 7 p.m. Coat and tie are optional. The golf tournament will begin on Saturday, Sept. 15, with registration and a continental breakfast at 8 a.m. A special Jason Diamond Gold Clinic will be held starting at 9 a.m. and the tournament’s “Shotgun Start” will be at 10 a.m. There will be a box lunch on the course and refreshments will be available. Delaware Sen. Thomas R. Carper, is encouraging support for the charitable golf tournament and dinner. "Johnny Janosik represents the best of what Delaware has to offer. His neverending energy is an example and inspiration to us all as he makes it a daily commitment to work in the service of others. In Johnny's name, please help us help those in need.” For more information about the golf tournament and gala, including how to participate, contact John Evans at 609970-4562 or visit the Janosik Charitable Golf Tournament website at johnnyjanosikcharitygolf.com.


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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Offer to join Phillies organization took Sheridan by surprise Continued from page 1

Orthopedic and Sports Physical Therapy Clinic as a certified athletic trainer. Sheridan also got his master’s degree in physical therapy from Neumann College during the 11 years he spent at Chester County Orthopedic, treating players and high school athletes for their injuries. It was here that he developed a friendship with long-time Phillies trainer Jeff Cooper, not knowing that someday he would fill his shoes. Sheridan stills keeps in contact with Cooper, who is now retired. While working at the clinic, one of the most famous athletes Sheridan treated was Curt Shilling, who then was with the Phillies and who later led the Arizona Diamondbacks and Boston Red Sox to the World Series. Shilling had severe shoulder problems, but under the care of the clinic and Sheridan he came back big, striking out 300 batters the first season after his injury. Sheridan also got former Phil’s catcher Mike Lieberthal back to action some years ago after a meniscus tear, a common injury for catchers, according to Sheridan. Others he treated while at the clinic included Phillies Tyler Green, Kevin Stocker, Pat Burrell and Scott Rolen. Sheridan’s plans to someday open his own sports clinic fell by the wayside in October 2002, when the Phillies, after meetings with Sheridan through Cooper and Susan Ingersall, announced that Sheridan was to become the Phillies Minor League Coordinator of Trainers. Sheridan would be based in Florida. His new job was announced in the Oct. 9 edition of the “Philadelphia Inquirer” and “USA Today.” “This opportunity took me completely by surprise,” said Sheridan. He was to coordinate all trainers, at Lakewood, N. J., Clearwater, Fla., Batavia, N.Y., Reading, Pa., and the Triple A Club in Scranton, Pa. After moving and getting his wife, Deb, and 2-year-old son, Scotty, settled, Sheridan found himself on a plane heading back to Philadelphia with Phillies brass, including Cooper, former general manager Ed Wade, former manager Larry Bowa, Dallas Green, the late John Vukovich, Reuben Amero Jr. and others in the Phillies hierarchy. Sheridan said that on that plane ride, he almost had to pinch himself to make sure the experience was real. “I kept thinking, what am I doing here? I tried not to be in awe.” Sheridan took over as Phillies trainer

Laurel Star Published by Morning Star Publications Inc. 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243

The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Seaford, DE. Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown and Federalsburg, Maryland; $29 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Laurel Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

this season, after the retirement of Cooper. Even after his first busy year as the Phil’s trainer, his feelings about the organization have not changed. “The organization is great — they have treated me unbelievable,” he said. “Read all you want, you just can’t believe how well they treat me. I am very fortunate.” As the Phils’ training coordinator, Sheridan was in Philadelphia in April 2003, sitting in the dugout, relieving then trainer Cooper, who was on vacation, when Phillie pitcher Kevin Millwood threw a no-hitter. A famous dugout photo shows Sheridan sitting beside the Phils’ pitcher during the game. Now, as the Phillies chase a chance at the World Series, Sheridan has a front row seat from the dugout and is ready to spring onto the field in a second’s notice if a Phillies player should go down with an injury. Mark Anderson is Sheridan’s assistant. Long time employees of the Phillies at the ball park cannot remember a year when there have been as many injuries as the players have had this year (see list below). The Phils have used 28 different pitchers to date and Sheridan has worked hard to get them back on the mound. One of these pitchers is Sheridan’s friend and Phillies ace, lefty Cole Hamels. Hamels experienced elbow problems and went on the disabled list in the middle of the heated National League East race. Sunday morning, Aug. 26, there was Hamels, with ice packed heavily around his shoulder and arm, leaving Sheridan’s trainers room as Scott Eaton another pitcher entered. It has been that kind of year for Sheridan as his services have been in great demand. “I have spent more time with Cole than anybody else,” including time spent with the pitcher in Florida treating him after an earlier injury, Sheridan said. “He has hung out with me, he is a very competitive person.” Phils manager Charlie Manuel supports Sheridan’s efforts and if Sheridan says the player is not ready he does not play. “Obviously it is a group effort, everybody is a part of making things better,” said Sheridan. When asked if the games affect him any, Sheridan, in his always low-key tone, said, “Sure I get caught up in it. When we win — I win. When we lose — I lose. Yes, I take it home with me. I am glad it’s a

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An optimistic Scott Sheridan peers from the Phillies dugout before the Sunday, Aug. 26 games. Photo by Pat Murphy.

one-hour drive to home.” During the season, Sheridan works 10to 15-hour days and is gone for 81 road games each year, in addition to spring training and meetings. Sunday before the San Diego home game, a call to Sheridan at 8 a.m. found him at his office in the ball park. Game time that day was 1:35 p.m. and it was perhaps 6 p.m. or so when he headed home. “This is what I want to do,”

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said Sheridan. When they made their decision on his career, Deb Sheridan said, “Let’s go for it,” her husband said. “She has encouraged me to do what I wanted in life,” he added. “Without her, this would not be the same.” Sheridan has not forgotten his roots either. In an earlier story he recalled many Continued on page 5

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

PAGE 5

His mom and dad taught Sheridan work ethic, values Continued from page 4

of his LHS classmates. “We had a great class,” he said. Some of his close friends were Danny Alvarez, David McCants, Chip Venables and Kevin Wheatley. Sheridan also talked about the work ethic his mom and dad, Paul and Judy Sheridan, instilled in him as well as the values that have been so valuable to him. Sheridan has a brother, Mark, and sister, Ann Hill, who both live in Laurel. His grandfather, Avery Owens, passed away several years ago, but his grandmother, Helen Owens, is very proud of Scott. Asking her about him lights her up like a

Christmas Tree. “Avery is one person I would have liked for Scotty and Debi to have seen and for him to see what I am doing,” said Sheridan. Sheridan misses being away from his family, but as he says, “I love what I do. I plan to stay as long as they will keep me.”. One thing for sure: When Sheridan goes to his class reunion and tells his classmates that his job is taking care of Ryan Howard and Chase Utley, they can believe it, because as Sheridan says, “There is nothing I would rather do than be around sports.”

The Phillies and their injuries A number of Phillies players have spent time on the disabled list this season. Three players, Freddy Garcia, Ryan Madson and Jon Lieber, each has had two stints on the D.L. Injured players and their injuries are: Rod Barajas (groin strain) Michael Bourn (sprained left ankle) Freddy Garcia (biceps tendonitis, strained right shoulder) Tom Gordon (right rotator cuff strain) Ryan Howard (strained left quadriceps) Jon Lieber (biceps tendonitis, ruptured

tendon in right foot) Ryan Madson (strained oblique, strained right shoulder) Scott Mathieson (Tommy John elbow surgery) Brett Myers (strained right shoulder) Francisco Rosario (strained right shoulder) Chase Utley (broken right hand) Shane Victorino (strained right calf) Jayson Werth (strained left wrist) Mike Zagurski (ankle) Cole Hamels (elbow soreness)

Federal grant to help middle school program The Delaware Adolescent Program Inc., (DAPI) the only statewide program in the nation that helps pregnant and parenting teens receive prenatal care while continuing their education, has received a federal grant for $176,743. The money will be used for the Laurel Kids Connection Mentoring Program, a partnership between Laurel Middle School and DAPI designed to establish outreach efforts with lowincome, at-risk middle school students and help them make smart choices. Sen. Joseph Biden announced the federal grant recently. He noted that the Delaware Adolescent Program Inc. has a national reputation and he praised its initiatives. “DAPI’s successful history over the last three decades has made it a national model,” Biden said. “Life as a pregnant teen can often be overwhelming. We AUTHENTIC MEXICAN

should teach life skills, promote selfesteem and hammer home again and again the message that an unplanned pregnancy can derail dreams. DAPI has done that in the past and I’m confident they’ll do the same in Laurel.” Dr. Doris Griffin, interim executive director of DAPI, said that the Laurel initiative has set high goals for area students. “This program is designed to make sure that our students never become pregnant teenagers,” Griffin said. “It’s an alternative method that provides guidance and structure to students who need more support. Mentoring will remind students frequently of their wonderful potential if they make the right choices. We want to facilitate bright opportunities for young people so that they can achieve higher standards than ever before.”

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Business Moore’s Meat Market to focus on customer service By Frank B. Calio

Left to right - front row, Walt Dorman, Beverly Arciuolo, Carol Scarfi, Rita Fitzgerald- manager, Steve Moore - Butcher, Al Turchon, Laurel Chamber president, Karen D’Armi-Hunt, Connie Lewis; back row, Jim Moore Owner, Nancy Massey, Donald Dykes, the Rev. Tim Jones. Photo by Frank B. Calio.

Business Briefs BIE seeks program volunteers

The Delaware Business, Industry, Education Alliance is recruiting volunteers for the “What in the World?” program to help influence elementary through high school students into looking at careers that require a science, math or technology background. This is an excellent opportunity for active business people, retired persons or graduate students to make a difference in our schools. Students enjoy interacting with community members and teachers state that the experience is a valuable learning tool that opens doors for each and every student. This program reinforces the importance of math, science and technology and offers students a glimpse into the business world and what is necessary to meet their future goals. Presenters bring objects that students probably won’t recognize in the context of the illustration. Then, they explain how the foreign object helps them do their job and how math, science or technology is important to their

jobs. Presenters speak for about 10 minutes to each group of students. If you are interested in participating, contact Robin Agar, BIE Alliance, at 202 Acorn Forest Dr., Felton, DE 19943; 302-284-8141; 302-284-2826 (fax); or e-mail ragar@bie.k12.de.us.

Stewart recognized by PPAI

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With most super markets turning to packaging their meat products, which can have a shelf life up to 20 days, it is rare to find fresh cut meats in the meat department; the term butcher shop is almost extinct. Steve Moore, a former assistant meat manager with Giant Foods hopes to change that and provide fresh meats every day from his new butcher shop. Moore and his father Jim Moore opened Moore’s Meat Market on E. 4th Street in Laurel last week promising to serve quality meat products featuring Certified Angus Beef, home made sausage, ribs, chicken, hamburger, roast beef, pork, all custom cut for the customer. Moore who was employed for six years in the meat department with Acme, and 10 years with Giant Foods says he is tired of seeing food markets heading in the direction of more pre-packed meats processed in factories and then shipped to stores. Moore says more meats are being packaged at processing plants and sealed with carbon monoxide gas which keeps meats red even though the meats may be spoiled. “ Packaged meats have a shelf life up to 20 days,” Moore states, adding,

“ My burger meat is fresh daily and has a shelf life of only one day; three days for red meat.” After one day the hamburger will be frozen and marked down. “ Still it will be fresher than you can find at most stores,” Moore said. Moore said there use to be a lot of meat cutters, but with pre-packaging that number has dropped. For the past few years he has been doing deer processing at his residence and had a deer checking station. Moore promises to focus on customer service; “ I want to treat my customers the way I want to be treated; that’s my goal,” he said. Moore plans future expansion to include cases for ham and turkeys for the holiday season, and to carry frozen products featuring frozen meat entries to include steak, chicken and pork at special prices. Rita Fitzgerald who moved to Laurel from Ohio is the store manager. She formerly worked in the meat department and served as produce manager in a food store in Ohio. She says the store will run daily specials; their phone number is 302-8752372. Business hours are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.


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MORNING STAR

SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

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MO V I E S ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

Diamond State Drive-In Theater US Harrington, Del. 302-284-8307 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 9/7 THRU SATURDAY 9/8 - NO SUNDAY SHOW Halloween . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8:00 Balls of Fury . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10:30

The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 9/7 THRU THURSDAY, 9/13 Shoot’em Up . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40, 4:25, 7:25, 9:50 Mr. Bean’s Holiday . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:35, 3:40, 6:35, 8:45 Hairspray . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:00, 4:15, 6:40, 9:05 I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4:25, 6:50, 9:20 3:10 To Yuma . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 4:00, 6:50, 9:30 The Bourne Ultimatum . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:25, 4:35, 7:10, 9:30 Halloween . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45, 4:40, 7:10, 9:35 Stardust . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 3:35, 6:40, 9:10 The Nanny Diaries . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 3:45, 6:45, 9:00 Balls of Fury . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:30, 4:05, 7:05, 9:15 Rush Hour 3 . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:50, 4:20, 7:00, 9:40 Superbad . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:10, 4:45, 7:20, 9:45 Death Sentence . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:05, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40 Ratatouille . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:30 9/7 - 9/20 Rehoboth Beach Film Society

A Mighty Heart . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:20, 4:10, 7:00, 9:20

Clayton Theater Dagsboro, Del. 20 732-3744 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 9/7 THRU THURSDAY 9/13 Hairspray . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri & Sat 7:30, Sun 2:00 & 7:30 - Mon-Thu 7:30

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 9/7 THRU THURSDAY, 9/13 3:10 to Yuma . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:30, 4:30) 7:20, 10:15 Shoot ‘Em Up . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:30, 2:45, 5:15) 8:15, 10:30 Halloween . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . .Fri-Tue (1:30, 2:15, 4:15, 5:00) 7:00, 7:45, 9:50, 10:25 Death Sentence . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:15. 4:15) 7:15, 10:00 Balls of Fury . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:05, 2:30, 5:30) 8:00, 10:20 Mr. Bean’s Holiday . . .G . . . . . .Fri (2:15, 4:30) 6:45, 9:00, Sat (12:00, 2:15) 6:45, 9:00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sun (2:15, 4:30) 6:45, Mon (2:15, 4:30) 9:00 The Nanny Diaries . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(11:15, 4:00) 6:45, 9:20 War . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:00, 2:45, 5:15) 7:50, 10:15 Superbad . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:00, 4:00) 7:00, 9:50 Rush Hour 3 . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:15, 2:35, 5:30) 8:00, 10:20 Stardust . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:45) 9:40 The Bourne Ultimatum PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:45, 4:45) 7:30, 10:10 Underdog . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(5:00), 7:30 The Simpsons Movie .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:15, 2:30, 4:45) 7:05, 9:30 Hairspray . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:00, 3:45) 6:30, 9:30 Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (12:45, 3:45) 6:30, 9:40 Advance Tickets On Sale Now! Good Luck (R) Resident Evil: Extinction (R) () Discounted showtimes in Parenthesis * Pass/Discount Restrictions Apply

FALL HOME IMPROVEMENT A Special Supplement to The Seaford and Laurel Star To Be Published September 27, 2007

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PAGE 8

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Meet Your Fire Service Volunteers Laurel’s first female firefighter still active after 19 years The Seaford and Laurel Star newspapers continue their series of articles highlighting the men and women who serve as volunteers in the local fire departments. These volunteers work tirelessly providing protection and responding in time of need. We hope the series helps to show our respect for their efforts as we increase community awareness of their sacrifices.

By Donna Dukes-Huston In 1988, Wendy Lowe became the Laurel Volunteer Fire Department’s first female firefighter. Over the past 19 years, Lowe has held many positions and remains active today. Lowe’s first training was Firefighting I, which is now called Basic Firefighting. Lowe said that in both fire school and at the department she never received any special treatment, good or bad. “I took the same training as the men in every fire school class,” Lowe said. Still not all members were ready to accept this change. “I had to prove myself to some of the members,” Lowe said. “It took a while for some to get used to it.”

Lowe says that joining a fire department has been something she has wanted to do since she was a child. Her grandfather helped establish a fire department in Pennsylvania where he was made an honorary member. “My mom says he put it in my blood because he didn’t have any boys,” Lowe joked. In addition to firefighting, Lowe has also served as secretary and ambulance lieutenant for the department and as president of the Sussex County Ambulance Association. She is also an EMS and public fire safety field instructor with the Delaware State Fire School. Lowe met her husband, Mike, at the Laurel department shortly after joining. He is currently public fire safety senior instructor for the state fire school. He also serves as president of the Sussex County Volunteer Fireman’s Association. Lowe feels that her experience in the fire department has been pivotal in her life. In fact, this experience has led Lowe to make a serious change in her career choice. Lowe is currently enrolled in Delaware Technical and Community

College and will soon transfer to Catonsville Community College of Baltimore County to pursue a degree in mortuary science. “This is something I’ve wanted to do for 10 years,” Lowe said. “I truly feel it is a calling from the Lord.” Lowe said both the scientific as well as the care-giving aspects of the mortuary business drew her to the profession. She hopes to be able to provide comfort for families during their time of loss. “It’s about making that time easier, making it right for the family,” Lowe said. “I hope to provide honor, service, and dignity to their loved one.” Lowe admits that this occupation as well as firefighting can take its toll on an individual. “Firefighting has taught me that you’ve got to look for the positive in a situation,” Lowe said. “It can really get to you.” Lowe strives to offer support to those in distress whether on a fire or an ambulance call. “By being there, I hope they feel that somebody cares and that they feel some kind of comfort from me.”

Inaugural

Johnny Janosik Charity Golf Tournament SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 TH Heritage Shores Golf Club Rt. 13, Bridgeville, DE 19933 for information call 302-398-1018 All proceeds benefit “Hope House” “PEOPLE HELPING PEOPLE IN NEED” Cost $150 ea $600/foursome HOLE SPONSORS: $200 Sign At Hole, Recognition In Tournament Program Call 302-398-1018 For More Information

Join us at our Inaugural

GALA DINNER Honoring Johnny Janosik

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14 TH Heritage Shores Golf Club, Rt. 13, Bridgeville, DE

Call 302-875-3333 (Small Insurance Agency) for tickets by Sept. 7 Win all paid trip to Hawaii or $25,000 cash Entertainment, Dancing, Celebrities, Live & Silent Auctions, Prizes Galore.

Wendy Lowe, Laurel Volunteer Fire Department’s first female firefighter.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

PAGE 9

Legislators hope to boost protection against seizure of property Two state representatives are working on legislation that they say will protect the property rights of all Delawareans. State Representatives Greg Hastings (R-Millsboro) and Dennis Williams (D-Wilmington) announced a cooperative effort that will use the resources of the Institute for Justice, the Delaware Bar Association, and the State House of Representatives to craft a bill to shield private property owners from unwarranted governmental takings. The issue has most recently surfaced in Wilmington, where city officials have threatened to use their power of eminent domain to seize as many as 62 properties as part of the next phase of the South Walnut Street Urban Renewal Plan. As many as 38 working businesses could be displaced if their properties are condemned by the city. Under the plan, the land would then be sold to private developers for use in high-end residential and commercial projects. “A lot of people see this as a Wilmington matter, but it’s not,” Hastings said. “This is an issue that cuts across the divides of party ideology and geography. Here you have an upstate and downstate lawmaker — one Republican and one Democrat — standing side by side because we both realize this is an issue of right and wrong. The ability to own property, and the self-determination to do with it as you see fit, are among our most basic of rights. Citizens should not have to fear that their land will be tak-

en because government officials believe it can be put to a more lucrative use by someone else.” Eminent domain is a power used by all levels of government enabling them to seize the private property of citizens and businesses for public use. Under the U.S. Constitution’s Fifth Amendment, people subject to these government takings must receive “just compensation” for their loss. In actual practice, the level of these payments is often highly controversial, Hastings and Williams said. In some cases, the government turns the property over to a third party to facilitate the “public use” cited as the reason for the seizure. Such a case was tested in the U.S. Supreme Court in June 2005 (Kelo v. City of New London). The city of New London, Conn., condemned private property so that it could be used for a comprehensive redevelopment plan. In a 5-4 decision, the High Court ruled that the general benefits a community enjoyed from economic growth qualified such redevelopment plans as a permissible "public use" under the Takings Clause of the Fifth Amendment. However, the court also said, “Nothing in our opinion precludes any state from placing further restrictions on its exercise of the takings power.” In the weeks following the Kelo decision, Delaware enacted a new law (SB 217) intended to restrict the use of eminent domain power in cases similar to what was done in Connecticut. The law required cities to have

EMPLOYMENT HEALTH PROGRAM COORDINATOR PMG Consulting LLC seeks Program Coordinator for the Planned Approach to Community Health (PATCH) initiative. This contractual non-benefit position person can work up to 25 hours per week. The applicant should be familiar with Sussex County communities and have experience in community outreach. He/She will have a four year degree preferably in the Human Services field and good written/ verbal communication skills, be able to facilitate small groups, understand evaluation methodology, and demonstrate an intermediate user level with computers and the Internet. The ability to work a flexible schedule is a requirement. He/she must have a strong work ethic and desire to help others.

PART-TIME ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT PMG Consulting LLC seeks a contractual non-benefit administrative assistant for up to 15 hours per week to perform basic office duties. The ability to work a flexible schedule is a requirement. The interested applicant will have good verbal and written communication skills. He/She should be proficient with Microsoft Office Suite and have familiarity with utilizing the Internet. Applicant will hold a High School Diploma and have office experience. He/She must be selfdirected and have a strong work ethic. Interested applicants should send a letter of interest and resume along with at least three references to the address listed below.

Deadline for applications is September 17, 2007 PMG Consulting LLC 543 Shipley Street, Suite D, Seaford, DE 19973 or email to Pgeisler@pmgconsulting.net

a plan when condemning property and mandates that the condemnations are for a “recognized public use as described at least six months in advance of the institution of condemnation proceedings.” The bill also makes the courts, not the condemning agency, responsible for setting the level of compensation in disputed cases. However, some say the law

fell short of its intent. The Washington D.C.-based Institute for Justice gives Delaware a grade of “D minus” for the eminent domain protections the First State provides its citizens. It notes that other states have enacted stronger and more specific safeguards for their residents. Williams and Hastings don’t fault the General Assembly’s response to the Kelo decision, not-

ing that the Supreme Court handed down the ruling only days before the end of the Delaware legislative session. “They were forced to play 'Beat the Clock' at their busiest time of year,” Hastings said. “Now that we have the luxury of time, we're going to take a more deliberative look at this issue and write a bill that’ll better protect the rights of our private property owners.”


PAGE 10

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Education HVACR program gets accreditation

Delaware Technical & Community College’s Refrigeration, Heating, and Air Conditioning (HVACR) training program has met the standards set forth by the Partnership for Air Conditioning, Heating, Refrigeration Accreditation. The accreditation will remain in effect through May 24, 2012. Through the program, employers of HVACR graduates will be assured that the students have met minimum competency levels required for graduation and certification, as determined by industry associations. Delaware Tech is one of 42 PAHRA accredited schools across the country, and the only one in Delaware. To learn more about the HVACR program, call department chairman Jim Yeako at 855-5924.

Students given scholarships To get to know one another, many team building exercises were conducted throughout the first day of school at Delmava Christian High School. In a game entitled Two Truths and a Lie, junior Jeff Mohr shares information about himself with sophomores Meghan McCarthy and Brittany Mariner as well as freshman Rachel Gooss.

Delmarva Christian starts year with 60 new students Susan Gum, Delmarva Christian High School’s admissions and marketing coordinator, said that every year at the school is better than the previous one. “We have over 60 new students this year, with 53 new freshmen joining our ranks as Delmarva Royals,” she said. On the first day of school this year, Gum watched the members of the student body get to know one another through team building activities and chapel services. “Our first day is a little different because we start at noon and then proceed to a family barbecue at 5 p.m.,” she said. “The outstanding turnout allows us to have a wonderful time of fellowship and helps us build the unity that is so important here at Delmarva Christian.”

After the barbecue, parents were invited to an open house and college fair. “It’s never too early to think about a student’s next step after high school,” said Mary Beth Rimmer, the school’s counselor. Parents are able to speak with their students’ teachers and get a sense of the expectations of the school. “We are blessed to be able to provide a faith-based opportunity for families in the Delmarva region,” said principal Scott Kemerling. “It’s exciting to be starting our fourth year and we look forward to graduating our first group of students who have been with us all four years. Even though we have already had 50 graduates, this group will be special. We are poised to have another successful year.”

The Delaware Community Foundation recently awarded Generation III scholarships, through a program started by the EDiS Company to honor the third generation of the DiSabatino family. The scholarships are awarded to students who are interested in studying business and construction-related fields. Robin Lee, Selbyville, originally received the Generation III Scholarship in 2004 and has continued to receive it each year since then. Frank F. Spalt III, Mills-

boro, has received the scholarship since 2005 and Kyle E. Roberts, Greenwood, since 2006. Lee, Spalt and Roberts are students at the University of Delaware. Bethany Kleiser, Laurel, who will also attend the University of Delaware, is a new Generation III Scholarship recipient. Jarrel L. Taylor, Frankfort, a student at Delaware State University, has been a recipient since 2006. The Delaware Community Foundation also administers the Janosik Scholarship Fund, along with several scholarships for the Laurel Alumni Association and Woodbridge School District.

Del Tech to offer GED tests

A free GED testing program is being offered this fall by Delaware Technical & Community College in Georgetown. The testing will be completed in three phases beginning Sept. 19 and continuing through Oct. 20. To qualify for the free testing, interested applicants must be Delaware residents and at least 18 years old. All participants must complete phases one and two in order to take the GED test in phase three. Seating is limited and pre-registration is required. For information or to register, call 856-5400, ext. 5907. This program is sponsored by the Delaware Dept. of Education/Adult Education Division and Delaware Tech.

Join us for …

Rally Begins at 10:00 a.m. at

Laurel Wesleyan Church Sunday, Sept. 9th with Motivational Speaker & Basketball Entertainer Sporting Contests • Fun for the Whole Family

Free Lunch • Carnival Rides • Music

CERTIFICATES AWARDED. Sussex Tech Adult Education Division recently awarded 15 nursing assistant candidates certificates for completing the 150-hour training program. Front, from left: Darlene Jones, Bridgeville; Tanisha Griffin, Frankford; Rachel RossenGozgoz, Georgetown; Kelly Lewis, Millsboro; Shaylynn Barker, Selbyville; Alesia Henry, Dagsboro; Heather French, Seaford; and Donna Racine, program coordinator. Back: Jesse Sauvageau, Ellendale; Brittany Smith, Seaford; Clanne Georges, Seaford; Veronica Tarr, Seaford; Saranna Chastain, Milford; Yvette Harpe, Milford; Kenda Mitchell, Millsboro; and Jonna Goodwin, Dagsboro. The next class begins Sept. 10. For details, contact Racine at 856-9035, ext. 329.

DAN WETZEL Building Champions One Choice at a Time! For more information call 875-5380 Laurel Wesleyan Church is located 1/2 mi. north of Laurel on Rt. 13A


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

PAGE 11

Public schools release policies for free, reduced-price lunches Information is also being sent home with students All public school districts recently announced their policies for free and reduced-price meals for children unable to pay the full price of meals served under the National School Lunch Program, School Breakfast and/or After School Snack Program. Each school and its nutrition services supervisor has a copy of the policy, which may be reviewed by any interested party. Children from households whose income is at or below the levels in the chart shown are eligible for free or reduced price meals. Application forms are being sent to all homes with a letter to parents or guardians. To apply for free or reduced price meals, households should fill out the form and return it to the school. Additional copies are available at the principal's office in each school. The information provided on the form will be used for the purpose of determining eligibility and may be verified at any time during the school year by school or other program officials. Area school districts will participate in direct certification of many students who receive food

stamps or DETANF. Families who qualify for the program because of eligibility for Food Stamps or another program will receive notification if they do not need to complete a form in order to qualify for free meals. For school officials to determine eligibility, households receiving food stamps and/or DETANF must list the child's name, their food stamp or DE-TANF case number and the signature of an adult household member. Households not receiving food stamps and/or DE-TANF must list the names of all household members; the amount of gross income each household member received last month and where it came from, and how often received, and the signature of an adult household member and that adult's social security number or the word “none” or mark the “No Social Security Number” box if the adult does not have a social security number. Meal benefit forms may be submitted at any time during the year. Under the provisions of the free and reduced price policy, representatives of the Nutrition Services Department will review

INCOME ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES

Meal Benefit Forms and determine eligibility. Parents or guardians dissatisfied with the ruling of the official may wish to discuss the decision with the determining official on an informal basis. Contact your local school superintendent if you wish to appeal. In certain cases, foster children and children receiving WIC may also be eligible for school meal benefits. If a household wishes to apply for benefits for foster children living with them, the household should contact the school for more information. Families whose children receive free or reduced-price meals may report changes anytime during the school year. The information provided by the household is confidential and will be used only for purposes of determining eligibility and verifying data. In the operation of child feeding programs administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), no child will be discriminated against because of race, color, sex, national origin, age or disability.

Family Size

Effective: July 1, 2007 - June 30, 2008 REDUCED MEALS - 185% Twice Per Every Two Yearly Monthly Month Weeks

Weekly

1

$18,889

$1,575

$ 788

$ 727

$ 364

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

$25,327 $31,765 $38,203 $44,641 $51,079 $57,517 $63,955

$2,111 $2,648 $3,184 $3,721 $4,257 $4,794 $5,330

$1,056 $1,324 $1,592 $1,861 $2,129 $2,397 $2,665

$ 975 $1,222 $1,470 $1,717 $1,965 $2,213 $2,460

$ 488 $ 611 $ 735 $ 859 $ 983 $1,107 $1,230

For each add’l. household member, add: + $6,438 + $537 + $269

+ $248

+ $124

The chart above details household size and income criteria that schools will use to determine eligibility for free or reduced-price meals. For further information, contact a local school district.

If any member of a household believes they have been discriminated against, they should write immediately to the USDA director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 14th

and Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice & TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

News items may be mailed to the Seaford and Laurel Star, 628 W. Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Or they may be faxed to 629-9243.

This small box can make a big difference Get fire fighters into your home FAST! The Knox-Box is a secure, rapid-entr y system developed for property owners and fire departments. When there is a medical emergency, when a fire breaks out, or even when there is a false alarm, the Knox-Box allows immediate entr y into buildings and property without forcible entr y damage or

delay. Lost time getting needed medical treatment and increased property damage, even total loss are threats when your property is not accessible. With Knox-Box, your entrance keys are stored in a high-security container mounted in a known and readily accessible location.

The Laurel Fire Department… is offering the Knox-Box system to property owners in the LFD Fire district. If you take advantage of this special offer the Laurel Fire Department (LFD) will ~  install and register your Knox-Box  pre-plan access to your property and load the plan into LFD computers. This pre-plan includes vital physical information about your property and allows us to plan our response to your emergency while in route.

order: Eliminate To fill out this form damage and mail it with your payment to: Eliminate Attn: Knox-Box/Mike Lowe Laurel Fire Dept. delay Laurel, DE 19956

 your keys will be locked in your Knox-Box with access limited to a single master key controlled by the Sussex County Emergency Operations Center and the LFD. The cost is small, only $225, the peace of mind is priceless! For more information, please e-mail Mike Lowe at mlowe@laurelfiredept.com

Your name ______________________________________ Daytime phone_____________________ Installation address ________________________________________________________________ Method of payment:  VISA or Master Card

 Check or Money order payable to LFD, Knox-Box

Name on card ________________________________________________  VISA

 Master Card

Card number ____________________________________________ Expiration date _____________ Your signature _______________________________________ ID# (3 digits on back of card)_______ Billing address ___________________________________________________________________

Small box. Small cost. Big peace of mind!


PAGE 12

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Looking Back

From the Archives of the Seaford and Laurel Star newspapers

Seaford 10 years ago

at Johns Hopkins Hospital, came to Seaford to address educators during orientation day.

Stein Highway Bridge Delaware Department of Transportation officials reported that a problem with concrete on the deck resurfacing project of the Stein Highway Bridge will result in another month of one-lane traffic on the bridge site. This announcement has left motorists frustrated and business owners concerned.

Graduate to study under Dr. Carson

Bridgeville bypass Construction begins on a $2.4 million bypass in Bridgeville which calls for widening of Sussex 884 and 582 leading to 404. Dr. Carson visits Seaford High Famous motivational speaker Dr. Benjamin Carson, chief of pediatric neurosurgery

Seaford native David Adam Jones, a recent graduate of Jefferson University medical school in Philadelphia will start a onemonth stint at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, under the guidance of world famous neurosurgeon Dr. Benjamin Carson.

Seaford 5 years ago Ministers converge Clergy in the East Seaford community held an anti-drug rally and tent meeting on the corner of Third and North streets, which for many years has been dubbed “Crack Alley.”

Minner asks for help Gov. Ruth Ann Minner submitted a request to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman to have Delaware declared a crop disaster area.

Pleasants were the proud recipients of the Eagle Award, given to them by Coldwell Banker real estate agent Gwen North. Pleasants rescued a kitten that was trapped in a drain pipe in one of North’s listings.

Laurel 10 years ago

Laurel 5 years ago

Utilities Expansion Laurel officials are hoping to begin formalizing plans regarding a $2 million to $3 million water and sewer extension to US 13.

Centenary Anniversary Centenary United Methodist Church in Laurel is planning its 200th anniversary. A dedication service will be held and a historical marker commemorating Centenary’s 200 years will be dedicated and placed in the churchyard.

Eagle award Bethel residents Bill and Anna Louise

Gospel Café

Centenary UM Church, Poplar & Market Streets, Laurel, is hosting Christian music each Saturday beginning at 6 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the church. Bruce & Nancy Willey are presenting live Christian music, fellowship, and refreshments. September Guest Singers: Sept. 8: Bill Primrose Daniel Premo Cassandra Abbott

Sept. 15:

“Revived” C. Bud Scott Joe Dawson

Sept. 22:

“Sounds of Joy” Todd & Diane Crofford Frank Silva

Sept. 29:

“Two Mile Road” Joe LeCates and the Bethel Worship Center Praise Band

CELEBRATE AUTUMN IN DELMAR DELAWARE

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

PAGE 13

A lesson in mourning from ‘a tired old miner’ As a young boy, my father-inlaw lived on a farm. His father, YNN ARKS who farmed and also worked in the coal mines, kept a mule that he We all mourn the pasused to pull farm machinery. sage of time — children Or was it a pair of mules? I have asked my father-in-law many grown and gone, parents times for details about the mule or passed away. But in the mules and, as with so many things, end, it is our sense of fun have forgotten them as soon as he that makes the mourning gave them to me. bearable. Among the forgotten details is the mule’s name. “I can’t remember the name of the mule you had He continues with directions in case his on your farm,” I would say nearly every daughter wants to return home — if she time we visited. And after he told me, I “should get tired of city living and the would say, “Maybe this time, I’ll write it bright lights no longer thrill.” down.” “Just fill up your Ford with some of I never did. And I’ll never be able to that good old Kendall gas and head it for ask him again. My father-in-law, to whose those Clearfield County hills of Pennsylson I have been married for more than 30 vania,” he writes. years, recently died. There’s not much rhythm or rhyme in His death followed a three-year battle the poem. But the father’s sadness in the against tongue cancer, which included face of time moving on is genuine. When rounds of surgery, radiation and his daughter arrives home, he writes, she chemotherapy that left him exhausted and will see “a tired old man just sitting there sick. But he fought the progression of the beneath a weeping willow tree.” cancer with a determination that surrenThe poem ends: dered just two weeks before his death, “For you see, I’m just a tired old miner when the doctor told him that there was now, with not much left in life for me nothing more to be done. it seems, During the funeral, my brother-in-law “With a crippled leg, a broken heart, and a stood up to praise his father-in-law. string of broken dreams.” Charles Parks was a man of integrity, he But there is a postscript that hints at an said, the likes of which do not come along underlying sense of fun: very often. “If I told you that I dreamed this all up in I know that to be true. one short night, I would be putting it I also know to be true another comment strong. made during the funeral, this by a niece, “But if true, just think what I could do, in that he was a thoughtful and kind man. “I Alaska, where the nights are six never knew Uncle Charlie to say an unmonths long!” kind word about anybody,” she said. And so goes life. We all mourn the pasThroughout the week before my father- sage of time — children grown and gone, in-law’s death, many people visited the parents passed away. But in the end, it is home he shared with his wife, my husour sense of fun, the little humorous postband’s stepmother. Some sang, many script, that makes the mourning bearable. prayed, and most talked about days gone Included in a display of family pictures by. (Sadly though, I didn’t hear anyone during my father-in-law’s viewings and mention the mules.) funeral were several photos of my fatherAmong the visitors was my husband’s in-law in the few years before his death. uncle, my father-in-law’s brother, who In one he is riding a horse, in another he is told my husband about a poem that his fa- paddling a canoe, in a third he is on a mother, my husband’s grandfather, had writtorcycle. In many, he is with grandchilten when one of his six daughters left dren, great-grandchildren and step-grandhome. Several days later, we received by children, talking and playing. e-mail a copy of the poem. In the midst of our sorrow, the pictures “Now you can have your cities, daughwere a reminder that life is good. Like the ter, with their buildings tall and fine,” the postscript written by a lonely father many poet wrote. “But when you want to see years ago, they presented a sense of fun your dad, I guess you’ll find him at the that made our mourning bearable. mines.”

