Issuu on Google+

THURSDAY, mAY 6, 2010

vol. 15 No. 2

50 cents

News HEROES - Carolyn Calio serves at helm of fundraiser for 20 years. Page 8 LEGENDS - Local author promotes the legacy of Class D baseball. Page 17 ENTERTAINMENT - The Scrapple Creek Runners to entertain at Heritage Weekend. Page 19 SCHOOL NEWS - Student accomplishments, included honor rolls, are highlighted. Pages 22-29

Play Ball!

POLICE - Copper wire thefts and arrests are key items in the Police Journal. Page 42 THE GUARD - Recruiter works hard to promote the National Guard. Page 43

Little League Baseball is under way in western Sussex County

MOTHER’S DAY - Five generations of women and gift ideas for Mother’s Day. Pages 53-56

In the top photo, the Woodbridge High marching band performs “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” as it leads players and coaches through the streets of Bridgeville during the Woodbridge Little League parade which took place last weekend. Photo by Mike McClure

WARNING - Beware of email hoaxes and don’t pass them on. Page 57 REACHING OUT - Two funds established to help family hurt in explosion. Page 58 PRIDE - Laurel Council supports ‘Pride in Bloom’ and special worship event. Page 59 ELECTIONS - See pages 60 and 61 for a look at the school board candidates.

Contact us

Subscriptions

kcherrix@mspublications.com

Seaford Star News

editor@mspublications.com

Seaford Star Sports

mmcclure@mspublications.com

Advertising

sales@mspublications.com

Business Report

businessreport@mspublications.com

Business Journal

brichardson@mspublications.com

Inside Bulletin Board Business ChurCh Classifieds entertainment final Word Gas lines Gourmet health letters lynn Parks movies oBituaries PoliCe Puzzles sPorts tides tony Windsor

10-14 6 15 34-42 19 63 59 18 30-33 62 58 7 16 42 14 45-52 51 59

In the bottom photo, during Nanticoke Little League’s opening day ceremony Saturday, the newest members of the league participate in the traditional hat toss after league president Mike Smith announces “play ball!” See page 45 for additional pictures. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Methodist Manor House under a new management structure

By Lynn R. Parks

A Pennsylvania-based not-for-profit company has taken over control of the three continuing care retirement facilities in Delaware that were operated by Peninsula United Methodist Homes. Those facilities include the Methodist Manor House in Seaford. ACTS has assumed management

and operation of the facilities as well as of Heron Point of Chestertown (Md.), also part of Peninsula United Methodist Homes (PUMH). The new affiliation was effective May 1. Both ACTS and PUMH are notfor-profit entities. No money changed hands in the deal and PUMH remains a separate legal entity from ACTS. PUMH has its own board of direc-

tors, which answers to the ACTS board. Whether the group of retirement facilities will keep the name Peninsula United Methodist Homes is still under discussion, said Marvin Mashner, president and CEO of ACTS. “We would like to keep the name because of its history,” he added. “But the Peninsula United Methodist Continued to page four


“Locally Owned &” Operated

Dog Days of Summer with the Blue Rocks Baseball Team

MaySpecials

Select 35 & 40 Lb. Dog Food

32

99

Get Out and Play

• Choose from adult, puppy, mature adult, light, large breed adult, large breed puppy, large breed mature adult, large breed light, puppy lamb & rice, puppy lamb & rice large breed, adult small bites, mature adult small bites, light small bites or puppy small bites

June 5, 2010 Festivities 4 pm - 6 pm 6:05 pm Game Time

All 13 Oz. K9 Cans

99¢

Select 35 & 40 Lb. Dog Food

GET A 12 OZ. TASTE OF RAW TREAT

Value Blend Select FREE Wild Bird Food

Select 35 &

32

40 Lb. Blend Dog Food Bird Luvers' Bird Food 99

32 99

With Purchase of any Nature’s Variety Kibble

6

99

GET AN EVO CANNED FISH DOG OR CAT FOOD • 25 Lb.

FREE

• All natural year-round blend • Attracts the greatest variety of birds of With Purchase

14 • •

• Choose from adult,

36 GET A 10 LB.

99¢ All 13 Oz. Each

Nyjer Seed BUY 4 CASES Select 17 & K9 Cans GET 1 CASE 20 Lb. Cat Food

3

• 35 Lb. 44 Lb. ...................$43.99 Chicken & Rice 30 Lb. ...................$29.99 Lamb & Rice 35 Lb. ...................$36.99

00

Off99 FREE 29

BAG OF WILD BIRD FOOD

FREE

99

• Choose from kitten, adult • 10 Lb. Program • On the Frequent Buyer care, mature • Preferred byoptimal finches adult active longevity, due to its size and high kitten light or indoor

With 1Purchase BUY – GET 1 of any Bird Feeder

FREE

Chicken, • Choose from kitten, adult optimal mature Lamb care, or Beef adult active longevity, light or indoor kitten

29

Adult 2.5 Oz. Science Diet Dog Food

• 3 Oz. • All varieties • Elegant Medleys not included

• Balanced nutrition • Promotes healthy digestion and strong defenses

29

BUY 3 BLUE BUFFALO CANNED DOG FOOD GET 1 FREE

99

Treats with Purchase of any Science Diet Beggin' •Small 44 Lb. & Toy Strips •Breed Balanced nutrition Food

¢Purchase any Each

Verus Pet Food 35 Lb. GET 6 OZ.Ultra FELINE Dog Food CANNED FOOD

10 FREE

799

• Promotes healthy digestion and strong • 25defenses Oz.

00

Off

• Low-fat treat made with real meat that dogs beg for

99

human-grade meats and 2.5 Oz. products; contains no Science Diet by-products, fillers or • Choose from Love Potion #9,Treats St. Patrick's Ultra 15 Lb. chemical preservatives with of Fare, Easter Brunch or Picnic in thePurchase Park • Limit 1 per customer Dog Food any Science Diet • Choose from kitten, adult Authorized BCI Retailer Copyright 2010, Circulars Unlimited www.circulars.com Small & Toy optimal care, mature Breed Food adult active longevity, light or indoor kitten

small holes or a sock feeder

• Designed to give your puppy an ideal standard of nutritional excellence • Plus Puppy formula not included

Conventional Cat Litter

2/

BirdBlend Luvers' Blend Bird Luvers' Bird FoodBird Food Shredded Concord Pike2.5 Oz. 302-478-8966Blends Chestnut Run Food • 25 Lb.Dog •Middletown 25 Lb. Shoppes of Red Mill 302-737-8982 Crossing

99

Value Blend Select Value Blend Select Pine Bedding Select 35Food & Bird Wild BirdWild Food 40 Lb. Dog Food

¢

1000

6/

• 10 Oz. • 8 flavors to choose from

Canned Cat Food

• 5.5 Oz. • All varieties • Friskies Selects not included

C

2

Party Mix Cat Treats

• • •

1

39

4 6 632

99 99 99

00

• 2.1 Oz. - 3 Oz. • Stimulate your cat's senses

Scoop Cat Litter

99

B 302-478-8966S

• 20 Lb. • 99.6% dust free • Moisture-activated odor-control

Small Animal

Wild Bird Suet

• •

Concord Pike Ultra 35 Lb. • 30 Lb. Shoppes of Red Mill 302-737-8982 • 99.6% dust free Dog Food • Long lasting Peoples Plaza odor-control 302-836-5787 Hockessin 302-234-9112 • Suburban Plaza 302-368-2959 • Dog Food Shoppes Of Graylyn 302-477-1995

00 Off

10-0009 BC

2

Prepared Meals

FREE 24/ 1200 20/800

Canned Cat Food

99

44 Lb. health and well •being

Select 17 & 20 Lb. Cat Food • All natural, made with

FREE

desired amount BUY 2• –Feed GET 1 in finch style feeder with

FREE

• 31.1 Lb. • Perfect balance of real, wholesome ingredients, • 35 nutrition Lb. quality and great taste from • Choose

D

Concord P 29 7 9 5 7 00 10 Off Concord Pet Foods & Supplies 99 FREE

Summer Seasonal oil content Canned Dog Food • Feed all year round

Precise Puppy Food

99

• 35 Lb. • Choose from Chicken, Lamb or Beef

500Off

All 13 Oz.

Tiki Cat & Dog Canned Food

3499 29

34

Adult adult small bites, Dog Food mature adult small • 20 Lb. or larger • Life Protection formula bites, light small bites Healthy nutrients and or puppy small •bites antioxidants for your dog’s

Intro K9Price Cans

99

24 20 Lb. Cat Food 99

Blue Buffalo Dry Dog Food

199

All Life Stages Dog Food

Shredded Blends Dog Food

• Choose from adult, puppy, mature adult, puppy, mature adult, light, large breed adult, light, large breed adult, large breed puppy, large 25 Lb. breed mature adult, large breed puppy, large An all purpose large mix breedthat light, puppy breed mature adult, & rice, puppy appeals to alamb wide variety large breed light, puppy lamb & rice large breed, of wild birds adult small bites, lamb & rice, puppy mature adult small bites, light small bites lamb & rice large breed, or puppy small bites

Wellness New Canine Stew Cans

EVO Fish Flavored Dry Dog or Cat Food

99

ShreddedEach Blends Dog Food Dog Food 99& Select 17

99 99 1414 Science Diet 99 Treats 34 with Purchase of

2499

Fox Run 302-995-2255 Prepared302-838-4300 Elkton 302-376-1616 Meals 410-398-5554 C • 31.1 Lb. Milford 302-424-8373 302-324-0502 • Perfect balance of C real, wholesomeNew London 610-869-8828 M 610-364-1100 Ultra 15 Lb. ingredients, • 35 Lb. 302-368-2959 Thornbury 610-399-0124 Edgehill s/c, Dover 302-672-9494 • 10 Oz. quality nutrition • Choose from Chicken, breedShoppes mature adult, Of Graylyn Dog 302-477-1995 LambWest 610-701-9111 • 8 flavors to302-653-1515 choose from and greatFood taste Smyrna, DE or Beef Chester, PA large breed light, puppy any Science Diet Not responsible for typographical errors. Som Page 4 Seaford, DE 302-628-1001 Rehoboth 302-226-2300 lamb & rice, puppy lamb & rice large breed, Small & Toy COUPON • Concord Pet Foods adult small bites, Sale Prices Good& Supplies • mature adult small Breed Food Mon. - Sat. 9 am-9 pm; Sun. 10 am-5 pm May 1 through May 31, 2010 bites, light small bites • or puppy small bites Commons Shopping Center, Seaford,Nyjer DE Seed

• 4 flavors to choose from • Attracts a wide variety of wild birds to your yard

• 25 Lb. • 25 Lb.• 40L • Choose from adult, Plaza Peoples • All natural •year-round blend • 100% natural All natural year-round blend puppy,the mature adult, • Attracts the•greatest Attracts greatest Hockessin • 100% biodegradable light, large breed adult, variety of birds variety birds natural smell • of Clean, Suburban Plaza large breed puppy, large

• An all purpose mix • An allthat purpose mix that 302-836-5787 appeals to a Community wide variety appeals to a wide Plaza variety of wild birdsAston, of wild birds 302-234-9112 PA

5 $

1000

6/

00 Off

CritterTrail Small Animal Homes

25

Middletown Crossing % Rehoboth, DE Off • Spacious living Milford, DE space for all hamsters, gerbils or mice Smyrna, DE with water • Comes complete bottle and food dish Seaford, DE

5

Off 3 3 29 12 8 99 F FREE FREEConcord Pet Foods 2010 % 20 Off FREE 99 29

Seaford AdultNyjer Seed Not responsible for typographical errors. Some are limited to stock on hand and will be available while supplies last. Some items require special ordering. GET A 2LB. LB. Page 410 GET A GET 10 LB. Dogitems Food AOz. Sale All 13 Canned Cat Food Canned Cat Food BAG OF WILD BAG OF BAG OF WILD K9 Cans 99 Prices Good 24/ 00 20/ 00 BIRD FOOD BIRD FOOD CAREFRESH ¢ • 10 Lb. • 10 Lb. Small • 44 Lb. Each May 1 - 31, • Preferred by•finches • 3 Oz. • 5.5 Oz. Preferred by finches COMPLETE RONTLINE Products • Balanced nutrition • All varieties • All varieties due to• its sizedue andhealthy high to its size and high Animal Food Promotes Expires 05/31/10. Limit 1 offer per coupon. 1 coupon perincluded customer. • Elegant Medleys not included • Friskies Selects not oil content

00 00 Off Off

302-376-1616 302-226-2300 302-424-8373 302-653-1515 302-628-1001

Seaf. Commons S.C., 22836 Sussex Hwy.

Mon.-Sat. 9 am - 9 pm Sunday 10 am - 5 pm

Not responsible for typographical errors.

2

PET FOOD

With Purchase With Purchase Select 17 & of any Bird Feeder of20 any Bird Lb. CatFeeder Food

oil and content digestion strong • Feed alldefenses year• round Feed all year round • Feed desired•amount Feed desired amount in finch style feeder in finchwith style feeder with small holes orsmall a sockholes feeder or a sock feeder

Concord Pike

302-478-8966

Not valid with other offers or on prior purchases. May not be used on: *Moonlight Madness Sale *Aniversary Sale *Big Bag Sale. CPFS reserves the right to limit quantities. STAR H

Chestnut Run Party Mix

• Entire line

302-99

COUPON Beggin' with premium With PurchaseShoppes of Red Mill • Developed Cat Treats Concord Pet Foods & Supplies 302-737-8982 Middletown Crossing 302-37 ingredients and unique formulas Strips • Choose from kitten, adult of any Carefresh Ultra 35 Lb. 39 optimal care, mature pets healthy and energetic Peoples Plaza Dog Food to keep 302-836-5787 Community Plaza 302-32 99 adult active longevity, Pet Bedding light or indoor kitten

FREE ¢ ¢

Wild BirdWild SuetBird Suet

9999

2.5 Oz. Science Diet • 4 flavors to•choose from Treats 4 flavors to choose from • Attracts a wide • Attracts a wide with Purchase of variety of wildvariety birds of wild birds any Science Diet to your yard to your yard Small & Toy

10 499499

Hockessin 00 302-234-9112 Suburban Plaza Small Animal 302-368-2959 Off Small Animal Pine Bedding Pine302-477-1995 Bedding Shoppes Of Graylyn Ultra • 40L 15 Lb. • 40L • 100% natural Dog Food • 100% natural

• 100% biodegradable • 100% biodegradable • Clean, natural smell • Clean, natural smell

00

5 30Off

1 $Aston,00 7 PA

610-36 Edgehill s/c, Dover 302-67 West Chester, PA 610-70 $ Conventional Scoop Cat Purchase of or more Rehoboth 302-22 Expires 05/31/10. Limit 1 offer per coupon. Cat Litter Litter1 coupon per customer. Page 3 • 25 Oz. • Low-fat treat made with real meat that dogs beg for

• 2.1 Oz. - 3 Oz. • Stimulate your cat's senses

00 99 7 9 Mon. - Sat. 9 am-9 pm; Sun. 10 a Not valid with other offers or on prior purchases. May not be used on: *Moonlight Madness Sale *Aniversary Sale *Big Bag Sale. CPFS reserves the right to limit quantities. STAR H

2/

• 20 Lb.

• 30 Lb.


MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

‘BFF’ BILL - State Rep. Dan Short (middle) with Delaware Economic Development Office Director Alan Levin (left) and State Rep. Mike Ramone at a recent press event in Dover during which Governor Markell unveiled the “BFF” (Business Finders’ Fee) legislation, which is aimed at bringing new jobs to the state. The “BFF” bill provides a $1,000 annual tax credit to be shared between a sponsor Delaware firm and a new business firm for each new employee their effort brings to the state, with the tax credit available for three years.

‘Dinner in the Library’ fundraiser May 22 in the Cultural Center

The Steering Group and Friends of the Seaford Library are putting the finishing touches on plans for their 1st annual “Dinner in the Library,” scheduled for the evening of Saturday, May 22, in the Cultural Center of the library. Music by the Medics will greet guests in the foyer, and continue throughout the evening for listening and dancing pleasure. The gala will begin with cocktails and hors d’oeuvres from 6 to 7 p.m., during which time items will be on display for the silent auction. A dinner catered by The Georgia House will be served at 7 p.m. in the Meeting Room, with a cash bar in the Exhibit Room, open both during and after dinner. After dinner, author Nancy E. Lynch will speak about her book “Vietnam Mailbag, Voices from the War, 1968-1972”. As a young reporter, Lynch relayed the hopes and fears, the joy and tears of hundreds of soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines from Delaware through the Vietnam Mailbag column she wrote in the Wilmington Morning News. Forty years after she began writing her column, Nancy incorporated those letters into her book, which gives a new generation a fresh look at the first-person accounts of troops in the combat zone. The results of the silent auction will be announced after Lynch’s presentation, while music for dancing continues in the foyer. The cost for the evening is $75, $45 of which is considered a charitable donation to the library. Proceeds of the auction will go toward the construction fund. For tickets and more information, contact Betty Wilbanks at 629-2466.

Golf Tournament/Dinner Dance to benefit Easter Seals is Friday

Century 21 Ramey Real Estate is hosting a Golf Tournament/Dinner Dance to benefit Easter Seals on Friday, May 7, at Heritage Shores Club in Bridgeville. Golf teams of four are $400 and will include 1st, 2nd and 3rd prizes, gross and net divisions, as well as closest to the pin on all Par 3’s. Dinner Dance tickets are $50. Help support people with disabilities in the local community. Call 628-9000 for registration or tickets.

K a t h r y n ’s

FLOWERS

8400 Bethel Rd., Laurel • 875-2055

Mulch, Top Soil, Peat Moss, Potted Plants, Annuals,P erennials, Hanging Baskets, Shrubbery & Trees OPEN 9-5 - 7 DAYS A WEEK

Dutch country Market

11233 Trussum Pond Rd.

875-1678

302

(Beside Johnny Janosiks)

Hrs: Thurs. - Fri. 9-6, Sat. 9-5

Pennsylvania Dutch FooDs

RotisseRie BBQ (HealtHy CHoiCe) FResH Meats - Deli salaDs - Bulk FooDs - CanDy JaMs - apple CiDeR BakeD GooDs inCluDinG suGaR FRee pies Mother’s Baby Swiss Cheese......................................................................... $429lb Day Specials Rice Pudding ............................................................................................. $159lb May 6-7-8 NEW Southwestern Turkey Bacon ...................... $369lb Come and See, Feel and Smell The Quality!

DUTCH COUNTRY HEIRLOOM FURNITURE Located Next to Dutch Country Market

Free Delivery & Set Up of our Play Sets up to 25 mi.

Gift CertifiCates Certifi for MoM

Saturday, May 8th - Mothers Day Event and Drinks in our backyard

Perennials For Sale Vinyl Patio Furniture dutchcountryfurniture.com

PAGE 3

TAKING THEIR OATHS OF OFFICE – Judge William Mulvaney of the Justice of the Peace Court in Seaford officiated at a swearing-in ceremony at the start of the Seaford City Council meeting last Tuesday night. Above, Mayor Ed Butler, with his wife, Shirley, at his side, is sworn in for his third term. At left, Leanne Phillips-Lowe takes her oath while her husband, Tony, stands next to her. Phillips-Lowe, who was named to the council in 2006 and was re-elected in 2007, won her second full term in last week’s election. Photos by Lynn R. Parks


PAGE 4

MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

Local garden show features the best flowers around Seaford’s new public library, where the Spade and Trowel Garden Club is installing a patio garden, was a perfect setting for the club’s joint flower show with the Laurel Garden Club on April 13. Winning not only first place in the “Painted Ladies’ Parlors’ class but the Designer’s Choice Award and Best in Show, Susan McCoy of Seaford also took Best in Show for the horticulture division for her tree peony. This was her first flower show. There were four entries each in four design classes. Taking first place in “Ross

Mansion Elegance” was a colorful entry by Ann O’Dea of Seaford. The blue ribbon for “Along the Waterfront” went to Lettie Perry of Seaford and also captured the President’s Award presented by Mary Noel of Spade and Trowel Club. First place in the “Trap Pond’s Treasure” and the Laurel Club President’s Award presented by Patricia Malinchak went to Carol Kinsley of Seaford, also showing in a flower show for the first time. There were 186 horticulture entries. The Show Chairman’s Award, presented

Manor House will notice little change Continued from page one

Conference may feel differently.” Mashner spoke to residents of the Manor House Tuesday afternoon. He told them that things at the retirement facility will remain pretty much as they are. “In many ways, you won’t see much of a change,” he told the residents. All contracts with current residents will be honored and the current staff of about 200, including executive director Linda Messersmith, will remain, he added. But Mashner said following his remarks that ACTS will look for new ways that the Manor House can reach out to the Seaford community, perhaps providing homehealth care, something other ACTS facilities do. Other possibilities include providing hospice care and admitting people in all stages of health. Before this affiliation, the Manor House only admitted people in reasonably good health, and promised to care for them throughout their lives. “We will be looking at the community at large to see what its challenges are and how we can best serve it,” Mashner said. Mashner praised the wellness center at the Manor House, calling it one of the best he has seen. “It is an excellent program and we hope to be able to learn from it and apply those lessons to our other facilities,” he said. William Holloway, past president of the PUMH board, told the Manor House residents that the affiliation with ACTS evolved after PUMH reached out to other organizations for advice in weathering economic hard times. Talks with ACTS started in early 2009. “As we looked for ways to make our

Planning A Wedding? Stop by the Star office 629.9788

302

PickUp A FREE copyof theS tars’

951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford

B RIDAL P LANNER

economies more successful, we turned to others to share their efforts,” he said. As a result, PUMH received several offers for mergers, Holloway said. “We realized that we could be stronger if we were part of a bigger group,” he said. ACTS was one of five organizations that the PUMH board selected to have discussions with. “And we came to the conclusion that the organization we most wanted to talk to was ACTS,” Holloway said. Like PUMH, it is a not-for-profit operator. “And it also had a religious background,” he added. ACTS’ first facility, Fort Washington Estates in suburban Philadelphia, was founded by a non-denominational church. Holloway said that it was difficult for the board to decide to give up its autonomy. “But we realized that our duty as trustees is not to the corporation, but to all of you,” he told the residents. “We wanted to make sure that that promise that we made to you will be upheld.” The Methodist Manor House, the second facility constructed by Peninsula United Methodist Homes, was built in 1966. It has about 190 residents in three levels of care, independent, assisted living and skilled care. With its affiliation with PUMH, ACTS, founded in 1972 in suburban Philadelphia, has 23 retirement facilities, in Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama and Florida. In total, its facilities have about 9,000 residents and 6,000 staff members. It is the largest not-for-profit owner, operator and developer of continuing care retirement communities in the U.S.

Seaford Star

Published by Morning Star Publications Inc.

951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243 The Seaford Star (USPS #016-428) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 951 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Dover, DE. Subscriptions are $21 a year in county; $26 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown, and Federalsburg, Maryland; $31 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Seaford Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

by Joanne Cooke for Excellence in Native Plants, went to Victoria Thompson of Seaford for a branch of Pinxtar Bloom azalea. A special prize, the Anne Collins Daffodil Award, went to Sharon Christopher of Seaford for a white daffodil with a yellow center, ‘Uncharmed Melody.’ Gardeners are invited to attend the Spade and Trowel’s “Garden Day at Ross Mansion” on June 12, one of the monthly special events held at the mansion in observance of its 150th anniversary. Speakers will share information on gardening and sales of anything garden-related will be offered from plants to pots to garden art. Vendors may reserve a 10-foot by 10-foot space for $10 by calling Carol Kinsley at 628-1385. Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Bright spring colors reflect the theme of the class “Ross Mansion Elegance” in this winning entry by Ann O’Dea of Seaford.

NOTICE OF ELECTIONS

SUSSEX COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER ELECTIONS TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010 ALL TERMS BEGIN JULY 1, 2010 POLLS OPEN: 10:00 AM - 8:00 PM

DELMAR SCHOOL DISTRICT - FIVE YEAR TERM For Board Member David A. Burton, Jr. Vote for One (1) Phillip W.Th ompson

Polling Location: Delmar High School, 200 N. Eighth Street, Delmar

LAUREL SCHOOL DISTRICT - FIVE YEAR TERM For Board Member Vote for One (1)

David Brent Nichols Jerry W.Wh ite

Polling Location: Laurel High School, 1133 South Central Ave., Laurel

SEAFORD SCHOOL DISTRICT - FIVE YEAR TERM For Board Member Vote for One (1)

John P. Hanenfeld FrankP arks

Polling Location: Seaford School District Administrative Office Polling Location: 390 North Market Street Extended, Seaford

WOODBIDGE SCHOOL DISTRICT - FIVE YEAR TERM WalterP .J. Gilefski For Board Member DarrynH arris Vote for One (1) John C. Poe

Laurel Star

Polling Locations : Woodbridge High School, 308 Laws Street, Bridgeville; Woodbridge Elem. School, Sussex Highway, Greenwood 951 Norman Eskridge Highway Voters must be aDE Bona Fide Resident of the School District, a Citizen of the Seaford, 19973 United States •of America and 18 years of age or older. Proof of identity will (302) 629-9788 Fax (302) 629-9243 be r equired. The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is May published weekly by Morning Starto mail out absentee ballots. Affidavits 7, 2010 - 12 Noon - Deadline Publications 951 Norman Eskridge available Inc., for voting absentee by mail at: www.electionssc.delaware.gov Highway, Seaford, DE iodiOr call 856-5367 and19973. formsPer will be mailed. Affidavit must be submitted cals postage paid at Dover, DE. before the absentee ballot can be mailed to voter. Subscriptions are $21 a year in coun2010 12 Noon - Deadline ty;May $26 a10,year in -Kent and New Castle to vote an absentee ballot in person in the Office ofDelaware, the Department Elections. Counties, Delmar,of Sharptown and Federalsburg, Maryland; $31 DEPARTMENT OF ELECTIONS FOR SUSSEX COUNTY elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address N.Star, RACE changes to 119 Laurel P.O. STREET, Box 1000, GEORGETOWN, DE 19947 Seaford, DE 19973-1000. PHONE: 302-856-5367 Published by Morning Star Publications Inc.


MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

Older Americans are celebrated

Starting a new exercise routine wasn’t easy for Martha Robins, but it sure has been worth it. “I like to exercise,” she says. For 30 years, she worked in chicken plants, doing physically rigorous tasks. Martha says it wasn’t uncommon for chicken plant workers to have serious injuries that prevented them from being able to work. Martha was lucky — she was never seriously injured while working. After her retirement at the age of 60, however, she developed a painful arthritic condition, especially in her shoulder. Martha takes part in exercise classes at the Nanticoke Senior Center. Many other participants her age (she’ll be 80 in November) have difficulty doing strenuous activity standing up. Nanticoke offers a series of exercises that can be done while sitting in a chair. Martha says that, at first, the stretches were hard to do, but they worked. “Doing the exercises makes my arm feel better,” she says. “It’s hard at first, but it gets easier the more you do.” She felt so good, she decided to take her own exercise one step further. “We have an elastic that you pull out and in to your chest. I bought one elastic thing so I could do it at home,” she says. Martha does light aerobic exercise, too: going for walks and climbing stairs. “[It makes] my legs feel better. It’s easier to move around.” The Sussex County Aging Network (SCAN) is sharing Martha’s story in cel-

PAGE 5

Reunion - The Laurel High School class of 1954 celebrated their 55th class reunion on the weekend after Thanksgiving. On Saturday, Nov. 28, they enjoyed dinner at the Seaford Elks Lodge. The next morning, they enjoyed breakfast at Pizza King, Seaford. Front row, from left: Ruth Ann Cordrey Brumbley, Evelyn LeCates Messick, Eva Jane Bourgignon Edgell, Carol Taylor Lynn, Connie Carmean Peterson, Gail Allen Cole, Charlene Devlin Whaley, Marilyn Phillips White and Sandra Stoeckel Williams. Second row: Gardner Gootee, Wayne Lowe, Billy Shockley, Franklin Hastings, Ronald Wharton, Donald Martin, Gary White, Leroy James and James Whaley. Kenneth Hastings was absent in the picture. The next get-together for the class will be on Friday, May 14, 2010, at the home of LeRoy and Evelyn Messick at 6:30 p.m. All classmates are welcome.

Martha Robins at the Nanticoke Senior Center.

ebration of Older Americans Month. Since 1963, the U.S. has set aside the month of May to acknowledge the contributions and accomplishments of older Americans. This year’s theme is “Age Strong! Live Long!” One way that SCAN agencies help seniors fulfill this ambition is by providing exercise and health information programs to seniors. SCAN wants seniors to take an active interest in their own health and well-being. SCAN’s celebration of Older Americans month culminates with Older Americans Day, on May 28.

LIBRARY SILENT AUCTION - Cochairs, Barbara Glover and Patty Dale admire three of the items donated for the upcoming “Dinner in the Library” event on May 22 - a handmade quilt by Peg Gum, a Canvasback decoy by Bob Larkin and an Egg purse by Mitzi Perdue. Also submitted for auction to date, but not shown, are a photography portrait package from Hilltop Studios, four tickets to Disney World in Florida, an artificial flower arrangement from Act II florists, a 4 ft. tall Oriental vase, a Longaberger basket, jewelry from Meg Mulrine, a book “History of the United States CAPITOL” by Billy Allen, a Bath and Body basket, and a wine basket. Tickets are still available for the event. Call Betty Wilbanks at 629-2466.


