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VOL. 12 NO. 16

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2007

NEWS HEADLINES Community Thanksgiving service set

Laurel Ministerial Association will hold a community Thanksgiving service Wednesday, Nov. 21, 7 p.m. at the Laurel Volunteer Fire Hall. The entire community is invited to the service. Area churches will provide the music and pastors of the Laurel Ministerial Association will speak. An offering will be taken to support the association’s scholarship fund to help local area students with college tuition.

POSSIBLE ANNEXATION - New development could bring 250 homes to the community. Page 2 STATE OF SCHOOLS - Laurel School Board hears from firm hired to assess condition of buildings. Page 4 DELMAR ELECTION - Four are vying for two seats on the Delmar (Md.) Town Commission. Page 20 ALL-CONFERENCE - This week’s Star features photos of local field hockey and soccer players named first team all-conference. Page 45 LOCAL RIVALS - The Laurel and Delmar football teams end their regular seasons with wins over nearby rivals. Page 46 FLORIDA BOUND - Laurel graduate Shawn Phillips recently signed with the Florida Marlins. He will report to spring training in March. Page 52

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OBITUARIES 28 43 ON THE RECORD OPEN HOUSES _______15 25 PAT MURPHY PEOPLE _____56 POLICE JOURNAL 31 SNAPSHOTS 60 SOCIALS 61 SPORTS 45- 53 TIDES/WEATHER 63 TODD CROFFORD 27 TOMMY YOUNG _____ 49 VETERANS OF WWII __ 18

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Developers blame lawsuit and loss of land for scaled-back Discovery Sports complex on 500 acres is out; strip mall and housing on 120 acres still possible By Frank B. Calio “We've put an end to Discovery Place as we had planned.” Those were the words spoken by David G. Horsey, one of the principals in the project, in an exclusive interview with the Laurel Star. Then he announced that the developers will proceed with a much scaled-down version of the project. Originally, the $500 million development on 500 acres on the north edge of town called for a million square feet of retail space, an amusement park, a hotel with an indoor water park, 1,400 homes, a 12,000-seat sports arena, a 6,000-seat baseball stadium, an equestrian center, 12 soccer fields, nine baseball fields, six volleyball courts and a free-standing firehouse. That plan is history, according to Horsey, owner of David G. Horsey and Sons, and his partner Preston Schell, president of Ocean Atlantic Associates. Reasons given by Horsey include

the developers’ inability to purchase 381 acres of land which was slated for the sporting complexes and which was sold to another developer, and the pending lawsuit by the Sussex County Organization to Limit Development Mistakes, SCOLDM. The large parcel was owned by Glenn Jones; representatives for Discovery said that the Horsey group had paid for an option on that land as well as the other parcels needed for the project that were annexed by the town of Laurel. After months of packed public hearings and controversy over the possible annexation of the land, most of which is farmland, the town annexed the land in January 2007. Groundbreaking was supposed to be the following spring; the project was expected to take 10 years to build out. SCOLDM filed its lawsuit in Chancery Court the morning before the annexation was approved by the town. The lawsuit states that the town did not

follow proper procedures in the annexation process and demanded that the process be started over. Because they did not have proper legal representation, members of SCOLDM were advised by New Castle County attorney Rich Abbott, a wellknown land-use attorney whom they contacted after filing the suit, to withdraw it. Then they hired Abbott and the lawsuit was refiled shortly thereafter by Rick and Lisa Culver and John and Sylvia Brohawn, organizers of SCOLDM. The second suit claims that the town did not follow its own charter, which, the suit says, states the property owners themselves must request annexation. On the other hand, the town believes that Discovery, with proxies from the land owners, had a right to represent those parcels and request annexation. Laurel Mayor John Shwed said he Continued on page 17

Minister speaks at Veterans Day service By Pat Murphy Retired area preacher the Rev. Charles Covington was the Laurel American Legion Post 19 guest speaker on Veterans Day, Nov. 11, at the post. State Sen. Robert Venables, who was in attendance, said, “Everyone should hear this message.” The service started with a welcome by post commander Carlton Pepper and a parade of service flags. In addition to Venables, guests were Laurel Mayor John Shwed and Amanda Jones, a ninth-grade student from Seaford Christian Academy who sang several songs. Covington is a former pastor at several area charges, including Centenary United Methodist Church in Laurel. He also is a retired Delaware Air Guard and Reserve Colonel, with more than 28 years in that capacity. Explaining Continued on page five

The Color Guard of American Legion Post 19 is shown during the legion’s Veterans Day service on Sunday, Nov. 11. From left: Roger Whaley, John Nichols (hidden behind flag), Ken Bolt and Will Derr. Photo by Pat Murphy.


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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Development will bring 250 new homes to Laurel By Tony E. Windsor The Laurel Town Council held a first reading on the plans for Village Brooke East, a 78-acre, 250-home development along Discountland Road, east of U.S. 13, during its Monday, Nov. 5, meeting. The reading follows a public hearing held on the project on Oct. 15 before the council. The project is the second phase of the Village Brooke East development. The first phase of the project was approved by the town council in July 2006. The first phase was presented at that time as 77 single-family townhouses, 84 residential duplex units and 200 single-family homes on Discountland Road, west of U.S. 13. Monday night, Jeff Clark, landscape architect for Land Tech Land Planning LLC, Ocean View, presented preliminary plans for Village Brooke East. Clark said the new project is a planned active adult community,” which will follow the same aesthetic layout as the Village Brooke West project. Both communities will have 25,000-square-foot community centers with indoor and outdoor swimming pools, tennis courts, putting greens, cafés and restaurants. Clark said that 42 percent of the development, which amounts to about 33 acres, will remain open space. This open space will include par space and walkways. Clark added that, given the size of the parcel being developed, the town codes allow for as many as 391 homes to be built on the property. Building that many homes, though, would hurt the opportunity for open green space, he said. About five acres on the property will be developed as commercial space, with up to three stores to be included in the Village Brooke East project. During the public hearing, residents living near the project expressed concerns about increased traffic and wetlands. Laurel’s Planning and Zoning Committee recommended that the council approve the Village Brooke East project as part of the town’s new “Large Parcel Overlay Development” zoning, with 21 conditions that must be met by the developer, Samanda Properties LLC, of Gladwyn, Pa. Clark said during the public hearing in October that the developer is prepared to meet all of the stipulations listed. These include

keeping the development at a maximum of 250 residential units, assuming responsibility for stormwater management and obtaining all state agency approvals, including those from the Delaware Department of Transportation and the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. The conditions also state that work on the development cannot begin before 7 a.m. and must conclude no later than 7 p.m. No work will be allowed on Sundays or any holiday when town hall is closed. The approval is also contingent on successful annexation of the property into the corporate limits of Laurel. The council voted unanimously to approve the first reading of the request for a large parcel overlay zoning and the master plan of the development. Each council member cited the fact that the development meets the guidelines of Laurel’s state-approved comprehensive plan for short term development of the community as a major reason to support the project. The second and final reading will be held during the Monday, Nov. 19, meeting of the town council.

LIFETIME MEMBERS - The Laurel Fire Department recently placed markers on the graves of deceased lifetime members of the fire department. Lifetime members are those with more than 20 years of service. Approximately 25 markers were placed in Odd Fellows and Laurel Hill Cemeteries in Laurel. Ed Hannigan of Short-Hannigan Funeral Home assisted in the project by locating the grave sites of as many members as possible. From left, fire department president Bill Hearn and past president Elmer Steele place a marker on the grave site of W. Jack Northam.

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Laurel Schools look for help from community to address needs By Mike McClure The Laurel School Board took the first steps toward addressing the needs of their students and the aging schools they attend by holding a workshop last Wednesday at the Laurel High School auditorium. The board, district administrators and members of the public listened as Studio JAED, a company hired to assess the district's schools and help prepare for the April 8 major capital improvement referendum, presented its findings and gave options for addressing the schools’ current and future needs. Acting Superintendent Linda Schenck emphasized that the district has not made any decisions on whether to renovate or replace its four schools, two of which were built in 1921. The district is looking for the public's input prior to next spring’s referendum, starting with the next workshop which will take place on Wednesday, Nov. 28 at 7 p.m. at P.L. Dunbar Elementary School. Studio JAED conducted assessment of the schools over the summer and shared the results with the administration as well as each building's staff. On Wednesday it was the school board and the public’s turn. Following additional workshop meetings the district will come up with a plan to address the schools’ needs and will develop a certificate of necessity to submit to the Delaware Department of Education for approval. Once that is done, the referendum will take place. According to Dick Moretti, an educational planner with Studio JAED, a facilities assessment was conducted at each of the district’s existing buildings. Items that needed to be fixed, replaced, or added were given priorities (1-4). According to Moretti, priority one issues are usually things that are broken and need fixed or items that will break soon. They are also usually code issues and include problems such as a leaking roof or bad windows. Priority two items are things that will need to be addressed in three to five years, priority three items will need to be fixed within five to 10 years, and priority four items go beyond 10 years or are enhancements to the buildings. A Facility Condition Index (FCI) was also used to determine whether a building should be replaced or renovated . If the FCI is above 1 it would cost more to renovate than to construct a new school. The district's schools received the following FCI ratings: P.L. Dunbar - 1.16,

Two from Delmar injured

State Police said a vehicle crash sent two Delmar men to local hospitals on Tuesday. Police said at approximately 9:35 a.m. members of the State Police Collision Reconstruction Unit (CRU) responded to the scene of a serious vehicle crash on US 9 (County Seat HWY) west of Georgetown in the area of the University of Delaware Carvel Research and Education Center. Police said a 2002 Chevrolet Camaro operated by Andrew J. Weber, 22, of Delmar, was traveling east on County Seat Highway. According to witnesses, the Camaro was traveling at an apparent high rate of speed and passing other vehicles on a wet road when it went out of control. The Camaro exited the road and struck two light poles and three parked vehicles located in the parking lot of the Carvel Center. Andrew J. Weber was wearing a seatbelt and was transported to the Peninsula Regional Medical Center. Weber was treated and admitted in critical condition for injuries sustained in the crash. Andrew’s brother, Miles Weber, 18, also of Delmar, was a passenger in the Camaro and was wearing a seatbelt. Miles Weber was transported to Beebe Medical Center and was treated and released for non-life threatening injuries. Alcohol is not believed to be a factor in the crash. The crash remains under investigation. County Seat Highway was closed for approximately three hours while investigators examined the scene.

North Laurel - .93, Laurel Intermediate and Middle School - 1.32, Laurel High School .99. Paul Laurence Dunbar Elementary was constructed in 1921. The cost of addressing this school's needs by renovating it follows: priority 1 - $3,728,612; priority 2 - $8,920,750; priority three - $6,301,251; and priority four $820,337. Some of the school's educational needs are: toilet upgrades, LCD projectors in each classroom, cafeteria expansion, and playground upgrades. North Laurel Elementary School, the district's second newest building, was constructed in 1955. The renovation costs are: priority 1 $6,844,456; priority 2 - $7,817,913; priority 3 $9,457,524; and priority four - $119,059. The school's needs include: LCD projectors, canopy connecting wings, additional parking, classroom additions, and a new gym, cafeteria, and administrative offices. Laurel Intermediate/Middle School was constructed in 1921. The projected renovation costs are: priority 1 - $1,495,134; priority 2 $18,334,874; priority 3 - $24,928,925; and priority 4 - $1,121,789. The building’s needs include: additional receptacles, security system, cafeteria sound system, and additional drive way and parking area. Laurel High School, the district's newest school, was built in 1972. The renovation costs are: priority 1 - $3,664,435; priority 2 $15,737,683; priority 3 - $23,596,164; and priority 4 - $2,315,504. The school's educational needs include: converting the choral room to classrooms, turning the small auditorium into two computer labs, library security system, new auditorium (12,000 seat auditorium with 4,000 square foot stage), science classroom upgrades, and nurse's suite reconfiguration. The district faces the following options: recheck assigned priorities and do only the high priority items (1 and 2) in each school; renovate all the schools; replace one or more schools and renovate the rest; or replace all the schools. Studio JAED estimates the following renovation (all four priorities) and replacement costs for each school: P.L. Dunbar- renovation cost $19,770,949, replacement cost $12,018,650; North Laurel- renovation cost $24,238,951; replacement cost $17,093,830; Laurel Intermediate/Middle School- renovation cost $45,880,722; replacement cost $24,249,250; Laurel Senior High School- renovation cost $45,313,786; replacement cost $33,472,090. Another option is to construct a combined elementary school for grades K-5 at a projected cost of $28,520,000. "Just looking at priorities one and two will not be enough,” said Laurel School District Director of Finance Bill Hitch, who pointed out that the priority three items will need to be addressed by the time the priority one and two items are fixed. If Laurel’s referendum is successful, the district will join other school districts waiting for bond money from the state. Funding that used

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The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Seaford, DE. Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown and Federalsburg, Maryland; $29 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Laurel Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

to come in one or two years is now being spread out over three to five years. Following a successful referendum, Laurel would receive planning money for two schools after July 2008. In July 2009 the district would receive planning money for the rest of the schools and construction money for the first two. Construction/renovation money would come in for the final two schools after July 2010. Once construction/renovation begins at a school it will take about two years to complete the school (three years if the school is occupied during renovations). Schenck asked the representatives from Studio JAED about building/renovating schools to address future growth. According to Moretti, DOE only allows construction and renovations based on current enrollment. "Unless you have developments on the way, being on the books isn't enough,” Moretti said. One audience member questioned why the district is going to referendum before it receives money from the state. "I have no doubt whatsoever that DOE will approve the certificates of necessity for a referendum in April,” said Moretti. "A certificate of necessity and a passed referendum puts you in line." Another resident asked how much this project will cost taxpayers. Moretti said it depends on how fast the assessed value is growing and the district's existing debt. He pointed out that in a capital referendum, districts ask for permission from taxpayers to sell a certain amount worth of bounds to be paid at the going rate. Hitch estimated that a $95 million referendum would cost taxpayers about $17 per month extra. "That's going out for pizza one night in a month. Seventeen dollars a month to help educate your children and give them facilities to work in is not a tremendous amount of money,” Hitch added. If the certificate of necessity is approved

and the referendum passes, the state will pay 74 percent of the project's cost with the district paying for 26 percent of the cost. One resident asked if the projected replacement costs include the cost of demolishing the old building. According to Studio JAED representatives, inflation and demolition costs would have to be added if the district chooses to build a new school. Studio JAED engineer Jim Hutchison said the board and the public will need to decide whether to renovate or replace a school during a future meeting. Once the district decides what direction it wants to take with each school, the costs can be figured out. The district’s last referendum took place in 1991 when a successful referendum brought seven new classrooms to North Laurel and seven classrooms at P.L. Dunbar as well as renovations/cosmetics. One resident asked whether the schools will break down again in 10 years if the district chooses to do renovations rather than replacing them. "You're probably reaching a point where there won't even be spare parts for some of the things you have in your schools,” said Moretti, who pointed out that the district’s youngest school is 35 years old. Laurel resident Melinda Tingle suggested opening the buildings up to the public so citizens can see the condition of the schools (while the students are there). “This community needs to see our schools when children are trying to be educated,” Schenck added. The school board decided to move ahead with additional workshop meetings but left the door open for future tours of the facilities (during school hours). In addition to the Nov. 28 meeting, an additional workshop will be held on Dec. 3 at 7 p.m. at the Laurel Intermediate/Middle School.

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

PAGE 5

Veterans, their families should not be forgotten, minister says Continued from page 1

that he still “get[s] the jitters before a speech but it is a pleasure to be with you,” he launched into a heartfelt emotional message that quickly got his audience’s attention. “World War I marked the end of war to end all wars, but it did not happen that way,” Covington said. “Everybody should know what we believe and for what we stand, and we should be able to assemble in openness.” Talking about veterans, Covington said, “Many of us carry battle scars and many have not come home. Please remember those emotionally and mentally still fighting the war, remember the friends, family and orphans of those soldiers… Embrace them in love. But for the grace of God it could have been us. Those things were not in vain.” Covington then read a message that minister Joe Wright read before the opening of the Kansas state Senate a few years ago. That message produced reaction worldwide and caused some of the Kansas senators to walk out, but of more than 5,000 calls Wright received following his mes-

sage, only 47 were against his speech. (See text of the speech, below.) Covington said that Wright’s message addressed the many evils that society is battling today. “Today we are ashamed of our prayers and often will not say God in our conversation, lest we offend,” he said. “What about the ideals our soldiers have fought for? The only thing they had was a prayer and the only thing they died with was a prayer. Let not our birthright be denied by do-gooders.” Covington received a long standing ovation for his message. “Let no one say the Rev. Covington does not say what he believes,” post adjutant Jim Moore said. Twelve members of the post received “Serving God and Country” awards during the service: Ernest Adkins, Jim Allen, Henry Bohm, Fred Dykes, Charlie Haddock, Rudolph Hastings, Johnny Janosik, Ray Lynch, Jim Ward, Herman Cubbage, Ray Foskey and Joe Stoakley. The service concluded with Jones singing “God Bless America.”

Wright’s prayer before the Kansas Senate When the Rev. Joe Wright addressed the Kansas state Senate, he offered the following prayer: “Heavenly Father, we come before you today to ask your forgiveness and to seek your direction and guidance. We know your word says, “Woe to those who call evil good and good evil” but that is exactly what we have done. “We have lost our spiritual equilibrium and reversed our values. “We have exploited the poor and called it the lottery. “We have rewarded laziness and called it welfare. “We have killed our unborn and called it choice. “We have shot abortionists and called

it justifiable. “We have neglected to discipline our children and called it building self esteem. “We have abused power and called it politics. “We have coveted our neighbor’s possessions and called it ambition. “We have polluted the air with profanity and pornography and called it freedom of speech and expression. “We have ridiculed the time-honored values of out forefathers and called it enlightenment. “Search us, Oh, God, and know our hearts today. Cleanse us from every sin and set us free. Amen!”


PAGE 6

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Business Stephen R. Huston attends appraisal regulatory conference

Discover Bank launches Bank at School program for fourth graders

Stephen R. Huston recently attended the 16th annual Fall Conference of the Association of Appraisal Regulatory Officials held in Washington, D.C., Sept. 29 through Oct. 2. Huston represented the Delaware Huston Council of Real Estate Appraisers at the conference. General meeting sessions included federal and legislative updates from David Bunton, president of the Appraisal Foundation and Ben Henson, executive director of the Appraisal Subcommittee. A 2008 USPAP update was also presented by Greg Accetta, chairman of the Appraisal Standards Board for The Appraisal Foundation. Other topics addressed at the conference included meeting sessions on the topics of supervising and mentoring programs, appraisal regulation, investigation and enforcement. The Association of Appraisal Regulatory Officials is a professional organization which serves to improve the administration and enforcement of real estate appraisal laws in member jurisdictions. The conference was attended by 127 members from across the nation.

In September, Discover Bank and LuLu Ross Elementary School in Milford launched the Bank at School program for 4th grade students. Bank at School is a state-wide program supported by the Delaware Financial Literacy Institute, the University of Delaware’s Center for Economic Education and Entrepreneurship, the State Treasurer, Jack Markell, and the Delaware Bankers Association. This program is made possible through a business-education partnership formed between the school and the bank in an effort to teach the value of savings to fourth grade students. Teachers are provided with appropriate lesson plans aligned with Delaware State Standards in Economics. Participation is voluntary and students may make weekly deposits to Discover Bank via employees at the school during class hours. There is no minimum deposit amount and students will be responsible for maintaining receipts, deposit slips, and a savings register. The savings accounts may also be accessed by the student at the bank’s Greenwood branch during regular business hours. “Discover Bank is pleased to be working with LuLu Ross Elementary to promote financial literacy in children. We feel that saving money at a young age will engender financial responsibility that will be

Top Callaway, Farnell & Moore agents Beverly Blades was named as Top Listing Agent and Fran Ruark was named the Top Selling Agent in October for Callaway, Farnell

JERRY’S INSTANT OIL AND TIRE CENTER - The ribbon was cut on Jerry’s Instant Oil and Tire Center on Monday. The business is located on Stein Highway next to Callaway, Farnell and Moore. From left are Drew Wheatley, Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Paula Gunson, Rick Costa, Sapan Shah, Seaford Mayor Ed Butler, City Councilman Mike Vincent, Jerry Sangh, Michael Keene, Doug Lambert of the chamber, CarolBeth Broomfield of the chamber, and Ronny William. Photo by Daniel Richardson.

utilized throughout these students’ lives. We are very pleased to be able to expand this program within our community,” said Sherry Berman, branch manager.

Discover Bank also participates in Bank at School programs at Phyllis Wheatley Middle School, Woodbridge Elementary, and the Greenwood Mennonite School.

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MORNING STAR

NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

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Diamond State Drive-In Theater US Harrington, Del. 302-284-8307 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRI. 11/16 THRU SUN. 11/18 Mr. Magorium s Wonder Emporium . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . .Fri. 6:00, Sat. 5:30, Sun. 5:30 The Bee Movie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . .Fri. 7:40, Sat. 7:10, Sun. 7:10 Fred Claus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri. 9:15, Sat. 8:45

The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 11/16 THRU THURSDAY, 11/22 Fred Claus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 3:40, 6:30, Lions For Lambs . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:50, 4:35, 7:00, Mr. Magoriums Wonder Emporium . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:30, 4:10, 6:45, Bee Movie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 3:45. 6:35, 30 Days of Night . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:05, 4:50, 7:20, Gone Baby Gone . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:35, 4:30, 7:10, Saw IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:00, 4:45, 7:25, Michael Clayton . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 4:05, 6:45, Dan In Real Life . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:20, 4:15, 7:05, P2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:10, 4:40, 7:15, American Gangster . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:25, 5:10, Martian Child . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45, 4:20, 6:50, Love In The Time of Cholera .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 3:50, 6:40, Beowulf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40, 4:00, 7:00,

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PAGE 8

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Wawa farmers remove hormone Wawa, Inc. announced that the company will only produce milk that is free of artificial growth hormones (rBST); this artificial bovine growth hormone will be eliminated from all milk that Wawa processes and sells at its 570 stores in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia. To ensure that all products processed and packaged by Wawa and under the Wawa label are free of artificial growth hormone, Wawa will now only purchase raw milk from farmers who will pledge, and sign legal affidavits, that they will not use artificial growth hormones in their cows. Customers will be able to see this “Farmers Pledge” through a seal on the label of all Wawa dairy products. Wawa is offering this choice to customers who, in recent years, have shown increasing interest in natural products and a greater commitment to overall health and wellness.

All cows naturally produce Bovine somatotropin (bST), including those raised according to “organic” standards. Its biological function is to direct energy derived from a cow’s food to meet certain physical needs. An artificial version of this hormone was developed and called rBST – and some farmers inject it into cows to increase their milk production. While the FDA has concluded that no significant difference has been shown between milk derived from rbST-treated cows and non-rbST-treated cows, some consumer groups are requesting a change.

Task force studies foreclosures Lt. Governor John Carney has announced the formation of the Foreclosure Task Force to look at the growing problem of mortgage foreclosures in Delaware. The Task Force is made up of members from the public, private and non-profit sectors and brings unique expertise to address a problem that is expected to grow to

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unprecedented proportions over the next two years. “The current problem and the impending crisis have been well documented,” the Lt. Governor said. “We know what we’re going to face and we need to get to work on developing ways to help those people who are facing a very difficult situation.” The Office of the Lt. Governor and the Office of the State Bank Commissioner have identified $50,000 in funding through the Department of State to continue outreach and education efforts by the Office of the State Bank Commissioner. Anyone interested in finding out more about the DEMAP program should contact the Delaware State Housing Authority at 800-363-8808.

INVISTA reaches safety milestone INVISTA, a leader in the integrated fibers and polymers industry, has reached an unprecedented warehouse safety milestone. As of September INVISTA’s Chattanooga facility has had no loss-of-time

Mt. Olivet UMC • 7:45pm Church Choir on Front Steps • Parking Lot - Port-a-Potty Burton Bros. Hardware & Appliances • For Your Pleasure Door Prizes • Tupperware by Jen Mencer • Women’s Heart Health by NMH • Free Drawing The Browsery Gift Shop • 50% Off Storewide Bon Appetit Restaurant • 8pm-9:30pm Dessert & Cocktail Hour • Featuring Dulcimer Musician John Kisela • Get your Gift Certificates for Christmas • Free Drawing Abacus • A Thrift & Gift Shop where everyone counts • Home of the Blue Jay print shop & gifts Truitt Sub Shop • Nylon Package Store • Wine & Ale Tasting • Tastefully Simple Foods • Food Tasting & Free Drawing Regional Builders • Toys - 4 - Tots Drop Box • Hand-turned wood art by Kenna Nethken • M’s Place watercolors, acrylics & custom frames by Marian Hertzog • Watercolors & acrylics by Tammy Kearney • Free Drawing

accidents in 30 years - a national record in the logistics and distribution industry. INVISTA is comprised of the former DuPont textile fibers and interiors business and the former KoSa polyester businesses. The company is now a wholly owned and independently managed subsidiary of Koch Industries, Inc., the nation's largest privately owned company, based in Wichita, Kan., and represented in nearly 60 countries. INVISTA also represents one of the longest-standing customers of Kenco Logistic Services, which has been managing logistics operations for the Chattanooga warehouse for more than 40 years. INVISTA is topping the pack in terms of operational safety, not only at the Chattanooga facility, but also at its other Kenco-managed warehouses in Chattanooga, Tenn.; Lugoff, S.C.; Waynesboro, Va.; and Seaford. In addition to Chattanooga’s perfect safety record for 30 years, the Seaford operation has had no time-loss accidents in 20 years, and the Waynesboro operation has no time-loss accidents in 20 years.

Fantasy Beauty Salon • A full service salon, manicures & tanning 20% Off Redken & Paul Mitchell Products • Free Drawing Procino Wells Attorneys at Law • Ducks Unlimited Silent Auction • Heritage Jewelers - Free Cleaning • Oil Paintings by Cassie Richardson • Photo Art by Daniel Richardson • Free Drawing The Open Cupboard Natural Foods • 20% Off Storewide • Barb’s Country Crafts • Free Drawing Seaford Museum & Historical Society • Card making by local artist Pat Davidson • Free Drawing Two Cats in the Yard Gift Shop • Storewide Sale • Michealynne PEACE products • Ducks Unlimited Silent Auction * Free Drawing & Door Prizes Act II Florist * Glass art by Eye 4 Glass Art Studio • Applebee’s Drawing * Ducks Unlimited Silent Auction Cranberry Hill Gift Shop • Known as one of Seaford’s most unique gift shops, our gifts are guaranteed to fill you with “Holiday Magic”. • Harley Davidson Scarf & Hat Drawing • Seaford Federal Credit Union

LET’S GO SHOPPING!

Nov. 15th - 5 pm to 8 pm - The Shoppes of High Street - Historic Downtown Seaford For Copy of Locator Map go to: www.2cats.ws or www.newszap.com


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Tanger Outlets will open at midnight on Black Friday For millions of Americans, the day after Thanksgiving is a holiday shopping tradition. Tanger Outlet Center in Rehoboth Beach is giving customers the chance to beat the crowds and be the first to kick off a big weekend of holiday shopping and saving. On Thanksgiving night, Thursday, Nov. 22, Tanger will open at midnight for its first annual Midnight Madness Sale. “Tanger stores are going to be ready at midnight with plenty of ‘sweet’ deals for our After Thanksgiving shoppers,” remarked Amy Norgate, general manager of the Tanger Outlet Center. Beginning at midnight on Thanksgiving night, the first 100 shoppers, 18 years or older, visiting the Tanger Customer Service Centers at either Seaside or Midway will receive a FREE $10 Tanger Gift Card. The next 200 shoppers, 18 years of age or older, will receive a free “Holly the Moose” plush holiday toy. The next 500 shoppers will receive a free bag of chocolate truffles. No purchase is necessary. All weekend long, Friday, Nov. 23 to Sunday, Nov. 25, most of Tanger’s 130 outlet stores will also feature holiday specials and

extended holiday shopping hours. Visit www.tangeroutlet.com for a complete listing of participating Midnight Madness stores, After Thanksgiving weekend special offers, holiday shopping hours, helpful shopping tips, and much more.

Aviation program bid Sussex County Council has followed through on its pledge to support a new airframe mechanics program, awarding a contract to renovate a hangar at the Sussex County Airport to serve as classroom and laboratory space. County Council, at its Tuesday, Oct. 23, meeting, voted 4-0 to award Richard Y. Johnson & Son Inc. of Ellendale the $720,318 contract to renovate a 9,750-square-foot hangar. The building will be converted into classroom and practical laboratory space for a training program to begin in 2008 through Delaware Technical & Community College. Work on the building, which will feature two classrooms, four laboratories and a resource library, will begin in the next few weeks and take approximately six months to complete. Sussex County Council, DelTech and PATS Aircraft LLC in October 2006 announced a partnership to create an airframe mechanics associate’s degree pro-

gram as part of the curriculum offered at the college. The program will train students to become airframe mechanics, who service all parts of an airplane, with the exception of the engine, propeller and instruments. No such program exists in Delaware today. As its contribution, Sussex County government agreed to provide classroom space at the airport for the new program. This past spring, Sussex County took ownership of the hangar, and

pledged to cover the cost of renovating the space. While the cost to perform the renovations were one third higher than originally anticipated, County officials said the dollars to be spent are an investment in Sussex County’s economic future. Students who train in the program will be in high demand from Sussex County-based employers such as PATS, an auxiliary fuel tank installer that has more than 175 jobs open and waiting to be filled.

PAGE 9 “The partnership between DelTech and the Sussex County Council will help to provide greater opportunities for Sussex County residents,” said County Administrator David B. Baker. “Trained airframe mechanics can earn salaries ranging from $30,000 to $60,000 a year. The County Council’s goal is to provide better employment opportunities, so hard-working people here in Sussex County can fill those jobs and take home those wages.”

Girls Night Out in Historic Downtown

The stores along historic High Street in downtown Seaford will celebrate the opening of the holiday season Thursday, Nov. 15, with the second annual Girls’ Night Out. The event will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. All shops and several other businesses on High Street will be open for Christmas shopping. In addition, retailers with businesses outside of the downtown area will have booths set up and artists from Nanticoke River Arts, an area art league, will have their works on sale. Ducks Unlimited will also have several art pieces that will be auctioned off. The Seaford Police Department will provide foot patrol during the evening. For further information, contact Sonja Mehaffey at 2 Cats Herbary, Bath & Body, 628-1601.

Stamping-out on Girls Night Out

The Seaford Historical Society will open the Seaford Museum on High Street on November 15th from 5-8 p.m. for Girl’s Night-out. Pat Davidson, a local stamper and member of the Historical Society, will demonstrate the art of stamping. Several other talented stampers will help to make this a fun experience for all who attend. Cards made by Sue Manlove, another local artist, will be offered for sale. The museum gift shop will be open with books by local authors and other items for sale. All profits from the evening will be used to improve the museum and the Ross Mansion. For information call 628-9828.

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PAGE 10

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

In life’s journeys, keep your lights on My husband and I, normally hip to all the latest jive, wonder if there YNN ARKS isn’t some new trend of which we aren’t aware, some new crave The only way they sweeping the nation that we have somehow missed. For twice during could see where they our 2,500-mile trip to St. Paul, Minn., and back, we saw cars zipwere going was by the ping along the interstate without lights of the cars in any lights on. At night. When the only way they could see where they were go- front of them. ing was by the lights of the cars in taps. “I’m on vacation,” he always exfront of them and when the only way we could see them was when the lights on the plained when he ordered his second draft. I too was on vacation, and so I bought cars of other, more responsible, motorists a new pair of earrings, silver, opal and reflected off their bumpers. The first car we saw was driving on I-90, amethyst. I also bought a jacket, made in just north of Chicago. It sped past us and the Nepal and emblazoned with symbols guaranteed to give me a good life, and two — driver, as long as we could follow his yes, two — new pairs of shoes. Our progress, ignored my husband’s message, via flashing headlights, that he would be bet- daughter is newly-employed in the ter off with lights on. Maybe his lights don’t women’s shoe department at St. Paul’s downtown Macys and as she is paid on work, we reasoned, and considering the commission, I felt obligated as her mother speed he was going, maybe he was rushing to do what I could for her. someone to the hospital, forced by emerMy husband and I also bought books gency to take to the crowded highway withfrom the neighborhood bookstore, proprietor, out adequate equipment. according to its sign, G. Keillor. The gardenBut then we saw the second car, on I-70 ing section alone was worth the drive out. just west of Baltimore. It too ignored mesAnd then there was the Mississippi Marsages flashed by my husband and we came ket, a cooperatively-owned food store to the conclusion that the drivers must be where the fruits and vegetables, many of joining the same fraternity, whose initiation rites require risky behavior, or proving their them locally grown, are organic and tasty and don’t come wrapped in plastic. The mettle by answering the same dare. Whatbread section, restocked every morning by ever the case, we wished both drivers, and several area bakeries, is larger than the all drivers in their paths, well. meat department and the variety of cheeses, Other than the lightless cars, our drive organic and local, and chocolates, organic was wonderful. We were in my husband’s and fair-trade, is enough to make an envipickup truck, which on the way out to St. ronmentally-conscious gourmand cry. Paul was loaded with household items for No beer taps, though, so my visits there our daughter and her new husband, and were not as long as I would have liked. we drove through eight states, including Like our drive out to St. Paul, the drive Delaware and Minnesota. Ohio always imback to Delaware too was one and a half presses me with its neatness and Wiscondays. But the arrival home in Seaford was sin, even in bare winter and even with the not nearly as exciting as had been our arrival ridiculously-large Jellystone “camping” in St. Paul — except for perhaps the cats, resorts that are springing up along the inwho both complained that during our nineterstate, has some of the loveliest scenery day absence, they had been very lonely. I have ever seen. So, this journey, like all journeys, has We completed the long journey out in ended. The secret to its success, I think, was one and a half days, arriving on Sunday just in time for lunch. That was the first of in the good company we had, in the good food, drink and conversation we shared and — let me count — six lunches out, not to in the long walk my daughter and I took, mention the four dinners we ate in restauarm in arm, one cold, clear evening. rants. (Once, I cooked dinner at home and And in the fact that, for you foolish another time, we ordered pizza.) St. Paul people out there catapulting through the has an abundance of small, unique restaudark, throughout it all, we kept our pathrants, most of which, to my husband’s deway ahead well lit. light, have an interesting variety of beer

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MORNING STAR

PAGE 13

Veterans are encouraged to attend meeting For Delaware’s estimated 85,000 veterans, understanding orders during their years of military service was essential to the success of every mission. Understanding the complexities of health care, its cost and accessibility is essential for veterans whose new mission is to enjoy retirement and a high quality of life. Dean Reid, administrator of the Delaware Veterans Home in Milford, will be the guest speaker at the November meeting of the Sussex County Advisory Committee for the Aging & Adults with Physical Disabilities. The meeting is scheduled for 10 a.m. Monday, Nov. 19, at the Sussex County Administrative Offices West Complex on North DuPont Highway in Georgetown. Veterans living in Sussex County and their families are encouraged to attend the meeting. Reid will discuss eligibility requirements, cost of care and other issues for veterans interested in living at the Delaware Veterans Home. The 150-bed facility opened in June 2007, and can accommodate veterans’ varied needs, including intermediate and skilled nursing care, comprehensive rehabilitation services, as well as specialized dementia care. The Sussex County Advisory Committee for the Aging & Adults with Physical Disabilities is an 11-member panel established by the Sussex County Council to be an advocate for programs and policies that benefit older and disabled residents. The committee meets on the third Monday of January, March, May, July, September and November. All meetings are open to the public. The Advisory Committee’s mission is to increase dialogue, make recommendations to Sussex County Council, and to give support, assistance and advice on significant issues and programs that may affect the lives of the county’s aging and adults with physical disabilities populations.

Adopting families this holiday season The holidays are a happy time filled with warmth and love; a time of celebration; and a time filled with generosity and hope. The holidays are also a time when individuals reach out and help a family in need. Through Adopt-a-Family, anonymous sponsors volunteer to “adopt” an individual or family for the holiday season. Last year, 525 families were referred to Kent and Sussex counties. Through this program, the sponsor purchases gift certificates for a sponsored family. In turn, the family uses these certificates to purchase items that best meet their family’s needs. Sponsors are asked to purchase gift certificates ($100 per child) and drop them off at the local Adopt-A-Family site by Dec. 13. Families aren’t the only ones in need this holiday season. Nursing home residents and other disabled adults are also available for adoption; a shopping list is provided to the sponsor for these individuals. For more information, call 302-424-7260 or visit 13 SW Front St., Ste. 103, Milford. Program hours are Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. All donations are tax deductible.


PAGE 14

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Cardiac rehabilitation program is recertified The cardiac rehabilitation program at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital has received recertification by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American Association of Cardiovascular & Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR). The national recertification is through Aug. 31, 2010. Nanticoke Memorial Hospital's cardiac rehabilitation is one of only three programs in the state to receive national certification. Residents of western Sussex County have benefited from the cardiac rehabilitation program at Nanticoke for 20 years. Nanticoke's cardiac rehabilitation comprehensive program emphasizes secondary prevention through risk factor reduction which is facilitated by individualize patient education and small group exercise training. The team of registered nurses is supplemented by access to a consulting staff that includes a dietitian, diabetic educator, and a pharmacist. Dr. Richard Simons serves as the program's Medical Director.

The American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACFPR) is an organization dedicated to the improvement of clinical practice, promotion of scientific inquiry, and the advancement of education for the benefit of health care professionals and the public in the fields of cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation. During the certification process, a national board conducts reviews and determines whether essential requirements for standards of care are met. Most people affected by coronary heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease would benefit from cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation, according to AACVPR. Cardiac rehabilitation improves health and quality of life, reduces risk of recurrence, reduces the use of health care resources, and teaches participants how to achieve an optimal level of independence within the community. To learn more, call 6296611, ext. 2428.

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital's cardiac rehabilitation program recently received national recertification from the American Association of Cardiovascular & Pulmonary Rehabilitation. From left are Barbara Ellingsworth, RN (NMH cardiac rehab); Dr. Richard Simons (NMH Cardiac Rehab medical director); and Tammy Donohoe, RN (NMH cardiac rehab).

SUBSCRIBE TO THE STAR ONLINE: seafordstar.com

Giving back a lifetime of hugs. It’s hard to imagine, this woman who gave you life now nearing the end of her own. Easier to imagine a time when her hugs meant the whole world, and still do. Now the roles are reversed and she needs you, more than ever. We can be there to lend a hand. We respond quickly and listen carefully. We tailor what we do to what she needs and what you need.

MILLSBORO LOCATION Saturday, November 17 10–2 PM

To ease the burden and relieve the stress, call Delaware’s most trusted hospice. Call today for your confidential visit, 302-856-7717. Or go to www.delawarehospice.org.

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200 OVERBROOK LANE, CLEARBROOKE ESTATES BRAND NEW 4 BR, 3 BA home w/open floor plan, C/A, FP, two car attached garage. Quality construction. $289,000 Directions: From RT 13 at Chrysler Dealership, West on 18, first left into Clearbrooke, first right to corner of Overbrook Lane & Highland Dr.