L

P

Sheriff’s office increases fees to offset costs Sussex County Sheriff Eric D. Swanson has announced that new fees will mean some changes for sheriff’s sales in Sussex County. As of Aug. 22, all sheriff’s sales will be subject to a 4-percent fee, up from 3 percent, on the total selling price of real property. The minimum amount to be collected by the sheriff’s office will increase from $300 to $500, but the cap will remain at $10,000. Also, for the first time, a onetime set-up fee of $75 will be charged on all sheriff’s sales. Swanson recommended the fee adjust-

ments, which were adopted by the Sussex County Council following a public hearing Tuesday, Aug. 21. The sheriff said the new fees will better offset the cost associated with sheriff’s sales, from producing copies to posting court orders. The new fees would have generated an estimated $100,000 in additional revenue in fiscal year 2007. For a copy of the ordinance establishing the new fees, visit www.sussexcountyde.gov, or contact the sheriff’s office at 855-7830.

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6095 Stein Hwy (Rt. 20W), Seaford, DE There’s a whole lot of owners’ pride in this 23BR, 2BA brick rancher. Located on a large rural lot West of Seaford and close to town. The new owners should love the hardwood floors, 3-season back porch, full basement with summer kitchen area, 2-car garage and screen house. And wait until you see the large private back yard with “green fence”. $214,000 MLS #549776 Hostess: Fran Ruark

2796 Matt’s Rd (Rd77), Seaford, DE Storage Galore! This 3BR, 2BA rancher has potential for a 4th BR. Located West of Seaford on a 4.7 acre lot. Offers a garage 30`X45` w/3 doors, three 12’X24` sheds, one Morton bldg workshop 30`X45`.All outbuildings have electric except gazebo. One year warranty Included. All of this and more for $375,000. MLS #549806 Hostess: Trina Ruark Directions: From Stein Hwy (Rt 20W) take Woodpecker Rd to dead end. Turn L on Line Rd & take 1st L on Matt’s Rd, 1st house on R.

26793 Malihorn Dr, Malihorn Crest, Seaford, DE This 3BR, 2.5 BA home features lg country kit, lg FR, 14’x14’ screened porch, formal DR w/ gas FP, perm stairs to attic, unfinished bonus room, upstairs laundry, security system and more. $359,000 MLS #550605 Hostess: Judy Rhodes Directions: From Rt 13 in Seaford, go West on Rt 20, turn left onto Sussex St, go to light then R onto Woodland Road, go 1.9 miles turn L into Malihorn Crest. Bear L and go to stop sign. Home is in front of you.

105 Broadcreek Rd, Lakeside Manor, Laurel, DE Beautiful 4 BR, 2 BA Home with in-ground pool, screened porch, large deck, 2nd story deck, finished basement, sunporch, attached double carport on a landscaped lot just out of town limits. Seller says hardwood floors under carpet. Home warranty included. $273,000 MLS #550883 Hostess: Barbara Cordrey Directions: From Rt 13 South in Laurel, turn R onto Delaware Ave. Make first L into Lakeside Manor. Turn R at stop sign. Turn L onto Broadcreek Rd, second house on L.

107 Washington Ave, Bridgeville, DE This charming 3BR, 1.5BA Colonial located just outside the town limits of Bridgeville. It offers hardwood floors, a new furnace and hot water heater, a 3-year old septic system and a delightful yard. $189,900 MLS #551037 Host: Ron Ruark Directions: Go North on Sussex Hwy (Rt 13), Turn West On Rt 404 heading into Bridgeville. Go past Jimmy’s Grille & Washington Ave is on the L.

7704 W Armiger Dr, Seaford, DE Nearly new Cape Cod, 2nd floor loft, 3BR, 2.5 BA, FP, lg rear deck, new paint & carpets. $2,000 Sellers Assistance available. Free home inspection. $269,900 MLS #550411 Hostess: Karen Hamilton Directions: Enter Hill-N-Dale, straight back, R on Armiger Dr, house On R.

3088 Neals School Rd (Rd 533), Seaford, DE Wonderful home, secluded, nicely landscaped yard, great sunroom, pool, paved driveway, fully-fenced yard all on 1 acre. $205,000 MLS #550142 Hostess: Sandy Duncan Directions: Rt 20 West to a right on Neals School Rd, go about 5 miles down on the left, see sign.


PAGE 14

MORNING STAR • SEPTMEBER 6 - 12, 2007

Health New chewing tobacco, same dangers By Anthony Policastro, M.D

On July 18, 2007 Phillip Morris announced that it was promoting a new product. The product was a chewing tobacco that did not require the user to spit. The product was touted as an alternative to cigarettes for places that no longer allow smoking. It was touted as a replacement for chewing tobacco that required juices to be spit out. It was touted as a great new breakthrough. In actuality, it needed to be touted as a way for Phillip Morris to make more money. Their cigarette sales have flattened. They are not addicting as many people to nicotine as they once were. This is nothing more than a disguise to keep their nicotine addiction industry afloat a little longer. Nicotine addiction is a very difficult addiction to break. Alcoholics who are able to go on the wagon usually continue with their nicotine addiction. Drug users who go through rehab

Because of the local concentration of chemicals, mouth cancer can develop more quickly than it can in other parts of the body. usually continue with their nicotine addiction. Phillip Morris knows this. Therefore, they have to work at getting as many people addicted as they can. What they do not tell the users of chewing (smokeless) tobacco is that it has significant side effects. It can affect the mouth in a number of ways. It increases the ability to develop dental cavities. That is caused both by the sugars in tobacco and by the abrasive particles it contains. It can cause gum disease. The long term impact on the gums can cause teeth to fall out prematurely. Even though the nicotine is in the mouth, it is still absorbed into the

Prostate Screening Friday, September 21st 8:00 am to 5:00 p.m. Screening to be held at the

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for additional information

system. That means it increases heart rate. It increases blood pressure. Those may increase the risk of heart attack. It has also ben associated with a higher cholesterol. However the greatest risk is the increased incidence of mouth cancer. Because of the local concentration of chemicals, mouth cancer can develop more quickly than it can in other parts of the body. Cancer can occur on the tongue. It can occur in the throat. It can occur in the gums. It can occur on the lips. It can occur in the cheek. Phillip Morris can offer one guarantee to patients who suffer these side effects. It will guarantee that it will not pay one penny of their medical expenses. It will be too busy turning its profits over to its shareholders. Therefore, if someone decides to spend money getting addicted to the nicotine in chewing tobacco, they might want to spend some money buying stock in Phillip Morris. Perhaps they can then spend their profits on medical care.

Substance abuse treament and management classes to begin Two separate courses addressing substance abuse treatment and management will be offered this fall at the Owens Campus of Delaware Technical & Community College. “Case Management with Substance Using Clients” will include a history of case management and the various models of case management available. Classes begin Wednesday, Sept. 12, and will run in the evenings through Oct. 30. “Enhancing Motivation for Change in Substance Abuse Treatment” will link research to practice by providing clear applications of motivational approaches in clinical practice and treatment programs. These approaches may be particularly beneficial to populations who are often seen as having a low motivation for change. Classes begin Thursday, Sept. 13, and will run in the evenings through Nov. 15. For more information on these offerings, call the Corporate and Community Programs division at 854-6966.


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

PAGE 15

Fish and Wildlife urges caution with wild animals If you see a wild animal in your yard or neighborhood, what should you do? First and foremost, the Delaware Division of Fish and Wildlife encourages citizens: don't panic. Second, watch its behavior before determining if - or whom you might need to call for assistance. “If you see a raccoon, skunk, fox or another wild animal in your yard, observe it quietly from a safe distance, preferably indoors, and keep children and pets away,” said Greg Moore, Wildlife Section Administrator. “But do not, under any circumstances, attempt to touch, pet, handle or catch it. Wildlife is just that - wild, and we need to leave it to its natural state.” “The Division of Fish and Wildlife is charged with the public trust to care for the wild animals that live in our state, but every Delawarean can be a good steward to wildlife and share in the legacy of our natural world,” he said. With Moore's precautions in mind,

people should understand that seeing wild animals in a suburban setting is not unusual, he explained. “Many neighborhoods, especially newer developments, are former wildlife habitat or border on natural areas. Rabbits and squirrels are very common backyard visitors, but fox, skunk, raccoon, possum, groundhogs and even deer might also make an appearance in some areas,” Moore said. “In most cases, animals will leave on their own.” To make your yard less appealing to wild animals, trash - especially if it contains food waste - should be placed in tightly closed trash cans or kept indoors until close to pickup time. Don't feed your pets or leave food for them outdoors, and don't feed or encourage strays. Livestock feed and even birdfeeders can also attract some types of wildlife. Concerns about rabies should factor into dealing with wild animals. Possible rabies symptoms to watch for fall into two categories: furious, in which

the animal may be very aggressive, biting at the air and attacking without provocation; and dumb, in which the animal may appear withdrawn and sluggish. Animals with rabies may also be thin, sickly or have poor coats, although these symptoms can also be indicative of diseases other than rabies. “Many people assume that just because they see a wild animal in their backyard, it must be rabid, which is usually not the case. Just seeing a fox walking around during the day is not symptomatic of rabies,” said Chief James H. Graybeal of the Division of Fish and Wildlife (DFW) Unless a human has been bitten by an animal, DFW Enforcement provides callers with phone numbers of commercial pest control operators in their area. In emergency situations in which the public's safety is threatened, police agencies will respond to put down a dangerous animal.

“We do not encourage private citizens to shoot animals, except in an emergency situation where the animal aggressively poses a threat and there is no other help available,” said Graybeal. If a human has been bitten by any wild animal, call the Division of Public Health's rabies program hotline at 302744-4545. To report a wild animal bite, please call the Department of Public Health's rabies hotline at 302-744-4545. To contact animal control officers through the Kent County SPCA, please call 302-698-3006 or 888-352-7722 toll-free. To contact Fish and Wildlife Enforcement, please call 302-739-9913 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. For natural resource-relate complaints on nights and weekends, call 800-523-3336, toll-free. For general information on wildlife, call the DNREC Wildlife Section at 302739-9912.

Health Briefs NHS Auxiliary meeting Sept. 12

Members of the Nanticoke Health Services Auxiliary will meet at 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 12, at St. Luke's Episcopal Church Parish House, North Street, Seaford, for a business meeting/luncheon. Janet Hubbard, president, encourages all members to attend this meeting and enjoy the luncheon. Lunch menu consists of chicken salad, broccoli salad, hot buttered carrots, rolls, beverage and peach cobbler, $8.50. Callers will contact members for reservations. Two of Nanticoke's new physicians will be welcomed: Dr. Ramin Mazhari and Dr. Danial Chan. Guest speaker will be Kathy Wright, clinical director of Nanticoke's Wound Care and Hyperbaric Center.

Prostate cancer test at NMH

Nantiocke Health Services will provide PSA screenings on Friday, September 21. The blood tests will be offered at the Nanticoke's Cancer Care Center, 1st Floor, adjacent to the Hospital from 8:00am till 5:00pm. The fee for the test will be $5.00. Results will be mailed approximately two weeks after the event. Nanticoke Memorial Hospital encourages men over the age of 50 to take advantage of this service. If you are 40 years old and at high risk of developing this cancer you are also encouraged to participate. African-American men are at high risk for developing prostate cancer, as are men who have a family history of the disease. For additional information on the PSA screening contact the Cancer Care Center at 629-6611, extension 3765.

Heart Walk

Trinity Transport Inc. and Nemours Health & Prevention Services are proud to be partnering with the American Heart Association's Start! Campaign, a physical activity program to fight heart disease and stroke by getting people moving through workplace working programs. Participating in this program can significantly im-

prove your health. We ask that you join us in the American Heart Association's Annual Sussex County Start! Heart Walk to show your commitment and support for this amazing cause. The 5K (3.1 miles) walk will raise money for research opportunities as well as education and awareness resources. The American Heart Association goal for this event is 1,000 walkers, so get a group together and register today. You can register online and find more information at heartwalk.kintera.org or call 856-7386. Contact Nemours at 302-444-9173 with any questions and take charge of your health. The event will be Oct. 6, at Delaware Technical Community College, registration is at 9 a.m.

CNA of the Year

To recognize the importance of Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) as invaluable members of the health care team, nominations are being accepted at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus, for the annual CNA of the Year award. The award will be presented at the 11th annual CNA Recognition Day held on Friday, Oct. 19, at the Owens Campus in Georgetown. The honoree will be chosen from nominations submitted by family members, friends, employers, and patients based on the CNA's dedication to providing care, comfort, and commitment to his/her patients. Nomination forms must be completed and returned to the college no later than Sept. 15. CNA Recognition Day is an annual event held at the Owens Campus and is co-sponsored by the college along with local hospitals, long-term care facilities, and home health agencies. The event includes workshops, exhibits, door prizes, and networking opportunities as it brings together CNAs from Delaware and the Eastern Shore of Maryland.For more information about the award, the event, or to receive a nomination form, call 302-856-5400, ext. 3190.

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PAGE 16

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Laurel puts skateboard park proposal on slower track By Tony E. Windsor After making presentations in support of a skateboard park during two separate Laurel Council meetings, the town’s mayor was dealt a blow Tuesday night by a council member who feels the project is moving too fast. Mayor John Shwed brought the issue of a partnership with the Laurel School District to build a skateboard park before the council during the August 20 meeting. He explained that he had been working with a group of volunteer citizens for over a year to develop the concept for the park. Recently, the Laurel School District Board of Education presented a Memorandum of Understanding that the two groups developed which spells out how the skateboard park would be built on school property and maintained by the town. The location of the proposed skateboard park is on Central Avenue on the grounds that currently house a basketball court and tennis courts near the Laurel Middle School. Shwed said during the Tuesday, Sept. 4, meeting of Laurel Mayor and Council that the location is a good one because it is close to both the middle and high schools, the age group that primarily utilizes skateboarding as a sport. Councilman Bill Trujillo said he and

his wife are two of the members of the volunteer citizen group that has been working on the skateboard park project. He said the skateboard park would be an excellent addition to the town. “This is the answer to the needs of a segment of our town’s population,” he said. “It is no more dangerous than other sports that are being played. This will take kids off the streets, instead of having them skating on streets all over the community.” Shwed told the council that he felt it important that when the Board of Education meets again later in the month to make a final approval for the memorandum of understanding, that it have the support from the Laurel Mayor and Council. Trujillo motioned to approve the Memorandum of Understanding and Council President Terry Wright seconded the motion. Prior to the vote, Shwed asked for any discussion from council members on the matter. It was then that Councilman Chris Calio addressed the council with his concerns about the skateboard park issue. Calio said he intended to vote against the skateboard park Memorandum of Understanding because he feels the council has been given too little information and he also feels the town is being placed in a position of liability.

Calio responded to newspaper articles which have quoted Shwed as saying the skateboard park could cost between $75,000 and $450,000, with a target of about $250,000. He also said Shwed said a fundraiser held by the volunteer citizens group has raised about $1,000. “I have searched the town budget and have found no $75,000 line item for a grant for this project,” Calio said. “Will the town of Laurel have to match funds, or will it be “free money?” He also asked why the citizen’s group has not been before the Mayor and Council to make a formal presentation, or why the town’s appointed Parks and Recreation Committee has not been shown any plans for the skateboard park. Calio also responded to Shwed’s comments during the August 20 meeting in which he said that the rules of the skateboard park would be enforced by the Laurel Police Department. “I personally think the police department has enough to do in this town without having to check whether skaters have a membership card,” he said. Calio said he also worries about the town’s liability in regards to the skateboard park. He said that an item in the Memorandum of Understanding causes him concern. “Item 5 in the MOU is a rather scary read and appears to leave the

Town of Laurel holding the bag if anything happens,” he said. “If we have to carry liability insurance, then the town is taking some risks with this park. If a slick lawyer can find a default with the construction or maintenance of the park, the town will face litigation.” Calio said he has not gotten any indication that Laurel’s attorney has advised the town concerning the Memorandum of Understanding. “I am not against a skateboard park within the boundaries of the Town of Laurel, but I think we are putting the cart before the horse,” he said. Calio asked that the issue be tabled until his concerns were addressed. Shwed offered no comments to Calio’s presentation and instead moved forward with a vote to table the skateboard park issue. The council voted four to three to table the issue. Council President Wright voted to table the issue, but said she will be happy to vote in support of the park once Calio’s questions are answered. Council members Don Phillips, Robin Fisher and Calio also voted to table the skateboard park issue. Shwed took a copy of Calio’s concerns and promised that the points would be addressed and he would get answers as soon as possible.

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Laurel gets four new officers By Tony Windsor Laurel Police Chief Jamie Wilson recently introduced four new members of the police force to the Laurel Town Council. All four officers were sworn in by Mayor John Shwed. Wilson said that for the first time in a number of years, the town’s police department is fully staffed. The four officers, Frank Bradley III, Carolos Granados Jr., Jared Haddock and Joseph Kansak, attended the Delaware State Police Academy and graduated on July 27.

Following the swearing in ceremonies, Shwed expressed appreciation for the new police officers in an address to the families who were in attendance. “I would like to thank you for sending your sons, your husbands and your boyfriends to us to serve our community,” he said. “These young men chose this career because there is something inside them that has drawn them into this type of special service to the citizens of our community. We welcome each of them to Laurel and are glad to have them.”

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

PAGE 17

Sixth graders, freshmen return to school portunities available to them at Delmar Middle. They also learned about the school’s dress code and behavior expectaDelmar Middle and Senior High tions from principal Cathy Townsend. School’s sixth and ninth graders began These same expectations were presentschool on Aug. 23 for an orientation day ed to parents of sixth graders at an orientabefore the rest of the students began tion session the evening before. school the following day. Parents also had the opportunity to Sixth grade marks those students’ first meet many other key players in their year in this building as they leave elemenchild’s education at DMSHS in addition to tary school behind. They began the day in homeroom where they received schedules, the teachers. These include the school resource officer, guidance counselor, nurse agendas and maps of the school. They were also assigned lockers for the and cafeteria manager. Although most ninth graders have been very first time. Students faced this new exin the building since they were in sixth perience with much trepidation, sixthgrade, they are not entirely familiar with grade teachers said. the high school side of the building or As this is their first year in middle with high school expectations. school, teachers took students on tours of Freshmen began their day with an asthe building, including the cafeteria and sembly in the auditorium where they met the specials wing. Teachers explained that specials classes the high school staff. Townsend shared with students the such as physical education and art rotate changes in rules regarding cell phones and on an A/B schedule. Students also had the the dress code as opportunity to learn well as the school’s the new rules and “The ninth graders were exnew tardy policy. procedures of the Letters to parents school. tremely well behaved at the aswent home prior to “Having this day sembly and in the cafeteria at the the start of school without the seventh end of the day. I’m looking forhighlighting these and eighth graders in changes in procethe building helps to ward to a great school year with dure. alleviate some of the them.” Officers of the fears that sixth National Honor Socigraders face entering ety presented rea new building,” said Cathy Townsend quirements and middle school vice Principal, Delmar Middle School guidelines for beprincipal Becky Neucoming members. bert. “It gives them a Students later had an opportunity to follow chance to get their bearings without other their schedules and meet each of their kids in the hallways with them.” Sixth graders ended the day in the audi- teachers in brief class sessions. Various high school and specials teachtorium where they met additional staff members and learned about events and op- ers then took freshmen on a tour of the By Donna Dukes-Huston

The Greater Delmar Chamber of Commerce is looking for its 2007 Citizen of the Year to honor at the annual banquet. The citizen of the year: • Must be a resident of the Delmar School District • Must have made a contribution for the improvement of the community • Must show commitment and contributions through local church, social, business, school, chamber or other community related projects, and • Must be a role model reflecting strong character. The Greater Delmar Chamber of Commerce has honored many Delmar citizens in the past. Past Citizens of the Year are: Mora Irene Culver, Jean Ellis, Joseph Morris, Ronnie Hastings, Doug Niblett, Bill Brittingham, Al Covington, Jay Green, Hattie Moore, Irvin Aydelotte, Pete Pedersen, Dee McDonnell, Percy Elliott, Anthony Triglia, Melba Hastings, Robert Handy, Shawn Brittingham, Mary Lee Pase, Linda Jones, Charles Truitt, Harry (Bunky) Naugle, Ronald Wilkosz, David Hearn and Wayne Bastian. Last year’s recipient was John McDonnell. Citizens of the Year who are deceased

are: J. William Gordy, A.E. Hantwerker, Edward McClaine, Joseph Morris Sr., Dr. Ernest Larmore and George Leong. This year, people interested in nominating a person for the award can access a nomination form on the Web site, www.delmar-chamberofcommerce.com. The ballot form can be put in any of the ballot boxes located around town, or can be e-mailed or mailed to the chamber office. Ballot boxes are located at the Delmar office of The Bank of Delmarva, Delmar Town Hall, Delmar Post Office, Delmar Public Library and Wilmington Trust in Delmar. The deadline for nominations is Monday, Sept. 24. Chairwoman for the Citizen of the Year program is Lisa Ellis. In addition to the Citizen of the Year program, the chamber sponsors Delmar’s Day in the Park, the Delmar Christmas parade and the Carnival of Lights. It also hands out scholarships to graduating seniors at Delmar High School. For details on becoming a member of the chamber or on volunteering for chamber events, contact the chamber office at 302-846-3336.

building. These tour guides described the layout of the high school wing and helped students find their classrooms. In addition, they provided students with trivia about many of the high school teachers. Students recorded this information and used it at the end of the day in a trivia contest hosted by high school vice principal Shawn Larrimore. Students who gave cor-

rect answers to the questions received Delmar gear such as footballs and key chains. Students enjoyed ice cream sandwiches while competing in this contest. “The ninth graders were extremely well behaved at the assembly and in the cafeteria at the end of the day,” Townsend said. “I’m looking forward to a great school year with them.”

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PAGE 18

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Woodland Ferry Festival 2007

Woodland Ferry residents welcome visitors State Rep. Danny Short will bring an official proclamation from Dover that recognizes the role that Bill and Gertrude Royal played in starting the popular festival

2007 Schedule of events

By Ann Wilmer Motorists who use Woodland Ferry, a cable-guided ferry, to cross the Nanticoke River, may not realize that travelers have been crossing the river at this spot for more than two centuries. The Virginia C makes the crossing roughly 100 times a day carrying two or more cars and saving travelers a trip around the rive of at least 10 miles. The ferry runs 362 days a year – no service on Christmas, Thanksgiving or New Year's Day – unless bad weather forces it to cease operation. During the

The Woodland Ferry is shown crossing the Nanticoke River. This ferry is being retired and a new, larger ferry for Woodland is under construction. Photo by Bryant Richardson

Enjoy This Great Family Event

This year’s festival is dedicated to the founders of the Woodland Ferry Association, Bill and Gertrude Royal. The Royal's started the Association in 1933. Schedule 7 - 10 a.m. - Country Breakfast AllYou-Can-Eat, $6. 8:45 a.m. - SHS Marching Band to play for the Opening Ceremonies. 9 a.m. - Raising of the Flag by JROTC Welcome by Woodland Ferry Association President Roger Hamrick 9:30 - Gospel music 9:30 - 10:45 a.m. - Singer Tony Windsor South of the Church 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. - The Jones Boys 2 p.m. - The Arabian Lights Dance Company

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007 summer, ferry operators said they often make 150 trips daily. The Delaware General Assembly granted Jacob Cannon’s widow an exclusive license to operate a ferry at that spot in 1793. But ferry service dates from the 1740s. James Cannon established the ferry and his son, Jacob, continued it after he died. The Cannon family operated the ferry privately until the mid-19th century when the Delaware legislature authorized the creation of a free ferry at that location. And, yes, the Cannons were related by marriage to the infamous Patty Cannon. (Patty Cannon was the leader of a band of kidnappers in the early 1800s. She lived near Reliance, Md., at the time.) Since 1935, the Delaware Department of Transportation (DelDOT) has operated the ferry and has continued to do so into the 21st century. In 1938, the state recognized the cultural significance of the ferry by placing a historic marker at the site. Woodland Ferry is one of the oldest, if not the oldest, ferries in continuous operation in the United States.

Birth of a celebration The residents of the tiny village love the river and the ferry. They are so proud of it that it wasn’t hard for Bill and Gertrude Royal to persuade their neighbors to mount a festival to celebrate 200 years of continuous operation. Although originally intended as a celebration of a milestone, every September

PAGE 19

since has found residents hosting another festival to celebrate the ferry and its contribution to local culture. They don’t even care if they make any money – although it wouldn’t hurt their feelings to break even, according to Christina Darby, vice president of the Woodland Ferry Association. The public is invited to join local residents for a festival to celebrate historic Woodland Ferry by sharing great food, arts and crafts, live entertainment and children’s activities on September 8, 2007, from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Eleanor Jamison grew up in Woodland Ferry and was married in the church where her mother played the organ for 52 years and she’s familiar with local history. She said that documenting the ferry’s history is complicated by the fact that the boundary between Delaware and Maryland in Woodland area was often disputed and the settlement has been considered part of both at one time or another. Jamison and Gertrude Royal were cousins whose family ties to Woodland go way back, but she says Bill Royal was adamant that he was a “come here” in Shore parlance. Still, someone who came to the village at age five and stayed, qualifies for honorary resident status. This year’s festivities are a tribute to the civic spirit of this couple.

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Scenes from 2006 - E.B. James of the Nanticoke Watershed Alliance and Jennifer Bowman of the Watershed Assessment Section of the Division of Water Resources for DNREC, show one of trees given away during the 2006 festival.

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PAGE 20

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Scenes from 2006 - Louretha Savage of the Western Sussex Boys & girls Club paints the face of Rebecca Anderson of Federalsburg, Md. Photos by Bryant Richardson

Claudia Courtney, left, president of the Greyhound Pets of America, Delaware subchapter, and Joanne Ronning hope to find homes for these dogs.

tan and served at the Woodland Church from 7 a.m. until 10 a.m. Cost is $6. Opening ceremonies take place at 9 a.m. and will feature the marching bands from Laurel and Seaford High School led onto the grounds by Miss and Little Miss Seaford. State Rep. Danny Short, who represents the area in the 39th District, will bring greetings and an official proclamation from Dover that recognizes the role that Bill and Gertrude Royal played in starting the popular festival. Tony Windsor’s performance will con-

Arts and crafts and auction

clude the opening ceremonies. The rest of the day is up to the visitor. Live entertainment punctuates the activities with the Jones Boys, a local musical group, performing at 11 a.m. and the Arabian Lights Dancers entertaining at 2 p.m. There are several children’s activities offered at no cost including a Moon Bounce, Snippy Doodles the Clown and the Duck Train. (Barrels that have been remodeled by Mike Covey of Seaford to look like ducks “waddle” on wheels behind a tractor. In the spirit of the event, he donates the use of the “ducks.”)

Woodland Pottery headlines the arts and crafts displayed and sold that includes vintage jewelry, and handbags, candles, antiques, crocheted items, chair caning, Discovery Toys and woodworking. There will also be demonstrations of rope making and glass bead making. Visitors can start their Christmas shopping early. Three years ago, the committee initiated a silent auction to bring them closer to their goal of breaking even. Since then, they have come close. “This year we have some different

things that may spark interest,” said Darby. “When the Captain John Smith Shallop came up and down the river in May, a local resident got a photo of the shallop and collected signatures of all the crew members. He’s had this one-of-a-kind item framed for the auction.” Jamison jokes that she is the festival’s insurance policy. The one year she missed, it rained. She was told that she must never miss another festival. And she does hate to miss any chance to visit. “Woodland is such a pretty spot; our river is so beautiful,” she said.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

PAGE 21

Scenes from 2006 - Boone Perkins, son of Eric McNatt of Seaford, enjoys a nap in the shade. Photo by Bryant Richardson

Scenes from 2006 - A young rider enjoys the Duck Train following a visit to the face painting booth. Photo by Bryant Richardson

Museums open for visitors

Bill and Gertrude Royal

History buffs will enjoy visiting two “museums” that house the interesting private collections of local residents. Days Gone By, owned and operated by Jack and Carolyn Knowles, features artifacts and memorabilia associated with the ferry. Water’s Edge features Dave Fluharty’s collection of just a little bit of everything, including buggies that might have crossed the ferry years ago. The collectors are so pleased to share their treasures with visitors that admission to both museums is free.

“Bill (Royal) was very much into the festival idea,” so it’s fitting that this year he will be remembered. Gertrude Royal died a few years ago, her husband this past year. But when he was organizing the festival, he had a theme for each event. “One year he honored Veterans living in the area,” she said. “My thought has always been that the festival celebrates the Nanticoke. Just being in Woodland is the best part of the day.” Earlier in the day, Jamison said she had

spent some time at Woodland Park planting chrysanthemums to provide color for the fall. “Greg English did a good job with the original plantings,” she said. Although the state owns the land “we freshen it up with annuals summer and mums in the fall.” After gardening, she said she sat on a bench and just enjoyed the river. Her memories of Woodland Ferry include a severe storm in the early 1930s after which she floated down the road in a rowboat as there was more than a foot of water standing in the road. “But I don’t

have a boat anymore,” she said. When the Nanticoke River is angry it spreads water all along the low-lying land on either side. Last summer the flood that took out the Galestown Millpond Dam also sent water up to the church. But most of the time, “when you stand down in our ferry park and look down the river, it is a beautiful sight.” The Woodland Ferry Festival is a project of the Woodland Ferry Association. Call 629-8077 or 628-0825 for information.