PAGE 6

MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

Business Bottle Bill would end deposits, encourage curbside recycling

A measure bringing all Delawareans the option of curbside recycling and ending the Bottle Bill deposit program cleared the Senate recently on a 17-3 vote. If the bill is approved by the House and signed by Gov. Jack Markell, the state’s 5-cent deposit on a variety of glass and plastic bottles would end in December. It would be replaced by a four-year, 4-cent charge on the same containers. That money would be used to cover the recycling program’s startup costs. Consumers who bought bottles under the deposit program would have until Feb. 1, 2011, to collect their deposits. Besides axing the bottle bill, the measure would get the Delaware Solid Waste Authority out of the curbside recycling

business. It would defer that responsibility to municipalities or their contract waste haulers. Under the bill, municipalities and haulers would provide single-family homes, restaurants and bars with recycling bins by September 2011, multi-family residences, such as apartment complexes, would be brought into the program by January 2013 and other businesses would be added by January 2014. The bill also sets out statewide recycling goals. Delaware has long been faulted by environmentalists in state and nationally for having a very low recycling rate. The bill’s targets include a 50 percent rate by 2015 and a 60 percent rate by 2020.

Members of the Sussex County Association of Realtors (SCAOR) joined with the Sussex County Council on Tuesday, April 13, to observe the anniversary of the 1968 Fair Housing Act. Declared “Fair Housing Month” in Sussex County by the five-member council, April marks the 42nd year since the passing of the legislation, also known as Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act. United States President Lyndon Johnson signed the Fair Housing Act on April 11, 1968. The law has allowed for significant advancements in fair housing practices and created federal enforcement guidelines regarding discrimination based on race, color, religion or national origin. But improvements still need to be made. According to the United States Census Bureau, more than 75 percent of white families own their own home, compared to only about 50 percent of black and Hispanic households. The designation of April as “Fair Housing Month” in Sussex County brings attention to the continuing battle for equal opportunities under federal law. The Sussex County Council approved the procla-

mation, which they recognized during their weekly meeting on April 13. “Every American is assured, by law, the right to fair housing opportunities, regardless of who they are, what they believe, or where they come from,” Council President Vance C. Phillips said. “The Sussex County Council recognizes the importance of such a basic right. We’re proud to use this proclamation as a way to raise awareness about fair housing, and we look forward to our partnership with the Sussex County Association of Realtors in continuing that mission.” While laws vary from state to state, a 28-member Human Relations Commission governs fair housing issues in Delaware. Members are appointed by the governor and operate under a mandate to “ensure equal opportunity for all people of Delaware by protecting against practices that discriminate based on race, color, age, religion, marital status, familial status, national origin or disability.” To learn more about the Fair Housing Act of 1968, visit the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s website at www.hud.gov.

Anniversary of Fair Housing Act

Trinity Gala raises $10,000

On Saturday, April 10, the Delmarva community gathered at Heritage Shores in Bridgeville, to enjoy fine dining, live entertainment and a silent auction during the Trinity Foundation 3rd Annual Community Spring Gala. Guests enjoyed live music by Alex and Shiloh Wersen, a brother and sister duet from Salisbury, and dance music by DJ service, Beyond Entertainment. The event raised nearly $10,000 that is distributed by the Trinity Foundation to local and national organizations such as the Relay for Life, American Heart Association, Delaware Teen Challenge, and the Delaware Youth Leadership Academy. For information on the upcoming 7th Annual Putt for Life Golf Tournament on Aug. 28, visit www.ttifoundation.org.

Allen’s plans expansion

Allen Family Foods has announced plans for an immediate expansion of its Harbeson processing facility. Production will increase from 1 million chickens to 1.2 million per week by September. Additional production increases are planned for 2011/2012. This expansion will create approximately 70 new jobs at the facility in 2010 and up to 200 additional jobs during the 2011/2012 expansion period. The expansion will also supply a revenue stream for local contractors and suppliers who will work on the project.

County Bank elects new directors

ALLEN PROMOTED - Tommy Cooper, president of Cooper Realty Associates, congratulates John Allen on his promotion to vice president and general manager of the Seaford office. Allen’s duties will entail managing all day-to-day operations as well as new agent recruiting, training and supervision of all Seaford realtors.

Apprenticeship training awards

The Sussex Tech Adult Division in Georgetown will hold its annual apprenticeship training awards ceremony on Thursday, May 6, at 7 p.m. One hundred and ninety-two students will be honored at this ceremony for advancing in their chosen career training programs. These adult students will be recognized for completing their first through fifth years of related instructional training at Sussex Tech, as well as, “on the job training” (OJT) with their sponsoring employers. In addition, 26 Delaware and 10 Maryland state registered apprentices will be recognized by the Delaware and Maryland Departments of Labor and will advance to “Journeyperson” status. Those who would like to know more about the apprenticeship training program, should contact Bill Feher at 856-9035.

We know our stuff. Which helps when we’re insuring yours. Great coverage, rates and insurance advice from Nationwide®. Richard Small

Small Insurance and Financial Services 1130 South Central Ave. Laurel

Call me for a quote today

875-3333

©2008-2010 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company and Affiliated Companies. Nationwide Life Insurance Company. Home office: Columbus, Ohio 43215-2220. Nationwide, the Nationwide Framemark and On Your Side are federally registered service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. Not available in all states. We offer non-Nationwide homeowners insurance products only in FL.

Two new members have joined the Board of Directors of CB Financial and the Board of Directors of its whollyowned subsidiary, County Bank. County Bank Chief Lending Officer Joseph Shockley and Chief Operating Officer David Gillan were elected to the boards on March 31. Each of the senior officers has provided almost two decades of leadership to the bank in lending, branch management and business development capacities within County Bank. “The expansion of the bank’s board to 14 members ensures the company will continue to benefit from a diversity of experience and opinions,” said President and CEO Harold Slatcher.

WITH SO MANY CHOICES, WHY WOULD YOU CHOOSE

TO PAY TAXES? Tax-Free Municipal Bonds

1.10% TO 4.90%* *Yield effective 05/03/2010, subject to availability. Yield and market value may fluctuate if sold prior to maturity and the amount you receive from the sale of these securities may be less than, equal to, or more than the amount originally invested. Bond investments are subject to interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds can decrease and the investor can lose principal value. Any bond called prior to maturity results in reinvestment risk for the owner of the bond. May be subject to alternative minimum tax. Municipal bonds may have original issue discount. Some of the available issues of bonds are callable. Contact your local Edward Jones financial advisor for more information about maturity dates and applicable call provisions.

Melinda R Tingle, AAMS® Financial Advisor

204 Laureltowne Front St & Delaware Avenue Laurel, DE 19956 302-875-0355


PAGE 7

MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

MO V I E S

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200

Make smarter buying decisions

SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRI, 5/7 TO TUES. 5/13 Iron Man 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . 1:30, 4:15, 6:50, 9:30

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3D: 1:00, 3:40, 6:25, 9:05

Babies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:15, 3:20, 5:10, 7:05, 9:00 Furry Vengeance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . 1:20, 3:50, 6:30, 8:45 Nightmare on Elm Street . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:10, 4:45, 7:25, 9:40

The Back-Up Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . 1:50, 4:10, 6:40, 9:05 The Losers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . 2:05, 4:35, 6:50, 9:15

Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . .1:00, 3:05, 5:05, 7:10, 9:10

Death At A Funeral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . .1:10, 3:15, 5:15, 7:20, 9:40 Kick-Ass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:40, 4:30, 7:00, 9:35

Date Night . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . .1:05, 3:10, 5:10, 7:15, 9:20 Clash of The Titans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . 3D 2:00, 4:40, 7:00, 9:30

The Last Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:35, 6:45 How To Train Your Dragon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . 3D 1:30, 4:00, 6:35, 8:50 Bounty Hunter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:20, 9:30

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 5/7 Iron Man 2 NEW . . . . . . . PG13 . 10:30 am, 11:00 am, 11:30 am, 12:30, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:30, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:30, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30, 9:30, 10:30, 11:00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3D: 10:00 am, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00 Furry Vengeance . . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:50 am, 1:20, 6:40m 9:10 A Nightmare on Elm Street . . . . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . 10:10 am, 11:50 am, 12:10, 12:50, 2:20, 3:10, 4:50, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5:35, 7:20, 8:05, 9:50, 10:20 The Back-up Plan . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:35, 5:10, 7:40, 10:10 The Losers . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11:20 am, 1:50, 4:20, 6:50, 9:20 Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:20 am, 1:10 Death at A Funeral . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:15 am, 12:40, 3:20, 5:40, ,8:20, 10:40 Kiss-Ass . . . . . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:40 am, 1:40 . 4:45, 10:35 Date Night . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:05 am, 12:20, 3:00, 5:25, 8:10, 10:45 Clash of The Titans . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:10, 2:45, 5:20, 7:55, 10:50 The Last Song . . . . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3:40, 6:20, 9:00 How to Train Your Dragon . . . . . . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11:40 am, 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40 OC = Open Captioned & Descriptive Audio Showtimes www .fandango .com/21804_movietheatershowtimes

Clayton Theater Dagsboro, Del. 20 732-3744 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 5/7 THRU THURSDAY, 5/13 Iron Man 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . Nightly 7:30, Sat . 4:30, Sun . 1:30 & 4:30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Closed Monday & Tuesday

s ’ r Open for Season! e m l t E e Mark

Bedding Flowers Vegetable Plants Herbs • Shrubs Open 8 am to 7 pm 7 Days A Week

Rt. 404/18, GeoRGetown, De 302-337-8388

Fresh Produce Delaware Honey

when you

subscribe to the

seaford/Laurel star FREE* classifieds

With and local shopping resources

saving is Easy.

onlY 21

One Year $ 00* Subscription One PLUS ReCeIVe MOnth Please send the Laurel Star Seaford Star My 1 year subscription ( plus 1 month) payment is enclosed.

FRee

Name: __________________________________________________ Address: _________________________________________________ City: _______________________ State: _____ Zip: _______________ Mail to: The Star Circulation, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973 or call 302-629-9788 with credit card payment OFFER GOOD THRU 4-30-2010

FREE* pERsonal classiFiEds for sTaR subscribers (some exclusions may apply)

Call 629-9788 to plaCe your ad

Sussex County $21 Kent & New Castle Counties $26 Delmar, MD & Federalsburg, MD $26 Out of State $31


PAGE 8

MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

Carolyn Calio serves at helm of fundraiser for 20 years By James Diehl

C

arolyn Calio has a special bond with the town of Laurel; a place very near and dear to her heart, she never plans on leaving her beloved hometown, no matter who or what tries to make her do so. “I’ve been disgruntled with the town before, and [my husband] Frank actually talked about moving out of town one time,” says Calio, who was born and raised in Laurel and is a graduate of the Laurel High School Class of 1960. “But I said we weren’t going anywhere. I was born in this town; this is my town and nobody who comes in is going to tell me what to do because I was here first.” A mother of five children – all graduates of the Laurel Public School System – the Calios today live a quiet life in the home they have occupied for decades. Frank Calio is a businessman and former state elections commissioner, while his wife has devoted much of her life, at least the last 20 years of it, to the Laurel Alumni Association. Founded in the late 1980s as a way of bringing graduates of Laurel High School together for one night each year – and awarding scholarships to as many deserving seniors as possible – the association today boasts more than 1,000 members from LHS classes spanning 80 years. This year marks the 20th consecutive year the alumni association has held its annual banquet at the Laurel Volunteer Fire Department, and the 20th year that Calio has been in charge of the event. The 2010 banquet on May 15 also marks the final time she will be in charge of the festivities. “This is my final year and I’m going to miss a lot of the people who are on my committee,” says Calio, who feels it’s time to give someone else a chance, though she still plans on being involved with the event moving forward. “I’ve always looked at the banquet as sort of a large class reunion. I’m very happy about the ones who keep coming, and can come, year after year.” Her husband has a much different perspective about his wife giving up her role as banquet chairperson after two decades. “I’m just looking forward to her finally being able to sit down and eat with me,” he says with a chuckle. At its first banquet in1990, the Laurel Alumni Association awarded three $1,000

Heroes series

If you know of someone who has dedicated his or her life to service to others, suggest their names for this series. Contact James Diehl at 302-222-2685 or email Bryant richardson, brichardson@ mspublications.com scholarships to graduates of Laurel High School. Twenty years later, with the help of Calio and scores of other committed volunteers, more than 400 attendees will watch as the association hands out nearly 30 scholarships, some totaling several thousand dollars. “This banquet is just so good to see,” says Calio. “We’ve put in the newspaper before that this is the highlight of Laurel’s year because there are so many people who come to it that went to school together. People may even come for the first time and find out that, not only are some of their friends still alive, but they are there at the banquet. That’s really special.” Through the years, there have been happy times, there have been emotional times and there have been countless occasions that have stuck in the collective memories of organizers and attendees. A favorite tale involved Laurel alumnus, and infamous scalloped oyster connoisseur Pat Murphy, vice president of Morning Star Publications. “The ladies auxiliary knew that Pat loved scalloped oysters, so they came out of the kitchen near the end of the meal one year with this great big pan of scalloped oysters and put it right in front of him,” Calio remembers. “I thought that was pretty funny.” A tradition at the annual Laurel Alumni Association banquet is seating honored students as a group, at tables apart from their family members. It has been designed that way since its inception, and Calio doesn’t plan on it changing any time soon – at least if she has anything to say about it. “We like to let the students have their own tables; we don’t want them to sit with their mommies and daddies,” says Calio matter-of-factly. “Most of the time, parents cooperate and it works out really well. I know that they’re proud of their child, but it is their child who wins the scholarship.

Carolyn Calio has been organizing the Laurel Alumni Association’s annual scholarship awards banquet every year since 1990. May 15 will mark her 20th, and final, event as head of the association’s banquet committee.

It’s their night and we want them to have fun.” Long before she became the driving force behind the annual alumni association banquet, Calio was a student at the old Laurel High School, currently the town’s middle school. She was a freshman there when her future husband was a senior. But she never really paid much attention to the dark haired young Italian roaming the hallways, at least in those days. “It was [Charlene] Whaley who got us together; I either love her or hate her most days for doing that,” says Calio with a sly grin. “Frank and I knew each other in high school, but I had other things on the fire then.” After having two children and losing her husband suddenly in a car accident, Carolyn Calio eventually went to work for her brother in his Laurel-based dental practice. Several years later, she met Frank Calio and eventually left her job as a dental assistant. “After I married Frank [in 1969], he said that I didn’t have to work anymore. But that was a big joke,” Calio says with a chuckle. “I just went from [working

on] the teeth to [working on] the feet at Frank’s shoe store.” In the late 1980s, Calio attended the first meeting of the soon-to-be Laurel Alumni Association, an organization that was the brainchild of Laurel High School graduate Brad Spicer. Ralph Gootee, the association’s first president, soon asked her to chair the banquet committee. The rest, as they say, is history. “We just wanted to have a social event once per year where we could present scholarships to worthy graduating seniors,” she says today. “We had cash donations, fundraisers and things like that to raise money.” Twenty years later, even through the country’s worst economic downtown since the Great Depression, the Laurel Alumni Association continues to thrive and continues to follow through with its original mission. Dues are today the same as they’ve been since day one – a staggering $5 a year. This year, there will even be a member representing the class of 1930 at the annual banquet – Marie Johnson Waller’s unofficial 80th class reunion. Continued to page nine

‘World War II Heroes of Southern Delaware’ and ‘Remembering Sussex County’

302-856-7773

Clifford D. Short, Independent Agent

606 E. Market St. • Georgetown, DE 19947 SINCE 1983

CLIFFORD SHOR T

INSURANCE

Titles from Award Winning Writer

James Diehl are available for purchase at

www.ww2-heroes.com


MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

PAGE 9

Postal workers ‘Stamp Out Hunger’ on May 8

On Saturday, May 8, Delaware letter carriers will again help “Stamp Out Hunger!” to provide food assistance to Delawareans who depend on the Food Bank of Delaware’s network of hungerrelief agencies for support. Leave a sturdy bag containing non-perishable foods, such as canned soup, canned vegetables, pasta, rice or cereal, next to your

mailbox before the time of regular mail delivery on Saturday, May 8. Food items should be in nonbreakable containers, such as boxes and cans. Local letter carriers will be collecting donations from homes across the state and delivering them to the Food Bank of Delaware.

Organizers hope to exceed last study measuring food security in For more information about year’s record-setting total of 73.4 the United States, the number of the Food Bank of Delaware, visit million pounds of donated food, Americans living in food insecure www.fbd.org. as well as surpass one billion homes increased from 36.2 milTo help you remember this pounds of food collected over the lion in 2007, to 49.1 million in food assistance event, take time history of the drive. 2008. Of this total, approximately now to place a sturdy bag in a Last year, letter carriers in one in four is a child (16.7 milconspicuous place. Better yet, fill Delaware collected close to lion). up a bag now and place it near 74,000 pounds of food. For more information about your front door, so you don’t forAccording to the U.S. Departthe effort, visit www.helpget to set it next to your mailbox ment of Agriculture’s annual stampouthunger.com. on Saturday 10CSDB_05ADV_6x10MRNGSTR_0427_00375 (Seaford Star & Laurel Star) 6”w morning. X 10”H

want to do my best to try and help them.” Through her involvement in local worthwhile causes and organizations, Calio remains firmly implanted in Laurel – it is “her town” after all. She has no patience for people who move in and try to change things in “Bulldog Country.” “I have a real problem with people who come in here, say how wonderful things are, and then want to turn around and change everything,” she says. “If it’s so wonderful, then why change it?” Frank and Carolyn Calio have five children, nine grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. They continue to be integral parts of the Laurel community, as they have been for more than a half a century. These clinics are a chance to get some real hands-on practice. In the process, you’ll gain confidence as you get more experience when you volunteer for the Sussex County Habitat for Humanity Women Build in Laurel. To sign up for the clinics or learn more about SCHFH’s Women Build program, visit www.sussexcountyhabitat.org or contact Kathy Goodman at 302245-4096. Pre-registration is required. Registered volunteers should wear comfortable clothing and bring a ready-to-learn attitude. All supplies will be provided on site. For more information about Habitat for Humanity International’s Women Build program, visit www.habitat.org/wb.

Accelerate your savings with May’s CD rates!

Calio serves her alumni Continued from page eight

“We’re very happy for people who can come in from year to year, especially since we don’t know how many more years they’re going to be able to make it here,” says Calio. “It’s just so good to see.” In addition to her role with the alumni association, Calio remains heavily involved with planning her own class reunion every five years and sits on the board of directors for the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club. Once a month, the board of the club’s Laurel chapter meets at the Calio home near Records Pond for a home cooked breakfast – all prepared by Calio herself. “There are a lot of kids out there who need the Boys & Girls Club, kids who just don’t have the supervision,” she says. “I just

Look-In Glass Shoppe holding jewelry sale

Shop for silver and gold jewelry and other select gifts in the lobby at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital on Thursday, May 6 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Friday, May 7, from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Look-In Glass Shoppe (located within Nanticoke Memorial Hospital) is hosting a “Pretty Pickins Jewelry Sale” with items from $5 to $500. Pretty Pickins will also buy your gold, silver and platinum on the spot. Payroll deductions for purchases are available for eligible NHS employees. All proceeds from The Look-In Glass Shoppe benefit Nanticoke Health Services.

Women Build ‘Clinic’

Have you ever wondered how HGTV “build it” hosts never seem to bash their fingers when swinging a hammer? Well, they were taught and then they practiced. If you don’t know where to start and you want to know what they know, Lowe’s, the 2010 underwriter for Habitat for Humanity International’s Women Build program, is offering a series of “How To Clinics” to teach women the practical know-how and skills involved in building a home.

Miss Delaware Golf Classic

The Miss Delaware Scholarship Organization will host the Miss Delaware Golf Classic on Monday, June 7. The event will tee off at Maple Dale Country Club, Dover, with a noon shotgun start. For more information, contact Georgeann White at 302-2361955, 302-934-9797, or email her at ghwhite70@aol.com. Information and forms are also available online at www.MissDE. org.

2.25

%

APY1

3-Year CD2 As of 4/27/10

3.00

%

APY1

5-Year CD2 As of 4/27/10

For friendly, hometown service, call or stop in today. Open an account in just minutes, and make more money in May. 1-302-349-4512 • Toll free: 1-888-765-6654 502 E Market St, Greenwood, DE 19950 MyDiscoverBank.com Banking Hours

Lobby

Drive Thru

Monday–Friday Saturday

9:00am–6:00pm 8:30am–1:00pm

8:30am–6:00pm 8:30am–1:00pm

On1Annual OctoberPercentage 3, 2008, FDIC Yielddeposit (APY). This offer applies to personal accounts only. CD rate based on a $1,000 minimum balance and insurance from appliestemporarily to a 3-yearincreased and 5-year term. A penalty may be charged for early CD withdrawal. Fees could reduce earnings on the account. $100,000 to $250,000 per Advertised rate is valid asdepositor of 4/27/10 and subject to change daily without notice. through DecemberFDIC 31, 2009. 2 On 10/3/08, deposit insurance temporarily increased from $100,000 to $250,000 per depositor, per deposit category,

through 12/31/13. ©2010 Discover Bank, Member FDIC

MRNGSTR_0427_00375


PAGE 10

MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

Community Bulletin Board Celebrity Golf Classic

NASCAR legend Bobby Allison and Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame third baseman, Brooks Robinson, will be two of the top sports celebrities appearing at the Horsey Family Youth Foundation Celebrity Golf Classic. The annual fundraiser will take place May 12-13 at Heritage Shores Golf and Country Club. For more information, contact Dale Webb at 841-5120.

‘Touch a Truck’ on May 22

The Banning and Trinity Foundations will hold a “Touch-a-Truck” family event on Saturday, May 22, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at Trinity Transport’s parking lot. The event will feature all types of equipment for kids to touch, feel and explore, including trucks, bulldozers, electrical units, fire trucks, police vehicles, farm equipment, race cars and more. Fun activities for kids include face painting, a horn honking show and “meet the local heroes,” area policemen and firemen. There will be plenty of refreshments, including Pizza King pizza, hot dogs, snow cones, cotton candy and popcorn. Admission is $5 per

person or $15 for four people. Proceeds benefit the Banning and Trinity Foundations, which support community development through supporting programs such as the Delaware Teen Challenge and the Delaware Youth Leadership Academy and national charities such as Relay for Life and the American Heart Association. For more information, visit www.trinitytransport.com or contact Brandy McMullen at brandy.mcmullen@trinitytransport.com or 800-846-3400.

They still need addresses for the following classmates: Luiz Bueno, Tyronne Drummond, Barbara Frazier Burk, Faye Hayes Wright, Irvin Johnson, Kenny Mullin, Ronald West, Wayne Hastings, Dee Dee Helfrich Anderson, Pete Viggiano, Susan Hydock Wessells and Sandra Turner. If you have any information to share, call Donna Hastings Angell at 6298077 or email her at woodlandangell@ hotmail.com.

Flapjack Fundraiser Breakfast

Come join us for a give-a-way on May 8, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. at St. Luke’s Parish House in Seaford. Delicious soup, sandwiches and dessert will be served and clothes of all sizes that have been gently used will be available. This event is sponsored by the women of the Seaford Wesleyan Church (The Ark). If you have any questions, please call the church office at 628-1020.

Applebee’s in Seaford is hosting a Flapjack Fundraiser Breakfast to support Laurel Kids Connection Mentoring Program on Saturday, May 15, from 8 to 10 a.m. The cost is $6 per person. Tickets may be purchased at the door. For more information contact Glenn Phillips Sr., program assistant of DAPI – Empowering Youth for a Bright Future, at 629-7790 ext 317 or 236-0321.

Class of 1965 need addresses

The SHS Class of 1965 Reunion Committee is planning their 45th reunion on Saturday, Oct. 9.

Soup & sandwich give away

Classic car & motorcycle show

The 5th Annual Classic Car and Motorcycle Show will be held on May 8, from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., at the Bethel Worship Center, 2 miles south of the Blades Royal Farms, next to the Ark Church on Rt. 13. There will be lots of fun for everyone. Registration is $10, from 8 – 10 a.m. Top 12 plaques for cars and top 12 plaques for bikes will be given out as well as dash plaques for the first 50 people.

There will be breakfast sandwiches all morning as well as chicken, ribs, hotdogs and drinks. Also, check out the bake sale and flower sale. Rain date is May 15. For more info contact Joe Lecates at 8582445 or Robert Ferrell at 372-9376.

Rabies Vaccination Clinic

There will be a rabies vaccination clinic on Saturday, May 22, 8 – 10 a.m., at the Seaford Fire Station, rain or shine. Leashes and carriers are required. Dr. Mike Metzler of Four Paws is the attending veterinarian. Cost will be $13 rabies, $10 distemper/parvo shots. Cash only. The clinic is sponsored by Homeless Cat Helpers, Inc.

Clarence St. COG Youth Yard Sale

Come to the Clarence Street Church of God Youth Yard Sale on Saturday, May 8, from 6 a.m. to noon. Church is located on Rt. 20 E., past the Concord Deli lot on the left. Clothes, toys and lots more will be available. Hotdogs and soda will be sold between 10 a.m. and noon.

National Safe Boating Day

The U.S. Coast Guard Seaford Flotilla will be presenting National Safe Boating Day at the Nanticoke River Marina on Saturday, May 22, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Marina is located on 30 S. Market St., Seaford. Admission is free. Displays and activities wll include

We can get you in,

get you help & on your way in 15 minutes or less.

®

Locally owned and operated

800 Norman Eskridge Hwy, Rt. 20 Ames, Plaza Seaford, DE • 302-628-7890

We have the perfect paint for every project!

Starting at

Starting at

14

99

Gal.

Essence™ Interior or Exterior Latex Paint 1965102

Starting at

16

99

Gal. After $5 Mail-in Rebate.* You Pay $21.99

Rotal™ Interior or Exterior Latex Paint

2499 Gal.

Lowest Price Ever!

1964824

* Maximum rebate $50 for 10 gallons total per household. Rebate offer applies for purchase of select Royal and Royal Finest paint only. See store for mail-in rebate form.

After $5 Mail-in Rebate.* You Pay $29.99

Royal Finest™ Latex Paint EThe only paint with Scotchgard™ Protector so stains wash right off. Lifetime warranty. 1400183

5

$ Save

After mail-in rebate on select ™

Royal Paint!

RommelsACE.com Price good May 1 through May 31, 2010. Plus 9 other locations offering ACE Paint including Perry Hall, MD - Stevensville, MD - Cambridge, MD Severna Park, MD - Ocean City, MD - Salisbury, MD - Dover, DE - Selbyville, DE - Exmore, VA Ace stores are independently owned and operated; offers and/or Ace Rewards® benefits are available only at participating stores. The prices in this advertisement are suggested by Ace Hardware Corporation, Oak Brook, IL. Product selection/color and sale items and prices may vary by store. This advertisement may also contain clearance and closeout items and items at Ace everyday low prices. Some items may require assembly. Return and “rain check” policies vary by store; please see your Ace store for details. Product selection and prices at acehardware.com vary from those in this advertisement. Ace is not responsible for printing or typographical errors. Prices are valid through May 31, 2010, while supplies last.


MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010 safety information, USCG Auxiliary Seaford free vessel safety check, Sea Scouts, fitting booth for life jackets, sign up for safe boating class or paddlesports class and more. For further information, contact Cindi Chaimowitz at 398-0309.

SHS 20 year reunion

Seaford High School Class of 1990 will hold their 20 Year Reunion on Saturday, Oct. 9, from 5 to 10 p.m., in the Ball Room at Heritage Shores Club House in Bridgeville. If your check is received before June 29, the cost is $35 per person. Checks must be mailed to: Sandy Whitten Stinson, 31521 Miller Road, Cordova, MD 21625. Checks should be made payable to: SHS Class of 1990. After June 29, the cost is $45 per person. This fee is nonrefundable. For more information, visit the Facebook page, “Seaford Senior High Class of 1990.”

Free community yard sale

Christ Lutheran Church in Seaford will hold a community yard sale on Saturday, May 22, from 7 a.m. to noon. Spaces are free and the church will sell hot dogs and sodas. Church members are asked to donate items that can be sold at the yard sale. We will have a table in the old dining room where you can put items to be sold. Proceeds will benefit the new activity center for the community. To reserve a space or have items picked up that you would like to sell, call Eric Stanton at 628-1946.

dren of all ages. Hunt through the library for funny, unique and intriguing items and win some cool prizes. • Teen Advisory Board meeting on  Thursday, May 13, at 3:30 p.m. • The Seaford Library and Cultural  Center has joined IHOP in an effort to raise money for the library. Eat a meal at the Seaford, Dover, Rehoboth, or Salisbury, Md. IHOP locations and return the itemized receipt along with a comment card to the Seaford Library and Cultural Center. We must have the itemized receipt in order to receive the reimbursement. The Library will receive 10% of the total receipt. • The “Science and Religion” book  discussion will meet at the library on Monday, May 17, at 6 p.m. For more information, call Rose Harrison at 629-2524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us. • Teen Manga/Anime Club meets  Wednesday, May 19, at 3:30 p.m. Open to teens ages 12 to seniors in high school. For more information, call Kenda at 6292524. • “Family Movie Afternoon” on  Wednesday, May 26, at 3:30 p.m. This program is for families and children of all ages. Bring a pillow and a blanket. Plus, get a sneak preview of the Summer Reading Program, “Make a Splash!” The movie  is rated PG. For more information, call 629-2524.