6979 ATLANTA CIRCLE, SEAFORD Well Priced 3 BR, 2 BA home with garage. $289,900 Well built home with fresh face & many updates. Located in quiet area & nestled in the trees. (MLS#551795) Directions : From US 13, left on Stein Hwy., right on Atlanta Rd., right onto Atlanta Circle, left at fork, to continue on Atlanta Circle. Host: Don Kellicut

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ELEGANT RANCHER ON RIVER RD. , SEAFORD This home has many unique upgrades. The tile work is a WOW factor in the DR & Foyer. Kit. & BA also have tile flrs. Outside has been improved by a lg. deck, garden paths leading to a Koi Pond & a Gazebo w/hot tub. Nice storage shed is also included. $275,000. (MLS#554550) Directions: From Seaford, South on RT 13A into Blades, turn right on River Rd., second right turn for Rivershore Dr. Home is the first house on the left corner of River Rd. & Rivershore Dr. Host : Fred Sponseller

Beautiful, spacious cape cod on 1.22 acres West of Seaford. 4/5 BRs, 3 full BAs, paved drive, nicely landscaped, 2 wells, swimming pool, huge game room w/wet bar, deck, fish pond and so much more. This is a must see! Seller motivated, priced to sell. $339,000. (MLS#553917) Directions: RT 20W from Seaford, left on Woodpecker Rd., at stop sign left on Line Rd., left on Matts Rd. right on Bowman Rd., home on right. Host : John Allen

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REDUCED!! Gracious Historic Colonial nestled on 2.58 treed acres East of Delmar. Known as “Shadrack Hall” (est. 1798), this home is reminiscent of days gone by yet modernized to meet the standards of today’s most discriminating buyer. A total of 3392 sq. ft. includes 4 BR, 1.5 BA, LR, FR, DR, Kit., sun porch, summer kit., utility rm., & walk-in pantry. 9’ ceilings, exposed beams, 2 wood burning FP’s, gorgeous pine flr., handsome moldings, built-in storage & an elegant marbleized staircase are just some of the features that must be seen to be appreciated. Reduced from $475,000 to $449,900 (MLS#551808) Directions: From Seaford, RT 13S to Delmar, turn left on RT 54E, then left on Pepperbox Rd. Go straight onto Oak Branch Rd., home on left. See sign. Hostess: Holly Cooper

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REDUCED! 4 BR, 2.5 BA COLONIAL, NORTH SHORES, SEAFORD. Quality Construction & smart, tasteful updates make this well-maintained home stand out from the rest! Highlights include stunning hardwood floors, new custom kit., family friendly floor plan & so much more! Reduced from $299,900 to $289,900 (MLS#552730) Directions : From RT 13 Seaford, go East on Middleford Rd., right on North Shore Dr., home on the left. Hostess: Mary Harding

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26679 MASTERS WAY, SEAFORD NEW LISTING! This 3 BR, 3 BA home has an attached 2-car garage w/huge work area. 2 large rooms above garage can be additional bedrooms. Beautifully kept home w/stone FP in FR. Situated on 18 acres. 3.5 acres has 240 ft. road frontage zoned General Business. Many Possibilities! $485,000. (MLS#554356) Directions: RT 13S to left on Airport Rd., right on Masters Way. See Sign. Hostess : Betti Pucci

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16720 WOODLAND COURT, BRIDGEVILLE LISTED BELOW Market Value. Ready to move in! This 4 BR, 2 BA is perfect for families w/kids & pets, or 1 level living for retirees. Fully irrigated lot. Fenced back yard, sun room, deck & office w/separate entrance. Free tank of propane and 2 yrs. of HOA fees paid. Sellers Closing Help! $319,900 #549929 Directions: From Seaford, RT 13N to Redden Rd. turn right go for approx. 3 miles to Sunnyside Rd., turn left, make right into dev., bear left to Woodland Court, house is on the left. Hostess: Mariana Thomas

35134 COUNTRY WALK, DELMAR, DE EXQUISITE 4 BR, 3.5 BA colonial home in sought after community, on a larger size lot. Entire yard sodded. Two gas FPs. Main flr. MSTR BR along w/2nd flr MSTR BR. Too many upgrades to mention. $359,900 #553778 Directions: From Bi-State Blvd., turn into Country Grove, make 1st right to the next road and turn right. Home on left, almost to the end. Hostess: Donna Neithardt

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21772 HERONS CROSSING, SEAFORD Lovely home - Ready to move in. This 3 BR, 2 BA home offers an open floor plan, FP, sun room, wraparound covered deck & basement all on a great country setting at the end of private land. Adjoining lot w/rented mobile home also for sale. All sales subject to deed restrictions & shared maintenance agreement. $329,000 w/a reduction of $20K. #552493 Directions: West on Stein Hwy., right onto Atlanta Rd., right onto Wesley Church Rd., bear right to Hearns Pond Rd., 1st left Herons Crossing. Hostess: Carol Crouse

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3088 NEALS SCHOOL ROAD, SEAFORD PEACEFUL and serene describes this 3 BR, 2 BA home on a one acre landscaped lot w/a private spacious fenced-in back yard. Above ground pool w/deck and sun/Florida room. Home also includes FP, upgraded tilt-in windows & storage shed. Conveniently located just outside of town limits. $195,000 #552778 Directions: Take RT 20W, turn right on Neals School Rd. approx. 5 mi. on left. Host: Rodney Joyner

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733 HURLEY PARK DRIVE, SEAFORD Custom built 3 BR, 2 BA ranch w/deck & double garage. $245,900 (MLS#529146) Hostess: Gerry Thomas

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32 CROSSGATE VILLAGE, SEAFORD 2 BR, End unit condo with 2.5 BAs, enclosed porch & garage. $214,900 (MLS#539933) Hostess: Eleanor Hickey

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505 OAK ROAD, WESTVIEW, SEAFORD Spacious 4/5 BR Cape Cod with 2 BAs, basement & 2 porches on lg. corner lot. $235,000 (MLS#542761) Hostess: Marla Mcteer

22322 BRIDGEVILLE ROAD, SEAFORD 3 BR, Cape Cod with hardwood floors., scr. porch & 2-car garage, near Hearn’s Pond—Reduced! $169,900 (MLS#553786) Directions: From Seaford Post Office, go RT 13N (B’ville Rd.), approx. 1 mile, property is next to last home on left before Hearn’s Pond Rd. Host: Jim Mcteer

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PAGE 16

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Veteran’s Day

VETERANS HONORED IN LAUREL... The American Legion Post 19, Laurel, held its annual Veteran’s Day service Sunday, Nov. 11. Several veterans received the post’s God and Country Award. Front, from left: post commander Carlton Pepper, Jim Ward, Rudolph Hastings, Fred Dykes, Henry Lee Bohm and Ernest Adkins. Back: Johnny Janosik, Jim Allen, Charlie Haddock and Ray Lynch. Photo by Pat Murphy.

...AND IN DELMAR - Each year, the Ladies Auxiliary to VFW Post 8276 holds a program to thank veterans for their service on the Saturday closest to Veterans Day. This year, auxiliary president Brenda Foskey opened the event, followed by an invocation by post chaplain Kenny Ralph. Madison Hill, granddaughter of post commander Percy Elliott, led the Pledge of Allegiance. A memorial service followed dinner. All veterans at the ceremony were presented with certificates of appreciation. The benediction was given by auxiliary chaplain Phyllis Crouch. Above left are Sgt. First Class Dean Elliott and his wife, Wendy. Above right are Chief David Holloway and his mother, Frances Holloway. Below left are Tom Cherrix, retired from the U.S. Air Force, and his daughter, Jessica. Below right are Sgt. Jerome Will and his wife, Jennifer. Photos by Francis Elliott.

The Rev. Charles Covington, above, was the guest speaker at the Veteran’s Day ceremony. Amanda Jones, below, a ninth grader at Seaford Christian Academy sang patriotic songs. Photos by Pat Murphy.

AUXILIARY HONORS VETERANS Brenda Foskey, president of the Ladies Auxiliary to VFW Post 8276, Delmar, speaks at the auxiliary’s annual Veteran’s Day service on Saturday. The program included a memorial service and a dinner. Photo by Francis Elliott.

The hats sitting on a table represent prisoners of war and soldiers and Marines who are still missing in action.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

PAGE 17

Pennsylvania developer purchased land slated for Discovery Continued from page one

believes the town was correct in its actions to annex. “During the annexation process, which was widely publicized, I never had one of the property owners whose land was to be annexed come before me or the council saying they did not want to be annexed into town,” he said. The court is expected to give a ruling sometime in January. Both sides believe they will win. If the court rules against the town, it is possible that the town could begin the process over again, according to the interpretation of the court. Horsey claims that money to develop the project was available from banking institutions until the suit was filed. “Then the money went away,” he said. Property owner Glenn Jones said that the Discovery group did not pick up the option on his 381 acres. He claims he and Horsey tried to reach an agreement for an extension but could not. Jones then listed the property with Laurel Realty. Michael Pouls of Samanda Properties LLC, Gladwyn, Pa., then signed a contract to purchase the property. He plans to go to settlement this month. Pouls said that he had told Laurel Realty he was interested in land near Laurel, and when Jones listed his property, the realty company called. Pouls said he liked what he saw and purchased the land. Pouls is not a newcomer to land purchase in this area. He purchased 75 acres two years ago on land situated between Holly Brook Apartments and the former Discountland building; that land has since been annexed by the town. Pouls plans to build an active adult community of 361 townhouses, houses and duplexes on the land, hopefully breaking ground next spring depending on the health of the housing market. The project is called Village Brooke West. Pouls is also in negotiations with the town to annex 76 acres along Discount Land Road, east of US 13 in Laurel, for another 250 units, all duplexes. That project would be called Village Brooke East. When asked about his plans for the Jones property, Pouls said he attempted to strike a deal with Discovery. Horsey stated during the interview that he was not interested in what Pouls was offering. Pouls said that he will go to the town council and ask for recommendations for use of the property.

Disappointment and elation

The decision to scale back the Discovery Project has met with mixed reactions. Mayor Shwed said he was disappointed in the decision. “I thought it was an interesting project,” Shwed said. He declined to comment further until he heard from Horsey regarding his plans for the property. Earlier during the planning process, Shwed said he supported the development because it would help Laurel's economy. The Laurel area has one of the lowest household incomes in Delaware, almost $20,000 below the statewide average. W.D. (Bill) Whaley, an outspoken critic of the project and an organizer and spokesman for SCOLDM, issued the following statement: “The sun shines a little brighter in Sussex County today. The news of the demise of the Discovery Project is wonderful news and we hope we can put this hideous blight on our town and our county to rest in the deep grave it deserves. “The entire community owes a great debt of gratitude to the Brohawn and Culver families and the 130 or so courageous supporters who sacrificed so much to fight for their families and properties. We congratulate them and thank them for the new friendships that were spawned by the terrible circumstances they faced. They were treated like mosquitoes, but turned out to be eagles.” Rick Culver, SCOLDM president, had this comment regarding the news of the Horsey decision: “I too would like to thank the members of the community that supported, and continue to support, SCOLDM and what our group stands for. Our community came together for a common cause — to preserve and protect the peaceful way of life we have become accustomed to from unchecked and fiscally irresponsible over development. “The fight was and continues to be a community effort. The only way to keep overdevelopment from encroaching upon our neighborhood and destroying the way of life we have come to expect and enjoy is continued vigilance. Those in the government must be held responsible and accountable for the decisions they make that affect our lives and livelihood. I want to encourage everyone in the community to attend town meetings, to ask questions, and to research the issues.

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The development was to be a destination for youth sporting events, complete with the two stadiums. Bobby Horsey, who served as project manager, said the loss of the large parcel eliminated all sport complexes, stadiums for sports and entertainment, non-profit centers, the fire house, 1.3 million square feet of retail space, hotels and the equestrian center. He said the Discovery Group has over $2.1 million invested in the project and had investors lined up to join in the project once the lawsuit was settled. Accommodation taxes from the hotels would have brought in thousands of dollars to the Laurel Chamber of Commerce. While many of the protesters at the town’s public hearings claimed the sports complexes would not make a go, others disagreed. Pete Townsend, director of Sports at the Beach, a Georgetown facility that offers dormitories and fields for baseball and softball tournaments, drawing from all over the east coast, said there is plenty of demand for tournament hosting in the area. Earlier this spring, Townsend was looking for extra fields in nearby communities because he did not have enough room to satisfy the demand of teams wanting to play. In an article that appeared in the News Journal in November 2006, Fred DeMicco, professor at the Hotel,

Restaurant and Institutional Management Department at the University of Delaware, said there is a growing demand for sports tournament-centered developments. The town government of Laurel will also be a big loser; revenue from property taxes, sewer/water and impact fees would have totaled in the millions of dollars. In addition, Discovery had agreed to foot the bill for the entire infrastructure for the project, including the cost of installing sewer and water pipes, pumping station, and contributing to the upgrade of the town's sewer plant. The project was billed as an economic boom to the little community, with 7,000 to 8,000 jobs being created after the 10year buildout and $30 million to $40 million dollars being invested in the project. David Horsey said that he feels sorry for the town of Laurel. “For once the town has a mayor and council that want growth and now this happens,” he said. The developers have gone back to the drawing board and have developed plan B for use of their land, about 120 acres. They hope to purchase additional land adjoining the property that has already been annexed into town. They plan to build a 200,000-square foot strip shopping center and moderatelyto medium-priced residential housing. David Horsey said that the investors are still lined up, and they will begin work on the revised development as soon as the lawsuit is settled.


PAGE 18

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Elmer Hearn relieved those who were ‘burned out’ The Seaford and Laurel Star newspapers are running a series of articles on the veterans who served this nation during World War II. We welcome suggestions for interviews. Contact Bryant Richardson at 629-9788.

By James Diehl Elmer Hearn never signed up for the armed forces and he wasn’t involved in the actual fighting during World War II. But, when Uncle Sam called on Aug. 17, 1945, the Laurel native was happy to “do his part.” “Back in those days, when we were called, we went, we did what was expected of us and then we came home and continued to make a living as best we could,” said Hearn, who has owned Hearn Insurance Co. in Seaford since 1962. “There’s no question I did what I had to do.” When Hearn received his draft papers, he was certain he would be serving his country overseas. What wasn’t certain was what his job would be, or even what branch of the service he would serve in. “Back then, our jobs were chosen for us, as well as the branch of service we’d be serving in,” Hearn remembers. “When we went through our physical and finally wound up at the end of the line, the person there would ask you if you wanted to go in the Navy, the Army or the Marines. “I listened to these guys and they would answer Navy and [get told] they were going in the Army, and so on. I decided that when I got to the front of the line, I would just say ‘You’re going to select anyhow, so just do it.’ And that’s what I did.” After being chosen for the United States Army, Hearn spent a tumultuous few weeks at Fort Dix, N.J., where he spent two weeks

Laurel native Elmer Hearn was drafted in the summer of 1945 and served in the United States Army through 1947. He was stationed in Rheims, France, the city which served as the backdrop for the German surrender on May 7, 1945.

in quarantine, with four other soldiers, after a bunk mate contracted meningitis. Finally released from Fort Dix, Hearn completed his basic training at Camp Croft in South Carolina before spending nearly a month traveling. He eventually arrived at his home away from home in Rheims, France. By the time Hearn arrived in western Eu-

rope, most of the world had heard of Rheims, at that time a war ravished city about 89 miles east-northeast of Paris. It was the city where, on the morning of May 7, 1945, U.S. General Dwight D. Eisenhower and the Allies received the unconditional surrender of the Wehrmacht, or the unified armed forces of Germany. The document marking the official end of the war in Europe was ratified in Berlin the following day on May 8, or V-E Day. The surrender was signed at the Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (SHAEF), commonly referred to in the media as a “little red schoolhouse” in Rheims. Hearn remembers to this day the first time he laid eyes on the structure. “Going over, I was under the impression that this was going to be a little, red country school,” Hearn recalls. “This was no little red schoolhouse. It was literally as big as the old Seaford High School, but I guess [using the term ‘little red schoolhouse’] sounded good in the newspaper. “Perhaps other people may not have envisioned it to be a one-room school as I did, but that’s what I was expecting to find,” Hearn continued. “I was in the room where the armistice was signed, but I didn’t really find it humbling at all. It was more humbling to me to see the cemeteries where all our boys are buried.” Trained in the handling of explosives, Hearn instead spent his time in western Europe working in the motor pool. Drawing on his farming experience in western Sussex County, he was quite good at it and quickly drew the attention of the powers that be. “When I first got over there, they were lucky if they could get one vehicle started. If

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they did, they would use that one to pull the rest of them,” Hearn said. “My first job was getting all those vehicles going. I made staff sergeant while I was there because they saw that, while I may not know the job by the book, I could always find out what was wrong and fix it.” Hearn and many traveling oversees in the first days after the war ended knew one of their main jobs was to relieve war-weary troops, some of which had been fighting for the better part of five years. To this day, when he hears someone saying they are just “burned out” with their life, he winces. “People today don’t really know what burned out means, but I’ve seen it first hand,” Hearn said. “Some of the guys over there would just sit down and stay there, even if a general entered the room. They were so burned out that they just didn’t care. One of our main jobs was to relieve them [so they could go home].” Hearn says it would be awful difficult to find a World War II veteran these days who considers himself a hero. There was a general consensus during the 1940s that everyone had a job to do, and they would simply do those jobs to the best of their abilities. “There were very few heroes in those days. Back then, if you were [recognized as] a hero, there was no doubt that you were a hero,” Hearn said. “I don’t think there’s a single man who was in World War II who considers himself a hero today. “We simply had a job to do, and we did the job the best that we could. Then we came home and we made a life.”

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acres perfect for home site or horse farm in Delmar School District. Call Dianne Reece’s cell 302745-1151 or her home 302-629-3348.

549598 3 BR, 2 BA Rancher in nice neighborhood is convenient to the beaches & bay bridge. Landscaping & invisible dog fencing. Call John Williamson’s cell 302-542-0289.

552298 3 BR, 3 BA in Clearbrooke Est. has privacy, 4-bay garage, heated in-ground pool, fencing, screened porch & more. Call Marty Loden’s cell 302-519-3545.

552350 4 BR, 1 1/2 BA 1915 extensively renovated Colonial in town Laurel. New plumbing, paint, hardwood floors, roof, bath & kitchen. $209,900 Call Marty Loden’s cell 302-519-3545.

541695

551331

3 BR, 1 1/2 BA on 3.81 acres outside Frankford is 15 min to the ocean. 4 poultry houses for storage. Call Barbara Smith’s cell 302-745-6489.

552656 3 BR, 1 BA on double lot. Recently new water heater, washer, dryer, roof, space heater. 2 sheds/garages. Call John Williamson’s cell 302-542-0289.

552786 3 BR, 1 BA in recessed dock has view of Indian River Bay. Large lot is 10 min. boat ride to the ocean. Call Britt Lenz’ cell 302-858-6796.

552836 2 BR, 3 BA in recessed dock, view of Indian Bay from 3 decks & enclosed porch. These views are a must see! $499,900 Call Britt Lenz’ cell 302-858-6796.

552145

in the Cove, Greenwood has shed, screened porch, new appliances, paved drive. Call Brenda Rambo’s cell 302-236-2660.

552344 4 BR, 2 BA is larger than it appears located in Nanticoke Acres Annex has a nice yard, 2X garage with heat, fencing, awesome family room & more. Call John Williamson’s cell 302-542-0289.

554129 4 BR, 2 1/2 BA Brand new is contemporary at family ready, Energy Star certified, has gas heat & fireplace & a computer room. Call Scott Venables’ cell 302-559-2333.

547388 3 BR, 2 BA just outside Seaford limits has open floor plan, front porch, rear deck, 1300 sq ft & is finished & ready. Call Brenda Rambo’s cell 302-236-2660.

554182 3 BR, 1 BA older home on almost 2 acres is . Has replacement windows and shed and is located outside Laurel. Call Scott Venables’ cell 302-559-2333.

547491 4 BR, 2 BA in town Laurel has architectural shingles, brick steps, landscaping, open floor plan & town amenities. Call Scott Venables’ cell 302-559-2333.

552912 3 BR, 1 BA bungalow has town water & sewer, but no town taxes. New carpet, tile, windows, heat/air, appliances. Call Scott Venables’ cell 302-559-2333.

in historic 554465 Bethel. All approved for standard septic; all 1/2 acre +. Principal is a licensed Real Estate Broker. Each Call Scott Venables’ cell 302-559-2333

550149 Here’s your in Manchester! 3 BR, 2 BA Cape has cathedral ceilings, hardwood & tile floors, gas heat & fireplace, 2x6 walls, Energy Star certified & more. Call Scott Venables’ cell 302-559-2333.

lot just 554046 outside Seaford limits in Devonshire Woods. Approved for LPP septic. Call John Williamson’s cell 302542-0289.

552841 zoned UB2 in town Georgetown. One has retail business & apt.; the other is 5 BR, 2 BA rental that could be a business. Call Britt Lenz’ cell 302-8586796.

544880 3 BR, 2 BA

4 BR, 3 BA in Cape outside Milford has 2 sheds, bonus room, above-ground pool with 3 levels of decks, fencing, ponds , all appliances & more. $369,000 Call Brenda Rambo’s cell 302-236-2660.


PAGE 20

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Three challengers, incumbent battling for commission seat By Lynn R. Parks Four people are running for two seats on the Delmar (Md.) Town Commission. One of those who are running is incumbent Luther Hitchens, who has already served two four-year terms on the commission. Hitchens “is a big asset,” said Mayor Doug Niblett, who is running unopposed for another term. “He is my deputy mayor and I would hate to see him lose his seat.” Delmar native Hitchens, 60, said that he loves the town in which he has always lived. “I was born here, right on Maryland Avenue,” he said. “I just like giving back to the town that has given me so much. I believe in the people here and I like giving back to the people.” Hitchens said that there are several projects in the works that he would like to see through. Among those projects are housing developments, including the development that will soon be going up around the golf course on the south edge of town. “There is a lot of development going on,” he said. “I think the town is going in the right direction, but at the same time we want to keep our old-town charm.” Hitchens graduated from Delmar High School in 1965 and served in the U.S. Army, going to Vietnam. Before retiring two years ago, he owned Hitchens Commercial Laundry Sales and Service, which primarily serviced industrial laundry equipment. He and his wife, Donna, have four adult children and seven grandchildren. Reginald Lizotte, 51, is one of three newcomers running for a seat. A resident of Delmar for more than 22 years, he served on the Delmar (Del.) Town Council 17 years ago. “I just feel like getting back into politics,” said Lizotte. “I like the community and I would serve [on the commission] for the people.” Lizotte is owner of Lizotte Construction, through which he is installing fiber optic cables for Verizon. He and his wife, Linda, have three adult children and seven grandchildren. The other two challengers, Chris Pittas and Marlena Hodgins, are running as a team. “We have decided that it is time for a change,” Hodgins said. “Delmar is growing by leaps and bounds and it is time to do some different things.” “We would like to see some new blood on the council,” Pittas added. “I hope that the people of Delmar will help those who are trying to make a change get in. New blood on the commission would bring knowledge and a lot of good things to Delmar.” Both Hodgins and Pittas would like to see the officers with the Delmar Police Department be allowed to engage in collective bargaining. “I want the department

For your information: Voting in the Delmar, Md., town election will take place Tuesday, Nov. 20, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. in Delmar Town Hall. Citizens have to have been registered to vote with the town or with the county by Tuesday, Nov. 13. For information, call town hall, (410) 896-3368. to be competitive with its wages,” Pittas said. Hodgins said that the town needs to provide recreation for its youth. “We need to find something for them to do so they are not driving around using drugs,” she said. She likes the idea of a skateboard park. She would also like to see the town institute impact fees on new developments. “With that additional income, we could do a lot for the town,” including fixing its roads, she said. Both Pittas and Hodgins agree that growth in Delmar is a good thing. “With the growth that is going on and the revenue it brings, Delmar has the capability of being what you might call a perfect town,” Pittas said. But Hodgins would like to see the growth slowed down a little. “I think growth is good,” she said. “But growth on the entire Eastern Shore is happening a little too rapidly. I would like to see it move a little slower, so our services can catch up. Our schools and our hospitals just can’t accommodate all the people coming in.” Hodgins retired from Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in 2000 as patient advocate and director of volunteer services. A widow, she has lived in Delmar for 25 years. She has three adult children, three grandchildren and two step-grandchildren. She also has a “daughter by choice,” a woman who chooses to consider her as a mother, she said, and three “grandchildren by choice,” and has hosted four exchange students in her home, three from Brazil and one from Hungary. Pittas, 49, retired in August as public service officer with the Salisbury Police Department. He is a five-year resident of Delmar. He and his wife, Joanna, have two adult children and a 17-year-old son, Justin Powell, who is a student at Delmar High School.

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

PAGE 21

Education LHS to present ‘The Music Man’

Recently kicking off the SmartDrive program at Sussex Tech were, from left, senior Megan Campbell, Laurel, SmartDrive CEO Pete Booker, senior Kristen Conner, Seaford, SmartDrive Program coordinator Karen Busby and senior Brittney Cooper, Laurel.

Students go online to learn how to drive Sussex Tech is encouraging its students to participate in the driver enhancement teenage driver program, SmartDrive, a free, online program of driver education reinforcement aimed at students who already have their driver's licenses. The program is offered from Nov. 1 to Jan. 31 and from Jan. 1 to March 31. SmartDrive Schools of the Year can earn $1,500, $1,000 and $500 for after-prom parties. Students can also earn individual prizes such as scholarships, trips, concert tickets, and I-pods. Last year, Sussex Tech had the highest

Wine Tasting

percentage of students, 94 percent, signed up for the contest in Kent and Sussex counties and received $1,500, which was used for the senior picnic. Sussex Tech students also received three of the top four individual awards in the South Contest, including the top prize of a $4,000 scholarship, two third places and the school SmartDrive Student of the Year award. Participation by Sussex Tech students is supervised by driver education teachers Merrill Moore, Randy Schaeffer, and Kevin Elzie. Students can sign up at www.smartdrivede.org.

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Tenth graders will be recognized

Laurel High School will celebrate the achievements of its 10th-grade students during an assembly, “Tenth Grade Project Crusade to Understanding,” tonight, Nov. 15, at 6:30 p.m. in the high school auditorium. The program will highlight the projects completed by LHS sophomores. For information, call Karen Beck, 8756120, ext. 233, or e-mail her at kbeck@laurel.k12.de.us.

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The Laurel High School Performing Arts Department will perform Merideth Wilson's "The Music Man.” Performances are set for Friday and Saturday, Feb. 22 and 23, and Thursday, Friday and Saturday, Feb. 28 and 29 and March 1., at 7:30 p.m. and at 1:30 p.m. on March 1. Tickets are $7 for adults and $5 for students and senior citizens with identification. This year's production includes an additional weekend due to the sell-out of last year's performance, "Grease." Musicians in the community are needed to be a part of the show. Parts are available for people playing piano, violin, flute, clarinet, bass clarinet, tenor saxophone, trombone, baritone sax and trumpet. This year's show will again be directed by Laurel High School's band and theater teacher, Brian Cass, and Laurel's elementary music teacher, Kim Parker.

er education teacher. Students from around the state will spend the day at Dover Downs International Speedway. The competition consists of road driving, skills tests, map reading, and a Meagan Colston written test. Colston, who participates in softball and cheerleading, holds a 3.33 GPA. “I am excited and a little bit nervous about the competition,” said Meagan, “but I plan to work hard and do well.” Two more students from Laurel High School will have the chance to participate with Meagan at Dover.

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PAGE 22

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Community Bulletin Board Events Joint effort for Military

We would like to have AT&T International Phone Cards (AT&T is accepted over there) donated to either Dr. Richard Tananis’ office or the Laurel Police Department. We will be accepting phone cards until Dec. 1. You can purchase the phone cards at any Wal-Mart, Happy Harry’s, Rite Aid or Food Lion. They range in price from $5 to $40 depending on the time bought. It is for the 153rd Military Police Company, National Guard. Adam Coleman from LPD is currently over there, along with several other police officers from surrounding communities. Currently they are over in Iraq on the front lines and are not expected home for at least nine months. This is an opportunity for them to call home and speak to their loved ones without incurring additional bills by doing collect calls. It is the one thing that they request the most.

Alice in Wonderland

The Laurel Public Library is thrilled to announce that the First State Children’s Theater will perform Alice in Wonderland on Saturday, Nov. 24, at 12:30 p.m. Families with children of all ages are invited to enjoy an afternoon with Alice and friends. For more information, call the Laurel Public Library at 875-3184.

Coast Guard Flotilla ceremony

United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12-03-001 of Seaford is pleased to announce that our acting Flotilla Commander, Dick Bailey, received the Division 12 Auxiliarist of the Year award at the annual Change of Watch Ceremony held at Cape Henlopen Elks Club No. 2540 in Lewes recently. Flotilla 12-03-001 meets the 2nd Thursday of the month at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club at the Blades Marina. New members are always welcome, come join us. For more information please call Nate Chaimowitz 398-0309.

Lap blankets for Vets sought

The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 19 of Laurel is looking for people who knit, crochet, or can hand-make lap blankets for our veterans in the local nursing homes. We have a goal of 60. If you are interested in helping us reach our goal, contact Ann Foskey, president of American Legion Auxiliary Unit 19, at 875-0714.

Where do you begin?

The Sussex County Genealogical Society will meet on Saturday, Nov. 17, at the Rehoboth Beach Public Library. Our featured speaker will be Nancy Lyons. Ms. Lyons is a regularly scheduled presenter at the Delaware Public Archives’ genealogical workshops and is well versed in the many areas of genealogy. Come join us on Nov. 17, at 10:30 a.m. in the upstairs meeting room of the Rehoboth Beach Public Library, 226 Rehoboth Ave. The meeting is open to everyone interested in learning about their family’s history. For more information call 302-875-5418, or go to our web site www.scgsdelaware.org.

Model train & toy show

The annual Fall Hartly Fire Co. model train & toy show and sale to be held at the Hartly Fire Hall on Saturday, Nov. 17, from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. More than 140 tables of toys and trains and fire service collectibles. Tickets $3, spouse $2, kids under 12 free with adult. Breakfast and lunch served by Fire Company Auxiliary. Call Allen at 302-492-3755, evenings and weekends for information.

Model Railroad Club

Over 5000 square feet of displays including 6 operating layouts in 4 different scales. Large white elephant table with plenty of train related bargains. Refreshments and snacks will be served and a chance to win one of three train sets being raffled. Admission is free (children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult). Camelot Hall, 103 East State St., Delmar. Saturday Dec. 1, 11 a.m-5 p.m.; Sunday, Dec. 2, noon-5 p.m.; Saturday, Jan. 12, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, Jan. 13, noon 5 p.m.; Saturday, Jan. 19, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, Jan. 20, noon-5 p.m. For more information call, 410-742-9325 or 856-9250.

AARP fund raiser

Longaberger fundraiser/bake sale sponsored by AARP Chapter #5340 on Friday Nov. 16, and Saturday, Dec 8, at Georgetown Wal-Mart. Basket donations are $2 each or three for $5. For more information call 856-3404 or 945-1288. AARP Chapter #5340 scholarship fundraiser is the Longaberger 2007 Christmas Collection Sweets and Treats Bundle basket. Basket ticket donations are $2 each or 3 for $5 and are available until Dec. 20. For tickets contact any AARP member, or call 856-3404 or 945-1288.

Seaford H.S. Alumni Social

Stay and play

Financial Planning classes

Holiday Concert Benefit

The Seaford High School Alumni Association is sponsoring a Fall Social at Nanticoke River Yacht Club, Blades Harbor, Blades Causeway on Friday, Nov. 23, from 6-9 p.m. The Executive Board invites you to spend time with classmates and fellow Alumni to revel in fond memories and retell “fantastic” stories about our school days. Bring a friend who is a SHS graduate, has attended Seaford Schools, or has an interest in the Alumni Association. You don’t have to be a member to attend. Light snacks and a cash bar will be available. EST Financial Group is offering a financial planning class entitled, “When Giving It Away Makes More Sense Than Selling It.” The class, scheduled for Monday, Nov. 19, is open to the public and is offered free of charge. The class will be held in the Hayman Meeting Room at the Delmar Public Library. The Delmar Public Library is located at 101 North Bi-State Boulevard in Delmar. The class will begin at 7:30 p.m. and will last approximately 30 minutes with time for questions during and after the class. Presenting the topic will be Samuel F. Slabaugh, Sr. Mr. Slabaugh is a Certified Financial Planner Professional with EST Financial Group of Delmar. Pre-registration is required: to reserve your seat, contact Carol Greene at 302846-9201 or 877-584-1944 today.

The “Parents As Teachers” (PAT) Stay & Play - Parents and children (birth to age four) are invited to play together, listen to a story, learn new songs and finger plays, and network with other families. Free. No registration required. Sessions are Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Seaford Dept. of Parks & Recreation (SDPR), 320 Virginia Ave., Seaford. Parent educator, Cris Henderson. (Closed on school holidays.) Call Anna Scovell at 856-5239 for more information. The community is invited to come and enjoy an evening of musical talent and good eats at the Holiday of Hope Community Concert and dessert bar benefiting teen ministry, Shiloh House of Hope. This display of local musical talent will take place Friday, Nov. 30, at Delmarva Christian High School in Georgetown, beginning at 6:30 p.m. Musical talent includes Greenwood Mennonite Ensemble, Kent Embleton and Lauren Henry from Delmarva Christian High School, Eagles Nest Praise Band, Ben Sorrells and Ken Deusa, and others. Area churches, Christian schools and other ministries are encouraged to mobilize the community to come out and enjoy this special night. Tickets are available for $10/person or

Ruritan’s ham and turkey shoot

The Ellendale Ruritan Club ham and turkey shoot, Saturday, Nov 17, (rain date Nov. 24) at 11:30 a.m., at Ellendale VFW, on V.F.W. Road. Directions: 1/2 mile south of U.S. 113 and 16 intersection). Refreshments will be available for sale. (If rain dates are cancelled, we will go to next shoot.) For possible cancellations call 302-422-2948 or cell 302-249-7025.

‘Alice in Wonderland’

‘Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland’ at the Seaford District Library Thursday, Nov. 29 at 6:30 p.m. Tumble down the rabbit hole with Alice and re-discover the fantastical and whimsical adventure through Wonderland. The program is made possible by the First State Children’s Theater Company. For more information contact Cindi Smith at 629-2524.

Georgetown Library events

• Hometown Pictures has returned to The Georgetown Public Library. The exhibit will be open to the public during the normal hours of the library in the conference room. For more information call the library at 856-7958. • The Georgetown Public Library will hold story time at 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday morning with Miss Sherri. For more information call the library 856-7958. • The library is sponsoring Popcorn and a Movie on the first Friday of every month.

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007 $25/family or at the door the night of the event. For more information or to purchase tickets, call Maria at (302) 337-9330 or visit their website at www.shilohhouseofhope.org.

Christmas in Bridgeville

The 32nd annual Christmas in Bridgeville sponsored by the Bridgeville Historical Society will be held Saturday, Dec. 1, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Woodbridge High School. Free admission. Chances will be available from the society on an Antique Ladies Writing Desk, to be raffled at 3 p.m. More than 60 vendors will be showing their wares ranging from homemade goodies, crafts, including wooden items, dolls, candles, Christmas decorations, quilts, poinsettias and Christmas greens. Lunch will be catered by “Jimmy’s Grille” in the school cafeteria. Caroling in the Park will take place on Friday, Nov. 30 at 6:30 p.m. at the Historical Society Park on the corner of Delaware Ave. and William St. Please bring a canned good donation for needy families.

Laurel AIDS awareness

AIDS awareness event on Dec. 1, “World AIDS Day,” will be held in the downtown area of Laurel beginning at 6 p.m. with a brief program. This will be followed by a candlelight walk down Delaware Avenue to Janosik Park where there will be a “flower toss” in honor of AIDS victims. Refreshments will be served following the event at Centenary Church on Market Street. Other World AIDS Day events in Sussex County will be held in Rehoboth Beach at the Grandstand beginning at 6:15 p.m. and the lobby of the State Service Center on Bedford Street in Georgetown from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. where brochures and red ribbon pins will be given out. For more information call the Sussex County AIDS Council at 644-1090.

Seaford Elk Lodge Hoop Shoot

The Seaford Elk Lodge will be holding their annual Hoop Shoot Contest on Saturday, Dec. 1, at the Laurel High School Field House. Registration will begin at noon and the contest will begin promptly at 1 p.m. All Boys and Girls who will be nine years old by April 1 of 2008 and will not be 14 years old on that same date are eligible to participate. The classification is 9-10, 11-12, and 13-14, with male and female students competing in their own gender groups. Trophies will be awarded to the first, second, and third-place winners and T-shirts will be awarded to all first place winners to wear at the District level of competition. All participants must bring a “copy” of their birth certificate on the above date to be in the contest. Questions may be answered by calling Roger Hall, local chairman at 875-5209.

Caroling on the Circle

Sussex Countians are invited to sing in the 2007 holiday season and help the needy during the 24th annual Caroling on The Circle event, to be held Monday, Dec. 3, in downtown Georgetown. The annual community singing event doubles as a food drive for the hungry and needy of Sussex County, drawing hundreds of residents who come out to sing Christmas carols while donating goods for area pantries, churches and food banks. This year’s festivities will begin at 7 p.m. outside the historic Sussex County Courthouse. The program will feature a blend of traditional and Spanish carols

performed by a number of singers, including local artists Ed Shockley and Kevin Short, and the El Centro Cultural group. This year’s festivities also will include the ceremonial Christmas tree lighting by the Town of Georgetown. The event is free to attend. Participants are asked only to bring with them canned goods or other non-perishable food items for donation. Anyone who cannot attend, but who still wishes to contribute, can drop off canned goods Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the County Administrative Offices building, next to the courthouse, in Georgetown. For more information, call (302) 855-7700.

Holiday Concert Benefit

Dr. Marie Wolfgang’s Relay for Life team is sponsoring their second annual “Sounds of he Season” Holiday Concert to benefit the American Cancer Society and the 2008 West Sussex Relay for Life on Sunday, Dec. 9. The concert will again be held in the auditorium at Delmar High School at 2 p.m., with doors opening at 1:30 p.m. Performers are volunteering their time and talents for this concert. Members of the audience will enjoy the talents of employees of Nanticoke Health Services, including Lori Miller, area middle school choruses and other members of the Sussex County area. Tickets are $15 each or $25 for two. Contact Dr. Wolfgang’s office at 629-2366 or any member of the Relay team for tickets. A Silent Auction will also be held, and refreshments will be available for purchase at intermission.

Children’s Christmas party

Laurel American Legion Post 19 is holding a Children’s Christmas party on Sunday, Dec. 9, from 2-4 p.m. at the Post Home for children 12-year-old and under. Santa Clause will be stopping by to see if you have been naughty or nice. You also may have a picture taken with Santa. There will be games, goodies, gifts and fun for the kids.

Seaford Class of 1987 Reunion

The Seaford Class of 1987 is preparing for their reunion and are seeking classmates. If you are a member of the class or are aware of the location of a member, please e-mail their information to seaford1987@yahoo.com or call 6287870. The reunion event will be held Friday, Nov. 23, from 7-11 p.m. Cost is $35 and will be held at the Seaford Golf and Country Club.

PAGE 23

Senior Center Red Hat Ladies

Help the Red Hat’s raise funds by participating in their Christmas Money 50/25/25 Give Away. Chances are only $1 each or six chances for $5. Chances will be sold by the Red Hat members and at the front desk of the Nanticoke Senior Center until Dec. 17. Open to the public - need not be present to win.

Meetings AARP Chapter #5340

AARP Chapter #5340 will hold a board meeting 10 a.m. Nov. 26, at the Nanticoke Tribe Lodge #21, Rt 113, 1/2 mile South of 1st State Chevrolet, Georgetown. All members are encouraged to attend. For details call Cathey Betts president 856-3441.

Sierra Club

A Public Forum, sponsored by The Sierra Club, Southern Delaware Group on Wednesday, Nov. 28, at 7 p.m., at the Sussex County Council Chambers, #2, The Circle, Georgetown. The forum will be preceded by a brief Membership Meeting, from 6 to 6:45 p.m. Members and interested parties are encouraged to attend both sessions. The early session is dedicated to formulating our 2008 Conservation Program. For information contact: 645-1732 or enviro@delaware.net.