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PAGE 22

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Changes ahead for Woodland Ferry

This will be the last year that a threecar, cable-guided ferry makes daily trips across the Nanticoke River at the Woodland Ferry crossing. DelDOT has scheduled to take the Virginia C out of service in October. The new ferry will be a six-car ferry and it will be named the Tina Fallon, to honor the former 39th District Representative who retired last year after a long legislative career during which she supported the ferry and did a lot to benefit the district. There was some debate over the carrying capacity of the new ferry; some folks would have preferred that it remain a three-car ferry. But, with the back-ups on either side during busy times, it just wasn’t practical. Christina Darby, vice president of the Woodland Ferry Association, said locals were pleased that, on the outside, the new ferry would look much like the one it is replacing, but “under the hood” everything will be state of the art. The Tina Fallon, now under construction at the Chesapeake Shipbuilding in Salisbury, is scheduled to begin service in August of 2008. Darby said she’s excited

Scenes from 2006 - Franklin Woodruff of Woody’s Paint & Pen Gallery, Seaford, is shown with some of his waterfront paintings. Photo by Bryant Richardson

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to hear that construction is ahead of schedule. The new ferry will cost $931,000. George and Lynch of New Castle will do the site work necessary to complete the project. The total cost for the update project will be approximately $3.1 million. Locals expected to be without ferry service from November 2007 through July 2008, but the 65-foot Virginia C just passed its Coast Guard inspection and it’s rumored that it may remain in service at least until January. Cable ferries are disappearing from the placid rivers of the mid-Atlantic region but a few, such as those at Woodland and Whitehaven and Upper Ferry, Md., near Salisbury remain. You can reach the Woodland Ferry wheelhouse at 302-629-7742 for operational information.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

On the Record Building Permits

Marriage Licenses

• 08/15/07, Jose A. Sr. and Alicia Campos, N/Rd. No. 40, Lot No. 2, Nanticoke Hundred, Game Room/Porch, $21,912 • Paul L. and Lori E. Hignutt, S/Rd. No. 46, 735', E/Rd. No. 526A, Nanticoke Hundred, Dwelling w/Additions, $164,686 • Robert a. and Theresa L. Taylor, Manchester Manor, Lot No. 29, Broad Creek Hundred, Dwelling w/Additions, $85,508 • David and Debra Quillen, SE/Rt. No. 530, 2000', SW/Oak Lane, Nanticoke Hundred, Inground Pool/Shed, $26,610 • Tejpartap and Drupatie Ramnath, E/Rd. No. 603, Nanticoke Hundred, Manure Shed/Lean To, $28,400 • Peggy L. Mills-Ivins, S/S. Rt. No. 485, 550', W/Rt. No. 13, Broad Creek Hundred, Det. Garage/Sunroom, $13,972 • 08/22/07, Kenneth S. and Judith Kiesler, Shiloh Woods, Lot No. 42, Broad Creek Hundred, Pole Building, $14,400 • Center Meeting Properties, NE/Rd. No. 598, Lot No. 2, Nanticoke Hundred, Dwelling w/Additions, $146,678 • Gloria Jane Drace, S/Arnett Road, Intersection of E/Oak lane, Nanticoke Hundred, Bathroom Addition/Closet, $10,800 • Seaford IR LLC, S/Locust Street, Lot No. 7, Seaford Hundred, Dwelling w/Additions, $160,000 • John Jr. and Monica F. Malandruccolo, E/Rt. No. 34, N/Rd. No. 581, Northwest Fork Hundred, Pole Building, $16,128

The Sussex County Clerk of the Peace George Parish joyfully announces the following couples have obtained marriage licenses: • Edgar T. Foskey, Jr., Laurel to Shelley Ann DeSilva, Laurel • Aaron R. Hastings, Laurel to Evelynn Hastings, Laurel • Donald Rex Lamping, Seaford to Charlotte Ann Donovan, Federalsburg, Md. • Ricardo Rojas Rascon, Laurel to Maria De La Luz Vicente Mendoza, Laurel • William E. Hitch, Jr., Delmar to Elizabeth Marie Anthony, Delmar

Deeds • 02/22/07, Mears Farm, LLC to Manonmani Antony, Lot No. 132, Mearfield, subdivision, Seaford Hundred, $352,933 • 02/07/07, Joe C. and Toni Jo Johnson to Cannon Road Farms Two LLC, parcel, Northwest Fork Hundred, $601,560 • 02/23/07, Steven D. Mayer, Successor Trustee for Hazel T. Mayer to Susan M.S. Simpson, Lot No. 11, Block B, Martin Farms, subdivision, Seaford Hundred, $19,000 • 01/16/07, H and M. Allen Family Limited Partnership to James E. and Rosaura A. Tennefoss, parcel, Seaford Hundred, $181,000 • 02/07/07, Celeste Marie Gonzalez to Prudential Relocation, Inc., Lot No. 4, South Towns End, subdivision, Little Creek Hun-

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dred, $211,500 • 02/15/07, Prudential Relocation, Inc. to John L. Hastings and Beverly A. Van Riper, Lot No. 4, South Towns End, subdivision, Little Creek Hundred, $211,500 • 02/22/07, Virginia D. Bendon to James A. and Marla R. McTeer, Lot No. 240, Clearbrooke Estates, subdivision, Seaford Hundred, $242,300 • 02/28/07, Kimberly A. Batson to Diane Marie Buonopane and Daniel Richard George Ross, parcel I, Town of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, $145,415 • 02/23/07, John M. Sloan to Brian J. Licinski, Lot Nos. 26-27, Section A, The Oak Lane Development, Town of Laurel, subdivision, Little Creek Hundred, $175,000 • 02/28/07, Marjorie G. Wallace, Marjorie W. Gibson, Christian D. Wallace to Charles A. and Bonnie J. Zonko, Lot Nos. 9 and 11, Block No. 127, Bethany Beach Improvement Company's plot of Bethany Beach, Town of Bethany, subdivision, Baltimore Hundred, $2,200,000 • 02/26/07, Ray H. and Joanna Millman to William N. Hoffman, 11 E. Third Street, Town of Blades, parcel, Broad Creek Hundred, $135,000 • 02/26/07, Jiloca and DeJesus-Jiloca, M.D., P.A. to George H. III and Justina Sapna, Lot No. 43, River's End, subdivision, Nanticoke Hundred, $120,000 • 02/28/07, Karl L. Reddick to Ralph Morris, Lot No. 40, Phase II, Meadow Stream Farms, subdivision, Little Creek

Hundred, $205,000 • 02/23/07, Barry G. Hastings to Kevin L. and Tiesha S. Niblett, parcel, Broad Creek Hundred, $56,500 • 02/28/07, Edward J. French, Sr., Jason French, and Stacy French to Stephen E. Saveikis, parcel, Broad Creek Hundred, $159,000 • 02/27/07, Troyer Construction, Inc. to Robert M. and Natalie K. Wynn, Lot No. 8, Lands of Leroy S. VanVorst, subdivision, Northwest Fork Hundred, $242,000 • 02/28/07, Bland Wallace, Jr. to Elie St. Louis and Cherline G. Val, Lot No. 82, Green Acres, subdivision, Seaford Hundred, $94,900 • 02/27/07, U.S. Home Corporation to Peter J. and Henrietta C. Truscello, Lot No. 218, Phase II, Heritage Shores, Town of Bridgeville, subdivision, Northwest Fork Hundred, $397,290 • 02/27/07, U.S. Home Corporation to Alfred J. and Lois M. Fay, Lot No. 417, Phase II, Heritage Shores, Town of Bridgeville, subdivision, Northwest Fork Hundred, $259,990 • 02/27/07, U.S. Home Corporation to Doris M. Lee, Lot No. 226, Phase II, Heritage Shores, Town of Bridgeville, subdivision, Northwest Fork Hundred, $354,990 • 02/26/07, U.S. Home Corporation to Alfred M. and Joanne M. Endre, Lot No. 223, Phase II, Heritage Shores, Town of Bridgeville, subdivision, Northwest Fork Hundred, $364,090


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

PAGE 25

It seems like just yesterday you were startng school Now you’re leaving home

These quick, easy dishes have plenty of pizzazz Summer is too short. This is a reality to which I’ll never become ORETTA NORR accustomed. Seeing the jumble of picked-over, tired-looking summer clothes in the stores and noting the glut of Halloween decorations always adds to my end of season funk. It was worse when my children were still in school. At that very first back to school day, the tempo of our household quickened dramatically. In my role as conductor of household meals, I Add rice; stir 1 minute. had the job of keeping the tempo and endPress chicken into ing on the right note. rice. Add 2 cups I had a repertoire broth; bring to boil. I had a repertoire of somewhat of somewhat reliable Cover, reduce dishes that everyone heat to medium-low, reliable dishes that everyone toler- and simmer until tolerated and which were designed to go chicken is cooked ated and which were designed to from pantry to table through and rice is as quickly as possitender, adding more ble. Because it was go from pantry to table as quickly broth if dry, about no small accomplish20 minutes. ment to find someas possible. thing that everyone would eat, these dishes were hard to give up. Result: dinItalian Meatball Soup Rapido ners that were familiarly comfortable but Serves 4. Parmigiano-Reggiano enriches deserving of more than a few yawns. canned broth for a quick, hot, and truly Today with the advent of the Internet, delicious meal in a bowl. finding new ideas for quick and easy meals with enough pizzazz to eliminate 1/4 cup olive oil this problem is a snap. Try these highly1 cup frozen chopped onions (about 6 oz) rated dishes from Epicurious.com that 4 garlic cloves, chopped pack a lot of punch for a minimum of ef1 celery rib, halved lengthwise and thinly fort. sliced crosswise 2 carrots, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced crosswise 5 1/4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth Spicy Chicken and Rice (42 fluid ounces) Serves 4. Hot chili paste gives the rice its 2 and 1/2 cups water kick. The briny olives and the sweet 20 refrigerated or frozen precooked meatraisins balance the heat. balls (15 to 20 ounces) 2 (14-ounce) cans small white beans, 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil drained and rinsed 4 large chicken thighs with skin and bones 1 (5-ounce to 6-ounce) bag baby spinach, (about 2 pounds) coarsely chopped Ground cloves 1/2 cup finely grated Parmigiano-Reg1 and 1/2 cups diced seeded red bell pep giano, plus more for serving pers 3/4 teaspoon salt, or to taste 1 cup chopped onion 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 1/3 cup golden raisins 1/3 cup coarsely chopped pitted imported Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a 5- to 6-quart green olives pot over high heat until hot but not smok4 small bay leaves ing, then cook onions, garlic, celery, and 2 garlic cloves, peeled carrots, stirring occasionally, until onions 1 teaspoon hot chili paste (such as sambal are pale golden, about 4 minutes. oelek) or 1 small serrano chile, Stir in broth and water and bring to a chopped boil, covered. 1 and 1/2 cups jasmine rice or long-grain Meanwhile, heat remaining 2 tablewhite rice (9 to 10 ounces), rinsed, spoons oil in a 12-inch heavy skillet over drained high heat until hot but not smoking, then 2 to 2 and 1/2 cups low-salt chicken broth sauté meatballs (do not thaw if frozen), turning occasionally, until browned all Heat oil in large skillet over mediumover, about 3 minutes. high heat. Sprinkle chicken generously Add meatballs to soup along with with salt and pepper, then lightly with beans and briskly simmer, covered, stirground cloves. Add chicken to skillet and ring occasionally, until vegetables are tensauté until brown, about 5 minutes per der and meatballs are heated through, side. Transfer chicken to plate. about 15 minutes. Pour off all but 4 tablespoons fat from Stir in spinach, cheese, salt, and pepper skillet. Add bell peppers, onion, raisins, and simmer, uncovered, until spinach is olives, bay leaves, garlic and chili paste to wilted, about 1 minute. skillet. Sauté until vegetables begin to Serve with additional Parmigiano-Regsoften, about 2 minutes. giano cheese.

L

K

The Practical Gourmet

Off To College You’ll make new friends, have new experiences and see new things at college, but having a link to your hometown helps you keep in touch with friends and family members and lets you know what’s happening at home.

Special out-of-state 9 month subscription rate of Only $24.00 Enclosed. Please Send:

Seaford Star

Laurel Star

12 Month Out of State $29

To: Name_____________________________________________ Address_____________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ____________________________________________ __________________________________________

Mail To: The Star, Circulation P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973 or Call The Star Office 302

629-9788

with credit card payment.


PAGE 26

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Church Bulletins Mission of Hope

The Mission of Hope in Seaford provides rehabilitation, education and housing for men who are homeless. The Mission is looking for a volunteer with “program development” or fund-raising experience. If you have such a background, or know a possible candidate, please contact the Mission at 629-2559, or you can e-mail the Mission at SeafordMission@Verizon.net, or write to Seaford Mission, PO Box 1271, Seaford, DE 19973.

Take My Hand Ministry meeting

The Mary and Martha Tea Room, a program of Take My Hand Ministry, Inc., meets on the third Wednesday of every month from 2-4 p.m. at 102 Maryland Ave. in Greenwood. A light lunch is served, and a guest speaker teaches and ministers. This is a women’s ministry.

Day of Champions

You're invited to a Day of Champions at Laurel Wesleyan Church Sunday, Sept. 9. The rally begins at 10 a.m. with motivational speaker and basketball entertainer Dan Wetzel. After the rally, enjoy free lunch, music, carnival games, sporting contests, and more. Laurel Wesleyan Church is located 1/2 mile north of Laurel on Alt. 13. For more information call the office at 875-5380.

Take My Hand Ministry luau

Join the Board of Directors of Take My Hand Ministry, Inc. for a night of good food, fun, and fellowship while benefiting the ministry. The festivities begin at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 15, at Haven Lake in Milford. There will be a live band, The Movies, as well as live and silent auctions,

door prizes, and a hula contest. Some very special items will be on the auction block for this event. Tickets are now on sale for $40 per person and $75 per couple. Contact person for tickets is: Dr. Michaele S. Russell at 302-349-4220. You may also send checks or money orders for tickets to: Take My Hand Ministry, Inc., PO Box 900, Greenwood, DE 19950. Each ticket comes with a map.

Ninety & Nine meeting

The Ninety & Nine extends an invitation to all women to join them for their regular quarterly dinner meeting at The Seaford Golf & Country Club in Seaford, on Monday evening, Sept. 10, at 6:30 p.m. Our special speaker for the evening is Lisa Vaughan. This past year, she began to help her husband pastor “The Father’s House” in Seaford, after teaching at Epworth Christian School for eight years. Reservations are necessary. Deadline is Sept. 5.

tickets. Carryouts will be available 4:30-5 p.m. only. The community hall is located on 13A between Seaford and Laurel.

Seaford Mission Graduation

The Mission of Hope in Seaford invites you to the graduation of Class 23 from the Mission’s Discipleship Program on Friday September 7. A pot luck dinner will begin at 6:30 pm. The graduation ceremony will follow at 7:30 pm. Help us celebrate the beginning of a new season in the lives of our graduates. The dinner and ceremony will be held at St. Johns United Methodist Church, 300 Pine Street, Seaford. Please contact Nancy or Paul at the Mission of Hope at 6292559. Let us know how many people will be attending and what covered dish item you plan to bring.

Union UMC Celebration

Centenary United Methodist Church is beginning a new ministry for children PreK through 4th grade. The purpose is to provide fun lessons and activities that will help in building a strong biblical foundation in the young child. The first meeting will be Sept. 20, from 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Please call Blair Hall at 875-8106 by Sept. 10, to sign up or get more information.

Sept. 9 will be one of the “great days” at Union United Methodist Church. During the 11 a.m. Worship Service, with gratitude and praise, we are proud to be dedicating the new Allen Organ and our new Sound System. At 4 p.m. everyone is cordially invited to share a lovely “Sunday Dinner” in the fellowship hall. Tickets for the dinner are $10 per person, with children 5 and under free. They are available at the 9 a.m. Contemporary Service, the 11 a.m. Traditional Service, at the church office (337-7409), or from Nancy HoldenSmith (424-0601).

Mt. Zion holding dinner

Seaford Nazarene Hosts Concert

F.I.S.H. Ministry sign-up

Mt. Zion Methodist Church will be holding a Beef and Dumpling Dinner on Saturday, Sept. 8. There will be one seating at 5 p.m. with a limited number of

Seaford Church of the Nazarene invites you to a concert of southern gospel music by the Wilson’s on Saturday, Sept 15, at 7 p.m. The Wilson’s are a full time singing

ministry and have a beautiful sound and spirit. You will be blessed! No charge for admission. Refreshments are available after the concert on a donation basis to help a local family in need. Seaford Nazarene Church is located at 520 South Dual Highway (Rt. 13 South next to the Guide) in Seaford. Call 302-629-3929 or 302-3816514 for more info.

Victory Tabernacle Revival Time

Revivalist Rick J. Lairsey of Easton, Maryland will be the guest speaker at Victory Tabernacle Church of God in Laurel for “It’s Revival Time” Revival Services, 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 30 and 7 p.m., Monday through Wednesday, Oct. 13. The Rev. Lairsey has ministered extensively throughout the United States over the past six years. He is presently serving as Regional Evangelist for the DelmarvaDC Region of the Church of God (Cleveland, Tenn.). Previously, he served as pastor in Maryland, Georgia, and Mississippi. He has ministered in Camp Meetings and Regional Meetings with the Church of God. Come hear the anointed message that will bring healing and help to the hurting, deliverance to those in bondage, and strength to those that are struggling with life. There will be a time of prayer for healing and deliverance in each service. He will minister with a heart of compassion from the brokenness of his own life experiences. You will leave changed and challenged by the Word centered message of Hope. Victory Tabernacle is located on Alt.13 between Laurel and Blades at 28261 Seaford Road. Call 877-0443 for more information.

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Trap Pond, CHURCHNearLaurel, Del. 875-7715 Sun. School 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pastor Julie A. Lewis

“A caring church, a giving church, a sharing church; showing love, warmth and friendship to all.”

St. John’s United Methodist Church Pine & Poplar Sts., Seaford 302-629-9466 E-mail: st_johns@verizon.net NURSERY & HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

SUNDAY WORSHIP 8:30 & 11:15 am Traditional 9:45 Sunday School 9:50 am Contemporary Come as you are… and be transformed in the love of Christ!

Centenary United Methodist Church “Making Disciples of Jesus Christ for Over 200 Years” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Every Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m. Sunday

Rev. John W. Van Tine, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1010 S. Central Ave., Laurel Phone: 875-7748 Donny Weimar, Minister Worship Services: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Bible Study: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m. In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Fred Duncan Church: 875-4233 Parsonage: 875-3398 Sunday Services: 8:30am Praise 9:30am Sunday School,11am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching Youth Group Sunday 4:30 pm

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

HARVEST CHRISTIAN CHURCH “Heart Felt Praise” Relevant Bible Teaching Children’s Ministry Midweek Bible Study Tom Birowski, Pastor Seaford, Del. • 628-7771

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church & Old Christ Church

“A Place to Belong”

600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956 (302) 875-3644 Rev. Rita B. Nelson, Rector www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing and Church School ~ Sunday @ 9:30 am

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY Underground Family Worship (7-12 grade) 6:15 p.m. 10:45 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Prayer Team ‘The Table’ God’s Big Back Yard (last Wed. of mo) 7:00 p.m. 9:30 a.m.

94 Walnut St. Laurel, DE 19956

875-7873

Centrally located at 14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road 68, South of Laurel Laurel, Del.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m. www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

Christian Church of Seaford Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298 Minister: John Herbst SCHEDULE OF SERVICES Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

PAGE 27

Trouble is one Lucky Dog By the Rev. Todd K. Crofford Laurel Weslyan Church

PASTOR’S PERSPECTIVE

Did you catch the news about Instead of one dog that lucky dog named “Trouble”? living in opulence, This White Maltese, the beloved lap pet of deceased hotetwelve million lier Leona Helmsley, learned that dollars can make she was to get $12,000,000 (that’s MILLION!) for her care as long as a world of difference she is alive. in the lives of many Without spending too much time venting my anger over this, people. let me put it simply. The Bible says we will give account to God might decide to build 120 Hope Houses for how we use what we have been given. with your windfall. I suppose I could go At that moment I will be glad not to be on and on about what a terrible decision her. Instead of one dog living in opulence, she made about her estate. Then again, it twelve million dollars can make a world was her money and her decision. The betof difference in the lives of many people. ter question is “How am I spending the Consider some of these. money that I have?” For twelve million dollars you can In Luke 18, Jesus told a story with the sponsor 1,666 children for the next twenty message that God does not provide us all years in disaster-stricken Peru. According with equal resources, but he does have the to World Vision, the money would provide same expectations of us all. God expects clean water, food, medicine, medical that we do all we can with what we have check-ups, and education. For twelve milbeen given. I’m not concerned about ever lion dollars you can buy twenty drilling having Leona Helmsley’s money, I just rigs and see over 2,500 wells dug in want to make sure I don’t have Leona Africa. According to World Hope InternaHelmsley’s heart when it comes to giving. tional, each well can service a community I have discovered over time that I can of up to 2,000 people who have a severe almost always rationalize spending my shortage of clean water to drink, cook, or money on me. Then I have to remind mybathe. For twelve million dollars you can self that it really is not my money. send 8,000 families of volunteers to Joni I am a steward of possessions, not an Eareckson’s summer camp for families owner. A steward is simply entrusted with with disabilities. In a very special week, the responsibility of a possession. All that these exhausted families get a break while I call my own in this world is on loan to others care for and interact with severely me from God and He expects me to be handicapped children in providing a lifegenerous with it all. So, thanks Leona, for long memory. For twelve million dollars once again reminding me that I need to you can run Laurel’s Good Samaritan for take careful note of what I am doing with the next eighty years, or triple their ability what I have been given. to give for the next twenty-five. You

Word Warrior begins training

Sept. 9 marks the beginning of Traveling Light Training Center, a Word Warrior Ministries outreach dedicated to helping prepare Christians to fulfill the call of Christ in their lives. The training program begins at 4 p.m. on Sunday afternoons with speaker’s training. This is a 13-week program, which will train speakers and equip them with a marketing kit and at least one CD recording of their work. At 5 p.m., participants are asked to attend the Bible fellowship, during which ministry speakers will conduct

45-minute preaching/teaching sessions based on scriptures.Specific ministry needs will be addressed during leadership/administrative training at 6 p.m. Workshop dates are Sept. 9, 16, 30; Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28; Nov. 4, 11, 18, and Dec. 2, 8, 15. The workshops will be conducted in “The Upper Room,” in Downtown Seaford. The Upper Room is located above 33 West and the entrance is on Bradford St. Workshops/sessions are free. Donations will be accepted during the three workshops. For more information, call Diane Cook at 302-734-0572 or visit www.wordwarriorministries.org.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Youth Minister: James Hollis Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel 302-875-4646 PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

Dr. Carl G Vincent, Senior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes, Music Minister Sunday 9:30 am Wednesday 7:00 pm Children’s Church • Nursery

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH 532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591 MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

LAUREL-MT. PLEASANT CHARGE 27225 Kaye Road, Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.livingwaterworship.com Pastor: Rev. Timothy P. Jones

Wed. Bible Study & Sunday Morning Worship & Children’s Children’s Discovery Club 7:00 PM Ministries 10:00 AM “Flowing in Power and Love to a Parched and Thirsty World”

Passing on God’s Love and Grace in Laurel, Delmar & Surrounding Area United Methodist Churches

King’s St. George’s Mt. Pleasant

Worship Sun. Sch.

Gordy Rd...........8:50....10:00 St. George Rd.. . . .10:10..... 9:00

Mt. Pleasant Rd. 9:30,11:30..10:15 Pastor Barbara Auer

VICTORY TABERNACLE River of Life Christian Center CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP 11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT Ministry for the whole family 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson 28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

The Atlanta Road Alliance Church 22625 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 • www.atlantaroadcma.org Rev. Edward J. Laremore, Sr. Pastor SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 8:30 Worship 6:45 Pioneer Clubs (age 3 9:45 Sunday School thru grade 6) & Divorce Care® 11:00 Worship/Kids Church 7:00 Prayer Service & Youth 7:00 Evening Service Group (grades 7-12)

COKESBURY CHURCH All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE (302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburywc.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

Mount Olivet United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School Pastor: Rev. Thomas Gross • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel Sunday School - 9:30 Worship - 9:00 & 10:45 Sunday Evening Worship Wed. Youth Ministries 6:30 p.m. Thurs. WKID, The Zone Children’s Ministries 6:30 Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Todd Crofford Assistant Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor/Youth: Sue Boyce Children’s Pastor: Marilyn Searcey

17 W. Market St., Greenwood, DE 302349-9420 Pastors Joseph & Yvonne Dixon WORSHIP SERVICE: SUN. 11 AM BIBLE STUDY: WED. 7:30 PM

Proclaiming Faith 4 pm Sunday on WKDI 840 AM Radio

Food Outreach Emergency Food

www.river-oflife.org

Sailor’s Bethel United Methodist Church Bethel, DE Pastor Arthur Smith III Sunday School - 10 am Worship - 11:15 am Nursery Provided office 875-3628

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church 629-7979 Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. Front & King St., Seaford, DE

The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - Anthony Melakian - 629-3633 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

“The Pickle Church” CHRIST THE CORNERSTONE COMMUNITY CHURCH PICKLE MINISTRIES OUTREACH & CORNERSTONE NOTE MUSIC MINISTRY Corner of Bethel Rd. & Alt. 13 • 302-875-8150 Worship Svce 10 a.m. - Rev. Rick Elzey Church School & Jr. Church 10 a.m. - Pastor Doris Whaley Wings of Prayer Tues. 7 p.m. Exploring God’s Word, Wed. 7 p.m.


PAGE 28

Obituaries

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Obituaries are run without charge thanks to the support of area churches

Albert Dill, 84

Albert James Dill of Bridgeville died at Genesis in Seaford on Sept. 1, 2007. He was born on Nov. 15, 1922, near Trinity, son of James B. Dill and Bertha Mae Priestly. Mr. Dill was an agricultural farmer his entire life. He was predeceased by his wife of 61 years, Roberta Outten Dill, in Dec. 2006. Survivors include his daughters, Joyce D. Handley and husband, Bill of Bridgeville and Janet D. Driscoll and husband, Bill of Seaford; a son, James A. Dill and wife, Tara of Laurel; a grandson, John Handley and wife, Christa of Bridgeville, and one great-grandson, Jacob Handley. Services were held on Wednesday, Sept. 5 at the Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Hardesty Chapel in Bridgeville. Burial was in Bridgeville Cemetery, Bridgeville. Contributions may be made to the American Heart Association, 1151 Walker Rd., Ste. 202, Dover, DE 19901. Online condolences may be sent to condolences@parsellfuneralhomes.com.

Delmar, Del.; a son and daughter-in-law, Freddie Wayne and Barbara Elliott, of Laurel; 13 grandchildren, and 34 greatgrandchildren. She is also survived by three sisters, Helen Quillen, Alice O’Neal, Sharon Edwards and husband, Dan, of Baltimore; an uncle, Rex Eller of Baltimore; and several nieces and nephews. In addition to her parents and her husband, she was preceded in death by seven brothers, Granville O’Neal, David O’Neal, Norman O’Neal, Linwood O’Neal, Preston O’Neal, Olan O'Neal, and Joe O’Neal; a sister, Margaret Callaway; and a special niece and nephew, Shirley Davis and Rueben O’Neal. Funeral services were held Sept. 5 at Short Funeral Home, Delmar. The Reverend Barry Devine officiated and interment followed at St. Stephen’s Cemetery in Delmar. Memorial contributions may be made in her memory to: Coastal Hospice, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, MD 21802, or First Baptist Church of Delmar, P.O. Box 200, Delmar, DE 19940. Online condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.shortfh.com.

Paul E. Barker, 75

Raymond L. Parsons, 70

Paul E. “Gene” Barker, of Georgetown went to be with the Lord on Saturday, Aug. 25, 2007, at St. Francis Hospital in Wilmington. Mr. Barker was born Aug. 1, 1932 in Kanawha, W.V., son of Roy and Lillian (Welch) Barker of Belle, WV. He served in the U.S. Army and his specialty was boxing. Gene retired in 1994 after serving 40 years as a custodian with the Indian River School District. He loved horse racing, fishing and traveling. In addition to his parents, Gene was pre-deceased Paul Barker by his wife Mary Lee Barker in 1993, his sister Joann Edwards and a stepson David McDaniels. He is survived by his step-daughter, Nancy J. Ireland of Dover; a stepson, Bobby McDaniels of Smyrna; his sister, Patty McClelland of Rutland, Ohio; and a host of grandchildren and great grandchildren. Funeral services were held at Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, DoddCarey Chapel in Georgetown. Interment followed in Union Cemetery, Georgetown. Online condolences may be sent to: condolences@parsellfuneralhomes.com.

Ethel M. Elliott, 83

Ethel M. Elliott, of Delmar, died Friday, Aug. 31, 2007 at her home in Delmar. Mrs. Elliott was born and raised in Laurel. She was a daughter of Edgar and Laura O’Neal. She retired from Deer’s Head Hospital in 1986 from the dietary department after 18 years of service. She was known for her cake decorating. She was an active member of First Baptist Church in Delmar for 41 years. Her husband of 60 years, Fred Elliott, died in 2001. She is survived by two daughters and sons-in-law, Frances and Arthur Abbott, of Milford and Linda and David Hastings of

Raymond Lee Parsons of Federalsburg, Md., passed away on Monday, Aug. 27, 2007 at Memorial Hospital in Easton, Md. He was born Feb. 2, 1937 in Salisbury, Md., the son of the late James M. and Edna Smack Parsons. He was employed by Acme Market for 21 years and had served as the former manager of the Federalsburg Acme Market. He was also a route salesman for Schmidt Baking Company for 23 years. He was a faithful supporter of Park Lane Church of God in Federalsburg. He is survived by his beloved wife of 51 years, Priscilla Tull Parsons, whom he married on June 9, 1956; loving father to three children, Ray Parsons and his wife, Trish, Janice Raymond Parsons Todd and her husband Roland, all of Federalsburg, and Kathi Dulin and her husband J.W., of Harmony; 11 grandchildren, Cory Parsons, Sarah Robinson, Crystal Rosario (Martin), Justin (Janet), Brooks, Nathan and Bethany Todd, Christian, Mandy, Courtney and Brittany Dulin; 15 great-grandchildren, Christopher, Esiah, Hannah, and Nathaniel Rosario, Cameron Parsons, Aaron and Landon Todd, Liam Todd, Kalea and Niomi Robinson, Ethan Toomey, Dylan Wheatley, Lindsay Breeding, and Alexis Fugate; 1 great-greatgranddaughter, Ryleigh Breeding; a brother, James S. Parsons and his wife Mildred of Delmar, Del.; a sister-in-law, Janet Esham of Fruitland, Md.; and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held on Aug. 30 at the Park Lane Church of God in Federalsburg. His son, Bishop Ray C. Parsons and Rev. Keith Colona officiated. Interment followed in Hillcrest Cemetery in Federalsburg. Contributions may be made in his memory to Park Lane Church of God, P.O. Box 235, Federalsburg, MD 21632.

Jeanette Viola Welch Beard, 73

Jeanette Viola Welch Beard left our home and hearts and was received by God on Aug. 16, 2007, after an extended battle with cancer and COPD. Mrs. Beard was born at home Aug. 18, 1933 in Laurel. Upon graduation from Laurel High School in 1951, she was trained at the Milford Memorial School of Nursing. She began a 28-year work relationship at Milford Hospital starting in 1966 until her forced retirement in 1994 caused by surgery, radiation and decline in health. Her service to Milford Hospital included 2 West Floor Nurse, Emergency Room, and Triage. After many notable achievements and volunteer contributions, she was awarded “Nurse of the Year for 1989.” As a medical professional, Jeanette touched the hearts of many patients and staff during her Jeanette Beard career. She was an inspiration to all. Her gracious spirit, selfless heart, and bubbly personality set her apart from many. Her legacy will continue long after her leaving us and live within the hearts of all with whom she came in contact. She especially enjoyed dancing, bowling, flower arranging crafts, cross stitch, her Gnome collection, singing as a mem-

ber of Sweet Adeline’s International, a member of the Laurel Alumni Association, the sun, beach, birds and wildlife. Relaxing times included watching NASCAR, TV Food Networks, and game shows along with reading, Audio Books and the laptop computer allowing her to reach family, friends and new-found friends on the internet. Most of all, she loved being able to travel in the RV seeing new places, friends and family. Preceding Jeanette in death was her father, James Ervan Welch; her mother, Sallie O’Neal Welch White; and stepfather, Fred White; father and mother-in-law, Carroll F. Beard, Sr. and wife, Eva. Also, dear to her heart, her beloved Yorkie “Skeeter.” Surviving and lovingly remembered by her husband of 53 years, Donald F. Beard, Sr.; son, Donald F. Beard, Jr. and wife Lauri; son, Tawn F. Beard, Sr. and wife, Joanne; daughter, Lisa Beard Johnson; brother, Quentin V. Welch and wife Mary; nine grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren; as well as many other family and friends. Sadly missed by “Punkin” and “Buhbuh” her Yorkie companions. A private viewing was held on Friday, Aug. 17 at Holloway Funeral Home in Salisbury, Md. Memorial gifts and contributions in Jeanette’s memory may be made to Milford Memorial Hospital, c/o Jeanette Beard, Nursing Memorial Fund, Cancer Research, a Hospice of your choice or Mount Olivet Church, Seaford. Arrangements were in the care of Holloway Funeral Home and Crematorium Professional Association, Salisbury, MD 21804. You are asked to join us at the


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007 Nanticoke River Yacht Club, Blades, on Saturday, Sept. 22, from 7-9 p.m. for a Memorial Tribute, remembrance and celebration of Jeanette’s Life. (In the event of location change, updated information will be available by contacting dfbeard@earthlink.net for the “Celebration of (her) Life.” The address of her Internet website will be provided for this purpose and to add your comments and sign the guestbook.

S. Jeanette Bradley, 88

S. Jeanette “Jean” Bradley of Seaford died on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2007 at home. Mrs. Bradley was a homemaker and a member of Wheatley United Methodist Church, the American Legion Post 218 in Sharptown, Md., and a life member of the VFW in Delmar. She was a daughter of Edgar and Florence Wheatley, who predeceased her, and she was also preceded in death by her husband, Claude “Kayo” Bradley, her son Robert Hee, and her brother, Edgar R. Wheatley Jr. Survivors include her grandchildren, Robert Hee of Chalfont, Pa. and Kelli Hee of Horsham, Pa.; her greatgrandson, Christian Hee; her stepson, Harry C. Bradley of Boothwyn, Pa., two stepgrandchildren, Wendy Bradley, and Curt Bradley. Funeral services were on Tuesday, Sept. 4 at the Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford where friends called prior to the services. Burial was in Galestown Cemetery, Galestown, Md. The family suggests donations may be made to Wheatley U. M. Church preserva-

tion fund, c/o Beverly Wheatley, 5833 Wheatley’s Church Rd, Seaford, DE 19973.

Michael L. Eller, age 54

Michael L. Eller of Delmar passed away Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2007 at his home in Delmar, surrounded by his loving family. He was born in Baltimore on Aug. 25, 1953, a son of Arnold A. Eller, who passed in 2001. He worked as a carpenter for various contractors on Delmarva. He was a diehard Oakland Raiders fan and enjoyed spending time with his family. He is survived by his loving companion of more than 22 years, Gloria J. Roberts; his stepmother who raised him, Barbara Eller of Millville; Gloria’s son, Shawn Roberts and his wife Jeanette, and their son, Caden, all of Delmar; Gloria’s mother, Rosalee Atkinson, of Delmar; and a step-sister, Mary Baumgardner and her husband Elmer of Frankford. As per his wishes, there will be no formal services planned. Memorial contributions may be made in his memory to: Coastal Hospice, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, MD 21802. Online condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.shortfh.com.

William J. Baron, 60

William J. Baron of Laurel passed away on Aug 27, 2007 at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. He was a fisherman. He received many citations, which hang on the wall, and his wife is sorry that you will not be seeing him at the river again.

She says he needs someone to catch that big bass that kept breaking his line. Mr. Baron had the form of small cell cancer that comes on suddenly, spreads very quickly, and took him away without warning. He was a hardworking electrician who loved overall maintenance work, so that he could learn to plumb, build and fix most everything. He loved to draw and do woodwork. Bill loved his big black car and the Pittsburg Steelers. He leaves behind his beloved wife, Melanie Baron and their adored dog Cinnamon Rose. He also leaves behind his much loved son, “B.J.” William J. Baron, Jr., Jennifer Tyler and grandson on the way. He also leaves behind his greatly loved nephew, Douglas Young, Jr., and brother-in-law, Douglas Young, Sr. His sister, Rosemary sadly passed away before him. He had many friends, and they will all miss him. There will be a gathering at the Mill Pond in Laurel on Saturday, Sept. 15, at 8 a.m. if you wish to join in saying goodbye. It's the day Bill and Melanie married 10 years ago. His wife thanks all of the well wishers. Arrangements were handled by the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel.

George V. Hitchens, 81

George V. Hitchens, age 81 of Laurel, DE passed away on Sept. 1, 2007 at Peninsula regional Medical Center in Salisbury. George was born in Harrington, DE, a son of the late Louis and Blanche Hitchens. He was a WWII Army Veteran,

PAGE 29 proudly serving as a tank driver under George Patten’s Division in Germany. A member of the American Legion Post #19 in Laurel, VFW Post #8276 Delmar, DE. and Past Governor of the Harrington Moose Lodge #534. He was also a Vestry Member of St. Philips Episcopal Church. George retired from Dolly Madison Ice Cream and was well know for his business: Hitchens Frame Shop in Laurel which he owned and operated. George is survived by a brother Joesph M. Hitchens and his wife Betty of Laurel, DE. A step-son Thomas Phillips of Wyoming, step-daughters Ann Cauffinch and her husband Richard of Salisbury and Kay Jones and her husband Roy of Laurel. Grandchildren: Mark and Scott Phillips, Scott and Cindy Phillips, Shawn Jones, Rob Jones, Garth Jones, Kathy and Paul Adkins and Molly and Raffaeld Dall‚ Evta, a nephew and seven great children. He is proceded in death by his wife Madelyn Hitchens and two sisters. A memorial celebration of his life will be held on Friday Sept. 7. at 11 a.m., at St. Philips Episcopal Church on S. Central Ave in Laurel, DE. Internment will take place in the church columbarium. The Rev. Rita Nelson will officiate. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made in his name to: St. Philips Church 600 South Central Avenue, Laurel, DE or Delaware Hospice 20167 Office Circle Georgetown, DE 19947 or your local Fire Department. Arrangements by the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel.