Book/plant/yard/bake sale

Yard sale

Seaford Church of the Nazarene on Route 13 will hold a yard sale on Saturday, May 8, from 7 a.m. to noon. Breakfast and baked goods will be available. Tables are $10 and spaces are $7. To reserve a spot and/or table, call 337-7162.

Seaford Library

PAGE 11

• “Lights, Camera, Action!” the Seaford Library and Cultural Center hosts “Movie Night” on Thursday, May 6, at 5:30 p.m. We provide the movie and refreshments; you take a seat and enjoy the show. • “Baby Bookworms,” an infant story  time is Monday, May 10, at 10:30 a.m. For more information, call 629-2524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us. • “Toddler Tales,” a toddler story time,  is Tuesday, May 11, at 10:30 a.m. • The Seaford Library and Cultural  Center board meeting will be held on Tuesday, May 11 and Tuesday, May 25, at 6 p.m. • “Splash Around for Lost Treasure in  the Library” on Wednesday, May 12, from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Fun for families and chil-

The Friends of the Seaford Library annual Book/Plant/Yard/and Bake Sale is from 7 a.m. to noon on Saturday, May 8, at the Seaford District Library, 600 N. Market St. Ext. Use the door at the north end of the building. Rain or shine. If you have items or plants to donate, they may be left any time. No clothing accepted. Proceeds will help fund educational programs. For more information, call the library at 629-2524.

SHS Class of 2012 BBQ

Seaford High School’s Class of 2012 will hold a chicken bbq on Saturday, May 8, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., in front of Home Team Realty on Stein Highway in Seaford. The bbq is to raise money for next year’s prom. Pre-orders or drive up will be available. Cost is $7 per chicken dinner. For more information, call Leigh Ann Tull or Kedra Lineweaver at 6294587.

N.R.Y.C.-Blades Yard Sale

The Nanticoke River Yacht Club, Blades, is holding a yard sale on May 8 with a rain date of May 15. Tables are $10 ea. Call 875-7143 for table reservations.

SEAFORD EAGLE DINER 23412 Sussex Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973

302-629-3338 or 302-629-3299

Hours: Open 6 a.m. - 10 p.m. - 7 Days a Week!

Check Out Our Mother’s Day Special Buy One Dinner Get Second Half Off Breakfast 8 oz Broiled or Special.......... $199 Dinners Include Soup or Salad, NY Strip Fried Trio 2 Vegetables & Dessert Lunch Special FLOUNDER, & 21 Pc. 16 oz 16 oz Soup or Salad SHRIMP & $ 95 & Dessert ...... 5 Shrimp SCALLOPS Prime Rib T-Bone Dinner Special 95 $ 95 $ 99 $ 95 $ 2 Vegs., Soup or Salad with Experienced Hostess - Call or Stop In To Apply Dessert ..........$895

11

16

16

16

g n i m o o l B Are Mother’s Day Gift Ideas Pay Us An Early Visit For The Best Quality At Very Reasonable Prices

• Thousands of Geraniums Red, White, Fuchsia 50¢ per plant & up

• 175 Varieties of Star Roses • Thousands of Bedding Plants (95 Varieties) - $110 per pack & up

• Thousands of Shrubs, Trees, Azaleas, Rhododendrons & Ground Covers • Thousands of Vegetable Plants • Big Selection of Herbs

HUNDREDS OF PERENNIALS & PANSIES, PEAT MOSS, POTTING SOIL, COW MANURE, PINE BARK, CHIPS, NUGGETS & MULCH Red • Black • Cedar • Cypress

Buy from the Grower and

SAVE

Largest Selection of Potted Plants in Southern Delaware

10” Hanging Basket $900or 2/$17 Premium (White Swirl Pots) With Coupon Good Thru May 15, 2010 • Cannot combine coupons

10% OFF Total Purchase $10 or More

With Coupon

Good Thru May 15, 2010 Cannot combine coupons

Jeff’s

3 Gal. Knock

Roses

$

Out

95 14 With Coupon

Good Thru May 15, 2010 Cannot combine coupons

Greenhouses & Gift Shop

SERVING DELMARVA FOR 48 YEARS

Main St.

302

875-3420

Bethel, Del.

800

276-3420

Mon.- Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-5, Sunday 12-4


MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

PAGE 12

Troop 90 Benefit Dance

The parents of Boy Scouts Troop 90 in Laurel are having a benefit dance on Friday, May 7, from 8 p.m. to midnght, at the Laurel Fire Hall to raise money for a new trailer. Cost is $10 at the door. Proceeds will be used to purchase a new, larger trailer to carry camping equipment. The goal is to purchase and equip the trailer before a June camping trip to Lehigh Valley for white water rafting. There will be light snacks, a silent auction and music by The Jones Boys.

AARP Refresher Driving Course

AARP will be offering a Refresher Driving Course on May 17, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Laurel Senior Center. The cost is $12 for AARP members, $14 for non-members. To register for the course, call 875-2536.

‘Bridge to a New Position’

The Sussex Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) announces a new “Bridge to a New Position” series of three free workshops, which will be held at the Laurel Public Library. Part one on Tuesday, May 11, from 1 to 4 p.m., will cover, “Overcoming the Trauma of Job Loss” and “Maximizing Resources for Your Job Search.” Part two on Tuesday, May 18, from 1 to 4 p.m., will cover, “Resume Writing” and “Understanding the Interview Process.”The final workshop on Tuesday, May 25, from 1 to 4 p.m., will consist of one-on-one consultations and mock interviews. These workshops are co-sponsored by Delaware Innovation at Work, Delmarva SHRM and Sussex RSVP. Attendance is limited to 20 participants. Call 856-5815 to register.

Strawberry Festival is May 22

The Fourth Annual Strawberry Festival is Saturday, May 22, at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Laurel. Breakfast, lunch, craft tables, everything strawberry and entertainment too begins at 8 a.m. Event includes Historical Society art events, the newest book in the cemetery series, “Cemeteries in the Town of Laurel,” and tours through some of the notable cemeteries in the Laurel area.

Sale benefits Historical Society

The Laurel Historical Society will offer a limited number of art objects, antiques,

collectibles and photographs of Laurel during the 1970’s at a benefit art sale from the collections of Laurel native Charles Palmer and former Laurel resident Reid Williamson on Saturday, May 22, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., as part of St. Philip’s Church Strawberry Festival. The shows will take place at the society’s two properties, The Cook House Headquarters at 502 E. Fourth St., and at their restoration Studley House project located at 600 E. 6th St. Admission is $6 to each show, or a combination ticket to both sites can be purchased for $10. Tickets can be purchased at the LHS Sales ticket booth at the Strawberry Festival or at either door. At the festival, the society will also launch its newest publication in the Laurel Cemetery series, as well as sponsor a bus tour of area graveyards. All profits will support the work of the Laurel Historical Society. For more information, visit www.laurelhistoricalsociety.com, email laurelhistoricalsociety@hotmail.com, or call 875-2820.

Annual Art and History Tour

The Laurel Historical Society will host three activities during the 4th annual Strawberry Festival on Saturday, May 22, at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church, located at 600 S. Central Ave., Laurel. The first offering is a limited-seating bus tour of Laurel cemeteries, which are currently being documented as part of the society’s ongoing cemetery transcription project. Tickets for the 90 minute van tour are $10 each and will be sold on a first come, first served basis at the Society sales table at the festival. Festival doors will open at 8:30 a.m. The non-stop bus tour will be held at 11 a.m. and repeated again at 1 p.m. Also that day, art objects and photographic prints by former Laurel residents, Charles Palmer and Reid Williamson, will be for sale at the society headquarters, The Cook House (502 E. Fourth St.) and The Studley House (600 E. 6th St.). Admission to the art sale is $6 at each house or $10 for both sites. Finally, the society will host a book signing and sales for its latest volume in the cemetery series at the festival from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. and again on Sunday, May 23, from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Cook House. This second book will cover the cemeteries within the town limits and will complement the previously published Odd Fellow Cemetery book, both of which will be for sale at the festival. For more information, email laurelhistoricalsociety@hotmail.com or call 8751344 and leave a message.

Re/Max Eastern Shore ncy ce Nancy Price, Realtor a N 628-7653 (Office) Pri 302

nancyprice@remax.net

236-3619 (cell)

302

Luxury in Beaver Dam

Priced to Sell Owners Relocating

Water vieWs With private access for canoeing! 2700 sq. ft. - 3 Full floors - completely remodeled - new everything! 5 BRs, 2 1/2 Baths, granite counters, all hardwood floors, eat-in kitchen with bar & cozy sitting area with fireplace. Interior decorated with exquisite taste to welcome your family home. Perfect for the large family or just for those who love to entertain family and friends! MLs# 556968 Reduced 45K. Now being offered at $297,900 Owners must move. FHA available.

Strawberry Festival at Hen House

The Hen House, located at 11465 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, will be having a Strawberry Festival on Saturday, May 22, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be a car show, Moon Bounce, strawberry picking, free homemade strawberry ice cream (while it lasts), and the Delaware State Police will be there to do fingerprinting and ID-ing from 10 a.m. to 12 noon.

Sandwich sale in Delmar

The Delmar Church of God of Prophecy, will be hosting a sandwich sale on May 8 from 9 a.m. Included will be oyster sandwiches, crab cakes, soft crabs, chicken salad, cheesesteak subs, hamburgers and hot dogs. The church is located on Rt. 13 and Dorothy Road (3 mi. north of the Md./ Del. state line). For more information, call the church at 875-7824.

Basket Bingo for Relay for Life

Geranium Sale

The Delmar Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary will hold a geranium sale on Saturday, May 8, from 8 to 11 a.m., at the Delmar Fire House. Cost is $6 each. The sale will benefit the ladies auxiliary. For more information, call 875-2195 or 846-2335.

Book and bake sale

The Delmar Library’s Spring Book and Bake Sale will be held on Friday, May 14, from 4 to 7 p.m. and Saturday, May 15, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Refreshments will be sold by the Delmar Kiwanis Club. In addition, yard sale space is available on Saturday for $10. Call the library at 846-9894 to reserve a space. Bring your own table. This event is sponsored by the Friends of the Delmar Library and all proceeds go towards new programs and materials to benefit library users.

The Mothers Against Cancer Relay for Life Team will have its annual Basket Bingo on Thursday, May 6, at the Salisbury Moose Lodge. Doors open at 5 p.m. and games begin at 6:30 p.m. Food, raffles, silent auction, door prizes and 50/50 will be available. The Delmar Teens Against Cancer Relay for Life Team will sell baked goods. Tickets are $20 in advance or $25 at the door. For more information, call Terry at 410-896-3195. All proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society.

Kiwanis Prayer Brakfast

The Kiwais Club of Delmar will hold their annual prayer breakfast at Camelot Hall, St. Stephens United Methodist Church, 101 State Street, on Saturday, May 8, at 9 a.m. Tickets may be purchased at the door. The Rev. Timothy Duffield Sr. will deliver the message. Music will be provided by the Gospel Choir from Union United Methodist Chuch. For further information, contact Jack Lynch at 410-896-9067 or Pete Overbaugh at 410-896-3725.

Sacred Sounds

Sacred Sounds are performing at the 11 a.m. service at the Delmar Wesleyan Church on Sunday May 23. The church is located on 800 East St. in Delmar. There will also be a performance on Sat., May 29.There will be a strawberry festival and yard sale. Cost of table is $10. Time is 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.. To rent a table call the church at 410-896-3600.

Pancake breakfast

The Delmar Fire Department will hold a Pancake Breakfast on Saturday, May 8, from 8 to 11 a.m., to benefit the ladies auxiliary. The menu includes pancakes, bacon, sausage, scrapple, eggs, coffee, juice and milk. Cost is $7 for adults, $3 for children ages 6-12 and free for children 5 and under. For more information, call 875-2195 or 846-2335.

Memorial Day Celebration

The Town of Bridgeville will host a Memorial Day Celebration at 9:30 a.m. on Monday, May 31, at the Veterans Memorial in the Bridgeville Cemetery. Join us for this special recognition of our veterans.

Indoor yard sale

The church ladies are sponsoring an indoor yard sale on Saturday, May 15, from 7 a.m. until noon, in the Fellowship Hall of Union United Methodist Church, Bridgeville. For more information, call the church office at 337-7409.

Join a Private Club at a Reasonable Price! Golf, Pool and Social Memberships available

• Join before June 1st and save $750 • Unlimited Cart Plan for $500 • Single golf memberships available, even if married

Call 410-479-1425

FREE

Round of Golf

If you are not a member of another club

for info or schedule free round

Caroline Country Club

Denton, Maryland • www.carolinecountryclub.com


MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010 Library, call 302-349-5309 or ask any librarian the next time you visit the library.

Eat at IHOP to help the library

Greenwood CHEER Dinner Club

The Greenwood CHEER Activity Center will host the Greenwood Dinner Club on Thursdays from 5 to 7 p.m. Join us for an evening of fellowship and a delicious dinner entrée, dessert and beverage. Card games are from 6 to 9 p.m. Cost for members is $5 and non-members is $6. For menus and more information, call Susan Welch at 349-5237.

Enjoy a meal any time at the IHOP restaurant in Seaford and support the Greenwood Library. Simply fill out a comment card after eating and give it to the cashier as you pay. You will be given a special receipt which you then take to the Greenwood Library on your next visit.

Home-style breakfast

Please join us at the Greenwood CHEER Activity Center for a home-style breakfast in honor of Mother’s Day, on Saturday, May 8, from 8:00-11:00 a.m. Cost is $4 per person and the menu includes scrambled eggs, sausage, bacon, hash browns, biscuits, juice and coffee. For more information call the center at 349-5237.

Older American’s open house

All you can eat spaghetti dinner

You are cordially invited to the Greenwood CHEER Center for an Older American’s Open House on Friday, May 21, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. In celebration of Older American’s Month, the lunch donation will be $1 for this event. There will be light refreshments, games and door prizes. RSVP by calling 349-5237.

Library offers MonoMouse

The Greenwood Public Library is now offering the Bierley MonoMouse – an easy to use, hand held electronic magnifier – as part of a loan program designed to help visually impaired members of the community. The Bierley MonoMouse Hand Held Electronic Magnifier is available to be borrowed from the library in the same manner as borrowing a book. A visually impaired patron can now have the opportunity to read any book from the library in the comfort of their own home. The magnifier, which is similar to an oversized computer mouse, is ergonomically designed to fit comfortably in the palm of a user’s hand. It connects to any television via the attached standard RCA plug and then the large blue button is simply pressed to start reading. For more information about the MonoMouse Magnifier at the Greenwood AUTHENTIC MEXICAN

The Bi-State Ruritans will sponsor an all-you-can-eat spaghetti dinner on Saturday, May 8, from 3 to 6 p.m., at Melson Church Community Hall, east of Delmar. Cost is $8 per person for spaghetti, salad, bread, iced tea and coffee. Desserts will be available for a small fee. A Chinese Auction is also planned (bidders do not need to be present to win).

May celebration dinner

The Greenwood CHEER Activity Center located at 41 Schulze Road in Greenwood is having a May celebration dinner on Thursday, May 20, from 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. There will be a roast turkey dinner with all trimmings. Cost is $6 member and $8 non-member. Gospel music entertainment with Wayne & Barbie Porter begins at 6:00 p.m. For more information, call the center at 349-5237.

June 5-6 - Strasburg, Pa. - Solve a murder mystery while having dinner on a train. Lunch at the Shady Maple before checking into your hotel and then boarding the train at 6 p.m. After buffet breakfast the next day, travel to Longwood Gardens for a guided tour of the gardens before time on your own. Mid afternoon travel to Winterthur Museum and Gardens for a guided tour and tram ride before some free time. Cost: $225/double.

BUY ONE LUNCH

Menu Items 1-13

CO RE UPO QU N IR ED

or BUY ONE DINNER Combo Items 1-21

GET SECOND DRINK ALS 1/2 PRICE S P E C I501 N. Dual Hwy., Seaford, DE

MEXICAN BEERS DOMESTIC BEERS DAILY DRINK SPECIALS EVERY MONDAY

Cactus Margaritas

$2.50

REG. $4 Lime Only

July 22 - A day trip to Norfolk for lunch on the Spirit Of Norfolk and play bingo and win prizes. Cost: $79. Oct. 25-29 - Pigeon Forge & Smoky Mountains, Tenn. - Visit the Titanic Pigeon Forge Museum and board an actual life boat, touch an iceberg and experience the chill of the 28 degree water. The museum will display hundreds of artifacts in 20 galleries on two decks. Admission to Dollywood, Dixie Stampede Dinner Show, Black Bear Jamboree Dinner Theatre, Smith Family Dinner Theatre, Magic Beyond Belief Show. A performance at the Country Tonite with entertainment of humor, dancing and singing. Also, a guided tour of the great Smoky Mountains. Four breakfasts, four dinners, two lunches included. Cost: $595/double. All trips are open to the public. Note that after a certain date if we do not have enough people signed up we will have to cancel the trip to get our deposit returned or lose it. For more information, contact Rose at 629-7180.

prime rib with crab cake dinner provided by Suicide Bridge Restaurant. The cruise is aboard the Dorothy Megan. Tips are appreciated. Bus transportation from all CHEER Centers is available by reservation. The bus departs the Greenwood CHEER Activity Center at 3 p.m. and returns to the center at approximately 10 p.m. Tickets are on sale at the Greenwood CHEER Center and all other CHEER Centers. Tickets must be purchased by June 24. For more information, contact Susan Welch at 349-5237.

Trip to Yankee Stadium

Centenary Church Sunshine Class is sponsoring a bus trip to Yankee Stadium on Saturday, May 29, to see the Yankees vs. the Cleveland Indians. Call 875-2823 for ticket information.

National Zoo trip

Greenwood CHEER Activity Center is offering a motor coach trip to the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, June 24. The bus departs Greenwood CHEER Activity Center at 8:30 a.m. and leaves Washington at 3 p.m. Cost is $30 per person and includes transportation. Zoo admission is free. Deadline for payment is June 3. For more information, call Susan Welch at 349-5237.

Choptank Riverboat Dinner Cruise

The Greenwood CHEER Activity Center is hosting a Choptank Riverboat Dinner Cruise on Thursday, July 8. Cost is $50 per person and includes a

USCG Auxiliary

United States Coast Guard Auxiliary meets the second Sunday of the month at 2 p.m. at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club. For more information, contact Cindi Chaimowitz at 302-398-0309.

Seaford Widowed Persons

The Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service will have its next meeting on Tuesday, May 18 at 12:15 p.m. at the Georgia House in Laurel.

DEAL OR NO DEAL

Seaford AARP trips

Our Bar Is NOW OPEN check out our

PAGE 13

Old English’s Bldg.

302-628-9701

Open Mon. - Fri. 11 am - 10 pm, Sat. Noon to 10 pm, Sun. Noon - 9 pm

Visit our new restaurant in North Salisbury

Ocean City, MD Easton, MD 12534 Ocean Gateway, 7813 Ocean Gateway, 410-213-7324 410-770-8550 Chestertown, MD Cambridge, MD Salisbury, MD 715 Washington Ave. 315 Sunburst Hwy. 1045 S. Salisbury Blvd. 410-810-1952 410-228-7808 410-749-4303

mAy th 18

Your ChaNCe to WiN extra Prizes

SUPER BINGO Delmar EvERy tUESday

VFW

Post 8276

WINNER TAKE ALL

410

Bonanza Game $100000 Jackpot!

$100*

Over 60 People

Friday Night Dinner May 7th

& May 21st Featuring A Live Band!

Grocery Night Bingo Coming June and August

Deal or No Deal Bingo Coming Again in July!

$50*

896-3722

200 West State St., Delmar, MD

Under 60 People *Based on the number of people. No one under the age of 18 allowed to play.

410

896-3379

TickeTs on sale doors Open 5 pm Tuesday nighT Games Begin 6:45 pm

Call for more information 410-896-3722 or 410-896-3379


PAGE 14 All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend. Please come join us – we all enjoy the trips, lunches, dinners, etc. that we do.

Sussex County Marines

Marine Corps League Detachment #780, Devil Dog Detachment, meets the first Thursday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at American Legion Post #6, “the log cabin,” in Seaford. All former and retired Marines, from all generations, are welcome.

USPS monthly meeting

United States Power Squadron (USPS) meets at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. If you are interested in boating education and safety, and enjoy boating, sailing or canoeing, join us and participate in our classes and outings. For more information, contact C.M. Kohlenberg at 629-0687 or Rob Hutton at 628-0312.

Genealogical Society

The Sussex County Genealogical Society will hold their annual meeting at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, May 15, at the Rehoboth Beach Public Library. Society members will talk about their research and show some of their family heirlooms. Parking is free and plentiful. For more information, visit www.scgsdelaware.org or call 875-5418.

H.A.P.P.E.N.

The Members of H.A.P.P.E.N., Hearns Pond Association for its protection, preservation, enhancement and naturalization will meet on Thursday, May 13, at 7 p.m. at the Seaford Museum. Among the topics to be discussed will be traffic, the Hearns Pond Dam and U.N.O.I. Mill, and the upcoming community yard sale. Anyone interested in attending the meeting is welcome. For more information call 745-3293.

MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - MAY 12, 2010

DSTA Golf Classic

The 2010 DSTA (Del. State Troopers Assoc.) Golf Classic sponsored by Jack Lingo Realtors is accepting registrations for its May 20 tournament, held at the Jack Nicklaus signature Bayside Resort Golf Club in Fenwick Island. Fee is $700 per foursome with all proceeds benefiting law enforcement for Special Olympics Delaware. Sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information, visit www.sode.org/support.

Delaware Grange schedule

Sunday, June 13 - Sussex County Pomona Grange picnic, 2 p.m., Soroptimist Park, Seaford. Saturday, June 26 - Bus trip to Washington, D.C., to help celebrate 50 years of the National Grange Building being in existence. For more information, contact Rosalie Walls at 302-542-3875.

Adult Plus+ art courses

Develop or improve your artistic skills with courses offered by the Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Discover how to sketch what you see in Basic Drawing Skills on Wednesdays from 1 to 4 p.m., May 12 to June 16. Participants will receive great tips and techniques to capture the moment. Novice to intermediate artists can receive informal instruction in Portrait Workshop on Thursdays from 1 to 4 p.m., May 13-June 17. Learn the keys to successful watercolor painting in a relaxed setting on Thursdays from 9:30 a.m. to noon, May 13-June 17. Adults ages 50 and up can become Adult Plus+ members for $18 per year. Benefits of membership include unlimited use of the Stephen J. Betze Library located on campus; exclusive advanced registration and special discounts on trips, courses and events; and a free drink with purchase of a meal in the dining hall on campus. For more information, contact Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus+ program at 856-5618.

Reunion

Country breakfast buffet

A country breakfast buffet will be held every fourth Sunday each month - September through June, from 7 to 10 a.m. at Galestown Community House. Adults, $7, ages 6 to 12, $4, under age 6, no charge. The buffet includes eggs, scrapple, sausage, pancakes, potato casserole, hominy, biscuits, toast, fruit cup and sticky buns. The community house is located on School House Road at the intersection of Galestown and Reliance Roads in Galestown, Md. The dates are: May 23 & June 27.

Colonel Richardson High School, Class of 1985, is planning a 25th high school reunion for this fall. The committee is updating classmate addresses. For more information, contact Debbie (Feyl) Brohawn at 410754-8910 or crhs1985@gmail. com.

Miss Delaware Golf Classic

The Miss Delaware Golf Classic, hosted by the Miss Delaware Scholarship Organization, will be held at Maple Dale Country Club in Dover on Monday, June 7. The tournament begins at noon with a shotgun start. The Miss Delaware pageant will be held at Dover Downs Hotel & Casino on Friday, June 11 and Saturday, June 12. Player registration is $125 for individual players or $500

for a foursome, which includes green fees, cart, unlimited range balls, gift bag, lunch and dinner and tournament prizes. Tournament hole sponsors are $125. For more information, contact Georgeann White at 302236-1955, 302-934-9797 or ghwhite70@aol.com.

Museum hosts silent auction World War II and military buffs will appreciate the treasures to be had at a silent auction offered by the Air Mobility Command (AMC) Museum in Dover, at 6 p.m. on Friday, May 21. Steve Kogler, wine master from Teller Wines, will be hosting a complimentary wine tasting while the museum furnishes hors d’oeuvres and other beverages. Tickets are $10 in advance or $12 at the door. To order tickets, call 677-5939. If you have a unique item to donate for the auction, contact Don Sloan at 302-678-8111 or visit the AMC Museum located at 1301 Heritage Road, just off route 9 on the south end of Dover Air Force Base. For more information, visit www.amcmuseum.org.

Annual rocket launch

DASEF’s 14th high altitude rocket launch is Saturday, May 8, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., at Cape Henlopen Park in Lewes. Rockets designed and constructed by K-12 Delaware students will be launched all day. Outdoor/tent event will feature displays, launches of canister, bottle, single stage, advanced plus kite demonstrations and the De Tech Terry Campus Balloon launch. Park entrance fee is $4 for Delaware residents and $8 for others. All events are rain or shine. For more information, visit www.dasef.org, call 302-8341978 or email dasef.outpost@ verizon.org.

Children’s Dessert Theatre

Milford Second Street Players Children’s Dessert Theatre “The Princess and The Pea,” will be presented on May 15 and 16 at 1 p.m. Tickets are $8 and include the show, dessert and an autograph session with the cast. No reservations required. The theatre is located at 2 S. Walnut St. in Milford. For more information, call 422-0220.

Pig Pickin’ at Killens Pond

The Hub Club Rotary will host a Pig Pickin’ Hoedown at Killens Pond State Park in the Sports Complex Pavilion in Felton, on Saturday, May 8, from 3 to 6:30 p.m. The menu features roast pork and turkey, side dishes, desserts and beverages. Bluegrass music, silent and live auctions and plenty of fun and games are also on the menu. For more information, call 302-398-5194. Tickets, at $20, are available now from any Rotary member or by calling 302335-2750.

SUDOKU Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

See Answers Page 51


MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

PAGE 15

Church Bulletins Free soup and sandwiches

New Zion United Methodist Church in Laurel offers free soup and sandwiches every Wednesday from noon to 2 p.m. For more information, contact Pastor Timothy Duffield Sr. at 875-0727.

County to host Prayer Breakfast

Tickets are on sale for the 33rd annual Sussex County Prayer Breakfast, to be held Tuesday, May 11, with the Rev. John W. Hobbs as this year’s featured guest speaker. An ordained United Methodist minister, Pastor Hobbs, of Wilmington, N.C, is president and evangelist of Maranatha Ministries Unlimited. He travels extensively across the United States preaching about the power of faith ‘with an emphasis on the wholeness of man.’ Pastor Hobbs is no stranger to Sussex County, though, having served as senior pastor at Epworth Fellowship Church near Laurel during the 1980’s. He has been instrumental in establishing new churches and worldwide ministries, work that continues today. Pastor Hobbs holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology from the University of North Carolina, and a Master’s of Divinity from Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington, D.C. Joining Rev. Hobbs as this year’s musical entertainment will be Kevin Short, Ed Shockley and John Thompson of ‘The Reminders,’ a local

band that plays an eclectic mix of original and familiar gospel music. This year’s breakfast is once again hosted by the Sussex County Council. Again this year, former County Councilman Dale R. Dukes is volunteering his time to coordinate the breakfast. The breakfast will begin at 7 a.m. on May 11 inside the Delmarva Christian High School auditorium, U.S. 9 and Airport Road, in Georgetown. Tickets are $15 per person, or $110 per table of eight, and will be available on a first-come-first-served basis. For tickets or more information, call 8557743.

Paul Wilbur performs

Worship4Him will present Paul Wilbur, praise and worship leader, on Friday, May 7, at 7 p.m. at Crossroad Community Church. The church is located at 20684 State Forest Road in Georgetown. Tickets are available online only at Worship4Him. org. The cost is $20 general admission, $30 Gold Circle. Children 12 and under are free with a ticket. For questions or information, call 443523-4095. Doors open one hour prior to the concert. Please do not contact the church.

Kidstuf 103 at Alliance Church

Atlanta Road Alliance Church in Seaford is offering Kidstuf 103 on Wednesday evenings.

Kidstuf is a program designed for children and parents to attend together. Each month features a different Biblical virtue using music, drama, a storyteller and games. A light supper is served at 6:15 p.m., followed by the program at 6:45 p.m. Kidstuf is designed for kindergarten through 6th grade; however, parents are welcome to bring their preschoolers with them. Registration is free. No drop-offs. For details, call 629-5600 or visit www.atlantaroadcma.org

This year’s theme is “Prayer for Such a Time as This.” Many local participants will present prayers for the nation and the community and a free will offering will be taken for the National Day of Prayer Task Force. Refreshments and fellowship will follow the program, and the public is welcome to attend. For more information, contact President Michaele S. Russell at 349-4220.