Laurel Class of 1956

The Laurel High School Class of 1956 will hold their quarterly luncheon, Friday, Nov. 16 at the Laurel Dutch Inn, at 11:30. Contact Frank B. Calio, 875-3770 for reservations.

MOAA meeting

The Southern Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) announces its November meeting. The speaker for the Nov. 20 meeting will be Rob Propes who is the Delaware Project director of Bluewater Wind. The luncheon will be held at LaRosa Negra at 1201 Savannah Road in Lewes, at 11:45 a.m. The cost of the buffet is $12 including tip. Reservations are not required. MOAA is a non-profit veterans’ association dedicated to maintaining a strong national defense and to preserving the earned entitlements of members of the uniformed services and their families and survivors. Membership is open to those who hold or have ever held a warrant or commission in any service to include Public Health Services and NOAA and their surviving spouses. The next meeting will be held Jan. 15, 2008.

Advisory Committee

The Sussex County Advisory Committee for the Aging and Adults with Physical Disabilities will meet at the Sussex County West Administrative Complex, North DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, at 10 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 19. All meetings are open to the public. For more information contact Sandy Dole, chair, at 302-684-2755.

Widowed Persons meet

The Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service will have its next meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 20, at 12:15 p.m., at the Golden Corral. The planned entertainment will be “Trio” Ole Time Gospel Singers

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The Santa Claus Committee is seeking entrants for the annual Federalsburg Christmas Parade, scheduled for 7 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 10. This year’s theme is Peace on Earth and will honor the men and women who are serving in the military. Rain date is Wednesday, Dec. 12 at 7 p.m. Entry forms and parade guidelines are available at the Federalsburg Town Office at 118 North Main St. or on-line at www.Federalsburg.org. For more information call 410-754-8157.

Preschoolers storytime

Parents, caregivers and children ages two -five are invited to enjoy stories, songs, poetry, art, science, math, music and fun at the Laurel Public Library’s Preschool Storytime, which is held every Tuesday morning at 10:30 a.m. For more information, call the Laurel Public Library at 875-3184.

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PAGE 24 from Shiloh Community Church. All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend. Come join us - we all enjoy the trips, lunches/dinners, etc., that we do.

NARFE meeting

The Georgetown Chapter (1992) of the National Association of Active and Retired Federal Employees will hold their next meeting on Monday, Nov. 19 at noon with lunch at the Pizza King Restaurant on Stein Highway in Seaford. For more information, or to become a member, please contact Les Martens at 629-9789.

Equine Council to meet

A meeting of the Delaware Equine Council will be held Monday, Nov 19, 7 p.m. at the Harrington Public Library. This will be a short meeting and election of officers for 2008. All those interested in horses are welcome. For info contact Nyle 422-4094 or Peggy 629-5233.

Marine Corps League

The Marine Corps League meets the first Thursday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at the Log Cabin in Seaford.

Sons of Confederate Veterans

The Maj. Gen. Arnold Elzey Camp #1940, Sons of Confederate Veterans meets the first Wednesday of each month in the lower level of the Salisbury Library at 7 p.m.

Trap Pond Partners

Trap Pond Partners’ monthly meeting will be held at the park’s Nature Center, the second Wednesday of each month. Anyone who is interested in Trap Pond State Park is invited to attend. For more information feel free to call 875-5153.

Cancer Support Group

The Wellness Community-Delaware is offering a support group for people affected by cancer and their loved ones at the Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. The group meets at the Cancer Care Center on the third Thursday of the month from 4:30 to 6 p.m. To register for this program or for more information call Kaye or Lori at 645-9150. All programs at The Wellness Community are free of charge for people affected by cancer and their loved ones.

Coast Guard Auxiliary

Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12-04 meets the second Thursday of each month at Nanticoke Yacht Club in Blades. Call Wayne Hickman at 629-6337 for details.

Trips Christmas Spectacular

Seaford Recreation’s 16th annual Radio City Music Hall Christmas Spectacular is scheduled for Sunday, Dec 2. The cost is $130. Call or come into the office to reserve tickets 629-6809.

Sight and Sound trip

Nanticoke Senior Center’s Sight and Sound Trip presents: Voices of Christmas, at Living Waters Theatre in Lancaster, Pa., on Dec. 19, at 10 a.m. Cost: $80 members, and $85 non-members. Price includes: Motor coach transportation and tip for driver, box lunch from the center, and dinner at Shady Maple Smorgasbord. For questions, call 629-4939.

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Christmas trip

Laurel Senior Center will have a Christmas trip to Wilmington Grand Opera House to see a show: “Home for The Holidays” with The Three Little Bakers, on Nov. 29. Cost is $60 which includes show, transportation, buffet meal and gratuity. For more information call 875-2536.

Food Breakfast Cafe

VFW 4961 Breakfast Cafe, open Monday-Friday, 7-10 a.m., Seaford VFW, Middleford Road, to benefit Veterans Relief Fund.

Spaghetti dinner and auction

On Friday, Nov. 16, the Sussex Tech Key Club and Greater Millsboro Kiwanis Club will host an all-you-can-eat spaghetti dinner and silent auction from 5-7 p.m. at the Sussex Technical High School Cafeteria on Rt. 9 west of Georgetown. Tickets at the door are $10 for adults and $5 for kids under age 12. Dinner includes spaghetti and meatballs, salad, bread, dessert and beverage. Takeouts are also available. The dinner and silent auction will benefit programs for local children and youth. The Greater Millsboro Kiwanis Club sponsors the Key Club at Sussex Tech, and both organizations raise funds to improve health and education for children, plus other important community service projects. Silent auction items will be awarded at 6:45 p.m. the evening of the event, payable by cash or check. A 50/50 drawing will also be held. For more information, call the Millsboro Kiwanis Club at 302-934-8424.

Woodland dinner

The women of the Woodland United Methodist Church will serve a chicken and dumpling dinner on Saturday, Nov 17, at 6 p.m. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Cost is: adult, $8; children 6-12 years, $4; 5 years and under are free. Woodland Church is located 4.5 miles west of Seaford next to the Woodland Ferry house. No carry-outs. For additional information call 629-5404 or 629-4662.

Friends of Agriculture breakfast

“Saving our Natural Heritage” will be the topic of the Friends of Agriculture breakfast on Friday, Nov. 16 at 7:15 a.m. at the Modern Maturity Center, 1121 Forrest Ave., Dover. Dr. Doug Tallamy, chair of the University of Delaware department of entomology and wildlife ecology, will speak about sustaining our natural heritage for future generations. Tallamy is the author of a newly released book ‘Bringing Nature Home: How Native Plants Sustain Wildlife in Our Gardens,’ which explores this unbreakable link between native plant species and native wildlife. Registration is $15. For more information or to register, call Alice Moore at 302-831-2504.

CHEER hosting dinner club

Join us at the Greenwood CHEER Center every Wednesday evening for our weekly dinner club. The CHEER Greenwood Center is located at 12713 Sussex Hwy., Greenwood, and the public is welcomed. Each week there will be a delicious dinner offered for the price of $4 per person for individuals over 60+ years. For more information call 302-3495237 or visit the CHEER website at www.cheerde.com.

DuPont Golden Girls luncheon

The Annual DuPont Golden Girls Luncheon will be held Thursday, Dec. 6, 11 a.m., at the Seaford Golf & Country Club. For reservations call Connie Keene at 629-3377, or Jackie Davis at 875-7625.

Potluck supper

On Saturday, Nov. 17, at 6 p.m., a potluck supper will be held at Bethel Church Community House, Neal’s School Road, Oak Grove. Bring a covered dish and enjoy an evening of live karaoke music. For details call Jerry Butler, 629-6319. Everyone welcome.

Ruritan Club breakfast

All-you-care-to-eat Sunday breakfast buffet served by the Galestown Ruritan Club, on the fourth Sunday of each month, October to June, 7-10 a.m. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 children 6-12 years, at The Galestown (Md) Community Hall, 5833 School House Road. Buffet features blueberry pancakes, eggs, scrapple, sausage, creamed chipped beef, biscuits, potato casserole, hominy, fruit cup, and sticky buns. This month it will be held Nov. 25.

Thanksgiving dinner

Everyone is invited to attend the Annual Union United Methodist Church free community Thanksgiving Dinner for great food, fun and fellowship on Thursday, Nov. 22 at 12 noon until all are served. Includes turkey and all the fixings. Located on the corner of Market and Laws street. For further information you may call 302-337-7409. All are welcome. Submit Bulletin Board items by noon, Thursday. Send to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, email to editor@mspublications. com or drop off at 628 West Stein Hwy., Seaford.

Texas Hold’em Poker Laurel Fire Department 205 West Tenth St., Laurel, DE

Nanticoke Senior Center breakfast Nanticoke Senior Center will hold its building fund breakfast on Dec. 6, at the Nanticoke Senior Center. Cost is $5. Menu includes: Fruit cup, bacon, sausage, scrambled eggs, cream chipped beef on toast, hash brown potatoes, biscuits, coffee or tea, orange juice. For sign ups and questions call 6294939.

Dinner & auction

Annual covered dish dinner & auction to be held at Union United Methodist Church, located at the corner of Market and Laws streets in Bridgeville on Saturday evening, Nov. 17. Dinner begins at 5:30 p.m. and the auction will follow immediately at 6:30 p.m. Tickets, available at the door, are $5 for adults and $2.50 for children ages 4 through 10 years of age, plus a large, wellfilled covered dish. Richard Lindale, our guest auctioneer, will keep you well entertained and laughing, as well as helping you with your Christmas shopping. Everyone is cordially invited for great food, fun and fellowship. For further information you may call 337-7409 or 424-0601.

Saturday, Nov. 17th 2007 at 7:00 PM Doors Open at 6:00 PM Entry Fee $100 (2) $25 Add-ons 1000 in chips plus 500/500 - Starting Level 10/20 1st place up to $2,000 - Total Prize Payouts up to $8,000 Based on player participation

PROCEEDS BENEFIT:

FREE DRAFT BEER Cash Bar & Refreshments For more info. or to pre-register: Call Steve Brittingham at 302-875-3081 Vendor: “Go All In” www.goallinde.com 302-697-6335


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

PAGE 25

Friendships made during school can last a lifetime This week I thought I would return to familiar surroundings and AT URPHY that’s Laurel. I cannot with any documentation say that the folks in Seaford, Delmar and Bridgeville do Laurel class reunions are not get together to hash over old times, but in any event I think Lau- always big and the alumni rel may hold the record as the peoassociation banquet ple there are “the great reminiscers,” or so they seem. draws around 450 people Girls from the class of 1963 get together once a month for breakevery year. fast. Members of the class of 1947 — well, that’s a story as they have game in the (Salisbury) bowl; bus rides gotten together 100 times since they startwith Clarence Whaley; the Village Driveed doing this. In; Howard Elliott and his stats; of course Laurel class reunions are always big, “The Streak,” as told by Morris Harris and the alumni association banquet draws Ben Sirman; the galvanized bucket; the around 450 people every year and now Johnson and Johnson medical kit belongCraig Littleton and Ken Brown, class of ing to the coaches; Charles “Franklin” 1962, started something a few years ago with a get-together on Friday evenings be- Moyer’s name; gym class; combination locks; the Whaley tradition; and sandburrs fore home football games. Usually there on the field at the early practices. And are a few classmates and former Laurel many reminisced about the taping before football players of any class. What started out with five or six people game day and the pep rallies after. Remember when everyone got their has now grown to 46, who attended this wrists taped and many their ankles, as it year. Let me tell this story and it will perhaps was believed the tape supported those parts of the body? Randy Wiley, sorry you set the mood for the great evening. Ron did not make it to the latest gathering, as Scott, a few years ago in his duties as aththose there had a tremendous laugh as they letic director, was cleaning out an old told of you getting most of your body locker full of coach George Schollenbergtaped before the games. er’s lifetime memory of items. Ronnie inButch, son of coach Schollenberger, stantly recognized two of the objects as gave a heart-felt message and it was for uniforms, shirts of former players — one belonging to Jim Spicer and one to Ronnie Dale Boyce, a former star player, Village Drive-In owner, announcer and lifetime Waller. Ronnie took the shirt to Jim and I guess the memories came flowing back as the tears flowed. Now Jim, a former state policeman, was a tough guy, at least he wanted us to believe this was so, but this told the story of Jim and the great closeness of those generations of people from Laurel. B ank-issued, FDIC- insured to $100,000 Some of the memories brought up included Bill Moore’s recollection of the last

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Senior center plans activities The Laurel Senior Center has planned the following activities: Thursday, Nov. 15 - 9 a.m., exercise; 9:30 a.m., shopping at Wal-Mart; 12:30 p.m., Turkey Day Trivia. Friday, Nov. 16 - 10 a.m., Musical bingo; 12:30 p.m., Turkey Day giveaway, refreshments. Monday, Nov. 19 - 9:30 a.m., shopping at Wal-Mart; 12:30 p.m., Pop Tart birthday. Tuesday, Nov. 20 - Holiday feast at Georgetown CHEER. Center closed. Wednesday, Nov. 21 - 9-12 a.m., open enrollment for Part D Medicare; 12:30 p.m., pin the head on the turkey; 5 p.m., covered-dish supper for members. Thursday, Nov. 22- Thanksgiving Day, center closed. Friday, Nov. 23 - center closed. Monday, Nov. 26 - 9:30 a.m., All-day shopping at the Centre in Salisbury with lunch out. Tuesday, Nov. 27 - 9 a.m., exercise; 10 a.m., shopping at Wal-Mart; 12:30 p.m., Share your Homemade Bread.

5-year

4.85

supporter of Laurel, to finish up. I’ll try to catch what he said: “As we get older one thing that comes back is those early friendships. Some of the best friends I ever had are in this room. Over the years I have watched many of you, as you started out as young men, and” — hesitation here — “we could beat any of you. This is great, don’t ever lose it. I am honored to be here.” Butch came up from Florida, Ken Brown from Roanoke, Don Powell from Virginia and others traveled, too. You see, their early friendships are still important! The Food Lion in Laurel has a new manager. His name is Rusty Turner and he is from Denton. Rusty got married this past summer on the beach complete with Irish singers and all. I think I am going to like this young man. He said he is also anxious to make changes in the store and wants it to become more of a part of the community. John Downes of The Insurance Market Financial Center in Laurel has had another prestigious designation attached to his title that did not come without a lot of hard work. Less than one percent of the financial people have this designation. Congratulations, John! The weatherman did not co-operate with the Delmar Heritage Day Celebration on Saturday. It really felt like fall, actually winter to me. The “76” Caboose that is on

a side rail in town was looking spiffy with a new coat of paint. Wayne Mitchell was inside giving history lessons on the caboose for all who would listen. Actually it got its name from the French word “kabius,” or little room. The railroad has meant a lot to Delmar and this one of 3,0000 Pennsylvania Railroad models fits in Delmar perfectly. They received it during the 1976 bicentennial, thus the name “76.” Wayne was very interesting to listen to and even told us about the “straight to the tracks toilet.” Much of Delmar has to do with the railroad as I guess it was a busy spur. The famous baseball team, the Railroaders, were named after it, as was the Railroad Café with that famous engineer, brakeman, conductor and, oh yes, cook, Linda Wells. Delmar you have a great idea — stick with it. What a great message was given by Pastor Charles Covington at the Post 19 Service on Sunday. As state Sen. Bob Venables stated in our conversation, “We all could stand to hear more of this.” Beware, all you four-legged friends. Hunting season is upon us and it’s time for all those “sure shots” to return. Now, Al Temple, keep talking about me and my Phillies and I’m going to put an X on your back for some of those “sure shots.” Enjoy the moments, folks. There’s plenty of humor out there!

Laurel Ministerial Association Presents:

A Community Thanksgiving Service

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Wednesday, November 21st 7 pm Laurel Volunteer Fire Hall The entire community is invited to join in giving thanks to God on Thanksgiving Eve. Area churches will be providing special music as well as pastors of the Laurel Ministerial Association who will bring us the message of God’s Providence, Faithfulness, and Salvation.

Melinda R. Tingle Financial Advisor

204 Laureltowne Front St & Delaware Ave. Laurel, DE 19956 302-875--0355 www.edwardjones.com

MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING

A love offering will be taken to support the LMA’s scholarship fund to help local area students with college tuition.

Mark your calendars! Spread the word! And don’t forget to bring a friend!


PAGE 26

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Church Bulletins Take My Hand Ministry meeting

The Mary and Martha Tea Room, a program of Take My Hand Ministry, Inc., meets on the third Wednesday of every month from 2-4 p.m. at 102 Maryland Ave. in Greenwood. A light lunch is served, and a guest speaker teaches and ministers. This is a women’s ministry.

Middle school conference

More than 3,500 middle school students and youth leaders from Maryland and adjoining states will experience a life-changing weekend at the ALIVE 2007:Transform 12/2 youth conference, Friday, Nov. 16 to Sunday, Nov. 18, at the Ocean City, Md. Convention Center. Alive 2007 is $75 per person and hotel accommodations are available for an additional fee. For a free leader’s information packet, call 1-877-896-3802 or view the information online at www.mmyfc.org.

Ministries third anniversary

On Dec. 7-9, All Walks of Life Outreach Ministries will be celebrating its third anniversary. This Year’s Theme is “Praise is the way, we say thanks.”Guest preachers are Pastor Helena Bailey of Kingdom Life Family Ministries of Millsboro; Apostle Richard Scott of Grow in Grace Worship Center of Delmar, Md.; Rev. Annette P. Wilson of Cathedral of Love AUMP of Salisbury, Md. Friday and Saturday services begin at 7:30 p.m. and on Sunday at 5 p.m. Should you have any questions feel free to contact the church at 875-7772; or email awolministry@ aol.com. Pastor Randy and Elect Lady Lorrie Jones, Host Pastors.

Celebrate Recovery

Celebrate Recovery, a step program which claims Jesus Christ as its Higher Power, is meeting at St. John's United Methodist Church, Pine and Poplar Streets, on Tuesday evenings from 7-9 p.m. This program is open to all persons who wish to turn over their hurts, habits, and hang-ups to God such that they may be healed. For more information, call Rev. Constance Hastings, 629-9466, or Robert Spadaccini 841-1720.

The Mission of Hope

The Mission needs people with grant writing or program development experience for a not-for-profit organization. Call Mission Administrator Paul Alexander for details. The Mission also accepts vehicle donations that can return a tax deduction and the good feeling that comes from helping those in need. Please contact the Mission at 629-2559, or you can e-mail the Mission at SeafordMission@Verizon.Net, or write to Seaford Mission, PO Box 1271, Seaford, DE 19973.

Seaford UMM Thanksgiving

A free, community Thanksgiving dinner sponsored by Seaford United Methodist Ministries will be Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 22, 2 p.m., at St. John’s United Methodist Church, Pine and Poplar Streets, Seaford. Turkey, stuffing and mashed potatoes will be provided, and the community is invited to bring their “first fruits” by donating side dishes, breads and desserts in disposable dishes. Donated food can be delivered to St. John's Church during the Thanksgiving

Eve service or on Thanksgiving Day from 10 am until 1:30 p.m. Volunteers are also invited to help cook, set-up, serve, and clean up from 1-4 p.m on Wednesday, November 21 and 9 a.m until 3 pm Thanksgiving Day. Call Sharon Byrns, 629-2741, or Rev. Constance Hastings, 629-9466, for more information or to volunteer.

Messiah tickets now on sale

The Southern Delaware Choral Society, under the direction of John Ranney and the Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra, under the baton of Maestro Julien Benichou will present Handel’s Messiah on Dec. 8, at 7:30 p.m., at Eagles Nest Fellowship Church, off Rt. 1 in Milton. This is the first time the choral group has collaborated with the Mid Atlantic Symphony Orchestra of Towson, Md. and this year will only be giving one performance. Tickets, which are $25 for the general audience and $15 for students, are being sold at Puzzles in Lewes and Browseabout Books in Rehoboth or by calling 645-2013.

Pastoral Aide Service

The pastoral aide committee of All Walks of Life Outreach Ministries will have a service on Nov. 25, at 5 p.m. The Guest Preacher will be Rev. Rosie L. Edwards of Tabernacle of Prayer of Salisbury, Md. Should you have any questions feel free to contact the church at 875-7772. “A ministry where Everybody is Somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord of All”

‘Operation Christmas Child’

The parishioners at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church are once again participating in Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse. Shoe boxes will be

filled with a variety of small gifts, school supplies and toys to be distributed to needy children in the U.S. and countries throughout the world. Information on how to participate in this worthwhile project can be obtained at the St. Luke’s Church office at 629-7979

Centenary UMC Thanksgiving

There will be a community Thanksgiving dinner served at Centenary United Methodist Church, Poplar and Market streets, Laurel, on Sunday, Nov. 18, at 4 p.m. for those who are alone or have a genuine need.

Bethel UMC Thanksgiving

Free Community Thanksgiving Dinner at Bethel United Methodist Church located at 2381 Neal’s School Road near Oak Grove. Serving the communities around Oak Grove and Atlanta. Traditional dinner with all the trimmings. Dinner will be served promptly at noon on Thanksgiving Day, with the kitchen closing at 1:30 p.m. For more information, call 337-8836.

Centenary presents Gospel Cafe

Centenary United Methodist Church, located at Poplar and Market Sts., Laurel, hosts Christian music every Saturday at 6 p.m. in the church fellowship hall.Join us for these events in November: Nov. 17 “Revived,” “All 4 Him,” and Cassandra Abbott; and Nov. 24 - Bethel Worship Center, Cross Country Band, and Laura Mitchell. For more information, call Bruce Willey at 875-5539. More church items on page 28

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Trap Pond, CHURCHNearLaurel, Del. 875-7715 Sun. School 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pastor Julie A. Lewis

“A caring church, a giving church, a sharing church; showing love, warmth and friendship to all.”

St. John’s United Methodist Church Pine & Poplar Sts., Seaford 302-629-9466 E-mail: st_johns@verizon.net NURSERY & HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

SUNDAY WORSHIP 8:30 & 11:15 am Traditional 9:45 Sunday School 9:50 am Contemporary Come as you are… and be transformed in the love of Christ!

Centenary United Methodist Church “Making Disciples of Jesus Christ for Over 200 Years” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Every Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m. Sunday

Rev. John W. Van Tine, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1010 S. Central Ave., Laurel Phone: 875-7748 Donny Weimar, Minister Worship Services: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Bible Study: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m. In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Fred Duncan Church: 875-4233 Parsonage: 875-3398 Sunday Services: 8:30am Praise 9:30am Sunday School,11am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching Youth Group Sunday 4:30 pm

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

HARVEST CHRISTIAN CHURCH “Heart Felt Praise” Relevant Bible Teaching Children’s Ministry Midweek Bible Study Tom Birowski, Pastor Seaford, Del. • 628-7771

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church & Old Christ Church

“A Place to Belong”

600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956 (302) 875-3644 Rev. Rita B. Nelson, Rector www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing and Church School ~ Sunday @ 9:30 am

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY Underground Family Worship (7-12 grade) 6:15 p.m. 10:45 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Prayer Team ‘The Table’ God’s Big Back Yard (last Wed. of mo) 7:00 p.m. 9:30 a.m.

94 Walnut St. Laurel, DE 19956

875-7873

Centrally located at 14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road 68, South of Laurel Laurel, Del.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m. www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

Christian Church of Seaford Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298 Minister: John Herbst SCHEDULE OF SERVICES Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

PAGE 27

How Much is Too Much? By the Rev. Todd K. Crofford Laurel Wesleyan Church

PASTOR’S PERSPECTIVE

The first question a A news report this week indibeliever and most cates that six mega-ministries are certainly a pastor receiving government scrutiny should ask when concerning the compensation of financial blessings their leaders. Stories come out of big homes, pour in is, “God, why jewel encrusted toilet seats, and have you given me on and on ad nauseum. such provisions?” Of course this is not the first time ministries have been accused We are not reservoirs looking to be of such things. (Remember the famed “air filled so we can boast of our own volconditioned dog house” of the PTL ume. days?) Rather, we are blessed to be blessingSuch abuses by a very few Christian channels that God surges provisions “superstars” become a flimsy excuse for through to others. some to reject Christianity outright. This is clearly a Christian understandFortunately, most reasonable people ing of wealth (and it is the underlying know that such self-absorbed affluent reason why we are incensed over opulent preachers are a minuscule minority in ministers.) Christianity. It was Jesus who told us not to store Still, most unbelievers and believers up our treasures on earth. (Matthew 6:20) recognizes, “Ministers and opulence just It was Jesus who told us that to spend our don’t seem to go together.” life fixated on accruing wealth was to truClearly most have no problem with a ly be a fool. (Luke 12:20) country music singer or a sports superstar It was Jesus who said when we chanliving high off the hog. Seldom do you neled our resources to needy people we hear “they shouldn’t live that way!” It were using them on him. (Matthew seems fans are willing to pay for the tick- 25:40) ets and merchandise that pay these monChristianity is the foundation of ster salaries. benevolence. Christianity is the foundaIn fact, it almost adds to the aura of tion of philanthropic action. Christianity the personality to live in a gated home is the foundation of trading temporal with security guards, an indoor pool, and wealth for eternal treasure. a six-car garage. Do the research and you will find But when it comes to the most sucChristian nations are the most generous. cessful preachers, something says, “Wait, So many of the most compassionate orit shouldn’t be that way!” And I FULLY ganizations in the world are founded and agree it shouldn’t. But why? led by deeply devoted Christians. It’s the Here’s the answer. By far the majority result of blessed-to-be-a-blessing thinkof Christians and their leaders believe ing. that money, like everything else, finds its Now, this naturally brings up the quesprimary usefulness in glorifying God. tion of whether Christians are supposed The first question a believer and most to be ascetics- committed to glorifying certainly a pastor should ask when finanGod by having absolutely nothing. cial blessings pour in is, “God, why have This too has been rejected in the New you given me such provisions?” Testament, thus requiring all believers to The question is plainly answered refind a balanced view of all God provides. peatedly in the New Testament through So, where is that line of how much is the image of a channel vs. a reservoir. too much and how do I know when I am God doesn’t give us blessings so we can about to cross it? simply multiply our own happiness or That’s what we will talk about next feather our own nests. week.

Tony Windsor’s CDs Would Make Great Gifts! “Grace of Ages” CD: Tony Windsor’s new CD captures classic spiritual hymns, including “How Great Thou Art” and “The Old Rugged Cross,” along with the powerful southern gospel sounds of “Swing Down Sweet Chariot,” “Bosoms of Abraham” and much, much more. Get your copy now at the Seaford Star office for only $5.00.

“A Few Old Friends” CD: This 20-song CD captures country music in its traditional style. From such classics as George Jones, Merle Haggard, Gene Watson, Marty Robbins, Doug Stone, Conway Twitty, Elvis Presley and more. Only a limited number left. Available at the Seaford Star office, Stein Hwy. Or call 302-236-9886. Only $5.00

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel 302-875-4646 PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

Dr. Carl G Vincent, Senior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes, Music Minister Sunday 9:30 am Wednesday 7:00 pm Children’s Church • Nursery

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Youth Minister: James Hollis Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591 MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

LAUREL-MT. PLEASANT CHARGE 27225 Kaye Road, Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.livingwaterworship.com Pastor: Rev. Timothy P. Jones

Wed. Bible Study & Sunday Morning Worship & Children’s Children’s Discovery Club 7:00 PM Ministries 10:00 AM “Flowing in Power and Love to a Parched and Thirsty World”

Passing on God’s Love and Grace in Laurel, Delmar & Surrounding Area United Methodist Churches

King’s St. George’s Mt. Pleasant

Worship Sun. Sch.

Gordy Rd...........8:50....10:00 St. George Rd.. . . .10:10..... 9:00

Mt. Pleasant Rd. 9:30,11:30..10:15 Pastor Barbara Auer

VICTORY TABERNACLE River of Life Christian Center CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP 11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT Ministry for the whole family 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson 28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

The Atlanta Road Alliance Church 22625 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 • www.atlantaroadcma.org Rev. Edward J. Laremore, Sr. Pastor David A. Krilov, Associate Pastor SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 8:30 Worship 6:45 Pioneer Clubs (age 3 9:45 Sunday School thru grade 6) & Divorce Care® 11:00 Worship/Kids Church 7:00 Prayer Service & Youth 7:00 Evening Service Group (grades 7-12)

COKESBURY CHURCH All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE (302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburywc.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

Mount Olivet United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School Pastor: Rev. Thomas Gross • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel Sunday School - 9:30 Worship - 9:00 & 10:45 Sunday Evening Worship Wed. Youth Ministries 6:30 p.m. Thurs. WKID, The Zone Children’s Ministries 6:30 Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Todd Crofford Assistant Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor/Youth: Sue Boyce Children’s Pastor: Marilyn Searcey

17 W. Market St., Greenwood, DE 302349-9420 Pastors Joseph & Yvonne Dixon WORSHIP SERVICE: SUN. 11 AM BIBLE STUDY: WED. 7:30 PM

Proclaiming Faith 4 pm Sunday on WKDI 840 AM Radio

Food Outreach Emergency Food

www.river-oflife.org

Sailor’s Bethel United Methodist Church Bethel, DE Pastor Arthur Smith III Sunday School - 10 am Worship - 11:15 am Nursery Provided office 875-3628

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church 629-7979 Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. Front & King St., Seaford, DE

The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - Anthony Melakian - 629-3633 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

“The Pickle Church” CHRIST THE CORNERSTONE COMMUNITY CHURCH PICKLE MINISTRIES OUTREACH & CORNERSTONE NOTE MUSIC MINISTRY Corner of Bethel Rd. & Alt. 13 • 302-875-8150 Worship Svce 10 a.m. - Rev. Rick Elzey Church School & Jr. Church 10 a.m. - Pastor Doris Whaley Wings of Prayer Tues. 7 p.m. Exploring God’s Word, Wed. 7 p.m.


PAGE 28

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Church Briefs No Name Band Nov. 16

The No Name Band will be at Grace United Methodist Church Hall, Georgetown, on Friday, Nov. 16, at 7:30 p.m. For further information, contact Everett Warrington at 337-7198.

St. Paul’s UMC praise weekend

On Nov. 16 and 17, St. Paul's United Methodist Church will be having a praise weekend. Special guest will be the Walking Miracles Ministry on Nov. 16 and Rev Sterling Green, past district superintendent on Nov. 17. This weekend will give all an opportunity to tell how God has blessed and answered prayers. This special service will begin at 7 p.m. on both nights. St. Paul's is located just east of US 13, on Old Stage Road, in Laurel. For more information, call Pastor Don at 856-6107.

Prayer resources at Grace Baptist

Rob Finley and his wife Judy will be at Grace Baptist Church, Atlanta Rd., Seaford, this weekend to present, what he calls, a prayer revival. They have traveled all over the world for more than 20 years with the single goal of challenging individuals and churches in their prayer lives. He notes that making prayer a personal priority always brings personal revival. Mr. Finley will speak Friday evening at 7 p.m. The church will have a breakfast for all who come at 8 a.m. Saturday, followed

by sessions on prayer from 9 until noon. Mr. Finley will also speak at the 10:45 and 6:30 services Sunday. The public is invited to join in any and all sessions that they can this weekend. There is no charge, but a love offering will be taken to support this work. As president, author, and primary speaker for Prayer Resources, Dr Rob Finley has conducted meetings in over 700 churches.

Latin Mass

A Latin mass according to the Missal of 1962 is celebrated on the third Sunday of every month at 3 p.m. at Holy Cross Church in Dover. The mass will be celebrated on Nov. 18. The mass is always a Missa Cantata using traditional Gregorian chant. For further information, call 302-674-5781

Youth Pastor sought

Trinity United Methodist Church, Phillips Hill Road, Laurel, is seeking a part-time Youth Pastor. For further information, contact 302-238- 7432.

Drama group at Alliance Church

The Covenant Players, a professional touring drama group, will perform at the Atlanta Road Alliance Church on Sunday, Nov. 25, at 7 p.m. The public is invited. Formed in 1963, the Covenant Players

now have more than 125 touring units and have performed throughout 82 countries on six continents and in more than 20 languages. The Covenant Players utilize dramatic plays that touch the heart, the mind and the soul. The Atlanta Road Alliance Church is located at 22625 Atlanta Road in Seaford, approximately 1-1/2 miles north of the intersection of Stein Highway and Atlanta Road. For more information, call 6295600 or visit www.atlantaroadcma.org

The Ninety & Nine meeting

The Ninety & Nine extends an invitation to both men and women to join them for their annual Christmas Dinner meeting at the Seaford Golf & Country Club on Monday, Dec. 3, at 6:30 p.m. If you would like a night out full of fun, food, fellowship and lots of encouragement, then The Ninety & Nine is the place for you. There are no membership dues to pay. The “Two Mile Road,” a Southern gospel group of men from the Harrington area, consisting of four singers and four musicians, will be conducting a concert at the meeting. They are Greg Collins, Lee Collins, Brad Turner, Ryan Collins, Steve Jackson, Rodney Collins, Aaron Collins, and Ronnie Voshell. Come, bring your spouse or a friend and plan to be blessed. Reservations are necessary.

Union Thank you,and w e love you! The children and fam ily ofG race E.L itchford w ish to thank the relativesand friends fortheirkindnessduring the lossofourm otheron O ctober31st,2007. W e w ish to thank you forthe flow ers,food,cards,telephone calls,and yourpresence atherfuneral.Thank you forallyourthoughtsand prayers. W e also w antto thank PastorE.K uhling forhiskind w ordsofencouragem entfor those leftw ith sorrow and to his“flock”w ho prepared and donated food atthe W esleyan Com m unity house afterthe service. Thanksto L oriM illerforsinging m other’sfavorite hym nsand M ary Torkelson w ho accom panied heron the organ. O urthanksto FrancisIreland w ho gave usalla briefreportofthe activity from the church m em bersin the early 50’s. And w e thank G od forblessing ourfam ily w ith the m otherw e shared you so m any years.

The fam ily ofG race L itchford

United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 Handicap Friendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

SNUGGLES BROWN MCGEE February 27, 1996 November 9, 2007

A PRAYER FOR SNUGGLES Almighty GOD, I was fortunate to receive the gift of “SNUGGLES” from you. Now that he has left this life, please help me to cope with my loss, strength and courage. I know that my beloved companion no longer suffers, and will live on in many fond memories. May they be treated with the care and respect as he has enriched my life. I wish someone had given Jesus a dog as loyal and loving as mine. To sleep by His manger and gaze in His eyes, and adore Him for being divine. Well the Lord has a dog now, I just sent Him mine. The old pal so dear to me . And I smile through my tears on this first day alone, knowing they’re in eternity. Day after day, the whole day through. Four feet said; “Wait I’m, coming with you” and trotted along behind. I Love You With All My Heart; Just Me........

Annual Fall Hymn Sing

Galestown United Methodist Church will have its annual Fall Hymn Sing on Dec. 2, at 2 p.m. No morning service. Guest singers will be Pam Rush, J.R. Mayle, and Ray Marine. A hot buffet style dinner will follow immediately at the Community Center.

Krilov joins Atlanta Road Church

The Atlanta Road Alliance Church announces the arrival of David A. Krilov as associate pastor effective Nov. 17. Krilov, a licensed pastor with the Christian and Missionary Alliance, graduated in May 2001 cum laude from the University of Delaware with a bachelor of arts degree in geography. In May 2007, he graduated magna cum laude from Liberty Theological Seminary with a master of arts in religion. Pastor Dave and his wife, Maria, were both born and raised in New Jersey. Mrs. Krilov graduated from the Rizzieri Institute and is a former hair stylist who now home schools two of their three children ages 9, 7 and 2. The Krilov family resides in Seaford.

BETHEL WORSHIP CENTER 9431 Ginger Lane, Seaford (2.4 mi. north of Wal-Mart on US 13) 628-4240 Recorded Info 628-4241 Church Office

Pastor Joseph Lecates - 875-2059 Adult Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:30 am Nursery 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Youth Meeting Sun. 7 pm Promise Keepers Tues. 7 pm Wed. Night Bible Study 7 pm “We’re not building a church, we’re building God’s Kingdom!”

Welcome… SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

701 Bridgeville Road 629-9077

“Welcome Home!” IN MEMORY

Deadline is Nov. 28. For details or more information, call Joyce Thomas at 6292248, Michele Thompson at 877-0797, or Arvalene Moore at 875-4387.

Wesley United Methodist Church 22025 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE Pastor Ed Kuhling Contemporary Worship 9 am Sunday School & Bible Education 10 am Traditional Worship 11 am Wednesday Worship 6:45 pm 302-629-3029 * Info Line 302-628-0112

Laurel Baptist Church, SBC Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 LBC Sunday School ~ 10:00 Morning Worship ~ 11:00 Wednesday Bible Study ~ 7:00 P.M. Nursery Provided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Minister of Music: Rev. David James

302-875-7998

743 E. Clarence St., Seaford, Del. Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Paster

629-9443, Cell: 448-0852 • cogclarence@verizon.net Sunday: Midweek Activities: Church School........9:45 am Call for Details Morning Worship......11 am Children’s Church & Youth Explosion ........6 pm Nursery Provided Evening Worship.........7 pm *Counseling by appt. only Tuesday: Thursday: Bible Study & Family Corporate Prayer.........7 pm ‘Come and Grow with Us!’ Training Hour...........7 pm

Greenwood United Methodist Church Greenwood, Del. Contemp Serv. 9 am Sunday School 10 am Traditional Serv. 11 am

“A Growing Church in The Heart of Our Community with a Heart for People & a Heart for the Lord.”

Pastor Richard Rogers 302-349-4047 Corner of Market & Church Streets

Thank You to the churches that sponsor these pages. Your contribution makes it possible for the “Good News” to be published each week.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Obituaries Ellen Sue Fields Mulford, 49

Ellen Sue Fields Mulford of Seaford passed away peacefully Nov. 6, 2007, with her two loving sisters at her side. Mrs. Mulford was a 1975 graduate of Seaford High School. After graduation she attended college in Florida and later became a flight attendant for Piedmont Airlines. She was sole proprietor of Tunes Music Store in Seaford, which she opened in 1986. She was forced to close Tunes in the summer of 2007 due to health reasons. She is preceded in death by her father, Jay W. Fields. Ellen is survived by her two loving children, Skyler (Sky) and Brielle (Brie), her mother, Ann Hill Fields, a sister, Pamela G. Passwaters and brother-in-law Frank W. Passwaters, Sr., all of Seaford; a sister Dr. JoAnn Fields of Dover, with whom she lived until her death; her stepmother Sally Fields of Bridgeville; her aunt, Mary Jester of Chestertown, Md., and several nieces and nephews. A celebration of life service was held Saturday, Nov. 10, at St. Johns United Methodist Church, Seaford. Burial will be private. The family suggests contributions to Delaware Hospice, 911 S. DuPont Hwy., Dover, DE 19901. Arrangements were by Pippin Funeral Home, Wyoming. Letters of condolences may be sent via www.pippinfuneralhome.com

Janice Ruth Hayes, 41

Janice Ruth Hayes of Federalsburg was unexpectedly taken home to be with her Lord on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2007 near Seaford. She was born on Oct. 23, 1966, a daughter of Pail W. Pierce and Marjean Gilbert Pierce of Nashville, Tenn. She received an associates degree in accounting and business from Pensacola Jr. College in Pensacola, Fla. She was a medical transciptionist. She attended with her husband and daughter, the Salvation Army Sussex Chapel in Seaford. She was an accomplished pianist and held several positions as an accompanist in local churches. Besides her parents she is survived by her husband, Robert H. Hayes, who she married on June 21, 1986; a son, Airman Robert C. Hayes, USAF of Monterey, Calif.; a daughter, April J. Hayes of Federalsburg; two sisters, Elizabeth Purtee of Nashville, Tenn. and Gloria Cardona of Jacksonville, Fla.; three nephews, and one niece. Funeral services were held on Saturday, Nov. 10, at the Denton Wayside Church of Christ in Christian Union, with Lts. Chas and Debbie Engel, of the Salvation Army, officiating. Interment followed at Bloomery Cemetery near Smithville. Friends called at the Framptom Funeral Home, P.A. in Federalsburg, Md. on Friday evening. Memorial contributions may be made to the Salvation Army Sussex Chapel, 601 N. Dual Highway, Seaford, DE

Obituaries are run without charge thanks to the support of area churches

19973; or to the American Red Cross ARC of the Delmarva Peninsula, 100 W. 10th St., Suite 501, Wilmington, DE 19801-6609. To send condolences to the family please visit www.framptom.com.