Mission of Hope joins forces with Celebrate Recovery By Robert Marx Would you rather stay sick and anonymous, or recover and celebrate? Current medical opinion says, ‘once an addict, always an addict.’ The New Testament says you can ‘become a new person’ and actually ‘renew your mind.’ One philosophy says you are cursed, the other says you are blessed. One approach implies shame, the other victory. We all know celebrity rehabs have become a laughing stock. These days, ‘rehab’ is a way to avoid the consequences of your actions, rather than to get rid of your addictions. Meanwhile, many real people quietly leave their addictions behind with the help of faith-based programs. We should be applauding their achievement rather than watching the celebrity failures with morbid curiosity. The newest program to help the Mission of Hope residents in Seaford recover from their addictions is Celebrate Recovery (CR). Using a Biblically based “twelve step” program. CR was started by Senior Pastor John Baker at Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, Calif. As many of you may know, this church was founded by Pastor Rick Warren. Pastor Warren wrote “The Purpose Driven Life,” a New York Times bestseller. CR, which started 16 years ago, and now reaches worldwide, is a natural fit with the Mission of Hope’s bible-based rehabilitation program. Mission Education Director Rev. Charles Whaley challenged Celebrate Recovery teacher Robert Spadaccini to include Mission of Hope residents in the CR program. Pastor Whaley also asked Robert to teach a vocational course at the Mission. Robert’s own problems started in Vietnam. Unknowingly suffering from post-traumat-

ic stress disorder, like many, he turned to substance abuse. He has been clean and sober for 23 years, but he had to do it without a support system. His vision is “to help others and make a difference in their lives.” He admits that he does not have all the answers and he leaves that “totally up to God.” This is where CR comes in. It does not just address addictions but “hurts, habits and hang-ups.” A curriculum of twenty-six lessons creates a formula that everyone in the program can follow. Each session starts with a large group for teaching and testimony, and then the session breaks into smaller gender based groups. This provides a “safe environment” for disclosures. This is especially welcome for women with physical and sexual abuse issues as a result of substance abuse. As Robert says, “men speak more freely with men, women speak more freely with women, and everyone wants to talk to the pastor.” For the nearest CR meeting or to host a group, visit www.CelebrateRecovery.com or Pastor Rick Warren’s website at www.Pastors.com. You can also contact Robert Spadaccini at 302-841-1720. The Mission of Hope provides rehabilitation, education and housing for men who are homeless. The Mission treats the causes of homelessness in order to return these men to a productive life in the community. The Mission needs volunteers with program development or fund raising experience. Contact the Mission at 629-2559, or you can e-mail the Mission at SeafordMission@Verizon.Net, or write to Seaford Mission, PO Box 1271, Seaford, DE 19973. As always, the Mission appreciates all financial help, vehicle donations, and especially your prayers. Robert Marx is a volunteer at the Mission of Hope.

Six-year-olds Hannah Merritt and Jerri Lankford recently donated items purchased with their own money to the Seaford Community Food Closet.

Community Food Closet needs donations The Seaford Community Food Closet, which is housed at St. John’s United Methodist Church, is requesting donations. Historically, donations are high during the fall and winter months, but in the summer the food supply becomes low. Specifically, the following items are needed: children’s juice boxes, bottled juices, canned fruit, small cans of spaghetti sauce, small packages of pancake mix, small bottles of syrup, powdered milk, canned meats, and Jello. At this time, canned vegetables and

soups are not needed. Donations may be dropped off at St. John’s Church office, located on Pine St., Seaford, from 9 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., Tuesdays through Thursdays. The Seaford Community Food Closet serves persons who are referred through social agencies such as the Shipley State Service Center. Volunteers distribute food to clients who have been screened for elegibility by the agency. To volunteer or for more information, call St. John's at 629-9466.


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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Community Bulletin Board Events Littleton Family Reunion

The 34th Annual Minos & Edith Littleton Family Reunion will be Sunday, Sept. 16, from 3-7 p.m. at the John West Park, Ocean View. For more info call Tommy Wilson at 629-2153 or Nancy Smith at 539-3278. Bring a covered dish. Rain date is Sept. 23.

Protecting family and pets

Animal Disaster Services of Delaware will present a program, “How to Protect Your Family and Pets During an Emergency” at Laurel Library on Sept. 11 at 7 p.m. Honor the 6th anniversary of the 9/11 bombing by learning how to cope in times of disaster. No registration required. For more information contact Norma Jean Fowler at 875-3184

Scrapbooking classes

A Creative Memories consultant will offer a series of classes on all aspects of scrapbooking as a fund-raising event for the Friends of the Laurel Public Library. Each class will require a prepaid $15 fee plus the additional cost of supplies. Classes are 3 hours each from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. and will be held on Sept. 29, Oct. 13, Oct. 27, Nov. 10 and Dec. 1. For more information contact Terry at Laurel Public Library at 875-3184.

Capt. John Smith explorations

“Captain John Smith and His Chesapeake Bay Explorations in 1608” Not only did this famed explorer travel the Chesapeake Bay, he also ventured up local tributaries. Dr. Michael Scott of SU’s Geography and Geoscience Department discusses Smith’s journey, which he has re-mapped using modern geographic information system technology. Presentations are: Wednesday, Nov. 7, at 2:30 p.m. Methodist Manor House, 1001 Middleford Road, Seaford, (RSVP to Dixie Carlisle 628-5631). Wednesday, Nov. 14, at 10 a.m. - Scarborough Student Leadership Center, SU campus. For more information about the classes or an annual membership visit the “Learn with SU” Web site at www.salisbury.edu/lifelonglearning.

Swensson presents program

Evelyn Swensson, soprano soloist, pianist, composer, choir master and multitalented performer will present a program in Seaford on Monday, Sept. 10. It will be held at the Manor House at 7 p.m. Swensson will enact the role of the life of Mary Todd Lincoln, wife of president Abraham Lincoln, whose life closely aligns with the period of the Ross Mansion. Swensson has done research on the subject, written the playlet, and will perform after which she will sing and lead the audience in group singing musical numbers of the era with Mary Ann Torkelson as accompanist. The program is open to the public. There is no charge. For more information, call Mary Ellen Farquhar at 629-2336.

Bethel Maritime Fall Festival

The Bethel Maritime Fall Festival will be held Saturday, Oct. 20 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the grounds of the Bethel Historical Society Museum. The festival will start out with a 3-mile recreational walk around the village. A breakfast, catered by the Bethel Market will be from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. with a performance by a gospel group. Food and craft booths will be open at 10 a.m. and entertainment by the Jones Boys will be from noon to 4 p.m. For more information, call Janet Cordrey at 875-3971.

Mystery Dinner Theater

Laurel Wesleyan Church presents a Mystery Dinner Theater, “The Case of the Show-Stopping Nun Nabber,” on Oct. 18 and 19, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets go on sale, Aug. 12. Ticket prices are $20 adults, $10 students 8-18, and $5 childcare for kids seven and under. Proceeds benefit Laurel Wesleyan Youth attending an International Youth Convention. For more information and tickets call the church office at 8755380.

Fall Fitness returns

Come join us in Fitness Classes Mon., Wed., and Fri., at 9 a.m.; Tue. and Thurs. at 5:30 p.m. We start a six-week session the week of Sept. 10 and meet in St. John’s United Methodist Church air conditioned Fellowship Hall in Seaford (sponsored by St. John’s but open to the public). Beginners to intermediate participants welcome in this co-ed, non-competitive, muscle-toning, stretching, high/low aerobic class. Try a free class to see if it meets your needs. Only a 6-8-week commitment at a time required. For more information or to register call Carol Lynch, 629-7539.

Trap Pond volunteers sought

Trap Pond offers free camping in exchange for volunteer services (required for free camping, 24 hours per week of volunteering). Host programs available in the campground, Nature Center, maintenance and administrative. Check out our other awards for short term volunteering. For more information, contact: Glen.Stubbolo @state.de.us or call 302739-1960.

Researching your home’s history

Have you ever wondered who owned your house before you did; or if your house has any historical significance? Did your property belong to Caesar Rodney or one of the other founding fathers of Delaware? On Saturday, Sept. 15, the Sussex County Genealogical Society will kick off its 2007-2008 season and you will have an opportunity to learn how to find your answers. Join us in the Rehoboth Beach Public Library's upstairs meeting room at 10:30 a.m. on Sept. 15. Our meetings are free and open to anyone interested. For more information about our society go to www.scgsdelaware.org.

Senior Center Red Hat Ladies

Help the Red Hat’s raise funds by participating in their Christmas Money 50/25/25 Give Away. Chances are only $1 each or six chances for $5. Chances will

be sold by the Red Hat members and at the front desk of the Nanticoke Senior Center until Dec. 17. Open to the public need not be present to win. The Red Hat’s want to make you a hero - a hero sandwich that is! Order one of their special 6" Italian hero (sub) for only $6 pre-paid at the desk or from a Red Hat member. Sandwiches can be picked up at the front desk beginning at 10 a.m. on Sept. 26. No delivery.

Laurel History Books Still Available

A few copies of the 19th Century History of Laurel, published by the Laurel Historical Society may still be purchased at either the Laurel Town Office, Laurel Public Library, or O’Neal’s Antiques. The price remains at $45 each. For further information or to arrange to have a book mailed please call 875-4217. There is a $5 mailing fee.

Baseball Equipment Needed

Any baseball equipment, used or unused, is needed for an Eagle Scout Project. Equipment will be collected, refurbished, and sent to the Dominican Republic. Contact Kirby Mills via email at terps19947@yahoo.com or call 1-302-6902749 if you can be of any assistance.

Teen volunteer opportunities

Check out teen volunteer opportunities at the Laurel Public Library. We have an

interesting group of teens in grades 7-12 from all over the area. They plan programs, perform skits, help with crafts and help with program set-up. Some teens help us by keeping our books in order and assist with getting our books ready to be checked out. For more information, contact Becky Norton at 875-3184 or by email at bshortri@lib.de.us.

Free Equine barn tour

Free Equine (Horse) Barn Tour, Thursday, Sept 20, at 5:45 p.m., hosted by Wicked R Productions of Wyoming, and co-hosted by the Delaware Equine Council. Come see a working ranch, gain new found knowledge about horses in the 1st State and lots more. RSVP is requested by Sept 14. Call Stan 302-684-3966, or Paula 629-5233. Everyone is welcome.

Historical Society 30th anniversary To celebrate the 30th year anniversary of the Laurel Historical Society three events have been organized . The kick off event is a wine and cheese reception on Friday, Oct. 12 from 7 until 9 p.m. at the Cook House, 502 East 4th Street, Laurel. An “Antique Appraisal Fair” will be held at St. Phillips Church from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Cost is $5, includes one appraisal. Sunday, Oct. 3 is a wine and cheese social followed by a candle-light dinner. For more information call 875-4217.

DELMAR VFW POST 8276

Super Bingo Every Tuesday! ER WINN ALL TAKE Game

za Bonan 0 . 0 0 $100 t! o Jackp

Tickets On Sale Tuesday Night

Delmar VFW Bingo 200 W. State St., Delmar, MD

CASH PAYOUT $100* Over 60 People $50* Under 60 People *Based on the number of people No one under the age of 18 allowed to play

TIMES: Doors Open 5:00 p.m. Games 6:45 p.m.

SPECIAL UPCOMING EVENTS

SATURDAY SEPT. 15

SATURDAY SEPT. 22

SUNDAY OCT. 7

9 AM ‘TIL Texas Hold Em

Wild Turkey Federation Banquet

CAR HOP DAY

CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION

9 AM RESERVATION

410-896-3722 or 410-896-3379


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Acorn Club membership tea

The G.F.W.C. Acorn Club of Seaford is having a membership tea at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club on Sept. 13, from 6 to 8 p.m. The hostess is Dian Bush and her committee. Anyone wishing to attend the membership tea and join the club may call Phyllis Nelson 629-9297, or Joyce Whaley, 8757075 for more information.

Safe Boating Class

The Seaford Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12-03 will be teaching the Delaware Safe Boating Course at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club at the Blades Marina. This course will consist of two sessions. You must attend both sessions to complete the course. Sept. 15th and 22nd, 8 a.m. to noon. Cost: $10 per person. To reserve a seat call Dick Bailey 302-4223772. Anyone born after Jan. 1, 1978 must have taken a boating education course to operate a boat.

Concert memberships available

Seaford Community Concert Association memberships are available in several categories: family is $95, adult is $45, and student is $12. Patron gifts are also being accepted: friends $25, contributors $50, donors $100 and sustainers $250. Contact Allan Kittita at 629-6184, Mary Ann Torkelson at 536-1384, or Sherry Wix at 629-2131 if you are interested in obtaining a membership or giving a patron gift.

St. John's UMC house tour

The St. John's United Methodist Women will sponsor the annual house tour on Thursday, Oct. 4, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Seven homes and the Woodland United Methodist Church will be open for visitors. A chicken salad luncheon will be served that day from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in fellowship hall. The cost of a ticket for the house tour is $10. The luncheon cost is $6 per person. For ticket information please call Teresa Wilson at 629-6417.

A Day of Remembrance for 9/11

Boys & Girls Club Basket Bingo

Laurel Boys & Girls Club Basket Bingo on Thursday, Oct. 11, tickets are $20 in advance, $25 at the door. Door prize: 16 pc. pottery set. Raffles: Horizon of Hope and Christmas '07 baskets. Bingo will be held at the Laurel Boys & Girls Club, on Central Ave. in Laurel. Call Chris 8751200 or Karen 628-3789 for ticket information.

Vera Bradley & Basket Bingo

The Ritual Team of Seaford Moose Lodge #1728 will host a Bingo featuring Vera Bradley bags and Longaberger Baskets on Monday, Sept. 17, at 7 p.m. Each game will alternate between bags and baskets. Door prizes featuring the Vera Bradley 21” Wheelaround Weekender and the Longaberger Medium Wash Day Basket will be given at the end of the night. The doors will open at 6 p.m. at the Seaford Moose Lodge located at 22759 Bridgeville Highway, Seaford. Tickets are $20 in advance, $25 at the door. Food and refreshments available. Call David or Travis Sirman at 875-3792 or Seaford Moose Lodge at 629-8408 to reserve your tickets or for information.

Yard and Bake Sale

On Saturday, Sept. 8, a giant Yard Sale and Bake Sale, will take place at Christ Lutheran Church, Seaford, from 7 a.m.- 1 p.m. There will also be scrapple sandwiches, chicken barbecue, and much more.

National Library Card Sign-up

September is National Library Card Sign-Up Month and the Laurel Public Library is joining the celebration with a special incentive for all area adult residents who do not as yet have a Delaware library card. Library cards are available to residents who can provide current photo ID and proof of Delaware residency such as a valid drivers’ license, passport, or two pieces of current mail showing same address. All new registrations during the month of September will have their names entered into a drawing for a $25 gift card from Barnes and Noble Bookstore. The drawing will take place on Oct. 2, and the winner will be notified by phone. With all the opportunities that today’s libraries offer, a Delaware library card can truly be the most valuable card in anyone’s wallet.

A Day of Remembrance for 9/11, or Patriot Day, will be observed on Tuesday, Sept. 11 at 7 p.m. at the Greenwood Memorial VFW Post 7478 on Governors Avenue in Greenwood. The program, prepared by the Ladies Auxiliary, is entitled “Where Were You When The World Stopped Turning”, and it features a series of personal remembrances and reflections. The public is invited to attend this solemn service. Light refreshments will be served.

DuPont 25-year dinner

National POW/MIA Recognition

Little Miss Apple Scrapple

The Greenwood Memorial VFW and its Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Post 7478 on Governors Avenue in Greenwood, will mark National POW/MIA Recognition Day on Saturday, Sept. 22 at 7 p.m. with memorial services. The public is invited to attend this unique memorial service. For more information contact Pres. Michaele Russell at (302) 349-4220.

Introduction to Square Dancing

The Sussex Whirl-a-ways Square Dance Club will be offering three free nights of beginning level square dancing on Wednesday evenings, Sept.12, 19, at the Presbyterian Church, 203 North Bedford St., Georgetown. The times will be from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. For more information contact Willard or Chris at 629-5530.

The annual 25-year dinner for DuPont employees will be held Friday, Sept. 7, at the Laurel Fire Department. Anyone who has not received a letter and who wishes to attend, call Ray Whaley at 537-6113 or Connie Keene at 629-3377. Join in the excitement of the second annual Little Miss Apple-Scrapple Pageant. The pageant is open to girls between the ages of 5-8 who reside in the Woodbridge School District. Each contestant will have the opportunity to share her talent and personality. All proceeds from the pageant will benefit the Apple-Scrapple Scholarship Fund. For more information or to request an application packet contact Rita Hovermale at 337-8318 or rhovermale@wsd.k12.de.us. Tickets for the pageant will be available at the door for $2 each.

Walk for Breast Cancer Drawing

Local Avon representative Renee Smith will be participating in the Avon Walk for Breast Cancer this year. Tickets are being sold for a drawing to help send Smith to the event. The prize will be a 2007

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Longaberger Horizon of Hope Basket with 2 pink mugs or an Avon gift basket. Tickets are a donation of $5 each or three for $13 and 300 are available. For more information or to purchase tickets, contact Renee Smith at 337-0352 or to just make a donation, go to www.avonwalk.org and click on Renee Smith. The drawing will take place on Sept. 15.

Class of 1977 Reunion

The Laurel Senior High School Class of 1977 will be celebrating their 30th year class reunion on Oct. 20. The reunion will be held at the Laurel Fire Department's auditorium. For more information, call Susan (Tull) Collins at 410-943-8303 or Barry Munoz at 875-7408.

Meetings

Friends of the Bridgeville Library

Georgetown's Lions Club meeting

Georgetown's Lions Club will meet Sept. 11, at Bonanza Family Restaurant, Mid Sussex Shopping Center, Millsboro, with a dinner meeting beginning at 6:30 p.m. The guest speaker will be Becky Madden, Marketing and Personal Relations from the Sussex County Senior Services/CHEER Home Services. Reminisce about 9/11 will be included. Visiting Lions and potential members are welcomed but should call Helen Wilson at 856-2972 or the Rev. Charles Covington at 855-1160.

MOAA meeting dates

meeting will be held in December 2007 or June, July and August 2008. The speaker for the Sept. 18 meeting will be Mr. George Parish, Clerk of the Peace for Sussex County. The luncheon will be held at LaRosa Negra at 1201 Savannah Road in Lewes, at 11:45 a.m. The cost of the buffet is $12 including tip. Reservations are not required. MOAA is a non-profit veterans’ association dedicated to maintaining a strong national defense and to preserving the earned entitlements of members of the uniformed services and their families and survivors. Membership is open to those who hold or have ever held a warrant or commission in any service to include Public Health Services and NOAA and their surviving spouses.

The Southern Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) announces the meeting dates for 20072008. Meeting dates are as follows: Sept. 18, Oct. 16, Nov. 20; Jan. 15, 2008, Feb. 19, March 18, April 15, and May 20. No

The Friends of the Bridgeville Library will be meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 11, at 7 p.m., at St. Mary’s Parish Hall. Topics will include fundraising ideas, library advocacy, future events and membership. Everyone is invited to attend and to bring a friend. For directions or special needs contact Karen Johnson at 337-7401.

Genealogical Society meets

The Sussex County Genealogical Society meets the third Saturday of each month between September and May. The meetings are held at the Rehoboth Beach Public Library's upstairs meeting room and begin at 10:30 a.m. Each month will feature a special topic of interest for discussion. The Society's web site is www.scgsdelaware.org

AARP Chapter 1084 meeting

AARP Seaford Area Chapter 1084 membership meeting Thursday, Sept. 13,

B eth el M a ritim e

Fa ll Festiva l Join all your friends at the

Bethel Maritime Festival on October 20, 2007 from 10 to 4 pm . A 3-mile walk followed by breakfast catered by the Bethel Market is planned. There will be antique cars, trucks, vendors, crafts and food. There will be a variety of entertainment including the Jones Boys. Any questions, call 875-3971 or 875 0647

If you have not already reserved you r space, please do so by calling 302-87 5-397 1 or by m ailing the vendor fee of $25 to P O B ox 189, B ethel, D E 19931


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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

at 1:30 p.m. at the Methodist Manor House Fellowship Hall. Lucretia Young, State Director of AARP Delaware, is guest speaker. Seaford area includes all of western Sussex County. Yearly chapter dues are $5. Must be National AARP member to join. Ages 50 plus are welcome. Refreshments served. Call Helen Skjoldager, chapter president, 875-5086 for information.

H.A.P.P.E.N. Meeting

SCWDC Meeting

Cancer Support Group

The Sussex County Women's Democrat Club will hold its regular monthly meeting at 5:30 p.m. on Sept. 20, at Sussex Pines Country Club, Georgetown. The guest speaker will be a representative from the Solid Waste Authority. Members are asked to bring a friend and newcomers are always welcome. Dinner will cost $13 per person. For details and reservations, call Thelma Monroe, president at 934-9716.

Marine Corps League

The Marine Corps League meets the first Thursday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at the Log Cabin in Seaford.

Sons of Confederate Veterans

The Maj. Gen. Arnold Elzey Camp #1940, Sons of Confederate Veterans meets the first Wednesday of each month in the lower level of the Salisbury Library at 7 p.m.

Trap Pond Partners

Trap Pond Partners’ monthly meeting will be held at the park's Nature Center, the second Wednesday of each month. Anyone who is interested in Trap Pond State Park is invited to attend. For more information feel free to call 875-5153.

H.A.P.P.E.N., Hearns Pond Association for its preservation, protection, enhancement and naturalization, will hold its next scheduled meeting on Sept. 13, at 7 p.m., at the Seaford Museum on High Street. The agenda will cover the historical marker dedication, national wildlife community progress, Hearns Pond Dam, annexation, and traffic issues.

The Wellness Community-Delaware is offering a support group for people affected by cancer and their loved ones at the Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. The group meets at the Cancer Care Center on the third Thursday of the month from 4:30 to 6 p.m. To register for this program or for more information call Kaye or Lori at 645-9150. All programs at The Wellness Community are free of charge for people affected by cancer and their loved ones.

Toastmasters

Toastmasters of Southern Delaware meets every second and fourth Thursday of the month in Bay Shore Community Church at 6 p.m. Develop your public speaking skills in a supportive environment. Contact Joy Slabaugh at 846-9201, or joy@estfinancial.com.

Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla

Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12-04 meets the second Thursday of each month at Nanticoke Yacht Club in Blades. Call Wayne Hickman at 629-6337 for details.

The Child Craft Co. Preschool • Kindergarten • Primary (302) 629-5411 (302) 629-7994

‘The Christmas Show’ trip

Trips Tech Adult Plus+ trips

Active seniors can broaden their horizons this September with a variety of trips and activities sponsored by the Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus, Georgetown. Travel to the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York, take a Tangier Island tour, or visit the historic Occoquan Craft Show. Spend a day in New York City on Sept. 12. On Sept. 15, enjoy a cruise around New York City, or see Johnny Mathis in concert at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia on Sept. 16. For more information on these and other Adult Plus+ offerings, or to register, call 856-5618.

Senior Center Museum Trip

On Tuesday, Sept. 25, at 8 a.m., a trip to the Holocaust Museum, Washington, D.C. will be taken. Cost is $35 for members; $45 for non-members. Trip includes motor coach transportation, tip for bus driver, and dinner on the way home. Sign up early for limited seating. Call 629-4939.

Baltimore National Aquarium

On Oct. 9, at 8:30 a.m., a trip to Baltimore Inner Harbor National Aquarium will be taken. Cost is $42 for members; and $52 for non-members. Trip includes motor coach transportation, tip for bus driver, admission to Baltimore Aquarium, and admission to the dolphin show. (Meals on your own).

AARP Chapter #5340 of Georgetown is offering a trip to see “The Christmas Show” at the American Music Theatre at Lancaster, Pa. Show time is from 3 to 5 p.m. The bus leaves Georgetown Square, East Market Street, Dec. 14, at 8 a.m. and returns approximately 9:30 p.m. The cost for each person is $89, which includes lunch at Miller's Smorgasbord Restaurant. Registration and payment is due Oct. 15. Call Hilda Parker at 8562760. Everyone welcome.

Trip to Vermont

Methodist Manor House will host a fall trip to Vermont on Oct. 17-20. This fourday, three-night trip features a luncheon at the Trapp Family Lodge among many other exciting features. Your cost of $440 per person (double occupancy) includes lodging, most meals, motor coach transportation, all taxes and gratuities and luggage handling. To register or for more information, call Dixie Carlisle at 628-5631. Only a few seats left.

AARP Chapter 915 trip

AARP Chapter 915 presents Kutsher’s Country Club in the Catskill Mountains of New York State, three days-two nights, Sept. 18-20, for only $340, per person, double occupancy. $60 additional single supplement. Included in the price: Two night accommodations in super deluxe rooms at Kutsher’s, two full breakfasts, two lunches and two complete dinners. For information and reservations call: 410-754-8588, Pick-up will be in Denton, Md.; or 410-822-2314, Federalsburg. Travelers insurance is available for purchase.

20TH ANNUAL PIG PICKIN!! A Fundraiser For State Representative

26380 Seaford Rd. Seaford, DE 19973

Problem Solving Resources for: Classrooms, Sunday Schools, Child Care Centers, Birthdays, Scouting

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Checks Payable to: Friends For Lee PO Box 186, Bethel, DE 19931 Tickets available at Richard Small Insurance, Central Ave. or At The Door


Senior Center's Myrtle Beach trip

Nanticoke Senior Center's Myrtle Beach Trip on Oct. 15-20, 6 days and 5 nights, cost $790 double occupancy. Deposit of $200 is due upon signing. Final payment due no later than Sept. 7. Trip includes: A visit to the Alabama Theatre, The Carolina Opry, Brookgreen Gardens Guided Tour, Carolin Elegance Tour, and Historic Georgetown, S.C. Dinner choices at The Parson's Table, Ryan's Steak House, and The Chestnut Hill Restaurant. All tips and gratuities. For information and sign-ups: call 6294939.

Trip to Washington D.C.

The Seaford Historical Society is sponsoring a trip to the National Museum of the American Indian and the Washington National Cathedral on Wednesday, Oct. 24. The bus will depart from the Sears parking lot at 7:30 a.m. and leave Washington at approximately 4 p.m. to return home. The cost is $55 for members and $70 for non-members (includes one year membership). Reservations can be made by calling Helen Ann Smith 629-8802 before Sept. 15.

Foxwoods & Mohegan Casinos The Seaford AARP 1084 is having a trip to Connecticut, on Oct. 8-10. We will be staying at Foxwood and visiting Mohegan Sun. Even if you don’t gamble, these are must see resorts. Included are three meals plus more. The cost is $239 for three days. Contact Rose Wheaton at 629-7180. Medieval Times Dinner Theatre The Seaford AARP 1084 is having a trip on Oct. 14 to Hanover, Md. The bus leaves Seaford 1:30 p.m. Watch an exciting performance of knights on horses while you enjoy your dinner. Cost is $60. Contact Rose Wheaton at 629-7180. Wheeling Festival Of Lights Seaford AARP 1084 is accepting reservations for a 3-day bus trip to Wheeling, W.Va., Nov. 13-15 for the Festival of Lights. The trip includes two nights lodging at Wheeling Island Casino Hotel, two full course breakfasts, two dinners including a holiday dinner show, Oglebay Park festival of lights tour, Colonel Oglebay's mansion museum, Glass museum, Kruger Street toy & train museum, Winter Fantasy displays and Greyhound racing at Wheeling Island race track. Cost is $335 per person. Call Margaret Wootten at 629-7419.

Mon. - Sat. 10 am - 5:30 pm Sunday 12 pm - 4 pm

CHEER hosting dinner club

Breakfast Cafe

VFW 4961 Breakfast Cafe, open Monday-Friday, 7-10 a.m., Seaford VFW, Middleford Road, to benefit Veterans Relief Fund.

NARFF luncheon

Chapter 1992 (Georgetown) of the National Association of Active and Retired Federal Employees will begin their 200708 season with a covered dish luncheon on Monday, Sept. 17, beginning at noon at the home of Les and Betty Martens, 9298 Middleford Road, Seaford. For directions to the Martens’ home, call 629-9789. Reservations are requested by Sept. 10. Beverages and dessert will be provided as well as place settings.

Old Seaford Block Watch

Olde Seaford Block Watch invites everyone to a covered dish dinner, Monday, Sept. 17 at 6:30 p.m. at the Seaford Police Station. Program: October clean up project; updates on properties. Drinks and desserts will be furnished. Call 629-5643 on information or ride. Biff Lee, 40th District Representative, invites everyone to his 20th annual “PigPickin” at the Laurel Fire Hall on Saturday, Sept. 8, from 4 till 7 p.m. All-you-can-eat barbecued pork and all the “fixins” will be available. Children under age 12 accompanied by an adult are free. Price is $15 and tickets are available at Richard Small Insurance, or at the door. You may also send checks for tickets to Friends for Lee, Post Office Box 186, Bethel, DE. 19931.

Chicken & dumpling dinner

The 35th District Democrat Committee will sponsor their annual chicken & dumplings dinner on Saturday, Sept. 8, at the Bridgeville Fire Hall, Market Street, Bridgeville. Dinner will begin promptly at 6 p.m. There will be several Democrat officials to address the audience. Tickets are $20 each and should be purchased in advance. For more information or tickets, call 628-4563.

Delmar Church of God sale

Delmar Church of God of Prophecy, Rt. 13 N. and Dorothy Road (3 miles north of Md/DE state line) is holding a sandwich sale on Saturday, Sept. 8, from 9 a.m. till ?, featuring oyster sandwiches, crab cakes, soft crabs, cheese steak stubs, hamburgers, hot dogs and more, also baked goods and yard sale.

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Looking for a nice place to have a good dinner? Join us at the Greenwood CHEER Center every Wednesday evening for our weekly dinner club. The CHEER Greenwood Center is located at 12713 Sussex Hwy., Greenwood, and the public is welcomed. Each week there will be a delicious dinner offered for the price of $4 per person for individuals over 60+ years. For more information call the center at 302-349-5237 or visit the CHEER website at www.cheerde.com.

Harvest Moon dinner

Shine on, Shine on Harvest Moon! Everyone is invited to the CHEER at Greenwood for their Harvest Moon Dinner. This dinner is scheduled for Wednesday, Sept. 26, beginning at 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The center is located at 12713 Sussex

PAGE 33 Highway, Greenwood. Musical entertainment will be provided by Donnie Hopkins, a favorite local talent. This will be an enchanting evening for everyone. For more information call Susan at 302-349-5937.

Art of pairing beer with cheese

Sample and discuss five beers and complementary gourmet cheeses with SU alumnus Nick “The Baltimore Beer trekker” Nichols. Admission is $10 per person. Friday, October 26, at 3 p.m. - Methodist Manor House, 1001 Middleford Road, Seaford (RSVP to Dixie Carlisle 628-5631).

Camille CARDS & GIFTS N E WU!C T S Beckman P R O D Bath & Body Yankee Candles Lang FOR ALL OCCASIONS

DONNA SHARP HANDBAGS

Calendars

Submit Bulletin Board items by noon, Thursday. Send to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, email to editor@mspublications. com or drop off at 628 West Stein Hwy., Seaford.

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Biff Lee ‘Pig-Pickin’

AARP Chapter 1084 trips

Shop

Food

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

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PAGE 34

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 -12, 2007

Entertainment SU annual Fun Day to feature carnival theme

SU’s annual Fun Day includes a “Fire and Ice” demonstration complete with explosions and ice cream in Devilbliss Auditorium.

It’s time for Salisbury University’s Fun Day 2007. On Saturday, Sept. 15, this year’s circus-themed event features two shows by the amazing acrobats of the nationally renowned Zany Umbrella Circus. At 12:30 and 2 p.m., they perform their trapeze tricks, fire juggling and rope walking on the Fun Day Green. Many other hands-on activities are part of this annual educational festival and funfilled celebration of learning. From 11 a.m. - 3 p.m., family and children of all ages are invited to discover something new. Another highlight is the SU Chemistry Department’s annual packed-house “Fire and Ice” demonstration, complete with explosions and ice cream at 11:30 a.m. in Devilbliss Auditorium. Most activities are on the Fun Day Green-the expanse of lawn between the Rt. 13 parking lot and Henson Science Hall. There will be an inflatable moon bounce and obstacle course, arts and crafts such as the Ward Museum’s duck carving with child-safe tools, games, free prizes, carnival snacks, a chance to be photographed with SU’s Sammy the Sea Gull, and much more! A hayride provides tours of the cam-

pus, stopping at Fulton Hall where families may enjoy more crafts, exhibits and demonstrations like glass-blowing. Children are encouraged to bring sneakers to play with the “big kids” during sports clinics, or a bathing suit to take a dip in SU’s pool. During Fun Day, SU students, faculty and staff demonstrate some of their unique talents, from using geographic information systems to take aerial photographs to playing in the Watershed Blues Band, one of this year’s many live music performances. But more importantly, the festival offers an interactive environment where children may experience things they have never tried before. Coming to campus from the community are organizations including the Wicomico County Sheriff’s Office and its K-9 unit and the Salisbury Zoo with live animals for youngsters and the brave-of-heart of all ages. Delmarva Broadcasting also returns to provide treats and tunes with its free ice cream truck. All Fun Day activities are free and the public is invited. For more information, call 410-5436324 or visit www.salisbury.edu/funday.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 -12, 2007

PAGE 35

Entertainment Bulletins Film society holds fundraiser

The Art House Theater, located in theater #14 at the Movies at Midway in Rehoboth Beach, returns with quality, independent films. The following films will be shown thru Nov. Sept. 7 - 20, A Mighty Heart (2007, 100 minutes, Rated R) Sept 21 - Oct 4, Once (2007, 85 minutes, Rated R) Oct 5 – 18, La Vie En Rose (2007, 140 minutes, Rated PG-13) Oct 19 - Nov 1, Becoming Jane (2007, 120 minutes, Rated PG) A pre-festival kick-off celebration for the annual Rehoboth Film Society festival will be held on Saturday, Sept. 15 at 6:30 p.m. at the Grinstead-Pirkey residence in Rehoboth Beach. The final date to purchase tickets is Monday, Sept. 10. This fundraiser will feature clips of the RBFS Tenth Anniversary Commemorative Film, a sneak-peek at this year’s Festival, hors d’oeuvres, and an open bar. Tickets are $135 per person; purchases can be made by calling the Film Society office at 645-9095 ext. 1.

Chejere performs at SU

Blend traditional Mexican music with a bit of Caribbean beat and Afro-Latin rhythms and it creates…a woodpecker? The name may be a bit offbeat, but the band Chéjere (Mexican for “woodpecker”) offers just that 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 12, in the Wicomico Room of the Guerri-

eri University Center at Salisbury University. Upon forming Chéjere, the band’s six musicians sought to represent the stories that bring together Mexico City and the country’s Veracruz region. Performing in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, which begins Saturday, Sept. 15, Chéjere’s concert follows a special dinner 5-7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 12, in the Bistro of the Commons. Cost of the dinner is $9.68, $5.95 for children 6-12, free for children 5 and under. The band’s performance is part of the SU Ambassador Series. Admission is free and the public is invited. For more information, call 410-6774685 or visit www.salisbury.edu.

Civil rights author to speak at SU

From the Montgomery bus boycott to the March on Washington, award-winning author Juan Williams tells the stories of people who changed the course of history in his bestseller “Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Years, 1954-1965.” Williams visits Salisbury University to discuss the book, and those 11 tumultuous civil rights years, at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18, in Holloway Hall Auditorium. His talk is part of SU’s “African American Cultural Celebration” fall events series, which highlights the life and work of influential African Americans. One of America’s leading journalists, Williams is a senior correspondent for National Public Radio, and former host of the NPR program Talk of the Nation. In addition, he serves as a political analyst for the

Fox News channel, and has appeared on programs including Nightline, Oprah and CNN’s Crossfire. Williams is an Emmy award-winning TV documentary writer who also spent 21 years as a reporter with The Washington Post. His talk compliments the SU screening of Eyes on the Prize, the critically acclaimed 14-part PBS

documentary of true stories from the Civil Rights era. The series begins Tuesday, Sept. 4, and continues on Mondays through Dec. 3. All films are at 7 p.m. in Caruthers Hall Auditorium. For more information, call 410-6774685 or visit www.salisbury.edu.