St. Luke’s Newsletter

A weekly Bible study is being held every Wednesday night from 7:15-8:15 p.m. at the Days Inn, Rt. 13 South, Seaford (next to KFC). Family oriented Bible lessons for all ages. Sunday worship service is at 12 noon in the same location. The Pastor is Elder Cornell Johnson of Jesus The Christ Apostolic Ministries. Call 628-0349 or 302-344-9672 for more information.

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church offers its newsletter on line and also, via email. Our “Luke’s Letter” is published approximately once a month and will be available on our website, www. stlukesseaford.org. You can also join our e-mail list if you send a request to StLukesEpis@ comcast.net. St. Luke’s services are Sunday, Holy Eucharist at 9 a.m., and Thursday evenings, Holy Eucharist and Healing at 6 p.m. The Rev. Jeanne Kirby-Coladonato is the Rector/Pastor.

National Day of Prayer

Homemade ice cream sale

Weekly Bible Study

The 59th Annual National Day of Prayer will take place at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 6, at Grace-n-Mercy Ministries, located at 9590 Nanticoke Business Park, Greenwood. The Ladies Auxiliary of Greenwood Memorial VFW Post 7478 will sponsor the program.

Mt. Zion Methodist Church, located on Route 13A between Seaford and Laurel, will host a homemade ice cream sale on Saturday, May 22, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Flavors include vanilla, chocolate, strawberry, banana and pineapple. For pre-orders, call 875-3055 or 629-7110.

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship CHURCH OF CHRIST

Sunday Family Worship 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. 94 Walnut Street, Laurel, DE (across from GameZone) 302-875-7873 www.laurelnazarene.org

A church you can relate to

1010S . Central Ave., Laurel Ph: 875-7748 Minister: Ian J. Drucker Worship Services: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. BibleS tudy: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m.

www.laurelcentenaryumc.org

875-3983

200 W. Market Street, Laurel, Del. Contemporary Worship, 8:45 a.m. Traditional Worship, 11:00 a.m. Sunday School, for ALL Ages, 9:45 a.m. Wednesdays: Bible Study 1 p.m.; & Youth Ministry 6:45 p.m.

Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching Youth Group Wednesday 7:00 pm

In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church

Christian Church of Seaford

600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956

Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298

The Rev. Dr. Howard G. Backus, Rector www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing Sunday ~ 8:30 & 10:30 am Church School ~ 9:30 am

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love

(302) 875-3644

Centenary UMC

Christ Evangelistic Church

The Gift of His Love Let others know where you are and when you meet. To advertise in this directory, call

629-9788

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES

Centrally located at

14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org Pastor Timothy Dukes, Senior Pastor Pastor John Lanzone, Youth/Family Pastor

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road68, South of Laurel Laurel,D el.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m.

Delmar Wesleyan Church www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

800 East Street Delmar, MD 21875 “The Church That Cares” 410-896-3600 Pastor James C. Hitch

Sunday: Sunday School 10 M Worship 11 AM & 6 PM

Wednesday: Bible Study 7 PM


PAGE 16

MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Obituaries Martha May, 64

Martha May of Seaford, passed away on Friday, April 23, 2010, in Philadelphia, Pa. She was formerly of Philadelphia and Cape May, N.J. She was born in Philadelphia, a daughter of the late Kenneth and Martha May. Martha retired from the Department of Aging in Cape May County in New Jersey as an administrator. She loved Cape May, everything but the taxes. Marcy, as she was fondly known, was a very special person - generous, loving and kind. She will be dearly missed for her many kind and caring ways. She is survived by her companion of 35 years, James E. Solley of Laurel. All services will be held privately. Arrangements are in the care of Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel.

George W. Skelton Jr., 89

George W. Skelton Jr. of Seaford, died on Wednesday, April 28, 2010. Quiet, gentle, caring, scientist, sailor, problem solver - these are but a few words that describe a man that was a beloved husband, father and grandfather. A U.S. Navy veteran and retired DuPont chemist, he is survived by his wife, Emily Skelton; daughters, Jeanine Skelton,

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor

WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

Georgia Ryan and Suzanne Jopp; and grandchildren, Sean Ryan, Eric Ryan, Sara Jopp and Amanda Jopp. Just as sailors seek their bearings in a sea of uncertainty, he was always our family’s “True North.” He will be greatly missed. Godspeed sailorman. Funeral services and burial will be private. Arrangements are in the care of Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford.

Steven Paul Dodson, 50

Steven Paul Dodson died Monday, April 19, in Wilmington, Del. Born in Blytheville, Ariz. on August 24, 1959, he was the oldest son of the late Harry Maynard Dodson and Celia Ann (McAdoo) Dodson. Steve served in the United States Army and was honorably discharged in 1981. Later, he worked in the construction industry, specifically in carpentry. Surviving are his son, Joshua Cardoso of Tampa Fla., two sisters, Dorcas (Dori) Horner and husband, Gene, of Bridgeville and Lynn Croom and husband, Norm, of Panama City, Fla.; a brother, Anthony (Tony) Dodson and his wife, Donna, of Columbia, S.C.; a stepmother, Bettie Dodson of Cherry Valley, Ariz.; two stepsisters, June and Tammy; and several nieces and nephews. Steve was preceded in death by his oldest sister, Carole. A private family gathering will be held at the home of his sister in Bridgeville.

What must I do to be saved? Acknowledge your sin and place your trust in Christ. All who place their trust in Christ in this way are adopted as God’s children. All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. ~ Romans 3:23 The wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. ~ Romans 6:23 God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. ~ Romans 5:8 If you confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus and believe in your heart that God has raised him from the dead, you will be saved. ~ Romans 10:9

Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

701 Bridgeville Road 629-9077

United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 Handicap Friendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

GETHSEMANE

Saturday Services Sabbath School 9:30 a.m. Worship Service 11:00 a.m. Pastor - O. Kenneth Scheller 302-875-0140

A Safe Sanctuary & Stephen’s Ministry Church Rev. E. S. Mallozzi

All are welcome to worship here every Sabbath.

Sun. 9:30 am Wed. 7:00 pm

Children’s Church • Nursery

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 4:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

VICTORY TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP

11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT

Ministry for the wholef amily 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson

28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH

315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-9755

Pastor: Rev. Andrew C. Watkins www.christlutheranseaford.com

Praise Worship 8:15 AM • Sunday School 9:45 AM • Traditional Worship 11:15 AM

Laurel Baptist Church, SBC 22625 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 - www.atlantaroadcma.org Sunday

Wednesday Evening

9:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. 6:45 Catalyst Youth (gr. 7-12), Worship, Nursery, Classes DivorceCare, KidStuf 103 (K-6 kids & their parents, 1st & 3rd for Kids & Adults Wednesday) 7:00 Intercessory 7:00 p.m. Prayer, Men’s Group Evening Service

COKESBURY CHURCH All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE

(302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburyworship.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

Mount Olivet

United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School

Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 LBC Sunday School ~ 10:00 Morning Worship ~ 11:00 Wednesday Bible Study ~ 7:00 P.M. NurseryP rovided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Music Director: Linda Lewis

302-875-7998

St. Luke’s

Episcopal Church Front & King St., Seaford, DE

629-7979

Holy Eucharist: Sunday, 9:00 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - G. W. Cliver - 629-6206 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10 a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

Union

Seaford Seventh-day Adventist Church

26295 Sussex Highway (south on 13), Seaford, DE

302- 875-4646

PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

Senior Minister: Dr. Carl G Vincent Senior Pastor: Pastor Barry B. Dukes wwwmessiahsvineyard.org

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Pastor: Rev. Jim Sipes • 302-629-4458

Welcome…

Messiah’s Vineyard Church

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Contemporary Services ... 8:45 & 10:30 a.m. Nursery Care & Children’s Church Provided Corner of Woodland Ferry Rd. & Stein Hwy., 4 miles West of Seaford • 629-2862 Jeans Expected! No Halos Required!

27225 Kaye Road Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.thelighthouselaurel.org Timothy P. Jones, Pastor Sunday Family Worship - 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Family Ministries - 7:00 p.m.

“Shining His Light”

743E . Clarence St., Seaford, Del. Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Pastor

629-9443, Cell: 448-0852 • cogclarence@verizon.net

Sunday: Midweek Activities: Church School........9:45 am Call for Details Morning Worship......11 am Children’s Church & Youth Explosion ........6 pm Nursery Provided Evening Worship.........7 pm *Counseling by appt. only Tuesday: Thursday: Bible Study & Family Corporate Prayer.........7 pm ‘Come and Grow with Us!’ Training Hour...........7 pm

MOUNT PLEASANT

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Rev. Dale Evans

Contemporary Service............9:30 a.m. Sunday School.............10:15 a.m. Regular Service. . . . . . .11:30 a.m. Mount Pleasant Road, Laurel (Just off Rt. 24 west, on Rd. 493A)

875-1045


MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

PAGE 17

Local author promotes the legacy of Class D baseball By Tony E. Windsor

It has long been hailed as “America’s past time,” and baseball fans are still among some of the more dedicated sports enthusiasts. There are those who simply enjoy the competitive nature of the game; choosing to give loyal support each season to their favorite team. Then there are baseball fans who are passionate to the point that it becomes a mission to not only enjoy the sport in its present form, but also become immersed in its history; this describes Seaford native, Mike Lambert. Over the years, Lambert has become committed to promoting baseball, but his mission is focused around protecting the legacy of baseball’s impact on the eastern shore of Delmarva. It was baseball in its purest form; before national media coverage of the sport brought games into America’s living room. It was called “Class D” baseball and Lambert is a foremost authority on its local history. Lambert has one of the most extensive collections of Eastern Shore League (ESHL) memorabilia to be found anywhere. His knowledge of the game as it impacted the region from 1922 to 1949 is staggering. When talking about the ESHL, Lambert literally lights up. He calls his passion for the subject, “my mistress.” He talks about ESHL players like Jimmie Foxx, Frank “Homerun” Baker, Mickey Cochrane and future Orioles and White Sox manager, Paul Richards, as if they were personal friends. Lambert has taken his passion to a higher level and has recently authored a book, “Eastern Shore League, Images of Baseball.” The book, released on April 5, is published by Arcadia Publishing, a national publisher of local and regional history books. The book is 128 pages packed full of

Replacement restricts lanes

The Department of Transportation (DelDOT) announces that Highway Safety Systems, Inc., will continue to replace guardrails across Sussex County. During the replacement, motorists will encounter intermittent lane restrictions through Friday, May 14, pending weather. The work schedule will be from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Work will take place at the following locations: • Kent Avenue from Double Bridges  Road to Jefferson Bridge Road, Ocean View • Bethany Road from Main Street to  Polly Branch Road, Selbyville • Frankford School Road from  Shockley Town Road to Thatcher Street, Frankford • Concord Road from Route 13 to  Bethel Concord Road, Blades • Cods Road from 13 Curves Road  to Fowlers Beach Road, Milford Motorists are advised to use caution when traveling throughout these locations and expect lane shifts. Real-time traffic information and construction project updates are available online at www.deldot.gov, or tune to WTMC 1380 AM.

vintage, never before seen photos from private collections, including those of Lambert and his fellow ESHL collector, Donnie Davidson of Cambridge, Md. Lambert said he and Davidson will oftentimes find themselves bidding against each other when vying for a piece of ESHL memorabilia. In his book, Lambert explains what the goal is with his newest venture. “Having collected and studied this glorious baseball league for several decades, I am committed to teaching its history at every opportunity,” he writes. “By reading the story behind these extraordinary artifacts and studying the interesting facts of the ESHL, you will not only learn about the Eastern Shore League, but you will also understand how minor-league baseball operated from the 1920s through the 1940s.” Inside the pages of the book are rare graphics, including tickets, game programs, contracts, stock certificates, balls, bats, personal player letters and schedules. One such photo shows the first paycheck received by Lambert’s friend and former ESHL league player, Robert “Ducky” Detweiler, from the Federalsburg [Md.] A’s. The check for $37.12 was part of the $75 per month paid to him by the Federalsburg Athletic Association for the 1939 season. In the book there are also photos and information about the “Seaford Eagles,” a team that was part of the ESHL from 1946 to 1949. In 1947, the Seaford Eagles was an affiliate of the New York Giants. In that same year, the Eagles won the ESHL championship, defeating the pennantwinning Cambridge team in a seven-game playoff. Lambert’s book chronicles the history of ESHL teams that played on home fields including Seaford, Dover, Milford and Laurel in Delaware; Crisfield, Cambridge, Salisbury, Easton and Pocomoke City in Maryland; and Parksley and Northampton in Virginia. As part of the 100th anniversary celebration of Minor League Baseball in 2001, Bill Weiss and Marshall Wright, two veteran chroniclers of minor league baseball, researched and rated the “Top 100” Minor League teams of the century. In the listing among such historic Triple-A minor league teams as the Baltimore Orioles, the Los Angeles Angels, Milwaukee Brewers and the Indianapolis Indians, was the Eastern Shore League’s Salisbury Indians, who were ranked in the number eight spot.

“Amidst the Triple-A colossi occupying the upper echelons of Minor League Baseball’s Top 100 list, one Class D club managed to slip into the top group. Playing in a small town in Maryland, this team seemingly performed the impossible in a truly singular campaign, Weiss and Marshall said on the website, MiLB.com. In 1937, under the management of ESHL icon, D’Arcy Raymond “Jake” Flowers, the team managed to go from a 0-26 record to capture the pennant. Weiss and Wright wrote, “Salisbury’s achievement in 1937 is believed to be unique. Their comeback from a 0-26 record to capture the pennant is a worthy enough achievement in itself. However, when you include Salisbury’s 21 missing wins into their record, the Indians’ winning percentage of .833 stands supreme, never equaled by any 20th century full-season minor league team.” On Sept. 1, more than 3,000 Salisbury fans turned out to honor the “wonder team,” as The Sporting News called the Indians. Washington owner Clark Griffith was the guest of honor. Engraved 17-jewel wristwatches were presented to all the players, Flowers and the three front office officials. In addition, Flowers received an automobile. Even the bus driver, the scoreboard operator and the batboy received gifts. The Indians responded by trouncing Pocomoke City 10-2 (Weiss, B. & Wright, M. 2001). In his book, Lambert writes extensively about Jake Flowers and also has photographs including newspaper clippings from the 1937 Indian’s pennant-winning season and a baseball signed by not only the entire Salisbury Indians team, but by Flowers, the club’s owner and two league presidents. Lambert said it is his love of the ESHL history and desire to promote its legacy to people who may know little about it that drives his passion for the subject. “I’m not in it for the money,” he said. “I just want to help keep this league and its players from being forgotten.” Lynn Beahm, publicity manager for Arcadia Publishing, said Lambert’s book is “doing extremely well” and is already in a second printing. “Within a couple of weeks of being released we started seeing the book stock dwindling and realized we would need to do a second printing,” she said. “It is rare that a book has a second printing in such a short period of time, if at

In Loving Memory of Our Mom, Joyce Mears, on Mother’s Day

Surprise Mom with beautiful, fresh flowers this

Mother’s Day May 9

We Deliver Our custom bouquets will incorporate her favorite blooms for a unique and personal gift she’ll love.

JOHN’S FOUR SEASON’S

It’s hard to believe that you are no longer here. Our hearts are breaking but our love keeps you near Like a ray of sunshine everyday memories of you come our way. All our love forever, Children: Shelly, Richard and Lisa Fiancé, Ronnie; and Grandchildren: Chris and Jessica, Courtney, Kara Beth and Jaread

all. This book is very successful.” A book signing is being planned at the Delmarva Shorebirds Stadium in May or June. In addition to Shorebird’s Stadium, Lambert’s book, “Eastern Shore League, Images of Baseball” is available at area bookstores, including Browseabout Books, Rehoboth Beach; independent retailers, including Walgreens; and online retailers including Amazon.com, Borders Books and Barnes & Nobles.

FLOWERS & GIFTS

Stein Hwy. at Reliance, John Beauchamp 302

June 21, 1953 ~ March 8, 2010

629-2644

410-754-5835


PAGE 18

MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

Show mom your appreciation on Mother’s Day with these dishes When I first began writing about Mother’s Day, I was astonished oretta norr to find in my research that Anna Jarvis, the Philadelphia schoolteacher who launched the campaign in 1907 to establish a national observation, was arrested in 1923 while protesting that white carnations — her symbol for mothers — were being sold to raise money. In fact, she left this earth harboring bitter resentment for the commercialization of the holiday for which the browning will occur in the oven as the she so ardently fought. French toast bakes. Cynics not aware of the Jarvis history Transfer to a baking sheet and bake at have always believed that Mother’s Day 400 for 10 minutes. was an idea hatched by the greeting card After 10 minutes remove, turn over and industry. It’s probably a good thing that she isn’t around today to see the proof that put back in the oven for another 5 minutes to brown the other side. no good deed goes unpunished. After 10 minutes on one side and 5 on Knowing the sad end to Anna’s story the other the custard should be cooked should make everyone ponder the true on the inside, and the French toast will meaning of Mother’s Day, which is that it be crisp on the outside. If it looks like it has nothing to do with cards and gifts but needs more time cook it longer, but be everything to do with the appreciation and love for those who chose the most difficult careful not to cooked very dark as the egg custard may become bitter. and most important of life’s jobs. Traditionally, pain perdu is served with Even if the kitchen is foreign territory powdered sugar sprinkled over the top. to you, you have no excuse not to honor your mom with these brunch recipes deSpring Asparagus and Bacon Frittata signed for the culinary challenged. All are Serves 6 from About.com’s American Food. Egg dishes are what usually mess up the novice cook trying to pull off a MothPain Perdu er’s Day brunch. The poached eggs break, New Orleans style French toast the fried eggs stick, the scrambled eggs “Pain Perdu” means “lost bread,” and turn out like rubber. The safest way to go this recipe was a scrumptious solution for what to do with those stale loaves of bread is an Italian-style baked omelet called a “frittata“. Easy and delicious! that were about to be “lost.” This recipe is 1 pound asparagus, washed, cut in just one of the countless French-influenced 2-inch pieces dishes of New Orleans, and one of the 6 slices bacon, cut in 1-inch pieces most delicious. Here’s what you need: 2 tbsp butter 2 eggs 1 clove garlic, minced 1/2 cup milk 8 large eggs, beaten pinch of salt salt and fresh ground black pepper to 1 tsp sugar taste 1 tsp vanilla 4 oz Swiss, Cheddar, or Jack cheese, 1/2 tsp cinnamon shredded (about 1 cup) 1/4 tsp allspice Blanch the asparagus in boiling salted 6 thick slices of day old French bread water for 1 minute; remove to cold water (staler bread is fine as long as you can and reserve. slice it) In a 10 or 12-inch cast iron skillet or 3 tbsp butter other oven-safe pan, cook the bacon until 1 tbsp vegetable oil crisp over medium heat. Drain fat and powdered sugar (optional) reserve cooked bacon. Wipe out pan and This simple milk and egg custard is melt butter over low heat. Add the garthe secret to a great pain perdu recipe. In lic and cook for 1 minute. Add the eggs, a large mixing bowl, whisk together the drained asparagus, bacon, salt and pepper. eggs, milk, salt, sugar, vanilla, cinnamon Stir with a spatula over low heat for a few and allspice. Slice the bread into thick slices, at least minutes, until the eggs begin to slightly thicken. Turn off heat. Scatter cheese over 1-inch thick and add to the egg mixture. I the top. used a beautiful whole-grain French loaf, Place in a pre-heated 350 degree oven, but any French or Italian loaf should work for about 10 minutes, or until the eggs are nicely. Slicing at a slight angle will make set. Allow to cool slightly, cut in wedges, for a longer piece of bread. and serve warm or room temp. Toss the slices until all the mixture has been absorbed into the bread. Depending on how stale the bread is, this may take Good Samaritan Benefit from 5 to 10 minutes. The secret to this Laurel Good Samaritan Benefit Dinner recipe is to completely saturate the bread. and Dance, sponsored by the Rebekah AsThis is also why thick slices of stale sembly of Delaware, May 21 at the Laurel bread are used, as thinner fresh bread American Legion Home. would fall apart. Social Hour is at 6:30 and dinner at 7 Preheat oven to 400. p.m. followed by a (DJ) dance from 8 to In a large non-stick skillet, over me11 p.m. dium heat, very lightly brown the slices Price is $22 a single or $40 a couple. in the butter and oil for about 2 minutes For tickets or information call 875-3733 or per side. Don’t cook too dark as most of 745-1959.

L

K

The Practical Gourmet

Oh, What a Pity Oh, What a Shame

60Years

it just isn’t the same!

s ’ o h W s s e Gu 0 6 g n i n r u T

d e r o v f r e s e R

Jeff Baker day

h t r i B y p p a H

from your

yOUNGeR friends!


MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

PAGE 19

Home Ownership is an Investment in Your Future

Work who

With a

realtor

can explain the best fit for your situation.

New ListiNg on Wood Branch Rd, Georgetown is 3 BR, 2 BA lovely rancher w/rear deck, large backyard & garage. New stainless steel appliances, upgraded lighting, and freshly painted. $194,900 Mls#577497 Call Kristy Conaway 855-0500.

The Scrapple Creek Runners

The Scrapple Creek Runners to entertain at Heritage Weekend

Step back into history on May 29-30 at the Governor Ross Plantation in Seaford for great food, crafters and exhibitors, period artisans, little miss pageantry, antique car show and lots of great entertainment. The Banjo Man, great gospel groups and the Scrapple Creek Runners will liven up the event. The Scrapple Creek Runners are an original old time string band from the northern Delaware/southeastern Pennsylvania region. Along with their own material, the band also plays a wide array of traditional old time American songs. In addition to their regular gigs, the band can be spotted around the Delmarva and south-

Annual Kids’ Fest

Community organizations and commercial vendors are invited to participate in the annual Kids’ Fest on Saturday, June 12, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Delaware State Fairgrounds in Harrington. The event is coordinated by the Greater Milford Boys & Girls Club. Kids’ Fest provides fun and games, education and entertainment while supporting youth activities in southern Delaware. The event includes a talent contest, free entertainment, a horse show, pony rides, hands-on activities, an Inflatable Fair and carnival games. Activities are planned to also attract teens. Kids’ Fest is a family friendly, affordable event. Admission is free for children and $3 for adults; parking is free. Ride and game tickets may be purchased at 25 for $5; some activities are individually priced, and many, including all entertainment, are free. A variety of food will be for sale throughout the day. For more information, call 302-3985194 or 302-242-0375 or visit www.kidsfestde.org.

PPP seeks director

New Faces of Shakespeare, a Possum Point Players’ subgroup dedicated to establishing Shakespeare in southern

ern Pennsylvania areas busking on random street corners, true to the spirit of traditional American music. If you are interested in booking Scrapple Creek Runners, please contact Paddy at paddy.corcoran@ yahoo.com or kindly call 302-465-2442 The band members are Paddy Corcoran, Vocals and Guitar; J.C. Bell, Mandolin, Tenor Banjo, and Vocal Harmonies; Mike Chevalier, Fiddle and Vocal Harmonies, and Dave Atherton, Bass. For more information on Seaford Heritage Weekend, call the Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce at 629-9690 or 800-416-GSCC or send an email to admin@seafordchamber.com Delaware, seeks a director for its August performance of “As You Like It.” The reading group meets monthly at Possum Hall to review the works of the Bard. “Because the venue is community theater, we need someone who is able and willing to work with a broad range of skills among actors,” says New Faces chairwoman, Beverly Smith. “As You Like It” is scheduled to be performed on Aug. 20-22, at Possum Hall in Georgetown. Applications, which are due April 26, are available at the Possum Point Players theater, 441 Old Laurel Hwy., in Georgetown. For more information, call 8563460.

‘Our Miss Brooks’ comes to PPP

The Possum Point Players’ Ad Hoc Touring Company will present old time radio comedies, including the old favorite “Our Miss Brooks” at Possum Point Players Theater in Georgetown on Sunday, May 2. The 2 p.m. show will also include the classic “Who’s on First” comedy routine of Abbott and Costello. An original sketch, “Shirley You Jest,” written by Ad Hoc’s Nita Gary, will complete the program. A donation of $6 per person will be welcomed at the door. For more information, call 856-3460.

REAL ESTATE • RENTALS • INSURANCE • PROPERTY MANAGEMENT BETHANY BEACH 32904 S. Coastal Hwy. 302-539-7511 1-800-441-8118

210 West Market St., Georgetown, DE

302-855-0500 • 1-888-421-6521

LEWES 1520 Savannah Rd. 302-645-9215 1-800-421-6521

Access to a great rate no matter what your options are.

2.99% APR* 3.99% APR** 6 Month Introductory Rate

Current Rate

OptionLine has a low minimum line amount of only $5,000. A unique line of credit with flexible floating rates and attractive fixed rates. Sign up today!

888.291.2400

|

delawarenational.com

Equal Housing Lender. Member FDIC. Member of the Fulton Financial Family. The product is a variable rate line of credit secured by the primary residence and not exceeding an 80% loan to value ratio. This account includes a fixed rate option. Current fixed rate APRs range from 6.49% to 10.49% depending on credit qualifications, payment option, and loan term selected. This rate may vary, but once established as a new Fixed Rate Advance, will not vary thereafter. A $100 rate lock fee applies each time you establish a Fixed Rate Advance. The fee is waived if rate is locked at closing. Closing costs for lines of credit up to $500,000 typically range from approximately $290 to $675 depending on line amount, appraisal requirements and property location. Any closing costs initially paid by the bank on the customer’s behalf, must be paid by the customer if the account is closed within 3 years. Borrower must pay mortgage satisfaction fees at loan termination. Property insurance is required. Rate and terms subject to change and may be withdrawn without notice. Subject to credit approval *The advertised 2.99% APR (Annual Percentage Rate) applies to new lines of credit of $5,000 or more and an automatic deduction of payment from a Delaware National Bank deposit account. Applications must be received by 5/29/2010. When the line is opened, customers with a credit score of 710 or better will receive 2.99% APR for 6 months from the opening date. For customers having a credit score of less than 710, APRs are variable and may range from 3.99% (Minimum) to 6.75% (WSJP plus 3.50%), depending on credit qualifications and payment option selected. **After the expiration of the 6-month promotional rate period, the APR will be based on the Wall Street Journal Prime (WSJP) as published daily plus a margin or minimum APR of 3.99%, whichever is greater. The advertised 3.99% APR is our current standard rate with automatic deduction of payment from a Delaware National Bank deposit account. Depending on credit qualifications and payment option selected, APRs may range from 3.99% (Minimum) to 6.75% (WSJP plus 3.50%). APR may increase if automatic payment is discontinued. The maximum APR is 18.00%.


PAGE 20

MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

People Milo, McPartland married in Rehoboth Ensign Joseph Patrick Reagan Milo and Caitlin Elizabeth McPartland were married on Jan. 30, 2010, at St. Edmond’s Catholic Church, Rehoboth Beach. The wedding took place as snow began to fall, marking the first of the heavy snows of the season. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel McPartland of New London, Pa. She is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Connor of Rehoboth Beach (formerly of Seaford), and Mr. and Mrs. Harry McPartland of Seaford. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Gregg C. Milo of Jacksonville, Fla. He is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. James R. Reagan (formerly of Laurel) and Dr. and Mrs. George Milo (formerly of Columbus, Ohio), all of Jacksonville. The Nuptial Mass was performed by Father Raymond Forester at two o’clock in the afternoon. He was assisted in the ceremony by the grandfathers who gave Bible readings, and the grandmothers who brought the Communion gifts to the altar. Music was provided during the ceremony by Brian Poole and The Shaw Strings. Escorted by her father, the bride wore a white organza-over-satin gown, featuring embroidery at the bodice and

Thomas Mazzuchi and Michelle Wilson

skirting, beading, crystal accents and matching cap sleeves. The gathered skirt fell into a semi-cathedral length train. She carried a bouquet of pink and white roses wrapped in satin ribbon. Maid of Honor was Melissa McPartland, sister of the bride. Bridesmaids were Erin Shannahan of Springfield, Va., cousin of the bride; Claire Guenthner of Lynchburg, Va.; Jessica Wray of McKenny, Va.; Lauren Mattson of Glen Allen, Va.; and Lura Harrell of DeWitt, Va. All wore floor-length dresses of royal blue, and carried bouquets of pink and white roses. The groom wore his Navy dress uniform and was served by Best Man David Bass of Atlanta, Ga. Groomsmen were ENS John Beinert of Bellrose Village, N.Y.; 2nd LT Trevor Miller of Harvard, Mass.; ENS Nick Friedewald of Mt. Pleasant, S.C.; ENS Matthew Fischer of Groton, Conn.; and ENS Nick Miller of Ewa Beach, Hawaii. Junior groomsmen were Connor McPartland, brother of the bride, and Colin Milo, brother of the groom. Flower girl was Jackie Reagan and ring bearer was Jimmy Reagan, both cousins of the groom from Herndon, Va. Following the ceremony, a sword ceremony was performed by the groom’s

classmates to welcome the new Mrs. Milo to the Navy. The wedding reception, hosted by the bride’s parents, was held at the Rehoboth Beach Yacht and Country Club, where guests dined and danced to music provided by The David Christopher Orchestra. The couple was feted at a rehearsal dinner, hosted by the groom’s parents, the preceding evening at the Atlantic Sands Hotel, Rehoboth Beach. The bride is a 2009 graduate of James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., where she earned her bachelor of arts degree in history, and graduated summa cum laude. She will attend Florida Coastal School of Law in Jacksonville, beginning in the fall semester. The groom is a 2004 graduate of The Bolles School in Jacksonville, and a 2008 graduate of the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., where he earned his bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering. ENS Milo completed advanced nuclear propulsion training, and is assigned to a submarine at Kings Bay, Ga. Following the ceremony, the couple honeymooned in St. Thomas. The couple makes their home in Fernandina Beach, Fla.