Benjamin Brooks Wheatley, Jr., 65

Benjamin Brooks Wheatley, Jr., loving husband of Linda Wheatley of 324 Miller Road, Waynesboro, Va., died Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2007, in the Augusta Medical Center, Fishersville, Va. He was born Feb. 6, 1942, in Milford, a son of Benjamin Brooks and Dorothy Ruth Davis Wheatley. Mr. Wheatley was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force. Prior to retirement, he was employed by E. I. DuPont as a supervisor for 41 years. He was an active member of Ruritan National Organization, the Virginia Thoroughbred Association, the U.S. Trotting Association, and he was an avid horseman. In addition to his wife, family members include three sons and a daughterin-law, Benjamin Brooks Wheatley, III, Scott Davis Wheatley, and Trey and Donna Hardesty; two daughters and sons-in-law, Donna Jill and Terrance Williams and Donna and Dale Sheets; four sisters and three brothers-in-law, Jane C. and Jerome Love of Seaford, Caroline W. and Bob Clayville of Bridgeville, Cathie Jo and Cecil Jones of Laurel, and Dorothy E. Wheatley of

In Loving Memory Joseph P.C asey November 19, 1979 - October 14, 2005

“The Broken Chain” We little knew that day, God was going to call your name. In life we loved you dearly, in death we do the same. It broke our hearts to lose you. You did not go alone. For part of us went with you, the day God called you home. You left us beautiful memories, your love is still our guide. And though we cannot see you, you are always at our side. Our family chain is broken and nothing seems the same. But as God calls us one by one, the chain will link again.

Happy Birthday Bub! We love and miss you! Mom, Scott, Erin & Tasha Aunts, Uncles & Cousins

Bridgeville; grandchildren, Jessica Wheatley, Ian Wheatley Bryant, Terrance Williams, Jr., Colin Williams, Kari Williams, Jayson Williams, Hunter Hardesty, Cody Sheets, and Cole Sheets; and a number of nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held Saturday, Nov. 10, at Union United Methodist Church, Bridgeville, with Pastor Dale Brown officiating. Interment was held on Tuesday, Nov. 13, at Delaware Veterans Memorial Cemetery, Millsboro. Memorial contributions may be made to the Wheatley Grandchildren Educational Scholarship Fund, 100 Earlee Ave., Bridgeville, DE 19933. Arrangments werer by Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Bridgeville, DE. Condolences may be sent to the family online at condolences@parsellfuneralhomes.com.

Joseph R. Allen, 73

Joseph R. “Ron” Allen of Seaford died on Monday, Oct. 29, 2007, at Green Valley Nursing Home in Smyrna. Mr. Allen retired from the Commissary at Fort Meade, Md., where he was a meat cutter. He was a Veteran of the U. S. Navy and was a member of the American Legion Post 29 in Denton, Md. Mr. Allen is survived by his wife of 51 years, Geraldine Jefferson Allen; two sons, Ronald Allen and his wife Mary of Hurlock, Md. and Timothy Allen and his wife Diana of Glen Bernie, Md.; two grandchildren, Lauren and Jenna Allen. Also surviving him are a brother,

PAGE 29

Charles Allen of Henderson, Md.; and two sisters, Janet Neff of Pasadena, Md. and Virginia Jordan of Cape Sinclair, Md. Funeral Services were held Friday, Nov. 2, at the Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford, where friends called prior to the services. Burial was in Delaware Veterans Cemetery, Millsboro.

Shirley W. Tipton, 77

Shirley W. Tipton of Federalsburg, Md. passed away on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2007, at Chesapeake Woods Center in Cambridge, Md. She was born July 24, 1930 in Cambridge, the daughter of George Washington Winthorpe Wheatley and Elsie Collins Jones Wheatley, who preceded her in death. She was a Hurlock High School graduate class of 1947 and had attended Salisbury State College. She was a member of the former Williamsburg Homemakers Club, a member of the Upper Shore Genealogy Society, served as a Den Mother for Pack #137, and had worked as a sales clerk at the former Fox’s in Federalsburg. She was affiliated with Lighthouse Community Church in Federalsburg. She is survived by her husband of more than 58 years, Lester Larkin Tipton; four sons, George Michael Tipton of Laurel, John Mark Tipton of New Castle, Richard Matthew Tipton of Federalsburg, and Leslie Mitchell Tipton of Middleford; six grandchildren and four greatgrandchildren; one sister, Mary Cullen of East New Market, and many nieces and

W e m iss you so m uch

K aren H itch November 21, 1941 August 2, 2007

T hinking of you on your birthd ay… T he L aurel L unch B unch R ed H at S ociety


PAGE 30

nephews. She was preceded in death by a granddaughter, Jennifer Michelle Tipton and eight siblings. Funeral services were held Friday, Nov. 9, at the Framptom Funeral Home, P.A., in Federalsburg with the Rev. Jeff Hudson officiating. Interment followed at the Eastern Shore Veterans Cemetery in Beulah, Md. Friends called Thursday evening at the funeral home. Memorial contributions may be made to the Upper Shore Genealogical Society, Box 514, Denton, MD 21629.

Tiana A. Thompson, newborn

Tiana A. Thompson, new born daughter of Amanda Christopher and Micheal Thompson of Seaford, became an angel on Nov. 6, 2007, at Christiana Hospital in Newark. In addition to her parents she is survived by her maternal grandparents, Sharlene and Terry Johnson of Seaford, and paternal grandparents, Darlene and Mike Thompson of Seaford. A maternal grandfather David Christopher also survives her. A Memorial Service was held at the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel, on Monday Nov. 12, at 4 p.m. with Pastor Mike Thompson officiating.

Marie N. Finney Adduci, 69

Marie N. Finney Adduci of Millsboro, formerly of Philadelphia, Pa., passed away on Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2007, at Lewes Convalescent Center, Lewes. Mrs. Adduci was born on Oct. 12, 1938 in Pungoteague, Va., a daughter of Benjamin and Marie Horsey Finney, who predeceased her. She was a teacher in Philadelphia, where she worked with troubled and special needs children; she also mentored other teachers in the same field. She also worked a few years at Stockley Center, near Georgetown. She retired and moved back to Millsboro in May 1995. She earned her B.A. in elementary education from Antioch College in Philadelphia, and she was pursuing her masters degree when she was called to the ministry. She ministered in many different churches doing home visitations and participating in conferences with fellowship churches. Mrs. Adduci was the First Lady of Jesus Ministries, Inc. She was a member of Lighthouse Church in Wyoming, and the Deliverance Church in Philadelphia. She is survived by her husband of 12 years, Joseph P. Adduci; a son, Ernest Anthony Finney and his close friend Regina Bush of Georgetown; one brother, James B. Finney of Millsboro; a sister, Jeanette L. Finney of Millsboro; a nephew, Alfonzo Sample; four nieces, Monica Kelly, Angelica Finney, Amy Kellam, and April Thacker; four great nephews, Larmar Finney, James Finney, Fulton Holland Jr., and Orlando Kelly Jr., and many friends and church brothers and sisters. Services for her were held Wednesday, Nov. 14, at St. John’s 2nd Baptist Church, Mount Joy, near Millsboro, with the Rev. Annie J. Custis officiating. Friends called one hour before the service. Interment was in the adjoining

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

cemetery. The family asks that contributions be made to the St. John’s 2nd Baptist Church, PO Box 116, Millsboro, DE 19966 Arrangements were handled by Watson Funeral Home, Millsboro. Letters of condolence may be emailed to: Watson Funeral Home at www.watsonfh.com or www.delmarvaobits.com

Deborah A. McCray, 49

Deborah A. “Debbie” McCray of near Georgetown died Thursday, Nov 8, 2007, at home. She was born on Oct 1, 1958 in Lewes, a daughter of James Wise and Minnie Hopkins Bibbins, who predeceased her. She was a dietician aide working for Green Valley Terrace, formerly the Millsboro Nursing Home, Millsboro, for 24 years. Mrs. McCray attended the Bayshore Community Church in Gumboro. She was a caring, giving person who was friendly to everybody. She loved soap operas Deborah A. McCray and game shows, in particular Wheel of Fortune, loved shopping for shoes and clothes, and she loved parties. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by a daughter, Denikia Hopkins and a granddaughter, Tionna White. She is survived by her husband of 12 years, Reuben McCray, one son, Jackie Hopkins of Georgetown; a daughter, Sheena Hopkins of Georgetown; three brothers, James Hopkins of Salisbury, Md., Ronald Hopkins of Rehoboth, and Tyrone Hopkins of Millsboro; two sisters, Delphine Williams of Millsboro and Vanessa Hopkins Grey of Georgetown; six grandchildren; and her canine companion, Sadie Mae McCray. Her services are at noon, Thursday at the Dickerson Chapel A.M.E. Church, US Rt. 113, south of Millsboro, where friends may call at 11 a.m. Friends also called Wednesday evening at the Watson Funeral Home, Millsboro. Pastor Sam Dennis will officiate at the services. Interment will be private. The family asks for contributions to the American Cancer Society, PO Box 163, Salisbury, MD 21803. Arrangements were handled by Watson Funeral Home, Millsboro, Delaware. Letters of condolence may be emailed to: Watson Funeral Home, Delmarvaobits.com or, Watsonfh.com

Louise Kemp, 67

Louise Elizabeth Cross Kemp of Rhodesdale, Md., passed away on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2007 at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. She was born on April 19, 1940, a daughter of Vincent Cross and Elizabeth Wallace Cross, who predeceased her. She graduated from Bridgeville High School. She was a homemaker. She was a member of New Liberty Wesleyan Church in Federalsburg.

She is survived by her husband, Ronald L. Kemp, Sr.; a daughter, Vicki L. Hafko of Greenwood; two sons, Ronald L. Kemp, Jr. of Laurel and Eric F. Kemp of Federalsburg; nine grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, a brother, Leon Cross of Seaford; two sisters, Irene Zedney of Newark, and Linda Reid of York, Pa. Funeral services were held on Sunday, Nov. 11, at New Liberty Wesleyan Church with the Rev. Doug Thornburgh and the Rev. Tim Wilson officiating. Friends called at Framptom Funeral Home on Saturday evening. The committal service was held on Tuesday, Nov. 13, at the Eastern Shore Veterans Cemetery in Hurlock, Md. Memorial contributions may be made in her memory to New Liberty Wesleyan Church, Building Fund, 8414 Bridgeville Rd., Federalsburg, Md, 21632. To share condolences visit www.framptom.com.

Gertrude W. Lloyd, 87

Gertrude W. Lloyd of Seaford died Friday, Nov. 9, 2007, at her residence. She was born in Philadelphia, Pa., a daughter of Gertrude Walls and Avery Messick, who predeceased her. She was a member of St. John’s United Methodist Church in Seaford. She was the co-owner, along with her husband, Richard M. Lloyd, Sr., in the M. H. Lloyd & Son Fuel Oil business. Her husband died in 1994, In addition to her parents and her husband, she was also preceded in death by her first husband Harley Riggin Wood in 1955; her son Harley Richard Wood in 1994; and by eight brothers and sisters. She is survived by her son and daughter-in-law Richard M. II and Crystal Lloyd of Seaford; two daughters and sons-in-law, Joan A. and Jack Messick of Seaford and Sandra L. and Brian Alloway of Bethel; a sister, Emma Hignutt of Seaford; a daughter-in-law, Helma Wood of Laurel; eight grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren and five great-greatgrandchildren. Services were held on Tuesday, Nov. 13, in Watson-Yates Funeral Home, Seaford, where friends called prior to the services. Burial was in Odd Fellows Cemetery, Seaford. Contributions may be made to Delaware Hospice, Inc, 20167 Office Circle, Georgetown, DE 19947.

Dorothy Louise Kirker Pettyjohn, 83

Dorothy Louise Kirker Pettyjohn of Seaford died Sunday, Nov. 11, 2007. Born in Leon, W.Va, she was a daughter of Dimmie Susan Smith and Joseph Kirker, who predeceased her. Mrs. Pettyjohn was a homemaker. She was a member of the Ladies Auxiliary, Virgil Wilson Post 4961, Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Ladies Auxiliary, Nanticoke Post 6, American Legion, and the Loyal Order of Moose Lodge, Chapter 1384. She is survived by her husband John Thomas Pettyjohn, Sr.; a son, James G. Tuck of Seaford; a daughter, Dorothy L. Owens of Galestown, Md.; a brother, Bobby Kirker of Rehoboth Beach; five grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. She is also survived by three stepsons; Edward Pettyjohn of Seaford,

William Pettyjohn of Bridgeville, and John T. Pettyjohn, Jr. of Laurel; four stepdaughters, Debbie Sibert of Georgetown, Texas; Deanna Marie Mack of Laurel, Tina A. Riggins of Laurel, and Tammy L. Denherder of Hebron, Md.; and six step-grandchildren. Services are Thursday, Nov. 15, at 2 p.m. in Watson-Yates Funeral Home, Front and King streets, Seaford, where friends may call from 1 to 2 p.m., prior to the services. Pastor James Hitch will officiate. Burial will be in Blades Cemetery, Blades. Contributions may be made to Alzheimer's Association, Delaware Valley Chapter, 399 Market St., Suite 102, Philadelphia, PA 19106.

Murray Walter White, 80

Murray White of Georgetown peacefully departed this life, Saturday. Nov. 10, 2007 at Milford Memorial Hospital surrounded by his loving family. He was affectionately known to many as “Whitey” and “Pard.” He ended his life’s journey to meet his Lord and to reunite with the love of his life, Thelma Jane, who preceded him in death in 2004. Theirs was a lifelong romance lasting 56 years. Murray was born Feb. 5, 1927 and was raised in Pittsville, Md. on the farm of his parents, Dorothy and Walter White. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and a member of the American Legion, Post 8, Georgetown. His career as a skilled mechanic began at Conaway Motors in Georgetown. For 20 years, he was an independent owner/operator of Whitey’s Texaco in Georgetown. After 17-1/2 years with the State of Delaware, he retired from the Stockley Center. During his lifetime, he enjoyed fishing, sailing, gardening, flying radio-controlled airplanes and spending time with family and friends. He was an unselfish man who never hesitated to help others. Murray and his wife were active volunteers for the Robin Hood Thrift Shop and Meals on Wheels. He was a long-time member of Grace United Methodist Church where over the years he served as trustee and usher. In addition to his parents and wife, he was preceded in death by a brother, Irvin White. Left to cherish his memory are three sons, Stephen M. and his wife Linda, of Middletown, Philip M. and his wife Karen of Federalsburg, Md., and Jeffrey A. of Georgetown; four grandchildren, Stephen White, Christine Rex, Robin Wooters and Trey White; four greatgrandchildren and a number of loving nieces and nephews. He is also survived by three sisters, Maridell West of Millsboro, Ida Widdowson of Mardela Springs, Md. and Amanda Taeuber of Salisbury, Md. Relatives and friends were invited to attend the viewing Nov. 13, at Short Funeral Services, Georgetown. Funeral services were held Wednesday, Nov. 14, followed by interment in Union Cemetery, Georgetown. Donations may be made to Grace United Methodist Church, Box 209, Georgetown, DE 19947; or Vitas Hospice, 10 Commerce Road., Suite 302, Newark, DE 19711.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

PAGE 31

Police Journal Woman bites state trooper

The Delaware State Police charged a 26-year-old Greenwood woman with assault on a police officer and other related charges after she allegedly resisted arrest during a domestic incident and bit a trooper's finger. On Nov. 11, at approximately 1 p.m. a state trooper was dispatched to the 9000 block of Shawnee Road in Greenwood to investigate a reported domestic dispute involving Lisa Munoz, 26, of Greenwood. Upon arrival, troopers met with the home owner who advised he wanted Munoz’s boyfriend, to leave the residence. He advised that the residence belonged to him and the boyfriend was not welcomed there. When the trooper advised the boyfriend to leave the residence Munoz became disorderly. Munoz started to curse in the presence of her 2-year-old child. When the trooper advised Munoz that she was under arrest for disorderly conduct, Munoz resisted arrest by pulling away. Munoz allegedly picked her child up so the trooper could not arrest her. At this time, the boyfriend removed the child from Munoz’s arms. When the trooper attempted to take Munoz into custody a second time, she resisted again and an altercation ensued. During the altercation Munoz got the trooper’s right thumb and placed it into her mouth and bit down until the skin was broken. The trooper was able to break free of Munoz and took her into custody with the assistance of another trooper who arrived at the scene. The trooper, a twenty year veteran of the force, was treated at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital and released. During the investigation, troopers charged Munoz with assault on a police officer, resisting arrest, disorderly conduct, and endangering the welfare of a child. Munoz was arraigned at the Justice of the Peace Court 3 in Georgetown and committed to the Delores J. Baylor Women’s Correctional Institution on $6,750 secured bond.

Driver hits utility pole

Delaware State Police arrested a 31-year-old Brooklyn, N.Y., man after he allegedly crashed his 2000 Jeep Cherokee into a utility pole. On Nov. 7, at approximately 10:43 p.m., state troopers from Troop 5 in Bridgeville responded to Sussex Highway just south of Seashore Highway to investigate a vehicle crash involving a gray SUV. Upon arrival, troopers located the 2000 Jeep Cherokee allegedly operated by Robert K. Lovelace, 31, of Brooklyn, New York. During their investigation,

troopers learned that Lovelace was traveling southbound on Sussex Hwy., and apparently fell asleep behind the wheel. The Jeep exited the west edge of the road and struck a utility pole. A preliminary state police investigation suggests alcohol was involved. Lovelace was not injured during the crash and it is unknown if he was wearing a seatbelt. During their investigation, troopers learned that Lovelace was wanted by the United States Navy for three felony charges of making a false claim. Troopers later charged Lovelace with driving under the influence of alcohol. He was also charged with being a fugitive from another state. Lovelace was arraigned at the Justice of the Peace Court 3 and later committed to the Sussex Correctional Institution in default of $5,000 cash bail. Lovelace is awaiting extradition by the US Marshall’s office.

Burglary suspect arrested

Delaware State Police criminal investigators assigned to the property crimes unit at Troop 4 arrested a Georgetown man after he allegedly broke into the home of a 76-year-old Rehoboth Beach woman. On Nov. 6, at approximately 9:50 a.m., state troopers from Troop 7 responded to the 20000 block of Delaware Ave., in Sea Air Village MHP to investigate a daytime burglary. Upon arrival, troopers contacted the victim who confronted the suspect in the hallway of her home. According to the victim, the suspect was holding a knife and appeared stunned when she confronted him. The victim states that the suspect began to back away from her and she ran forward and slammed the door shut on the suspect’s right arm as he fled. The victim was not injured during the incident and provided troopers with an accurate description of the suspect. She also told troopers that she had seen the suspect a couple of hours earlier walking in the neighborhood with an unidentified woman. Later that day, troopers contacted a man matching the suspect’s description during a traffic stop on Warrington Rd., near Rehoboth Beach. The man was a passenger in a 1987 Chevrolet Nova that was pulled over for running a stop sign. The man, later identified as Richard Cohen, 19, of the 500 block of Mulberry Lane, Georgetown, gave the troopers a false name. Troopers later realized that Cohen matched the physical description of the suspected burglar. He was also wearing a jacket that was identical to the clothing description given to police during

Georgetown and committed to the Sussex Correctional Institution on $28,500 secured bond.

Officer faces charges

SPLASHDOWN - Sometime late Saturday night a black Kia SUV drove off Old Furnace Road at a high rate of speed and landed in the middle of the Nanticoke River. The road was closed Sunday morning while Seaford VFD volunteers and the State Police had the car pulled out. Photos by John King

the initial burglary investigation. During the investigation, Cohen was picked out of a photo line up by the victim. As a result of the investigation, Cohen was charged with second degree burglary and criminal impersonation. Cohen was arraigned at the Justice of the Peace Court 2 and pled guilty to one count of criminal impersonation. He received a $1,000 fine for that charge. Cohen was later committed to the Sussex Correctional Institution on $5,000 cash bail for the second degree burglary charge.

Man threatens officers

The Delaware State Police charged a 51-year-old Laurel man with assault on a police officer and numerous weapons related offenses after he allegedly resisted arrest during an incident at his home. On Nov. 10, at approximately 7:47 p.m. a state trooper and two Laurel police officers were dispatched to the 10000 block of Warrington Lane in Laurel to investigate a report of an intoxicated disorderly man armed with a shotgun. During their response, officers were advised that the suspect, later identified as Charles H. Whary, 51, of Laurel allegedly made statements that he wanted to commit “suicide by cop” and fled into his shed with guns. Upon arrival, officers confronted Whary who was sitting on a tractor's front end loader near the shed. Officers observed weapons and ammunition located in the shed approximately twenty

feet away from Whary. The trooper ordered Whary to raise his hands and he refused to comply and rushed at the three police officers knocking them to the ground. Whary was later subdued by the officers. During the altercation, the trooper suffered a sprained right thumb and both Laurel police officers received damage to their uniform pants. The trooper, a two year veteran of the force, was treated and released at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. During the investigation, witnesses at the residence were interviewed. According to their statements, Whary had been drinking and was depressed. Witnesses told police that Whary went inside the residence and retrieved his shotgun and began waving it around and threatening to kill them all and wanted to commit suicide by COP. While at the scene officers seized three black powder rifles, two (22. caliber) rifles, a shotgun, and ammunition. Whary was charged with the following offenses: second degree assault on a police officer, two counts of aggravated menacing, possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony, resisting arrest, terroristic threatening, two counts of offensive touching, two counts of criminal mischief, failing to comply with the taking of photographs and fingerprints; and fifteen counts of possession of a firearm by a person prohibited. Whary was arraigned at the Justice of the Peace Court 3 in

Delaware State Police have arrested Ismael Torres, Jr., 32, of Georgetown for offensive touching, terroristic threatening, and second degree reckless endangering. Torres is employed by the Delaware River & Bay Authority Police Department in Lewes. He was formally charged after an investigation was completed by the State Police and the Attorney General's office. Investigators were assigned the case on Nov. 7, after three employees of the Complete Auto Recovery Company in Millsboro filed a complaint against Torres. The victims alleged Torres identified himself as a police officer and threatened to shoot them as they attempted to repossess a 2002 Ford Explorer parked on private property near Savannah Road in the town limits of Georgetown. During the investigation, detectives learned that Torres allegedly physically threatened to shoot the members of the recovery service if they did not vacate the property. Investigators also learned that when the Ford Explorer was in the process of being affixed to a wrecker for repossession, Torres allegedly entered the Ford and drove it away from the recovery equipment causing one of the straps to hit a member of the recovery service. As a result of the investigation, Torres was charged with the following: one count of offensive touching, three counts of terroristic threatening, and one count of second degree reckless endangering. Torres was processed and arraigned at Troop 4 and released on $2,050 unsecured bond.

Pornography charges

The Delaware State Police Internet Crimes Against a Child Unit (ICAC), the Delaware State Police High Tech Crimes Unit (HTCU) and the Attorney Generals Office concluded a five week investigation that resulted in the arrest of a 60-year-old Magnolia man on thirty child pornography related charges. On Nov. 1, members of (ICAC) and (HTCU) were assisted by troopers from Troop 3 during the execution of a search warrant at the home of David L. Moore, 60, of the first block of Ponderosa Dr. in Magnolia. During the investigation Moore was charged with fifteen counts of using a computer to unlawfully depict a child engaging in a prohibited sexual act, second offense, and fifteen counts of possession of child pornography. Moore was arraigned and released on $105,000 bond.


More than 200 brand name appliances in stock

10

% off

ALL MAJOR APPLIANCES IN-STOCK AND SPECIAL ORDER $ 397 AND UP

Offer valid now through 11/18/07. Discount taken at register. Final purchase amount must equal $397 or more before taxes. Not valid on previous sales, installation and delivery fees, extended protection plans or select Fisher&Paykel® items. See store for details.

free

NEXT-DAY LOCAL DELIVERY AND HAUL AWAY

FREE APPLIANCE HOOK-UP

Via mail-in rebate with any major appliance purchase $397 or more . Offer valid now through 1/31/08. Final purchase amount must equal $397 or more before taxes and after all applicable discounts and/or qualifying instant rebates. Offer can be combined with other rebates (instant or mail-in) and/or credit financing offers. Additional fees may apply for deliveries outside 20-mile local area. Rebate values and additional charges may vary. Hook-up service includes refrigerators (including ice makers), freezers, electric ranges, washing machines and electric dryers. Does not include installation of dishwashers, over-the-range microwaves, gas ranges, gas dryers, cooktops, wall ovens or range hoods. See store for details.

HURRY IN FOR LIMITED-TIME VALUES GET UP TO 10 SPECIAL ORDER KITCHEN CABINETS INSTALLED FOR

$

799

500 free GIFT CARD $

Labor only

In home measure (detail fee) must be purchased by 11/21/07. Installation contract must be signed by 12/7/07. Discount taken at register. See store for details. Details on our policies and services Prices may vary after November 18, 2007 if there are market variations. "Was" prices in this advertisement were in effect on November 2, 2007, and may vary based on Lowe’s Everyday Low Price policy. See store for details regarding product warranties. We reserve the right to limit quantities. We guarantee our everyday competitive prices. If you find a lower everyday or advertised price on an identical stock item at any local retail competitor that has the item in stock, we'll beat their price by 10% when you buy from us. Just bring us the competitor's current ad or other confirmation of the price that you have found. Lowe's reserves the right to verify the lower price prior to sale. Cash/charge card and carry purchases only. Competitor's closeout, special order, discontinued, clearance, liquidation and damaged items are excluded from this offer. On percent off sales, we will match the competitor's percent off offer. Limited to reasonable quantities for homeowner and one-house order quantities for cash and carry contractors. Current in-store price, if lower, overrides Lowe's advertised price. Price guarantee honored at all Lowe's retail locations. Labor charges for product installation are excluded from our price guarantee offer in our stores with an Installed Sales Program. Visit store for complete details. No-Hassle Return Policy: If you are not completely happy with your purchase, simply return it along with your original sales receipt to any local Lowe's store within ninety (90) days** of purchase. We'll either repair it, replace it, refund your money or credit your account. **30 days for Outdoor Power Equipment (mowers, chain saws, blowers, tillers, trimmers and pressure washers).

Via mail-in rebate with purchase of 10 or more Special Order kitchen cabinets. Offer valid now through 11/21/07. See store for details. For additional offers, log on to Lowes.com/offers.

Fair Purchase Policy: In order to provide fair purchase opportunity to all our customers, Lowe's reserves the right to limit quantities sold to individual customers. Non-Stock Policy: If, by chance, your local Lowe's store does not stock an item we advertise, we will be glad to order that item for you at the advertised price. Delivery Policy: Delivery applies to deliveries made to locations within the United States only. Certain restrictions apply. See store for details.  All installation services are guaranteed by Lowe's warranty. See Installed Sales contract for details. Professional installation available through licensed independent subcontractors. Lowe's contractor license numbers: AK#28341; AL#5273; AZ#ROC195516; CA#803295; CT#558162; FL#CGC1508417; HI Contractor's License No.: C 23784 - see store; IL Plumber #058-100140; IL Roofing #104014837; LA Master Plumber #1440 WSPS; MD# 91680,50931; MI#2101146786, Lowe's Home Centers, Inc., 6122 "B" Drive North, Battle Creek, MI 49014; NJ Plumbing - see store; NM#84381; NV#2-45450; Brooklyn, NY#1162261; Staten Island, NY#1160554; Suffolk County, NY#30182-H1; Putnam County, NY#PC2742-A; NV# 59290 - 59296; OR#144017; TN#3070; TX TRCC #14447 and Texas State Plumbing License Number Available Upon Request; VA#2701-036596A; WA#982BN; ND#30316; Washington DC #100594; DCRA# 5218553006539, 52185-53006554, 52185-53006552, 52185-53006557, 52185-53006533, 5218553006534, 52185-53006541, 52185-53006543, 52185-53006537, 52185-53006544: Water heater installation: If an expansion tank is required by local code it will be an additional charge (not included in the basic replacement labor). Permit fees are additional (not included in the basic replacement labor). Gas appliance license numbers: AL - MP#1837, GA - MP#207878, If a gas shutoff valve replacement is required by state code, additional charges may apply (not included in basic installation). Additional charges for LP conversion kit may apply. Additional

charges may apply for permit fees. ‡The "Payment as low as" amount is an estimate of the first required minimum monthly payment for that purchase. Length of time to repay will depend on your interest rate and amount of your payments. Project Card: During the first 6 months of a Project Window, no finance charges assessed and no payments required on purchases made during that Project Window. Thereafter, standard account terms apply to that Project Window. APR tier will be assigned after Account is opened based on your credit qualifications. APR for first Project Window will be 7.99%, 9.99%, 11.99%, 13.99% or 17.99% if first purchase is made within 60 days after account is opened. Otherwise, a variable APR will apply: 9.49%, 11.49%.13.49% 15.49% or 19.49%, as of September 1, 2006. Once APR is assigned to a Project Window, it will not vary for that Project Window. Min. Finance Charge $1.00. First purchase in each Project Window must be at least $1,000. Subject to credit approval. Basic cabinet installation includes all hardware, installation of fillers, scribes, toe kicks, installation of one layer of molding for top or bottom of wall cabinets, haul-away of cabinet cardboard and daily cleanup of jobsite. Additional charges will apply for installation of over 10 cabinets, permits, and for other services and/or accessories. Offer valid through 11/21/2007. Customers must purchase job site detail by 11/21/2007 and purchase eligible cabinets and sign installation contract by 12/7/2007 in order to qualify. Additional restrictions apply, see store associate for details.

We’re in your neighborhood ! For the store nearest you, visit us at LOWES.COM or call 1-800-993-4416. 001/6417/003,004,005,006,007,008,010,023,037,038,040,041,045,046,049,056,058,061,062,064,077,082,084,087,090,091,092,095,096,102,103,104,106,108,112,115,127,132,137


10

% off

ALL ARTIFICIAL TREES

now

Includes full-size trees and specialty trees. Discount taken at register. Applies to store-stock only. Offer ends 11/18/07. See store for details.

$

140

price before 10% discount 7' Just Cut Grand Fir Pre-lit Tree

Choose from 25 varieties of artificial trees

15

was $230

•600 GE clear lights •1,394 tips •3-piece easy assembly •50"Dia. at base #258009

10

%

off

%

off

SEASONAL HEATING

ALL IN-STOCK LAMINATE FLOORING

Includes all in-stock fireplaces, gas logs, portable electric heaters, mantels, stoves, gas and kerosene heaters, patio heat, construction heat and fireplace accessories. Discount taken at register. Offer valid through 11/18/07. Selection varies by market. While supplies last.

Discount taken at register. Offer valid 10/28/07 through 11/21/07. See store for details.

SHOP NOW FOR SPECIAL VALUES buy one get one free A. Quick-Change Folding Lock-Back Utility Knife #240888 $8.74 B. 6-In-1 Screwdriver #239374 $7.98 C. 16 Oz. Curved Steel Hammer #17757 $9.96

Details on our policies and services Prices may vary after November 18, 2007 if there are market variations. "Was" prices in this advertisement were in effect on November 2, 2007, and may vary based on Lowe’s Everyday Low Price policy. See store for details regarding product warranties. We reserve the right to limit quantities. We guarantee our everyday competitive prices. If you find a lower everyday or advertised price on an identical stock item at any local retail competitor that has the item in stock, we'll beat their price by 10% when you buy from us. Just bring us the competitor's current ad or other confirmation of the price that you have found. Lowe's reserves the right to verify the lower price prior to sale. Cash/charge card and carry purchases only. Competitor's closeout, special order, discontinued, clearance, liquidation and damaged items are excluded from this offer. On percent off sales, we will match the competitor's percent off offer. Limited to reasonable quantities for homeowner and one-house order quantities for cash and carry contractors. Current in-store price, if lower, overrides Lowe's advertised price. Price guarantee honored at all Lowe's retail locations. Labor charges for product installation are excluded from our price guarantee offer in our stores with an Installed Sales Program. Visit store for complete details. No-Hassle Return Policy: If you are not completely happy with your purchase, simply return it along with your original sales receipt to any local Lowe's store within ninety (90) days** of purchase. We'll either repair it, replace it, refund your money or credit your account. **30 days for Outdoor Power Equipment (mowers, chain saws, blowers, tillers, trimmers and pressure washers).

$

99

Purchase any of the Kobalt tools listed, and receive the same tool free. Offer valid 11/15/07 through 11/18/07. While supplies last.

10" Single-Bevel Compound Miter Saw •15 amps •5,000 RPM #261797

$

99

10" 15-Amp Portable Table Saw •Includes stand and wheels #261577 Fair Purchase Policy: In order to provide fair purchase opportunity to all our customers, Lowe's reserves the right to limit quantities sold to individual customers. Non-Stock Policy: If, by chance, your local Lowe's store does not stock an item we advertise, we will be glad to order that item for you at the advertised price. Delivery Policy: Delivery applies to deliveries made to locations within the United States only. Certain restrictions apply. See store for details.  All installation services are guaranteed by Lowe's warranty. See Installed Sales contract for details. Professional installation available through licensed independent subcontractors. Lowe's contractor license numbers: AK#28341; AL#5273; AZ#ROC195516; CA#803295; CT#558162; FL#CGC1508417; HI Contractor's License No.: C 23784 - see store; IL Plumber #058-100140; IL Roofing #104014837; LA Master Plumber #1440 WSPS; MD# 91680,50931; MI#2101146786, Lowe's Home Centers, Inc., 6122 "B" Drive North, Battle Creek, MI 49014; NJ Plumbing - see store; NM#84381; NV#2-45450; Brooklyn, NY#1162261; Staten Island, NY#1160554; Suffolk County, NY#30182-H1; Putnam County, NY#PC2742-A; NV# 59290 - 59296; OR#144017; TN#3070; TX TRCC #14447 and Texas State Plumbing License Number Available Upon Request; VA#2701-036596A; WA#982BN; ND#30316; Washington DC #100594; DCRA# 5218553006539, 52185-53006554, 52185-53006552, 52185-53006557, 52185-53006533, 5218553006534, 52185-53006541, 52185-53006543, 52185-53006537, 52185-53006544: Water heater installation: If an expansion tank is required by local code it will be an additional charge (not included in the basic replacement labor). Permit fees are additional (not included in the basic replacement labor). Gas appliance license numbers: AL - MP#1837, GA - MP#207878, If a gas shutoff valve replacement is required by state code, additional charges may apply (not included in basic installation). Additional charges for LP conversion kit may apply. Additional

free $40

GIFT CARD

Via mail-in rebate with purchase of both #261797 and 261577. Valid now through 1/31/08. See store for details

charges may apply for permit fees. ‡The "Payment as low as" amount is an estimate of the first required minimum monthly payment for that purchase. Length of time to repay will depend on your interest rate and amount of your payments. Project Card: During the first 6 months of a Project Window, no finance charges assessed and no payments required on purchases made during that Project Window. Thereafter, standard account terms apply to that Project Window. APR tier will be assigned after Account is opened based on your credit qualifications. APR for first Project Window will be 7.99%, 9.99%, 11.99%, 13.99% or 17.99% if first purchase is made within 60 days after account is opened. Otherwise, a variable APR will apply: 9.49%, 11.49%.13.49% 15.49% or 19.49%, as of September 1, 2006. Once APR is assigned to a Project Window, it will not vary for that Project Window. Min. Finance Charge $1.00. First purchase in each Project Window must be at least $1,000. Subject to credit approval. Basic cabinet installation includes all hardware, installation of fillers, scribes, toe kicks, installation of one layer of molding for top or bottom of wall cabinets, haul-away of cabinet cardboard and daily cleanup of jobsite. Additional charges will apply for installation of over 10 cabinets, permits, and for other services and/or accessories. Offer valid through 11/21/2007. Customers must purchase job site detail by 11/21/2007 and purchase eligible cabinets and sign installation contract by 12/7/2007 in order to qualify. Additional restrictions apply, see store associate for details.

We’re in your neighborhood ! For the store nearest you, visit us at LOWES.COM or call 1-800-993-4416. 001/6417-1/003,072,136


MORNING STAR

PAGE 34

• NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Classifieds

FREE CLASSIFIEDS* (For Personal Use Only) *Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

EARLY DEADLINE FOR THANKSGIVING: FRIDAY, NOV. 16, 2 p.m. Businesses: $4.50/inch (Liners, $9 min.) Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.50/inch Legals: $6.50 per inch Not responsible for typographical errors after first insertion

629-9788

Call: Or E-mail: ads@mspublications.com LOST

YARD SALE

LOST CAT: On Rt. 9 W. of Dukes Lumber Rd., Multi color top, white bottom, gray tail. 875-3890. 11/15

GARAGE SALE, Sat., Nov. 17, 8 am until. 18005 Progress School Rd., Bridgeville. Call 3378775 for directions. 11/15

2 LOST DOGS, on Woodland Ferry Rd., Sun., 10/28. Male Beagles, lemon & wh., orange color. 2 yrs. old. If found please return. 5426316. 11/8

GIVE-AWAY BLACK WALNUTS, Seaford. Call 628-8761. 11/15 2 MALE CATSm Blk. w/wh. chest; orange tabby w/wh. chest & paws. Very friendly. 249-9287. 10/18 FREE ENGLISH SETTER, to good home, about 5-6 yrs. old, good hunter, orange & white. 542-6316. 10/4 FREE HORSE MANURE, great for gardens & shrubs. 337-3840. 8/23

SERVICES WILL HAUL your old appliances & remove big old satellite dishes, free. Call Mike, 245-2278. 10/25/2t

HELP WANTED

FUN PROMOTIONAL JOBS $18/hr. for Alcohol Promotions

1-800-219-2159 PromoGirl.com

WANTED

‘89 LINCOLN TOWNCAR, 115k mi. original, loaded, mint cond. $1500 OBO. 877-0777. 11/01

LADDER RACK, Stainless steel, for 6' Bed PU, $175. Metal tool box fdor standard size PU, $75. 344-3052.