Music fest and family fun day to benefit Habitat for Humanity

ern shore of Maryland and Delaware, will play from 6 to closing. Also featured is a hot rod and classic car show, martial arts demonstrations by local children, a boat display, door prizes and refreshments. Habitat’s Executive Director, Kevin Gilmore, commented, “We are grateful to Mr. Wheatley for organizing this benefit, the V.F.W., and all other sponsors of this family fun day which also provides a chance for everyone to contribute to Sussex County Habitat for Humanity’s mission of building simple, decent and affordable houses in safe neighborhoods in partnership with low-income families in Sussex County.” Wheatley commented, “My wife and I believe in helping others and try to give back to our community. We hope others will contribute by participating in this worthy cause.” Local businesses, organizations, clubs, and non-profits are encouraged to participate. For more information about participation, contact Troy Wheatley at 628-8200.

A family fun day, sponsored by Wheatley Homes and Improvements of Seaford, will be held on September 15th from 12 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Veterans of Foreign Wars building on Middleford Road in Seaford. Sponsored by Wheatley’s Home Improvements of Seaford, a building and contracting company known for custom building and renovations of residential and commercial properties on the eastern shore of Maryland and lower Delaware, the music fest will benefit Sussex County Habitat for Humanity. Donating their talents on stage from 12 to 2 p.m. playing acoustical guitar is soloist Trevor Young from the Chowderfoot band whose members are from the Seaford-Laurel area. Described as high energy rock from the seventies, eighties and nineties, the band Rampage from Delmar, will play from 2 to 6 p.m. The Missing, known for playing classic and modern rock throughout the east-

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PAGE 36

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Police Police investigate home invasion

Delaware State Police are investigating a home invasion robbery that occurred on Aug. 31 at 12:05 a.m. in the 31000 block of Janice Rd., Whispering Pines Mobile Home Park, Lewes after 911 was called reporting a robbery. Investigators learned that three victims, a 51year-old Lewes woman (who resided at the residence), 37-year-old Seaford woman and 19year-old Seaford man (who were visiting) were inside the residence playing cards when a fourth victim, a 21-year-old Lewes man, entered the home to visit. As the fourth victim entered the home, he was approached from behind by a black male suspect who apparently stuck something in his back and told him to get inside the residence. This transpired on the front doorstep as the victim was walking into the house. Two other white male suspects entered the residence unlawfully along with the black male suspect and confronted the victims in the kitchen. The black male suspect, who was armed with a handgun demanded money from the homeowner. The remaining suspects were armed with a baseball bat and stun gun. The victim complied and turned over an undisclosed amount of cash and jewelry to the robber. As the suspects were fleeing the residence, the white male suspect armed with a stun gun stunned the fourth victim in the left arm. The victim was not injured. The suspects fled the residence on foot. Suspect # 1 was a black male, 18 to 25 years of age, 5’7”, medium build, wearing black pants, black shirt and a cream colored bandana over his face. Suspect #2 and #3 were described as white males, 18 to 25 years of age, 5’10” to 6’, medium build wearing black pants, black shirt and a black bandana over their faces. No one was injured in the incident. Anyone with information on this crime is urged to call investigators at Troop #4 at 856-5850 ext. 216 or Crime Stoppers at 800-TIP-3333.

Investigation concludes with arrest

On Monday, Aug. 27, members of the Delaware State Police Sussex County Drug Task Force (DTF) concluded a two month drug investigation, which led to the arrest of Christopher D. Snively, 23, of the 21000 block of Greenway Place, Georgetown. The investigation began after members of DTF received information that Christopher Snively had been selling marijuana in the GeorgeSNIVELY town area. On Monday, Aug. 27, at approximately 5:20 p.m., members of DTF and Governor’s Task Force (GTF) observed Snively arrive in the parking lot of J.W. Pickles restaurant in Georgetown. Members of DTF and GTF observed Snively exit his 1998 Red Ford F-150 truck with a white plastic baggie in his hand. Snively was approaching another subject in the parking lot when detectives contacted him. Snively allegedly dropped the plastic baggie and was taken into custody. The baggie contained suspected marijuana. During the investigation, detectives executed a search warrant at the 21000 block of Greenway Place in Georgetown, (Snively’s residence) and seized approximately $12,000 in suspected drug proceeds (US currency). Another search warrant was executed at the home of Daniel L. Milburn, 22, of the 14000 block of Cokesbury Rd., Georgetown. During that search, police seized a small amount of marijuana, drug para-

phernalia (glass pipes and bongs), and two Dyno Mighty Mites fireworks. Milburn was arrested on three counts of possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of marijuana and possession of fireworks. Milburn was summoned to appear for arraignment at Justice of the Peace Court #4 on Sept. 19, and released. A third search warrant was executed on Snively’s truck. The search revealed a black lock box behind the seat, which contained marijuana, small baggies of suspected marijuana, a pill container with suspected cocaine, mushrooms, and a substance that appeared to be hashish, razor blades, extra baggies, a digital scale and several pills. As a result of this investigation, detectives seized approximately 316.8 grams of marijuana, 25 grams of mushrooms, 2.9 grams powder cocaine, 4.7 grams Hashish, multiple prescription pills, digital scale, and numerous plastic baggies. Drug proceeds in the amount of $11,972 were also seized along with Snively’s red Ford F-150. Snively was charged with one count of trafficking illegal drugs (mushrooms); one count of possession with intent to deliver (PWITD)-marijuana; one count of PWITD-mushrooms; one count of PWITD-hashish; one count of maintaining a vehicle for keeping controlled substances; four counts of possession of narcotics; and three counts of possession of drug paraphernalia. Snively was committed to Sussex Correctional Institution on $75,000 secured bond, and was released after posting bond.

Nanticoke boater arrested

Fish and Wildlife Enforcement agents arrested William J. Matthews, 45, of 21309 Berlin Rd., Georgetown on Aug. 28 and charged him with operating a vessel under the influence, no navigational lights, disorderly conduct, resisting arrest, unlawful defacing/damage of equipment belonging to the Division, and criminal mischief. After receiving a citizen complaint of a disorderly person drifting in a boat on the Nanticoke River near the Delaware-Maryland state line, agents found Matthews and another person in a 15-ft.Funcraft, and observed several beer cans floating in the water near the vessel. Agents detected a strong odor of alcohol on Matthews, who became disorderly, refused to comply with the agents and began resisting arrest. Agents then attempted field sobriety tests which the defendant refused. While the Agents were processing Matthews, he again became disorderly by attempting to pull the restraining bolt from the wall in the Sussex Enforcement Office. Matthews was arraigned at Justice of the Peace Court 3 and committed to Sussex Correctional Institute, in default of a $2,800 secured bond. For more information, contact Sgt. Greg Rhodes, Fish and Wildlife Enforcement, at 302739-9913 or 302-542-6102.

Police recover stolen electronics

Delaware State Police detectives assigned to the property crimes unit at Troop 4 recently concluded a year long investigation into several thefts of electronic equipment from Video Flicks, Aaron’s Rentals and three Rent-A-Center stores in Georgetown, Milford, and Millsboro. Detectives were initially contacted by the Rent-A-Center company in June of last year about an alleged theft of electronics by several suspects. Detectives learned that Rent-A Center had been the victim of numerous thefts totaling approximately $46,950. During the investigation, detectives identified William E. Hudson, 54, of Frankford as the alleged organizer of the

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007 theft ring. Hudson allegedly enlisted several of his friends and family members to assist him in obtaining expensive electronic items from RentA-Center stores in Georgetown, Milford, and Millsboro. Hudson allegedly sold the stolen items for profit. During the investigation, state police detectives learned that the Video Flicks store in Selbyville had also been victimized by Hudson and his associates. As with the Rent-A-Center incidents, Hudson had rented property, and also had friends and family rent property. None of the property was returned or paid for. Delaware State Police detectives also learned that Aaron’s Rentals in Seaford had been victimized by Hudson in a similar fashion. During their investigation police learned that the Rent-A-Center stores were victimized between 7-11-06 and 6-8-07 and lost a total of $46,949.93 in property. Video Flicks was victimized between 9-9-06 and 4-2-07 and lost a total of $19,592.67 in property. Aaron’s Rentals was victimized between 1215-06 and 2-19-07 and lost a total of $3,452.99 in property. A total of 84 items were stolen in the above thefts, which consisted of LCD flat screen televisions, plasma televisions, large screen projection televisions, and laptop computers. The following individuals were arrested during this investigation: William Hudson, 54, of Frankford was arrested on three counts of felony theft, and three counts of second degree conspiracy. Hudson was committed to SCI on default of $6,000 secured bond. State Police also arrested Orville Bailey and Jerry Gully who allegedly purchased large amounts of stolen property from Hudson. Orville Bailey, 74, of Frankford was arrested on two counts of receiving stolen property and was released on $2,000 unsecured bond. Jerry Gully, 40, of Selbyville was arrested on three counts of felony theft, three counts of second degree conspiracy, four counts of manufacturing of marijuana, possession with the intent to deliver marijuana, maintaining a dwelling for keeping controlled substances, and six counts of possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony. Gully was committed to Sussex Correctional Institution on default of $35,000 secured bond. The following subjects allegedly helped Hudson with obtaining stolen property from Rent-A-Center and were charged with theft and conspiracy and released on unsecured bond Traci Demby, 41, Georgetown; James Smith, 60, Dagsboro; Sheila Hooper, 47, Millsboro; Anna Young, 41, Millsboro; and Jeri Brown,

PAGE 37

38, Ellendale. State police detectives recovered 23 televisions and 3 laptop computers valued at approximately $20,000. The investigation is continuing and more charges are pending for associates of Hudson, who obtained property from the above victims.

Sex offender arrested

State police criminal investigators recently concluded a three-day investigation of an alleged sexual assault of a child. During their investigation, state police detectives issued an arrest warrant for a 44-year-old, Harrington man who allegedly sexually assaulted a 12-year-old girl. On Aug. 27, state police detectives received a call from the Division of Family Services (DFS) regarding a 12-year-old Harrington girl who was allegedly sexually assaulted by a family member in mid-July. The suspect, Willie L. Spruance, was registered as a sex offender on 614-02. On Aug. 30, the Delaware State Police arrested Spruance on the following charges - first degree unlawful sexual contact; first degree rape; failure to register, re-register or provide verification as a sex offender as required; incest; and endangering the welfare of a child. Spruance was committed to the Delaware Correctional Center on $58,000 cash bail.

Sexual assault suspect wanted

On Tuesday, Aug. 27 at approximately 11 p.m., state police criminal investigators from Troop 3 Major Crimes Unit responded to Kent General Hospital to investigate an alleged sexual assault involving an 8-year-old Harrington girl. As a result of their investigation, state police detectives have issued an arrest warrant for Harold A. Shook, 71, of the 2100 block of Todds Chapel Rd., Greenwood. Shook allegedly sexually asSHOCK saulted the girl on Tuesday, Aug. 27. Shook is described as a white male, 5’9” tall, 172 lbs., blue eyes and gray hair. Shook may be operating a 1982 Dodge Truck with Delaware registration (unknown color). Delaware State Police urge anyone with information regarding the whereabouts of Harold A. Shook to call Troop 3 at 302-697-4456 or Crimestoppers at 800-TIP-3333.

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MORNING STAR

PAGE 38

• SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Classifieds

FREE CLASSIFIEDS* (For Personal Use Only) *Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

Deadline: Monday, 2 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch ($9.00 minimum)

Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.50/inch Legals: $6.50 per inch Not responsible for typographical errors after first insertion

629-9788

Call: Or E-mail: ads@mspublications.com FOUND

YARD SALE

MED. WHITE DOG, brown on face, male, blue collar, friendly, Gum Branch Rd., Seaford. 628-9309. 8/9

YARD SALE: Sat., Sept. 8, Fleetwood Estates, 8-noon. Follow signs on Rt. 20 between Rt. 13 & Rt. 9 at Baker Mill Road, between Fleetwood Pine & Pepper Road. Balloons on mailboxes indicate sellers. 9/6

GIVE-AWAY OAK DRESSER, 4-drawer chest. Matching end tables & lamps. 877-0131. 9/6 FREE KITTENS, 6 wks. old, all colors. 875-9585. 8/30 FREE HORSE MANURE, great for gardens & shrubs. 337-3840. 8/23

SERVICES WILL REMOVE big, old Satellite dishes. 245-2278. 8/30/2t

NOTICE $1,000 REWARD: For info leading to capture, conviction & prosecution of individual(s) involved in vandalism & theft of copper wire & wire remnants from a new construction on Wootten Road, Laurel. Crime was committed between 8:30 pm, Sun., Aug. 26 & 11:15 am, Mon., Aug. 27. 5424163 or 875-5477 if you have any info. Thank you. 8/30 CAN’T LOSE WEIGHT? THEN DON’T WAIT! Get the Training & Help you need! Finally, a system that really works! Seating Limited. Call today for free intro session! 302-875-3099 http://healthieryou. transitionslife.com

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DOWNSIZING SALE: Fri., 9/7, 4-8 pm, Sat., 9/8, 8 am?, & Sun., 9/10, noon-4 pm at 125 Lake Dr., Laurel. (Fr. Rt. 13, west on Rt. 24, right at 2nd st., brick house on corner). Furniture (chairs, tables, TVs, more), tools, clothes, linens, dishes, flatware, collectibles, etc! 8/30

WANTED DAY BED, with pull out trundle bed, can pay $60, call Sherri 410-430-5764. 8/23 LITTLE GIRL PRINCESS, makeup vanity set, princess room decorations, call Sherri 410-430-5764. 8/23

AUTOMOTIVE PAYING MORE THAN $35 / Month for AUTO INSURANCE? 1-877-621-1030 Credit Cards accepted. tnc Cheap • Cheap • Cheap AUTO INSURANCE? 1-877-621-1030 Credit Cards accepted. tnc ‘88 CHEV. CONVRSION VAN, handicap assess. w/ hydraulic lift & remote access., V8 350 eng., less than 60k orig. miles. Runs good & in good cond. 7 pass. w/bench seat that folds into bed & table in back, 4 captains chairs, $3000 OBO. 875-4969. 9/6

‘07 MAZDA B2300 PICKUP, excellent cond., 5k mi., sprayed-on bed liner, bed cover - hardly used, garage kept. $11,350. 875-4668. 9/6 ‘04 NISSAN TITAN, 25k mi., white, fully loaded, $12,995. 228-6202 or 2496017. 8/23 WHITE WALL TIRES, 2/3 tread, exc. cond. 2 sz. 20570-R-15, $25. 2 sz., 20575-R-15, $25. 629-2425. 8/23 ‘87 DODGE RAM, runs good, AC, $1800. 2620387. 8/9 ‘99 FORD TAURUS, silver, 4 dr., Runs, needs some work. $1900 OBO. 443523-5508, leave msg. 8/9 ‘96 FORD BOX TRUCK, AT, runs great, $800 OBO. 443-523-5508, lv. msg. 8/9

MOTORCYCLES/ REC VEHICLES ‘91 TOUR GLIDE HARLEY, $9000 OBO, garage kept. 875-3115. 8/23 ‘05 HONDA 450R 4WHEELER, barely used $4900 OBO. 542-5809. 8/23 ‘02 HONDA VFR 800, very clean, single side swing arm, 12k mi., $4500 OBO. 542-5809. 8/23 VICTOR SCOOTER, 3 wheels, new, $1000. 6294881. 8/9 ‘04 YAMAHA V-STAR Motorcycle, 1100 Silverado, 7500 mi., lots of extras: saddle bags, Mustang seat, accent lights. Garage kept & exc. cond. $6000 OBO. 628-8754, lv. msg. 8/2

MOTOR HOME, 40’ Diesel Pusher, 9M mi., 2 slide outs, washer & dryer, all leather pkg., many extras. 6294881. 8/9 ‘04 COLEMAN POP-UP CAMPER, like new, used 4 times. 1 king, 1 dbl., sleeps 6-8, AC, refrig, table, sink, 2 stoves, scr. porch, awning & many extras. Garage kept, $5500 OBO. 337-8569. 8/9

BOATS 12’ JONBOAT, like new G3 1236, used only 3 times, never powered, extra handles, a new boat at a great price! $675. 875-9431. 8/23 ‘95 DIXIE BOAT MOTOR & TRAILER, $8500. 8753115. 8/23 17’ FISHING & CRABBING BOAT. ‘93 Polarkraft alum. john type boat w/v-bow & 25 HP oil-injected manual start Suzuki motor & galvanized Cox trailer. Boat has all required safety equip. plus fish finder w/ speed & temp, 24 volt trolling motor, 3 deep cycle batteries, bike & regular seat for bow deck. Trailer has new springs & like new tires. All licensed and ready to go. $3295 OBO. 628-5479. 8/16

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES

‘00 24’ WINNEBAGO, motor home, Class C. 22k mi., clean/great cond., $29,000. 337-7359. 9/6 ‘79 31’ SOVEREIGN AIRSTREAM Travel Trailer. Good, orig. cond., awning needs work, interior nice. Full size gas oven & 4-burner stove top. Email for pics: sweettrees@netzero. com Asking $9000. 410-6411465. 8/30 ‘05 COACHMAN CAMPER, used twice, take over payments. 875-3115. 8/23

UNIDEN TRUNK TRACKER Scanner, hand held. Paid $240, will sell for $210, new in box. 2452278. 8/30 MOVING, MUST SELL: Sears Hydroclass Shallow Well Jet pump, never used. Orig. $110, asking $50. Expasion tank w/pump, 2 yrs old, best offer. 875-0787. FURNITURE, MUST SELL: Pecan color DR set, $175 for table w/2 leaves, 6 chairs, 2 pc. china cabinet, 7’ h, 5’ l, 17” w. Ethan Allen maple single bed w/ or w/o mattress, $100. Roll away bed w/mattress, $65. Victorian style couch w/matching chair, beige w/blue, $75. Octagon coffee table w/black granite top, $65. 875-0787 anytime. 8/30 MISC. SHOP EQUIP., mechanics tools, $450 for lot. 228-6202. 8/30 8.0 LIFESTYLE TREADMILL, auto incline, extended stride, exc. cond., $150. 228-6202. 8/30 OAK TWIN BED, complete, solid wood, exc. cond., like new mattress, $150 OBO. 629-3628. 8/30

ANT. PORCELAIN/CAST IRON SINK. 24X58 single bowl w/dbl. drain boards, short backsplash, good cond. $75 OBO. 236-7593. 8/9

MOVING SALE: Solid Oak Table & 6 Chairs. Computer Desk w/hutch & computer. Leather LR furniture. Asst. tables. Harley Davidson Motorcycle. Coachman Camper. Boat w/motor & trailer. Lots More! 875-3115 8/23

MD LICENSE PLATES, 100 yr. anniv., like new in wrapper (2), $75 for pair. 398-0309. 7/19

MASSSIVE OAK MANTLE with matching oak-framed mirror. Never used. $1500. 956-0086. 8/23

FOR SALE CAMPERS/ TRAILERS

UPRIGHT FREEZER, Kenmore, exc. cond., $50. 8775-1005. 8/30

EGGS, free range chicken fed nonmedicated feed. Call 9am - 8pm, 337-7126. 5’ BED TRAILER, $200. Fergeson, 2 row, Cultivator, excellent cond., $200. 8469932 9/6 WASHERS/DRYERS, for sale. Do repairs also. 6299809. 9/6

2 BEAR BRAKE LATHES, drum & dish set ups. 1$1000 OBO. 1-$1500 OBO. Misc. machine shop equip. 228-6202 or 249-6017. AAMCO LATHES: Set up for disbrakes & all attach. on table, $2400 OBO. Set up for drums, all attach. on table, $2400 OBO. 2286202 or 249-6017. 8/23

GOLF CLUB SET, left handed, like new, $25. 3377494. 8/30

FURNITURE: 2 LR Sets, 1 leather & recliner $1500 OBO. Almost new, lg. sofa & love seat, $700. DR table, 6 chairs, 2 leaves, $550 OBO. 875-3115. 8/23

WEIDER PRO 9940 Home Gym, perfect for strength training, like new, $100. 875-8284. 8/30

SYSTEMAX COMPUTER, complete w/solid oak desk & hutch. $500 OBO. 8753115. 8/23

BROYHILL OAK BR SET, 3 pc., 2 yrs. old. Full size bed w/storage headboard & footboard. 6 drawer dresser w/tilt mirror& 4 shelf bookcase. Pd. $5000, asking $1500 OBO. Joe, 2496444. 8/23 SOFA & LOVE SEAT, matching, great cond., Victorian style, cherry legs, 175 OBO. 629-6511 or 301908-1381. 8/23 TIMBERLAND BOOTS, men’s steel toe, size 11, never worn, $50. 875-7298. 8/23 AIR COND, low profile, 8000 BTU, good working cond., $49. 856-3799. 8/16 CRAFTSMAN GRASS BAGGER for 30” rear eng. riding mower, $50. 8770585. 8/16 FUTON - Queen sz., good cond., $65 firm. Elec. Range $50 firm. 877-0885. 8/16 REFRIG., 21 cu. in. w/ice maker, works great, $150. Camper size refrig., works great, $50. 410-479-1586. 8/16 MEN’S JEANS & KHAKI PANTS, like new, great for back to school! Sz. 36W32L & 36W-30L, $3 pr. 8758720. 8/16 PATIO/PORCH FURNITURE, 7 pcs., glass top table w/4 chairs, chaise lounge & end table, very good cond., $275 OBO. 629-6159. 8/9 CRYSTAL LAMPS, 1 pr., new, 27” H w/white shades, $30. 629-6159., 8/9 BATH CABINET w/light fixture & mirror, very good cond., $25. 629-6159. 8/9 FORMULA: Enfamil Lipil w/ iron, never opened. 4 - 12.9 oz. cans, 3 singles (makes 4 oz. bottles)., $35 for all, approx. $30 savings. Call if interested, 462-5895, lv. msg. 8/9 PLAY STATION 2 SYS., cordless w/adapter. 10 games, $100. 875-3744. BAGS OF BOOKS, mysteries, fiction, romance, Western, etc. $4 per bag. 8753744. 8/2 ‘01 ATV DIRT BIKE CR250, $1200. 684-8609. 8/2 WINDOW AIR COND., Kenmore 4-Spd., almond, good cond., $40. 629-6719.


BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY ATTORNEYS

AUCTIONEER

AUTO ACCIDENT AND PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS

Lee Collins

Initial Consultation Free No Fee Unless You Recover Evening and Weekend Appointments

• Personal Property • Real Estate • Antiques • Farm

FUQUA and YORI, P.A.

(302)

ATTORNEYS AT LAW

The Circle • Georgetown • 856-7777 *Listing areas of practice does not represent official certification as a specialist in those areas.

CONCRETE

AUCTIONEER

Have Gavel Will Travel

(302)

410-742-0134 Mark Donophan

Licensed & Insured

Free Estimates

FITNESS

236-0344 Cell

Laurel, Delaware

CONSTRUCTION

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INCORPORATED 55 Years Experience

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CALL 302-629-6786 or 302-228-5158 Bill Barnes

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EMPLOYMENT

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Call 628-2828 Apply Online:

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302-530-3376

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629-0444

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PAGE 40

ANIMALS, ETC. BICHON FRIES PUPPIES. Cute & cuddly, non-shedding, ACA registered. Male, $550; Female, $650, 6283373. 8/30 BIRD CAGE, Large, w/access., exc. cond. $30 OBO. 629-6159. 8/9

WANTED TO RENT SR. LADY SEEKING TO RENT 2 BR mobile home or appt. close to shopping centers. Have ref., need ASAP. 877-0131. 8/30

FREE CLASSIFIEDS Personal Items for Sale. No Vendors Please.

Call 629-9788

MORNING STAR

SPECIAL REGIONAL ADS Antiques & Collectibles DC BIG FLEA MARKET! Largest Antique & Collectibles Event in the MidEast. 2 Buildings, 1100 Booths. September 15 & 16. Admission $8- Saturday 9-6: Sunday 11-5, Dulles Expo Center, Chantilly, VA. Metro Washington DC. Directions: 703-378-0910. Apartments For Rent 3bd 1.5ba Home Buy only $300/mo! More Foreclosures from $199/mo Never Rent Again! 4%dn, 30yrs @ 8%apr! For Listings 800585-3617 ext. T297 Business Opportunity Measure Your Success. Advertise in 120 newspapers across Maryland, Delaware, and DC, reach over 2.3 Million households for only $495. For more information contact this Newspaper or call 410-7214000, ext. 17 or visit: www.mddcpress.com ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800 in a day? Your own local candy route. Includes 30 Machines and Candy All for $9,995. 1-888753-3452

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easy way to earn $10,000 monthly at home. Free money-making report. Write Zaken Corp., Suite 53465A8, 20700 Plummer St., Chatsworth, CA 91311. Career / Training Start your Paramedic Training Now! Basic EMT Certification Classes start soon. We also offer Free CPR classes. Call 202-383-2899 to tour the campus and apply. Classes are certified by the DC Department of Health. EARN $35K TO $87K+. BECOME A HOME INSPECTOR. MD approved training by nationally recognized Building Specs professionals.800-217-7979 www.buildingspecs.com Donations Donate Vehicle, running or not accepted. FREE TOWING TAX DEDUCTIBLE, NOAHS ARC, Support No Kill Shelters, Animal Rights, Research to Advance Veterinary Treatments/Cures 1-866-912-GIVE Employment Sales Professionals Wanted $75,000+ Pre-qualified Leads helping Seniors. Full Benefits, Retirement, Vacations, Stock Options + Management Opportunities Call Tony Holland toll free 1866-229-8447 SECRET SHOPPERS NEEDED Pose as customers for store evaluations. Local stores, restaurants & theaters. Training provided.Flexible hours. Email Required. Call Now! 1-800-585-9024 ext6046 EARN $500+ FOR THREE DAY’S WORK! Crofton, MD based newspaper association has opening for skilled, experienced telemarketing sales

Place your business-card-size ad in 100 Maryland-Delaware-D.C. newspapers. Get your message to over 3 million readers for $1450. Statewide coverage for only $14.50 per publication. FOR R MORE E INFORMATION:: CONTACT T THIS S NEWSPAPER R orr calll the e 2x2 2 Display y Network k Coordinatorr Maryland-Delaware-D.C.. Press s Association n 410-721-4000 0 extt 17;; Email:: acoder@mddcpress.com



DISCLAIMER: be aware that Morning Star Publications has no control over the Regional ads. Some employment ads and business opportunity ads may not be what they seem to be.

rep. Friendly motivated individual will earn a very generous commission selling classified advertising for a statewide network of newspapers. Hours can be arranged for the middle of the workday. Send resume, cover letter to MDDC Press Association, fax 410-7215909; e-mail to ahay@mddcpress.com EOE. For Sale $500! POLICE IMPOUNDS! Hondas, Acuras, Toyotas!! Cars/Trucks/SUV’s from $500! For Listings 800-5853563 Ext L174 General Merchandise ABOLUTELY NO COST TO YOU!! ALL BRAND NEW POWER WHEELCHAIRS, HOSPITAL BEDS AND SCOOTERS IMMEDIATE DELIVERY CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-998-4111 TO QUALIFY. Help Wanted #1 TRUCK DRIVING SCHOOL. Training for Swift, Werner & others. Dedicated/Regional/Local. Approx. $50,000-$70,000 yearly. Home Weekly! 1-800-883-0171 Help Wanted-Drivers DRIVERS ACT NOW! SignOn Bonus 36-45 cpm/ $1000+ weekly $0 Lease/ $1.20 pm CDL-A + 3 mos OTR 800-835-8669 Homes for Rent Foreclosures From $199 /mo! Buy a 4bd 2ba Home only $238/mo! 4bd 2ba only $350/mo! 4%dn, 30yrs @ 8%apr! For Listings 800585-3617 ext. T296 3bd 1.5ba Home Buy only $300/mo! More Foreclosures from $199/mo Never Rent Again! 4%dn, 30yrs @ 8%apr! For Listings 800585-3617 ext. T297 Houses 3bdr 1ba Foreclosure! $265/mo! Stop Renting! 5% dw, 20 yrs @ 8% apr For Listings 800-585-3617 Ext. T182 Hud Homes only $35,000! 3bdr 1ba Foreclosure!

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WET BASEMENT WOES!!

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Boats, Cars, RVs, Equipment, Real Estate, Forklifts & Wheelchair Access Vans Associated Charities represents numerous non-profits in need of your property. Call Toll Free: 866-639-8724 or 410-603-3468 E-mail: bob3416@mchsi.com

OK. Special on-site financing. Only 12 parcels avail. Rare opportunity! Call now! 800-888-1262 LAND SALE! Saturday, September 15th. 20 acres only $29,900. SAVE $10,000. Plus NO closing costs. Subdivision potential! Big ridgetop acreage, spectacular views. 1 mile to Nicklaus designed golf course. Near Tennessee River & recreation lake. Excellent financing. Call 1866-999-2290 x1491 The only 20+ acre paradise this close to DC! Incredible 50 mile river & mtn. views. Private access to fishing, swimming, canoeing, hiking, biking, or just relaxing. The perfect getaway! SAVE THOUSANDS this weekend, go to: www.mountain bargains.com ONE OF A KIND! 20+ AC$189,900 Incredible 50 mile mtn & river views in every direction! Large, flat mountaintop ridge with private river access. Driveway in, utilities avail. Special financing. Call now 1-800-8881262 20+ ACRES- $99,900 Flat wooded knoll with beautiful eastern views. 20+ Long rd. frontage. Easy access to nearby river and Trout Lake. Utilities available. Call owner at 304-262-2770 Medical Supplies All new power wheelchairs, scooters, hospital beds, ABSOLUTELY NO COST TO YOU if qualified. Medicare accepted. New lift chairs at $699, limited time offer. Toll free 1-800-470-7562. Miscellaneous AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for High Paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA Approved Program. Financial Aid If Qualified - Job Placement Assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance (888) 349-5387. Mountain Property FOR SALE BY OWNER. 26+ Acres- $129,950. Easy access to huge Mtn. top ridge. Long range sunrise panoramic views. Nice mix of hardwoods and pines. Perc done. Must sell, call now 304-262-2770 Real Estate NYS HUNTING & FISHING LAND SALE Salmon River Region- 11 Ac Bass Pond$59,900. 6.6 Ac Beautiful Woods- $19,900. Tug Hill/ MadRiver Area- 5 Ac- New Cabin- $22,900. 11 AcHugh Pond- $25,900. 5 AcATV/ SLED Trails- $18,900. CABIN OFFER: You pick any site-Built by Opening Day- $15,900! Call C&A 800-229-7843


MORNING STAR NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS - Gated community -Spectacular views. Public water including fire hydrants, DSL accessibility, paved roads, nearby lakes, coming soon Phases 5-6 $45,000+ 800-463-9980 www.theridgeatsouthmou ntain.com 3bd 1.5 ba Home Buy only $300/mo! More Foreclosures from $199/mo Never Rent Again! 4%dn, 30yrs @ 8%apr! For Listings 800585-3617 ext. T297 Orlando Condos from $99K- close to parks, fully upgraded withstainless steel, granite, berber, tile, etc. Best value and location in Orlando. Call Today!! 1888-591-7933 MOVE/ RETIRE TO TAXFREE DELAWARE! Spacious, single- family homes, near beaches. From Upper $100's. Brochure Available. Call 302-684-8572 www.je ffersoncrossroads.com

LEGAL NOTICE

Tax Services IRS TAX DEBT KEEPING YOU AWAKE? Local CPA firm resolves all Federal and State tax problems for individuals and businesses. US Tax Resolutions, P.A. 877-477-1108. Vacation Rentals OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals.Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily.Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www.hol idayoc.com Waterfront Properties Coastal WATERFRONT SALE. Direct Ocean Access. $89,900 Timber Co. liquidating deep, dockablewaterfront w/ fantastic views, sandy beaches, more. Access to ICW & Atlantic. Buildable. Excellent bank financing. Call now 1800-732-6601, x1786

NOTICE: Trussum Pond Self Storage, LLC Located at 11323 Trussum Pond Road, Laurel, DE, will be holding a Public Auction On September 10, at 10:00 AM. The following units will be sold Because of nonpayment of rent Pursuant to the Self Storage Facility Act. Shree Deshields — Unit A12, house hold goods, toys, bikes. Crystal Odham — Unit B25, TV, VCR, furniture, beds, microwave, washer & dryer, house hold goods, boxes. Carl Walker — Unit A22, remnants. Ruthynia A. Walker — Unit B47, B8, bedding, boxes of house hold goods, furniture, luggage, TV, yard tools, toys, etc. TPSS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CANCEL THIS SALE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTICE. CASH ONLY. 9/6/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Real Estate Rentals NO RENT- $0 DOWN HOMES Gov't & Bank forclosures! No credit O.K.

• SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

LEGALS

$0 to Low Down! For listings, (800)860-0573

www.landandcamps.com

Count: ads 41 6 pages Categories: Antiques and Collectibles to Waterfront Properties

A Public Hearing will be held on September 24, 2007 at 7:00 p.m. at Delmar

PUBLIC AUCTION OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE WITH HOME & LARGE SHED/WORKSHOP ON 0.60+/- ACRE LOT IN SEAFORD, DELAWARE

Town Hall located at 100 S. Pennsylvania Avenue in Delmar, Maryland 21875. The Public Hearing will be conducted by the Delmar Mayor and Council with respect to the applications of the following persons and entities for annexation into the Town of Delmar, Delaware, Sussex County, with the zoning classification specified: 1. Patrick and Donna Hurley Proposed Zoning - R-2 Residential 2. DWA Brittingham, LLC Proposed Zoning - R-4 Residential 3. Old Stage Road Development Co., LLC Proposed Zoning - Highway Regional 4. DWA Chesapeake, LLC Proposed Zoning R-2 Residential 5. Old Stage Road, LLC Proposed Zoning - R-2 Residential All that are interested are invited to attend and present their views. Additional information including copies of the annexation

SATURDAY, SEPT. 15, 2007 -- 1:00 p.m. Preview: Thursday, September 6 from 4:00 to 5:00 P.M. Tuesday, September 11 from 4:00 to 5:00 P.M. Check our website for full ad, photos, & terms The property is identified on the Sussex County Tax Map as District 1-32 Map 1.18 Parcel 12.00 and is further described in Deed Book 2743 Page 109. The property consists of 0.60+/- Acre (approx. 26,170 sq. ft.) of land improved with a 3 BR/1.5 BA (65’ x 14’) single-wide mobile home on block foundation with a 450+/- sq. ft. addition as well as a 12’ x 16’ salt-treated deck. The property is also improved with a large 24’ x 50’shed/workshop with 16 ft. ceiling, cement floor, & add-on air compressor room, as well as a 10’ x 14’ hip-roof shed w/wooden floor (to be sold separately). The property is located close to the Nanticoke River and is situated just outside of Blades on River Road. (Sussex County Annual Property Tax-$516.29) This is a perfect investment property located extremely close to the Nanticoke River. If you’ve been looking for an investment property in Western Sussex County, do not miss this auction! Check our website at www.onealsauction.com for complete ad.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Seaford Hundred Case No. 9948 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article IV, Subsection 115-25, Item C of said ordinance of BEV-

ERLY D. AND DAVID J. HENRY who are seeking a variance from the side yard setback requirement, to be located south of Road 554, southeast of Road 560. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, OCTOBER 1, 2007, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 9/6/1tc See LEGALS—page 42

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Call 629-9788

PUBLIC AUCTION OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE CONSISTING OF CLASS “C” MOBILE HOME w/DETACHED GARAGE, SHEDS, & POOL ON 2.09+/- ACRE LOT ON RT. 13 IN LAUREL, DELAWARE Location: 28506 Sussex Highway, La urel, Delaware 19956. From the intersection of U.S. Rt. 13 (Sussex Highway) and Del. Rt. 24 in Laurel, travel north on U.S. Rt. 13 for approx. 3.4 miles. Make a U-turn and travel south on U.S. Rt. 13 for 0.2 mile. Property will be on right (Signs Posted).