Mazzuchi, Wilson to wed

Terry and Lois Wilson of Blades announce the engagement of their daughter, Michelle Ann Wilson, to Thomas Andrew Mazzuchi Jr., son of Thomas and Katherine Mazzuchi of Fairfax, Va. The bride-to-be is a 2001 graduate of Seaford High School and a 2005 graduate of Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, Va. She is completing her master’s degree at American University in Washington, D.C. and is employed at the university. Michelle is the granddaughter of Irene Wilson of Blades. Her fiancé graduated from RandolphMacon College in 2005 and holds a master’s degree in business administration from George Washington University. He is employed by Futrend Technologies in Vienna, Va. A June wedding is planned. Formal invitations will be issued.

Send us your news items

Send items to editor@mspublications.com. Send photos as attachments in the jpg format. Items may also be mailed to Morning Star Publications, Inc., P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973. Deadline is one week before preferred publication date. Items are used on a first-come basis.

Ensign Joseph Patrick Reagan Milo and Caitlin Elizabeth McPartland were married on Jan. 30, 2010.

Out-perfO Out-perf O rming Y O ur e xpectati xpectatiO O ns

YOU WANT RESULTS ...

CALL John Williamson, CRS, GRI, Realtor

Century 21 Ramey Real Estate Seaford, DE 302629-5575

or call John direct at 302-542-0289

FREE VIRTUAL TOUR WITH EVERY LISTING Check out www.johnthedeliverer.com


PAGE 21

MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

Starry, starry Night: Africa

Starry, Starry Night attendees sampled African culture during the Serengeti Safari. Guests could engage in a number of activites, including have their hair braided, make a beaded bracelet, watch a documentary on the Serengeti or watch a performance of central Delaware’s own West African drum and dance group, the Sankofa African Dance Company (above and below). Stevia Ndoe (right) handed out braid clips for those afraid to try the real thing. Photos by Daniel Richardson

The poster (right) for this year’s Starry, Starry Night theme, Africa: Ancient Rhythms, Modern Heartbeats, was designed by Jeanne Du Nord, an artist, author and playwright who lives in Princess Anne, MD. Du Nord is pictured above with her husband, David Buser. Photos by Daniel Richardson

Karen Clark, of Teller Wines, handed out samples of African wines during the reception. Photo by Daniel Richardson

Several sponsors donated African style art for display at the event. Bayhealth Medical Center donated a Balefon, (bottom left) a popular musical instrument in Africa, Nemours Health and Prevention Services donated a hand-made South African beaded doll (above) and PATS Aircraft Systems donated a rhino made in South Africa from materials salvaged from metal lathes (above left). Photos by Daniel Richardson


PAGE 22

MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

School NewS Woodbridge Elementary students are named to quarterly honor roll

From left are Matt Taylor, Jacqueline Torkelson, Lamar Meekins and Jessica Harris with their awards from the recent TSA competition.

Seaford High School students compete in technology event Seaford High School students returned from the state Technology Student Association (TSA) competition with several honors and awards. The competition was held at the Harrington Fair Grounds on April 23. TSA is the only student organization devoted exclusively to the needs of students interested in technology. TSA members learn through competitive events and leadership opportunities. With projects that involve designing dragsters, structural designs to career exploration, students learn from a variety of diverse activities. Lamar Meekins, a returning senior who placed ninth in the nation last year, continued to dominate the dragster design chal-

lenge by taking first prize. Jessica Harris, freshman, followed Lamar by taking third place. Both Harris and Meekins teamed up to win the structural engineering challenge. Harris placed in two other events: first in model rocketry and third in transportation modeling. Shaun Repp wrote a report and resume for career comparison and placed second. Jacqueline Torkelson and Matt Taylor placed third in a video completion. Torkelson also placed third in promotional graphics while Taylor placed second in imaging technology. The Seaford TSA would like to thank Tower Signs and Seaford Machine Works for their technical support.

BIE VISIT - Frederick Douglass Elementary School fifth graders recently had a visit from the Delaware Business, Industry, Education Alliance. Math, science and technology are vital to our students’ education and future, yet many students don’t realize how important these subjects are to almost any career path. This interactive two hour program used a “mystery object” as a conversation starter. Students gathered at each table for a 10 minute interval before rotating to another station. Volunteers used this time to explain their own career while stressing the importance of math, science or technology. Students were able to see a diverse group of careers.

The following students have been named to the honor roll for the second marking period at Woodbridge Elementary School. 1st grade - Distinguished Honor Roll - Makayla Bennett, Julia Benton, Elijah Bronson, Michael Burris, Erin Carey, Alani Castrejon, Christine Charles, Braeden Davis, Sabrina Gerving, Jerry Greene, Halie Hart, Zoe Kenton, Shawn Layton, Charles Little, Genevieve Maddox, Michael Mangan, Xander Mansfield, Teigan Mariner, J Jesus Mendoza-Garcia, Nicholas Messick, Kylie Mitchell, Sofia Oyola Morales, Caleb Perdue, Jade Powell, Shannon Rogers, Or’mon Sanders, Josie Scramlin, Harley Short, Edwin TorresMartinez, Robert Vera, Madison Weidlein, Mackenzie West, Kasyn White Honor Roll - Steve Alcantara-Villalobos, Emily Aleman, Reuben Banks, Jason Barnes, Savannah Baynard, Jimena Benitez-Villalobos, Alexander Bohenko, Marie Brooks, Tyair Cannon, David Cardenas, Gerald Carroll, Kaylynn Casiano, Joshua Chaffinch, Isaias Cortez-Aguilar, Stephanie Cuny, Mycah Dickerson, Breanna Duncan, Lauren Elliott, David Ferreira, Joseph Fischer, De’Andre Foskey, Stacy Garabito-Acosta, Marco Garcia-Avila, Anya Gillespie, Bryan Gonzalez-Garcia, Edgar Hernandez-Cruz, Kyle Hill, Jaquon Jackson, Elizabeth Johnson, Madison Johnson, Sarah Jones, Deronn Kane, Aiden Kvilhaug, Denise Lagunes-Ponce, Anyah Massey, Paul Morris, Edward Nichols, Aaron Noland, William Norman, Antonio Ortiz, Gabriela Pineyro, Michael Plummer, Lillian Pusey, Ceci Rodriguez-Berduo, Kennedy Russ, Taylor Scott, Hazael SotoPerez, Dylan Souva, Skyler Speed, Leroy Stafford, Ryan Stevens, Tireke Straughn, Seth Tinsman, Rosita Villalobos-Labra, Paris Webb, Matthew Welch, Dakivis Whaley, Serenity Willey, Brenton Williams, Cyniah Williams, Nacari Williams, Levi Yost 2nd grade - Distinguished Honor Roll - Lillian Anderson, Macey Bautista, Hannah Bennett, Aynasti Bowden, Blake Butt, Chris Cannon, Clayton Carper, Alexis Durham, Eric Fields, TaeShaun Ford-Jackson, Elyssia Gonzalez, Mario Hernandez, Aaiyana James, Isaiah Jenkins, Heaven Jones, Ricky Kane, Joshua Messick, Edward Nichols, Hannah Pearson, Justus Ramos, Gabriella Scramlin, Grace Slacum, Summer Slacum, David Smith, Alastornia Swift, Karl Tepe, Wisdom Waters, Benjamin Webb, Annika Widen, Jason Willey, Litzy Yepez-Alcantara Honor Roll - Esther Aguilar, Shyanne Bawel, Harry Bell, Alyssa Betts, Adriana Blake, Rachel Bollinger, Kayla Brownlee, Nina Burns-Skrobot, Rynasia Cannon, Diana Chavez-Galvez, Maite Chilel-Martin, Cody Coleman, Quinton Cuffee, Ryan Cummings, Dynasty Davis, Ana Domingo, Debralyss Garcia Serrano, Kaitlyn Hall,

Michael Hastings, Trey Haynes, Charley Herrera, Ro’Niaya Holden, Damian HoltGum, Madison Isaacs, Kahleb Jackson, Anthony Jenkins, Mackenna Kerrick, Tanner Lecates, Turner Lee, De’Asia Lopez, Gavin Manning, Joseph Marquez, Marcus Massey, Christopher Mathis, Jason Mendez-Gaona, Hailey Moore, Gabriella Morra, Trinity Morris, Alexandria Nechay, Fredrick Norwood, Ty’Reei Owens, Adaly Perez, Mackenzie Price, Kristen Reed, Claudia Reyes, Zachary Rowe, Ty’Quan Sampson-Banks, Taylor Schulties, Syerra Smith, Cassidy Soderback, Ty’Asia Thomas, Carissa Tinsman, Joshua Torbert, Tanya Velasquez-Mendez, Edwin Velasquez-Perez, Angel Walker, Pharah-Joi Webb, Ashley Williams, Ta’Shon Willis, Alexis Wilson, Indya Wright, Tyler Yoder, Hunter Young, Yadan Zacarias-Garcia 3rd grade - Distinguished Honor Roll Christopher Andrews, Seth Baker, Yuseff Bartsch, Christian Boggs, Gary Breeding, Joshua Brumfield, Meredith Carey, Brisa Cazares-Quezada, Christina Chituck, Corrin Farris, Sade Hall, Corey Hastings, Trey Hatfield, Taylor Holcomb, Kenneth Iverson, Nevada Jackson, Brock Keeler, Sean Kvilhaug, Cristina Limon-Gutierrez, Steven Lord, Mia Martin, Kristen Nichols, Alexandra Opaliski, Jennifer OroscoOcampo, Dylan Perdue, Brandon Polite, Joshua Propes, Kenisha Reid, Steven Ridgaway, Alyssa Staley, Nadine Tinsman, Stephanie Vera, Mia Williams Honor Roll - Jordan Abrams, Ty’Jae Armstrong, Hailee Bennett, Robert Boyer, Caleb Callaway, Jerome Cannon, Jalisa Covington, Jayden Craft, Jonathan Data, Douglas Diaz, Joseph Disharoon, LaVonte Edmonds, Maredy Felipe-Lucas, Dominic Figueroa, Javon Gibbs, Anmarie Goetz, Caitlyn Goodwin, Rebekah Harding, Marlayna Hart, Zachary Harvey, Destinee Huggins, Jerry Lacy, Thomas Lacy, Sarah Layton, Brayan Lopez-Galvez, Richard Massey, Jessie Molesi, Victoria Moore, Noelle Morrison, Tajere Nock, William Norwood, Ty’miere Owens, Mo’Ajah Pilot, Carleah Rayford, Ja’Monta Ross, Kolby Rust, Summer Sekscinski, Sarah Sharp, Trevion Simms, Alexander Strain, Ja’mez Styles, Justin Thomas, Kylie Tull, Alanna Vanderwende, Faith Vesterman, Gabriel Wescott, Alex Zagal-Ponce 4th grade - Distinguished Honor Roll Amanda Moore Honor Roll - Morgan Absher, Ian’tae Albury, Lester Alcantara, Caleb Anderson, Megan Boyce, Rebecca Bristow, Tyler DeFord, Joy Deputy, Dae’shjah Everett, Dante Goodman, Emily Harrington, Rejahn Hill, MaKenzie Howell, Damon Hurley, Mikah James, Brooke Joseph, Eric Kemske, Nolan Lamontagne, Grace Lee, Kandy Mendoza-Garcia, Cristian OrdonezAlbino, Darshil Patel, Colby Simpson, Katarina Swift, Chance Thomas, Harlia Watts, Jacob Zanowic


MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

PAGE 23

Delmar students named to third quarter honor roll The following students have been named to the honor roll for the third quarter at Delmar Middle & Senior High School. Grade 12 Merit Honor Roll: Megan Beach, Denzel Brown, Jazmine Brown, Kevin Cahall, Ashley Caruso, Heather Conaway, Nicholas Damico, R. Wade Dickerson, Mallory Elliott, Natasha Holland, Chelsea Hudson, Kiera Hudson, Nikkia King, Amelia Mitchell, Zachary Morcom, Kevin Nichols, Ashleigh Pais, Christina Parsons, Corey Phillips, Sara Shaw, Dylan Shupe, Joshua Smith, S. Olivia Smith, Alison Tingle, Megan Warren, Leah Wilson Grade 12 Honor Roll: Casey Bellamy, Britany Brooks, Jennifer Carr, Stacey Daniels, Amanda Fields, Jeffrey Fleetwood Jr., Spencer Fothergill, Melita Hyland, Kirsten Kervin, Scott Kunkowski, Meredith Layfield, Candace McDonald, Joshua Messick, Sean Moore, M. Elizabeth Niblett, Shytayzia Parker, Brinkley Rayne, Andrew Reed, Lauren Ruark, D. Cody Salerno, Joshua Tauber, Noah Vincent, Elizabeth Warren, David Willbanks Grade 11 Merit Honor Roll: Skyler Blewitt, Chelsey Cornelius, Alexander Ellis, Leah Gilmore, Cecilia Lehman, Haley Littleton, Ashley Matos, Tarl Newberry, Chelsea Ralph, Skylar Schirtzinger, Allison Scott, Brian Thaw, Brent Tran, Jaclyn Watts, Shannon Webb, Hannah Wilkinson Grade 11 Honor Roll: Haley Barrall, Logan Baxter, Kristyn Beauchamp, Andrew Bergeron, Casie Brinck, Noman Choudhry, Nicholas Cooper, Janae Corbin, Steven Cox, Della Curtis, Ashley Elliott, Justin Elliott, Kelsey Eskridge, Meagan Farber, Lyndsey Gerstle, Thomas Gray, Kimberly Hopkins, Kourtney Hudson, Courtney Jones, Janae Leonard, Jessica Ludemann, Kourtney Mansfield, Lauren Massey, Ryan Mcculley, Amanda McIntyre, Desirae Parkinson, Bethany Pennewell, Darren Reid Jr., Sierra Schirtzinger, Mustafa Shauket, Sherrylynn Shockley, Nicholas Sonnier, Tyler Spiker, Hailee Travis, James Whaley III, Caila White, Miranda Wood, Brittany Wroten Grade 10 Merit Honor Roll: Genevieve Booth, Mary Bradshaw, Kayla Brennick, Carlee Budd, Courtney Bunting, Jeffry Caskey, Taylor Collins, Shante Douglas, Caitlin Frey, Claudia Geissler, Connor Hill, Rockell Jackson, Samantha Johnson, Dillon Koval, Justin McCain, Danielle

McWilliams, Samantha Parsons, Alexandria Phippin, William Poole, Jackie Presley III, Jessica Rickards, Alexis Smith, C. Nikkole Stehl, Carl VanGessel, Matthew Waldman, Kerry Ward Grade 10 Honor Roll: Amber Austin, Kendra Bailey, Brittany Bolen, Cassie Brennan, Chelsea Brown, Hunter Causey, Sha’Lynn Chandler, Shawn Conaway, Monisha Dennis, Erika Downes, Hailey Fretz, Parth Gadani, Jhazmin Gonzalez, Shelby Hill, Tevin Jones, Brittanie Kelly, Christina Lehman, Taylor Malcom, Jerosalee Medico, Matthew Miller, Adwoa Nyame, Prerak Patel, Caroline Phillips, Brittany Pinkosz, Christopher Raglin, Gabrielle Rairan, Donya Smith, Molly Welch, Rebecca Witzke, Katherine Zerillo Grade 9 Merit Honor Roll: Brittany Bennett, Marissa Bradley, Ashley Brobst, Autumn Campbell, Keyana Gaines, Brittany Groover, Bridgette Hamilton, Ayza Hayat, Jenny Lee, Melinda Matos, Maegan Mercier, Jared Messick, Megan O’Day, Bethany Parsons, Samuel Prettyman, Michaela Rittenhouse, Erin Sensenig, Alex Seymore, Jonathan Smith, Brooke Spicer, Allyson Thompson, Jessica Walter Grade 9 Honor Roll: Amanda Ball, Evan Barrall, Victoria Blewitt, Caroline Brannock, J’Len Buffington, Amore’ Buonopane, Robert Curtis, Edward Czwalina, John Dayton, Jr., Joshua Elliott, Emily Ellis, David Goslee, Cody Grabusky, Tara Hopkins, Caleb Hunter, W. Beau James, Andre Jones, Cedric Jones Jr., Amber Kirby, Ronald Knight, Hunter Lecates, Carly Lucas, Amanda Malone, Kiernan Maloney, Matthew Martel, S. Tyler McGoogan, Courtney Melvin, Lisa Melvin, Brooke Naumann, Morgan Nichols, Miranda Scurti, Samantha Simms, Tessa Terlson, De’Vonna Towns, Brian Tran, Jenna Watts Grade 8 Merit Honor Roll: Zanjibeal Albarr, Gregory Baker, William Bounds, Danielle Bradley, Elizabeth Brooks, Robert Budd, Jawariah Butt, Cloby Cambron, Michael Carney, Cortney Cathell, Taylor Dashiell, Briana Davis, Emily Davis, Evan Davis, Chad Dempsey, Taylor Dennis, Amanda Elliott, Sara Ellis, Autumn Ford, Lauren Frey, Jessica Gerstle, Larry Gilmore III, Kristina Gove, Shelton Gray, Brittany Harris, Justin Hernan, Kara Hughes, Tessa Jarvis, Otto Jester Jr., Jalesa Johnson, Jeremy Joyner, Julia Kellett, Brandon Kershaw, Kyle King, Mack-

enzie Kowalski, Sierra Lane, Samantha Layfield, Earnest Leatherbury III, Dylan Lister, Ariana Lucas, Brooke Lynch, Elizabeth Mills, Samantha Mitchell, Augusto Morales, Bri’Aunna Morris, Tionna Morris, Danielle Napier, Savannah Neubert, Benjamin Noonan, Aerial Nurse, Hannah Park, Dhvani Patel, Kajol Patel, Shivang Patel, Holly Records, Elijah Rodriquez, Nathanial Schilling, Sammy Schroeder, Brehanna Sigwalt, Amber Smith, Taylor Smith, Zoe Sonnier, Shaina Thompson, Virginia Webb, Tressie Windsor, Hannah Young Grade 8 Honor Roll: Cody Adams, William Adkins, Daniel Asare, Alyssa Atkins, Ericka Barbecho, Melissa Bradford, Ryan Brittingham, Erin Brumbley, Sha’Kyra Butler, Allison Carey, Justin Conklin, Taryn Cornish, Daniel Cropper, Rakeem Dixon, Jade Downes, Kelci Dykes, Kendra Fontaine, Eric Frayne, Ashley Goslee, Ashiona Handy, Chase Harmon, Jordan Harris, Krista Harris, Angel Horseman, Robert Jennette, Jacob Johnson, Tara Kershaw, Dalton Layfield, Lauren LeCates, Samantha Liller, Priscilla Magner, Sara Martens, Justin Meschino, Stephen Michaels, Kalya Milewski, Alysia Mills, Daniel Moore, Robert Moore III, Mariah Nutter, Chantel Parker, Karon Patton, Brandon Peterman, Kenneth Presley Jr., Jordan Reynolds, Charles Rhem, Jessica Saunders, Katherine Selby, Travis Sewell, Tyler Sewell, Natalie Smith, Tamara Truitt, Jonah Vincent, Jessica Whaley, Chad Wien, Dustin Wolfgang, Clarisse Young Grade 7 Merit Honor Roll: Kayla Adkins, Sequoia Bernard, Dylan Brumbley, Nina Chen, Henry Cheng, Zachary Egolf, Dillon Fletcher, Ta’kyrah Gibson, Sierra Grachik, Kenneth Holler, Sara Howard, Renee Jennette, Marcus Jones, Koy Langless, Shane Leatherbury, Michaela LeCates, Krista Lepter, Joshua Lord, Magdalena Martinez, Victoria McDonough, Tiffany Meadows, Sharazzia Mills, Alex Moore, Hannah Mudge, Katelyn Muir, Justin Phippin, John Pleasanton, Anna Prado, Travis Quillin, Kylie Reinhardt, Samatha Romero, Demyra Selby, Jessica Shockley, Shelby Shores, Theran Smith, Ethan Walker Grade 7 Honor Roll: Alyssa Andrus, Cristina Arce, Karlie Arter, Austin Bergeron, Bethany Bolen, Julie Brennick, Hope Campbell, Anam Choudhry, Zach-

ary Coco, Nadirah Collins, Hannah Crenshaw, Brianna Czwalina, Tasjah Davis, Tyler Disharoon, Jessica Elliott, Taylor Graham, Chase Harding, Alisha Justice, Trevor Karpavage, Joshua Lanier, Zane Luffman, Cameron Malone, Mackayla Malone, Jeffrey Melvin, Timothy Moore, Damyrah Mumford, Devin Palmer, Mackenzie Parker, Amanda Persinger, Jordan Reed, Ashton Riddle, Lauren Robertson, Justin Ruark, Brittni Ryan, Brooke Ryan, Christiana Schilling, Savanna Shores, Nathaniel Smith, Savannah Smith, Lauren Spicer, Zachary Teter, Dymond Trader, Sydney Walbert, Kyra Webb, Caroline White Grade 6 Merit Honor Roll: Shania Bailey, John Bell Jr., Andrew Blewitt, Kevin Bradshaw, Katelyn Bromwell, Charles Brown, Trent Carr, John Craven, Benjamin Dashiell, Jasmin Deal, Emily Dill, Matthew Dill, Nathan Dill, Lauren Fleetwood, Alexander Gibb, Miranda Haday, Molly Harmon, Amna Hayat, Madison Hill, Joseph Hubbard, Aubrie Jones, Devan Just, Andrew Knight, Brady Knight, Trey LeCates, Jenna Lloyd, Katelyn McGlaughlin, Drew Michaels, Autumn Moore, Kassadi Morris, James Nibblett, Parker O’Day, Kari O’Quinn, Dhruv Patel, Janvi Patel, Brooklyn Pearsall, Rachel Piper, Taylor Reid, Dale Rhodes Jr., Sean Riggins, Alexander Rosenthal, Cyrus Teter, Logan Thomas, Nathaniel Vincent, Timothy Ward, Amy Wilber, Heather Windels Grade 6 Honor Roll: Sadie Addlesberger, Ashley Arter, Yadiry Bejar, Brook Bishop, Dylan Brown, Taner Cakir, Florida Callis, Pamela Carey, Isabella Castrogiovanni, Danielle Day, Brittany Deal, Lauren Defelice, Courtney DelfinLara, Konner Dykes, Frederick Frey, Rachel Giamello, Sarah Givens, Tabitha Groover, Paige Hales, Hannah Hall, Tra’Naizah Handy, Hannah Hosier, Kaiya Hudson, Carol Hughes, Alyvia Hutley, Damarae Johnson, Zachary Lewis, Sebastian Machado, Maxwell Meegan, Caitlin Nichols, Aubrey Pastula, Niral Patel, Taylor Phillips, Muhammed Purnell, Kevon Reid, Timothy Rippel, Alexis Rodriquez, Antoinette Rommel, Dylan Ross, Katherine Schell, Daniel Smullen, Kheyonne Taylor, Brandon Thompson, Christopher Thompson, Paige Twilley-Webster, Zachary Tyler, David Vickers, Paige Vincent, Madison Whaley, Kiana Williams

Your Full Service Feed & Hardware Store

Bryan & Brittingham, Inc. 302-846-9500

Bi State Blvd. • Delmar, DE www.bryanandbrittingham.com Mon-Fri 7:30-5:00 Sat. 7:30-3:00

Keep “Fueling Up” Education is Your Future

We Proudly Support Our Local Students!

Rt. 13 & Connelly Mill Road, Delmar, MD

Congratulations On Your Accomplishments


PAGE 24

MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

Phillis Wheatley students named to third marking period honor roll

Jessica Bennett of Seaford (right) receives congratulations from James H. Groves Adult High School Principal Terri Corder after being inducted into the OAASIS Hall of Fame.

Graduate inducted into OAASIS The Sussex Tech Adult Division announces that one of its graduates, Jessica Bennett of Seaford, has been named to the OAASIS Hall of Fame. Jessica is a 2000 graduate of the James H. Groves Adult High School. The Organization of Adult Alumni and Students in Service is an organization composed of alumni and students from adult education programs throughout the State of Delaware. Its mission is to link students and alumni to individuals and organizations involved in adult and community education. Bennett’s natural ability to encourage others and make them feel at ease led to her becoming the Sussex Tech Groves OASSIS worker following her graduation. According to Principal Terri Corder, staff at the Sussex Center relied on Jessica to relate to students to get them to put forth their best effort. Her sense of humor could always get a smile from even the most discouraged student.

Bennett held this position for seven years, while working and raising two sons, before becoming an instructional paraprofessional at the Positive Outcomes Charter School in Camden. She now holds an administrative support position at the charter school. In 2005, Bennett was a keynote speaker at the statewide OAASIS Student Conference. She bravely shared her educational journey, including the obstacles she has had to overcome. At the end of sharing her story, an audience of more than 200 people gave her a standing ovation. Also at the Second Joint Summit of the Delaware Association for Adult and Community Education held on March 27, several James H. Groves students received awards as 2010 OAASIS Outstanding Students. Honorees included Lisa M. Henderson of Millsboro, Tradina Snead of Bridgeville, Elena Vasquez of Seaford and Juan Carlos Villacorta of Millsboro.

LEGISLATORS HOST EDUCATORS - Staff and student representatives from Sussex Tech Adult Education were invited to join other statewide adult educators in participating in the annual Legislative Luncheon in Dover on March 25. The purpose of the gathering was to provide a casual atmosphere where students and state legislators could converse about the immediate and long-term value of adult education in Delaware. Attending the luncheon were, from left: Javier Limon Aguilera of Millsboro, Kristina Hudson of Seaford, Emily Hatch of Milton and Terrance Nock of Bridgeville. In back are Terri Corder of Milford, principal of the James H. Groves Adult High School, and Dr. John Kreitzer of Lewes, director of Sussex Tech Adult Education.