'99 MERC. MARQUIS, 4 dr., 4 cyl., AT, PW, PL, AC, 118k mi., no rust, no leaks. Great work transportation. $2450. 877-0231. 10/25

'06 FORD EXPLORER Lmt., 25.8k mi., 1 owner, local vehicle. Leather quad captains chairs, power fold 3rd seat, P/moon roof, 18" chrome whls., pearl white, exc. cond. $23,500. Call Kevin, 258-6455. 10/11

'03 CHEV. VENTURE EXT. SPORT VAN, 3.4L V6. Lease vehicle purchased in '06;. Exc. cond., 47k mi. Warranty transferrable. $9400. For more info, call Melissa, 855-9002. 10/25 '00 DODGE DURANGO, green, tan int., 3rd seat, int. like-new cond., Michelin tires, running boards, tow pkg., $6500. 228-9737. '04 NISSAN TITAN TRUCK, 25K MI., WHITE, AC, Auto 5 spd., CO pkg., 4-whl. PDB, $12,995. 2286202. 10/18

'04 FORD MUSTANG, 40th Anniv. Ed., red, 3.9L V6, 5 spd., PW, PL, AM/FM, CD, garage kept, showroom cond., 19k mi., $12,900 OBO. 875-9218 or 5429956. 10/11

MOTORCYCLES/ REC VEHICLES '05 YAMAHA KODIAK 400 4-wheeler w/a 05 trailer. Both in exc. cond. $6000 OBO. 875-4188. 10/11

CAMPERS/ TRAILERS TOW BAR - Blue Ox Aventa II, all acces. Brake Buddy in orig. box, used once. Transfer tank - 33 gal., like new. Everything's negotiable. 877-0231. 10/25

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES ANT. OAK PUMP ORGAN, upright, $700 OBO. 6280741. 11/8 MICKEY MOUSE Memorabilia, includes TV, DVD player, cookie jars, figurines, etc. for info call 6289856 after 5 pm, ask for Ruth Ann. 11/8 RICKY RUDD Memorabilia: jacket, die cast sz. 1/24 to `1/64, etc. For info call Ruth Ann, 628-9856 after 5 pm. ELVIS MUSIC BOX DECANTER SET. 875-2647. 10/25

FREE ELEC. RANGE, for single mother of 4 children, now using a hot plate. Call 875-0964 before 7 pm. A good refrig. could also be used. 11/15

3 YEARBOOKS, Bridgeville High, '48; Seaford '79, Univ of Del. '52. $75 for all or will separate. 398-8915. 10/11

FOR SALE GOULDS WATER PUMP, 1/2 hp, $100 OBO. 410546-4335. 11/15 VANITY, SINK & COMMODE, 1.6 gpf, $100 OBO. 410-546-4335. 11/15 2 STEEL SPOKED IMPLEMENT WHEELS, 32" $22 for both. 846-9788. 11/15 3 IH 100 lb. HANG ON Weights & 3 IH PTO Tractor Shields. $85 for all. 8469788. 1/15 BOOKS, FICTION, all kinds, $3/bag. 30 DVDs, all kinds, $5 ea. 875-3744. 11/15 OKI MICROLINE 320 Turbo 9 pin printer. Like new! $75 OGO. Olympia elec. typewriter, $15. 629-0298. 11/8

Nobody does it better...

GOOD USED FURNITURE, at no cost for elderly lady. 877-0777. 11/8 SHOTGUN, 410 semi-auto. or dbl. barrel. 875-2893. 10/18

A New Path to Comfort

AUTOMOTIVE

and Care...

PAYING MORE THAN $35 / Month for AUTO INSURANCE? 1-877-621-1030 Credit Cards accepted. tnc

Building on our proud tradition of responding to community needs, Delaware Hospice will create a new center to provide patients and their families short-term hospice care services and support in a home-like setting. Offering 16 patient/family suites, a Family Support and Counseling Center for outreach, training and education, Delaware Hospice Center will serve as a home away from home for our patients and continue our 25 year commitment to serving the community.

Cheap • Cheap • Cheap AUTO INSURANCE? 1-877-621-1030 Credit Cards accepted. tnc

Begin A New Career in Our Beautiful Center.

“Providing the best care, by the best people, in the best place … HOME”

WANTED Highly motivated RN’s looking for a challenging change. Join our dedicated team of healthcare professionals. For more information contact Holly at 302-629-4914. EOE. 8470 Herring Run Road, Seaford, DE 19973

Are you ready to work for the best? As you begin your career with the hospice most recommend by Doctors in DE, your skills, work ethic and ability to help people are appreciated in a supportive and collaborative environment offering competitive pay and comprehensive benefits. Get back to hands-on patient care in our state-of-the-art center!

• LPNs – Requires current LPN license in DE and minimum of two years' experience. FT and PT positions include weekend rotation. • STAFF RNs – Requires current RN licensure in DE, BSN preferred. Must have a minimum of 3 years oncology, medical-surgical or home care nursing experience.FT and PT positions include weekend rotation. If you are interested in learning more about the positions listed and are looking for an excellent growth opportunity, great benefits, positive, and supportive working atmosphere– check out our website: www.delawarehospice.org. You may also apply by forwarding your resume with salary history via email to: blenzin@delawarehospice.org or faxing it to 302-478-1351. EOE.


BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY ATTORNEYS

AUCTIONEER

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTO ACCIDENT AND PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS

Lee Collins

Initial Consultation Free No Fee Unless You Recover Evening and Weekend Appointments

• Personal Property • Real Estate • Antiques • Farm

FUQUA and YORI, P.A.

(302)

ATTORNEYS AT LAW

The Circle • Georgetown • 856-7777 *Listing areas of practice does not represent official certification as a specialist in those areas.

CONCRETE

AUCTIONEER

Have Gavel Will Travel

(302)

410-742-0134 Mark Donophan

Licensed & Insured

Free Estimates

FAX SERVICE Need To Send A Fax? Only

$

236-0344 Cell

Laurel, Delaware

CONSTRUCTION

• DRIVEWAYS • GARAGES • SIDEWALKS • PATIOS

MR. CONCRETE

846-3936

ALLEN BODY WORKS, INC. 413 NORTH CENTRAL AVE. LAUREL, DE 19956

302-875-3208 FAX 302-875-3229

COSMETICS

Behind County Bank

302-629-9788

PASSPORT PICS

Passport Pictures Donald L. Short, Owner/Sales

INCORPORATED 55 Years Experience

EMPLOYMENT

FARM & HOME

A complete line of salon quality cosmetics individually selected just for you. Ask about our custom blended foundations.

M-F 8-5; Sat. 8-4 Full Service Nursery:

302-628-0767

• Ponds • Mulch • Shrubs • Stones • Trees • Lawn & Gdn. Supplies Full Service Store: • Pet Food • Livestock Equip. • Flags • Wild Bird Seed & Feeders • Giftware • Rowe Pottery • Candles • Clothing

INTERNET

IRRIGATION

MORTGAGES

Call for a FREE consultation

Jay Reaser

875-3099

1004 W. Stein Hwy.Nylon Capital Shopping Ctr., Seaford, DE

Donald L. Short, Owner/Sales 320 W. DuPont Hwy. Ste. 2, Millsboro, DE 19966

R & L Irrigation Services The power to amaze yourself.™

216 LAURELTOWNE LAUREL, DEL. 302-875-4541

Access, Design & Services

888-432-7965 / www.ce.net

PHOTO COPIES Self Service

Photo Copies 10¢ per pg

Finish Site Work Complete Irrigation Systems Sod Laying & Seeding Exterior Lighting Ponds, Mulching, Concrete Pavers

RICHARD E. WILLIAMS

George M. Bennett Cell: 302-236-5327

Independently Owned & Operated

Fax: 302-628-0798 - www.jacksonhewitt.com 320 W. DuPont Hwy. Ste. 2 31A Creamery Lane Millsboro, DE 19966 Easton, MD 21601

302-934-9450

410-819-6990

Call 628-2828 Apply Online:

302-530-3376

www.easy-loan-application.com

PRINTING For Your Business Needs Business Cards Letterheads, Etc. Call The Star

REAL ESTATE

SEAFOOD

LAUREL REALTY

“Making A Difference” 1128 S. Central Ave. Laurel, Delaware

Directly Across from the Laurel enior High School

302

629-0444

628 W. Stein Hwy.

629-9788

302-875-3000 800-887-3001

800-492-0444 Fax 302-629-0745 504 Bridgeville Rd., Seaford, DE Mon-Thurs. 10-6, Fri & Sat 10-7

TREE SERVICE

WATER TREATMENT

WEIGHT LOSS

All Work Guaranteed

302-629-4548

PURCHASE REFINANCE DEBT CONSOLIDATION

28 Old Rudnick Lane, Dover, DE

FREE ESTIMATES Donald L. Short, Owner 1004 W. Stein Hwy.Nylon Capital Shopping Ctr., Seaford, DE

Licensed & Bonded

Seaford, Delaware

628 W. Stein Hwy. Seaford - 629-9788

FITNESS

GOO MAN

4676 White Deer Rd., Delmar, DE 19940

302-629-4281

U.S. 13 N., Seaford 302-629-9645 • 800-564-5050

TAX SERVICE

302-846-0593

Call For Appt. Open Tuesday thru Sunday

302-934-9450

SEPTIC SERVICE

OF DELMAR

The Star

http://elegantyou.motivescosmetics.com

1004 W. Stein Hwy.Nylon Capital Shopping Ctr., Seaford, DE

Septic Care Services

Healthy Hair with a Healthy Glow Men - Women - Children

Healthy Hair Clinique

Our Reputation Is Building In House Draftsman 28385 Dukes Lumber Road, Laurel, DE 19956 Barry Dukes Bo Dukes Fax (H) 875-2625 542-5149 875-7640 (C) 542-9106

Morning Star Publications 628 West Stein Highway Behind County Bank 302-629-9788

302-628-0767

BRIDAL See Us For Your Announcements, Napkins, Etc.

Dukes Builders

1.00/Pg. Local

Stop By Our Office: Morning Star Publications 628 West Stein Highway

BARBER/BEAUTY

J oh n’s TREE & LANDSCAPE SERVICE Commercial • Industrial • Residential John Liammayty - Licensed & Insured

Delmarva’s #1 Water Treatment Dealer Also Offering Premium Spring Water

628-0139 Emergency Number 875-5776

410.742.3333 800.439.3853 sharpwater.com

To Advertise In This Directory Call

302-629-9788

Only $10.00 Per Week (3 Month Minimum)

Are you ready to commit to a Lifestyle change?

Why Weight? Make the Transitions Today! You owe it to yourself to check out this program! Call 302-875-3099 for Info HealthierYou.TransitionsLifestyle.com


PAGE 36

MORNING STAR

PEDESTAL OAK RND. DR TABLE w/4 chairs, $165. 629-8745. 11/8 GE PROFILE DRYER, 220 plug, $150. 628-0741. 11/8 AB LOUNGE 2 Exercise chair, new cond., $30. Daisy Red Ryder BB gun in orig. box, ammo incl., ages 10 & up, $15. 875-9431. 11/8 CEMETERY LOTS - 3 Lots in Odd Fellows Cemetery, Seaford, $2400. Call board members of the S.H.S. Alumni scholarship Foundation, 629-2279, 629-2498 or 629-8429. 11/8 DINING ROOM SUITE, solid maple, table w/3 leaves, 6 chairs, matching hutch; desk w/chair; maple rocker w/cushion; 3 end tables; twin bed; 3 fans. 8755354 or 236-7963. 11/8 SAXOPHONE, Bundy Alto, w/case, excellent cond. $800 OBO. 875-3589. 11/01 DESKTOP COMPAQ COMPUTER, #5120, w/ monitor & speakers. Asking $50 OBO. 11/01 UPRIGHT PIANO, Gulbransen, w/bench, good cond. $975 OBO. 6443317. 11/01 SILVERTONE ORGAN, w/padded bench. $125 OBO. 644-7344. 11/01 LAWN TRACTOR, Bolens Husky, Snow Blower, mover deck & plow blade. $500 OBO. 628-5198. 11/01 FIREWOOD, 5+ Cords, Seasoned Hardwoods, you move, $400. Call 410-5464335. 11/01

COMPUTER MONITOR: Mitsubishi Diamond Scan 15HX SVGA color, $49. 856-3799. 10/25 CRIB/BED & Mattress, $150. 875-2647. 10/25 3 BAR STOOLS, colonial style, roundded backs, arm rests, swivel seats, $25 ea. or $65 for set. 628-1029.

DAY BED, white metal w/ link springs. No mattress, $40. 629-3312. 10/18 PRO-FORM AIR WALKER, no impact total body workout, $50. 629-8765. 10/18 BLUE DOWN COMFORTER, king size, new, duvet cover & shams, $60. Junior sleeping bag, new, $8. 6285484. 10/11

STAINLESS STEEL COOLER, chest type, 2 drs., 4 comp. inside, almost new, goes under bar. 628-8113. 10/25

FINANCIAL CALCULATOR, Radio Shack, EC5500, $10. 628-5484. 10/11

9" COLOR TV w/cable & remote. $20. 875-7143. 10/25

LAWNCRAFTER MOWER CART w/dump body, $40. 875-1862. 10/11

OLD CAST IRON WOOD / COAL COOK STOVE, great shape, $250. 8469788. 10/25 2 SEARS CRAFTSMAN Inertia Activated 16" Chainsaws w/case. $75 ea. 8753066. 10/18 BOWLING BALLS: 13 lb. Apex Obsession, new, undrilled, $125. 16 lb. Apex Adreniline, drilled, $75. 15 lb. Hammer, drilled, $50. 875-3066. 10/18 KENMORE WASHER/ DRYER, white, used only 6 mos., bought new home & couldn't use, Heavy duty, super capacity, top load washer. Front load dryer. Bought as a combo for $800, asking $500. Call 858-7841. 10/18 ASST. LASER DISC MOVIES, $4,.99 ea. Pool Stick, good cond., $7. Sealed packs of football, baseball & nonsport trading cards, $100, or will separate. 398-0309. 10/18 KENMORE GAS DRYER, 80 series, used 2 1/2 years. $150. 629-2711. 10/18

ANIMALS, ETC. CHIHUAHUA-TERRIER PUPPIES, 2 Male $125 each, 1 Female $150, (1 white, 1 gray, 1 brown). Ready to go in 2 wks. Call before 7 p.m. 875-0964. 11/01 2 JACK RUSSELL PUPS, 1 male, 1 female, tails & dew claws done. 1st shots taken care of $250. Call 3378311, home or 841-8426, cell. 11/01 2 PURE BRED PIT BULL Puppies, female, 9 wks. old, $250 OBO. 410-8964573, lv. msg. 10/11

FREE CLASSIFIEDS Personal Items for Sale.

No Vendors Please.

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Apartments For Rent $199 HUD HOMES FROM $199/mo! Buy a 3bd 1ba Home only $300/mo! 4bd 2ba only $350/mo! For Listings 800-585-3617 ext. T296 Affordable Foreclosures from $199/mo! 5bd 2ba only $375/mo! 3bd 1.5ba Home only $300/mo! Never Rent Again! For Listings 800585-3617 ext. T297

Kill Shelters, Animal Rights, Research to Advance Veterinary Treatments/Cures 1-866-912-GIVE DONATE YOUR VEHICLE: MAX. IRS TAX DEDUCTIONS. UNITED BREAST CANCER FOUNDATION, Free Mammograms, Breast Cancer Info www.ubcf.info FREE Towing, Fast, NonRunners Accepted, 24/7 1888-468-5964 Elder Care

Automotive $500 Police Impounds! More Acuras/Hondas/Toyotas from $500! Police Impounds! Listings 800-5853563 ext. L218 Autos Wanted Top cash paid for your unwanted cars, trucks, SUVs. Same day service. I’ll come to you anytime. Dents, damage, high mileage OK. Call Larry 443-768-0969 Business Opportunity Measure Your Success. Advertise in 120 newspapers across Maryland, Delaware, and DC, reach over 2.3 Million households for only $495. For more information contact this Newspaper or call 410-7214000, ext. 17 or visit: www.mddcpress.com ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800 in a day? Your own local candy route. Includes 30 Machines and Candy All for $9,995. 1888-753-3452

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• NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

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ELIZABETH COONEY PERSONNEL AGENCY. THE NURSING CARE SPECIALISTS. SINCE 1957. RN’s, LPN’s, CNA’s, AIDES, COMPANIONS, HOME HEALTH CARE. PRIVATE DUTY. HOURS / LIVE IN. 24-HOUR SERVICE. LICENCED AND BONDED. (410) 323-1700. CALL NOW FOR CARE. Employment Sales Professionals Wanted $75,000+ Pre-qualified Leads helping Seniors. Full Benefits, Retirement, Vacations, Stock Options+ Management Opportunities Call Tony Holland toll free 1866-229-8447 SECRET SHOPPERS NEEDED Pose as Customer for Product and Customer Service evaluations. Local stores, restaurants and theaters. Flexible hours and Training Provided. 1800-585-9024 ext 6046 Nations Largest Repossession Company needs Agents in all areas of Maryland. Experienced with equipment, and ability to service our customers. Reply to rhoward@ renovoservices.com

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$99 3-day, 2-night Getaway to Golf Course Living at Savanna Lakes Take our $99 3-day, 2-night Discovery Getaway* to tour Savanna Lakes, a new home community surrounded by the beautiful Meadowlands Golf Club and ideally located between Myrtle Beach, S.C., and Wilmington, N.C. Great amenities, nearby beaches and more make this the perfect address for your new Coastal Carolina home.

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Help Wanted Part-time, home-based Internet business. Earn $941 per month or much more. Flexible hours. Training provided. No selling required. FREE details. www.K348.com #1 TRUCK DRIVING SCHOOL. Training for Swift, Werner & others. Dedicated/Regional/Local. Approx. $50,000-$70,000 yearly. Home Weekly! 1800-883-0171 Open 7 days a week. Help Wanted-Drivers DRIVERS-DON’T MISS THIS Special Sign-On Bonus 36-43 cpm/$1.20 $0 Lease / Teams Needed. Class A + 3 months recent OTR required 800-6358669 Homes for Rent $199 HUD HOMES FROM $199/mo! Buy a 3ba 1ba Home only $300/mo! 4bd 2ba only $350/mo! For Listings 800-585-3617 ext. T296 Affordable Foreclosures from $199/mo! 5bd 2ba only $375/mo! 3bd 1.5ba Home only $300/mo! Never Rent Again! For Listings 800585-3617 ext. T297 Homes for Sale Affordable Foreclosures from $199/mo! 5bd 2ba only $375/mo! 3bd 1.5ba Home only $300/mo! Never Rent Again! For Listings 800585-3617 ext. T297 Job Listing POST OFFICE NOW HIRING. Avg. Pay $20/hour or $57K annually including Federal Benefits and OT. Paid Training, Vacations. PT/FT. 1-866-498-4945 USWA Land SIX ACRES STREAMFRONT $39,990 Own 6 acres on the Middlefork Trout Stream in Elkins, West Virginia. Just $39,990. No money down... 100% Financing! Call owner: 866391-9278.

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Little Switzerland, West Virginia 10 acres just $59,990! 400’ stream frontage on White Thorn Creek. Mature hardwoods, abundant wildlife. Power, perk, all- weather roads. Owner: 866-4038037 DISCLAIMER: be aware that Morning Star Publications has no control over the Regional ads. Some employment ads and business opportunity ads may not be what they seem to be.


MORNING STAR 15 ACRES WITH VIEWS $49,990 WV mountain retreat great for custom cabinbuild when ready. Lots of bear, deer & turkey– close to national forest access. Power, perk, roads. Larger parcels available. Owner: 866-342-8635. VIRGINIA MOUNTAINS 5 acres riverfront on Big Reed Island Creek near New River State Park, fishing, view, private, good access $89,500 866-789-8535 Lots & Acreage 6.38 AC- Water access with Log Cabin Package $89,900. NC Waterfront Community. Boat ramp, day dock, paved rds, access to ICW, Atlantic & Sounds, CALL NOW: 1-252-3559288 ext 1973 HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS LAND SALE! Sat Nov 24th. 2.6 acres$89,900. Spectacular country acreage just 2 miles to historic Shepherdstown & 5 minutes from Potomac River access! Easy commute to DC. Enjoy our employee discount and SAVE 20%- up to $15,000! Bonus: Pay no closing costs when you close within 14 days. Take a tour & receive a $100 holiday dinner certificate! Join the Hunter Company family of satisfied land owners- call now for early app’t 1-877-202-2727 The ONLY Large Acreage Paradise this close to you! Incredible 3 state Mtn. & Valley Views in every direc-

tion. Enjoy canoeing and trophy fishing from your private river- front park. To find out more to www.mountainbargains.com 50 Mile Views! 27.5 AC$124,900 Enjoy 50 mile southern views w/ beautiful pines & large hardwoods in park- like setting. In area of great outdoor recreation. Perfect for log home/ vacation getaway. Long terms! Call now 1-866-685-2720 ABSOLUTE STEAL! 20+ Ac/ Stream $99,900 Nicely wooded parcel w/ mtn stream & long range southern views! End of rd privacy. Small down pymt. Truly unique! Call now 1-800888-1262 Miscellaneous ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. Medical, business, paralegal, computers, criminal justice. Job placement assistance. Financial aid and computer provided if qualified. Call 866-858-2121 www.Online. TidewaterTech.com AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for High Paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA Approved Program. Financial Aid If Qualified - Job Placement Assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance (888) 349-5387. Real Estate STOP RENTING!! Gov't Bank Foreclosures! $0 to Low Down!! No Credit OK! Call Now! 800-860-0732

• NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS- Gated community - Spectacular views. Public water including fire hydrants, DSL accessibility, paved roads, nearby lakes, coming soon Phases 5-6 $45,000+ 800-463-9980 www.theridgeatsouthmountain.com MOVE/ RETIRE TO TAXFREE DELAWARE! Spacious, single- family homes, near beaches. From Upper $100's. Brochure Available. Call 302-684-8572 www.jeffersoncrossroads.com Real Estate Services Stop Foreclosure? Behind in payments? We will make your payments at no cost to you. Sell your house in 30 minutes. Any area, price, condition. Call now 866208-8695 Tax Services IRS TAX DEBT KEEPING YOU AWAKE? Local CPA firm resolves all Federal and State tax problems for individuals and businesses. US Tax Resolutions, P.A. 877-477-1108.

FREE CLASSIFIEDS Personal Items for Sale. No Vendors Please.

LEGALS CITY OF SEAFORD, DELAWARE ORDER OF DEMOLITION To: Mary Faist 312 Hickory Lane Seaford, DE 19973 Property: 312 Hickory Lane, Seaford, DE Tax Map and Parcel 5-31 13.09 39

PURSUANT TO THE CITY OF SEAFORD HOUSING CODE It is hereby ordered that the above described property is hereby ordered to be demolished within thirty (30) days of this Order due to the structure being so out of repair as to be dangerous, unsafe, unsanitary or otherwise unfit for human habitation, occupancy or use. Failure to comply with this demolition order within the time prescribed will result in the CIty demolishing the structure either through an available public agency or by contract with private persons and the cost of such demolition and removal shall be charged against the real estate upon which the structure is located and shall be a lien upon such real estate. THE CITY OF SEAFORD Joshua E. Littleton Building Official Dated: November 8, 2007 11/15/3tc

Call 629-9788, or send to P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973.

Public Auction ESTATE SALE in Laurel Saturday, November 17, 2007 • 10 am Selling for the Estate of Mary Louise English, 11201 Laurel Road. Rain Date 12/01/07 Furniture: Brandt drop leaf table w/6 chairs, Marble top coffee table, set of Haligan upholstered chairs, Brandt server, Marble top lamp table, 3-Cain bottom rockers, Oak leather top desk, Marble top vanity, Tell drop leaf kitchen table w/3 chairs, Cedar chest, Clayton Marcus Sofa, Lazy Boy recliner, Wooden 3 shelve corner cabinet w/glass doors, Enamel wear kitchen table and chairs, Plank bottom chair, (2) 3 piece maple bedroom suites, Maple double bed, night stands, steel file cabinet, wicker patio furniture, Magnavox floor model TV, Patio furniture, RCA TV, area rugs. Appliances: Maytag washer, Maytag elec. Range, Maytag refrig. Microwaves. Glassware, Figurines & Collectables: McCoy Frog planters, Lefton bird figurines, Fostoria pieces, Italian painted glass goblets & painted glass basket, Bavarian China, Pink Candy dish, Purple Glass urn, Punch bowl and cups, Paul Revere bowl, Aluminum pitcher & serving tray, Asst. Pieces of leaded glass, collection of figurines and S.P. shakers, Stoneware crock, Royal meat carving set, Spartus mantel clock, Carvel Hall meat carving set, Barometers, Amt of costume Jewelry, concrete lawn planters, old baseball glove, old board games, Centenary Church print be Brad Spicer, Centenary Church Cats Meow, Asst. Local advertising thermometers, steel milk can. Lawn, Garden Tractor, Equipment & Tools: Allis Chalmers 912 Hydro tractor with 42’ deck/wheel weights, Brinley double gang disk, Agqifab lawn spreader, Craftsman Lawn Sweep, Steel dump cart, Murray 22’ push mower, Iraig pump, Socket sets, wrenches, ratchets, hammers, grease guns, pipe wrenches, pry bars, screwdrivers, bench grinder, cord winder, bench vise, car ramps, wheel barrow, shovels, rakes, etc. Terms and Conditions: Everything Sold “AS IS”. Prompt Removal. Not Responsible for Accidents. No Buyers Premium. Directions: Take RT 13 South to Laurel, at the light at 13 & 24 at Laurel Motor Company make a left onto 24 Laurel Road, 2/10 mile on left past Lakeside Green House. 11201 Laurel Road.

Lee Collins Auctioneer 302-846-3936 • 302-236-0344

PUBLIC HEARING The Town of Greenwood, Delaware, in cooperation with the Sussex County Council (SCC), and the Delaware State Housing Authority (DSHA), will hold a public hearing so that all citizens can have an opportunity to participate in the development of an application to the State of Delaware Community Development Block Grant Program for a grant under the provisions of the Community Development Act of 1977. The primary objective of the Community Development Program is the development of viable urban communities, including decent housing and a suitable living environment and expanding economic opportunities, principally for persons of low and moderate income. It is also a primary objective to alleviate physical and economic distress through the stimulation of private investment and community revitalization in areas of population out-migration or a stagnating or declining tax base. In accordance with the Section 106 Review Process established by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended, comments are especial-

PAGE 37 ly encouraged from interested agencies and individuals with respect to undertakings that may affect historic properties of significance to such agencies and individuals. The hearing will be held in the Greenwood Town Hall, Greenwood, Delaware on Tuesday, December 4, 2007 at 7:00 p.m. A status report for FY07 will also be included. For more information contact William Lecates, Director of Community Development and Housing at 8557777. 11/15/1tc

PUBLIC HEARING The Commission of Bridgeville, Delaware, in cooperation with the Sussex County Council (SCC), and the Delaware State Housing Authority (DSHA), will hold a public hearing so that all citizens can have an opportunity to participate in the development of an application to the State of Delaware Community Development Block Grant Program for a grant under the provisions of the Community Development Act of 1977. The primary objective of the Community Development Program is the development of viable urban communities, including decent housing and a suitable living environment and expanding economic opportunities, principally for persons of low and moderate income. It is also a primary objective to alleviate physical and economic distress through the stimulation of private investment and community revitalization in areas of population out-migration or a stagnating or declining tax base. In accordance with the Section 106 Review Process established by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended, comments are especially encouraged from interested agencies and individuals with respect to undertakings that may affect historic properties of significance to such agencies and individuals. The hearing will be held in the Bridgeville Town Hall, Bridgeville, Delaware on Monday, December 10, 2007 at 7:00 p.m. A status report for FY07 will also be included. For more information contact William Lecates, Director of Community Development and Housing at 8557777. 11/15/1tc

PUBLIC HEARING The Town of Blades, Delaware, in cooperation with the Sussex County Council (SCC), and the Delaware State Housing Authority (DSHA), will hold a public hearing so that all citizens can have an opportunity to participate in the development of an application to the State of Delaware Community Development Block Grant Program for a grant under the provisions of the Community Development Act of 1977. The primary objective of the Community Development Program is the development of viable urban communities, including decent housing and a suitable living environment and expanding economic opportunities, principally for persons of low and moderate income. It is also a primary objective to alleviate physical and economic distress through the stimulation of private investment and community revitalization in areas of population out-migration or a stagnating or declining tax base. In accordance with the Section 106 Review Process established by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended, comments are especially encouraged from interested agencies and individuals with respect to undertakings that may affect historic properties of significance to such agencies and individuals. The hearing will be held in the Blades Hardin Hall, Blades, Delaware on Monday, December 10, 2007 at 7:00 p.m. A status report for FY-07 will also be included. For more information contact William Lecates, Director of Community Development and Housing at 855-7777. 11/15/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING

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Nanticoke Hundred Case No. 10012 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article XXV, Subsection 115-185, Item F of said ordinance of ELIZABETH FENNELL who is seeking a variance from the side yard setback requirement for an accessory structure, to be located north of Road 483, north of Waterview Drive, being Lot 1 within Waterview Acres development. The hearing will be held

Call 629-9788

See LEGALS—page 38


PAGE 38

MORNING STAR

LEGALS - from Page 37 in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, DECEMBER 17, 2007, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 11/15/1tc

LEGAL NOTICE On DECEMBER 10, 2007 at 1:00 p.m., Laurel Storage Center — Road 468, Laurel, Delaware will conduct a sale pursuant to Title 25, DEL. C. Ann 49044905. The contents of the following Bin’s will be sold: Bin’s: #11 Keith Kennedy; #81 Eric Wilke; #88 Arthur Strunk; #110 Veronica Oney; #127 and #218 Ellery Bensel; #183 Gretchen Peek; #223 Beverly Ellis; #198 April Kellem. BIDDERS: Call office on day of sale to confirm, (302) 875-5931. 11/08/2tc

NOTICE Estate of Gladys R. Jackson, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Gladys R. Jackson who de-

parted this life on the 28th day of September A.D. 2005 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Gerry J. Richards on the 2nd day of November, A.D. 2007, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 28th day of May, A.D. 2006 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Garry J. Richards 1216 Silverthorne Rd., Baltimore, MD 21239 Attorney: Karl Haller, Esq. Haller & Hudson P.O. Box 533 Georgetown, DE 19947 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 11/15/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Alvin P. Lyons, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Alvin P. Lyons who departed this life on the 28th day of September A.D. 2007 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Catherine Allen Lyons on the 1st day of November, A.D. 2007, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to

• NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007 deceased are required to NOTICE

exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 28th day of May, A.D. 2008 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Catherine Allen Lyons 2837 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Attorney: David W. Baker, Esq. P.O. Box 551 Georgetown, DE 19947 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 11/15/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Laura Celeste Jackson, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Laura Celeste Jackson who departed this life on the 13th day of October, A.D. 2007 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Viola E. Cannon on the 7th day of November, A.D. 2007, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administratrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administratrix on or before the 13th day of June, A.D. 2008 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administratrix: Viola E. Cannon 504 W. 7th Street, Laurel, DE 19956 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 11/15/3tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING The Laurel School District Board of Education will consider the request for a waiver to the requirements per 14 Delaware Code §’a41705 (A) (a) requiring the ratio of students to instructors in any class in kindergarten or grades 1-3 in a Delaware public school shall not exceed 22 students as of the last school day of October. This student-to-instructor ratio shall only apply to a class within which students are instructed in the core academic subjects of English/Language Arts, mathematics, science and social studies. A local school board may waive subsection (a) of this section after voting to waive such subsection at a public meeting noticed for that purpose. Any local school board vote on such a waiver shall occur on or before December 1 of each year. This public meeting will be held on Tuesday, November 20 th at 7:00 PM in the Laurel School District Office Board Room, 1160 South Central Avenue, Laurel, DE 19956. The general public may present written or oral comments on the matter under consideration by the Board of Education. Procedures for presenting such written or oral comments include the following: 1.) Citizens who wish to address the Board must first seek recognition from the presiding officer of the meeting. 2.) Citizens, once recognized by the presiding officer, must state their names and the topic upon which they would like to speak. 3.) The presiding officer may limit the time that each citizen is permitted to speak. WHAT: WHEN: WHERE: PURPOSE:

Public Meeting of the Laurel Board of Education Tuesday, November 20, 2007 at 7:00 PM Laurel School District Board Room 1160 South Central Avenue Laurel, DE 19956 Consideration of a waiver of the requirements per 14 Delaware Code, §1705 (A)(a) for Paul L. Dunbar Elementary School and North Laurel Elementary School

THE LAUREL SCHOOL DISTRICT IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER AND DOES NOT DISCRIMINATE OR DENY SERVICES ON THE BASIS OF RACE, COLOR, NATIONAL ORIGIN, SEX, HANDICAP, AND/OR AGE IN ITS PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES. PERSONS HAVING CIVIL RIGHTS INQUIRIES REGARDING THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) MAY CONTACT THE ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT AT (302) 875-6108.

Estate of William Volante, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of William Volante who departed this life on the 8th day of June, A.D. 2005 late of Lewes, DE were duly granted unto Mona D. Volante on the 30th day of October, A.D. 2007, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 8th day of February, A.D. 2006 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Mona D. Volante 33788 Walnut Grove Dr., Lewes, DE 19958 Attorney: Michele Procino-Wells, Esq. 225 High St. Seaford, DE 19973 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 11/08/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Xavier Charleron, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Xavier Charleron who departed this life on the 30th day of July, A.D. 2007 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Paulette Charleron on the 22nd day of October, A.D. 2007, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administratrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the

exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administratrix on or before the 30th day of March, A.D. 2008 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administratrix: Paulette Charleron 408 Cherry St., Laurel, DE 19956 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 11/01/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Clarence D. Bazzrea, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Clarence D. Bazzrea who departed this life on the 11th day of October, A.D. 2007 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Cynthia B. Elkman on the 18th day of October, A.D. 2007, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 11th day of June, A.D. 2008 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Cynthia B. Elkman 2002 Ludlow St., Philadelphia, PA 19103 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 11/01/3tc

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Call 629-9788

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING The Woodbridge School District Board of Education as a part of its regular November public meeting will consider a waiver to the provisions of 14 Delaware Code § 1704(4) and § 1705(A)(a). Subsection 1704(4) of the law requires all public school buildings to have allocated to them 98% of the Division 1 units generated by the actual unit count in that building by the last school day of October of the current school year. Subsection 1705(A)(a) requires any kindergarten or grades 1-3 public school classes to have no higher ratio of teacher to students than 1:22 by the last school day in October of the current school year. This ratio is only to apply to a class where students are instructed in core academic subjects of English/Language Arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. The meeting will be held in the library of the Phillis Wheatley Middle School. Citizens may present written or oral comments on the matter under consideration by the Board of Education, under the public commentary portion of the meeting. WHAT: A public meeting of the Woodbridge Board of Education WHEN: Tuesday, November 20, 2007 WHERE: Phillis Wheatley Middle School Library WHY: Consideration of a waiver of the provisions of 14 Delaware Code, § 1704(4) and § 1705(A)(a) 11/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 20, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain piece, parcel or tract of land lying and being situate in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being designated as LOT THIRTY ONE (31) of GREEN ACRES SUBDIVISION, as shown on a plot of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 310, page 540, and being more particularly described according to a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr., dated September 9, 1997 as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a pipe found on the northerly right of way line of Garden Lane, marking a common corner for this lot and Lot 32; thence, by and with Lot 32, North 22 degrees 20 minutes 00 East, 150.00 feet to a pipe found marking a common corner for this lot, Lot 32, and lands of Ray S. Mears and Son, Inc.; thence by and with lands of Ray S. Mears and Son, Inc., South 67 degrees 40 minutes 00 seconds East, 50.00 feet to a pipe found marking a common corner for this lot and Lot 30; thence by and with Lot 30, South 22 degrees 20 minutes 00 seconds West, 150.00 feet to a pipe found on the northerly right of way line of Garden Lane; thence by and with the northerly right of way line of Garden Lane, North 67 degrees 40 minutes 00 seconds West, 50.00 feet, home to the point and place of Beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. AND BEING the same lands conveyed unto Kathleen L. Beauchamp by deed of Mark L Lloyd, Sr. Guardian of Clara Lloyd Hill, dated October 22, 1997 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Deed Book 2241, Page 285. Tax Parcel: 3-31-3.00205.00 Property Address: 8665 Garden Lane, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check See LEGALS—page 39


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 38 payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 3, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 7, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of KATHLEEN L. BEAUCHAMP and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/7/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 20, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, lying on the Western side of Highway No. 13-A leading from Laurel to Delmar, Delaware, and more fully described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument found on the Westerly right of way line of U.S. No. 13-A (60 feet r/w); said monument being situate Northerly a

distance of 285 feet more or less from the center line extended of Sussex County Road No. 460; thence with the lands of Melvin D. and Doris E. Forney, now or formerly, North 81 degrees 40 minutes 57 seconds West a distance of 300.40 feet to a concrete monument found; thence continuing with the said Forney lands, North 08 degrees 36 minutes 15 seconds East a distance of 110.00 feet to a concrete monument found; thence continuing with the said Forney Lands South 81 degrees 40 minutes 22 seconds East a distance of 299.91 feet to a concrete monument found; thence with U.S. No. 13-A, South 08 degrees 21 minutes 29 seconds West a distance of 110.00 feet home to the point and place of Beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. AND BEING the same lands conveyed unto John M. Jones, Sr. and Michelle P. Jones, by deed of Karl S. Klein dated December 30, 2003 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Deed Book 2930, Page 268. Tax Parcel: 3-32-3.001.00 Property Address: 32672 Bistate Blvd., Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 3, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 7, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these

• NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MICHELLE P. JONES & JOHN M. JONES, SR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/7/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of an Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 20, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the Town of Laurel, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, more particularly described in accordance with a survey prepared by Peninsula Surveying & Site Design, Inc. dated June 27, 2000 and revised July 10, 2000, as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pin set at the inner edge of a 4' wide concrete sidewalk on the South side of East 4th Street at the intersection of East 4th Street and Iona Avenue, a corner for this land; thence, by and with the inner edge of the sidewalk and the South side of East 4th Street and the curve thereof having a radius of 794.96 feet, a length of 242.33 feet and a chord of North 85 degrees 07 minutes 06 seconds East 241.39 feet to an iron pipe found; thence, continuing with the inner edge of the sidewalk on the South side of East 4th Street and the curve thereof having a radius of 794.96 feet, a length of 44.69 feet and a chord of South 84 degrees 32 minutes 19 seconds East 44.68 feet to an iron pipe found, a corner for this land and lands now or formerly of George W. Collins and Janice B. Whaley; thence, turning and running by and with lands now or formerly of George W. Collins and Janice B. Whaley, South 22 degrees 30 minutes 32 seconds West 130.60 feet to an iron pipe found; thence, turning and running by and with lands now or formerly of George W. Collins and Janice B. Whaley, South 67 degrees 33 minutes 47 seconds East 9.03 feet to an iron pipe found, a corner for this

land; thence, turning and running with said Whaley lands, South 21 degrees 26 minutes 01 seconds West 145.54 feet to a concrete monument on the North side of Orange Street, a corner for this land; thence, turning and running by and with Orange Street, North 68 degrees 50 minutes 00 seconds West 261.47 feet to an iron pin set, a corner for this land; thence, turning and running by and with Iona Avenue North 23 degrees 05 minutes 00 seconds East 142.48 feet to a concrete monument; thence, North 07 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West 18.00 feet to the place of beginning, containing therein 1.35 acres of land, more or less. Tax Parcel: 3 - 3 2 1.07-320.00 & 320.01 Property Address: Not Available Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 3, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 7, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of FAMILY ENRICHMENT & DELIVERANCE CENTER, INC. & FAMILY ENRICHMENT DAYCARE CENTER, INC. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/7/2tc

PAGE 39 SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 20, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece or parcel of land, with improvements thereon, situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a concrete monument in the southeasterly right-of-way line of County Road 516 at a corner for these lands and lands now or formerly of Laura King Heirs; thence from said point of Beginning along a line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Laura King Heirs, South 88 degrees 40 minutes 38 seconds East, 150.15 feet to a pipe; thence along a line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Donald L. and Shirley Givens, South 48 degrees 43 minutes 26 seconds West, 193.19 feet; thence turning and running North 41 degrees 16 minutes 34 seconds West, 150.00 feet to a pipe in the southeasterly right-of-way line of County Road 516; thence by and with the southeasterly rightof-¬way line of County Road. 516, North 48 degrees 43 minutes 26 seconds East, 200.00 feet to the point and place of Beginning, containing 0.6770 acres of land, more or less. This description is derived from a survey prepared by Miller-Lewis, Inc., dated December 12, 1990. BEING the same lands and premises conveyed to Dolly Faye Morris by deed of Donald L. Givens and Shirley M. Givens, husband and wife, dated March 15, 1996, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware in Deed Book 2116, Page 80. Tax Parcel: 2-31-13.0062.12 Property Address: RR 4, Box 723 C, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be

demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 3, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 7, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DOLLY FAYE MORRIS & MARVIN MORRIS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/7/2tc