From the Estate of Christian Bauer Location: 26159 River Road, Seaford, Delaware 19973. From the intersection of U.S. Rt. 13 and Concord Road in Seaford (at Royal Farms), turn west onto Concord Road towards Blades and travel for approx. 0.6 mile. Turn left onto S. Market Street (U.S. Rt. 13-Alt.) and travel for approx. 0.2 mile. Turn right onto River Road and travel for approx. 0.4 mile. Property will be on left (Signs Posted).

PAGE 41 petition, and reports from the Annexation Investigative Committee are available at Delmar Town Hall, located at 100 S. Pennsylvania Avenue, Delmar, Maryland 21875, during regular business hours (8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) Mayor and Council Town of Delmar, Delaware 9/6/1tc

SATURDAY, SEPT. 15, 2007 -- 10:00 a.m. Preview: Wednesday, September 5 from 4:00 to 5:00 P.M. Sunday, September 9 from 2:00 to 3:00 P.M. Check our website for full ad, photos, & terms

The property is identified on the Sussex County Tax Map as District 1-32 Map 12.00 Parcel 102.01 and consists of 2.09+/- Acres of land with approx. 175 ft. of frontage along U.S. Rt. 13 South (Sussex Highway) improved with a 3 BR/2 BA Class “C” double-wide mobile home, detached two-car garage/workshop, a pair of storage sheds, above-ground pool, and hot tub. The home features a 12’ x 16’Florida room, kitchen with like-new appliances, laundry room, diningroom, livingroom, master bedroom with walk-in closet, master bathroom with garden tub & separate shower, as well as two bedrooms with ample closet space. The home also features front & rear decks, central air, gas heat, & ceiling fans. The property is also improved with a 24’ x 28’ detached two car garage/workshop, a 12’ x 16’ storage shed, a 10’ x 16’ storage shed, a 18’ x 33’ above-ground pool with large deck, as well as a Viking 6-person hot tub (pool & hot tub are only 4 years old). (Sussex County Annual Property Tax-$387.04) The home is situated on U.S. Rt. 13 South on a partially wooded 2.09+/- acre lot that provides privacy as well as seclusion. The home, garage, and sheds are immaculate and the property is beautifully landscaped. The home is perfect for the growing family or couple looking to downsize. Check our website at www.onealsauction.com for complete ad.

Terms: $7,500.00 down payment in the form of Cash, Certified Check, or Cashier’s Check made payable to Jos. C. O’Neal, Inc.. Balance to be paid within 45 days when a good and marketable deed will be given. The property is being sold in “AS IS” condition. A 4% Buyer’s Premium will be charged on the final selling price. Seller reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids, but it is their intent to sell said property. Broker Participation invited. Brokers must have clients registered 24 hours prior to auction. Contact our office for complete details. View complete terms at www.onealsauction.com.

Terms: $15,000.00 down payment in the form of Cash, Certified Check, or Cashier’s Check made payable to Jos. C. O’Neal, Inc.. Balance to be paid within 45 days when a good and marketable deed will be given. The property is being sold in “AS IS” condition. A 5% Buyer’s Premium will be charged on the final selling price. Seller reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids, but it is their intent to sell said property. Broker Participation invited. Brokers must have clients registered 24 hours prior to auction. Contact our office for complete details. View complete terms at www.onealsauction.com.

JOS. C. O’NEAL & SONS, INC.

JOS. C. O’NEAL & SONS, INC.

AUCTIONEERS & APPRAISERS

302.875-5261

www.onealsauction.com

AUCTIONEERS & APPRAISERS

302.875-5261

www.onealsauction.com


PAGE 42 LEGALS - from Page 41

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Nanticoke Hundred Case No. 9957 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article VI, Subsection 115-42, Item B of said ordinance of Rachel Absher who is seeking a variance from the front and side yard setback requirements, to be located at the south corner of Route 40 and Road 565. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, OCTOBER 1, 2007, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 9/6/1tc

TOWN OF BRIDGEVILLE REFERENDUM The Commissioners of the Town of Bridgeville will hold a Referendum to Approve or Disapprove the Borrowing by the Commissioners of the Town of Bridgeville a Sum Not to Exceed Four Hundred Fifteen Thousand Dollars ($415,000.00) to Provide Funds for Modifications and Improvements to the Town Wastewater Treatment Plant, including the Purchase of Equipment, and all Other Necessary and Related Matters Associated Therewith, and that the Borrowing be Secured by a General Obligation Bond Issue, Grant Application or Other Financial Obligation. The Referendum will be held on Wednesday the 12th Day of September, 2007 at the Town hall, 101 North Main Street, between the hours of 10:00 A.M. and 2:00 P.M. Every citizen of the Town of Bridgeville who has attained the age of eighteen (18) shall have one vote and, in addition, every partnership, corporation or other entity owning real property, within the corporate limits of the Town of Bridgeville shall also have one vote and the said vote

MORNING STAR of a partnership, corporation or other entity may be cast either in person or by proxy. COMMISSIONERS OF BRIDGEVILLE JOSEPH T. CONAWAY COMMISSION PRESIDENT 8/23/3tc

TOWN OF BRIDGEVILLE REFERENDUM The Commissioners of the Town of Bridgeville will hold a Referendum to Approve or Disapprove the Borrowing by the Commissioners of the Town of Bridgeville a Sum Not to Exceed Two Million Six Hundred Fifty Eight Thousand Dollars ($2,658,000.00) to Provide Interim Financing, in Anticipation of Receipt of Permanent Loan and Grant Proceeds, for Modifications and Improvements to the Town Wastewater Treatment Plant, including the Purchase of Equipment, and all Other Necessary and Related Matters Associated Therewith, and that the Borrowing be Secured by a General Obligation Bond Issue, Grant Application or Other Financial Obligation. The Referendum will be held on Wednesday the 12th Day of September, 2007 at the Town hall, 101 North Main Street, between the hours of 10:00 A.M. and 2:00 P.M. Every citizen of the Town of Bridgeville who has attained the age of eighteen (18) shall have one vote and, in addition, every partnership, corporation or other entity owning real property, within the corporate limits of the Town of Bridgeville shall also have one vote and the said vote of a partnership, corporation or other entity may be cast either in person or by proxy. COMMISSIONERS OF BRIDGEVILLE JOSEPH T. CONAWAY COMMISSION PRESIDENT 8/23/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Thomas C. Moore, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Thomas C. Moore who departed this life on the 30th day of July, A.D. 2007 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Lettie A. Perry, Dale A. Evans on the 15th day of August, A.D. 2007, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Executors without delay, and all persons hav-

• SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

ing demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Executors on or before the 30th day of March, A.D. 2008 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Executors: Lettie A. Perry 130 Village Dr., Seaford, DE 19973 Dale A. Evans 4348 Snowhill Rd., Salisbury, MD 21804 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/30/3tc

NOTICE Estate of William R. Clark, Sr., Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration WWA upon the estate of William R. Clark, Sr. who departed this life on the 1st day of August, A.D. 2007 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Jay Samuel Clark, on the 21st day of August, A.D. 2007, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administrator, W.W.A. without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administrator, W.W.A. on or before the 1st day of April, A.D. 2008 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administrator, W.W.A.: Jay Samuel Clark 144 Semmel Road, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472 Attorney: Cindy Szabo, Esq. Sergovic & Ellis, P.A. P.O. Box 875 Georgetown, DE 19947 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/30/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Leo Ades, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Leo Ades who departed this life on the 3rd day of July, A.D. 2007 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Sandra A. Grantham, on the 2nd day of August, A.D. 2007, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 3rd day of March, A.D. 2008 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: See LEGALS—page 43

20 Upcoming Auctions by Marshall Auctions www.marshallauctions.com Large Public Multi-Estate Auction From the Estate of Eldon Willing Jr. of Chance, MD, & several other local estates.

Friday Night, September 14 th , 2007 at 5:00 PM Nice Selection of Local Advertising, Primitives, Furniture and More!! Held at the Marshall Auction Facility at 8000 Esham Rd., Parsonsburg, MD

Real Estate Auction of Fantastic Horse Farm & Equestrian Facility 46+/- Acre Horse farm known as “Magical Acres” at Bechers Brook – 238 Grey Fox Lane, Dover, DE –

Friday Sept. 28th, 2007 at 4:47 PM Real Estate Preview: 9/16 1-4 PM (Preview Party & Tour)

Public Real Estate Auction – Wonderful 2 year old home in Becher’s Brook The owners are relocating out of state & Marshall Auctions is honored to sell their home.

3 3 Grey Fox Lane, Dover, DE

Friday Sept. 28th, 2007 at 5:07 PM Auctioneers Note: Home will be sold from the Equestrian Center location at 238 Grey Fox. Ln, Dover

Real Estate Preview : 9/16 2-3 PM

Sealed Bid Real Estate Auction – 50.47 Acre Farm Incredible Investment Opportunity Marshall Auctions is honored to offer “Fawn Crossing” Sub-Division Beautiful 46 Lot Approved Sub-Division in Kent County Farm is located on Rt. 14 (Milford - Harrington Highway), in Milford, DE Referred to as Kent Co. Tax Map # MD-00-173.00-01-074.04-000 Bids being accepted soon! Auction Ends October 5th, 2007 at 5 PM

Real Estate Auction of an Incredible 269 Acre +/- Farm Farm is located on Collins Wharf Rd., in Eden, MD Wicomico Co. Taxmap 56 Parcels 104, 167, 166 & 102

Saturday October 6th, 2007 at 1:47 PM Beautiful farm consisting of 227 Ac, 20 Ac, 15.9 Ac & 5.8 Acre Parcels Real Estate Preview: Sept. 23rd 1 - 3 PM & Sept. 30th 2 - 4 PM or by appt.! ADDITIONAL UPCOMING AUCTIONS. VIEW THE MARSHALL AUCTION WEBSITE FOR ADDITIONAL INFO Sept. 7th, 2007 – 5:37 PM–5 BR, 4 BA 4,800 Sq. Ft. log cabin on 26 Ac in Hebron. Located at 7581 Levin Dashiell Rd., Hebron, MD. Sept. 8th, 2007 – 11:18 AM - 6850 Charles Cannon Rd., Marion Station, MD. 22.44 Acre +/farm located on Gales Creek. Sept. 11th, 2007 – 5:47 PM – 915 E. Church Street., Salisbury, MD. Starter home/Invest. opportunity. Central location in town limits. Sept. 12th, 2007 – 5:47 PM – 6614 Arvey Rd., Parsonsburg, MD 3 BR, 1 BA 1,300 Sq. Ft. farmhouse w/4 chicken houses on 7.17 Ac. Sept. 25th, 2007 – 5:47 PM – 208 W. Green St., Snow Hill, MD – “Tavern on Green St.” 3,149’ Commercial Building/Restaurant. Sept. 27th, 2007 – 5:47 PM – 27495 Waller Rd., Hebron, MD – 3 BR, 2 BA 1,536 Sq. Ft. rancher on a large 0.92 Acre lot. Oct. 4th, 2007 - 5:17 PM – 5429 E. Nithsdale Dr., Salisbury, MD 4 BR, 3.5 BA 2,788 Sq. Ft. Home in Nithsdale Sub-Division. Oct. 5th, 2007 – 5 PM – Personal Property Auction at the Marshall Auction Facility on 8000 Esham Rd., Parsonsburg, MD. Oct. 12th, 2007 – 5:17 PM – Incredible Investment opportunity. 105 W. Ruark Dr., Salisbury, MD. 1 Ac C-2 (Gen. Comm) zoned lot. Oct. 13th, 2007 – 10 AM – Absolute Auction - 2007 Fall O.C. Surplus Auction. Selection of Surplus City Equip./Abandoned vehicles Oct. 25th, 2007 – 3:07 PM – 122 Acre Farm in 3 Parcels. 2418 Snow Hill Rd., Stockton, MD – 29 Ac, 51 Ac & 41 Ac Parcels. Oct. 27th, 2007 – 20 Approved Building Lots in Bridgewood Estates Sub-Division off of Foskey Ln. & Old State Rd. in Delmar, MD Oct. 27th, 2007 –9105 Drawbridge Dr., Delmar, MD. Brand New 4-5 BR, 3 BA, 2,700 Sq. Ft. home in Bridgewood Estates Nov. 1st, 2007 – 203 Davids Ct., Fruitland, MD – Brand New 4 BR, 2 BA 2,133 Sq. Ft. home in Eastfields Sub-Division. Nov. 8th, 2007 – 4:47 PM – 10728 Bishopville Rd., Bishopville, MD. Large 3 Acre lot with frontage on 2 roads & Village Zoning.

View Website for Complete Listing with Additional Information, Descriptions, Terms, Directions & Pictures!

Five Generations of Combined Auction Experience Doug Marshall, Jr., CAI, Christal Marshall, Auctioneers 302-856-7333 or 410-835-0383 www.marshallauctions.com


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 42 Sandra A. Grantham 316 East Sixth St., Blades, DE 19973 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/23/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Berneda Benson, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Berneda Benson who departed this life on the 1st day of August, A.D. 2007 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Jonathan C. Benson, on the 14th day of August, A.D. 2007, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administrator without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administrator on or before the 1st day of April, A.D. 2008 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administrator: Jonathan C. Benson 8 S. Street, Harrington, DE 19952 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/23/3tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of an Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain tract, piece or parcel of land located in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, on the North side of Delaware Road 483, leading from Concord to Georgetown, known and designated as Lot 3, on a plot titled "BAKER MILL ROAD SUBDIVISION, as prepared by Miller-Lewis, Inc., Donald K. Miller, PLS, dated August 9, 2002, and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Plot Book 84, Page 277, be the contents thereof what they may. And being the same lands conveyed unto Joanne E. Allaband by deed of Baker Mill Road, LLC, dated June 30, 2004 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and

State of Delaware in Deed Book 3002, Page 4. Tax Parcel: 2-31-17.0022.01 Property Address: 12089 Baker Mill Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 1, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 5, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOANN E. ALLABAND and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece and parcel of land with all the improvements and building thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Town of Delmar, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being Lot Number 70 as shown and desig-

• SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

nated upon the maps of Delmar Manor, which are now of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown Delaware, in Plot Record No.2, Page 30, etc., more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument, said concrete monument located on the Northwestern right of way of Hantwerker Drive, said concrete monument also being located 65.0 feet from the centerline of Ellis Parkway, said concrete monument also being located at a corner for this lot and Lot 69; thence turning and running by and along a common boundary line between this lot and Lot 69, South 67 degrees 43 minutes East 120.84 feet to a pipe; thence turning and running by and along a common boundary line between this lot and Delmar School South 23 degrees 28 minutes 50 seconds West 65.01 feet to a pipe; thence turning and running by and along a common boundary line between this lot and Lot 71 South 67 degrees 45 minutes East 118.84 feet to a pipe; thence turning and running by and along the aforementioned northwestern right of way of Hantwerker Drive, North 24 degrees 43 minutes East 64.97 feet, home to the place of Beginning, and said to contain 7,755 square feet of land, more or less, surveyed by Gene R. Littleton & Assoc., Registered Surveyors, April 1985. AND BEING the same lands and premise conveyed unto John Wesley Smith, Sr. by deed of The Sussex Trust Company, Trustee Under Agreement, dated May 9, 1985 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Deed Book 1336, page 345. Tax Parcel: 5-32-20.1564.00 Property Address: 209 Hantwerker Drive, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 1, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 5, 2007 and also subject to a

1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOHN WESLEY SMITH, SR., JOHN W. SMITH, JR., ADMINISTRATOR AND HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN WESLEY SMITH, SR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Blades, Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being deposited as Lot No. 38, on the plot of MOORE'S ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF BLADES, and being more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a concrete monument located on the eastern side of Route No. l3A (Market Street) said monument being 19.1 feet from the centerline of Route No. 13A and being 70.5 feet from the centerline of Sixth Street and also being a corner for these lands and lands now or formerly of A.R. Bowden; thence along lands now or formerly of A.R. Bowden, North 87 degrees 00 minutes East, 97.90 feet to a concrete monument and other land now or formerly of A.R. Bowden; thence along lands now or formerly of A.R. Bowden, South 04 de-

PAGE 43 grees 59 minutes East 49.2 feet to a concrete monument and lands now or formerly of Harvey D. Hitchens; thence along lands now or formerly of Harvey D. Hitchens South 86 degrees 09 minutes West, 102.4 feet to a concrete monument located at a 4 foot sidewalk on the eastern side of the aforesaid Route No. 13A; thence along these lands and said sidewalk North 00 degrees 09 minutes East 50.75 feet to the place of Beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. AND BEING the same lands conveyed unto Monty Twilley by deed of Clinton David Dunn, dated April 12, 2006 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Deed Book 3305, Page 235. Tax Parcel: 1-32-1.15151.00 Property Address: 602 S. Market Street, Blades Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 1, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 5, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MONTY TWILLEY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece and parcel of land lying and being situated in the Town of Laurel, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being designated as Lot 3, "Subdivision Survey Plan prepared for trice appraisal", prepared by AdamsKemp Associates, Inc. Professional Land Surveyors, as recorded in Plot Book 76, Page 328 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County in the County Administration Building in Georgetown, Delaware, more particularly described as follows to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe to be set along the southerly line of 10th Street at a corner of this Lot and Lot 2; thence with Lot 2, South 11 degrees 10 minutes 00 seconds West, 136.25 feet to an iron pipe to be set along the line of lands now or formerly of Odd Fellows Cemetery; thence with lands of Odd Fellows Cemetery, North 79 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West 50 feet to a found concrete monument at a corner of this Lot and Lot 4; thence with Lot 4, North 11 degrees 10 minutes 00 East 136.25 feet to a point along the southerly line of 10th Street, South 79 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds East 50 feet to the point and place of beginning. Containing with described metes and bounds 6,812.5 square feet of land be the same more or less. BEING the same lands and premises which Colby Wolfensberger by Deed dated October 31,2002, of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware under Book 2795, Page number 50, did grant and convey unto Desiree Fitchett. Tax Parcel: 4-32-8.1075.01 Property Address: 232 West Tenth Street, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of See LEGALS—page 44


PAGE 44 LEGALS - from Page 43 the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 1, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 5, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DESIREE FITCHETT and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain piece, parcel and tract of land lying situate and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, and being Lot Four (4) of "Phillips Subdivision" as shown on a Plot Prepared by Miller Lewis, Inc., dated August 20, 2003, of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Plot Book 81, Page 237, be the contents thereof what they may. AND BEING the same lands conveyed unto Deidre Schaal by deed of Deidre Schaal and Timothy Bell, dated November 14, 2005 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of

MORNING STAR Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Deed Book 3239, Page 310. Tax Parcel: 4-32-10.0021.19 Property Address: 33016 Ellis Grove Road, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 1, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 5, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DEIRDRE SCHAAL and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situated on the development of Country Glen, Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware being known as Lot 26 of

• SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

said subdivision and being located and on the northerly side of Glen Circle (50 feet wide) a short distance West of Glen Road ( 50 feet wide) and bounded on the South by said Glen Circle, on the West by Lot 25 of said Country Glen Subdivision on the North by Knotts Landing Subdivision and on the East by Lot 27 of said subdivision, being more particularly described in a recent survey by Homewood Engineering, Ltd., Gary B. Homewood, Registered Professional Engineer, dated February 21,2004, as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe set, said iron pipe being the following two (2) courses and distances from the physical centerline intersects of Glen Circle and that of Glen Road: (1) from said intersect point of Glen Circle and Glen Road following the centerline of Glen Road North 65 degrees 36 minutes 34 seconds West 363.9 plus or minus feet to a point, (2) North 24 degrees 23 minutes 26 seconds East 25.00 feet to said point; thence from said beginning point on the northerly line of Glen Circle and following said line of Glen Circle North 65 degrees 36 minutes 34 seconds West 105.00 feet to a capped rebar found at a corner for Lot 25 of said subdivision; thence with a line of Lot 25 North 24 degrees 23 minutes 26 seconds East 122.54 feet to a capped rebar found at a corner in land of Knotts Landing Subdivision; thence with lands of Knotts Landing Subdivision South 65 degrees 36 minutes 34 seconds East 105.00 feet to an iron pipe set at a corner for Lot 27 of Country Glen Subdivision; thence with a line of Lot 27 South 24 degrees 23 minutes 26 seconds West 122.50 feet to the point and place of Beginning having within said metes and bounds 12,867 square feet or 0.2654 acres of land, be the same more or less. BEING the same lands and premises which Delmarva Homes Land Management, L.L.C., by deed dated December 14, 2004 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware in Deed Book 3067, Page 18, did grant and convey unto Jeffrey J. Dalton and Pamela M. Dalton, in fee. Tax Parcel: 4-30-19.0095.00 Property Address: 11885 Glen Circle, Bridgeville Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check

payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 1, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 5, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JEFFREY J. & PAMELA M. DALTON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, designated as LOTS NINETEEN (19), TWENTY (20), TWENTY ONE (21) AND TWENTY TWO (22) on a plot of "Lands of Charles G. Friedel" more particularly described in accordance with a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr., dated September 8, 2000, as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a con-

crete monument found on the South side of Road No. 534 (25 feet from the centerline thereof) a corner for this land and Lot 24; thence by and with Road No. 534, North 72 degrees 24 minutes 00 seconds East 101.64 feet to a concrete monument found, a corner for this land and Lot 16; thence turning and running by and with Lots 16, 17 and 18, South 27 degrees 55 minutes 00 seconds East 175.40 feet to a pipe found on the North side of Pine Street (20 feet from the centerline thereof) a corner for this land and Lots 18, thence turning and running by and with Pine Street, South 62 degrees 05 minutes 00 seconds West 100.00 feet to a concrete monument found, a corner for this land and Lot 23; thence turning and running by and with Lots 23 and 24 North 27 degrees 55 minutes 00 seconds West 193.60 feet to the place of Beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. AND BEING the same lands conveyed unto Joseph S. Morris and Stacie V. Morris by deed of Roger E. Hammond and Althea Gail Hammond Trustees under revocable trust agreement of Roger E. Hammond and Althea Gail Hammond dated 11/23/94, deed dated October 6, 2000 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Deed Book 2528, page 17. Tax Parcel: 3-31-6.00271.00 Property Address: 9674 Tharp Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 1, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 5, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the

Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOSEPH S. & STACIE V. MORRIS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a Fourth Pluries writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN lot, piece of parcel of land with the buildings thereon erected, commonly known as 16727 Cedar Corners Rd., Cty. Rt. 638, Bridgeville, Delaware. BEING THE SAME LANDS and premises which James Owings Trustee under the Last Will and Testament of Osbourn Owings by Certain Deed dated the 6th day of January, A.D., 1994 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 1959, page 207, did grant and convey to Samuel E. Cephas in fee. Tax Parcel: 4-30-17.0048.00 Property Address: 16727 Cedar Corners Road, Bridgeville Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 1, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the SuSee LEGALS—page 45


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 44 perior Court on October 5, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of SAMUEL E. & PATRICIA CEPHAS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of an Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot or parcel of land situate, lying and being in North West Fork Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, lying East of (but not bordering on) the "Handy ¬Delaware #533 Road" formerly known as the FederalsburgJacob's Cross Road and bounded on the North by a right of way road bordering the J.H. Brown property, on the East and South by property the J .H. Brown property, on the East and South by property being reserved by this grantor, J. Edwin Rowser, and on the West by property now or formerly of Grace Beulah, and more fully described as follows: BEGINNING at a marker on the South side of the right of way bordering the J .H. Brown property; thence (1) from the said marker and with the South side of the said right of way South 46 degrees 30 minutes East 270 feet thence (2) with a line parallel to and

270 feet from the Grace Beulah property South 44 degrees 45 minutes West 220 feet; thence (3) North 46 degrees 30 minutes West 270 feet to said Beulah property, thence (4) with the said Beulah property North 44 degrees 45 minutes East 270 feet to the place of beginning containing 1.36 acres of land more or less, together with the right of the grantees, their heirs, and assigns to the joint use of the aforesaid right of way leading to Delaware #533. BEING the same property conveyed to Kenneth C. Messick and Shirley A. Messick, his wife, and by Deed from Frank J. Hastings and Robert W. Hunsberger, recorded 07/01/81 in Book 1069, Page 333, Sussex County Records, Delaware. Tax Parcel: 1-31-12.0029.00 Property Address: 19297 Handy Road, Bridgeville Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 1, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 5, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of KENNETH C. & SHIRLEY A. MESSICK and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/6/2tc

• SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Blades, Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, lying on the northerly right of way line of East 7th Street, being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument found on the northerly right of way line of East 7th Street, a corner for this land and lands now or formerly of Patsy M. West; from this point of Beginning, South 87° 57' 13" West 150.13 feet to a pipe in the northerly edge of East 7th Street, a corner for this land and the lands now or formerly of John H. Reynolds et ux.; thence with line of Reynolds lands North 02° 15' 42" West a distance of 99.89 feet to a point; thence North 87° 44' 21" East a distance of 75 feet to a corner monument a corner for this land and the lands now or formerly of Patsy M. West; thence with the lands formerly of Patsy M. West; South 02° 15' 42" East a distance of 100.17 feet to a concrete monument in the northerly edge of East 7th Street the point and place of beginning containing approximately 7,507 square feet of land be the same more or less with all improvements located thereon according to a survey prepared by Thomas Temple dated July 23, 1986, attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference. BEING a part of the same lands conveyed by Ronald R. Lowe and Charlotte J. Lowe, his wife, by Deed dated August 1, 1986, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 1432 at Page 13, unto Robert E. Ridinger, in fee. Tax Parcel: 1-32-1.15150.02 Property Address: 10 E. 7th Street, Blades Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D.

are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 1, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 5, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ROBERT E. RIDINGER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN THE TOWN OF LAUREL, LITTLE CREEK HUNDRED, SUSSEX COUNTY AND STATE OF DELAWARE, DESIGNATED AS LOT THREE (3) OF CENTER STREET SUBDIVISION IN WEST LAUREL, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, TO WIT; BEGINNING AT AN "X" IN THE CONCRETE OF A SIDEWALK ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF WEST SEVENTH STREET, A CORNER FOR THIS LOT AND LOT 4; THENCE, TURNING AND RUNNING

PAGE 45 BY AND WITH LOT 4, SOUTH 21 DEG 30' 40" WEST 88.48 FEET TO A FOUND CONCRETE MONUMENT, A COMMON CORNER FOR THIS LOT, LOTS 4, 11 AND 12; THENCE, TURNING AND RUNNING BY AND WITH LOT 12, NORTH 69 DEG. 38' 00" WEST 85.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOUND; THENCE BY AND WITH LOT 13, NORTH 69 DEG. 38' 00" WEST 10.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOUND, A CORNER FOR THIS LOT AND LOT 2; THENCE, TURNING AND RUNNING BY AND WITH LOT 2, NORTH 30 DEG 56' 00" EAST 96.55 FEET TO AN "X" IN THE CONCRETE OF A SIDEWALK ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF WEST SEVENTH STREET, A CORNER FOR THIS LOT AND LOT 2; THENCE, TURNING AND RUNNING BY AND WITH WEST SEVENTH STREET, SOUTH 50 DEG 46' 00" EAST 20.00 FEET TO A NAIL; THENCE, CONTINUING WITH WEST SEVENTH STREET SOUTH 69 DEG 41' 20" EAST 60.10 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING THEREIN 7,814.6 SQUARE FEET OF LAND, MORE OR LESS AS SURVEYED BY BRAD A. TEMPLE, DATED APRIL 14, 1997. Being the same lands and premises which Lavonda E Cromwell, administrator of the Estate of Quentin L Cromwell, did grant and convey unto Lavonda E Cromwell, by deed dated June 28, 2000 and recorded on July 6th, 2000 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 02501, Page 098. Tax Parcel: 4-32-8.06228.00 Property Address: 530 West Seventh Street, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 1, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 5, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Sell-

er and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LAVONDA E. CROMWELL and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece, or parcel of land situated in a subdivision known as HUNTERS RUN, Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being all of lot #8 as shown on a plan recorded In Plot Book #48, Page #221, being more recently shown on a plan of ELLIOTT SURVEYING dated 3/16/98, said lot lying on the Westerly side of the County Road #570 (50 foot wide), and being bounded as follows; on the North by lot #9, on the East by Road #570, on the South by lot #7, and on the West by lands now or late of Russel C. Moore; being more particularly described as follows. BEGINNING at a point on the Wester1y side of Road #570, a corner for this lot and lot #9, said point being a found iron pipe located the following two (2) courses and distances from the point of commencement, which said point is the intersection of the centerline of Delaware Route #16 with the Westerly side of Road #570, said course are a measure in part along the Westerly side of Road #570: (1) 1,097 feet, measSee LEGALS—page 46


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007 LEGALS - from Page 45 ured in a Southerly direction, to a point, a found concrete monument, said point being the Northeaster1y corner for lot #12 of the above noted subdivision, thence, (2) South 28 deg. 15 min. 18 sec. West 697.04 feet to a point, the point of beginning; thence proceeding from the said point of beginning the following four (4) courses and distances: (1) South 28 deg. 15 min. 18 sec. West 174.26 feet measured along the Westerly side of Road #570, to a point, a found iron pipe, a corner lot for #7, thence with the same, (2) North 61 deg. 44 min. 42 sec. West 924.41 feet, passing over found iron pipes at 450.00 feet and 859.41 feet, to a point within the banks of the MarshyhopeCreek ditch in line of lands of the said Moore, thence along a line within the said "banks", with line of lands of the said Moore, (3) North 16 deg. 35 min. 15 sec. East 177.94 feet to a point, a corner for lot #9, thence with the same, (4) South 61 deg. 44 min. 42 sec. East 960.40 feet, passing over a found pipe at 65.00 feet and 510.40 feet, to a point, the point of beginning. Containing within said metes and bounds 3,770 acres of land, more or less. Being the same lands and premises which Gene R. Alverson and Sylvia M. Alverson (Deceased May 9, 2002) did grant and convey unto Rudy Salandanan and Louise Salandanan by deed dated May 30, 2003 and recorded on June 2, 2003 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 02843 Page 008. Tax Parcel: 5-30-2.0048.00 Property Address: 11638 Double Fork Road, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 1, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 5, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Sell-

er and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RUDY J. & LOUISE SALANDANAN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land with the improvements thereon situate, lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, and being more particularly bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a pipe located 201' from the northerly right of way line of County Road 535 at a corner for these lands and Parcel B; thence from said point of Beginning along a line between theses lands and lands now or formerly of Middleford Holding Company, Inc., North 53 degrees 08 minutes 00 seconds West 201.00' to a pipe; thence along a line between these lands and lands now or formerly of James M. Rowe North 62 degrees 41 minutes 42 seconds East 144.45' to a concrete monument; thence along a line between these lands and lands described below South 53 degrees 08 minutes 00 seconds East 175.00' to a concrete monument; thence along a line between these lands and Parcel B South 52 degrees 43 minutes 28 seconds east 135.16' to the point and place of beginning, containing 24,444 square

feet of land more or less. This parcel is known and designated as Parcel A on the survey by Miller-Lewis, Inc. dated June 3, 1997. Being the same lands and premises which Steven R. Ingram did grant and convey unto Cristobal Trejo and Anna R. Trejo by deed dated August 31, 1994 and recorded on September 1, 1994 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Rook 2001, Page 245. Tax Parcel: 3-31-6.00101.02 Property Address: 10188 Delvalle Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 1, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 5, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of CRISTOBAL & ANNA R. TREJO and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Com-

plex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Beginning at a pipe found on the northerly right of way line of Fourth Street at a corner for these lands and lands of Ngon Tran, et ux; thence with the Northerly right of way line of Fourth Street South 76 degrees 31 minutes 53 seconds West 77.10 feet to a railroad spike found at the intersection of the Northerly right of way line of Fourth Street with the Easterly right of way line of Cedar Avenue; thence with the Easterly right of way line of Cedar Avenue North 04 degrees 54 minutes 02 seconds West 75.17 feet to a pipe found on the Easterly right of way line of Cedar Avenue at a corner for these lands and lands of C. Bryan Bennett, Trustee of the C. Bryan Bennett Revocable Trust; thence with said Bennett lands North 77 degrees 41 minutes 03 seconds East 66.26 feet to a pipe found at a corner for these

PAGE 46 lands, lands of Ngon Tran, et ux, and in line of said Bennett lands; thence with said Tran lands South 13 degrees 11 minutes 37 seconds East 72.99 feet to a pipe found on the Northerly right of way line of Fourth Street located at the point and place of beginning, containing 5,290 square feet of land be the same more or less as shown on a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr., DEL.P.L.S. No. 242, dated April 11, 2006. Being the same lands and premises which Donna Liammayty did grant and convey unto Woodrow C. Murphy and Tammy L. Murphy by deed dated April 28, 2006 and recorded on May 2, 2006 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3303, Page 200. Tax Parcel: 4-31-4.0024.00 Property Address: 106 4th Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder

Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 1, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 5, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of WOODROW C. & TAMMY MURPHY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/6/2tc

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PAGE 47

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Sussex County Jamboree brought six hundred Democrats together by Frank Calio Six hundred Democrats from all over the state weathered 100 degree heat to attend the annual Sussex County Jamboree, Saturday, Aug. 25, at Cape Henlopen State Park, Lewes, to hear party leaders rally the party’s faithful for the 2008 elections. Although candidates predicted wins in '08, a cloud hung over the audience; four of the statewide open seats are contested with challengers which could lead to party primaries. They include two each seeking the Democrat nomination for governor, Lt. governor, congress, and insurance commissioner. The most watched race is for governor with current Lt. Gov. Jack Carney, and State Treasurer Jack Markell vying for their party’s nod. Both major political parties frown upon primaries, which usually divide a party and usually result in a win for the opposing party because disgruntled losers some-

times either don’t vote in the general election or support the other party’s candidates. The evening spotlighted Delaware’s U.S. Senator and presidential hopeful Joe Biden, who autographed his new book, “Promises to Keep.” U.S. Senator Tom Carper praised Biden’s work in the Senate and on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and urged support of the audience for Biden's presidential bid. Biden spoke on his views on the Iraq war, his views for ending the conflict, and his assessment of the first primary in Iowa in September and his chances of winning. Biden was first elected to the United States Senate in 1972 at the age of 29. While Biden’s polling numbers are down, and he struggles with fund raising, he feels he has strong support of the delegates who will do the voting and he intends to win. The Jamboree was hosted by the 14th District Democratic Committee.

Former Laurel Mayor Dick Stone, and wife Juanita Stone enjoy a fried chicken dinner at the Democrat Beach Jamboree.

U.S. Senator Joe Biden autographs his newly released book, “Promises To Keep”, while Betsy Davis, president of the Western Sussex Democrat Club, Laurel, back right, speaks to the senator’s wife, Jill, after having a book autographed.