The following students have been named to the honor roll for the third marking period at Phillis Wheatley Middle School. A Honor Roll - Amy Green, Tanner Savage, Jordan Walker, Aaron Ballweg, Nicholas Constantine, Makayla Johnson, Jedidiah Chung, Jordan Clark, Benjamin Pari, Itzel Sanchez-Quintero, Kaitlyn Willin, Erica Apgar, Kirsten Blake, Savannah Harris, Shelby McBroom, Taylor Richey AB Honor Roll - Michael Apgar, Douglas Avery, Zachary Blankenship, Cheyanne Durham, Marissa Esham, Edmar Felipe-Lucas, Kayla Hastings, Lane Hastings, Brittny Hurd, Jaycie Kerrick, Elizabeth Manlove, Caitlyn Mathis, Erin Polite, Jack Ryan, Dai’Mere Sample, Rebekah Swift, Abraham Thomas, Rickangelo Thomas, William Vanderwende, Trevor VanVorst, Angela Williams, Broy Willis, Starlynn Wood, Zachary Zanowic, Robert Bove, Zachary Breeding, Nathaniel Cooper, Bragg Davis, Sara Davis, Catarina Domingo, Kelsey Eckert, Alexis Harned, Megan Joseph, Brady Keeler, Shaina Larimore, Megan Luchansky, Kristin McClain,

Epworth’s honor roll

The following students have been named to the honor roll for the third quarter at Epworth Christian School. “A” Honor Roll First Grade (Mrs. Bryant) - Brenna Hummel, Adam Jenkins, Madelyn Moore, Farren Wright Second Grade (Mrs. Kerins) - Abigail Agapito, Mia Berger, Jaylah Culver, John Fink, Kaylin Hatfield, Gabriel Hoffman, Logan Tyler Third Grade (Mr. Moore) - Alexa Allen, Holly Baker, Kyle Briggs, Sophia Dykstra, Caleb Reid, Taylor Wroten Fourth Grade (Mrs. Bynes) - Liam Catron, Caleb McFarlin, Jerrica Robertson Seventh Grade (Mr. Crosby) - Angela Agapito, Cassie Gordon, Bailey Kinnikin, Abe Wharton “A/B” Honor Roll First Grade (Mrs. Bryant) - Riley Culver, Nicholas Dykstra, Christopher Owens Second Grade (Mrs. Kerins) - Michael Briggs, Christian Layton, Brayden Smith Third Grade (Mr. Moore) - Jeremiah Daudt, Rabecca Hastings, Cannon James, Marissa Kerins, Gabriella Lanzone, Sharoon Mall, Haley Owens Fourth Grade (Mrs. Bynes) - Olivia Berger, Elijah Knapp, Luke Kinnikin, Alyssa Layton, Cameron Sorrells, Abigail Swain, Noah Theis, Camryn Thompson, Taylor Tucker Fifth Grade (Mrs. Pusey) - Gabrielle Hastings, Moriah Reid, Andrea Timmons, Jared Willey Sixth Grade (Mrs. Lanzone) - Kyle Atkinson-Steele, Emily Groton, Jenna Espenlaub, Alexis Holston Seventh Grade (Mr. Crosby) - Renee Adams, Jacob Calloway, Logan Downes, Matthew Dykstra, Robert Hazel, Nicholas Kary, Caroline Kerins, Carol Anne McFarlin, Alexandra Murphy, Jeffrey Munro, Grant Ward Eighth Grade (Mrs. Morris) - Taylor Daudt, LeighAnn Elzey, Justin Shepard, Chanah Zrien

Lakalla Molock, Brianna Morris, Hailey Penuel, Morgan Ramos, Adam Thomas, Breania Albury, Desmon Bolden, DJeson Charles, Remington Dewey, Domonique Edwards, Jarrod Elliott, Nour Elmasri, Alyssa Fitzgerald, Lesly Garcia-Vega, Corey Green, Isabelle Grinstead, Katelyn Harding, Kevin Harrold, Tae-Oun Hunt, Joseph Hutson, Jeshale’ Johnson, Joshua Keefe, Martha Limon-Gutierrez, Nathan Milligan, Brenna Murphy, Bradford Nelson, Holly Rich, Cheyenne Rickabaugh, Russell Smith, Mikaela Smith, Amber Thomas, Joshua Vazquez, Nicole Verrastro, Logan Wescott, Alexis Wyatt, Brent Adams, Lauren Andrews, Lyteesha Bailey, Shawn Beggs, Zachary Bell, Collin Breeding, Diamond Brown, William Davis, Thomas Deputy, Christopher Eck, Dajah Emory, Amanda Friend, Alana Frisby, Jaime Garcia, Kalene Garrison, Danielle Glenn, Olivia Grinstead, William Harris, Gabrielle Johnson, Jamie Kennedy, Tyler Mathis, Micala Polite, Clarissa Powell, Horacio Reyna, Rudy Salandanan, Tyrone Smith, Sydnee Smith, Diamond Turner, Tabbrea Walker

AAUW scholarship available

The Western Sussex Branch of AAUW will offer a scholarship to a woman who is a resident of the Seaford, Laurel, Woodbridge or Delmar (Del.) School District and who, having completed at any time a two-year associate program at the Owens Campus, Georgetown, plans to pursue a four-year bachelor’s degree. Applications for the scholarship for the 2010 – 2011 college year are available from the Financial Aid Office, Delaware Technical and Community College, Owens Campus. The deadline is May 15.

Bradshaw in Phi Eta Sigma

David Bradshaw, son of Carlton and Kimberly Bradshaw of Delmar, Md., was recently accepted into Phi Eta Sigma, the national freshman honor society, at Salisbury University. Bradshaw is a freshman majoring in physics. He is an Appalachia Service Project participant and a member of the Dodgeball Club. He is a 2009 graduate of Delmar High School.

Bay named to Who’s Who

Seventy cadets and active duty military students have been chosen by The Citadel faculty members as the college’s Class of 2010 Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges. Among those students is Sophia Margaret Bay of Seaford. Bay is a physical education/health and wellness major. Nominations are based on strength of character, academic achievement, military achievement, leadership, campus activities and participation and excellence in athletics at the varsity, intramural or club sport level.


MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

PAGE 25

invest in the future

STAMP CONTEST WINNERS - Lenore Huffer, regent of the Delaware State Society of The Daughters of the American Colonists, recently presented awards to Abby Pearson, 5th grade, and Clarice Pamplona, 4th grade, winners of the American History Stamp Contest sponsored by the National Society of the American Colonists. The girls, members of Mrs. Renee Clarke’s class at West Seaford Elementary School, were the state winners from Delaware. Parents and classmates celebrated the occasion with refreshments.

Laurel Intermediate School students named to honor roll The following students have been named to the honor roll at Laurel Intermediate School for the third quarter. 5th grade Mrs. Brennan - All A’s - Cody O’Ferrall, Mitchell Moyer, Brianna Hyland, Corey Evans, Summer Black; A/B - Elijah Tant, Tristen Russell, Anita Pacheco, Alexis Newman, Jaden Johnson, Briana Davis, Alexis Cooper Mrs. Callaway - All A’s - Natalie Culver, Lexie Ullman, Marissa Walls, Stone Wilson; A/B - Brett Aliff, Deborah AngelGabriel, Josh Conner, Mikayla Green, Jarrett Hall, Desiree Hastings, Jacky Matics, Angie Monteleone, Aliyah Pierce, Austin Venables, Jacob White Ms. Dolan - All A’s - Timothy Chandler, Destiney Mumford; A/B - Zeynep Darilmaz, Rebecca Hutchinson, Bailey McCausland, Joe McGarvey, Shawn Saunders, Katelynn Skipper, Shyla Timmons, Alton White Mr. Moyer - All A’s - TyAnna Handy, Julianna Wedding; A/B - Breanna Brittingham, Cheylan Davenport, Greg Dukes, Wanda Flores-Gabriel, Kristian Griffith, Taryn Lewis, Christian Murphy, Juan Sanchez-Hernandez, Rohini Singh, Monica Small Mrs. Pugh- All A’s - Hannah Layton; A/B - Emily Briggs, Logan Foy, Tyler Hare, Darline Murat, McKenzi Walter Mrs. Pusey - All A’s - Audrey Asher; A/B - Amari Cannon, Devon Carmean, Skyler Chaffinch, Jonathon Cooper, Kristy Kazar, Courtney Norman, Georgia O���Neal, Carlos Reyes, Rossy Reynoso, Daisy Tillman, Lauribeth Whaley Mrs. Thielemann - All A’s - Cassidy White, Chase Ruark, Samaria Risper; A/B - Donnell Briddell, Chance Congleton, Jordan Hagaman, Katarina Humphrey, Rebecca Marvel, Gracie Morris, Deanna Osorio, Darien Shockley, Samantha Skerstad, Ty-Tionah Thompson, Dalton Wood

6th grade Mrs. Bice - All A’s - Anthony Ash, Christian Riggin; A/B - Allyssa Alpert, Mariah Riggin, Zaidel Sanchez, Eliezer Shahid Mrs. Bowden - All A’s - Connor Bailey; A/B - Zane Ball, Breannah Bell, Morgan Callaway, Juanita Carreno, Ashton Christophel, Melania Clark, Cole Cook, Taylor French, Nicole Hovatter, Zach Johnson, Kendrick McDaniel, Harley Tuck, Cedric Ulysse, Ashlan Venables Mrs. Burton - All A’s - Nathan Heinicke, Daniel Yu; A/B - Seamus Burke, Elijah Deshields, De’Neco Garcia, Brandon Hoy, Suneydi Jimenez, Joseph Johnson, Ashlee McCoy, Taylor Smith, Hunter Toomey, Rosa Toomey, Christian Vega, Chance Watts Mrs. Hastings - All A’s - Sarah Allen, Dylan Eskridge, Justin Hill, Cade Pusey; A/B - Jimmy Boyle, Joey Carney, Maria Gomez, Jenna Hovatter, Brandon Jackson, Donald Joseph, Charelle Lewis, Noah Rose Ms. Palmer - All A’s - Zachary Carey, Cassie Dyson Ka’Suana McKenrick, Kellye Rowe, Sabrina Vandeyar, Nieja West; A/B - Tressie Bennett, Durand Carey, Taylor Carroll, Elias Orellano-Santos, Matthew Stokes, Tiara Taylor, Timaun Williams Mrs. Thompson - A/B - Amber Birney, Gemima Murat, Sam Rash Mrs. Parker - All A’s - Cole Collins, Trent Hearn, Brooke Jones, Joanne Yeary; A/B - Nicole Albino-Lopez, Mary Kate Bennett, Kailyn Bickerton, Morgan Brunner-Cooke, Nathaniel Cannon, Hunter Henry, Michael Henry, Bethany Watson, Quentin Wilkerson Mr. Swain - All A’s - Dhamir Bailey, Chris Wathen, Josh Yawn; A/B - Evan Ahtes, Kacie Bruce, Charles Hagaman, Jeffrey Howard, Anthony Jones, David Morton, Theopolis Teagle, Jordyn Tonelli

of today’s young students Currently Morning Star Publications is placing almost 1,000 copies of the Seaford and Laurel Star newspapers every week in Sussex County classrooms. Wouldn’t you like to become a

Newspaper In Education Sponsor

If you would like to support Newspapers In Education for the 2009-2010 School Year, please call the Star office at 302-629-9788 or clip this coupon and mail to Morning Star publications, Attn: Karen Cherrix, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973 Your Name ____________________________________________________ Address ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ Phone _______________________

Any Size Donation Appreciated March 18, 2010

r, Dear Supporte West Seaford t a t n e d u t s e d a I am a fifth gr ppreciates the a l o o h c s y m d an m named Hannah for us. We the s r e p a p s w e n buy like essays, fact that you s n io s a c c o d n cts a for many proje ers, Delaware d a r g d n o c e s r s are career day fo current event t a h w e e s o t notebooks, and aking your own t r o f u o y k n a th happening. So for my school s r e p a p s w e n ing money and buy Hannah Very Thankful, Actual Letter from West Seaford Student


PAGE 26

MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

Sussex Tech students named to third marking period honor roll

From left, Delaware Tech international students Emmanel Edmond, Haiti; Karla Cedillo, Mexico; Mi Keong Sung, South Korea; Jorge Duran Sanchez, Mexico; and Samuel Senatus, Haiti; during the International Day celebration at the Owens Campus.

Students enjoy day of festivities Students engaged in a variety of fun and cultural activities at the annual Roady Fest Carnival on April 14 and International Day Celebration on April 15 at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus in recognition of National Community College Month. Community colleges provide affordable access to a postsecondary education, prepare students for transfer to four-year universities, supply workforce development and skills training, and offer noncredit programs to the community. During the carnival, student services counselors, student ambassadors and student clubs hosted activities including a baseball throw, basketball hoops, games and karaoke. Communications student Carrie Mullen, of Laurel, drew caricatures; students in automotive technology’s East Coast Performance Club applied airbrush tattoos; and members of the Performing Arts Club performed skits. More than 100 students won Roady Dollars by collecting them in a money machine. Roady Dollars can be used in the campus bookstore and dining hall. During the International Day celebration, Delaware Tech students from around the world performed traditional songs and dances, wore traditional and modern clothing from their countries and shared food with each other and the college community. “We are very proud to have approxi-

Students (left) Clovis Mutombo, nursing, and (right) Mary Roisland, medical laboratory technology, pose with (center) Kerri Harmon, counselor, to show off Roady Dollars that they won in the money machine during Roady Fest.

mately 320 international students from 52 different countries studying at the Owens Campus this year,” said Allison BurrisCastellanos, English as a Second Language (ESL) instructor and International Club advisor. “My favorite part of International Day is the singing; I like hearing the different singing styles from countries around the world,” said Ping Chen, an ESL student from China.

SCS students named to honor roll The following area students have been named to the second quarter honor roll at Salisbury Christian School. Summa Cum Laude - Grade 6 - Seth Slacum, Laurel; Josh Smith, Seaford; Grade 8 - Nathaniel Laremore, Seaford; Grade 11 - Shelby Dukes, Laurel; Micah Laremore, Seaford; Kristen McTernan, Delmar; Grade 12 - Jamie Curtis, Laurel; Stephanie James, Delmar; Ben Katzaman, Delmar; Jenna Kirk, Laurel Magna Cum Laude - Grade 6 - Christian Bethard, Laurel; Cameron Cordrey, Laurel; Zach Johnson, Delmar; Grade 7

- Katelin Whaley, Laurel; Grade 8 - Hannah Millman, Bridgeville; Katie Minton, Laurel; Grade 9 - Allison Lowe, Laurel; Tyler Smith, Seaford; Grade 10 - Megan James, Delmar; Grade 12 - Kristen Whaley, Laurel Cum Laude - Grade 6 - Caleb Kirk, Laurel; Grade 8 - Keller Bruce, Laurel; Kelsey Johnson, Delmar; Kenzie Johnson, Delmar; Katyanna Kerr, Laurel; Grade 9 - Nathan Katzaman, Delmar; Grade 11 - Jared Alexander, Delmar; Ross Lugasi, Laurel; Blake Phillips, Laurel; Jeri West, Bridgeville

The following area students were named to the third marking period honor roll at Sussex Tech. Bethel - Grade 12 – Brittany N. Coffin Blades - Grade 9 – Jenna L. Joseph; Grade 10 – Ashley D. Taylor; Grade 11 – Shelby L. Marvel Bridgeville - Grade 9 – Christopher M. Clifton, Shaunay D. Duncan, Sarah E. Eckhardt, Ryan M. Johnson, Bethany M. Killmon, Stephen J. Mervine, Kate L. Schroeder, Lauren E. Shapley, Kaitlyn R. Steelman, Natea E. Welch; Grade 10 – Kyrstin E. Cameron, Margaret E. Lee; Grade 11 – Briana R. Bolden, Daly Pineyro; Grade 12 – Tyler D. Dickson, Kristin N. Drummond, Caitlin L. Knotts, Benedict Pineyro, Caitlin R. Stone Delmar - Grade 9 – Casey L. Gove, Taylor R. Wilson; Grade 10 – Brooke A. Faulkner; Grade 11 – Erica B. Adkins, Kenneth S. Poole, Emily F. Tull; Grade 12 – Denay P. Lucas, Sarah N. Lyons Greenwood - Grade 9 – Jessica L. Brandenburg, Shy-Deja D. Fooks, Imani S. Nichols, Nicole A. Widen; Grade 10 – Hunter R. Murray, Ashleigh M. Sturgis, Alexander L. Trivits, Jacob B. Williams; Grade 11 – Samantha Constantine, Cassandra N. French, Georgia A. Spencer, Courtney E. Taylor; Grade 12 – Jennifer M. Bailey, Michael T. Fuller, Amanda L. Nichols, Kasey B. Thompson Laurel - Grade 9 – Caitlin M. Cook, Christopher G. Jester, Ashley N. Jump, Ciera M. Lewis, Katie A. Schieferstein, Salina M. Schirtzinger, Joseph T. Yawn; Grade 10 – Lucas Acosta, Gulbeyaz Arslan, Alexandra L. Ash, Kathryn P. Bethard, Travis A. Griffith, Erin N. Johnson, Martina C. Major, Ryan T. Mitchell, Kristine D. Phulesar, Noelle C. Rash, Sudesh Singh, Hannah G. Small, Justin T. Stevenson, Isabel R. Wharton, Tara C. Windels; Grade 11 – AnaMaria AlvaradoIbarra, Bethany A. Bell, Jeffrey J. Bradley, Alexandra A. Cannon, Brittany M. Chesser, Rachel E. Crum, Taylor P. Forse, Jessica E. Hansen, Melanie A. Hitchens, Kelly E. Mullen, Timothy A. Pianka, Autumn R. Stevens, Angela R. Wilson; Grade

12 – Justin C. Allen, Cody L. Belote, Michael D. Edelin Jr., Whitney F. Handy, Sharmaine M. Harris, Brooke D. Miller, Halie A. Parker, Melissa M. Trout, Courtlyn C. Whaley, DaNee C. White Seaford - Grade 9 – Travis B. Anderson, Dylan W. Banning, Taylor E. Baynum, Tyler J. Bradley, Evan W. Budke, Zoe N. Callaway, Zachary A. Cannon, Julia E. Chojnowski, Michael P. Dopler, Zane D. Garand, Abigail J. Genshaw, Victoria L. Hearn, Ti’Andra J. Henry, Nathan E. Justis,, Benjamin W. King, Chelsea A. LeCates, Shannon L. Lecates, Amanda K. Liffers, Crystal R. Loudon, Jessica M. Morris, Alexis B. Mulford, Jazmine C. Mullen, Priyen M. Patel, Victor J. Pineda Gonzalez, Matthew N. Rosas, Joshua A. Rump, Amanda M. Sava, Cory D. Showard, Hannah N. Smith, Matthew T. Smith, Alysa E. Swingle, Page E. Van Brunt, Heather R. Walls, Tyler F. Whaley, Crystal M. Williamson; Grade 10 – Jasmine G. Anthony, Ricky Bautista, Ashley L. Bean, Damira C. Bolden-Downing, Matthew B. Dopler, Ryan K. Fitzgerald, Alexander D. Geniesse, Bethany M. LaChance, Mahnoor Mahmood, Shane P. Marvel, Aaron A. Massey, Morgan R. Messick, Chase C. Milligan, Payton E. Shirey, Shane A. Smith, Cassidy B. Taylor, Megan S. Thompson, Krista J. Whaley; Grade 11 – Scott C. Bell, Katie M. Brown, Taylor J. Budke, Kayla M. Collins, Paige E. Collins, Elizabeth A. Coulbourn, Meghan Engst, Alyssa M. Francus, Timothy E. Gaskin, Myles J. Gray, Michelle R. Haney, Kaitlin S. Hardesty, Tianna N. Hutchins, Brandi L. Johnson, Chelsea A. Kimbler, Matthew S. King, Chase G. Kouts, Caitlin A. Liffers, Charinel Matos, Brock A. Smith, Shannon L. Story, Clare C. Thomas, Nathan C. Truitt; Grade 12 – Paul D. Asa, Andrew G. Bell, Sabree C. Burbage, Joseph S.L. Casullo, Ryan D. Davila, AnnaMarie F. Dill, Whitney N. Ebron, Emily J. Genshaw, Emir W.A. Laroya, Cynthia N. Mejia, Kinjal R. Patel, Alexis M. Turzani, Sarah D. Val, Amber L. Williamson, Anna M. Yelverton

The ABC Child Development Center in Federalsburg, Md., celebrated its 40th year of service to the community on March 6. The celebration honored community leaders whose lifelong commitment has contributed to the success of the center. The daycare center is housed in the former Federalsburg Elementary School building located on Laurel Grove Road in Federalsburg. Men For Change, a local ministry outreach and Ms. Cynthia Seymore, of Federalsburg, co-sponsored the event. Seymore is the granddaughter of the late Gertrude Johnson, who was one of the founders, and the first director of the daycare center. The civic league committee was founded in 1960 by a group of concerned citizens, including Johnson, to better address the issues facing the community. These efforts led to the purchase of the former Federalsburg Elementary School building and property from the Caroline County Board of Education.

Special honorees received certificates of appreciation for their service: Helene and Herbert Griffin (40 years); Mary West, second director; Martha Stanley, assistant manager; and Pearl Lofland, financial manager. Men For Change honored the late poet Henry Wilson, one of their cherished members, with a candlelight memorial. Proceeds from fundraising and community donations went to support the daycare center. A check for $1,500 was presented to the center for payment to Tri-Gas & Oil Company.

Child center celebrates 40 years

School News pages sponsorship

The School News pages will be published monthly in the Seaford and Laurel Star newspapers. Thank the sponsors on these pages by supporting their businesses. Businesses or schools interested in advertising to help sponsor the pages should email brichardson@mspublications.com


MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

PAGE 27

Woodbridge Elementary students named to honor roll The following students have been named to the honor roll for the third marking period at Woodbridge Elementary School. 1st grade - Distinguished Honor Roll Savannah Baynard, Makayla Bennett, Julia Benton, Elijah Bronson, Michael Burris, Tyair Cannon, Erin Carey, Gerald Carroll, Alani Castrejon, Stephanie Cuny, Braeden Davis, Mycah Dickerson, Breanna Duncan, Lauren Elliott, Sabrina Gerving, Anya Gillespie, Jerry Greene, Halie Hart, Sarah Jones, Zoe Kenton, Denise LagunesPonce, Charles Little, Genevieve Maddox, Michael Mangan, Xander Mansfield, Teigan Mariner, Nicholas Messick, Kylie Mitchell, Edward A. Nichols, Antonio Ortiz, Sofia Oyola Morales, Caleb Perdue, Michael Plummer, Alexus Ricketts, Ceci Rodriguez-Berduo, Taylor Scott, Josie Scramlin, Harley Short, Hazael SotoPerez, Cara Stevens, Seth Tinsman, Edwin Torres-Martinez, Robert Vera, Paris Webb,

READING IS FUNDAMENTAL WINNER - Dunbar Elementary students in Laurel read 20,060 books during the Reading is Fundamental celebration. Shown here is Sarah Phippin with principal Judy Noll. Sarah read 502 books and was the winner for “Most Books Read” for the school.

Madison Weidlein, Mackenzie West, Kasyn White, Kayla White Honor Roll - Steve Alcantara-Villalobos, Emily Aleman, Cody Alton, Reuben Banks, Jason Barnes, Alexander Bohenko, Alexander Bowden, Marie Brooks, Hailey Butler, David Cardenas, Alexus Carmack, Kaylynn Casiano, Joshua Chaffinch, Christine Charles, Joseph Fischer, De’Andre Foskey, Stacy Garabito-Acosta, Marco Garcia-Avila, Bryan Gonzalez-Garcia, Xabier Harmon, Joshua Heim, Sebastian Hernandez, Edgar Hernandez-Cruz, Kyle Hill, Deronn Kane, Aiden Kvilhaug, Shawn Layton, Anyah Massey, Mario Mazariegos-Vasquez, J Jesus Mendoza-Garcia, Kaitlyn Missimer, Aaron Noland, Casey Olson, Gabriela Pineyro, Jade Powell, Jayla Powell, Lillian Pusey, Shannon Rogers, Kennedy Russ, Seth Rust, Or’mon Sanders, Abdiel Soto-Perez, Dylan Souva, Skyler Speed, Leroy Stafford, Ryan Stevens, Jaried Taylor Gelzer, Rosita VillalobosLabra, Matthew Welch, Dakivis Whaley, Serenity Willey, Brenton Williams, Cyniah Williams, Nacari Williams, Levi Yost 2nd grade - Distinguished Honor Roll - Lillian Anderson, Macey Bautista, Hannah Bennett, Rachel Bollinger, Aynasti Bowden, Blake Butt, Chris Cannon, Shazab Chaudhry, Maite Chilel-Martin, Ana Domingo, Alexis Durham, Eric Fields, Elyssia Gonzalez, Mario Hernandez, Aaiyana James, Isaiah Jenkins, Ricky Kane, Turner Lee, Joshua Messick, Gabriella Morra, Edward J. Nichols, Adaly Perez, Justus Ramos, Taylor Schulties, Gabriella Scramlin, Grace Slacum, Summer Slacum, Syerra Smith, Alastornia Swift, Tanya Velasquez-Mendez, Angel Walker, Wisdom Waters, Benjamin Webb, Annika Widen, Jason Willey, Litzy Yepez-Alcantara, Tyler Yoder Honor Roll - Esther Aguilar, Joshua Arscott, Bret Balascio, Shyanne Bawel, Harry Bell, Alyssa Betts, Adriana Blake, Kayla Brownlee, Nina Burns-Skrobot, Jessica Cac-Lopez, Rynasia Cannon, Clayton Carper, Lluvia Castrejon-Quezada, Diana Chavez-Galvez, Ryan Cummings, Thomas Data, TaeShaun Ford-Jackson, Debralyss Garcia Serrano, Jordan Givens, A’Sauna Hadley, Kaitlyn Hall, Trey Haynes, Charley Herrera, Ro’Niaya Holden, Damian Holt-Gum, Emily Hurlock, Michael Hutchison, Madison Isaacs, Kahleb Jackson, Heaven Jones, Mackenna Kerrick, Angel La Fuente, Tanner Lecates, De’Asia

W E A R E P R O U D TO S E R V E OUR AREA STUDENTS EST.

1978

PIZZA PIZZA • SUBS SUBS • STEAKS STEAKS GRINDERS GRINDERS • SALADS SALADS

1008 South Central Ave. Laurel, DE

875-4477 300 Stein Hwy. Seaford, DE

629-6003

Lopez, Gavin Manning, Derek Mansfield, Jayquon Massey, Marcus Massey, Christopher Mathis, Adam Miller, Hailey Moore, Anahi Morales-Rivera, Trinity Morris, Alexandria Nechay, DaJah North, Fredrick Norwood, Regan Ogden, Ty’Reei Owens, Hannah Pearson, Devin Perry, Mackenzie Price, Kristen Reed, Vanessa RomanCastrejon, Zachary Rowe, Ushba Saleem, Ty’Quan Sampson-Banks, Mikayla Serpa, David Smith, Tyler Smith, Cassidy Soderback, Jenna Steward, Karl Tepe, Ty’Asia Thomas, Carissa Tinsman, Joshua Torbert, Edwin Velasquez-Perez, Juliana Villalobos-Gutierrez, Gerald Walker, Pharah-Joi Webb, Ashley Williams, Alexis Wilson, Indya Wright, Hunter Young 3rd grade - Distinguished Honor Roll - Yuseff Bartsch, Christian Boggs, Joshua Brumfield, Caleb Callaway, Meredith Carey, Brisa Cazares-Quezada, Corrin Farris, Sade Hall, Corey Hastings, Taylor Holcomb, Nevada Jackson, Brock Keeler, Sean Kvilhaug, Cristina Limon-Gutierrez, Jessie Molesi, Kristen Nichols, William Norwood, Alexandra Opaliski, Jennifer Orosco-Ocampo, Dylan Perdue, Joshua Propes, Kenisha Reid, Alyssa Staley, Mariah Taylor Gelzer, Stephanie Vera, Mia Williams Honor Roll - Jordan Abrams, Christopher Andrews, Ty’Jae Armstrong, Seth Baker, Hailee Bennett, Robert Boyer, Gary Breeding, Marquez Burbage, Aaliyah Cannon, Jerome Cannon, Jalisa Covington, Ellen Craft, Jayden Craft, Jonathan Data, Germain Diaz, Joseph Disharoon, Maredy

We don’t guarantee straight A’s, but a good nights sleep will keep you at your best.