SHERIFF SALE* By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 20, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: Entire Parcel Previously Advertised. ALL that certain piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a point in the Easterly right of way line of Route 13 which is North 16 degrees 40 minutes West, 1280.37 feet North of the point of intersection of the Easterly boundary of Route 13 and the Northerly boundary of Route 482; thence South 85 degrees 19 minutes East for a distance of 201 feet to a point; thence South 86 degrees 25 minSee LEGALS—page 40


PAGE 40 LEGALS - from Page 39 utes East for a distance of 1,132.8 feet to a point; thence by and with the boundary line of H. Moore North 18 degrees 53 minutes West for a distance of 1,427.6 feet to a point; thence South 77 degrees 28 minutes West, for a new division of 185.64 feet to a point; thence South 3 degrees 35 minutes West for a new division line between the lands hereby conveyed and other land of Joseph W. Constantino, et al. for a distance of 407.88 feet to a point; thence North 85 degrees 19 minutes West for a distance of 239.15 feet to a point in the foresaid Easterly right of way line of Route 13; thence South 16 degrees 40 minutes East for a distance of 107.37 feet home to the place of beginning as will more fully and clearly appear upon reference to a survey prepared by Theodore S. Simpler on or about March 30, 1970. Approved Subdivided Parcels Each Constituting a Portion of the Above-Described Lands: Parcel # 1: All that certain piece, parcel and tract of land lying and being situate in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, comprising of all of Parcel # 1 of the Paradise Produce Co, Inc subdivision, the plat which was prepared by Miller Lewis, Inc. and recorded in Plot Book 103, at Page 291, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, and more particularly described, as follows: COMMENCING at a point on the easterly rightof-way of U.S Road 13 at 200 feet wide, distant southerly along said rightof-way 1,152 feet, more or less, from SCR # 482; thence with a right-of-way for ingress and egress and lands now or formerly of Glen R. Jones the following two (2) courses and distances: 1) South 85°-19’00” East 201.11 feet to a point, and 2) South 86°-25’00” East 571.21 feet to an iron pipe (set), the point of BEGINNING; Thence proceeding partly with said right-of-way for ingress and egress and in part with Parcel #2 North 03°-35’-00” East 366.35 feet to an iron pipe (set), passing over an iron pipe (set) at 183.07 feet; thence continuing with said Parcel #2 North 54°32’-05” East 395.41 feet to an iron pipe (set); thence with lands now or formerly of REJ, Inc. South 18°-53’00” East 666.00 feet to a disturbed concrete monument (found); thence with aforementioned lands now or formerly of Glen R. Jones North 86°-25’-00”

MORNING STAR West 561.59 feet to the point of beginning; containing 5.259 acres of land, be the same more or less. Together with the right of ingress and egress to and from U.S. Road 13 over a 1.972 acre right-of-way. Parcel # 2: All that certain piece, parcel and tract of land lying and being situate in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, comprising of all of Parcel # 2 of the Paradise Produce Co, Inc subdivision, the plat of which was prepared by Miller Lewis, Inc. and recorded in Plot Book 103, at Page 291, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, and more particularly described, as follows: COMMENCING at a concrete monument (found) on the easterly right-of-way of U.S Road 13 at 200 feet wide, distant southerly along said right-of-way 1,045 feet, more or less, from SCR # 482; thence with a right-of-way for ingress and egress and in part with lands of David Lui and partly with lands of SRS Leasing the following three (3) courses and distances: 1) South 85°-19’00” East 239.15 feet to a concrete monument (found), 2) South 86°-25’00” East 407.88 feet to a concrete monument (found), *This sales’ notice amends and supersedes the previous sales’ notice which has been posted and advertised and 3) North 66°-30’-38” East 91.14 feet with Parcel 3 to an iron pipe (set), the point of BEGINNING; Thence proceeding with Parcel #3 the following two (2) courses and distances: 1) North 03°-35’-00” East 586.11 feet to an iron pipe (set), and 2) North 54°-32’05” East 329.58 feet to an iron pipe (set); thence in part with lands now or formerly of Stone Creek Business Park, LLC and partly with lands now or formerly of REJ, Inc. South 18°-53’00” East 346.15 feet to an iron pipe (set); thence with Parcel #1 the following two (2) courses and distances: 1) South 54°-32’-05” West 395.41 feet to an iron pipe (set), and 2) South 03°-35’00” West 183.28 feet to an iron pipe (set); thence with aforementioned right-ofway for ingress and egress South 66°-30’-38” West 91.14 feet to the point of beginning; containing 3.478 acres of land, be the same more or less. Together with the right of ingress and egress to and from U.S. Road 13 over a 1.972 acre right-of-way. Parcel # 3: All that certain piece, parcel and tract

• NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

of land lying and being situate in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, comprising of all of Parcel # 3 of the Paradise Produce Co, Inc subdivision, the plat of which was prepared by Miller Lewis, Inc. and recorded in Plot Book 103, at Page 291, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, and more particularly described, as follows: COMMENCING at a concrete monument (found) on the easterly right-of-way of U.S Road 13 at 200 feet wide, distant southerly along said right-of-way 1,045 feet, more or less, from SCR # 482; thence with a right-of-way for ingress and egress and in part with lands of David Lui and partly with lands of SRS Leasing the following two (2) courses and distances: 1) South 85°-19’00” East 239.15 feet to a concrete monument (found), and 2) South 86°25’-00” East 407.88 feet to a concrete monument (found);, the point of BEGINNING; Thence proceeding with said lands now or formerly of SRS Leasing North 03°-35’-00” East 1,167.60 feet to an iron pipe (found); thence with lands now or formerly of Stone Creek Business Park, LLC the following two (2) courses and distances: 1) North 77°-28’-00” East 185.64 feet to a concrete monument (found), and 2) South 18°-53’-00” East 415.45 feet to an iron pipe (set); thence with Parcel #2 the following two (2) courses and distances: 1) South 54°-32’-05” West 329.58 feet to an iron pipe (set), and 2) South 03°-35’-00” West 586.11 feet to an iron pipe (set); thence with aforementioned right-ofway for ingress and egress South 66°-30’-38” West 91.14 feet to the point of beginning; containing 4.293 acres of land, be the same more or less. Together with the right of ingress and egress to and from U.S. Road 13 over a 1.972 acre right-of-way. AS TO ALL OF THE ABOVE PARCELS, being the same lands conveyed to Paradise Produce Company, Inc. by deed of James A. Martin, Ovida D. Martin and Mar Tek Systems, Inc., dated June 29, 2005, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 3170, Page 074. Tax Parcel: 1-32-12.00111.00 (Parcels: 1, 2 & 3) Property Address: 28667 Sussex Highway, Laurel THE FORECLOSING MORTGAGEE has elected

to first offer for sale each of the three subdivided parcels, as described above, and then the entire parcel as first described above. Whatever method of sale results in the higher price will be presented to the Superior Court for confirmation. Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 3, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 7, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of PARADISE PRODUCE COMPANY, INC & JOHN W. ALLEN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/7/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 20, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN tract, piece or parcel of land lying and being in Nanti-

coke Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a concrete monument on the north side of County Road 516 said marker being 428.82’ with the right of way line of County Road 516 to the extension of right of way line of road 525; thence North 41° 45’ West 154.70 feet to a concrete monument set on the South side of County Road 525; thence along said County Road North 25° 39’ East for an arc distance of 166.25’ to a concrete monument; thence South 41° 45’ East 218.52 feet to a concrete monument set on the northern side of County Road 516; thence along said road South 48° 15’ West 153.33 feet to the point and place of beginning containing 28,363 square feet of land more or less. BEING the same lands conveyed to Arletha D. Brown by deed of Morris Millwork Company, Inc. dated June 16, 1982, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 1120, Page 334. Tax Parcel: 2-31-13.0024.03 Property Address: 24330 Concord Pond Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 3, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 7, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confir-

mation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ARLETHA D. BROWN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/7/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a Second Pluries writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 20, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN lot, piece and parcel of land situated, lying and being in North West Fork Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, fronting the State Highway leading from Bridgeville to Atlanta, said lot being shown on the plot of lots of Alonzo E. Coulbourne recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County in Deed Book 334, Page 600, as Lot No. 10, beginning for the outlines thereof at a point on the right of way line of the Highway, a corner of Lot No. 9 retained by Vivian Jones, and this Lot 10; thence, running at right angles to the Highway with Lot No. 9, south 24 ? degrees east 150 feet to a point; thence, north 65 ? degrees east 18 feet to a point, thence, north 7 degrees east 175 feet to a point in the line of the Highway; thence with the same, south 65 ? degrees west 110 feet to the place of beginning, containing 9,600 square feet of land more or less. BEING THE SAME LANDS and premises which Vivian Jones by certain Deed dated the 11th day of December, A.D., 1992 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 1893, page 204, did grant and convey to Darrick E. West and Veronica T. West in fee. Tax Parcel: 1-31-10.0052.01 Property Address: 701 W. Market Street, Bridgeville Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check See LEGALS—page 41


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 40 payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 3, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 7, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DARRICK E. & VERONICA T. WEST and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/7/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 20, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a monument found on the easterly side of Co. Rd. 525 (50 feet) at a corner for lands now or formerly of Calvin J. Doyle and Sandra Wright, said monument also being located .055 mile from Rd. 526; thence with the easterly side of Co. Rd. 525,

North 03 degrees 44 minutes 30 seconds East 150.00 feet to a monument found on the easterly side of Co. Rd. 525 at a corner for lands now or formerly of Nathaniel Powell, Jr.; thence with the line of lands of said Powell and with the line of lands now or formerly of Barbara Hitman, South 80 degrees 00 minutes 37 second East 586.00 feet (and passing over two monuments found on line) to a monument set; thence turning and running with the line of lands of said Hitman, South 03 degrees 44 minutes 30 seconds West 150.00 feet to a monument set; thence turning and running with the line of lands of said Hitman and with the line of lands of said Doyle and Wright, North 80 degrees 00 minutes 37 seconds West 580.00 feet (and passing over an iron stob found on line) to the point and place of beginning, containing 2.00 acres of land, more or less, as will more fully and at large appear upon reference to a survey prepared by Gene R. Littleton & Associates; dated December 1992 and incorporated herein by reference. BEING the same land and premises that John E. Blount and Catherine V. Coleman, by deed dated December 10, 1998 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 2412 Page 1, did grant and convey unto John E. Blount, in fee. Tax Parcel: 2-31-9.0024.13 Property Address: RR1, Box 335J, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 3, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 7, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the respon-

• NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

sibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOHN E. BLOUNT and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/7/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of an Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 20, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being more particularly described according to a survey prepared by Miller Lewis, Inc., dated September 3, 1999, as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a point on the easterly right of way line of Sussex County Road #533 (70' R/W), said point being 0.30 miles, more or less, from Rd. #547, and located 8.93 feet from a pipe set in the aforesaid right of way, and marking a common corner for this parcel and Land now or formerly of Calvin R. and Jeanette S. Allen; thence, by and with Lands now or formerly of Calvin R. and Jeanette S. Allen, North 86 degrees 52 minutes 00 seconds East, 667.80 feet to a pipe set; thence turning and running South 01 degree 34 minutes 00 seconds East, 149.51 feet to a pipe found marking a common corner for this parcel and Lands now or formerly of Derik P. and April Callaway; thence, by and with Lands now or formerly of Derik P. and April Callaway; South 86 degrees 52 minutes 00 seconds West, 650.87 feet to a point on the easterly right of way line of Sussex County Road #533 (70' R/W), said point being 8.93 feet from a pipe found in the aforesaid right of way; thence, by and with the easterly right of way of Sussex County Road #533, North 08 de-

grees 02 minutes 40 seconds West, 150.00 feet, home to the point and place of Beginning, containing 2.2621 acres of land, more or less. This property is located in the vicinity of land used primarily for agricultural purposes on which normal agricultural uses and activities have been afforded the highest priority use status. It can be anticipated that such agricultural uses and activities may now or in the future involve noise, dust, manure and other odors, the use of agricultural chemicals and nighttime farm operations. The use and enjoyment of this property is expressly conditioned on acceptance of any annoyance or inconvenience which may result from such normal agricultural uses and activities. BEING the same land and premises conveyed unto Benjamin Adam Chaffinch by Deed of Benjamin Adam Chaffinch, dated June 23, 2000, and now of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 2500, Page 250. Tax Parcel: 5-31-9.0043.03 Property Address: 4951 Neals School Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 3, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 7, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these

PAGE 41 terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of BENJAMIN ADAM & RAYNA F. CHAFFINCH and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/7/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 20, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, tract, piece of parcel of land situate, lying on the South side of the State Highway leading from Laurel to Georgetown, and on the West side of County Road No. 474, more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument in the Southerly side of the State Highway leading from Laurel to Georgetown, now known as U.S. Route 9 formerly Delaware Route 28, where the said Southerly side of said State Highway leading from Laurel to Georgetown, Interests the Westerly side of County Road 474; thence along the Westerly right of way of County Road No. 474 South 32 47’ East 283.52 feet to a concrete monument in the right of way of said County Road No. 474, and lands now or formerly of Minnie R. Culver; thence along a line between this lot and lands now or formerly of Minnie R. Culver, S 57 07’ W 155.86 feet to an iron pipe set one foot below the surface; thence N 33 11’ 00” West 304.17 feet to a concrete monument in the Southerly right of way of State Highway leading from Laurel to Georgetown; thence along the Southerly right of way of said State Highway leading from Laurel to Georgetown N 64 34’ E 158.78 feet home to the place of beginning, said to contain 1.0567 acres of land, more or less. BEING the same lands and premised which G. Brent Culver and Monica R. Culver Morris and Larry Morris did grant and convey unto Leonard J. Griffin and Barbara J. Griffin by deed dated November 13, 1980 and recorded on November 13, 1980 in the Office of the

Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 1034 Page 129. Tax Parcel: 2-32-1.001.00 Property Address: 28046 Dukes Lumber Road a/k/a Rt. 1, Box 127, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 3, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 7, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LEONARD J. & BARBARA J. GRIFFIN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/7/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 20, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain tract, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex See LEGALS—page 42


PAGE 42

MORNING STAR

LEGALS - from Page 41

SHERIFF SALE

County, State of Delaware, being known as Lots 62 and 63 as shown upon a plot of "Lake Pines" development now of record in the Office of Recorder of Deeds at Georgetown, Delaware in Book 310, page 588. Being the same lands and premises which Thomas R. Marine and Dorothy L. Marine did grant and convey unto Stephen C. Lasher and Dawn M. Lasher by deed dated June 24, 2005 and recorded on July 1, 2005 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware in Deed Book 03164 Page 278. Tax Parcel: 3-32-2.0035.00 Property Address: 106 Boyce Avenue, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 3, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 7, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County.

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 20, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot or parcel of land situate, lying and being on the East Side of Arch Street, between King Poplar Streets, in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, more particularly described as follows to wit: Beginning at the east side of said Arch Street to the line between this lot and lands now or formerly of Annie Whaley; thence in parallel lines about 63 square feet or to the lands now or formerly of Edwina S. Willey, containing 2,520 square feet of land, more or less. Being the same lands and premises which Elizabeth L. Whaley n/k/a Elizabeth L. Sisk did grant and convey unto Gideon F. Sisk, III and Elizabeth L. Sisk by deed dated November 14, 2001 and recorded on December 10, 2001 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 02655 Page 206. Tax Parcel: 4-31-5.00178.00 Property Address: 205 Arch Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 3, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 7, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the respon-

Seized and taken in execution the property of STEPHEN C. & DAWN M. LASHER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/7/2tc

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• NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

sibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ELIZABETH L. & GIDEON F. SISK, III and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/7/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 20, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN lot, piece or parcel of land situate in Seaford, Sussex County. Delaware, designated on the plot of Nanticoke City as Lot Nos. 69 and 70, and more fully described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a point formed by the intersection of the north line of Harrington Street with the west line of Maple Street, thence with the north line of Harrington Street South 75 degrees 15 minutes west, one hundred feet, thence North 14 degrees 45 minutes West, one hundred fifty feet, thence North 75 degrees l5 minutes east one hundred feet, to the west line of Maple Street, thence with the west line of Maple Street, South 14 degrees 45 minutes East, one hundred fifty feet to the place of beginning, containing 15,000 square feet of land be the same, more or leas, excepting and reserving that portion of this lot of land which has heretofore been conveyed unto Harlan Marvel. Being the same lands and premises which Earl S. Robinson and Mary A. Robinson, husband and wife, did grant and convey unto Carlton W. Hurley and Wanda S. Adkins -Hur1ey, husband .and wife, by deed dated November 28, 1983 and recorded on November 28, 1983 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book

1225, Page 338. Tax Parcel: 5-31-13.10154.00 Property Address: 220 Harrington Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 3, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 7, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of CARLTON W. & WANDA S. HURLEY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/7/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 20, 2007 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, located on an access road leading southwesterly off the Southwesterly side of Route 451 being known and designat-

ed as Parcel "C" as shown on a plot prepared by Gene R. Littleton & Associates, Registered Surveyors, dated June 1994 and filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County at Georgetown, Delaware in Plot Book 53, page 167 (Surveyors note thereon stating that the 1994 plat cited above supersedes plat recorded in plot book 43, page 270 entitled Ellis Pond Subdivision) and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Commencing to reach the point of beginning at a concrete monument in the southwesterly right of way line of County Road 451, at 50 feet wide, which monument marks a corner for lands of "Parcel B" and for lands now or formerly of Rachel A. Houseberg; thence running with the dividing between the same, 325.21 feet south 15 deg. 31 min. 35 sec. west to a concrete monument in line of parcel "C"; the point and place of beginning; thence with theses lands parcel C and lands now or formerly of Rachel A. Houseberg, south 75 deg. 33 min. 28 sec. east 110.89 feet to a pipe in line of lands of Clarence L. Williams which pipe marks a corner for this lands and said Houseberg lands; thence turning and running by and with said Williams land south 15 deg. 23 min. 57 sec. west 440.00 feet to a coordinate point, corner for theses lands and lands known as parcel "D"; thence turning and running by and with said Parcel "D" north 58 deg. 23 min. 54 sec. west 625.11 feet to a coordinate point in the easterly side of an access road; thence turning and running by and with said roadway north 28 deg. 19 min. 39 sec East 343.00 feet to a coordinate point corner for these lands and for Parcel "B" thence turning and continuing with said Parcel "B" south 64 deg. 53 min. 38 sec. east 418.66 feet to a concrete monument at point and place of beginning. Said to contain 6.00 acres of land, more or less, and being all of Parcel "C". Being the same lands

and premises which D&N Properties, LLC did grant and convey unto Vanessa L. Horseman and Erick J. Durham by deed dated September 6, 2000 and recorded on September 12, 2000 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2519, Page 212 Tax Parcel: 5-32-8.0028.00 Property Address: 451 Country Road, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 3, 2007. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 7, 2007 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ERIK J. DURHAM & VANESSA L. HORSEMAN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/7/2tc See Auction Page 43

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

PAGE 43

On the Record Marriage Licenses

Deeds

Sussex County Clerk of the Peace George Parish joyfully announces the following couples have obtained marriage licenses: • Timothy Obryan Morris, Laurel to Tiaire Monique Meekins, Laurel • Edward Gill, Seaford to Amanda Cornelia Ternstrom, Seaford • Daniel Edward Hrupsa, Seaford to Melissa Ann Taylor, Seaford • James Stephen Kendall, Bridgeville to Judith Lee Creger, Bridgeville • Juan David Urquia-Batista, Laurel to Maria Del Carmen Vargas Vela, Laurel • Denis Amisial, Lawrenceville, Ga. To Caroline Daphnis, Seaford

• 04/25/07, Jeffrey R. and Pamela E. Tull to Mark R. and Diane M. Comolli, parcel, Town of Bridgeville, Northwest Fork Hundred, $339,900 • 04/27/07, Barbara C. Brown to Patrick L. Tierno, parcel, Nanticoke Hundred, $250,000 • 04/25/07, Carol A. Kamien to Jennifer Ruff, Lot Nos. 30 and 32, Longfellow Addition to Blades, Town of Blades, subdivision, Broad Creek Hundred, $159,900 • 04/26/07, Nelson E. Ortiz to Douglas A. Kauffman and Ruth Dearing, Lot No. 28, John N. Wright’s First Addition to Seaford, subdivision, Town of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, $127,200

6th ANNUAL FALL CONSIGNMENT SALE Saturday, November 24, 2007 • 10 am TRACTORS: AC 6080 w C.H.A. motor rebuilt, new clutch, AC WD45 w/front scraper, AC C.A. NFE, MF 1135 w C.M.P. new rear tires, MF 2805 W.C. MF 85 Gas, Case 1210 D 3ph, Case Vac W.F.E., Case 440 w/loader, 1600 Ford 4x4 D w/loader-nice, Ford Jubilie, Ford 9N., Kubota B7200 4x4 w/loader-nice, Kubota B2150 4x4 - 3ph, Farmall A w/cultv, Farmall A w/cultv stock, Farmall Cub w/cultv, Massey Harris Pony, Kioti 2552 D 3 ph, Satah s-650-G-G 3 ph, Ford 4500 w/loader, D steering problem. COMBINE: IH 1440 hydro, turbo, w/grain table approx 1200 hrs on new motor, 7720 JD hydro-4wheel drive w/218 grain table-ready to work-A/C cab. BACKHOE: Case 530 G. FORKLIFT: Princeton K-D 36 piggy back Kubota D, Spider piggy back G. REELMOWERS: (2) Jacobson dual wheel reel mowers, lgld. POWER UNIT: JD 414 w/clutch panel mounted on trlr, JD Luc 2 cyl G. TILLAGE: MF 520 14’ - IH 5’16 semi mount plow, IH 475 14’ disk notched blades IH 10’ pull type disk, Pittsburg 14’ disk, MF 3-16 3ph plow, Brillion 7’ 3ph chisel plow, JD 2-14 pt plow, IH 5 pt disk, AC 2-16 nap hitch plow, Bush hog 4-3ph pto rotary tiller. MISC: Nolts 3ph water wheel, AC 6 pt mower, Brillion 15’ crowsfoot w/carrier, JD 7000 6r 30 in planter, IH 6r 30 in cyclo air planter liqd fert, Long hard hose traveler, Water wheel 1503 mini hard hose traveler, (2) Clark 300 gal sprayers, Peque 5’ landscape rake, Howse 5-3ph mower, Woods 6’ 3ph mower, New Idea 213 3 Beater spreader, New Holland 513 spreader, Dearborne 3 ph dirt scoop, Keller 4 wheel wagon chassis, 3ph lift boom, Central tractor 8 ton funnel body wagon, John Deere 15’ gyro mower, MF grinder mixer, MW 3ph hay tedder, Zimmerman 300 gal sprayer, NH funnel body on JD chassis, JD #34 manure spreader. TRAILERS: Hudson 9 ton tandem axle trlr, Hurst 9 ton tandem axle trlr, White haul mark enclosed trlr-no title, 2007 carry-on 6-12 enclosed trlr-side door-rear ramp-gen set, 1989 Sunbird 17’ boat w/trlr, Freuhoff 43 flat trailer, Car Dolly, Beer trlr w roll up doors, 43 enclsed trlr for storage-no title. TOOLS & SHOP EQUIPMENT: Snap-On and Matco socket sets, Snap-On Crows feet, Snap-On screwdrivers, Snap-On, Matco and Williams wrench sets, Snap-On extension, Snap-On and Matco Ratchets, Proto socket set,, 3’ - 3 1/4’ 1 inch drive, Cat injector tools, porta powers, Chicago pneumatic 1’ impact gun, parts washer, tire dolley, shop press, air compressors electric and gas, gasoline welder, tire changer, many more Snap-On and Matco items not listed. LAWN, GARDEN, MISC: New Landscape pavers and bricks, Asstd new baser assembly, Riding mowers, Push mowers, 275 gal fuel tank, shop press, wheel dolly, Karcher power washer, Spartan power wash-hot/cold etc., Asstd oils, hand tools and many more items too numerous to mention. DIRECTIONS: Follow Rt. 13 S to Laurel at 1st stop light make a right onto County Seat Hwy. The block is located on the right. Large fenced in area next to Laurel Grain. A sale you do not want to miss, something for everyone. New consignments arriving daily. Consignments accepted Saturday, Nov. 17th thru Friday, Nov. 23rd, 8:30 a.m. to dark or by appt. EVERYTHING SOLD AS IS, PROMPT REMOVAL, NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCIDENTS. NO BUYERS PREMIUM.

Lee Collins Auctioneer 302-846-3936 • 302-236-0344

• 04/24/07, Roger A. Griffith, Jr. and Ashley B. Spencer to Michael R. and Susan J. Martin, Lot No. 13, Section D, Buckalew Addition to Greenwood, Town of Greenwood, subdivision, Northwest Fork Hundred, $143,500 • 03/28/07, Wilmington Trust Company, Trustee of Sara D. Parsons Morris Trust to Blades Development, LLC, parcel, Town of Blades, Broad Creek Hundred, $150,000 • 03/30/07, Chase Home Finance, LLC to Henry S. Jr. and Wanda M. Smith, Lot No. 2, Lands of Sussex Land Company, subdivision, Northwest Fork Hundred, $165,000 • 04/25/07, Harold D. Short, Heir of Laurita A. Short Rash Estate to James A. Weller, Lot A, Lands of Laurita A. Short Rash, subdivision, Cedar Creek Hundred, $167,000 • 04/25/07, Mabel E. Kelly, a/k/a Mabel E. McIntyre to Charles D. and Todd D. Perzynski, parcel, Town of Slaughter Beach, Cedar Creek Hundred, $200,000 • 04/27/07, William and Jean Rhoades to David Williamson and Lindsay Eller, Lot No. 56, Morningside Village North, subdivision, Nanticoke Hundred, $189,900 • 04/27/07, Paul A. and Kathleen Brande • 04/27/07, Delmar Homes, Inc. to John H. and Julia R. Cornell-Ferris, parcel, Northwest Fork Hundred, $55,000 • 04/26/07, U.S. Home Corporation to James E. Jr. and Margaret M. Chaney, Lot No. 219, Phase II, Heritage Shores, Town of Bridgeville, subdivision, Northwest Fork Hundred, $395,090 • 04/27/07, U.S. Home Corporation to Arnold J. and Michelle F. Dickler, Lot No. 418, Phase II, Heritage Shores, Town of Bridgeville, subdivision, Northwest Fork Hundred, $229,990

Building Permits • Phil A. and Lynn Riche, N/Rd. No. 588, Northwest Fork Hundred, Dwelling

w/Additions, $184,264 • Seaford Commons LLC, W/Rt. No. 13, Approx. 782’, N/Rd. No. 53, Seaford Hundred, Tenant Fit Out, $60,000 • Donald H. McGinty, S/Rt. No. 16, Lot No. 6, Northwest Fork Hundred, Dwelling w/Additions, $114,647 • Winifred N. and Carl Dale Rattelle, Corner of Filbert Street and Sussex Avenue II, Broad Creek Hundred, Pole Building, $11,390 • Victoria L. Bolden, Coverdale Acres, Lot No. 17, Nanticoke Hundred, Exterior Bedrooms, $28,800 • North State Street, Bridgeville chase, Lot No. 13, Nanticoke Hundred, Dwelling w/Additions, $163,919 • S and L Contractors, Inc., Hill-NDale, Lot No. 21, Broad Creek Hundred, Dwelling w/Additions, $90,185 • Edward J. Kaye, SE/Corner of Road No. 474, Broad Creek Hundred, Dwelling w/Additions, $80,144 • 10/30/07, Jere Lee Sr. and Hollie R. Marvel, N/Rd. No. 74, 122’, E/Rd. No. 62, Lot No. 2, Broad Creek Hundred, Det. Garage, $19,500 • Christopher and Michelle Stephan, Fleetwood Estates, Lot No. 17, Nanticoke Hundred, Att. Garage/Bedroom Addition, $23,336 • Carlton J. II and Betty M. Spicer, S/Ross Street, 227’, S/Rt. No. 13A, Seaford Hundred, Family Room/Att. Garage, $25,920 • Gerald B. and Ruth Ann Yoder, SE/Rd. No. 612, 725’, E/Rd. No. 612A, Lot No. 2, Northwest Fork Hundred, Dwelling w/Additions, $178,121 • Milford Street Associates, Inc., W/Rt. No. 13A, Parcel No. 1, Seaford Hundred, Tenant Fit Out, $400,000 • Harold K. and Colleen Lester, SW/Rd. No. 632, 3490’, N/Rd. No. 611, Nanticoke Hundred, Pole Barn, $14,400 • John Dorr, E/South Front Street, 340’ South Adams Alley, Georgetown Hundred, Dwelling w/Additions, $100,925

WE DELIVER

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PAGE 44

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Some sage advice from the ‘Guru of the Giblets’ This week, I continue to pursue the Thanksgiving theme. I would ORETTA NORR say that I’m “committed” to it but that particular word conjures up certain references to the state of insanity to which I’m driven each year at this season. I have an admiration (grudging though it may be) for those people who smilingly hustle and bustle through the holidays, decorating, buying gifts, cooking and generally thriving through all the chaos. I imagine that Rick Rodgers is utes longer. Serve immediately. one of those people. That man knows how to get through a holiday dinner. I refer to him as the Guru of Giblets and the Wizard Homemade Turkey Stock of Wattles. He’s certainly helped relieve Makes about 10 cups some of my Thanksgiving anxiety since I started following his sage advice. 3 pounds turkey wings (about 3 large Speaking of sage, Rick’s stuffing recipe wings) below is his all-time favorite. I prefer to 2 tablespoons vegetable oil bake it as a side dish but however you fix 1 medium onion, chopped (about 2 cups) it, it’s foolproof and a step above the rest. 1 medium carrot, chopped (about 1/2 cup) His stock recipe takes a bit of time to pre1 medium stalk celery with leaves, pare but can be made days in advance and chopped (about 1/2 cup) is truly worth the effort. 6 sprigs fresh parsley 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme, crumbled 1/4 teaspoon whole black peppercorns Farmhouse Herbed Stuffing 1 dried bay leaf Serves 8 (about 9 cups or enough to fill a Note: This recipe requires special 12 pound turkey) equipment, a large, flameproof roasting pan. 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter 2 medium onions, cut into 1/4-inch dice Position rack in top third of oven and (about 3 cups) preheat to 450°F. 6 stalks celery with leaves, cut into 1/4Using heavy cleaver, chop wings into inch dice (about 2 and 1/2 cups) 2-inch pieces. Spread wings in the large 1 (14-ounce) package seasoned bread roasting pan and roast, turning with tongs stuffing cubes after 20 minutes, until deeply browned, 1/3 cup fresh parsley, chopped about 45 minutes. 1 teaspoon celery salt Meanwhile, in 6-quart stockpot over 1 teaspoon dried sage, crumbled moderate heat, heat oil until hot but not 1 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed smoking. Add onion, carrot, and celery 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme, crumbled and cook, stirring occasionally, until soft, 1/4 teaspoon salt about 10 minutes. Add wings and any pan 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper juices and reduce heat to low. 1 1/4 cups hot homemade turkey stock Straddle the roasting pan across 2 burn(see recipe below)or canned turkey ers on high heat and cook until browned stock, plus 1/2 cup more if baking all bits are sizzling, about 1 minute. Add 2 of stuffing outside of turkey cups cold water and bring to boil, scraping up browned bits with flat wooden spatula or spoon. Pour liquid into pot and add In 12-inch, heavy skillet over moderate enough cold water to cover ingredients by heat, heat butter until hot but not smoking. 1 inch, about 14 cups. Stir in onion and celery, cover and cook, Raise heat to high and bring to boil, stirring occasionally, until soft, 15 to 20 skimming foam from surface. Add parsley, minutes. (Vegetables can be prepared up thyme, peppercorns and bay leaf. Reduce to 1 day ahead and refrigerated. Reheat heat to low and simmer, uncovered, 3 before continuing: In 12-inch, heavy skilhours, adding water as needed to keep let over moderately high heat, sauté, stirwings covered. ring often, until heated through, about 5 Pour stock through fine-mesh sieve into minutes.) large bowl, discarding solids. Transfer to large bowl and add stuffing If using immediately, let stand until cubes, parsley, celery salt, sage, rosemary, yellow fat rises to surface, 1 to 2 minutes, thyme, salt and pepper. Stir in 1 and 1/4 then skim off and discard fat. cups hot stock. If not using immediately, place bowl in If using to stuff turkey: Use immedilarger bowl of iced water. Let stand, ately to fill cavities and spread remainder changing ice water as it warms, until stock in baking dish as directed in recipe below. is tepid, at least 30 minutes. Cover and reIf baking entire recipe as side dish: frigerate until chilled, then scrape off and Preheat oven to 350°F and butter 3-quart discard fat. casserole or 9- by 13-inch baking dish. Stock can be made ahead and refrigerTransfer stuffing to dish and drizzle with ated in airtight container up to 2 days or 1/2 cup hot stock. Cover with aluminum frozen up to 6 months. Reheat in saucepan foil and bake until heated through, about over low heat before using for stuffing and 30 minutes. Uncover and bake until top is turkey. slightly crisp and golden, about 10 min-

L

K

The Practical Gourmet

You’ll find plenty of things to get excited about in the Seaford and Laurel Star.

Community Events Church News Health News Entertainment Sports Local Shopping and More

Please send Laurel Star Seaford Star My 1 year subscription payment is enclosed. Name______________________________ Address:____________________________ City __________ State ____Zip ________ Mail to: Morning Star, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973 or Call 302-629-9788 with Credit Card Payment

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

PAGE 45

Laurel Star Sports

Gabby Andrade- DelmarFirst team All-Conference

Kelsey Gordy- Laurel High First team All-Conference

Cody Webster- DelmarFirst team All-Conference

Shannon Wilson- DelmarFirst team All-Conference

Jared Rittenhouse- DelmarFirst team All-Conference

Megan Wilkinson- DelmarFirst team All-Conference

Katie McMahon- DelmarFirst team All-Conference

Casey Bellamy- DelmarFirst team All-Conference

Maribeth Beach- DelmarFirst team All-Conference

Denny Murray- Delmar First team All-Conference

Alison Bloodsworth- DelmarFirst team All-Conference

Lindsay Lloyd - Delmar First team All-Conference


PAGE 46

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Bulldogs win ground game over Jays, 28-7, in final regular season game By Pat Murphy The Laurel Bulldogs used their 382 yards and 74 yards passing to good advantage in a 28-7 victory over the Seaford Blue Jays at Robert Dowd Stadium on Friday, Nov. 9. The Blue Jays had a big night on offense too as they gained 260 yards on the ground. The less than capacity crowd watched in disbelief as both teams ran up and down the field at will in light rain which started in the second quarter. The Blue

Jays, with only two seniors, finished the season with a 1-9 mark while the Bulldogs improved to a final record of 5-5. Laurel senior halfback and linebacker Cody Bristow finished his high school career in a grand way as he gained 196 yards and two touchdowns on 18 carries. Bristow also had 14 tackles and a quarterback sack from his linebacker position. Seaford junior My’Keal Purnell had 188 yards rushing on 28 carries for the Blue

Continued on page 53 Delmar’s Justin Thomas runs with the ball as Woodbridge’s Doug Coppock pursues him during last Friday’s game in Delmar. The Wildcats won the annual contest, 399, to end the regular season. Photo by Mike McClure

Wildcats move to 10-0 with 39-9 win over Woodbridge, earn first round bye By Mike McClure

The Bulldogs John Whitby closes in on Seaford running back Yvens St. Phard. Whitby tackled St. Phard for a short loss on the play. Photo by Gene Bleile

The Delmar varsity football team completed its second straight undefeated regular season with a 39-9 win over Woodbridge in the annual season ending contest between the two teams last Friday night. Delmar’s defense held the Raiders to three plays and out in the opening possession of the game. The Wildcats’ offense started with the ball on the Woodbridge 39 with Tevin Jackson scoring on a 37-

yard touchdown run with 9:53 left in the first quarter. Delmar’s Justin Thomas dropped the Raiders’ Jorge Young for a one-yard loss and Woodbridge was forced to punt once again. Jackson had a 34-yard run before Thomas ran it in from 32 yards out to make the score 12-0 with 6:54 left in the opening quarter. The Raiders started their next possession at midfield and moved the ball into

Continued on page 53

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

PAGE 47

A PLANNED RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITY

Introducing

Delmar’s Alison Bloodsworth, Haley Keenan, and Mallory Elliott wait for the ball to be put in play on a penalty corner during last week’s state tournament game in Delmar. Photo by Mike McClure

Delmar field hockey tops Milford, falls to Sussex Tech in quarterfinals By Mike McClure The Delmar varsity field hockey team scored a late game goal to defeat Milford, 1-0, in the opening round of the state tournament last Wednesday. The Wildcats netted the first goal of last Saturday’s game quarterfinal game against Sussex Tech, but the Ravens netted a pair of goals for the 2-1 win. On Wednesday, Delmar held a 6-2 advantage in penalty corners but Milford had a 2-0 edge in shots in the first half. Mallory Elliott scored the game’s only game with 4:35 left in the game for the win. The Wildcats held a 10-5 advantage in shots and a 16-5 advantage in corners. Shannon Wilson recorded a pair of saves in Delmar’s victory. “We came out and we came down and we had opportunities. Milford had a very nice game plan today,” Delmar head coach Linda Budd said following the win. “Sometimes it’s hard when you’ve played a team and have beaten them.” Delmar faced another Henlopen South foe on Saturday night in Dover in the state quarterfinals. Alison Bloodsworth scored the first goal of the contest with 9:45 left in the

Delmar senior defender Haley Keenan puts the ball in play during last Wednesday’s state tournament game. The Wildcats topped Milford, 1-0, in the home playoff game. Photo by Mike McClure

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Scott A. Venables Cell (302) 559-2333 Business (32) 629-5575 Toll Free (800) 221-5575 Fax (302) 629-5573 Delmar’s Lauren Massey looks to pass to a teammate as the Delmar crowd looks on during a home win over Milford in the first round of the state field hockey tournament last week. The Wildcats fell to Sussex Tech in the semifinals. Photo by Mike McClure

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PAGE 48

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Laurel Stars of the Week

Male Co-Athlete of the WeekJared Rittenhouse- Delmar

Male Co-Athlete of the Week-Cody Bristow- Laurel

Delmar’s Jared Rittenhouse capped a solid senior season with his play in the Laurel senior Cody Bristow paced Wildcats’ 2-1 loss to Dover in the state the Bulldogs on both sides of the ball in tournament last Tuesday. Rittenhouse, a a win over Seaford last week. Bristow first team all-conference goalie, made a ran for 196 yards and two touchdowns number of nice plays at sweeper before on 18 carries and also recorded a team moving to offense at the end of the high 14 tackles with one sack. game. Honorable mention- - Mallory Elliott- Delmar; Alison Bloodsworth- Delmar; Sara Adams- Sussex Tech; Ellen Rowe Sussex Tech; Caitlin Stone- Sussex Tech; Frank VanGessel- Delmar; Zach Bettes- Delmar; Cody Webster- Delmar; Sean Scovell- Delmar; Tevin Jackson- Delmar; Kerry King- Delmar; Billy Cropper- Delmar; Matt Campbell- Delmar; Justin Thomas- Delmar; David Albert- Laurel; Alex HawesLaurel; Rodney Grant- Laurel; Josh Kosiorowski- Laurel; Tony Rubino- Laurel; Blake Hare- Laurel; David Ricksecker- Sussex Tech; Geoffrey Morton- Sussex Tech

CONGRATULATES THE ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

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SOCCER PLAYOFFS- Shown (clockwise from top) are scenes from the Delmar varsity soccer team’s 2-1 loss to Dover in the state tournament: Delmar senior Andy Spindler, left, boots the ball downfield; Delmar’s Frank VanGessel, who netted his team’s lone goal is shown defending against a Dover player; and Delmar’s Cory Phillips looks to move the ball up field during last Tuesday’s state tournament game at Cape Henlopen. Photos by Mike McClure

Laurel Pop Warner Pee Wee advances to championship game

Shown (l to r) are the Delmar varsity football seniors who were at the Kiwanis Club banquet on Monday: front- Billy Cropper and Matt Campbell; second row- Kerry King, Justin Thomas, Taylor Ballard, Joe Pete, Sean Stehl, Craig Thompson; back row- Jeremy Layton, Kevin Robles, and David Smith. Photo by Mike McClure

Delmar Youth League basketball signups taking place Nov. 17 Signups for the 2007-2008 Delmar Youth League Basketball season, for boys ages 7-12 and girls ages 7-13, will be held on Saturday, November 17 from 10 a.m. to noon at the north entrance of Delmar High School by the gym. The cost is $20 per child or $40 for a family. Children must be residents of the Delmar School District. Any questions please call Odell Jones Jr., president of Delmar Youth League Basketball, at 410251-6570 (cell) or 302-846-9544 ext. 141 (work).