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PAGE 48

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Sussex Tech recognized as ‘pacesetter’

Wilmington Trust program gets school supplies to children Wilmington Trust staff members recently donated schoolbags filled with school supplies to children at La Esperanza in Georgetown. The schoolbags were distributed to the children as part of Wilmington Trust’s Filla-Schoolbag program, a community outreach effort organized by Juntos, an internal Hispanic networking group, and BEACON, an internal African-American staff networking group, both sponsored by the Diversity Council of Wilmington Trust. The Diversity Council reflects the company’s commitment to diversity and serves as a resource for staff members. “Our goal is to help children whose families may not otherwise be able to afford school supplies,” said Wilmington Trust’s Lesley Rosario, organizer of the Fill-a-Schoolbag program. “It’s important for children to have what they need to get their school year off to a good start.” Staff members throughout Wilmington Trust donated supplies, such as pocket

Jonathan Sanchez Martinez, 8, and Angie Sanchez Martinez, 4, with their mother, Angelica Martinez, show off their new schoolbags filled with school supplies, received through the Niños Bien Educados program presented by La Oficina De los Niños in Wilmington. The bags were donated as part of a community outreach program sponsored by Wilmington Trust.

folders, notebook paper, glue sticks, crayons, rulers, erasers and tissues, to fill schoolbags. The schoolbags, purchased by Wilmington Trust, were given to children from low- to moderate-income households. In addition to filled schoolbags, extra school supplies will also be donated to the Latin American Community Center in Wilmington for children to use throughout

the year. More than 270 school-children throughout Delaware are benefiting from Wilmington Trust’s Fill-a-Schoolbag program. Earlier this month, filled schoolbags were donated to children at the Kingswood Community Center in Wilmington, the Niños Bien Educados Program in Wilmington, and the YMCA in Kent County.

Sussex Technical High School has been selected as a national High Schools That Work Pacesetter School based on the success of local school leaders and teachers in improving school practices and raising student achievement. The award was presented by Dave Spence, president of the Southern Regional Education Board, at the annual High Schools That Work Staff Development Conference in New Orleans recently. Spence praised the school for its achievement, pointing out that it takes dedication and hard work from state, district and school leaders, as well as teachers, to make progress in preparing students for college and a career in an increasingly competitive world. The school is one of 20 high schools in the nation to receive the 2007 Pacesetter Award. More than 1,100 high schools in 32 states participate in the school improvement initiative based on the premise that most students can master rigorous academic and career/technical studies under the right circumstances. The initiative engages state, district and school leaders in partnership with teachers, students, parents and the community to equip all students with the knowledge and skills needed to graduate from high school and succeed in college and the workplace.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

PAGE 49

Laurel Star Sports Delmar soccer looks for winning record, state tournament berth By Mike McClure

LAUREL POP WARNER- Above, Laurel’s Colin Bergh runs with the ball on a quarterback keeper during the Mitey Mite team’s win over Harrington last Saturday. Below, the Laurel Pop Warner Pee Wee football team’s defense prepares to make a play during last Saturday’s season opening win over Harrington. More photos on page 53. Photos by Mike McClure

Greg Cathell is back as the Delmar varsity soccer coach after coaching the team to a 9-6-1 mark two years ago. Cathell would like to see his team have a winning record and return to the state tournament while also competing for the Henlopen South title. Last year’s squad went 7-8 behind seniors Chris Phillips, Russell Lecates, Corey Basch, Brent Murrell, Craig Wilkinson, and Jamie Brinck. This year’s Wildcat team has one returning senior starter in Jarred Rittenhouse, who will be the team’s goalkeeper most of the time. “He definitely changes the whole complexion of the game,” Cathell said of his senior goalie. The top returning goal scorers are Denny Murray and Cody Webster with Casey Bellamy, the team’s stopper last

Continued on page 54

Delmar’s Cody Webster, shown with the ball during a home scrimmage, is one of the soccer team’s top returning scorers. Photo by Mike McClure

Wildcat senior Jarred Rittenhouse, shown dribbling the ball down field, will look to secure the Delmar defense as the team’s goalkeeper. Photo by Mike McClure

PEE WEE WIN- Laurel quarterback Bryce Bristow prepares to throw a pass as Tarez White, left, blocks during the Pop Warner football team’s 26-21 win over Harrington last Saturday in Laurel. Photo by Mike McClure

FINAL SCRIMMAGE- The Laurel varsity football team’s defense gets some work against Sussex Central in a home scrimmage last week. The Bulldogs also scrimmaged against Salesianum. Photo by Mike McClure


PAGE 50

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Shown (r to l) are the top three finishers in the SGCC Senior Ladies Golf Championship flight two net: Marilyn Simpler, first; Florence James, second; and Shirley Ellis, third.

Jenny Davis places first after sudden death playoff in Seaford Golf and Country Club Ladies Championship Jenny Davis (172) was the champion of the 2007 Seaford Golf and Country Club’s Ladies Club Championship after winning a sudden death playoff. The rest of the results follow: Sorenstam Flight- 1. Denise Dickerson, 172, 2. Judy Griffith, 186 Ochoa Flight- 1. Marilyn Simpler, 189, 2. Carol Schreffler, 200 Creamer Flight- 1. Shirley Ellis, 195, 2. Mary Pegram, 197 Inkster Flight- 1. Barbara Allen, 199, 2. Florence James, 214

Jenny Davis, shown with SGCC golf pro Matt Keller, was the 2007 SGCC Ladies Club champion after winning a sudden death playoff.

Barbara Allen, right, placed first and Carol Schreffler placed second in the Flight 1 net of the Seaford Golf and Country Club’s Senior Ladies Golf Championship. Not pictured is Rajani Purandare who placed second.

Messick wins Delmarva Peninsula Golf Association tourney Kyle Messick placed first in the Delmarva Peninsula Golf Association Junior Golf Tournament’s 16-17 year old division. Messick, a senior at Sussex Tech, played in the tournament at Hog’s Neck Aug. 14.


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

PAGE 51

Laurel/Seaford Star sports predictions: week 1 Mike McClureHigh school football- Sussex Tech at Milford- Milford 20-12This game is always a close one and the fact that the Bucs moved to the Henlopen South shouldn’t change that. If the game were being played at Sussex Tech I’d go with the Ravens and their senior laden backfield. Hodgson at Laurel- Laurel 21-12 Snow Hill at Seaford- Seaford 14-6 Wilmington Friends at Woodbridge- Wilmington Friends 21-20Wilmington Friends is supposed to be pretty tough this year, but they are playing against a Henlopen Conference team so they’ll actually have to work to get a win. Don’t be surprised if the homestanding Raiders win this one. Delmar at Cape May (NJ)- Delmar 28-12 High school field hockey- Sussex Tech at Seaford- Seaford 2-1 College football- West Chester at University of Delaware- UD 28-14- It would be easier to root for the Hens if they had more local players on their roster than West Chester does. Notre Dame at Penn State- Penn State 35-21- Well let’s see, I’m a Penn State fan and I don’t like Notre Dame. Still the top 20 ranked Lions, at home, should prevail. NFL- Philadelphia at Green Bay- Philly 21-10 Baltimore at Cincinnati- Cincinnati 17-14 Daniel RichardsonHigh school football- Sussex Tech at Milford- Sussex Tech 2410 Hodgson at Laurel- Laurel 21-20 Snow Hill at Seaford- Seaford 27-7 Wilmington Friends at Woodbridge- Woodbridge 24-21- It is too early to tell who will win the high school games, so this week I will go with most of the home teams. Delmar at Cape May (NJ)- Delmar 21-20 High school field hockey- Sussex Tech at Seaford- Seaford 3-2- Again I have to go with the home team. College football- West Chester at University of Delaware- UD 21-7 Notre Dame at Penn State- Penn State 24-10- I expect UD to bounce back from last season and Penn State definitely has the edge over Notre Dame. NFL- Philadelphia at Green Bay- Philadelphia 24-7- Philly is my team and Green Bay is not going anywhere as long as they start Favre. Baltimore at Cincinnati- Cincinnati 21-20- This will be a great game. The AFC North games are always good, even when Cleveland is involved. I will give the edge to Cincy at home. Jesse PiquetteHigh school football- Sussex Tech at Milford- Sussex Tech 21-7 Hodgson at Laurel- Laurel 42-0- I’m from Laurel and don’t know the scouting reports for the high school teams. Snow Hill at Seaford- Seaford 28-14 Wilmington Friends at Woodbridge- Woodbridge 28-21 Delmar at Cape May (NJ)- Delmar 28-0 High school field hockey- Sussex Tech at Seaford- Sussex Tech 3-1 College football- West Chester at University of Delaware- UD 17-10- University of Delaware is ranked number one in their division this year and the Blue Hens do not disappoint their fans at home. Notre Dame at Penn State- Penn State 28-10- Penn State is ranked in the top 20 and the team’s stadium is one of the toughest to play in. Notre Dame is looking at rebuilding. They have not said who will start at QB but most think it will be Demetrius Jones. NFL- Philadelphia at Green Bay- Philadelphia 24-10- Green Bay hasn’t been good for awhile and I don’t expect them to be a good team anytime soon. Philadelphia, on the other hand, must be the NFC East favorite. The Eagles will rely on their defense to make plays. Brett Favre will throw at least two interceptions. Baltimore at Cincinnati- Baltimore 17-13- Last year the Ravens went 13-3 and were ranked second in the NFL going into the playoffs. Can Cincinnati stop McNair and the Ravens’ offense? Sports editor’s note: The Star is making high school, college, and pro predictions for the first time starting this week. Send your week two predictions (with scores) to sports editor Mike McClure at sports@mspublications.com or 302-629-9243 (f) by Thursday, Sept. 13 at 5 p.m. Please include your name and phone number. The reader with the most correct picks will be a guest prognosticator in a future edition of the Star. Week two games- high school soccer- Sussex Tech at Seaford; high school field hockey- Delmar at Laurel; high school football- Polytech at Woodbridge, Laurel at Delcastle, Cape Henlopen at Delmar, Laurel at Delcastle, Seaford at Wilmington Friends; college football- West Virginia at Maryland; NFL- New York Jets at Baltimore, Washington at Philadelphia

Seaford/Laurel Star sports section has a new e-mail address Got sports? Send your sports scores, photos, and press releases to the Star’s new sports e-mail address: sports@mspublications.com. You also still send info to 302-6299243 (f). Call sports editor Mike McClure at 302-629-9788 with any questions. Coaches are asked to send their scores from Monday and Tuesday games to sports@mspublications.com for inclusion in our Monday/Tuesday scoreboard.


PAGE 52

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Young Delmar volleyball team looks for continued improvement in 2007 By Mike McClure Herb Simon takes the helm as the Delmar girls’ volleyball head coach this season. Simon has coached high school volleyball for the past 13 years and has also coached men’s club volleyball at Towson University, men’s volleyball at Villa Julie College, and an assistant girls’ coach at Loyola. Simon has helped develop two AllAmericans who are currently playing Division III college volleyball. He also continues to play the sport and will play in nationals in the 70 and older division. Returning from last year’s Wildcat squad are: seniors Melinda Quillen (OH) and juniors Carolyn Zimmerman (MH-O), Katyln Elliott (O-S), Gabby Andrade (LOH), Jayme West (MH), Kelsey Murrell (S), Meghan Gordy (OH-L), Shayne Harvey (MH-O), and Elise Breda (MH). The team’s newcomers include juniors Brittani Scott (OH) and Annika Nichols (S-OH) and sophomore Sarah Smith (OH). Simon calls West his top captain, Zimmerman his best skilled player, and An-

drade (libero) the best back court player he has ever coached. He also sees Elliott as his most athletic player, Murrell as his top hustler, and Scott and Quillen are the best all around players. Simon says the team’s other starters (Smith, Gordy, and Breda) have great desire. “It’s a great group of girls to work with,” said Simon. “All the qualities are there, they just lack the skill right now and knowing where they need to be on the court. I’m really excited about the program.” Simon is pleased with his team’s aggressiveness, desire to win, effort, and athleticism. The team’s youth (one senior), lack of knowledge of the game, and lack of certain skills are concerns entering the regular season. “I think we have a lot of potential,” Simon said. “I think I have a very athletic team.” Simon said he usually knows who will play where coming in to the season, but as a first year coach of a program that is only in its third year he is still discovering the best players in each of the different areas of the game.

Shawn Phillips finishes regular season with eighth win Laurel graduate Shawn Phillips finished the regular season with an 8-4 mark with a win last Friday. Phillips allowed two hits in seven shutout innings while striking out five and walking one in the Windy City ThunderBolts’ 4-3 win over Traverse City. Phillips is 8-4 with a 2.45 ERA and 12 walks and 100 strikeouts in 121.1 innings. He ranks fourth in the Frontier League in ERA and third in strikeouts. Phillips and his team were scheduled to begin playoff play this week.

Delmar’s Gabby Andrade, left, and Katie Elliott are two key returning players for the Wildcats’ varsity volletball team which will begin its third season next week. Photos by Mike McClure BULLDOG RUNLaurel’s Jamar Archer looks for running room against the Salesianum defense during last Friday’s scrimmage. Photo by Mike McClure

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

PAGE 53

MITEY MITES- The Laurel Mitey Mite coaches talk things over with their players before the start of the fourth quarter during the team’s home and season opener last Saturday. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel Pee Wee football team tops Harrington, 26-21

Above, Laurel’s Jerron Tull (left) runs with the ball after making a catch during the Pee Wee football team’s win over Harrington last weekend. Pee Wee player Christian Ellsworth hauls in a fourth down pass from Bryce Bristow for a touchdown in the same game. Below, the Laurel Pee Wee offense looks to put some more points on the board. Photos by Mike McClure

The Pee Wee Bulldogs hosted the Harrington Huskies in the season opener last Saturday with the little Bulldogs scoring first on the first play from scrimmage. Tarez White took the handoff and went 63 yards for a touchdown. The extra point pass was good from Bryce Bristow to Derrick Eskridge. The Huskies would come right back with a 51 yard run of their own and the extra point was good to tie the score at 7 at the end of the first quarter. Harrington scored again on a 55-yard run and the extra point was good. Laurel would score on a 25-yard pass from Bryce Bristow to Christian Ellsworth with the extra point no good making the score 14-13 Harrington. After Laurel blocked a punt, White scored on a five-yard run and the extra point was no good making the score 19-14 Laurel. On the last play of the half Harrington would score on a 40 yard run and the extra point was good making the score 21-19 Harrington. Both defenses tightened up as there were no points scored until fourth quarter. With just over four minutes to go in the game the little Bulldogs would take over at their own 33 yard line. Bryce Bristow hit Devin Collins with a eight-yard scoring pass as Collins tight roped the sideline with only 12 seconds left on the clock. The extra point pass from Bristow to Jerron Tull was good to make the final score Laurel 26, Harrington 21. White had 14 carries for 179 yards and two touchdowns; Bristow completed seven of 16 passes for 68 yards, two touchdowns, and two extra points; Tull caught four passes for 40 yards; and Ellsworth had one reception for 25 yards and a touchdown. Collins led the defense with 10 solo tackles and three assists, Dylan Bunner had four solo tackles and eight assists, Daylin McCausland made four solo tackles, Tull added three solo tackles and an assist, and Bristow made two solo tackles and two assists. Laurel hosts Cape this Saturday.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007 Delmar soccer continued year, also moving up to midfield. Sophomore Corey Phillips, who saw some time last year, will start at left outside. Cathell is looking for Bellamy, Phillips and the other Wildcat players to take some of the pressure off of Murray and Webster. The team’s newcomers include sweeper Zach Bettes and defenders Sean Wilkerson and Sean Deen. While the majority of the Wildcat defenders are young, Rittenhouse will help solidify the defense. The Wildcats lack depth and are looking for some consistency from the defense. Cathell is looking for some big things from his offense.

“This is the fastest offensive team I’ve ever had,” said Cathell. “I’ve been more of a ball movement kind of coach.” Cathell expects his team to be competitive with Indian River, which he expects to be the team to beat in the Henlopen South. “We’re definitely going to have to have out best game when we face them (IR), but we’re not going to take anybody for granted,” Cathell said. “We’re ready to go. We’re battle tested (after scrimmages against Parkside and Mardela). We just have to stay healthy.” The Wildcats face a tough test in the season opener (at Caesar Rodney Sept. 11) before hosting Cape Henlopen on Sept. 13 in the home opener.

New Laurel varsity soccer coach Tony Matthews, left, looks on during a recent practice. Matthews believes his team can improve if the players play together as a team. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel soccer team looks to work together as a team under new coach By Mike McClure The Laurel varsity soccer team, behind five seniors and first year head coach Tony Matthews, looks to show improvement this season by working together as a team. Matthews, who is originally from London, has coached NYSA youth soccer and Crown Sports soccer but this is his first time as a varsity head coach. He says he enjoys coaching high school soccer because the older players understand more and are able to grasp what he wants them to do quicker. As of last week the Bulldogs had just 12 players, but Matthews is hopeful he can pick up some freshmen with the start of school. His returning experienced varsity players include top scorers Lineker Valladares and Kyle Brown up front and seniors L.J. Watts, Jose Sanchez, Josh Brittingham, David Bartee, and Joey Kempf who will anchor the defense. Matthews is looking for his team to

improve upon last year by improving its passing game and being more competitive in games. “It’s a team game. There is no “I” in team,” Matthews said. “Someone loses the ball and they all have to be on the defense. If you lose it you just can’t give up.” “He knows a lot about soccer. His experience is really helping us a lot,” said Bartee, who is in his third year with the team. “He’s figuring out a lot of what we were lacking from past seasons.” Among the Henlopen Conference teams Laurel will have to contend with is Cape Henlopen which features a number of returning players. Unlike other programs, Laurel does not have a JV team, something Matthews would like to see happen. In the meantime, the Laurel players are hopeful about the coming season. “We’re actually excited about playing the first game,” Valladares said. “I can’t wait for our first game.” “It feels a lot more hopeful than in past

Delmar’s Casey Bellamy tries to keep the ball in play during a home scrimmage against Parkside last week. Bellamy moves to midfield this year after serving as the team’s stopper last season. Photo by Mike McClure

years,” added Bartee. While the team has been able to work on its teamwork during practices, Matthews and his team are ready to start

the season. “Practicing every night is one thing but there’s nothing like match night,” Matthews said.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy! Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

Preview stories before the season begins, only in the Star.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

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Sussex Tech cross country teams feature six returning seniors Head coach- Lou Nicoletti Number of years coaching- 10 at ST Last season- boys- 8-2 overall, 7-2 conference; girls- 4-6 Returning runners- boys— seniors Dave Ricksecker, Derek Kitchen, Steve Spera, Rob Davidson, Evan Lieb; sophomore Brian Singh girls-senior Kariann Flynn; juniors Dee Carrillo, Emma Mancusco, Casey Carter; freshmen Paige Collins and Rachel Crum Team strengths- experience Concerns- depth

Sussex Tech soccer has many returning players from ‘06 Head coach- Carlos Villa Years coaching- eight Last season- 5-11, 5-10 Returning players- Evan Lee (MF), Ariel Espinoza (MF), Nathan Zanks (D), Sebastian Borror (F), and Geoffrey Morton (G) Team strengths- many returning players

Sussex Tech football team has a large number of senior backs SOCCER DONATION- Sussex Technical High School’s soccer program recently received a donation from USA Promotions, an international promoter of soccer, for its cooperation in producing soccer tournaments last April with the Family League of Delmarva and for helping with tournaments at Delaware State University. Shown in photo at the presentation are, left to right: Gerson Guox, president of USA Promotions; Joe Thomson, Sussex Tech athletic director; Carlos Villa, Sussex Tech soccer coach; Dr. Patrick Savini, Sussex Tech superintendent; and Bruce Fitzgerald, director of operations for USA Promotions.

Head coach- Bill Collick Years coaching- seventh year Offense- Quarterback- senior Josh Marshall (6’ 2”, 180 lbs), junior Zach Adkins; WR- sophomore Sean Hopkins and junior Andrew Townsend (6’ 4”, 170 lbs); Backfield- seniors Tyrone Hickman (HB), Darius Sivels (HB), George Godwin (FB), Jamar Beckett (5’ 10”, 225 lb. FB), and Marcus Dukes (WB); TE- juniors Jake Mitchell (6’ 4”, 230 lbs) and Robert Furbush (6’ 3”, 185 lbs); C- sophomore Josh Cooper (6’ 1”, 200 lbs) and Jermaine Cannon (6’ 2”, 205 lbs); Offensive tackles- junior Tyler Justice (6’ 2”, 220 lbs), seniors Corey Wyatt (6’ 2”, 215 lbs) and Cannon, sophomore Jon Davis (6’ 2”, 200 lbs); Guards- sophomore Joey Casullo (6’ 1”, 225) and senior Robert Chandler placekicker/punter- junior Seth Hastings Defense- Defensive end- sophomores Casullo and Hastings; Defensive tackle- junior Jack Mitchell (6’ 5”, 240 lbs), senior Beckett, junior Earl Batten (6’ 4”, 245 lbs), sophomore Terrance White (6’, 225 lbs); Linebackers- sophomore Andrew Hitchens (6’ 2”, 190 lbs), senior Godwin, senior Dukes, junior Adkins; Defensive backs- seniors Sivels, Terrell Hutchins, and Hickman, junior Townsend, sophomore Hopkins Synopsis- “The Sussex Tech football team will return an experienced backfield with Sivels, Hickman, Godwin, and Beckett. Wide receiver Sean Hopkins is a threat to score. It will be important for the offensive line of Justice, Cooper, Wyatt, Cannon, Chandler, Davis, and Casullo to come together early in hopes of establishing the run as well as protecting the quarterback.”

Delaware Stingers to hold indoor tryouts starting Sunday

Kathy Boyd was the champion in the Seaford Golf and Country Club’s Senior Ladies Golf Championship.

Colin Handy was received the high point award for the SGCC Gators’ 6u boys division. Not pictured is Josh Bredbenner who received the most improved award. Photo by Steve Bradley

The Delaware Stingers field hockey teams will be holding tryouts for the 2007-2008 indoor hockey season on September 9 and September 16. These tryouts are for girls in the U14, U16, and U19 age divisions. Any girls interested in trying out should call Lloydlee Heite at 302 337-8545 or e mail him at Lloydlee@dol.net for your tryout time or for more information. This is for returning players and new players as well. The Delaware Stingers play in Dover in the winter as well as travel to Pa., Md., Va., and Del. for tournaments.

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Syndney Beard (high point) and Jenna Procino (most improved) received awards in the 8u girls division during the Gators’ awards ceremony Aug. 12 at the Seaford Golf and Country Club. Photo by Steve Bradley

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Star Sports Calendar SDR signups taking place- Signups are going on now for the following Seaford Department of Recreation programs: Youth Tackle Football- ages 7-13, the cost is $ 30 and includes a physical; NFL Youth Flag Football- ages 6-14, the cost is $ 20; Youth Cheerleading- ages 7-14, the Cost is $40 and cheerleaders keep their uniforms; Youth Field Hockey- ages 8-12, the cost is $20 and includes a t-shirt. Call 629-6809 for more information or come by the office to sign up. Sussex County Sports Foundation to host Fall baseball, softball- The Sussex County Sports Foundation will be hosting Fall Ball for baseball and softball teams. Teams will alternate play every other Sunday at the Laurel Little League complex. Teams ages will be 9U-18U. Registration is $40 per player on each roster. Registration includes a Fall ball shirt. Registrants can register as a team or as an individual and individuals will be placed on a team according to age. Play will start on September 9 and continue through November 4. There will be two games per Sunday. For more information call 302-644-7777 or visit www.scsportsfoundation.com. Registrants will be taken on a first come basis.

Delaware Storm 16U baseball team to hold golf tournament Shown (not in order) are the SGCC 10u girls’ award winners: High Point- Catherine Mackler; Most improved- Kendal Butterworth; Best Attitude- Emma O’Donnell; Coach awards- Abby Adams, Gabby Alicea, Lindsey Banning, Shannon Bradley, Alex Kimpton, Annie Perdue, Erika Smith and Hailey Parks. Photo by Steve Bradley

SGCC Gators end swim season with awards ceremony The SGCC Gators met for one last time for the 2007 swim season on August 12 to acknowledge those swimmers that sacrificed over half of their summer vacation to make a difficult year a success. Angie Tinsman, the coach for 2007, thanked everyone for their patience and participation. She made sure that there was an award for every kid on the team. One of her main goals is to have overwhelming support and moral for each swimmer. Also in attendance was Mr. and Mrs. John Hollis, to present the John Hollis Award to Chelsey Procino. This award is presented to the swimmer that displays overwhelming personal achievements, leadership, courage and discipline. The award winner has to be viewed as a mentor for other members of the team. SGCC’s Jacob Procino (high point); James Hemmen (most improved), not pictured; and N a t h a n Bradley (best attitude) received awards in the 12u boys division. Photo by Steve Bradley

The Delaware Storm 16U Baseball Team will be holding its second annual golf tournament on Friday, Sept. 28 at the Sussex Pines Country Club in Georgetown. Registration is at 8 a.m. with shot gun start at 9 a.m. The cost is $400 per team and includes golf, cart, lunch, and gift bag. Format will be four person scramble. If you have questions or would like to register, please contact Guy Wilkins at 856-9058 or Alan Shields at 875-3174.

Seaford Bowling Lanes wraps up summer league play The Seaford Bowling Lanes wrapped up summer league play recently. Fall leagues start this week. The Wednesday Summer Adult/Youth results follow: High games and series- Russ Moore 281; Lee Bibb 776; Shirley Prettyman 297; Paula Zoller 741; Ryan Prettyman 297, 789; Taylor Richey 294, 779 Summer Adult/Youth standings- 1. Fantastic Four 40-16, 2. K.O. Smachers 36-20, 3. Destroyers 29.5-26.5, 4. The Dogs 27-29, 5t. The N Squad 25.5-30.5, 5t. Crash Tube Dumbies 25.5-30.5, 7. Just 4 Fun 24.5-31.5, 8t. Pin Busters 24-32, 8t. Topeka 24-32, 10. The Red Sox 22-34

Sussex Slammers 11U travel baseball team to hold tryouts The Sussex Slammers 11U travel baseball team is having its last tryout for the upcoming 08’ season on Saturday, Sept. 8 from 1-3 p.m. at the little league complex on the city field in Seaford (across from the Ace Hardware). The team will participate in approximately six tournaments in ‘08 and will be heading to Cooperstown in ‘09. Please call Mike Sturgeon 302-245-8612 or Darrel Banning 302-249-2418 for any questions.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy! Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

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Award winners in the 8u boys age group are Dominic Longo- high point, Sebastian Buenano- most improved (not pictured), Christopher Smith- best attitude; and Alvaro Buenano- coach award (not pictured). Photo by Steve Bradley

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

The horrors and emotional damage caused by recess I now understand why I have so many unresolved emotional issues. ONY INDSOR It is because my elementary school recklessly and thoughtlessly alLooking back on this I lowed us to play tag during school recess. What a malicious and mennow see just how acing game this is! damaged I am because of I will join what I hope are throngs of Americans totally mystified by the recent decision by some the affects of this school schools to ban the game of tag yard run amok. among its elementary school students. Apparently, this game has caused emotional issues with children who school EQ professionals. Here is one that comes to mind. Chilhad been chased by other students and led dren line up against the wall of the school in some cases, to school yard arguments and another student hurls a ball at them. and fighting. Sounds like pretty normal The student who gets struck by the ball is school yard antics to me. out of the game. We called that “Dodge I vividly recall being tagged “it” and Ball.” I still have nightmares of that ball then running like a mentally challenged coming vengefully toward my more sensigoat after every student body that was tive body areas. Oh the horror of it! within eyesite. And, yes, I will venture to Oh yea, then there is the game where guess that there were a number of these we throw an unassuming member of our students who did not particularly care for school yard colleagues down on the me smacking them on the back or other ground and yell, “pile on!” Then from body area and shouting “you’re it!” So, I seemingly nowhere hordes of young’uns am probably opening up myself to a lawcome running from all points on the playsuit by even admitting this. ground and drop like a pile of rocks onto But, I have to say. “Tag” was the least aggressive of the school yard recess games the pile. This game we appropriately that we played as kids. Given today’s stan- called, “Pile On.” I was on the bottom of the pile on numerous occasions and every dards, I cringe to consider the other more time felt the same: like there were a huge regular games we played and how they pile of kids on top of me. Okay, now I am may be viewed by some parents and

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feeling that I certainly have grounds for a negligence lawsuit against Crisfield Elementary #1. Oh, my goodness, I almost forgot the most treacherous school yard game we played, “War.” Here is a game worthy of an independent psychological study. The key to this game is to use your school class time just prior to recess to choose up teams. This way once you get to the playground you head to the big open field and the two teams stand at opposite ends. Oh, I almost forgot, we did not refer to ourselves as teammates or to this as a game. It was “War,” and we were warriors. Once both teams of warriors were lined up and ready, the head honcho, who was usually Jesse Brittingham, because he was older and seemed more like a warrior than the rest of us, would shout at the top of his lungs, “Charge!” Now, perhaps my memory is slightly askew, but as I recall the aftermath of Jesse’s yelled order, was nothing less than a cross between “Brave Heart” and “They Died with Their Boots On.” Scores of young’uns would haul across the field like they were after money. Somewhere in the middle of the field we would converge and bodies would be thrown here and there like bags of trash on collection day. When the recess bell rang, the team with the most players still standing, or able to walk, would be declared the winner.

Okay, after my few examples of school yard recreation, do I sense a lawyer out there salivating and chomping at the bit to take on my case of mental and physical anguish? Looking back on this I now see just how damaged I am because of the affects of this school yard run amok. Where were the school officials when all of this was taking place right under their noses? I tell you where they were, some were doing recess accompaniment with the younger children and others were preparing class for our studies. My recommendation is to let kids be kids and let’s stop adults from stepping in every five minutes in an effort to find evidence of some kind of emotional abuse. There are real, horrific things happening to our children everyday, some even in their own households. This is where our energies should be spent as an effort to protect our young people both mentally and physically. For the most part, I hope we can agree that developing games on the school yard playground has always been a source of creativity and, yes, in some cases, the catalyst for a shoving match or even bloody nose. But, in my opinion, this is part of growing up and learning how to co-exist in this society. Note: The previous comments do not represent the opinion of an academic professional or psychological expert.

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way. Mr. Calio ignores this data. I suspect he was aligned with the crowd [AARP included] who were against Part-D Medicare prescription drug coverage. Fortunately, reason prevailed and today more seniors are enjoying an affordable prescription drug coverage driven by competition. In fact the number of seniors [myself included] who purchased prescription drugs from Canada has dropped by 50%. That tells me that the government does not know how to manage programs and decides on the basis of what is politically correct vs. the facts. The second column has to do with bashing the oil companies. He claims that “Big Oil” is somehow restricting the supply in order to gouge the consumer. This

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should get attention. But, recent facts suggest that there are 47 million Americans who do not have health care coverage [about 12% of the total population]. Now, Clinton & Obama and Edwards [whose recent positions are polluted with numerous contradictions] all call this an outrage. When one looks at the data closely, 25 million are illegal immigrants. Granting free health care to this sector could create a rush to the U.S. borders by Mexican, Central American and South American citizens, [to take advantage of this perk] the size of which is mind boggling. Also, another third of these individuals are 18-25 year olds who have come off their parent’s coverage and who feel that they do not need this coverage any-

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As a new reader of the Seaford Star, I read a number of columns in order to get a sense of the local minds. One column [that of Frank Calio] appears to be so distorted as to cause me to wonder why the Star continues to publish such trash. I have read two of his columns and both are so far left wing as to contain little or no fact. Yes, he spouts data and statistics. But the sad part is that he is playing to the reader who is not savvy on the topic he is presenting. Let me give some examples. The first article I read was about free health care. Now there is some free health care in this country [indigent hospital care] where the hospital treats the poor and spreads such cost to other paying customers. And, yes there is some need which

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007 blatant misrepresentation would not appear if Mr. Calio had even a minute understanding of the oil market operation mechanics and economics 101. Without going into micro detail, let me give you a few examples as to why he is wrong. Oil and gasoline pricing is driven by the commodities market. Traders here and around the world trade these commodities. Mr. Calio would have us believe that Big Oil can somehow manipulate all these thousands of traders to conform to the wishes of Big Oil. Second, the supply line is driven by independent shippers using super tankers. Again, he would have us believe that all

the world shipping companies would agree to have their vessels sitting idly in ports around the world while the oil companies make up their minds as to when they may offload. Does he know the cost of keeping just one of those tankers sitting an extra day? Third, recent market values for these two commodities were moving in opposite directions because the refinery capacity in this country is at its limit and any breakdown or shutdown for maintenance will cause a rise in price. In fact, earlier this year we had an over supply of crude oil while gasoline was in short supply. If the Democrats want cheaper gasoline prices for Americans [like they would

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have us believe] one option is to support expanding refining capacity. Finally, the biggest flaw in Mr. Calio’s diatribe is his lack of knowledge of what drives decisions at the highest levels in American Business — the stockholder and market financial analysts. These folks can do much damage to company earnings the minute that suspect inefficient operations. In closing let me suggest that Mr. Calio’s only objective is to get a Democrat elected and not present a fact based position on the topics he chooses. There is no doubt that Mr. Calio is a Socialist. His star democratic candidate [Clinton] has announced her presidency’s basic foundation: “Shared prosperity with

shared responsibility.” Folks, this is Socialism! It hasn’t worked outside this country and it will not work within it. The best asset America can have is an informed mind. Mr. Calio is simply playing to the uninformed. His mind and many of his type is like concrete: all mixed up and permanently set. Mr. Editor, why not give us someone who knows something about which he writes and send Mr. Calio to pasture? I'm tired of reading such trash. Robert Daley Seaford

U.S. remains vulnerable despite best efforts in Iraq It's time to bring our troops RANK ALIO home from Iraq. There are still The recent right wing TV a few who bead suggesting that if we lieve we can win the war in Iraq. pull out of Iraq and the From there, we President's statement that can defeat Al Qaeda and find our withdrawal would be a Osama bin surrender are not true. Laden. The saying, "better to keep country cut, the deficit grow, the the terrorist over there, than in rich get richer, and the middle this country," still rings loudly in class lose ground. circles of some believers. While our troops were dying According to two separate in August, the Iraqi Parliament CNN reports, neither is happendecided to take a month-long vaing. cation. A senior government official When they are in session 17 of who has seen a new U.S. govern- 37 Iraqi Cabinet ministers either ment analysis says Al Qaeda is boycott or don't attend Cabinet the strongest it has been since the meetings. They have yet to pass aftermath of the September 11, key legislation in energy resource 2001, terrorist attacks. sharing and the future roles of Another CNN report claims former members of Hussein's the nightmarish political realities Baath Party. in Baghdad are prompting AmeriEven President Bush has excan officials to curb their vision pressed frustration with efforts by for democracy in Iraq; instead, the government of Prime Ministhe officials now say they are ter Nuri al-Maliki to promote powilling to settle for a government litical reconciliation. Last week, that functions and can bring secu- he reversed himself again, and rity. said he supported the Iraq leader. Do you think our administraDelaware's U.S. Senator and tion in Washington might finally presidential hopeful Joe Biden be getting the message? I doubt if has been saying for months we the message has sunk in with the will never see a unified governtop two officials, but maybe ment in Iraq because there are some are finally getting it. several fractions, different groups Having spent some $160 bilwho each want power to rule, and lion American dollars, we are no will not concede to unification. further ahead of the game in Iraq Biden suggests giving each of than the day we invaded the them a slice of the country that country. We are losing more these groups can call their own troops than we did with the invapiece of real estate and form a sion. government with representatives According to the CNN report, from each. exasperated front-line U.S. generAt the last Democrat presidenals talk openly of non-democratic tial debate, many candidates governmental alternatives, and, agreed with Biden's comments while the two top U.S. officials in regarding settling the civil war in Iraq still talk about preserving the Iraq. country's efforts to develop demBoth political parties in this ocratic institutions, they say their country have agreed it is impossiambitions aren't as “lofty” as they ble to just pull out, that there will once had been. always be an American presence The failure of the new govern- there. ment to gain control of their peoThe U.S. government has long ple is a bitter pill for the U.S. cautioned that a fully functioning who has seen thousands of soldemocracy would be slow to diers and civilians killed or emerge in Iraq. But with key maimed, social programs in this

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U.S. senators calling for el-Maliki's removal, some senior U.S. military commanders even suggest privately that the entire Iraqi government must be removed and replaced with a stable, secure, but not necessarily democratic, entity. Our President convinced Congress and Americans that Iraq was a threat because they had weapons of mass destruction and that Saddam was connected with Al Qaeda, both statements proven to have no substance. The recent right wing TV ad suggesting that if we pull out of Iraq and the President's statement that our withdrawal would be a surrender are not true. I will have more on this TV ad when I round up my facts. The comments that a pull out is a surrender is a slap in the face of the Americans who sacrificed their lives in Korea and Vietnam. We didn't surrender there; we left them better places and we still have troops in both countries. But our leaders then were smart enough to know we could-

n't win. To bring our troops home would save lives. As a matter of fact, we have American troops in Germany, Italy, and Japan, almost everywhere in the world, except the number needed in this country if we are ever attacked. The rationale in Iraq was if we defeated Saddam, we would end terrorism. Al Qaeda never had a presence in Iraq while Saddam was in power. If they did, Saddam would not have had the trouble finding the group that we do, and all would have been eliminated. But I understand the presence of Al Qaeda is now known in Iraq. The CNN report claims the White House's view is that "over the past six years, we have prevented attacks from al Qaeda by taking the fight to them," according to a senior administration official. "But they are an enemy that adapts," he concluded. Despite the billions we have spent in Iraq, and other countries looking for the terrorist group,

our Homeland Security Secretary chief and other officials warn that al Qaeda remains a serious threat and that the United States is vulnerable despite the numerous security changes made since September 11, 2001. Gee, what a great return on our $160 billion investment! What I've never understood is that our intelligence people tell lawmakers that al Qaeda leaders hiding in Pakistan are able to maintain relationships "with affiliates through the Middle East, North and East Africa and Europe." We can tap into personal conversations in this country, but we can't tap conversations with al Qaeda leaders that could lead us to Osama bin Laden? I can't believe that with all of our intelligence, we can't find that guy. Sounds like our government doesn't want to find them so that they can continue to have us live in fear of another 9-11 and take our minds off the costly and deadly war in Iraq.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Multi-cultural day-care center receives $50,000 USDA grant Group hopes to build new facility by 2010 Primeros Pasos, a non-profit organization dedicated to the establishment of a multi-cultural early child care and education center for all children of families living and working in the Georgetown area, has received a $50,000 federal grant. The organization’s center at 101 Savannah Rd. in Georgetown, opened this fall with 15 children as part of its first class. Sen. Tom Carper, Congressman Mike Castle and USDA Rural Development State Director Marlene Elliott recently announced the grant. “Sussex County is growing so quickly and I am pleased that another facility has opened in Georgetown to meet the needs that come with a growing population,” said Carper. “Many members of that population are children who deserve the opportunity to develop and flourish in their communities and grow up to be leaders in our state.” The federal funding was pro-

vided through a USDA Rural Development special initiative designed to develop and improve the quality of child care services in rural America. “The Bush Administration recognizes that access to quality child care is a major component in helping the unemployed and underemployed make the transition to employment,” said Elliott. “All children need to learn and develop the skills necessary to grow up healthy and strong. I am confident that this facility will be a good neighbor in the community and bring an improved quality of life to all who walk through their door.” USDA Rural Development is committed to the future of rural communities. Last year, the agency returned over $53 million to rural Delaware. “We are very grateful to USDA for their support of this important community project,” said the Rev. Earl Beshears, president of Primeros Pasos.