Felipe-Lucas, Dominic Figueroa, Javon Gibbs, Maragelique Gonzalez, Caitlyn Goodwin, Tajhon Hammond, Rebekah Harding, Marlayna Hart, Zachary Harvey, Trey Hatfield, Lane Hill, Kenneth Iverson, Joseph Jester, Michael Jewell, Jamon Kane, Jerry Lacy, Sarah Layton, Diana Lofland, Brayan Lopez-Galvez, Alyssa Lucke, Alexis Marquez, Mia Martin, Namel Martin, Makenzie Masten, Victoria Moore, Noelle Morrison, Nicholas Murphy, Tykeya Nelson, Tajere Nock, Ty’miere Owens, Brandon Polite, Carleah Rayford, Steven Ridgaway, Alexis Roberts, Skylar Russ, Sarah Sharp, Alexander Strain, Ja’mez Styles, Emily Taylor, Justin Thomas, Nadine Tinsman, Oscar Torrez-Rocha, Kylie Tull, Alanna Vanderwende, Faith Vesterman, Gabriel Wescott, Jameesha Whidbee-Toppin 4th grade - Distinguished Honor Roll Amanda Moore, Colby Simpson Honor Roll - Morgan Absher, Matthew Albanese, Ian’tae Albury, Hunter Blake, Drianna Bolden, Rebecca Bristow, Tyler DeFord, Dae’shjah Everett, Anthony Garabito-Acosta, Micah Gonzalez, Dante Goodman, Emily Harrington, Orbby Holder, MaKenzie Howell, Mikah James, Brooke Joseph, Josue Juarez, Rayne Lawrence, Grace Lee, Kandy Mendoza-Garcia, Diego Morones-Castillo, Cristian OrdonezAlbino, Allison Orellana, Darshil Patel, Jaden Perez, Jesus Rodriguez-Santos, Katarina Swift, Chance Thomas, Beverly VanBusKirk, Ayonnia Warner, Harlia Watts, Shawn Wessells

SAle Mattress and $ Box Twin Set 159

*

s ’ e k i M Mon-Thurs 9-6, Fri 9-8 Sat 9-5:30 Sun 11-5

302-846-0310

*Trundle Bed Not Included

CLEARANCE CENTER RT. 13 SOUTH • DELMAR, DE

GIFT CERTIFICATES www.mikesclearancecenter.com


PAGE 28

MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

Seaford Middle School recognizes honor roll students The following students have been named to the honor roll for the third marking period at Seaford Middle School. Regular Honor Roll Grade 6 - Dai’Ron Antuan Abbott, Tai’Ron Andre Abbott, Brady Cole Absher, Karissa Marie Anderson, Saul Arbaiza, Damien Lee Argo, Emanuel Beckett III, Garverich William Besnoska, Alexis Gabrielle Bloomfield, Cierra Renae Bramble, Katelynn Simone Brittingham, Samantha Marie Brown, Jaylyn Ti’Myah Calloway, Bryant Lee Cannon Jr., Robert CenicolaEdwards, Shawn Kwanita Chartin, Amiah Danae Cooke, Taylor Lee Cornish, Janeise Drayton, Isaiah Marc’Elle Epps, Courtney Nicole Eskridge, Olivia Evans, Kayla Alexis Fleming, Dylan Lee Harris, Darell Rashad Horsey, Isiah Devon Horsey, Ian Matthew Jager, Ditasia Disha Johnson, Nigel Lemai Caleb Johnson, Matthew Shayne Joseph Wingate, Shai Ronae Kenney, Dylan Michael Kensinger, Rose Manoucheka Louis, Dominique Brianna Renee Mangino, Ynez McCray, William Joseph Meddings, Lauren Lynn Melton, Robinson Metelus Jr., Chelda Mistal, Kelsee Moore, Markhalia Moore, Ayonna Shyniece Newcomb, Rene Ojeda-Perez, Makayla Monet’ Perry, Judith Sierra Sammons, Greggory Jaren Schwamberger, Alexis Taylor Short, Noah Smith, Chelsea Aylin Sosa, Ashley Marie Stewart, Zariyah Alexis Street, Tucker Ian Strickroth, Thalia Monae Thomas, Alexis Paige Vickers, Savannah Renee Vincent, Shaun Anthony Waples, Alexys Danielle Welch, Taylor Shaye Wheatley, Rachel Faith Wootten Grade 7 - Briana M. N. Abbott, Devonta T. Adamson, Aubre J. Allen, Jose Antonio Almanza-Baltazar, Rosalinda Valentina Barron, Tyree Anthony Bass, Robert Alvin Bay, Joseph Christopher Bell, Taylor LaFaye Biles, Alexis Bolden, Haylee Lynn Cain, Stefan M. Cannon, Kathleen Ann Carney, Peyton B. Chaffinch, Rachel R. Covey, Gretchen Emily Daehn, Michael Edward Delgado, Darius Tyree Deshields, Elijah Zachary Desir, Dimarco Dorsey, Jeremy Grant Dulis, Dwardly Valner Edouard, Katherine Harte Gladding, Gretta Hernandez Gomez, Nicholas A. Gray, Cooper E. Hearn, Corrinna A. Hitch, Alaya Tajsha Hopkins, Charles Edward Hopkins, Brianna Onay Horsey, Mandy Leigh Hoskins, Ricky Johnson, Tiffany Lynn Michelle Johnson, Demontraye Lamere Jones, Breona Kellam, James L. King II, Byrone Lamont Lake Jr., Richard Lamontagne,

Allissa Ann Mann, Jeremy D’Shea Mann, Zenobia A. McIvor-Smalley, Pierrevil Mondestin, Derek Scot Murphy, Cheyenne J. Nason, Alyssa Lee Nichols, Elis Daniel Petion, Hannah Pollock, Sydney A. Ricketts, Cody Phillips Robison, Tory Lynne Ruark, Jeanior R. Sainphard, Emmaly Salkowitz, Aylea Sandifer, Darnell Henry Savage Jr., Rian Annabeth Shirey, Jade Brooke Singleton, Tabitha Lee Smedley, Mark Edward Spicer Jr., Casandra Morgan Stanley, Nelson Telemac, Seth Christopher Thomas, Kyle Tingle, Erykah Lach’E Tolliver, Rosa Hilda Torres, Thalia Marivel Torres, Zachary M. Truitt, Corey Lachlan Wallace, Jermiesha R’Mani Watkins, Terry-Ann Lee Weiss, Joseph Wiseman, Brittani Wortmann Grade 8 - Jodi Ann Abraham, Nicholas S. Bennett, Rhiannon Nichole Besnoska, Damian Ty-Lee Bluto, Andrae Bowden, Jyree’ Jabar Brice, Brandyn Rasean Brittingham, Robert Nelson Brown, Alex Steven Caporale, Tyiana Monique Clark, Ashley N. Clergeau, Jenna Lynn Cottet, David Daniel Cyr Jr., Rae’Kwan Ra’mierBarry Deshields, Allison M. Draper, Rigoberto Elvira-Mendoza Jr., Shawnna Esham, Calvin Wanya Georgia, Taschiana Gibbs-Hughes, Raidel L. Gomez Jr., Brenda Antonia Gonzalez, Audrey Nicole Grant, Ashley Marie Gray, Caleb Isaiah Handy, Donald Trevor Hare, Karey Anne Hayes, Kole Michael Hearn, Alexa Jana Herr, Tiffanni Lita Hinds, Thomas Lee Hodges, Matthew James Horne, Hannah Jo Irvin, Dylan Lee Joseph, Kierra Shanice Kilgoe, Montez Lake, Joshua Ryan Lee, Megan Christine Mahetta, Andrea L. Marshall, Payton Victoria Monroe, Bruce Lamont Mosley Jr., Lauren Ashley Norman, Taylor Skye Pavone, Tyler Christian Potter, Taylor Alexander Prance, Ana Sandra Rojas-Labra, Haleigh Rebecca Shrensel, Jameisha Victoria Smith, Jessica Lynn Taylor, Shaiquan Thomas, Victor Vega Jr., Esnika Veillard, Jordan Christopher Walls, Amber Nicole Wise, John Jacob Zoch Jr. Distinguished Honor Roll Grade 6 - Nayab Abid, Anthony Brian Alanis, Sheila Artiga, Cameron Baynum, Colin Christopher Bergh, Autumn Lei Bone, Kyler Nicholas Norman Brightwell, Michaela Noelle Brodie-Willey, Emma Rose Buttridge, Haley Aleen Cannon, Mack Harrison Caplan, Austin James Carmean, Heaven Lee Carter, Alican Ceylan, Robert Swisher Clagg, Taylor Renee Collins, Brandon Conley, Taylor Lynn Con-

ley, Nicholas Ryan Coulbourn, Breanna Summer Dean, Nicole Evette Drummond, Carine Duverger, Ludjina Dwardine Edouard, William Robert Elliott, Cuauhtemoc Espinoza, Cristofer Erik Frederick, Vincent Gao, Christyn Ashley Geniesse, Ilse Geovanna Gomez-Flores, Jerry Lamont Greene, Jorge Gualpa, Zackry Wendell Hall, Nathan Jon Hanenfeld, Ruby Lynn Harris, Jessica Shae Hennessey, Jonathan Eric Jackson, Sabrina Madison Jefferson, Ti’Asha Lee-Ayre Johnson, Kiara Bone’E Kilgo, Matthew Tyler King, Elijah Dante Knowles, Shelby Marie Lankford, Jacob A. Lee, Amber Lovelace, Zachary Brian Marine, Elisha Raven Marks, Anthony Wayne Marshall Jr., John Tyler Martin, Dwayne Russell McConnell, Deonise Mondestin, James David Moore, Rylie Jennifer Moore, Ariana Marie Myers, Gina Norman, Gabriella Olivince, Esteban Antonio Orozco-Andujo, Ashil Patel, James Connor Pennington, Peyton Perkins, Pajuah Mariah Purnell, Emily Elaine Richardson, Angela Lee Rust, Ronalda Sainphard, Travis P. Shockley, Somantha Signey, Marvin Spady, Shianne Paige Sparrow, Brennan Nicholas Stark, Arlenys Torres-Rivera, Joshua Kenneth Trammell, Marlon Aldair Trejo, Zaneilia Diamone West, Stephanie Brooke Wheatley, Michael Julian Yelverton Grade 7 - Nelson Amisial, Teona Shawnte Andrews, Alicia Marie Atkins, Kristie Jo Beyer, Mikeyah Lashae Brewer, Kiana Danielle Brown, Kayprece Cannon, Joseph Gonzalo Castel De Oro, Michael Erin Coggin, Sara E. Davis, Destinee Renaee Depew, Samantha Marie Flynn,

Citlalic Garcia-Martinez, Omar Torres Gutierrez, Jeffrey Kyle Hill, Amanda Jean Jones, Kelsie Brook Joseph, Quinn X. Kirby, Kimberly Brook Lipsett, Michael Thomas Mahetta, Tiffany Mendible, Sabrina Motta, Kaila Muniz, Tuyet-Kha Thi Nguyen, Mary Catherine Niles, Roxanne Arlene Patrick, Trung Tin Pham, Guadalupe Pineda-Gonzalez, William A. Pruitt Jr., Tana N. Tingle, Josue Reno Toledo, Shania Mona’E Trammell, Susan Belinda Velasquez-Perez, Rebecca Lynn Zachry, Zachary David Zellhart Grade 8 - Breanna Nicole Andrews, Jordan N. Barr, Tanaja C. Beckett, Sarah Lynne Bell, Amethyst Nicole Brasfield, Christian Alexander Caredio, Tugce Ceylan, Haley Jane Cherrix, Ann Marie Childress, Bradley Aaron Cook, Raiquan Markell Deshields, Henson Destine, Nhu Quynh Do, Johnathan Mitchell Hare, Shelby Marie Hignutt, Devon Lamont Hunt, Braiden A. Johnson, Shahiem Terez Johnson, Nikales Charles Joseph, Vanessa Dione Joseph, Nicholas Keith Karek, Sage Ryan Kelley, Sidney A. Kilgo, Taylor Nicole Knox, Jenna Lynn Lord, Catherine Jennifer Mackler, Shakita Shana Major, Faith Michelle Maltby, Alicia Martinez, Jessica Sandra Massey, Courtney Ann Michel, Alexander Martin Mitan, Masha O’Bryan, Dhruvilkumar S. Patel, Darlaine Paul, Lisa Thanh Pham, Clifford Antonio Pitts, Natalie L. Sava, Leah Lashaun Snead, Jordan Shane Spicer, Brynescha Denise Stanley, Jennifer V. Vasquez Cantarero, Gray Robert Venables, Gene Rabe Wildonger, Matthew Alan Wilson, Mackenzie P. Wooters, Troy Joseph Wright

GIVE THEM A PAT ON THE BACK!

Wish the 2010 area graduates the best as they forge ahead in pursuit of their hopes and dreams. Morning Star Publication’s annual Graduation Magazine will feature graduates of Delmar, Laurel, Seaford, Woodbridge, Greenwood Mennonite, Seaford Christian and local students of Sussex Tech, Delmarva Christian School, Salisbury Christian School and Worcester Preparatory.

This year’s keepsake edition will be inserted in the Seaford and Laurel Star on Thursday, May 20, 2010

RESERVE YOUR ADVERTISING SPACE TODAY. TEA TIME - Enjoying teatime at the Enchanted Tea Room in historic Berlin, Md., are (clockwise from left) Worcester Prep Grade 5 students Zachary Wilson, Berlin; Rayne Parker, Ocean City, Md.; Jonathan Ruddo, Berlin; Lauren Gosnear, Rehoboth Beach; Leigh Lingo, Rehoboth Beach; Shelby Cannatelli, Fenwick Island; Julie Talbert, Eden, Md.; and Sambina Anthony, Seaford.

phone: 302629-9788 fax: 302629-9243 email: sales@mspublications.com


MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

PAGE 29

SHS students are named to third quarter honor roll The following students have been named to the honor roll for the third marking period at Seaford High School. Regular Honor Roll Grade 9 - Zachary R.J. Burbage, Gary Lowell Camper III, Andrew Scott Cannon Jr., Miselande Cenou, Radesha Shanee Cook, Adam David Crouse, Christian Alexander Daniels, Joshua Michael Davis, Victoria Elmidort, Sean Javier GibsonThomas, Jose Luis Guadarrama, Kyra Hanzer, Jessica Lyn Harris, Kyle Patrick Horseman, Jemika Leroy, Carter Quillen Moore, Kaitlyn Michelle Rouse, Parris Rache Smack, Lindsey Renee Stafford, Preyona Suevon Turnage, Tynetta Washington, Jeremy Ross Wheatley, Aaron Williamson Grade 10 - Courtney Louise Brittain, Bryant Lamar Brooks, Kadesha Renee Cook, Dajon Copes, Ryan Matthew Craft, Maria Allison DeMott, Alvin Leon Dixon, Darrell Eugene Dredden II, Taylor Faye Grimes, Hannah Michaela Hitchens, Shenece Nicole Horsey, Keona Regine Hughes, Briana Marie Hurley, Robert Tipton Kincaid IV, Jennifer Elizabeth Lancaster, Samantha Lynn Lister, Shawna C. Meagher, Christopher Spencer Michel, Alex Moul, Daisha AnTerrya Norris, Mercedes Victoria Orozco, Ebony Nigel Palmer, Zachary Spicer Parks, Akshay P. Patel, Priyanka S. Patel, Colton Harley Phillips, Shelby Lee Porches, Travis Christopher Robinson, Thania Alheli Sanchez, Amanda Lynn Scudder, Jeffrey Deshon Smith, Matthew Ryan Taylor, Dustin Blair Venables,

Senior art exhibit on display

The 20th annual Statewide Senior Art Exhibit is on display until June 2 at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. This event is cosponsored by the Delaware Association of Programs for the Aging (DAPA) and Delaware Tech. View 92 works of art from amateur and professional artists ages 50 and up in the following categories: acrylic, oil, pastel, woodcarving, photography, pencil, watercolor, 3D art and other. The exhibit can be viewed Monday through Friday, April 26 to June 2, in the Carter Partnership Center during normal business hours; the event will culminate with a delicious luncheon and awards presentation on June 3 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Worcester Prep students honored

The following area students have been named to the Headmaster’s and Honorable Mention lists for term three at Worcester Preparatory School. Headmaster’s List Grade 6 - Jason Cook, Seaford. Grade 7 - Amanda Gabriel, Laurel; Jenny Rosales, Laurel; Mark Wilson, Seaford. Grade 8 - Ariella Anthony, Seaford; Lorenzo deJesus, Seaford. Grade 9 - Brad Mullen, Seaford; James Willey, Bridgeville. Grade 10 - Alyssa Alicea, Seaford. Grade 11 - Matthew Carey, Seaford; Erin Cook, Seaford; Ali Schwartz, Seaford. Grade 12 - Lauren Price, Seaford; Megan Rosales, Laurel. Honorable Mention Grade 7 - Gabrielle Alicea, Seaford; Lindsey Banning, Seaford; Raphael deJe-

Haley Georgia Zachry Grade 11 - Jessica Marie Abraham, Jeffrey Lorenzo Akins, Gregory Lloyd Brittingham, Kelly Anne Butcher, Jessica Belem Carino, Brittany Anne Deats, Preston Elwood Godfrey III, Tosajhn JoaquinDevonte Hughes, Caleb Robert Allan Martinez, Samantha Marie McMasters, Jamil Linnard Moore, Kathryn Scarlett Papp, Matthew David Parker, Bani Udiel PerezMendez, Sunday April Sanchez, Alexandria Christine Smith, Shaniqua Monique Smith, Jordan Remell Stanley, Kathy Tran, Gilberto Vazquez Chavez, Katelyn Nicole Wesselhoff Grade 12 - Omar Bolden, Melvin Edward Cannon III, Nicholas Cody Evans, Timothy Mark Oscar Fields, Brittany Nicole Gibson, Michiah Isiah Grainger, Justin Alexandar Hammond, Faith Ceirra Hayes, Daniela Hernandez, Kathryn Elise Hickey, Edward Lee Hicks Jr., Christopher Scott Johnson, Joshua Lewis Mayfield, Charles Donald Michel, Matthew Garrett Norman, Jean Josue Pradieu, Jeffrey Brandon Purnell, Carl Lee Reilly, Rochelle Lorraine Smack, Jacob Elijah Smith, Seth Tanner Trice, Keyona Roshae Vessels, Charles Reed Wilkins Distinguished Honor Roll Grade 9 - Tyler A. Balas, Jhimmy Cenou, Brooke Marie Chaffinch, Brentdy Chavez, Ambere Sumarie Eskridge, Ashley Marie Foxwell, Alyssa Hoch, Andrew Carlton Jones, James C. Kinnikin III, Soraida Ramos Morales, Thanhtam Tran Pham, Mari Alisza Phares, Shaquia

Antashia Pierce, Kyle A. Poplaski, Eryn Rachel Quillen, Maria Nicole Saintine, Jose Antonio Santos, Andrew Horace Showell, Brenna Erin Sigai, Deanna Ashley Sigai, Jordan Danielle Sigai, Carolyn Smith, Nadine Trigo, Casselande Vernet, Danielle Wagoner Grade 10 - Osbaldo Cruz Alcantara, Lindsay Dawn Alexander, Ketsia Brunie Aurele, Orleana Bland, Kara Nicole Brockbrader, Jeremy Richard Burris, Shanice Nacole Cannon, Ryan Dorsey Collins Jr., Hailey Marie Dill, Alexis Denee Hawkins, Kaitlyn Brooke Hitch, Ashley Irvin, Eryn Nicole Johnson, Kyle Thomas Johnson, Andrew Bradley Mackler, Johane Mommin, Pierriline Mondestin, Rebecca Lauren Oliver, Chad Dean Osborne, Emily Ann Phifer, Shaun A. Repp, Tasha Nicole Snow, Tameka S. Wallop, Xin Weng, Daniel Lowder Wheatley III, Tamara Rena Wyche Grade 11 - Sandra Lynn AckermanWinter, Kayla Anne Anderson, Tiffany Booth, Molly Masten Cain, Macey Lee Cordrey, Esaie Derolus, Amber Paige Desautels, Justin A. Ellsworth, Christian Gosnell, Timothy Lee Hall, Joshua Clayton Hamilton, Amanda Paige Hastings, Benjamin Kevin Hearn, Stephen Raymond Jackson, Carlancia Jean, Kaitlyn Rebecca Johnson, Anthony Bruce Johnston, Dylan Maguire Jones, Jacques Hervens B. Jules, Brandi Lashawn Kearse, Martha P. Lamb, Ethan David Lee, Kathia Masseus, Luis Felipe Mier, Margarette Amissial Osias, Paige Marie Robbins, Andrew Scott Rut-

sus, Seaford. Grade 8 - Alexa Conaway, Seaford; James Hemmen, Seaford. Grade 10 - Cole Phillips, Seaford.

arships to students from Seaford who are furthering their education. This year the scholarships have been given to Adam Caldwell, son of Sue Brunner and Kelsey Hoch, daughter of Lori and Keller Hoch, both of Seaford High School.

Acorn Club awards scholarships

The GFWC-Acorn Club of Seaford, Inc. assists in the sponsorship of two area sophomores so they can attend the Hugh O’Brian Youth Leadership Seminar. The program provides leadership development and opportunities to help empower individuals to achieve their highest potential. The students selected this year are Colby Willey, Seaford Christian Academy, son of Danny and Candy Willey and Kaitlyn Hitch, Seaford High School, daughter of Raymond and Stacy Hitch. The seminar will be held in June. The club also awards two $3,000 schol-

ter, Emily Grace Sallade, Jonathan Alan Schwinn, Tyler Ray Sparrow, Franklin Dewayne Stewart III, Ryan Christopher Stewart, Ania Victoria Sypek, Brittany Walters, Candice Trashae James Waples, Zachary Brian Wayne Webb, Lorenzo Anthony Williams Jr., Cassie Virginia Wooters, Whitney Helayne Wright Grade 12 - Pawarin Amornthatree, Fabricia Villela de Novaes Barcellos, James Thomas Betts, Adam Patrick Caldwell, Tyrek Camper, Michael Delaney Cherrix, Shanyelle Lee Cornish, Katelyn Marie Cottet, John Cortland Darden, Phillip Matthew DeMott, Kristen Nicole Eckhardt, Elizabeth Katherine Ferber, Renee Marie Garrison, Rachel Elizabeth Green, Timothy David Halter, Lauran Melane Hare, Brittany Leigh Hassett, Amanda Nicole Hayes, Talexis Domonique Henry, Jessica Rae Hill, Kelsey Marie Hoch, Jennifer Marie Hoffman, Regens Janvier, Savannah Brooke Jones, Danetrea L. Kollock, Lashonda Rennee Lawson, Alex James Layton, Danielle Brent Levredge, Gregory Lee Mayer, Joseph Adam Mitchell, TuyetNhung Thi Nguyen, Elizabeth A. Perciful, Jessica Lee Phifer, Victoria Popova, Haley Elizabeth Quillen, Ashley Saincy Louis, Alison Ann Schwinn, Risa Shinagawa, Ryan Curtis Shockley, Amanda Lynn Short, Alexandra Spiropoulos, Karen Taloute, Courtney Leigh Torbert, Tracie Marie Vanvleck, Paige Marie Venables, Dhanat Vongkositkul, Andrew Christopher Webb, Lorenza Catarina Williams, Jenna Coale Wills, Terry Richard Wooters, Erin Elizabeth Wootten, Jessica Lynn Zoch

Residential • Commercial

Student photography on display

A new photography exhibit, “The Decisive Moment,” will be displayed now through Tuesday, May 25 in the Art Gallery of the Arts & Science Center at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. The Art Gallery is open Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The exhibit will feature the works of seven students who are enrolled in the photography course offered by the communications program.

Supports Your School News We Service All Models

Sales • Service • Installation www.yoderdoors.com

Fisher Auto Parts We Support Our Local Studentsʼ Progress

Laurel

Millsboro

404 N Central Ave (302)875- 5951

422 Union St (302)934- 8088

Lewes

Georgetown

Milton

18421 Coastal Hwy (302)645- 2816

211 W Market St (302)856- 9591

221 Ellendale Rd (302)6 84-3077

302-875-0663

Route 13, Laurel, DE


PAGE 30

MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

Health briefs NMH celebrates occupational therapy April was Occupational Therapy Month and the theme was “Living Life to Its Fullest.” Health professionals involved in occupational therapy programs throughout the United States sponsored activities to help people learn about occupational therapy. Occupational therapy (OT) helps people regain their strength and begin performing basic daily living activities independently again. OT focuses on many areas during a person’s rehabilitation phase, including range of motion and strength of the upper body, fine motor, sensation, visual abilities, and cognitive or mental capabilities that would enable someone to function safely in their home. Occupational therapy can work with a patient in a wide variety of settings, such as hospital care, a rehabilitation facility, home care, or long-term care. An individual in long-term care may require OT for upper body positioning, splinting or even passive range of motion. The occupational therapy staff at Nanticoke Memorial hospital and the Mears Outpatient Center strive to tailor all of their treatments to the very specific needs of each of their patients. For more information, contact Nanticoke Memorial Hospital at 629-6611, ext. 5108 or the Mears Outpatient Campus at 629-6224, ext. 8613.

Free prostate cancer screening

Bayhealth Medical Center is offering a free screening for prostate cancer on Saturday, May 22, beginning at 9 a.m., at the Bayhealth Cancer Center at Milford Memorial Hospital. The free screening consists of a PSA blood test and digital rectal exam (DRE). Pre-registration is required. For more details or to register, contact Paula Hess, MSN RN OCN, at 744-6752.

Bayhealth sponsors stroke seminar

Stroke is the third leading killer and the top cause of disability in the United States. Bayhealth Stroke Care Coordinator Dawn Fowler, MSN, RN, PCCN, will join Bayhealth Neurologist Joel Rutenberg, MD, during Bayhealth’s upcoming Stroke Seminar, Wednesday, May 19 and Thursday, May 20. Dr. Rutenberg will lead a discussion about prevention and treatment for stroke, while Fowler will provide insight on how strokes impact entire families. The seminars will be held on the following dates and times: Wednesday, May 19, 5-8 p.m., in the Board Room & Conference Center at Milford Memorial Hospital, Milford. Thursday, May 20, 5-8 p.m., in the General Foods Conference Room at Kent General Hospital, Dover. For more information, visit www.bayhealth.org or call 302-744-6584.

Stroke and osteoporosis screenings Residents living in and around the Blades community can be screened to reduce their risk of having a stroke or bone fracture. The Blades Town Hall-Hardin Hall will host Life Line Screening on May 17. The site is located at 20 W. Fourth St. in Blades. Appointments will begin at 9 a.m. For more information regarding the screenings or to schedule an appointment, call 1-877-237-1287 or visit our website at www.lifelinescreening.com. Pre-

registration is required. Life Line Screening was established in 1993, and has since become the nation’s leading provider of preventive screenings.

Lunch and Learn about diabetes

The Sussex Child Health Promotion Coalition Diabetes Prevention and Control Program will hold Lunch and Learns throughout Sussex County for individuals with diabetes and their caregivers. Participants will learn more about diabetes and how to manage the disease. The following area lunches are scheduled: • Clarence Street Church of God, Seaford - Thursday, May 20, 11:30 a.m. 1 p.m. To register, contact Pastor Cannon at 629-9443 by May 14. • Delmar Public Library - Thursday, May 20, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. To register, call 846-9894 by May 14.

Cancer support group

The Wellness Community-Delaware offers a free general cancer support group for people affected by cancer and their loved ones at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. The monthly support group meets in the second floor conference room of the Cancer Care Center on the third Monday of each month from 4:30 to 6 p.m. The Wellness Community is dedicated to helping people affected by cancer enhance their health and well-being through participation in a professional program of emotional support and hope. All facilitators of these groups are trained mental health professionals. Call 645-9150 for information or to register.

Man to Man support group

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital offers a Man to Man support group meeting on the fourth Wednesday of each month. Man to Man helps men cope with prostate cancer by receiving information and peer support. Man to Man is a forum for men and their support network to learn about diagnosis and treatment options through presentations, written materials and videos. Specialists share information such as side effects and how to cope with prostate cancer and its treatment. News and information about nutrition, general health, research and treatment, as well as messages from men living with prostate cancer and other Man to Man activities, are offered to assist in the recovery process. Pre-registration is not required for this free support group. For more information, contact Larry Skala (337-3678) or Grafton Adams (628-8311).

Depression Support Group

There is a free bimonthly Depression Support Group meeting in Laurel on the second and fourth Wednesday evenings from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Any person who has signs and symptoms of depression and is under the care of a professional counselor/MD is welcome to attend. To register, call 302-465-6612.

Bereavement support group

Compassionate Care Hospice, The Wellness Community-DE and Nanticoke Memorial Hospital will collaborate to present a monthly bereavement group, The Next Step. The group focuses on issues of loss that continue beyond the early stages of grief. Mary Van House, bereavement co-

ordinator, will facilitate the group at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month, at the Nanticoke Cancer Care Center, second floor conference room. To register, call Lisa at 629-6611, ext. 2378.

Breast cancer support group

Delaware Breast Cancer Coalition, Inc. (DBCC) has expanded its Beginning Your Pink Ribbon Journey, a program for women newly-diagnosed with breast cancer, by partnering with Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Cancer Center in Seaford. The free, monthly program is offered at the Cancer Center located at 801 Middleford Road, Seaford, the third Thursday of each month from 3 to 4 p.m. The program is facilitated by Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Cancer Center professional staff - Terri A. Clifton, MS, NCC, Cancer Care coordinator; Mary Brown, RN, DSN, manager Cancer Care Center; and Wendy Polk, nutritionist – with assistance from Lois Wilkinson, DBCC special projects manager, who helps facilitate the program at Bayhealth. Together, they answer questions, help calm fears, and share information about resources that are available at Nanticoke, through DBCC, and other organizations within the local community. Of particular value to newly-diagnosed women is DBCC’s Peer Mentor Program through which they are paired with a long-term survivor for one-on-one support. To learn more about Beginning Your Pink Ribbon Journey at Nanticoke

Memorial Hospital Cancer Center, call Lois Wilkinson at 672-6435. Registration is required and light refreshments and small gifts are provided.

Wellness Program funding available

Obesity, which is the second most preventable cause of death in the U.S., has reached epidemic proportions. The Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH) announces that a two-year funding opportunity is available to support two Delaware municipalities in implementing a sustained approach to healthy eating and active living. The Municipal Wellness Leadership Program assists with planning, assessing, initiating or expanding environmental systems to support healthy lifestyles. To apply, municipalities led by city/ town mayor or management must be able to mobilize a partnership that includes representatives from schools, businesses and municipal, governmental, faith-based and community organizations. The deadline to send responses to this grant is June 15, at 11:30 a.m. A pre-bid meeting is required. The meeting will be held on May 11, at 10 a.m. at Delaware Health and Social Services, Herman Holloway, Sr. Social Services Campus, Main Administration Building, Sullivan Street, 1st Floor, Room 198, 1901 N. Dupont Highway, New Castle. All bidders must be present on time at this mandatory pre-bid meeting. For more information, contact Michelle Eichinger at 302-744-1011.


MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

PAGE 31

SENIOR VOLUNTEERS HONORED - Governor and Mrs. Markell recently joined DHSS Secretary Rita Landgraf in honoring members of the New Castle County Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP). The recognition took place at a luncheon at the Chase Center on the Riverfront in Wilmington. Molly Cohen, of Claymont (third from left), was the winner of this year’s Outstanding Senior Service Award presented by Wilmington Trust. Molly has been an RSVP member for almost 35 years and has provided over 18,000 hours of service to the community. At 95, she still serves at Riverside Health Care and Jewish Family Services. Volunteers also received honors for 5,000, 10,000 and 15,000 hours of service. ANNUAL HEALTH FAIR - Peggy Geisler, executive director of the Sussex County Child Health Promotion Coalition, discusses the healthy aspects of vegetables with 11-year-old Omar Haro-Perez, of Georgetown, during the 8th annual health fair at Iglesia de Dios Maranatha near Concord on Saturday, April 24.