The Laurel Pop Warner Pee Wee Bulldogs will play in the Henlopen Conference championship game against Harrington on Sunday Nov. 18 at 1 p.m. at Sussex Tech High School. The little Bulldogs defeated the Smyrna Eagles 34-0 at home on Saturday with a 27 point second half outburst. The Bulldog defense scored first when Tarez White ran 58 yards for the first score of the ball game. The defense allowed Smyrna only 49 total yards. Leading the way on defense was Daylin McCausland with eight tackles and Jacob Carney with six tackles. The Bulldogs also caused five turnovers. The Bulldogs had seven players with at least four tackles each. The defense is as follows ends: Jeron Tull and Ryan Koesters; tackles: Jacob Carney and Devin Burke; nose guard: Cole Gullett; linebackers: Dylan Bunner, Devin Collins and Daylin McCausland; corners: Bryce Bristow and Tarez White; safety: Caine Collins. White’s touchdown run came on a fumble recovery return. Bryce Bristow completed a pass to Tull for the extra point to make it 7-0 at the half. In the third quarter, Christian Ellsworth scored on an eight-yard run and Brent Marine had a 35-yard touchdown run before Bristow completed an extra point pass to Devin Collins. Marine also ran 36 yards for a touchdown before running in the extra point to start the scoring in the fourth quarter. Caine Collins added a 45-yard interception return for a touchdown and Johnny McGinnis ran in the extra point for the 34-0 win. Marine had six carries for 77 yards and Ellsworth carried the ball six times for 60 yards. Laurel, seeded first, defeated sixth seeded Harrington, 26-21, in the first game of the season.

Laurel’s Kelsy Gordy named first team Henlopen All-Conference Laurel senior defender Kelsy Gordy was recently named first team all-conference for her solid play for the Bulldog field hockey team this Fall. Gordy’s name was mistakenly left off the Henlopen All-Conference list which ran in last week’s paper.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

PAGE 49

Delmar Sports Scene By Tommy Young When the over flow crowd began to leave Nunvar Stadium last Friday night and the scoreboard read Delmar 39Woodbridge 9, the fall schedule for all Wildcat sports’ teams had come to an end as the field hockey and soccer teams had completed their regular schedule over a week ago, and the Delmar fans could not have asked for much better results. The field hockey team had gone undefeated, won the Henlopen South title, and was ranked second in the state. The soccer team won 11 games for the first time in several years and was ranked eighth in the state. The football team had just completed its second straight undefeated season giving them their second straight Henlopen South title, and all three teams made the playoffs. And now the bad news, the field hockey and the soccer teams have been eliminated both in hard fought, close games. The boys, playing without one of their top scorers, Denny Murray, because of too many yellow flags in the final game, dropped a 2-1 decision to Dover as Frank Van Gessel, the other half of the scoring duo all year, notched the only goal for Delmar. Meanwhile, the field hockey team won their opener 1-0 over Milford on a goal by Mallory Elliott. But in the quarterfinals, they dropped a 2-1 decision to Sussex Tech as Alison Bloodsworth scored the only goal for the Wildcats. A final thought about this team, I know the players who do the scoring get most of the ink, but this team’s defense was outstanding all year, and while I cannot mention them all, the Delmar goalie, Shannon Wilson, had a great season and was the backbone of this group. Also kudos go to the winningest lady coach in Delmar High School sports, Linda Budd, and her coaching staff for another job well done. Then there is David Hearn, the winningest male coach in Wildcat sports’ history (remember he does baseball too) and his coaching staff who have been with him through the good times and the few bad times. And now, I guess we will have to depend on this group to inspire this good football team through the playoffs and to another State title. It’s a large order, but I know this group can handle it. Because Caravel and Delmar finished first and second in the state as far as state rankings are concerned, they both

received byes in the first round of the playoffs. That is good news for the Wildcats as they have a couple of players dinged up, and this will give them another week to get better. ASSISTS AND ERRORS- Not a word was mentioned in any of the daily papers about the Friday night game, so here is a bird’s eye sketch of what happened. Woodbridge received the opening kickoff and went three and out. Delmar took over on their own 39 and Tevin Jackson took it in from 36-yards out for the first Delmar score. Woodbridge was three and out on the next series, and Delmar took over on their own 33, and Campbell and the same set of backs ran the ball down to the six-yard line where Thomas scored. Woodbridge managed one first down on its next offensive series and Delmar took over on its own 27-yard line. Jackson scampered for 50 yards, and Campbell completed two passes to Kerry King, the last one for a touchdown. The kick was good-19-0, and the first quarter ended. Campbell ran for 70 yards and Jackson scored on the next play. The kick was good-26-0. Delmar kicked to Woodbridge’s 45, and they drove to Delmar’s 25 where they were stopped, and their kicker banged one through for a 35-yard field goal-Delmar 26-Woodbridge 3. Delmar received the ball on its own 26; Thomas ran for 45 yards and Campbell ran it for a touchdown. David Smith kicked his third straight extra point-Delmar 33-Woodbridge 3 at halftime. At the beginning of the third quarter, Coach Hearn left his first team in for one series as he always does, and Campbell ran it in from 33-yards out and finally got a touchdown he could keep. The kick was not good-Delmar 39Woodbridge 3. Then the Delmar reserves took over and did not score but looked pretty good. Woodbridge scored on a long pass to make the final score 39-9 as they tried to run in the extra point, and it failed. The Delmar and Bridgeville Kiwanis trophy dinner to honor senior football players and coaches from both schools was held Monday night at the Delmar VFW. There will be more about that and the soccer team and coaches next week.

WILDCATS- Shown (clockwise from top) are scenes from the Delmar field hockey team’s state tourney win over Milford: Milford’s Marcy McKee and Delmar’s Alison Bloodsworth, right, fight for the ball during last Wednesday’s game; Hali Ramey is all smiles after a Delmar goal, and Shannon Wilson mans the nets during a 1-0 win. Photos by Mike McClure

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GANG TACKLESeaford halfback My’Keal Purnell fights for tough yardage against the Bulldog defense last Friday. Purnell picked up three yards on the play. Photo by Gene Bleile

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Register by November 20th


PAGE 50

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Laurel/Seaford Star sports predictions: week 11

Raven Roundup: Tech field hockey team nets two playoff wins

College football- University of Delaware at Villanova- University of Delaware 31-20 Penn State at Michigan State- Penn State 28-14 NFL- Cleveland at Baltimore- Cleveland 28-10- Baltimore only put up seven points against Cincy last week. Since Cincy’s defense is one of the worst in the NFL, Baltimore might want to make some changes on offense. Miami at Philadelphia- Philadelphia 21-10- Will, it looks like Philly will finally make it to the .500 mark. It won’t last long though because Philly goes to New England next week. Washington at Dallas- Dallas 31-17 Daniel RichardsonHigh school playoffs- field hockey- Sussex Tech vs. Brandy- 9-0 last week, 65-28wine- Sussex Tech 3-2 1 overall Football- Indian River vs. Concord- Indian River 28-27

By Mike McClure

College football- University of Delaware at Villanova- University of Delaware 35-24- Here’s another game where the Hens have less local players than their opponents, but Nova doesn’t have enough fire power to pull off the upset. Penn State at Michigan State- Penn State 31-17 NFL- Cleveland at Baltimore- Cleveland 24-10 Miami at Philadelphia- Philadelphia 28-10 Washington at Dallas- Dallas 42-21- I guess a late down is possible for the Cowboys, but not against the Redskins who are coming off an embarrassing showing against the Eagles. High school playoffs- field hockey- Sussex Tech vs. Brandy- Mike McClure- 8-1 last week, 65-28-1 wine- Sussex Tech 2-1 overall Football- Indian River vs. Concord- Concord 28-17 College football- University of Delaware at Villanova- University of Delaware 47-31- Delaware is a force this year. Villanova doesn’t stand a chance. Penn State at Michigan State- Penn State 27-17 NFL- Cleveland at Baltimore- Baltimore 17-14 Miami at Philadelphia- Philadelphia 31-21- Philly usually plays well against under matched opponents. Washington at Dallas- Washington 28-27- This is the part of the season where Dallas will disappoint its fans. High school playoffs- field hockey- Sussex Tech vs. Brandywine- Sussex Tech 3-1- Tech is the Cinderella story after beating Jesse Piquette- 7-2 Delmar last week. Football- Indian River vs. Concord- Concord 27-20- Indian last week, 59-34-1 River has surprised some teams this season, but Concord is well overall grounded and will keep IR on its heels Sports editor’s note: Send your week 12 predictions to sports editor Mike McClure at sports@mspublications.com or 302-629-9243 (f) by Thursday, Nov. 29 at 5 p.m. Please include your name and phone number. Week 12 games- College football- Florida State at Florida, Virginia Tech at Virginia, Alabama at Auburn; NFL- Washington at Tampa Bay, Baltimore at San Diego, Philadelphia at New England; High school playoffs- football- Delmar home vs. TBA, Sussex Central home vs. TBA

Become a “Star Swami”, send in your week 12 picks.

The Lady Ravens advanced to the state semifinals with a 2-1 win over previously unbeaten Delmar last Saturday after a 1-0 victory over Cape Henlopen last Wednesday. Rebecca McMillan scored on a feed from Maxine Fluharty to knot the score at 1-1 on Saturday. Fluharty found Sara Adams with 3:53 left in the game for the game-winning goal. Sussex Tech goalie Caitlin Stone made six saves in the win. Ellen Rowe scored a second half goal for the only score in the Ravens’ 1-0 win over Cape Henlopen on Wednesday. Stone had 19 saves while Cape Henlopen held a 19-2 advantage in shots. The Ravens are scheduled to face Brandywine, which beat William Penn, 3-2, in the quarterfinals on Saturday, in the semifinals. The championship game will take place on Saturday. See next week’s Star for more on the Ravens. Ricksecker places seventh in state- Sussex Tech senior David Ricksecker placed seventh in the Division I state cross country meet with a time of 16:39 last Saturday. Ricksecker finished first in the Henlopen Conference meet.

RAVEN SOCCER TEAM- Sussex Tech’s Wyatt Spellman, left, looks to move the ball during his team’s loss to Indian River in state tournament play last Tuesday. Evan Lee goes for the ball during the contest with the Indians which was played at Cape Henlopen. Photos by Mike McClure

Gaull caps third field hockey season at Washington College Washington College junior attack Candace Gaull of Laurel concluded her third season with the Washington College field hockey team. She played and started in all 17 games for the Shorewomen in 2007. Gaull registered team-highs with 11 goals and 29 points. She was second on the team in assists with seven. Candace tallied three goals in a 4-2 win at Marywood on September 23 and had one goal and three assists in a 7-0 triumph over Bryn Mawr on October 25. Gaull earned Centennial Conference Offensive Player of the Week on September 24. She has played in 49 career games for Washington College, tallying 12 goals and eight assists for 32 points. Gaull was named to the Centennial Academic Honor Roll for the second time for her achievements in the classroom. To be named to the Academic Honor Roll, a student-athlete must be a sophomore, junior or senior; a starter or key reserve on his or her team; and carry at least a 3.40 cumulative grade-point average.

Rekitzke named second team all-conference as goalkeeper The York College field hockey team placed three student-athletes on the 2007 edition of the All-Capital Athletic Conference squad. Junior forward April McFarland (Eastern York), junior midfielder Casey Knauss (Easton), and sophomore goalkeeper Claire Rekitzke (Seaford) each earned second team honors for their efforts during the season. Rekitzke backed up a stellar 2006 freshman campaign with her first All-CAC selection in her second season in the green and white. Rekitzke played 1423:41 of York’s 1485:58 drawing starts in 19 of 21 contests. She posted a .709 save percentage en route to setting York’s single season save record with 161 stops. “Claire is one of the strongest goalkeepers not only in our conference but also in Division III field hockey,” York head coach Megan Eckenrode said. Pictured (l to r) is the Jets U8 NYSA soccer team which plays in Seaford: frontcoach Matt Gaskill, Austin Cave, coach Keith Trivits; second row- Mackenzley Gaskill, Riley Wagner, Cameron Mollohar, Antonio Ambrosiro; back- sponsors Marco and Franco Ambrosiro of Brothers Pizza of Laurel. Antonio Ambrosiro led the team with 28 goals. Photo by Pat Murphy

NYSA youth soccer results: November 3rd game Lions 6, Bulldogs 3- Shai Mears and James Hill each had three goals for the Lions. Jacob Adkins, Corey Mitchell and Josh netted one goal each for the Bulldogs.


PAGE 50

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Laurel/Seaford Star sports predictions: week 11

Raven Roundup: Tech field hockey team nets two playoff wins

College football- University of Delaware at Villanova- University of Delaware 31-20 Penn State at Michigan State- Penn State 28-14 NFL- Cleveland at Baltimore- Cleveland 28-10- Baltimore only put up seven points against Cincy last week. Since Cincy’s defense is one of the worst in the NFL, Baltimore might want to make some changes on offense. Miami at Philadelphia- Philadelphia 21-10- Well, it looks like Philly will finally make it to the .500 mark. It won’t last long though because Philly goes to New England next week. Washington at Dallas- Dallas 31-17 Daniel RichardsonHigh school playoffs- field hockey- Sussex Tech vs. Brandy- 9-0 last week, 65-28wine- Sussex Tech 3-2 1 overall Football- Indian River vs. Concord- Indian River 28-27

By Mike McClure

College football- University of Delaware at Villanova- University of Delaware 35-24- Here’s another game where the Hens have less local players than their opponents, but Nova doesn’t have enough fire power to pull off the upset. Penn State at Michigan State- Penn State 31-17 NFL- Cleveland at Baltimore- Cleveland 24-10 Miami at Philadelphia- Philadelphia 28-10 Washington at Dallas- Dallas 42-21- I guess a late down is possible for the Cowboys, but not against the Redskins who are coming off an embarrassing showing against the Eagles. High school playoffs- field hockey- Sussex Tech vs. Brandy- Mike McClure- 8-1 last week, 65-28-1 wine- Sussex Tech 2-1 overall Football- Indian River vs. Concord- Concord 28-17 College football- University of Delaware at Villanova- University of Delaware 47-31- Delaware is a force this year. Villanova doesn’t stand a chance. Penn State at Michigan State- Penn State 27-17 NFL- Cleveland at Baltimore- Baltimore 17-14 Miami at Philadelphia- Philadelphia 31-21- Philly usually plays well against under matched opponents. Washington at Dallas- Washington 28-27- This is the part of the season where Dallas will disappoint its fans. High school playoffs- field hockey- Sussex Tech vs. Brandywine- Sussex Tech 3-1- Tech is the Cinderella story after beating Jesse Piquette- 7-2 Delmar last week. Football- Indian River vs. Concord- Concord 27-20- Indian last week, 59-34-1 River has surprised some teams this season, but Concord is well overall grounded and will keep IR on its heels Sports editor’s note: Send your week 12 predictions to sports editor Mike McClure at sports@mspublications.com or 302-629-9243 (f) by Thursday, Nov. 29 at 5 p.m. Please include your name and phone number. Week 12 games- College football- Florida State at Florida, Virginia Tech at Virginia, Alabama at Auburn; NFL- Washington at Tampa Bay, Baltimore at San Diego, Philadelphia at New England; High school playoffs- football- Delmar home vs. TBA, Sussex Central home vs. TBA

Become a “Star Swami”, send in your week 12 picks.

The Lady Ravens advanced to the state semifinals with a 2-1 win over previously unbeaten Delmar last Saturday after a 1-0 victory over Cape Henlopen last Wednesday. Rebecca McMillan scored on a feed from Maxine Fluharty to knot the score at 1-1 on Saturday. Fluharty found Sara Adams with 3:53 left in the game for the game-winning goal. Sussex Tech goalie Caitlin Stone made six saves in the win. Ellen Rowe scored a second half goal for the only score in the Ravens’ 1-0 win over Cape Henlopen on Wednesday. Stone had 19 saves while Cape Henlopen held a 19-2 advantage in shots. The Ravens are scheduled to face Brandywine, which beat William Penn, 3-2, in the quarterfinals on Saturday, in the semifinals. The championship game will take place on Saturday. See next week’s Star for more on the Ravens. Ricksecker places seventh in state- Sussex Tech senior David Ricksecker placed seventh in the Division I state cross country meet with a time of 16:39 last Saturday. Ricksecker finished first in the Henlopen Conference meet.

RAVEN SOCCER TEAM- Sussex Tech’s Wyatt Spellman, left, looks to move the ball during his team’s loss to Indian River in state tournament play last Tuesday. Evan Lee goes for the ball during the contest with the Indians which was played at Cape Henlopen. Photos by Mike McClure

Gaull caps third field hockey season at Washington College Washington College junior attack Candace Gaull of Laurel concluded her third season with the Washington College field hockey team. She played and started in all 17 games for the Shorewomen in 2007. Gaull registered team-highs with 11 goals and 29 points. She was second on the team in assists with seven. Candace tallied three goals in a 4-2 win at Marywood on September 23 and had one goal and three assists in a 7-0 triumph over Bryn Mawr on October 25. Gaull earned Centennial Conference Offensive Player of the Week on September 24. She has played in 49 career games for Washington College, tallying 12 goals and eight assists for 32 points. Gaull was named to the Centennial Academic Honor Roll for the second time for her achievements in the classroom. To be named to the Academic Honor Roll, a student-athlete must be a sophomore, junior or senior; a starter or key reserve on his or her team; and carry at least a 3.40 cumulative grade-point average.

Rekitzke named second team all-conference as goalkeeper The York College field hockey team placed three student-athletes on the 2007 edition of the All-Capital Athletic Conference squad. Junior forward April McFarland (Eastern York), junior midfielder Casey Knauss (Easton), and sophomore goalkeeper Claire Rekitzke (Seaford) each earned second team honors for their efforts during the season. Rekitzke backed up a stellar 2006 freshman campaign with her first All-CAC selection in her second season in the green and white. Rekitzke played 1423:41 of York’s 1485:58 drawing starts in 19 of 21 contests. She posted a .709 save percentage en route to setting York’s single season save record with 161 stops. “Claire is one of the strongest goalkeepers not only in our conference but also in Division III field hockey,” York head coach Megan Eckenrode said. Pictured (l to r) is the Jets U8 NYSA soccer team which plays in Seaford: frontcoach Matt Gaskill, Austin Cave, coach Keith Trivits; second row- Mackenzley Gaskill, Riley Wagner, Cameron Mollohar, Antonio Ambrosiro; back- sponsors Marco and Franco Ambrosiro of Brothers Pizza of Laurel. Antonio Ambrosiro led the team with 28 goals. Photo by Pat Murphy

NYSA youth soccer results: November 3rd game Lions 6, Bulldogs 3- Shai Mears and James Hill each had three goals for the Lions. Jacob Adkins, Corey Mitchell and Josh netted one goal each for the Bulldogs.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Maxine Fluharty- Tech First team All-Conference

Caitlin Stone- Sussex Tech First team All-Conference

Ariel Espinoza- Sussex Tech First team All-Conference

Lindsay Danz- Sussex Tech First team All-Conference

PAGE 51

Jara Pugh- Sussex Tech First team All-Conference

Ellen Rowe- Sussex TechFirst team All-Conference

Nathan Zanks Sussex TechFirst team All-Conference

HERE COMES THE PASS- Quarterback Lewis Dexter looks to pass the ball during a Seaford Department of Recreation men’s flag football game last Sunday. Photo by David Elliott

All-conference photos and design by Mike McClure

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PAGE 52

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Shawn Phillips perseveres in pursuit of pro baseball career By Mike McClure Shawn Phillips has witnessed first hand how professional baseball is as much of a business as it is a game. The 2000 Laurel High graduate played one season in the Texas Rangers’ organization before being released after sustaining an injury. Phillips, who was drafted by the Rangers in 2004, fought his way back following Tommy John surgery and pitched for two different teams in the independent Frontier League before finally getting a chance to sign with a major league organization following a strong season in the Frontier League last summer. The hard work paid off for Phillips, who is currently working at the Laurel Intermediate School. Phillips recently signed a contract with the Florida Marlins and will report to Jupiter, Fla., in March. “I’ve been waiting a long time to get my foot back in the door,” said Phillips, who will turn 25 in December. “I don’t know what else I could do because this summer was one of the best years I’ve ever had.” Phillips posted a 10-4 record with a 2.40 ERA for the Windy City ThundeBolts over the summer. He also struck out 120 batters and walked just 15 in 144.1 innings during the regular season. That effort, and the contacts he made while playing for the 2007 Frontier League champions, earned him another opportunity to play for a Major League organization. Phillps’ summer manager Andy Haines signed as a hitting instructor with the Marlins following a successful season with the ThunderBolts. He mentioned Shawn’s named to a Marlins scout and told Shawn to call him. Following a 15 to 20 minute conversation the scout offered Phillips a contract and invited him to spring training. Phillips thought the offer over for five minutes and called the scout back and accepted it. Phillips’ signing was announced that night at the Laurel varsity football game (against Delmar). Playing in the Frontier League allowed Phillips to show that he had returned to his old form and that he could pitch for an entire season. He also had an opportunity to improve on his fast ball and learn one or two pitches from pitching coach Benden Sargara, a part-time scout with

Bulldogs fall in Eastern Regionals The 2007 Laurel Pop Warner “Midget” Bulldogs fell short in the second round of the Eastern Regional Tournament last Sunday in Brick, New Jersey. The Bulldogs fell, 30-22, against the Asbury Park Blue Bishops. The Bulldogs ended their season for the second straight year in thesecond round of the regional tournament. Photos from this game will appear in next week’s Laurel Star.

Seaford Bowling Lanes Young Adults High games and series Justin Sherman 241, 670 Cassie Wooters 232 Nicole Marciano 603

Friday Trios High games and series Hakaim Comegeys 292 Tony Johnson 686 Marcy Robbins 247, 665

Star High games and series Matthew Zoller 238 Robert Bay 660

Rachel Loose Shelby Causey

226 226, 646

Baby Blue Jays High games and series Nolan Lamonlagne 164 Zachary Carey 292 Dallas Slavin 171, 326

Mardel ABC

Doris Barron Dot Dullis

261 713

Tuesday Early Mixed High games and series J. Stanley Howell 253, 709 Sandie Weldon 244 Nancy Blockers 678

High games and series Jesse Evaristo, Jr. 288, 779

Eastern Shore Men

Wed. AM Mixed

High games and series David Spicers 280 Bryan Bennett 757

High games and series Mark Benson 295, 738

Club 50 High games and series Harold Sheets 283, 778 Jane Wilson 271, 721

Tuesday AM Mixed High games and series Mike Baker 258 Pam Good 238, 621

Nite Owl High games and series Carl E. Johnson 287 Rich Smith 750

Laurel graduate Shawn Phillips

the New York Mets. “It (Frontier League) was just like professional ball. There were a lot of young guys who were hungry to get back into pro ball and a lot of young guys looking to get into pro ball,” Phillips said. Phillips was drafted by the Rangers in 2004. He went 6-1 with a 3.93 ERA and 53 strikeouts and eight walks in 71 innings for Spokane of the short season Northwest League. But Phillips suffered an arm injury and was let go during spring training the following year. “They told me it was nothing I did wrong. It was an investment and I wasn’t contributing,” said Phillips. Phillips had Tommy John surgery two years ago and is now at 100 percent. The former Delaware State University standout has not seen a jump in the velocity of his pitches, but he has returned to his old form. “When I first got my surgery and they released me I said ‘I’m going to give it another shot’,” Phillips said. He gave himself two years to get back. Shawn pitched in the Frontier League in 2006, pitching just 20 innings. This year he pitched over 100 innings. “The big thing I did this year is I stayed healthy. I didn’t miss a start,” said Phillips. “If it (signing with a pro team) didn’t happen me and my dad would have to see what else is out there. I don’t know if it was time to move on. I guess it was God’s way of putting me in that situation. I just kept on and kept on and I guess it

TROPHY PRESENTATION- Woodbridge varsity football coach John Parker, left, presents the trophy to Delmar head coach David Hearn during the annual Kiwanis dinner which took place in Delmar on Monday. Photo by Mike McClure

paid off.” Shawn reports to spring training on March 1. The Marlins’ scout made no promises, but Phillips will be given an opportunity to make a low A or high A team. If Phillips plays for the low A team in Greensboro, N.C. he would get a chance to come home and pitch in Salisbury against the Delmarva Shorebirds. He pitched at the Shorebirds home field when he was in high school, but this would be the first time playing for a professional team on the east coast. “That would be a good thing. That would be my dream to go there and play against them,” Phillips said. “That would be the best thing that I could dream about.” Phillips has received a lot of support from his family and the Laurel community during his career. He also has a number of well wishers at Laurel Intermediate School where he does in school suspension. “Being in a small town everybody knows pretty much everything,” said Phillips. “When they (the school’s staff

and students) heard they were happier than I was. It was overwhelming, all the kids are excited.” In addition to his part-time job in the Laurel School District, Shawn has served as a coach with the Laurel Pop Warner Pee Wee team. He has also volunteered his time to coach boys basketball at Laurel Middle School and varsity baseball at his alma mater. Phillips says working with the area’s youth takes him back to his younger years. He wants the kids he works with to see that they can make something of their lives. “I just like being around kids. I just want to take the younger kids and show them you can make it. I want to put the kids on the right track,” Phillips said. Phillips is glad to get another chance to make play in a major league organization, but he is trying not to get too excited because he knows how the business of baseball works. “This could be my last shot and I don’t want to let it slip by. I want to give it my best in spring training,” said Phillips.

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Seaford-Laurel continued Jays. After trading possessions a couple times to start the contest, the Bulldog defense stopped Purnell on consecutive plays midway through the first quarter. Alex Hawes and Tony Rubino stopped Purnell on third down and Rubino and Rashawn Felder stopped the Seaford workhorse on fourth and inches. Laurel’s David Albert made an acrobatic catch of a Lance Kelley pass on the Seaford 25 yard line. Bristow took the ball to the 16 yard line and junior Blake Hare bounced off tacklers to score at the 2:57 mark of the first quarter. Kyle Brown’s kick was good to give the Bulldogs a 7-0 lead. Hare also had a big game for the Bulldogs as he gained 122 yards on 17 carries. He also had six tackles. On Seaford’s last series of the first quarter, the Blue Jays reached the Laurel four yard line before being stopped by a host of Laurel tacklers as the quarter ended. The drive featured runs by Purnell and Vincent Glover, a sophomore running back who was converted to wing back two days before the game. The Bulldogs started their best drive of the game on the next series, starting from their four yard line. Bristow gained six yards, Hare ran for six yards before catching a pass on the 31, and Laurel’s “Mr. Clutch” David Albert caught a pass on the 49 while on the seat of his pants. Moments later Josh Kosiorowski carried the ball to the Seaford six yard line on a reverse and Albert caught another pass in the end zone for the score at the 8:43 mark. Brown’s kick made it 14-0. On Laurel’s kickoff, Glover took the

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007 ball across the field and raced 88 yards Delmar-Woodbridge continued for a Seaford touchdown. Spencer CoulWildcat territory on an eight-yard run by bourn’s kick made it 14-7. Seaford conYoung and a 15-yard pass from Austin Pettinued to make a game of it as Robbie ty to Greg Seay before kicking the ball Payne intercepted Kelley’s pass on the back to Delmar. Bulldogs’ 38 yard line. Woodbridge’s Trez Kane, T.J. Jefferson After several defensive plays by Lauand Young combined to sack Campbell on rel’s John Whitby and Bristow and a great the Wildcats’ next possession before Jackdefensive play by Rodney Grant, the son scampered for 50 yards out. Jackson Bulldogs had the ball back. Payne proved had a 13-yard reception and Campbell to be a “pain” to the Bulldogs all night as rolled left and fired to Kerry King who he boomed several punts into Laurel terrimade a diving catch in the end zone on tory, one while on the run following a fourth and four for a 19-yard touchdown. high snap. The first half drew to a close Delmar kicker David Smith booted the as Kelley was sacked on consecutive extra point with 1:02 left in the first to plays by the Bluejays’ Yvens St. Phard make it 19-0. and Chris Nichols. In the second quarter, Campbell rumThere was no scoring until the 4:50 bled 70 yards before Woodbridge’s Doug mark of the third quarter when the BullCoppock made a touchdown saving tackdogs scored to take a commanding 21-7 le. Thomas added a 16-yard run and Jacklead. The drive featured runs by Bristow son capped the drive with a three-yard and Hare with Bristow banging his way touchdown run followed by Smith’s extra into the end zone from 18 yards out. point (26-0 with 10:42 left in the half). Brown’s kick was again boomed though Woodbridge started its next possession the uprights. on the 45 and moved the ball downfield Defensive plays by Laurel’s Whitby, on a six-yard run by Josh Quinones, a 12Rubino, Archer, and Felder again kept the yard pass from Perry to Seay, and a sevyoung Jays off the scoreboard as the third en-yard run by Young. Reuss Idler capped quarter ended. Purnell continued to roll the drive with a 31-yard field goal to up yardage in the fourth quarter, going make it 26-3 with 5:23 remaining. over the 1,000 yard mark for the season. The Wildcats started with the ball on But Laurel’s defense continued to bend their own 26 and again moved the ball but not break. Grant, Kosiorowski, and downfield. Thomas had a 29-yard run, Hawes played a big part in the Bulldogs’ Jackson picked up 11 yards on third and defensive game in the fourth quarter. five, and Campbell scored from three The Bulldogs completed the scoring with 3:49 left in the game as Bristow for next year. We are a young team with broke through one more time for a 41one senior starting. As you know a team is yard run which resulted in a touchdown, run by senior leadership and we only had making it a 28-7 final after the kick. two during the year.” Seaford coach Marc Dickerson said, Laurel’s defense, which was again led “We are going to regroup and get ready by Bristow who has recorded 26 tackles in

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PAGE 53 yards out. Smith’s PAT gave Delmar a 333 lead with 1:22 left in the first half. Woodbridge pushed the ball into Delmar territory on an eight-yard run by Young and a 36-yard run by Quinones, but Idler missed on a 42-yard field goal attempt. Delmar was forced to punt the ball on its first possession of the second half thanks to a sack by Kane and Jordan Maddox. Delmar’s Billy Cropper dropped Quinones for a two-yard loss and King and Ballard hauled him in after a fouryard gain to help force a punt. Delmar started with the ball on its own 46 and quickly made the score 39-3 following an 11-yard run by Jeremy Layton and a 37-yard touchdown run by Campbell, who faked a pitch and spun his way into the end zone with 4:51 left in the third quarter. Woodbridge came back with a scoring drive at the beginning of the fourth quarter after Perry had a 20-yard run at the end of the third quarter. Perry picked up three yards on fourth and one from Delmar 33 before completing a 27-yard touchdown pass to Quinones, who made a leaping grab in the end zone to make the score 39-9. Jackson paced the ‘Cats with 10 carries for 170 yards and two touchdowns, Campbell ran the ball six times for 137 yards and two touchdowns, and Thomas had four carries for 90 yards and a touchdown. two games. Hawes had nine tackles, Kosiorowski added six, Hare made six tackles, and Whitby and Grant added five apiece. Kosiorowski also had six carries for 75 yards, Kelley completed four of 10 passes for 74 yards and one touchdown.

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PAGE 54

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Entertainment Possum Point Players present holiday play Possum Point Players’ holiday production, “The WPPP 1954 Christmas Special” will incorporate an old-style radio version of “Miracle on 34th Street” and additional choirs of music. This production will be presented at Possum Hall in Georgetown during the first two-weekends of December. Possums’ Ad Hoc Touring Company held open auditions to cast the roles of the radio version of “Miracle on 34th Street.” The cast includes Christian Auer, Roger Ault, Cat Baker, Claudius Bowden, Art Curley, Haley Dennis, Frank Frey, Jim Hartzell, Rick Jenkins, Beverly LaFazia, Ron Nardi, Don Norton, Paul Norton, Karol Powers-Case, George Spillane, Brode Weaver and Kate Wenner. This cast includes regular Ad Hoc members, as well as new talent to that group. Dick Rosse, a long-standing member of the Ad Hoc group, is directing this portion of the show. The Ad Hoc group tours Delmarva throughout the year, leading audiences to reminisce about all variety of classic radio programs. They have frequently provided a holiday show at Possum Hall, but last year was the first time the Ad Hoc group took a leading part of Possums’ mainstage holiday production. Audiences appreciated the unique presentation, so they were asked to do something similar this year. Beryl Martin will direct the musical

portion of the production. Christian Auer, Claudius Bowden, Alicia Dennis, Maureen Downing, Frank Frey, Jim Hartzell, John Hulse, Colleen and Rick Jenkins, Constance Johnson, Tara Jones, Beverly LaFazia, Susan McMullen, Suzy Messick, Ron Nardi, Peggy Naylor, Karol Powers-Case, Susan Shockley, Marsha Shull, Emilie Sizemore, Tiffany Straza, Kate Wenner and Melissa Willey. Some of the “WPPP Singers” were also cast as characters in “Miracle”. The name of the show “The WPPP 1954 Christmas Special” is to convey the idea of an old radio station - the fictional “WPPP” – putting on one of the Christmas classics of that time period “Miracle on 34th Street,” together with traditional holiday music that one might have heard on the radio or have gone to the radio station and became the “live studio audience.” “The WPPP 1954 Christmas Special” will be performed on Nov. 30, and December 1, 7 and 8, at 8 p.m., and on December 2 and 9 at 2 p.m. at Possum Hall in Georgetown. Tickets are $16, or $15 for Seniors or students. Call the Possum Point Players ticketline at 302-856-4560 to make reservations, request further information, or for directions to the theater. Possum Point Players is supported in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Delaware Division of the Arts.

United Way of Delaware and YWCA to hold fashion show On Saturday, Nov. 24, at 6:30 p.m., the ballroom in the Atlantic Sands Hotel of Rehoboth Beach, will be transformed to usher the first local holiday event. Look to the Light, co-chaired by Dian Stein and Michael J. Thawley, is United Way of Delaware’s Premier Fashion Show. It will benefit and raise community awareness for the United Way of Delaware and YWCA Delaware. The evening will feature a specially designed grazing menu, a fashion extravaganza, silent auction, cash bar and entertainment. Tickets may be purchased at the Atlantic Sands Hotel (302.227.2511), any of the Bad Hair Day Salon locales or the United Way of Delaware (302.573.3738). The cost is $50.00 per person.

Pictured are Dian Stein and Michael J. Thawley


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

PAGE 55

Mezzo soprano and tenor to perform in Messiah concert Mezzo soprano, Jessica Renfro and Tenor Alvaro Rodriguez are among four guest soloists singing with the Southern Delaware Choral Society and the Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra Christmas concert of the “Messiah” on Dec. 8, at 7:30 p.m. at Eagles Nest Fellowship Church, off Route One in Milton. The chorus, under the direction of John Ranney, and the symphony Orchestra, under the baton of Maestro Julien Benichou will also be joined by soloists soprano Megan McCall and baritone Matthew Osifchin. This is the first time SDCS has collaborated with the Mid Atlantic Symphony Orchestra of Towson, Md. “This promises to be a wonderful and inspiring evening,” said SDCS executive director Elizabeth Hochholzer, “We are all very excited to be singing with such a prestigious orchestra and such talented guest soloists.” This will mark the first time Rodriguez has sung with the Mid Atlantic Symphony Orchestra and the SDCS. Singing engagements this year included a Zarzuela Anthology gala with Zarzuela Di Si in Washington, DC, a French Opera gala with Opera Camerata of Washington, the role of Leandro in Sorozabal's “La tabernera del puerto” with Zarzuela Di Si, his first Rodolfo in Puccini's "La boheme" with Amici Opera in Philadelphia, another recital with Opera Camerata in a presenta-

tion at the residence of the Embassy of the Kingdom of Morocco in Washington, DC, and performances of Roberto with OTNV/Teatro de la Luna in the Spanish zarzuela “Bohemios.” Upcoming engagements for the Mallorca native tenor include the role of Edoardo in Verdi's “Un giorno di Regno” in Philadelphia, PA and Rodolfo in “La boheme” at George Mason University, Va. Ms. Renfro has been critically claimed performer in the Baltimore/ Washington opera community since her arrival in 2001. Sought out for her “winning characterizations and vivid phrasing” (Tim Smith, Baltimore Sun), she has been described as “simply marvelous” with “deliciously playful comic timing” (Mark J. Estren, The Washington Post) and a “sparkling voice” (T.L. Ponick, The Washington Times). Her opera credits include Dorabella in “CosX fan tutte,” Marcellina and Cherubino in “Le Nozze di Figaro,” Ramiro in “La finta giardiniera,” Cenerentola in “La Cenerentola,” Der Komponist in “Ariadne auf Naxos,” Nancy in “Albert Herring” and many more with such companies as Opera Vivente, Bel Cantanti Opera, Portland Opera Performing Institute, Bay Area Summer Opera Theatre Institute, and Peabody Opera Theatre. Her concert work includes Mozart’s “C Minor Mass” and “Requiem”, Bach’s “Magnificat,” Duruflé’s “Requiem,” Pergolesi’s

“Stabat Mater,” Handel’s “Messiah” and Mahler’s “Rückertlieder.” She holds a Master’s Degree and Graduate Performance Diploma in Opera from the Peabody Conservatory, where she worked with acclaimed soprano Phyllis Bryn-Julson. Her upcoming engagements this season include Romeo in “I Capuleti e i Montecchi,” and Hansel in “Hansel und Gretel” for Bel Cantanti Opera, Sarah in “Tobias and the Angel” and Diana in “Orpheus in the Underworld” for Opera

Vivente, and the Alto soloist in Handel’s Messiah with the Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra. The Southern Delaware Choral Society is supported in part by grants from the Delaware Division of the Arts, the Sussex County Council, the Freeman Foundation and the City of Lewes. Tickets are $25 for the general audience and $15 for students and are being sold at Puzzles in Lewes and Browseabout Books in Rehoboth or call 645-2013.

‘THE NUTCRACKER’ - The Eastern Shore Ballet Theater, will present the famous “Nutcracker” on Saturday, Dec. 1, at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday, Dec. 2, at 2 p.m. in the Wicomico High School Auditorium. Their artistic director, Elena Manakhova-Amy, is a graduate from the Kirov Ballet School and the Vaganova Academy in Russia.

Ticket prices are $15 for adults, $10 for students and seniors. On sale at all Peninsula Bank and Bank of Delmarva locations, the Salisbury Wicomico Arts Council, the Salisbury Studio of Dance in Fruitland and Dance Wear, etc. in the Court Plaza shopping center. For more information call Susan at 410-896-4212, or Betty at 410-742-2858.