Primeros Pasos was formed 10 years ago to provide low-income children, many of whom are from Spanish-speaking parents, with early childhood education and care. Its center is situated in a modular classroom, but the organization hopes to build a larger in three years that will serve 80 to 100 children. A $1.8 million capital campaign is under way to raise money to build the early education center. The center will be built with environmentally friendly components. The public is invited to the ribbon cutting ceremony for the modular building at First Steps Primeros Pasos on Thursday, Sept. 27, at 10 a.m. There will be tours and the children will present a program.

Senator Carper and Congressman Castle present a $50,000 USDA Rural Development grant to Primeros Pasos, a multicultural early care and education center that is scheduled to open in Georgetown on Sept. 4. From left: the Rev. Earl Beshears, president of Primeros Pasos; Carper; Marlene Elliott, USDA Rural Development state director; Castle; Gene Dvornick, Georgetown town manager; Trudy Cole, program director; and Lynne Maloy, executive director.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

PAGE 61

Bear hunting, avalanche — thank goodness it was a dream! Dreams. We all have them. Now, I am not talking of our wishAT URPHY es in the years ahead. I'm talking about those things in our minds As I lay there, the thought that, when we wake up fully in the morning, we remember but usually ran through my mind, not for too long. Over the m any years of my life, “You don't suppose he I've had some good ones. But the will call his brother ‘Ol’ other evening I may have had a Sure Shot’ Dick Whaley, to nightmare instead of a dream. It seems that Wayne Whaley of the rescue, do you?” Laurel and I were on a bear hunting trip out west and I went over a I know "Ol’ Sure Shot" would come and cliff in a snow avalanche. Now mind you, get me — well, Bob would! I've never been hunting in my life except one January evening coon hunting in EldoNorris Niblett was telling me the other rado. day that the Bethel postmaster, Roger Anyway, Wayne could not get to me so Joseph, is the first male to his knowledge he said he would call for help. As I lay ever at the post office. there, the thought ran through my mind, “You don't suppose he will call his brother Speaking of Bethel, Janet Cordrey ‘Ol’ Sure Shot’ Dick Whaley, to the reswanted me to know that she is not the orcue, do you?” ganizer of Bethel Heritage Day, the event Well, I woke up and I'll never know if I that is returning after a five-year absence got off that mountain or not. from the scene. She is just one of many I told my wife about this and she said it who are involved in it. She felt that a rewas because I talked to Wayne at the carcent story made it seem as if she was the nival recently. Then she laughed as she only one who is organizing the event. A added, “It’s the Whaleys coming back to very humble person, she would have none haunt you.” of that. Well, life is funny like that sometimes.

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Laurel football coach Ed Manlove said in a conversation the other day that he is very grateful for the Pop Warner football program. It has made his job easier and it is a great program. You can look for Pop Warner to have another good year if the recent scrimmage means anything, as the players ran up and down the field like it was just another walk in the park. The program’s first games were on Saturday, Sept. 1. Thursday evening was a busy time behind the school as the league fundraiser and pizza delivery was taking place. Steve Gordy is one of the leaders of this organization. American Legion Post 19 in Laurel is planning a Veteran’s Day service for the community. More on this in the fall. The recent story run only in the Seaford paper about the Mlyczek home on Dual 13 got my attention. For many of us, George Mlyczek was a well-known and trusted friend. His wife had already passed and he lived in that huge house by himself. Bill “Ace” Himes and I visited George on several New Year’s Days and we usually spent a couple hours there reminiscing and mostly talking baseball. George had a cleaning lady who

Litter-Free Delaware Day is set for Sept. 29 The Delaware Department of Transportation (DelDOT) will host the third annual “Imagine A Litter-Free Delaware” cleanup day on Saturday, Sept. 29. DelDOT has designated this as a statewide cleanup day when everyone is invited to come out to clean Delaware’s roads, highways and community areas. Especially invited to participate are volunteers with the Adopt-A-Highway and Adopt-A-Bike Path programs. Businesses, citizens and homeowners are also being asked to ensure that trash is well contained, to pick up debris blowing around their property and to step outside to sweep

a sidewalk, pick up sticks, or rake leaves. In addition, Secretary of Transportation Carolann Wicks is requesting that DelDOT maintenance forces pay special attention to cleaning Delaware’s roadsides during the week of Oct. 1-5. There is no fee to participate. Anyone cleaning roadways should visit the nearest DelDOT district office during the week of Sept. 24-28 to obtain safety information, safety vests and trash bags. One free pair of sunglasses will be given to the participants when they pick up their supplies. Following the cleanup, participants

should either dispose of the trash themselves (i.e., via household trash pick up, landfill, etc.), or place it near a highway sign for DelDOT to pick up. If you need DelDOT to remove the trash bags, call the nearest DelDOT district office to request DelDOT to remove them as soon as possible. The rain date for the event is Sunday, Sept. 30. To participate in the cleanup day, register by Sept. 21 at www.deldot.gov, under “hot topics.” For further information, contact the Office of Public Relations at 302760-2080 or 1-800-652-5600.

State looking for perfect decorated egg for national contest The Delaware Department of Agriculture is hosting the 2008 Delaware White House Decorated Egg Contest. The egg decorating contest is open to any Delaware resident. The winning egg decorator will receive $100 and an invitation from the White House to visit a display of the state eggs as well as a welcome reception by First Lady Laura Bush. Each year since 1994, each state has sent a decorated egg to the White House for display. The display is coordinated and sponsored by the American Egg Board. Susan Monahan of Dover was Delaware’s winning artist for the 2007 display. Her winning egg, as well as those from other states, are currently on display at the White House in Washington, DC. The registration deadline for the 2008 contest is Sept. 28. For registration forms and other information, contact Sheree Nichols by phone at 800-282-8685 or by e-mail at sheree.nichols@state.de.us. Decorated eggs are due at the Delaware Department of Agriculture on or before

Oct. 31. Judging will be held in November. Interested artists and crafters are invited to an egg decorating workshop on Sept. 25, from 7 – 9 p.m., at the Delaware De-

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came in once a week and although I am sure, the house did not have a lady’s touch, it was clean. George, I can see you clearly, talking about Hall of Fame baseball player Hoyt Wilhelm. We miss you. Tommy Young had a one-day visit to the hospital last week. He admits he is not the “spring chicken” he once was. Tommy recently enjoyed his 83rd birthday and is a well respected Delmar sports figure and supporter. Feisty, spirited, call it what you want, but Tommy Young bleeds Delmar. His column two weeks ago about Coach Hearn and the kids complaining about the heat was as touching and meaningful as it can get. Tommy, hope you are doing fine. Root for the Phillies now, as they may be playing some October baseball. The Delmar Chamber of Commerce is looking for candidates for its Citizen of the Year award. Deadline for nominations is Sept. 24, so you Delmar folks need to submit your choice. I know there are many people down there who are deserving of that great honor. See a separate article in the paper for more detail. Hope your short week goes well, everyone. Friday night football and fall have returned!

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PAGE 62

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 -12, 2007

Delmar School District welcomes 17 new members to staff By Donna Dukes-Huston Delmar Middle School and High School welcomed several new faces this fall. Delmar graduate Dawn Webb is the new financial secretary for the school. Webb worked in bookkeeping with the Bank of Delmarva for 17 years prior to joining the Delmar staff. Webb also serves as secretary Webb to Cathy Townsend, principal. Terri Addlesberger became the new food services manager for the district in June. Addlesberger has been involved in the food industry for more than Addlesberger 17 years. Eve Motichka is the district’s information technology specialist. Her responsibilities include network administration, setting up equipment for classrooms and labs, maintaining inventory and writing grants for Motichka new technology. Dr. Rochell Peoples joins the Delmar staff as the middle school intensive learning center assistant. Peoples has worked as a microbiologist and in manufacturing for a Fortune 500 comPeoples pany. He also spent 20 years as an administrator in higher education. He first came to Delmar as a substitute. Don Smith will serve as a technology education teacher. Smith worked in various roles in manufacturing, including produc-

tion and quality control, prior to entering the field of education. He received a bachelor’s degree in industrial technoloSmith gy from Southern Illinois University and a master’s degree from Wilmington College in business logistics and transportation. He received his teaching certification through the University of Delaware. Vicki Bailey replaces Gail Fooks who retired last year as the seventhgrade keyboarding teacher. Bailey has spent the last ten years teaching marketing and software applications Bailey at the high school level. After six years as a Title I assistant at Delmar Elementary School, Allison Bergeron has moved to the middle school to serve in the same position with sixth grade. She is attending SoBergeron journer Douglass College in Salisbury where she is pursuing a degree in middle school math. Jenny Meister joins the Delmar staff as the tenth-grade English teacher. Meister received a bachelor’s degree in English and creative writing from Flagler College and has Meister completed coursework for a master’s degree in rhetoric and composition from Salisbury University. Dawn Timmons is the new eighth-grade English/language arts teacher. She taught in Wicomico County for 10 years and is also a facilitator for Be-

yond the Limits, where she works with fifth graders through adults. She earned a bachelor’s degree in elemenTimmons tary education from Salisbury University and a master’s equivalency in guidance and counseling. Gene Warner joins the district’s special education department as an inclusion teacher for sixth graders. He received a bachelor of science Warner degree in special education K-12 from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and a master’s degree in secondary education from Salisbury University with a concentration in science. Shannon Juris is beginning her teaching Juris career as an eighth-grade special education teacher for math and science classes. She has a bachelor’s degree in elementary and special education from Wilmington College. Ashley O’Neal O’Neal graduated from the University of Delaware in May with a bachelor of science in elementary education. She will be one of two eighthgrade math teachers. Nancy Clayton is an inclusion teacher in the special education department where she will work in high school English classes. Clayton worked as an eighthgrade inclusion teacher in Somerset County for 13 years and has most recently served as a coordinator of special services for the Wicomico County Board of Edu-

cation. Sally Irwin joins Janet Holloway as a nurse for the district. Irwin worked at PRMC as an ICU step-down Clayton nurse and has spent the last five years as a school nurse in Wicomico County. Kelly Grubb first served as a substitute for the district and will now serve fulltime as the Irwin middle school life skills paraprofessional. Originally from Baltimore, Grubb has lived in Delmar for 12 years. Sean Grubb Jackson is

Delmar High School’s new life skills teacher. He received a bachelor’s degree in business from Salisbury Jackson University and a master’s degree in special education from Wilmington College. His teaching experience includes seventh-grade inclusion and resource pull-out for English/language arts and math. Tracey Waters joins the staff as a middle school custodian. Waters has had a variety of work experience and received much of the training for these various jobs while Waters serving in the Army for ten years. He has worked as a certified nursing assistant and as a one-on-one paraprofessional in the Wicomico County school system. Most recently, he drove a truck for Johnny Janosik.

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Business Briefs ucts in businesses and organizations. To view the presentation, contact Stewart at 629-2610 or visit www.stewarts.biz. A limited number of viewing opportunities are available.

“Keep More of What You Earn”

Edward Jones Financial advisor Melinda Tingle, of Laurel, will host a free broadcast titled, “Keep More of What You Earn” at 11:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m., Sept. 11, at her Laurel office.

Many investors will work longer to pay for taxes than they will for food, clothing and housing combined. Join us to learn how you may be able to pay less in taxes while investing toward your financial goals. The broadcast features Scott Hodge, president of the Tax Foundation, a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that has monitored tax policy at the federal, state and local levels since 1937. This interactive event is presented at select Edward Jones branch offices nationwide via the firm's private video network. To reserve a seat or for more information about the Sept. 11 program, call Tin-

gle at 875-0355. For those unable to attend, additional viewing opportunities are available.

Rohlich joins GMB

James R. Thomas, Jr., P.E., president/CEO of George, Miles & Buhr, LLC (GMB) announces that John Patrick Rohlich has joined the firm as an engineer at the Seaford office. A Seaford native, Rohlich graduated from West Virginia University with a bachelor of science in civil engineering in May. He recently passed the fundamentals of engineering exam. As an engineer-in-training, Rohlich is responsible for components of larger

PAGE 63 projects under the supervision of a professional engineer. He will assist in the preparation of plans and specifications, supporting documentation, permitting applications, calculations, computer modeling and designs of a variety of projects for muRohlich nicipalities and developments. For more information, visit www.gmbnet.com.


PAGE 64

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Snapshots Running through the Bulldog makes for a grand entrance The first group to make use of the new, giant, inflatable Bulldog to make a grand entrance onto the Laurel High School football field was the Pop Warner team, the Mighty Mites. On right, the Pop Warner cheerleaders welcome the players onto the field. Photo by Pat Murphy

PIZZA SALES - Food sales to help Laurel Pop Warner Football were brisk on Friday, Aug. 30, at the middle school. Above, Scott Hearn and his son, Alex, do the loading, with the help of Alex’s mom, Debbie, and Sandy Rash, center. Below, Rachel Calloway helps her father, Dwayne, load pizzas. Photos by Pat Murphy

FISHING CHAMP - Casey Cook, 15, Laurel, was the winner of the Dick Banks Fishing Tournament trophy, handed out during the American Legion Post 19 and A&K Tackle Fishing Tournament held recently. Casey, right, also placed in the competition for the biggest bass caught. With her is Kim Littleton of A&K.

RIDING TO HELP KIDS - Rob Harman, Glen Merritt and Ray Nack get ready for the start of the Ride for Kids Sake poker run. The annual run, which this year took place on Aug. 25, raises money for the Children’s Advocacy Center of Delaware and the Laurel Police Department’s No Child Without a Gift Christmas Campaign. Photo by Gene Bleile.


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

PAGE 65

Character of state park has Doing the Towns Together changed since days gone by LAUREL AND DELMAR SOCIALS There is an old expression, “Some things never change,” that we hear said quite often. But, things do change, and quite often change happens without us realizing it. A good example is the area known for years and years as Trap Pond. Generations of Laurelites have spent many weekends at Trap Pond State Park, camping out with their families during the summer. About mid-week, a parent would go out to Trap Pond in the wooded area across from the swimming area and reserve a camping spot for the weekend. Camping was rustic in those days, with rest room facilities and a common bathhouse where campers could get showers. Each camping spot had a stationary grill and that was about the extent of facilities for the camper. Early on Friday afternoon the campers would start arriving at the park. Some had homemade trailers they pulled behind their vehicle. These units provided a sleeping space for the family. Others literally pitched tents and family members slept on cots each night, praying it wouldn’t rain while they were there. Others had fancier portable units that were often the envy of the other campers. Electricity was non-existent. Trap Pond was truly a camping area. There was a small camp store where visitors could buy supplies, plus a concession stand across the pond. The joyful shouts of laughter could be heard as the young children enjoyed the swimming area. (The water was totally safe in those days). A lifeguard was always on duty during the week, and for several years the now defunct Laurel Recreation Summer Program provided a school bus to transport young students out to the park where they learned to swim. Two huge pavilions provided shelter from the weather and family reunions filled these buildings every weekend. They operated on a first come, first served basis, which meant that on any given Saturday or Sunday a family member arrived at the area very early and sat and waited for the rest of their group. A large building near the concession stand provided rest room facilities. The park superintendent’s home was the only

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VIRGINIA ‘MIKE’ BARTON residence in the park. Area Boy Scouts camped in the woods just outside the perimeter of the swimming area on almost every weekend during the summer. When DuPont’s Seaford nylon plant was in its heyday, many men and women from the area who worked shift work at the plant would pack a picnic lunch and take their families out to Trap Pond several times a week. The young family members enjoyed the water and visiting with their friends. The parents, carrying the food, the bath towels, water bottles, containers of sweet drinks, the lunchbox, suntan lotion, inner tubes, buckets and shovels, would resemble pack horses as they traversed from the parking lot to the picnic/swimming area. These fun times took place mornings of the 4-12 shift, or afternoons of 12-8, plus every sunny long weekend. The beach area was filled with young families nearly every day. The main reason? It was good, clean fun, and it was cheap! A recent trip to Trap Pond was an eye opener for us. The area has changed considerably. The camping area is different, with electrical hookups for camping trailers. And there is one area next to the camping area, outside of the park, that has been developed into lovely homes. The Woods at Trap Pond is something some of us never thought we would see. The homes have beautiful surroundings with many old trees remaining, well landscaped yards and a quietness of peace and tranquility. Just standing in the middle of the roadway, one can pause and listen to the rustle of the tree leaves or hear the call of a variety of birds. All of this proves that some things do change. And sometimes, the change catches us off guard.

The Laurel Historical Society held a successful basket bingo party on Aug. 28 at the Laurel Fire Hall. The group’s next big fund raiser and social event will be the weekend of Oct.12 and 13. There will be more complete details, as the time grows closer. But I do want to add to this item that it was so gratifying to see the reception for Ed and Lee Connor when they arrived for the event. There were hearty hugs and handshakes for both and Ed was kidded about winning the last prize of the evening, a piece of gold jewelry to which he remarked, “Yes, I won it, but Lee will wear it.” Alan and Sug Whaley have returned from a vacation in the upper peninsula of Michigan, where they took in sights and scenes in and around that whole area, including parks, waterfalls and Mack Island. En route to Laurel, they came through Wisconsin where they stopped in Green Bay to tour Packer Stadium. Now, what sports fan wouldn’t get a real kick out of viewing and visiting a fabulous stadium such as that one? Several more of our journeying friends returned Sunday, Aug. 26, from an eightday trip to beautiful Alaska. This group included Doug and Edna Marvil and a few of Edna’s siblings, Raymond Whaley, Joyce Sadler, Betty Harding and June Dwyer. Vince and Sharon Whaley (not siblings despite having the same name) also enjoyed the trip. Edna reported that in spite of the fact that this is Alaska’s rainy season, they saw not one drop of precipitation and the weather was simply gorgeous the entire time. The group traveled the Inside Passage as far north as Juno. The Bonnets and Boas, a Laurel Red Hat group, said bye-bye to August activities with a luncheon at the Georgia House in Millsboro on Aug. 26, with 26 members attending and enjoying guest speaker, Maxine Ungerbuehler. Birthday celebrants for the month were Flaudine Otwell, Mildred West, Kathleen Domico and Dian Bush. Guests last week of Flaudine Otwell

were her friends Ted, Carol and Shawn Mulder from Stony Creek, Ontario, Canada. Joe Elliott from Flanders, N.J., was in Laurel for the holiday weekend, spending the time with his mother, M.L.Elliott The annual luncheon for the past presidents of the Laurel New Century Club was held on Aug. 28 at the Seaford Golf and Country Club. Those honored members attending were Dianne Thompson, Eleanor Paradee, Addie Haddock, Anne Tracey, Lillian Wootten and Juanita Stone. Unable to attend were Ruth Hickman, Sharron Shulder, Terry Wright and Harriett Hickman. Members of the Laurel High School class of ‘52 will join together for a period of reminiscing and fellowship on Sept. 9, at noon at the Dutch Inn. If you are a member of this class, please plan to attend and join your former classmates for the conviviality — it’ll be fun. We express our deepest sympathy to the family and friends of William K. “Bill” Beach and Louis Breeding. We continue with prayers for our service men and women all over the world and prayers for our friends who are ill: George Hitchens, Jim Moore (of Bethel) George Wingate, Richard Kenny, Ruth Hickman, Herman Cubbage, Terry Layton, Jean Henry, Steve Trivits, Derrick Henry, Hattie Puckham, Richard Cordrey, Martha Windsor, Marie Adams, Donald Layton Sr., Harriett Mac Veigh and Linda Absher. Happy September birthday greetings to: Mattie Duncan on Sept. 6; Jean Conaway and Etta Morris, Sept. 7; Charles Gordy, Sept. 9; Edward Dubinski and Nola Hearn, Sept. 10; Anna Hall and Barbara Simon, Sept. 11; Frederick Allen, Sept. 12; and Barbara Berkeley, Sept. 13. “The greatest wealth is contentment with a little.” See you in the Stars.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

Question: Are you influenced by public opinion polls? How would you like to participate in a public opinion poll about RYANT ICHARDSON the influence of public opinion polls? While the President's apSound funny? Don’t laugh just proval for his handling of yet. Have you ever thought about the war showed slight how public opinion is being shaped gains, Congress remains by survey results? stuck at just a 3% posiWorse yet, how many voters do you think are persuaded to vote for tive rating... a certain candidate because that candidate is ahead in the polls? Their website states they have been You have to know that the money goes tracking public opinion since 1984 in to the candidates who are ahead in the North America, Latin America, the Middle polls. Those who want to influence our East, Asia, and Europe. “Working with a lawmakers are betting on those frontrunpanel of psychologists, sociologists, comners to win. Wouldn’t it be nice if you could change puter experts, linguists, political scientists, economists,and mathematicians, Zogby Inyour bet in the middle of a horse race and ternational explores every nuance in lanput your money on the lead horse? guage and tests new methods in public Those public opinion surveys are imopinion research,” the site claims. portant, but my greatest worry is that they So, let’s see what they are reporting. are too influential with voters. If voters are forming opinions about the Following are a few of their observations: • A majority of Americans - 54% - becandidates based on their ratings in the lieve the United States has not lost the war polls, they may not be examining those candidates’ positions on the issues careful- in Iraq, but there is dramatic disagreement on the question between Democrats and ly enough. Republicans. While two in three DemocAnother concern I have is that very rats said the war effort has already failed, similar questions can be worded a little just nine percent of Republicans say the differently and the polling results will same. change dramatically. • The poll comes ahead of a September It boils down to how much you trust the report to Congress by David Petraeus, integrity of those conducting the polls. If the poll takers have their own agendas, the commander of the multi-national force in Iraq, on the progress of the so-called surge questions can be phrased in such a way as in quelling attacks by insurgents and creatto benefit those whose ideas they support. ing an atmosphere where the new Iraqi This week I cautiously mention some government can develop. poll results from Zogby International.

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Morning Star Publications Inc. P.O. Box 1000 • 628 West Stein Highway Seaford, DE 19973 629-9788 • 629-9243 (fax) morningstarpub@ddmg.net Subscriptions - $19 a year in-county, $24 a year in Kent and New Castle, Del., and Federalsburg, Sharptown and Delmar, Md.; $29 elsewhere out of state.

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President Bryant Richardson Vice President Pat Murphy Secretary Tina Reaser Treasurer Carol Wright Richardson Managing Editor Mike McClure

(The words “so-called surge” were from Zogby. That seems opinionated to me.) • This strong skepticism of success in Iraq among Democrats echoes the position of some party leaders, most strongly worded by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, who said in April that he believed that "this war is lost and that the surge is not accomplishing anything." • This latest UPI/Zogby poll shows Americans are divided on the success of the U.S. troop surge in Iraq. While 49% believe it is not working, nearly as many (45%) said the surge has been effective. The vast majority of Democrats (86%) don't believe the surge is working, compared to just 11% of Republicans. • More than a third of Americans (34%) said they don't believe a U.S. victory in Iraq is possible: 60% of Democrats say there cannot be victory in Iraq, compared to just 7% of Republicans. The online survey of 6,711 adults nationwide was conducted August 17-20, 2007. • As Democratic and Republican presidential candidates gear up for upcoming state primaries and caucuses, Americans are split over which party, if elected, would be more likely to bring the war to a successful conclusion: 39% believe a Re-

American Legion Auxiliary from area is recognized at National Convention 2007

Reno, Nev., was the host to the 87th Annual American Legion Auxiliary National Convention from Aug. 25-30, at the Reno Sparks Convention Center. Nearly 2,000 delegates, alternates and distinguished guests from across the world attended the convention. Attending the convention from Nanticoke Unit 6 of Seaford were Department Chaplain Beverly Buchanan and Department President Lillian Tune. Attendees were allowed to participate in a variety of activities throughout the week, including National Executive Committee meetings, divisional caucuses, a patriotic memorial service, a parade through downtown Reno, the nomination of 2007-2008 national officers and recognition of the achievements from 2006-07. Receiving an award at the national level was Unit 6 Public Relations Chairman Lillian Tune for the best overall Unit program emphasis articles award. During National President JoAnn Cronin's administration, the American Legion Auxiliary actively pursued proj-

Editorial Gene Bleile Frank Calio Lynn Parks Daniel Richardson Elaine Schneider Kay Wennberg Tony Windsor Circulation Karen Cherrix

Composition Rita Brex Carol James Cassie Richardson Sales Beverly Arciuolo George Beauchamp Rick Cullen Jesse Piquette Jim McWilliams Laura Rogers

Laurel Star Advisory Board Dale Boyce Sandy Davis Toni Gootee H. Robert Hickman Jane Hudson Linda Justice Albert Jones Kendal Jones Mike Lambert

publican president would be more likely to bring a positive end to the war, while 36% feel the same about a Democratic president. Another 17% said neither party would be likely to successfully end the war. The next question concerned which of the 2008 presidential candidates would best handle the war in Iraq. • Among Republicans, Rudy Giuliani (28%), Fred Thompson (21%) and John McCain (11%) were seen as having the ability to best handle the war, while Democrats favored Hillary Clinton (22%), Barack Obama (17%) and Joe Biden (12%). • In this latest online poll, 27% give President Bush a positive rating on his handling of the war in Iraq, up slightly from 24% who gave the president favorable marks in July. • While the President's approval for his handling of the war showed slight gains, Congress remains stuck at just a 3% positive rating for its handling of the war, unchanged from polling last month. Are you influenced by public opinion polls or are you taking time to learn the candidate’s positions on the key issues? This upcoming election is too important to allow the opinions of others alone to decide your vote. ects that benefited more than 252,247 children and its members volunteered more than 450,000 hours on behalf of America's youth. Always community minded, the American Legion Auxiliary also donated $160,876 to Children's Miracle Network and $7.8 million to veterans through its Veterans Affairs & Rehabilitation initiative. Convention attendees also had the opportunity to listen to guests including Major General Gale Pollock who was presented with the Legion Auxiliary Woman of the Year award and President George W. Bush who addressed the American Legion and Auxiliary on Tuesday, Aug. 28. The nation's largest veterans' service organization and the world's largest women's patriotic service organization heard from the Commander in Chief on the war in Iraq and its implications in the broader Middle East. For anyone wishing to be a part of this organization, eligible individuals including youth under the age of 18, may obtain membership information and an application from any American Legion Auxiliary member or by calling Seaford's Post Home at 629-9915.

Janet Lee Don Phillips Cora Selby Richard Small Debbie Waller Seaford Star Advisory Board Shirley Baynum Beverly Blades Tommy Cooper

Edward Cranston Mike Hall Nancy Harper John Hollis Karen Johnston Jan Lundquist Ron Marvel John Rittenhouse Steve Theis Layton Wheeler

Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR

• SEPTEMBER 6 - 12, 2007

PAGE 67

Seven-Day forecast for Western Sussex County Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Tides Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Mostly sunny and warm

Mostly sunny and more humid

Humid with sun and some clouds

A thunderstorm possible

Mostly cloudy and humid

Mostly cloudy

Sunshine

86/62

87/66

88/67

87/67

87/67

81/52

75/55

Almanac Statistics through Tuesday Sept. 4 at Georgetown, Delaware

Temperatures

Precipitation

High for the week . . . . . . . . . . . Low for the week . . . . . . . . . . . Normal high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Normal low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Average temperature . . . . . . . .

. 85° . 55° . 83° . 61° 70.4°

Total for the week . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Total for the month . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Normal for the month . . . . . . . . 0.49” Total for the year . . . . . . . . . . 22.74”

Smyrna 85/68 Dover 84/68

Time 5:07 p.m. 9:54 p.m. 5:54 a.m. 6:52 a.m.

Apogee Perigee Apogee Perigee

Date November 9 November 23 December 6 December 22

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

Rise .6:36 a.m. .6:36 a.m. .6:37 a.m. .6:38 a.m. .6:39 a.m. .6:40 a.m. .6:41 a.m.

Harrington 85/66

Time 7:33 a.m. 7:13 p.m. 11:55 a.m. 5:12 a.m.

Milford 84/66 Greenwood 86/65

Lewes 83/64

Bridgeville 86/62

Sun and Moon Sun Thursday . Friday . . . . Saturday . . Sunday . . . Monday . . Tuesday . . Wednesday

. . . . . . .

New Sep 11

Set .7:26 p.m. .7:24 p.m. .7:23 p.m. .7:21 p.m. .7:19 p.m. .7:18 p.m. .7:16 p.m.

First Sep 19

Low High Low 5:15 a 11:18 p 5:10 p 6:18 a —- 6:17 p 7:12 a 12:48 p 7:15 p 7:59 a 1:36 p 8:06 p 8:39 a 2:18 p 8:52 p 9:15 a 2:56 p 9:33 p 9:48 a 3:30 p 10:12 p High 1:58 p 3:09 p 4:07 p 4:55 p 5:37 p 6:15 p 6:49 p

Low 8:03 p 9:10 p 10:08 p 10:59 p 11:45 p —12:41 p

High 1:20 p 2:31 p 3:29 p 4:17 p 4:59 p 5:37 p 6:11 p

Low 7:25 p 8:32 p 9:30 p 10:21 p 11:07 p 11:48 p —-

Vienna, MD

The moon, and its relative distance to the Earth, affects tides on a monthly basis. When the moon is farthest from the Earth (apogee), tides of decreased range or currents of decreased speed occur. When the moon is closest to the Earth (perigee), the occurrence of increased range or currents of speed is more prevalent.

Date September 15 September 27 October 13 October 25

Day High Thurs. 10:39 a Fri. 11:50 a Sat. 12:20 a Sun. 1:12 a Mon. 1:56 a Tues. 2:35 a Wed. 3:10 a

Sharptown, MD Shown is Thursday’s weather. High Low Temperatures are Thursday’s highs Day and Thursday night’s lows. Thurs. 1:24 a 8:08 a Fri. 2:37 a 9:11 a Sat. 3:39 a 10:05 a Sun. 4:31 a 10:52 a Mon. 5:15 a 11:32 a Tues. 5:54 a 12:08 p Wed. 6:29 a 12:26 a

Apogee and Perigee

Apogee Perigee Apogee Perigee

Nanticoke River Roaring Point, MD

Moon Thursday . Friday . . . . Saturday . . Sunday . . . Monday . . Tuesday . . Wednesday

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

Rise .1:11 a.m. .2:19 a.m. .3:27 a.m. .4:34 a.m. .5:39 a.m. .6:40 a.m. .7:41 a.m.

Full Sep 26

. . . . . . .

Set .4:55 p.m. .5:34 p.m. .6:06 p.m. .6:33 p.m. .6:56 p.m. .7:18 p.m. .7:38 p.m.

SEAFORD 86/62 Blades 86/62

Georgetown 84/64

Rehoboth Beach 82/64

Concord 86/62 Laurel 86/62 Delmar 87/61

Millsboro 84/64

Bethany Beach 81/64 Fenwick Island 82/65

Last Oct 3

Day High Low Thurs. 12:46 a 7:30 a Fri. 1:59 a 8:33 a Sat. 3:01 a 9:27 a Sun. 3:53 a 10:14 a Mon. 4:37 a 10:54 a Tues. 5:16 a 11:30 a Wed. 5:51 a 12:03 p

Rehoboth Beach Day Thurs. Fri. Sat. Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed.

High Low 3:56 a 9:52 a 5:04 a 10:58 a 6:01 a 12:14 a 6:50 a 12:59 a 7:32 a 1:37 a 8:12 a 2:11 a 8:51 a 2:43 a

High 4:46 p 5:46 p 6:36 p 7:19 p 7:59 p 8:36 p 9:12 p

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007

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September 6, 2007