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

People Sussex Habitat chapter has youth coordinator Seaford resident Alison Willey first heard about Habitat for Humanity when she participated in Collegiate Challenge in the spring of 2006, promoted by the Habitat Campus Chapter at the University of Delaware. She is now working as the Sussex chapter’s youth program coordinator. Willey and 15 students from the University of Delaware spent spring break in Mount Pleasant, S.C., roofing, landscaping and completing other tasks on four houses in different stages of completion. In the fall of 2006, after hearing about the Public Allies Delaware program, Willey spoke with Lisa Smith, Sussex County Habitat for Humanity’s volunteer coordinator, and Kevin Gilmore, the affiliate’s executive director. Public Allies Delaware places young adults, ages 18 to 30, in nonprofit apprenticeships throughout the community for 10-month leadership development programs. The AmeriCorps program combines full-time, paid apprenticeships in nonprofits with skills training, community-building projects personalized coaching and critical reflection. “Our affiliate has grown in both number of families served annually, the number of volunteers it attracts, and the number of homes being built,” Lisa Smith, Willey’s Habitat supervisor, said. “Be-

Alison Willey

cause of the generosity of donors and the ever-increasing number of volunteers, we knew we needed someone dedicated to reaching out to an un-tapped resource -the youth in Sussex County. Alison is the perfect fit.” Since mid-September, Willey has been focusing on the recruitment, education and coordination of young volunteers to help meet the needs of the growing organization. She is coordinating the building of a traditional Habitat house at Delmarva

Star

Newspapers

$500 Holiday Giveaway

Sign up today! Entry forms from all of the stores will be combined for a random drawing. One $250 cash prize and five $50 gift certificates will be given away. There is no cost to enter. Deadline to sign up is Friday, Dec. 14. Drawing will take place Monday, Dec.17. Winners will be announced in the Star’s Thursday, Dec. 20, edition.

Sign up at any of these locations: Bethel • Jeff’s Greenhouse Delmar • Bassett • Mike’s Clearance Laurel • Dennis N. O’Neal, Jeweler • The Hen House Seaford • Butler’s Sewing Center • Heritage Jewelers • Peebles • Barton’s Southern States • Burton Bros. Hardware • Two Cats in the Yard • Nylon Package Store Salisbury • Kuhn’s Jewelers

Christian High School in Georgetown. A school advisor and Habitat construction crew members will oversee the project and parents willing to donate their skills, time and ideas will be included. Approximately 40 students will also be involved in the entire build project. Initially, students and parents will be involved in “panelization,” which is building the walls more cost-effectively in a small space — in this case the school parking lot -- and moving and erecting them on a Habitat build site. Construction training for students at the school will begin in December and building will commence for three weeks in late January as part of the students’ community service. Another project, Collegiate Challenge, Habitat International’s alternative spring break, is planned for early March. The Georgetown affiliate will host up to 30 college student volunteers for the weeks of March 2-8 and March 9-15. The students will be housed at a local church. Willey is seeking volunteers to provide lunches while the students are building and is planning educational and social activities for the evenings. For details about Sussex County Habitat Youth Programs, contact Willey, 8551153, or alison@sussexcountyhabitat.org.

KADEN TULL BAPTIZED - Kaden Michael Earl Tull was baptized on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2007, at Centenary United Methodist Church in Laurel. A luncheon in his honor was given by his mother, Ashley M. Tull, directly after the service. Many family members and close friends attended both the service and luncheon.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

PAGE 57

Laurel could have become a sought-after destination When I received the call from local businessman David G. Horsey to RANK ALIO come to his home for an update on the Discovery Place project, my gut Big time investors, east, west, feeling was the game was over. David, a classmate and long-time north and south, who don’t friend, had kept me informed of the ups and downs of the project since it throw away money, were was introduced. When things began going south, standing in line for shared he promised me an exclusive story when he threw in the towel and that interest in the project. he would issue an official statement when the story broke. That story is in David was rude, unfair, and uncalled for durthis week’s issue. ing the hearing process. I imagine when this issue reaches the A hope for Laurel existed with the Horsey public the phones will be ringing off the project, including 6,000 to 7,000 jobs from a hook from other media sources. I thank him $500 million project which would pump for giving this little paper and writer a oncemoney into a local dying economy, making in-a-lifetime chance to get the ‘scoop.’ Laurel a major hub for sporting events and The news that the Discovery project was shopping. Laurel would become a destinaover was not what I wanted to hear. David’s tion, not just a place to drive through. comments that followed and his determinaYes, it was a mammoth undertaking, to tion to salvage the remaining land and develmany unbelievable. But being on the inside I op it commercially and residentially providknew the money was there. Big time ined some consolation, but not with the same vestors, east, west, north and south, who burst of enthusiasm I received when Discovdon’t throw away money, were standing in ery was announced. line for shared interest in the project. By Three years of dedication by son Robert hook or crook they would have made the to save the project from going down the project work. tubes was a great setback for the Horseys. These were business people who knew a The announcement may be seen as a vicgood thing when they saw it. tory for SCOLDM and the little guy, and Most of the people in this area understand those who believe you can fight city hall and the plight we are living with in this area, inwin. cluding SCOLDM members. It appears In the case of the SCOLDM lawsuit, this delayed banks from lending money while the whenever something comes up, it’s in somebody’s back yard. case was in court and this led to the Horseys I’m sure the members involved in the not following up on an option on a key piece lawsuit against the town will tell you they faof property (381 acres). The land was later sold to another developer. More on that later. vor growth, but not in their back yard. Who could blame them? Being a person who has worked most of I can understand the feelings of the resimy life as a local businessman and also as dents who would be most impacted by the director of Economic Development for Susproject; the claim of losing front yards with sex County, I have always tried to bring inroads being widened, something that wasn’t dustry and business to Laurel. documented because DelDot never surveyed I grew up in an era when Laurel was the the area; the increased traffic, and the noise talk of the state, the place to be. My dad’s from the sporting events. No one can argue shoe repair business along with other businesses stayed open until 10 o’clock Saturday these points. Unfortunately a project this size needs nights; the Waller Theater had people standsewer, water, and to be on a major access ing in line to view the movies. The line was road. US 13 was the perfect site, close to wrapped around Waller’s Men Store half Laurel where all of this was available. It was way down the block Friday, Saturday and bound to be in someone’s back yard. Sunday nights. If past town fathers had annexed land as It hurts to see my community look the aggressively as Seaford has done over the way it does today. It was once the wealthiest years, the Horsey project would have a place town south of Wilmington with the strongest to go. But spot housing exists all around the school system, an active Chamber of Comouter limits of the town. merce, and an over all bustling community. Look at Seaford now with road congesNone of that exists today. tion, but how many Laurel people can you David lived during those times; he wantspot shopping or eating in Seaford at any ed to do something for his home town to given time? bring some of that era back and this was his I served on the Laurel Council for eight contribution. Sure he was going to make years in the ‘60s and ‘70s. Most council money out of the project; he’s a businessmembers were satisfied with the status quo man. I think much of the abuse and criticism of of the town. There were few homes outside

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along with the jobs for our young people who must go out of town for work. The town government will lose millions in tax revenue, the school will lose thousands of needed dollars. I was disappointed they chose not to comment during the hearings, since they would have greatly been impacted. The superintendent was present at the first meeting with his brief case, but when the hearing got hot and heavy, he slipped out. Remember when Delmar was looked upon as a place not to live? Now with a top rated school system, two shopping centers across from each other, a housing boom and industry coming to the area, Delmar is the place to live. The school can’t keep up with the growth, having several expansions in recent years. The school won’t accept choice school students because of overcrowding. I applaud David and his family for their attempt at development, and I have to applaud those few but outspoken who opposed for their reasons. At least they made their voice heard. I hope people from both sides can come together and support the remainder of the Horsey project, which is to build a 200,000 square feet of retail space and moderate to medium homes. The arguments, “He’ll never fill the stores, or sell the homes, or he’s going to make a lot of money,” shouldn’t come into play. That’s his problem and his nickel, and if he puts his neck on the line he deserves a profit. The land was for sale to anyone who wanted to make an investment. No one else took the gamble. David did.

Laurel Chamber of Commerce COMMUNITY PROFILE & MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

2008 Morning Star Publications is producing a Community Profile & Membership Directory for the Laurel Chamber of Commerce. The full-color glossy magazine will showcase the Town of Laurel, past, present and future. The magazine will be a great tool for recruiting new residents and business people to the area. Copies will be distributed to Realtors and will be included in information packets sent out by the Laurel Chamber. Products and services of Laurel Chamber members will be listed.

Call 629-9788 today to be a part of this full color, glossy magazine! or email sales@ mspublications.com

Producing Agent for the month of September is Bobby Nibblett and their Top Listing Agent for the month of September is Rick Bennett.

the town limits. Development always causes problems, but the final outcome is usually positive. I believe the death of this project puts an end to any businesses of great size coming to Laurel. It doesn’t take an Einstein in the business world to know the word will be out: Laurel is not favorable to business. Other towns are standing in line for business. When I was Economic Development director for the county and when I had a client interested in this side of the county, I would invite them to visit the towns along US 13. Right off the bat they would tell me, “Not Laurel, they are anti-business.” That was 15 years ago. Those comments hurt. I thought we had passed that with the current mayor and council members who want growth. What we will become is a retirement community which is not bad if you want peace and quiet. A sign of that to come is what developer Michael Pouls is attempting to do with an estimated 700 homes for active adult communities. Housing will put more demand on Laurel’s sewer plant; more water will be needed than if the same property was devoted to commercial use. But when these older citizens move here, where do they shop, how far will they have to go for medical care, and if they can’t drive how do they get where they want to go? As someone said recently, “You can’t even buy a spool of thread in Laurel.” But since no one sews anymore, I guess that’s not a good enough reason to want business. We’ll continue to shop in Delmar, Salisbury, and Seaford for that spool of thread, money that could go into this community

Nibblett

Bennett

Payment Plans Available * Deadline Nov. 21 Publication Date: January 2008


PAGE 58

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Health Common birth myths debunked By Anthony Policastro, M.D Now that I am doing more newborn exams, I frequently get asked a question about birthmarks. It seems that some people believe that every newborn has some kind of a birthmark. While a lot of children are born with some type of spot on their skin, most newborns have no such thing. All a birthmark means is a spot present at birth. There is no requirement that every child has some kind of birthmark. There are other ideas that patients have that are not true. One of these is related to umbilical hernias. These occur when the umbilicus (belly button) sticks out on an infant. In most cases this goes away by two years of age. There are many people who think that taping a silver dollar to the umbilicus will help it to go away. Doing such makes it better in about two years. It does not change what will happen. All it does is create skin problems from the tape. Some people still think that children whose feet turn in need to wear braces at night. We did treat turned in feet like that at one time. We found that children who wore the braces had their feet turn straight by 15 -

National Hospice Month Delaware Hospice celebrates its 25th anniversary as President Bush declares November 2007 “National Hospice Month.” In a proclamation issued from the White House yesterday, hospice care professionals and volunteers were recognized for their strength and compassion “in answering a timeless call to love their neighbors as themselves.” This is the 29th consecutive year in which November has been designated as a national month honoring hospice and it is the 25th year that Delaware Hospice has been answering that timeless call. On Oct. 18, 1982, the first patient was admitted to Delaware Hospice. Thus, years of research, planning, community education, and fundraising by nurses, physicians, religious, community leaders and dedicated volunteers launched the first and still the only notfor-profit hospice organization in Delaware. The original goal of the organization was “to offer hospice care to New Castle County.” Twenty five years later, 30,000 patients and families have been served statewide and in adjacent counties of Pennsylvania. Delaware Hospice has proven to be a model of community need being met through community support, which will be demonstrated this 25th year of operation with the opening of the Delaware Hospice Center, funded with the support of the “Community Campaign to Expand Delaware Hospice.”

People get concerned when their children get a chill. They think that it will make them more prone to infection. That is only true if the chill causes a significant decrease in body temperature. 18 months. We then found out that children who did not wear braces had their feet turn out at 15 - 18 months. There was no difference. Some people think that it is a good idea to buy special shoes for babies once they begin to walk. It makes no difference what shoe a baby wears. All they need is something to protect their feet from the elements. Sneakers do that the best. The idea about feeding babies cereal to help them sleep through the night usually works only through coincidence. By the time we feed the cereal and then give the formula, the bedtime is changed. They get to sleep later so they wake up later. However, they usually sleep for the exact same number of hours.

FLU SHOT CLINIC $30 FLU SHOTS $40 PNEUMONIA SHOTS

Nov. 16, 2007 1 to 5 pm MEDICINE SHOPPE Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE Medicare part B accepted with no copay if medicare part B is the primary insurance. No credit cards accepted.

To Receive A Flu Shot You Must: • Meet a minimum age requirement. “If under 18 years of age, please see management.” • Not have any known sensitivity to any component of the influenza virus vaccine. • Not have an allergy to chicken eggs or egg products. • Not have an allergy to Thimerosal (a preservative found in some cleaning products or contact lens solution). • Not have a cold, fever or acute illness. • Not have a history of Guillain-Barré Syndrome or an active neurological disorder. • Not have had an advance reaction to another vaccine.

• Meet any CDC eligibility requirements required at the date of service.

Most newborn males in the United States get circumcised. In most other countries that is not the case. However, some people believe that newborn males have to be circumcised. It is a choice not a necessity. People get concerned when their children get a chill. They think that it will make them more prone to infection. That is only true if the chill causes a significant decrease in body temperature. That is very unlikely to happen from a brief chill. It usually requires a prolonged period of being wet and then chilled. The decreased body temperature interferes with the immune system. It makes us more likely to get sick. Ear infections in children occur in the middle ear. That is the area behind the eardrum. Some people believe that getting fluid in the ear canal causes an ear infection. Fluid in the ear canal cannot get past the eardrum. It does not cause middle ear infections. These are just a few of the common things that we have heard over the years. The stories go from person to person. However, there is usually not much to them.

DPH adopts new rapid HIV test Delaware’s Division of Public Health (DPH) announces the adoption of a new HIV rapid test for use in DPH clinics and community testing programs statewide. After evaluating several test technologies, DPH offers the Unigold Rapid HIV test which requires only a drop of blood from a finger prick to produce results in about 10 minutes. The test is offered free of charge. The Unigold test was selected because: It delivers accurate results in just 10 minutes, making it more convenient for clients and providers to fit into busy schedules. The shelf life of the product is 12 months, making ordering and supply to community providers easier. It offered a cost savings. While the previous OraQuick rapid test cost DPH $13 each, the Unigold test costs $10. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that 50 percent of all new HIV infections are passed from those who simply do not know that they are infected. HIV testing is recommended for all Delaware adults. To find the HIV testing site nearest you, visit hivtest.org and type in your ZIP code or call 800-232-4636 or the Public Health HIV Prevention Program at 302-744-1050.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

PAGE 59

Health A nutritious breakfast is beneficial, important by John Hollis

Director, Community Relations Nemours Health and Prevention Services

Lots of people skip breakfast, or grab a cup of coffee and a donut to jump start their day. It’s definitely not the best plan. Experts tell us that a nutritious and balanced breakfast is essential for energy, focus, and concentration, and possibly even for maintaining a healthy weight. While it is important for everyone to eat breakfast, it’s especially important for children and teens. Eating breakfast starts the day off right and may make kids more alert. There is also evidence suggesting that a healthy breakfast

improves problem-solving skills and creativity. And kids who eat breakROWING P EALTHY fast regularly are less likely to miss days of school. A healthy breakfast should inNo time for breakfast, clude a nutritious variety, for examyou say? If you or your ple, whole grains, low-fat protein or dairy, and fruit. This winning comchildren are dashing out bination provides fuel that will delay the door, you can still hunger for hours, and help to stave off snacking or overdoing it at lunch. have breakfast on the Be sure to include: • At least one serving of fruits and run. vegetables, such as a banana, 100% juice without added sugar, or a fruit • Grains, such as oatmeal and wholesmoothie (blend together fresh or frozen grain breads, bagels, cereals, waffles, or fruit, with milk, soy milk, yogurt or 100% muffins; good cereal choices include those juice)

G

U H

are high in fiber and low in sugar: Wheaties, Cheerios, Shredded Wheat, Raisin Bran, and Wheat Chex to name a few. • Dairy, such as fat-free milk, low-fat yogurt and string cheese or cottage cheese. • Protein, which might include eggs, peanut butter, lean meat or tuna. No time for breakfast, you say? If you or your children are dashing out the door, you can still have breakfast on the run. Items such as a carton of milk, yogurt, fruit like bananas or apples, bagels, toasted plain waffles, granola bars, or just a small bag of dry cereal can be eaten easily on the go. Don’t skip breakfast, and don’t underestimate its importance to your children’s wellbeing!

Health Briefs Osteoporosis and stroke screenings

Residents living in and around the Seaford community can be screened to reduce their risk of having a stroke or a serious bone fracture. Life Line Screening will be at Nanticoke Senior Center on Dec. 4. The site is located at 310 Virginia Ave. in Seaford. Appointments will begin at 8 a.m. The cost for a Wellness Package of all screenings including a free osteoporosis screening is $129. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 877-2371287 or visit lifelinescreening.com. Pre-registration is required.

Depression support group in Laurel

The Mental health Association in Delaware will be sponsoring a Depression Support Group in laurel on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month. The meetings begin at 7 p.m. In November, the meetings are the second and fifth Thursdays due to the Thanksgiving Holiday. The purpose of the Laurel Depression Support Group is to share experiences related to living and coping with depression. The group is confidential and offered at no charge. The MHA encourages anyone dealing with a depressive disorder to attend. Register by calling 800-287-6423.

Peer support groups sponsored by Mental Health Association of Delaware are not intended to replace professional mental health treatment. To maintain the privacy of our members, MHA does not publish support group locations; locations are provided with registration.

Stroke support group

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital will offer free monthly Stroke Support Group meetings designed for individuals who have survived a stroke and their families and caregivers. Meetings are held the third Thursday of each month at Nanticoke Cancer Care Center, from 1:30 - 3:30 p.m. The meetings will consist of guest speakers and breakaway sessions, in which caregivers and survivors will meet in two groups to discuss concerns, provide support and networking. Refreshments will be provided. Sheila Brant and Joan Burditt, occupational therapists at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, will facilitate the support group meetings. Pre-registration is not required. For more information, call 629-6611, ext. 5121.

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Snapshots

READY FOR THE CROWD - Harry Dye and Jesse Beebe of Mid Atlantic Painting do a little dressing up of the old “76” Caboose in Delmar, before the town’s Heritage Day event this past Saturday. Photo by Pat Murphy

PIE EATING CONTEST - Delmar’s inaugural Heritage Day Festival took place last Saturday in the downtown area. The old theater, which has been renovated into apartments and retail space, held vendors during the festival and was a popular site for people looking to get warm. Above, Will Griswold, winner of the Heritage Day Festival pie eating contest, works to gulp down his pie first. John Persinger won the contest in the kids’ division. Photos by Mike McClure

LEARNING ABOUT FIRE SAFETY - Students in Jolene Cross Morris’ kindergarten class enjoy fire prevention treats from the Laurel Fire Department. The Delmar Heritage Day Festival featured a number of activities, including horse drawn carriage rides.

IN TRAINING - Laurel Fire Department member B.J. Hitchens shows Hannah Boyce how to be a real firefighter.

Heritage Day Festival goers enjoy some of the festival’s food while watching the pumpkin roll during last weekend’s inaugural event.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Amid flurry of the holidays, we must still remember the troops This is the time of year when we take a hard look at our calendars and give serious thought to how we will find the time to accomplish everything we want to accomplish before the end of the year. With Thanksgiving just a week away and Christmas just four weeks and a few days after that, we send our brain into overdrive as we face that calendar and reality. There is shopping to be done, with the challenge of finding that just-right gift for everyone on the list. Decorating the house for the holidays takes time and ingenuity and there are hours and hours of baking time to be included in our plan of action as we prepare dozens and dozens of cookies — some to be kept here at home, but a large amount to be shipped throughout the country to special family members. Time must be made to wrap all of the purchased gifts, address the cards we send to special friends all over the nation, to rehearse the special music that will accommodate the choir as they present their music honoring the Babe of Bethlehem. We must make time to have the house sparkling from top to bottom as anything less than “squeaky clean” will be unacceptable. Some of us must include hours of handiwork involved in creating special gifts for special family members, friends or special gift recipients. We must also continue the business of living our lives, completing the day-to-day chores, some of which we enjoy, others of which are less memorable but necessary. And, to top it all off, in just a few short weeks we will be receiving the dreaded income tax forms for use in preparing our 2007 tax returns for the Internal Revenue Service. If we base our lives on too serious a nature, we will totally freak out, throw up our hands and collapse in our favorite recliner in a state of dismay! This is also the time of year when we absolutely must give thought to those men and women who are in the Armed Forces, defending each of us as they are stationed both here at home and away from home. Those who are in active battle zones face challenges every single minute of every day in ways we who live complacently here at home cannot possibly imagine. They are fighting to stay alive and eliminate the enemy. Far too often we forget that these are

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Moments With Mike VIRGINIA ‘MIKE’ BARTON the most special people on earth. They are men and women from all walks of life, many with young children here at home. They are men and women cut from a different bolt of cloth than most of us. They are the ones who are willing to face the challenges of battle every single day. There is not time for many of them to even think ahead for a few days, much less to Thanksgiving or Christmas. Last Sunday this nation observed Veterans Day. This special day honoring those who served in the Armed Forces of our nation during all of the wars and conflicts we as a nation have been involved in was recognized at churches throughout the country. American Legions, Veterans of Foreign Wars and other service-related organizations paid special tribute to those men and women who proudly served. Special recognition was given to those who paid the supreme price by giving their lives in defense of you and me. Another Veterans Day is behind us. But lives will be lost every single day that we have American men and women in a war zone. More than any time since the founding of this nation, our government should be concentrating on bringing all of our troops back to American soil. Presidential candidates are spending millions and millions of dollars to tell us how unbelievably great they are, what they will do when elected, what will not happen if they are elected. Some of the candidates make it all sound peaches and cream — if they are elected. For some of us, the best thing that can happen is for Congress to concentrate on bringing home every single man and woman in a battle zone. Not next week, next year or the year after, but today. Now. Sometimes ego gets in the way of common sense. Let’s get our priorities straight right now.

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Doing the Towns Together LAUREL AND DELMAR SOCIALS SARAH MARIE TRIVITS • 875-3672 In memory of their former “queen,” Karen Hitch, the Red Hat Lunch Bunch of Laurel will commemorate her birthday, Nov. 21, with prayers and flowers at her memorial site and then have lunch at Heritage Shores in Bridgeville. The November birthday celebrants for this group are Janet Lee, Barbara Melvin and Janet Windsor. Becky Brittingham of Delmar recently spent a week with her daughter, Kim, sonin-law, Derek, and grandson, Griffin Lane, in Wynantskill, N.Y. Becky told me of enjoying so much the brilliant fall colors in upstate New York. They are so great at this time of the year. The Chapeaux Rouge group, the Red Hat Ladies in Delmar, dined at the Imperial Gallery in Salisbury for their monthly get together. Hostess was Dianna Dean. Members of the Laurel New Century Club met on Tuesday, Nov. 6, for a luncheon at the Delmar Diner. Following their business meeting they were enlightened on the subject of breast cancer awareness by Barbara Tucker of the Delaware Breast Cancer Coalition Inc. The club is now making plans for its Christmas program and entertainment to be held at the Flight Deck in Georgetown. Anne Trivits Fellows and her husband, Irving, of N. Troy, Vt., will arrive on Saturday to spend holiday time with her brother, John, and his family and her mom (me, of course). This will be a double celebration as the Fellows live a bit far away and won’t be back for Christmas so it’s now turkey day and Christmas tree time while they’re here. Bring on the snow, but actually, they might bring some with them as they live in real cold, snow territory and they can spare it. The Laurel Garden Club met at St. Philip’s social room last Sunday. Their guest speaker was master gardener Brenda Brady, who talked about growing of herbs, with demonstrations of various types and tasting of the same. Hostesses for the afternoon were Sug Whaley, Dot Hickman

and Melinda Thornton. Ryan and Ethan Meade, who both attend Messiah College in Pennsylvania, spent the weekend here. Their top priority this weekend was to attend a performance and to see their younger brother, Steven, who performed in a play, “Play On,” at the Salisbury Christian School, a delightful comedy-mystery. The boys will return for the Thanksgiving holiday with their parents, Darrell and Charlene Meade in Bethel. Happy birthday to Delmar’s Beverly Shockley on Nov. 19. And to Phyllis Parker, happy turkey-day birthday — best wishes for a great holiday. Special happy birthday wishes to Betsy Davis on Nov. 20, from “a very old friend.” Just to inform her friends, Irma Ellis is no longer hospitalized but is back in Laurel at the home of her daughter, Nicole Dickerson. She can be reached with getwell thoughts and calls at 875-8017. We wish her a speedy recovery. We express our deepest sympathy to the family and friends of Isabell Bell, Grace E. Litchford, Margaret Kirkendall, Avery Curtis Prettyman, William H. Hill and Wallace W. Brittingham. We continue with prayers for all of our servicemen and women and prayers for our friends who are ill: Irma Ellis, Harriett MacVeigh, Steve Trivits, Philip Lowe, Madelyn Mitchell, Donald Layton Sr., Jean Henry, Martha Henderson, Hattie Puckham, Martha Windsor, Teresa Littleton, Sam Moore and Terry Layton . Happy November birthday greetings to: Molly Collins and Emma Jean Hickey on Nov. 16; Barbara Melvin, Nov. 17; Rosemarie Hartshorn, Nov. 18; Helen Morris, Nov. 20; and Cecelia Kehnast, Nov. 22. “Happiness is a stock that doubles in a year.” See you in the Stars.

CLIFFORD SHORT

302

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

Letters Single mother needs help

My name is Mary Walker, I am a 26year-old resident of Seaford and single mother of two children, ages 7 and 2. I am writing this letter searching for answers. I work full-time for a company where I have been employed the last seven years. I also attend Delaware Technical and Community College full-time, where I am a member of the national honor society Phi Theta Kappa. I am pursuing my AA degree in criminal justice and want nothing more than to help the community when I graduate in May. I plan to continue my education until I achieve my master’s degree in a few years. As you can imagine my schedule is very busy and money is very tight since my husband abandoned our children and me over a year ago. Recently I have had to refer to the state for assistance (something I did not want to see myself doing). Since I work full time I am only eligible for a portion of my childcare expenses to be covered along with a miniscule amount in food stamps each month. You have no idea how it pains me to resort to such programs. I have had no choice in the matter since the state can not seem to assist me in receiving child support from my children’s father, although I have supplied them with his place of employment, cell phone and work numbers. The explanation I continue to receive is they “need to get a verifiable home address.” My question is this: Is it not important enough to the state of Delaware to protect the children of this state and go through any means necessary to contact the negligent parents and make them honor their obligations? I feel as though, since I supplied the only viable contact information for him, my court hearing should be able to move forward. My next set of questions pertains to the Delaware income guidelines for assistance. Since I have been so financially strapped due to my lack of child support, I have fallen quite a bit behind in my household bills. I have tried to sign up for further assistance in paying my rent (two months behind and on the verge of losing my rental home), my electric (received a shutoff notice because I am two months behind), free/reduced lunch for my oldest daughter (I make too much so she only receives reduced lunches). My cell phone is about to be cut off (my only mode of communication in case of emergency — would you go without a phone with having two small children)? And I had to get an extension on my automobile loan so I did not lose that. (I have to have a car to get myself back and forth to work and school. Public transportation in Sussex County is sub par — could you rely on it?) The Shipley State Service Center in Seaford explains that my gross income is taken into account when calculating benefits. Why do they count my gross income? I do not see all of that money. I pay nearly $400 per month for health insurance that I cannot afford, but I have to carry it because the state tells me I make too much for Medicaid. As mentioned above I do receive a minimal amount per month in food stamps (it comes out to $6.50 per day to feed myself and my children… can you

accomplish that?) I feel so robbed by the system, and have a right to! I am trying to do the right thing and go to work everyday and get a degree so I won’t have to rely on state programs, but I cannot get the necessary aid to do so. I feel like I would be better off quitting my job and relying fully on the state for support. Why is it that people who are working to be a better Delaware resident and a productive member of society are left out in the cold? Yet, able-bodied residents choose to sit at home, have more babies and “collect a check.” I don’t see the right or the just in that! I break my back working and going to school every day for my children, yet I am unable to get a hand up from that state that I am striving so hard to eventually be employed with. The current state policies and financial guidelines make it virtually impossible for the productive citizen that needs a little help. Yet the leeches of the system continue to win. I am simply asking for a hand up, not a hand out. I want to be able to wake up each day and know that I will have a roof over my head at the end of the day. I want to know that when my daughter needs her night light on because she is scared, there will be electricity for that to happen. I do not want to be a single mother statistic. I want so much more for myself and my children. But in my current situation, I just need a little more help than the state is offering. I am about to lose everything because I am trying to do the right thing. All I need is the state to help me help myself. Mary M.B. Walker

Seaford

Many help with Vets Day program

On Sunday, on the 11th hour of the 11th day in the 11th month, citizens in the Seaford area gathered at the War Memorial in the Kiwanis Park to honor all veterans, living and dead, who are distinguished by their sacrifices to keep America free. Many thanks go out to those who made this occasion special. On behalf of the Seaford Veterans Committee, consisting of the American Legions Posts 6 and 37, Am Vets Post 1694, Disabled American Veterans Chapter 9, Marine Corps League Detachment 780 and the Veterans of Foreign Wars post 4961, I thank the citizens of Seaford for their support. A sincere thank you is also extended to the following for helping to make the service a success: the VFW honor guard, the NJROTC from the Seaford Senior High School, the city of Seaford Parks Committee for setting up the chairs and audio, the National Guard Reserves for providing the tent, the Seaford Volunteer Fire Department and Police Department for standing by, and the Seaford Senior High and Middle School bands for providing the music. The Seaford Veterans Committee would also like to thank Peter Bohn for his role as master of ceremonies and Vaugh Russell of Bridgeville, who was the guest speaker. Following the Veterans Day service, a brief dedication ceremony of bricks along the Memorial and Survivors Walkway was held. This walkway is the project of many hands: the City of Seaford, which supports and receives the money to pay the bills;

Charles Towers from Towers Signs who engraves the bricks, and John Whitt, owner of Nanticoke Concrete, along with employee James Jenkins Jr., who donate their time and labor to lay the bricks. A sincere thank you is extended to these people for their support and dedication. Veterans who are eligible for this walkway may obtain applications at the Seaford City Hall or from any member of the Seaford Veterans Committee. The committee has established Memorial Day and Veterans Day celebrations as the dates of dedication with Sept. 1 and April 1 being the cutoff dates for each dedication. Seaford Veterans Committee Joe Tune, coordinator

Seaford

Foreign service workers are brave

Media commentators have heaped scorn on the State Department’s Foreign Service Officer corps for alleged reluctance to accept involuntary assignments to Iraq. Typically, commentators contrast cowardly diplomats to our brave military. But factually: • The Foreign Service is small, less than one-half of one percent the size of the U..S. military in personnel and budget. The FS is stretched thin at some 260 embassies and consulates worldwide, many of which are designated hardship posts. • More than 2,000 Foreign Service members have already volunteered for service in Iraq and Afghanistan over the last five years. Well over 80 percent of the FS-designated positions in Iraq for summer 2008 have already been filled, eight months in advance. • U.S. diplomats are unarmed, yet like the military, physical threat is part of their lives. To evade attacks, do you have to vary your routes and times when commuting? Do you practice holing up and holding out in secure areas of your offices against potential rioters or terrorist attacks? FS people have to, even in supposedly cushy places like Rome, Paris, London and Brussels. Do bombs go off at other workplaces down the street from you? Do your vehicles and yourselves have to undergo bomb searches before you can park and enter your workplaces? They do and I did, at the U.S. Embassy in Ankara, Turkey. Unlike ill-informed commentators, I’ve been there, done that. All praise to the military, but our U.S. State Department diplomats, staff and locally-engaged employees abroad are heroes too. D. Thomas Longo Jr.

Delmar, Md. U.S. Foreign Service Officer (retired)

Scare tactics are Trojan horses

For those of you who attended government schools, you probably have never heard of what happened to the city of ancient Troy during its war with the Greeks. To make the story simple without boring you to death, the Greek army had besieged the city for 10 years and still had not conquered it when it came up with the idea of building a giant wooden horse and hiding Greek soldiers inside it and withdrawing the rest of the army out of sight, while a spy by the name of Sinon convinced the Trojans that the giant horse was

a gift and that they should take it inside the city walls. Later that night, while the city of Troy was partying and reveling, the Greek soldiers emerged from the wooden horse and easily conquered the city, something they had been trying to do for 10 years. I see a parallel in today’s political scene. Instead of a wooden horse, it’s the “children.” When the liberals and “demecans” (Republicans who act like Democrats) want a social piece of legislation passed, they will tell you, “It’s for the children,” so as to imply that if you don’t go along with their socialist schemes you hate children. A similar lie has been used for years on the “mom-moms and pop-pops” of this country, telling them that evil conservatives want to take away their Social Security and cause them to resort to eating cat food. Something tells me that the tire they have been riding on for so many years, fooling the elderly into something that is not true, is beginning to wear pretty thin and that is why they have switched from “grandma and grandpa” to “little Johnny and little Susie.” People! Don’t be sucked into a guilt trip by these people when you object to these social programs for the children, because you will be reacting exactly the way they want you to. Once they get these “Trojan horse” laws passed, you will see later what surprises will come out of these things and believe me, it won’t be good. By the way: I like children. Larry Calhoun Laurel

Proud to be part of ceremony Yesterday, Veterans Day, was a day I’ll always remember. I was so proud to be a member of the American Legion and to be able to take part in this outstanding tribute to the veterans. I want to thank everyone who helped make this affair a huge success. First I want to thank the Star and Pat Murphy for the fine coverage. Then what can I say about the Rev. Charles Covington and the inspiring message he presented? It was great! And then there was the beautiful singing by 14-year-old Amanda Jones of Seaford. Her lovely renditions of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” “America the Beautiful” and “God Bless America” were wonderful. We had so many compliments. Thanks again Amanda. We love you. A special thank you goes out to the many Legionnaires who spent so many hours working on this presentation. I just want you to know how proud I am and how much I appreciate your work. And last but not least, a special thank you to the American Legion Ladies Auxiliary. What an outstanding job they did with the food, decorations and helping with the program. Thanks again – you ladies are great. Jim Allen and Jim Moore Co-chairman Laurel American Legion Post 19 Laurel


MORNING STAR

• NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2007

PAGE 63

Seven-Day forecast for Western Sussex County Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Tides Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Rainy; breezy and cooler

Partly sunny, windy and colder

Partial sunshine

Clouds and sun

Cloudy

Times of clouds and sun

Mostly cloudy and warmer

58/37

49/30

52/32

54/39

54/36

52/39

62/41

Almanac Temperatures

Precipitation . 55° . 30° . 60° . 39° 42.9°

Total for the week . . . . . . . . . . 0.37” Total for the month . . . . . . . . . . 0.38” Normal for the month . . . . . . . . 1.32” Total for the year . . . . . . . . . . 28.61”

Smyrna 55/36 Dover 54/37

Apogee and Perigee

Date November 23 December 6 December 22 January 3

Time 7:13 p.m. 11:55 a.m. 5:12 a.m. 3:07 a.m.

Perigee Apogee Perigee Apogee

Date January 19 January 30 February 13 February 27

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

Rise .6:44 a.m. .6:45 a.m. .6:46 a.m. .6:47 a.m. .6:48 a.m. .6:49 a.m. .6:50 a.m.

First Nov 17

Harrington 56/37

Time 3:40 a.m. 11:27 p.m. 8:09 p.m. 8:28 p.m.

Milford 56/37 Greenwood 57/37

Lewes 57/40

Bridgeville 58/37

Sun and Moon Sun Thursday . Friday . . . . Saturday . . Sunday . . . Monday . . Tuesday . . Wednesday

. . . . . . .

Set .4:50 p.m. .4:49 p.m. .4:48 p.m. .4:47 p.m. .4:47 p.m. .4:46 p.m. .4:46 p.m.

Full Nov 24

Moon Rise Thursday . . .11:44 a.m. Friday . . . . . .12:18 p.m. Saturday . . . .12:47 p.m. Sunday . . . . . .1:13 p.m. Monday . . . . .1:39 p.m. Tuesday . . . . .2:04 p.m. Wednesday . . .2:32 p.m.

Set . .9:23 p.m. .10:29 p.m. .11:37 p.m. . . . . . .none .12:45 a.m. . .1:55 a.m. . .3:07 a.m.

SEAFORD 58/37 Blades 58/37

Georgetown 55/38

Rehoboth Beach 56/39

Concord 58/37 Laurel 59/37 Delmar 60/36

Millsboro 55/38

Bethany Beach 55/41 Fenwick Island 57/36

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The moon, and its relative distance to the Earth, affects tides on a monthly basis. When the moon is farthest from the Earth (apogee), tides of decreased range or currents of decreased speed occur. When the moon is closest to the Earth (perigee), the occurrence of increased range or currents of speed is more prevalent.

Perigee Apogee Perigee Apogee

Day High Low High Thurs. 4:54 a 11:21 a 5:15 p Fri. 5:42 a 12:18 a 6:04 p Sat. 6:37 a 1:10 a 6:58 p Sun. 7:38 a 2:04 a 7:56 p Mon. 8:41 a 2:59 a 8:57 p Tues. 9:42 a 3:53 a 9:57 p Wed. 10:40 a 4:46 a 10:56 p

Sharptown, MD Shown is Thursday’s weather. High Low High Low Temperatures are Thursday’s highs Day and Thursday night’s lows. Thurs. 8:13 a 2:24 a 8:34 p 2:14 p Fri. 9:01 a 3:11 a 9:23 p 3:06 p Sat. 9:56 a 4:03 a 10:17 p 4:07 p Sun. 10:57 a 4:57 a 11:15 p 5:13 p Mon. 12:00 p 5:52 a —- 6:21 p Tues. 12:16 a 6:46 a 1:01 p 7:26 p Wed. 1:16 a 7:39 a 1:59 p 8:27 p

Statistics through Tuesday Nov. 13 at Georgetown, Delaware High for the week . . . . . . . . . . . Low for the week . . . . . . . . . . . Normal high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Normal low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Average temperature . . . . . . . .

Nanticoke River Roaring Point, MD

‘96 VOLKSWAGON CABRIO

Day Thurs. Fri. Sat. Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed.

High 7:35 a 8:23 a 9:18 a 10:19 a 11:22 a 12:23 p 12:38 a

Low High Low 1:46 a 7:56 p 1:36 p 2:33 a 8:45 p 2:28 p 3:25 a 9:39 p 3:29 p 4:19 a 10:37 p 4:35 p 5:14 a 11:38 p 5:43 p 6:08 a —- 6:48 p 7:01 a 1:21 p 7:49 p

Rehoboth Beach Day High Low High Low Thurs. 11:02 a 4:23 a 11:21 p 5:30 p Fri. 11:51 a 5:16 a —- 6:21 p Sat. 12:15 a 6:15 a 12:45 p 7:13 p Sun. 1:16 a 7:18 a 1:43 p 8:05 p Mon. 2:19 a 8:22 a 2:42 p 8:56 p Tues. 3:18 a 9:25 a 3:39 p 9:47 p Wed. 4:14 a 10:28 a 4:34 p 10:38 p

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007

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DELMAR ELECTION - Four are vying for two seats on the Delmar (Md.) Town Commission. Page 20 OBITUARIES 28 ON THE RECORD 43 OPEN HOUSES _____...

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