Arguing wastes time and energy By Dr. Anthony Policastro People spend a lot of time arguing about things. If we stop and think about it, much of that time is not worth the effort. The gist of most arguments is the expectation that one person is right and the other is wrong. Even in the best of circumstances one person is not going to be right 100% of the time. That means that sometimes when you argue about something, you are wrong. One question then to ask when you are having an argument is whether it really matters if one person is right and the other is wrong. In most circumstances the world will not end if one person is correct and the other is not. So, why bother arguing about something that has no real long term impact? Another issue is the type of arguments that people tend to have. Most of them are about trivial things. The thing that begins the argument is frequently not worth arguing about. A classic is the issue of leaving the toilet seat up or down. In the overall scheme of things, is it really a serious issue? Is it really worth arguing over? One of the things I frequently tell newly married couples is to spend some time looking at their first few arguments. When they take their wedding vows, they are only thinking about each other. If I were to ask them on their wedding day if they would have an argument over a toilet seat, they would think I was crazy. The third thing that frequently occurs in arguments is transitioning from the original issue to an unrelated issue. The classic example of this is the adolescent who wants to go somewhere and the parents say “no.” It goes from being an issue about a particular item to a generalization such as “you never let me have any fun.” There are some important lessons to be learned when there is any kind of argu-

ment. The first is that the two parties must stop and ask themselves some questions. This is the hardest part of all. When someone gets into a situation like this, it is hard to come up for air. However, that is the only way to do it. Once that is done, there are three questions that need to be asked. The first is whether it really matters who is right or who is wrong. In most circumstances even if one person is right, it matters very little in the overall scheme of things. So why argue? The second question is whether the issue is really an important one. In most cases it is not. So why argue? The third question is whether the argument is about the issue that started it all or has it transitioned to something else? If it has transitioned, then it makes sense to go back to the original issue. Once you do that, you will find that the first two questions then apply. The result will still be the same. Why argue?

LAKESIDE

PHYSICAL THERAPY, LLC Pampi Pamplona, PT

302

280-6920

202 Laureltown, Laurel, DE Monday - Friday 7 am to 7 pm

ORTHOPEDIC BALANCE DISORDER PAIN MANAGEMENT STRENGTHENING NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS ARTHRITIS FRACTURES POST SURGERIES Accepting Blue Cross/Blue Shield, Medicare, CIGNA - HMO Open Access, Optimum Health, Workman’s Comp, Auto Insurance

COLON CANCER SCREENING • Screening exams for early detection & prevention of colo-rectal cancer • Endoscopy for investigation & treatment of digestive diseases • All in a caring, comfortable & convenient outpatient facility

PENINSULA ENDOSCOPY CENTER 9315 Ocean Highway, Delmar, MD

410-896-9005

HOME CARE

“The best care, by the best people, in the best place … HOME”

Compassionate,Medi care-certified care in the comfort of your home

• Skilled nursing services • Physical & occupational therapy • Medical social worker services • Home health aide services

302-629-4914

800-990-3909 toll free 302-629-6542 fax

SENIOR CITIZENS SeafordC enter

Genesis ElderCare® Network • Retirement • Assisted Living • Skilled Nursing Care

1100 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-3575 Fax 302-629-0561

EYE CARE

Azar Eye Institute

“With An Eye In The Future” www.azareyeinstitute.com

Alex Azar, M.D. Peter I. Filipov, M.D. Jason M. Tu, M.D. James Gallagher, M.D. Emerson T. Que, M.D. Tracey Boss, O.D. Jennifer R. Giles, O.D.

Laurel Office: Salisbury: Suite 1 31519 Winter Place Pkwy., 116 E. Front Street Laurel, DE 19966 Salisbury, MD 21804

410-546-2500

302-875-8991

INTERNAL MEDICINE

“Medicine for Adults” with emphasis on prevention and early detection of disease

Over 20 Years of Service and Experience

Darius S. Sypek, M.D.

Diplomate, American Board of Internal Medicine

DelMar Medical Center P.A.

at Park Professional Center 1350 Middleford Road, Suite 501, Seaford, DE 19973 302-628-4370 - by appointment only www.delmarmedicalcenter.com

URGENT CARE ORTHOPAEDICS H. PAUL AGUILLON, MD

Sussex Medical Center

GENERAL & FAMILY PRACTICE INTERNAL MEDICINE • WALK-INS

X-Ray and Lab on Premises Minor Emergencies • Lacerations Office Gynecology - Pap Smears Executive, Sports & Insurance Physicals Orthopedics • Minor Surgery Cardiology • Stress Testing

Se habla español 401 Concord Road, Blades, DE 19973

629-6664 LET PEOPLE KNOW YOU’RE AVAILABLE FOR THEM -- CALL 302-629-9788


PAGE 32

MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

Nanticoke celebrates Hospital Week, Nursing Home Week

National Hospital Week is the nation’s largest health care celebration and is a tradition that dates back to 1921. National Nursing Home Week began in 1967 to celebrate the lives of residents and to recognize the quality of care provided in America’s nursing and rehabilitation facilities. Over the decades, both nationally celebrated weeks have helped revolutionize the public view of hospitals and home

health facilities. This year’s Hospital Week theme is “Health, Hope & Healing”. From providing treatment and comfort to the sick, to welcoming new life into the world, hospitals are central to a healthy and optimistic community. This year’s Nursing Home Week theme is “Enriching Every Day”. This year’s theme was selected to honor those who are

“Enriching Every Day” for others, thus adding value to life and overcoming many of the infirmities of age and disability. Today, hospitals are multidimensional facilities covering every area of specialization, with a focus on wellness and a reach that extends into the communities that built and nurtured them. America’s hospitals and nursing homes are positive, vital places

that promote health and well being. That’s the message health care facilities across the country are voicing as they celebrate National Hospital Week and National Nursing Home Week 2010. In commenting on the weeklong observances, Steven Rose, RN, MN, Nanticoke Health Services President and

CEO shared, “As we celebrate National Hospital Week and National Nursing Home Week, we thank the health care professionals and employees at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital and Lifecare at Lofland Park. We are very fortunate to have dedicated employees who put our patients and our community first. Thank you.”

National Nurse’s Week at Nanticoke

The work of America’s 3.1 million registered nurses to save lives and to maintain the health of millions of individuals is the focus of this year’s National Nurses Week, celebrated annually throughout the United States. Nanticoke Health Services is celebrating National Nurses Week May 10th – 14th. This year, Nanticoke Health Services has selected “Nurses: Our Passion Is Our Profession” as the theme for 2010. Traditionally, National Nurses Week is devoted to highlighting the diverse ways in which registered nurses, the largest health care profession, are working to improve health care. From bedside nursing in hospitals and long-term care facilities to the halls of research institutions, state legislatures, and Congress, the depth and breadth of the nursing profession is meeting the expanding health care needs of American society. Nanticoke Health Services salutes all those in the nursing profession and especially recognizes and thanks those nurses caring for the residents of Sussex County. Nanticoke Health Services features a full-service community hospital and an award-winning, long-term care facility. The hospital has emergency services ranked #1 in Delaware for heart emergencies, a comprehensive cancer center, a Nationally Accredited Stroke Center and Nationally Accredited Sleep Center, the only Delaware health care facility to have an Outpatient Pulmonary Rehabilitation program certified by the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation, and a growing physician network that includes 37 different specialties. For more information, call 629-6611 or visit nanticoke.org.

Are you dumping medicines down the drain? Disposing of unwanted and expired medications in the sink or toilet leads to water contamination. The Delaware Division of Public Health and other community partners are offering homeowners an easy, anonymous and environmentally friendly disposal alternative for unwanted and expired medications. Bring your old prescription and over-the-counter medications in their original containers—including unwanted vitamins and supplements, inhalers and liquid medicines, and even pet medicines—to the nearest Medicine Cabinet Clean-out Day site on Friday, May 14, 2010, from 8 a.m. until noon. Visit any of the following locations: New Castle County — New Castle County Police Headquarters 3601 North DuPont Highway (Route 13), New Castle, Delaware Kent County — Bayhealth Medical Center 640 South State Street, Dover, Delaware Sussex County — Tunnell Cancer Center 18947 John J. Williams Highway, Rehoboth Beach, Delaware Abuse of prescription and over-the-counter medications, most notably by teenagers and young adults, is an emerging health issue. Now is the time to safely get rid of unwanted and expired medications for humans and pets. All medications will be disposed of in an environmentally safe manner free of charge. For more information, call the Delaware Helpline at 1-800-464-4357 or visit DelawareHealthyHomes.org. DELAWARE HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES Division of Public Health Health Systems Protection

The following organizations are involved in this project: Delaware Division of Public Health, Delaware Cancer Consortium, Delaware Nurses Association, Delaware Board of Pharmacy, Delaware Pharmacists Society, Delaware Division of Professional Regulation, Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Control (DNREC), New Castle County Police Department, City of Dover Police Department, Delaware State Police Department, Drug Enforcement Administration, State of Delaware – Office of Controlled Substances, Beebe Medical Center, Bayhealth Medical Center, Christiana Care Health System, Happy Harry’s Pharmacies and Rite Aid Pharmacies. Underwritten in part by the Delaware Health Fund.


MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

PAGE 33

Foot care for diabetics Health symposium held

An average of 235 amputations a day are performed in the United States on patients with diabetes. Each year one in 20 people with diabetes will develop a foot ulcer which may result in chronic non-healing wounds and, in extreme cases, lead to amputation. Tragically, those cases are hardly isolated: on average a staggering 235 amputations a day are performed in the United States on patients with diabetes. “Most people with diabetes know the importance of checking blood sugar levels while the importance of daily foot exams is underemphasized, even though the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found that comprehensive foot care programs can reduce diabetes-related amputation rates by 45 to 85 percent,” says Katherine J. Rowland, chief clinical officer for the National Healing Corporation. The local experts at Nanticoke Wound Care and Hyperbaric Center, a National Healing Corporation Wound Healing Center, recommend these foot care tips: • Don’t count on foot pain to  alert you to problems since diabetes can cause changes in the skin on the feet as well as nerve damage, which can impair sensation of feeling. Visually inspect your feet and between your toes for blisters, cuts, red spots and swelling. • Avoid crossing your legs:  this can cause pressure on the nerves and blood vessels, possibly causing damage. • Sit with your feet up to keep  the blood flowing to them. Two or three times a day, wiggle your toes and move your ankles up and down for five minutes. • Your feet contain a million  sweat glands. Always wear properly fitting socks made of cotton and wool, and change your socks and shoes twice a day. • Don’t go barefoot. Feel inside your shoes before putting them on to make sure they don’t  have tears in the lining or foreign objects. • Cut toenails straight across  and don’t trim them too short.   Use an emery board to smooth corners of toenails or ingrown nails. • While Medicare and many  health care providers will reimburse a portion or all of the cost of shoes and custom inserts prescribed by a doctor, don’t buy  more than one insert at a time in case the size or shape of your foot changes. • Don’t pull loose pieces of  skin off your feet. See a health care professional to have them removed. • Seek medical treatment  if a leg or foot wound has not healed in 30 days or shows signs of infection such as increased

pain, redness or swelling, foul wound odor, a change in color, or amount of drainage from the wound. For more information about  diabetes management and treating and preventing chronic wounds, contact Nanticoke Wound Care and Hyperbaric Center located at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, 628-8322.

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital held a successful health symposium Saturday, May 1, 2010 at the Atlanta Road Alliance Church, Seaford. The health symposium, held in partnership with Atlanta Road Alliance Church, featured more than 30 health care areas offering FREE information and  education, along with FREE  health screenings for cholesterol, glucose, prostate and more. In

addition, FREE blood pressure  checks were offered. There was health information and interactive displays on heart risk factors, stroke awareness, summer safety, healthy eating, sleep disorders, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer’s and  much more. Over 200 individuals attended the health symposium. During the event, approximately 100 individuals had cholesterol and glucose testing completed.

During the May 1 Health Symposium, Nanticoke’s Brenda Johnson helps a young attendee look through Nanticoke’s ultraviolet light box to see if simulated germs were left behind after washing.

Don’t miss out on the grandkids you love.

Get tested for

colon cancer. A nurse will help you schedule your test. Call 1-800-464-HELP or visit delawarehelpline.org

African-American women are more likely to die from colon cancer in Delaware than Caucasian women. In fact, colon cancer is the second-leading cause of all cancer deaths in the United States.

DELAWARE HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES

And it can be prevented. If you’re 50 or older—younger if you

Division of Public Health

have a family history of colon cancer—it’s important to get

Comprehensive Cancer Control Program

tested. A colonoscopy can detect polyps—growths in your

Made possible with the cooperation of the Delaware Cancer Consortium, and underwritten in part by the Delaware Health Fund.

colon that could become cancerous—and remove them. You could qualify for a free test through Screening for Life. Schedule your colonoscopy today. And be there for the life you’ve planned.


PAGE 34

MORNING STAR

• MAY 6 - 12, 2010

WANTED: Vendors of garden-related items (incl. flowers, plants & vegetables) to reserve $10 space 10’x10’ at Spade & Trowel Garden Club’s “Garden Day at Ross Mansion,” in Seaford, June 12, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 628-1385. 4/29

COMPUTERS

Classifieds

FREE CLASSIFIEDS*

(For Subscribers - Personal Use Only) *Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

Deadline: Monday, 2 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch Line ads ($9.00 minimum)

Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.50/inch Legals: $6.50 per inch Not responsible for typographical errors after first insertion

629-9788

Call: Or E-mail: ads@mspublications.com FOUND

Homestead Manor

YOUNG PIT BULL, black & white, very gentle nature. Needs a good home. 2362413. 4/15

Employment Wanted

AUCTION See Auction Page 36.

Assisted Living Facility

Weekend Dietary Aid Needed. Full-time Temporary Housekeeping Position.

5 days a week for 3 months. Apply in person:

Homestead Manor

GIVE-AWAY

410 Colonial Drive Denton, Md., 410-479-2273

FREE HORSE MANURE mixed with shavings. You load. 337-7200. 5/6

NOTICE

BLACK LAB MIXED PUPPIES, about 8 wks old, to good homes. 629-4930 after 7 weekdays. 4/8

HELP WANTED

To the ladies that answered my ad around Feb. to meet other ladies for friends: I have been in the hospital, but I am home now, so please call again. 8750747. 4/29

ANT. WOODEN CHICKEN COOP, fair cond., $25. 2452278. 4/22

(4) OAK CANE-BOTTOM CHAIRS, $55 ea. 629-7363.

FOR SALE

YARD SALE

WANTED

YARD SALE, May 8, 8 am till. Raindate 5/15. 201 Meadow Court, Little Meadows, off Concord Rd., Blades. Proceeds benefit Del. Alzhieimers Assoc. Adult bikes, bike rack, coffee table, Sony TV, HH items, much more! 5/6

12’ STOCK TRAILER or Large Open 2-Horse, fair to good cond., needs to be tablable, reasonable price. Call 745-1911 before 8:30 p.m. 4/29

HUGE GARAGE SALE, at 29096 Discountland Rd., Laurel, May 8, 9 a.m. rain or shine. Selling remainder of estate - everything must go. 4/29 YARD SALE, May 8, Raindate 5/15. N.R.Y.C., Blades. Tables $`10 ea. Call 8757143 or tables. 4/22

Help Wanted -- Seaford School District Fall Sports 2010-2011 school year

CrossC ountry—HS Football—MS(2) Cheerleader AdvF all—HS CrossC ounty Asst—HS Football HD Coach—HS Cheerleader AsstF all—HS FieldHockey Asst—MS Football JV—HS (2) Cheerleader AdvF all—MS FieldHockey Asst—HS Football V Asst—HS(2) (considered year round Field Hockey HD Coach— Soccer Boys JV—HS position) HS SoccerB oys Asst—HS Cheerleader AsstF all—MS FieldHockey— MS Soccer Boys HD Coach—HS (considered year round Field Hockey JV—HS Soccer HD Coach—MS boys position) Football Freshman—HS (2) Soccer Asst—MSboys Interested and qualified candidates should complete an extra duty application available online at http:// www.seaford.k12.de.us or in our school offices. Completed application must be submitted no later than May 21st. Please include contact information, education, experience and teacher certification on your resume. All final candidates for employment must have a satisfactory criminal background check before being placed on contract/payroll as per State of Delaware regulations. Candidates must call the Delaware State Police at (800) 464-4357 to make an appointment. The cost of the criminal background check is $69.00 (expense borne by the prospective employee). Final candidates must also receive a satisfactory child protection registry check. The State of Delaware does not discriminate against qualified persons with disabilities in its programs or services. Persons with disabilities are encouraged to contact the Human Resource and Public Information Office, at (302) 629-4587, as soon as possible to request an auxiliary aid or service. The Seaford School District is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination against any employee or applicant because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, ethnicity, age, marital or handicapped status in accordance with state and federal laws. This policy shall apply to recruitment, employment, and subsequent placement, training, promotion, compensation, tenure and probation, and other terms and conditions of employment over which the district has jurisdiction. Inquiries should be directed to: Director of Personnel, 390 North Market Street Ext., Seaford, DE 19973. Phone: (302) 629-4587. Current staff members of the Seaford School District will be given first consideration. An open and continuous search will be conducted until the positions are filled.

Smell Great Feel Good!

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC, 1950 - present. Make offer. 875-5667. 4/22

WANTED: Crafters & Vendors for the St. Philip’s Strawberry Festival, May 22. Contact Gloria Ellis at 875-2775 or Jen Fleming at 610-703-5452. 4/1

NEIGHBORHOOD YARD SALE! May 8, 8-12. Raindate 5/22. Virginnia Commons, Seaford. Lots of Stuff! 5/6

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES

OUTBOARD MOTOR, 25 hp w/short shaft, good cond. 875-7119. 4/1

CRAFTSMAN 10” TABLE SAW, new in box. Jig saw & disc & belt sanders, router & table. House furniture. 9348021 after 4 p.m. 5/6 PATIO SET, Beige alum., 6 pc., $110. 629-7363. 5/6 LENNOX CENTRAL AC unit, 2 1/2 ton, used, in good cond., $200. 337-0710. 5/6

AUTOMOTIVE

GAS STOVE, Magic Chef, 30” almond, clean, good shape, $75 OBO. 875-4570. 5/6

‘92 TOYOTA PREVIA VAN, 190k mi., runs but needs work, $800 neg. 629-4969. 4/15

NEW CAULDRON, 3 legs, cast iron, used during hogkilling days. Great shape, $160. 846-9788. 5/6

PU TRUCK CAP, Dk. Blue, 8 ft., $210. 875-5406. 4/8

CHAIN LINK FENCE 150’ long, 42” high, green vinyl covered. 629-6103. 5/6

MOTORCYCLES/ REC VEHICLES

SM. CHEST FREEZER 34x25x21.5 works fine, exc. cond., first $60 takes. 8750747. 5/6

‘08 SUZUKI GZ250 Motorcycle, 1400 mi., 2 owners, like new. Perfect stater bike. $2200. 628-8532. 4/1

BOATS ‘02 MERC. OUTBOARD MOTOR, 20 HP, short shaft, 2-stroke series 20M. Used less than 5 hrs. Stored in protected area. Completely serviced by Walker’s Marine. Remote steer/control. $999. 629-6184. 5/6 20.5’ GAMBLER BASS BOAT, 200 hp Suzuki 12/24 motor, guide dbl. axle trailer, garage kept, $9900. Ask for Ted, 875-9480. 4/29 ‘05 16’ CAROLINA SKIFF, exc. cond., incl. trolling motor & trailer, 15hp motor, $3000. 875-7775. 4/15 16’ ROWING SHELL, 9.5’ carbon fiber oars, dolly; cost new $3700. Sell for $1750. 349-4107. 4/8 EVINRUDE-JOHNSON PROS., 13.75 x 21 SS, 13.75 X 15 SS, 14X19 alum. $50 ea. SS, $35 alum. 6294195.

DELL LAPTOP Computer, 14” scr., mouse, ac adapter & more, still in box, never used. Pd. $600, asking $200 OBO. 875-0747. 5/6 COMPOSTER: “ComposTumbler,” $150. 877-0844. 5/6 BROYHILL SOFA w/2 recliners & matching sleeper love seat. Green & tan plaid, exc. cond., $400 OBO. 6296159. 5/6

The Bath & Body Shop 628-1601

S. Conwell St., Seaford Wed., Thus., Fri. & Sat. 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.

BIKES: Girl’s 10-spd., $35. Men’s RetroBike, $35. ongoose 21-spd., $100. 3980309. 4/29 STIHL WEED WACKER, $125. Craftsman 7 1/2” miter saw, $5. 398=0309. 4/29 FISHING EQUIP., everything needed for fishing, mostly salt water. 629-5238. 4/22 MAYTAG WASHER, 5 yrs. old, $100. 875-5159. 4/22 SEATED BACK MASSAGER, elec., good for bad backs, $35, like new. 6294482. 4/22 APPROX. 2000 VHS taped movies, only $150 for all. 628-1880. 4/22 SMALL REFIGERATOR, 2.0 cu. ft., $20. Power Washer, 2200 psi, from Sears, Briggs & Stratton eng., used 3 times, $200. 628-0502. 4/22

DORM SIZE REFRIG., $20. 628-0502. 5/6

38” MOWER DECK, fits MTD Yard Machine, very good cond. 245-2278. 4/22

POWER WASHER 2200 PSI, used 3 times, $150. 629-0502. 5/6

CHEST FREEZER, Gibson, 22 cu ft., exc. cond., $200. 628-8761. 4/15

HOOVER STEAM VAC JR. spot cleaner, $20. Sm. Dormsize Refrig. $25. Walker, 4 legs, $1. 875-4570. 4/29

24” TILLER, 5 hp, $130. 875-7775. 4/15

NEW TRANSFORMER for Oil Burner, $50. 875-4570.

KENMORE AIR COND., 18,500 BTU w/remote, good cond., $100. 8770476. 4/15

ASST. GAS TRUCK BANKS, $12-$15 ea. 398-0309. 4/29

LIFT CHAIR, gold, good cond. 349-4103. 4/15

WOMEN’S 22” BIKE, good cond., $40 OBO. 629-8765. 4/29

LARGE BOOKCASE, $75. 875-9401. 4/15


ATTORNEYS

AUTO ACCIDENT AND PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS

Initial Consultation Free No Fee Unless You�Recover Evening and Weekend Appointments

BUSINESS & SERVICE BUS DIRECTORY PAGE DIRECTORY

BARBER/BEAUTY

Healthy Hair Clinique

FUQUA and YORI, P.A.

Healthy Hair with a Healthy Glow Men - Women - Children

The Circle • Georgetown • 856-7777

Call For Appt. Open Tuesday thru Sunday

ATTORNEYS AT LAW

*Listing areas of practice does not represent official certification as a specialist in those areas.

CONTRACTORS: DRYWALL FOR SALE 1/2” 4’x8’ - $5.44 ea. 5/8” 4’x8’ - $6.08 ea. CALL CHRIS

ELECTRICIAN

Ken’s Electrical Service All Residential Wiring

No Job Too Small!

628-6980/6982 fax Cell 302-462-1528

Leave a Message!

FAX SERVICE Need To Send A Fax? $

Seaford, Delaware

Specialty Products & Insulation Co. 22367 Sussex Hwy. Seaford, DE 19973

Only

302-629-4281

629-3795

FITNESS

302-629-9788

MORTGAGES

PAINTING

���������

������������������ PURCHASE • REFINANCE DEBT CONSOLIDATION Call 628-2828 Apply Online:

www.easy-loan-application.com

CALL JOE

628-3373

Fast, Neat, Reasonable & Reliable

10x10 room - $75 Special

SEAFOOD

629-9788

Save Money & Conserve Energy.

LAWN CARE

410-742-0134

Mark Donophan

A & C Lawn Care Since 1997

Residential & Commercial

Grasscutting, Mulching & Fertilizing

Insured • Owner On Every Job

Licensed & Insured

Free Estimates

FARM & HOME M-F 7:30-6; Sat. 8-4 Full Service Nursery:

• Ponds • Mulch • Shrubs • Stones • Trees • Lawn & Gdn. Supplies Full Service Store: • Pet Food • Livestock Equip. • Flags • Wild Bird Seed & Feeders • Giftware • Rowe Pottery • Candles • Clothing

U.S. 13 N., Seaford 302-629-9645 • 800-564-5050

LAWN CARE

Millstone River Lawn Care LLC

OWNER OPERATED ~ LAUREL, DEL.

Lawn Mowing, Pruning, Spring & Fall Clean Up, Bed Renovations, Garden Rototilling

302-530-3376

302-258-9775

PAINTING

REAL ESTATE

RESTAURANTS

“Making A Difference”

PIZZA PA S TA

and

1128 S. Central Ave. Laurel, Delaware

Directly Across from the Laurel Senior High School

302-875-3000 800-887-3001

Sussex County

Fax: 302-628-0798 - www.jacksonhewitt.com

WATER TREATMENT Delmarva’s #1 Water Treatment Dealer

Also Offering Premium Spring Water

Independently Owned & Operated 320 W. DuPont Hwy. Ste. 2 31A Creamery Lane Millsboro, DE 19966 Easton, MD 21601

302-934-9450

302-260-2679

LAUREL REALTY Brother’s

302-535-4582

Donald L. Short, Owner 1004 W. Stein Hwy.Nylon Capital Shopping Ctr., Seaford, DE

800-492-0444 Fax 302-629-0745 504 Bridgeville Rd., Seaford, DE Mon-Thurs. 10-6, Fri & Sat 10-7

& Show You How Easy It Is To

IRRIGATION

TAX SERVICE

629-0444

Electric Energy Audit of Your Business

302-629-8790

302-629-4548

302

Give us the opportunity to do an

302-934-9450

“One Room or Entire House” Quality Work Free Estimates HOUSE PAINT EPA ‘lead safe’ Certified Call Lee at

302-258-7750

ELECTRIC CONSERVATION CONSULTING LLC

320 W. DuPont Hwy. Ste. 2, Millsboro, DE 19966

Licensed & Insured

SALES

Call The Star To ADVERTISE!

ENERGY

Interior & Exterior

One Coat - One Color - Materials Extra

(3 Month Minimum)

EMPLOYMENT

RICHARD E. WILLIAMS

E-Mail: Frank.Rask@comcast.net

Increase Your Sales Only $10/Week

875-2498

239 E. Market Street Laurel, DE 19956

Finish Site Work Complete Irrigation Systems Sod Laying & Seeding Exterior Lighting Ponds, Mulching, Concrete Pavers

COUNTRY COLOR PAINTING

MR. CONCRETE

Call for an appointment!

Call for an appointment

R & L Irrigation Services

“StrengtheningW omen.”

Donna Brown & Mary Hearn

CONCRETE

• DRIVEWAYS • GARAGES • SIDEWALKS • PATIOS

9025 Sharptown Road, Laurel, DE

Donald L. Short, Owner/Sales

Cell 228-5435

BEAUTY/BARBER

Just Outside of Town, before the airport, on right

1004 W. Stein Hwy.Nylon Capital Shopping Ctr., Seaford, DE

20 Years Experience

216 LAURELTOWNE LAUREL, DEL. 302-875-4541

In the Home Team Building

Sandy’s Hair Styling

302-628-0767

1.00/Pg. Local

Stop By Our Office: Morning Star Publications 951 Norman Eskridge Hwy.

BEAUTY/BARBER

410-819-6990

410.742.3333 800.439.3853 sharpwater.com

To Advertise In This Directory Call

302-629-9788

Only $10.00 Per Week (3 Month Minimum)

STROMBOLI CHICKEN TWISTS APPETIZERS CALZONE STEAK SALAD SUBS

Rt. 13, Laurel Square (next to Food Lion)

875-2090

WEDDINGS

Getting Married?

Stop By The Star Office Pick Up A FREE copy of the Stars’

951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford

6299788

B RIDAL P LANNER


PAGE 36 JAZZY 600 POWER Chair, like new, fully equipped. High Back Wheelchair, fully equipped, good cond. Must sell, make offer. 628-3362. WATER CONDITIONER, North Star, only used 10 months, like new. 349-4103. 4/15 12 - 1/2 BUSHELL PEACH BSKTS., new, wooden, $25. 20 - 1 Qt. New wooden Berry Baskets, $5. 846-9788. LONGABERGER BASKETS, 846-9788. 4/15 ROMANCE & MYSTERY Books, $2 a bag. DVD movies, $3 ea., some new, science fiction. 875-3744. 4/15 TIMBERS: 30 - 4x6x11.5 creosoted, $300. 2 - 4x6x 11.5 pressure treated, $44 for both. 846-9788. 4/8 2 LG TREES, 1 black walnut, come & get it. Laurel area. Call Jeff, 542-2832. 4/8 4 KLIPSCH SURROUND Sound Speakers, $25 ea. 629-7363. 4/8 WEIGHT LIFTING MACHINE, Complete, w/free weights incl., exc. cond., must see, $400 OBO. 8754486. 4/8 BEAUTY SALON EQUIP. for sale, Call Carol at 6292309 or 228-4996. 4/8 OSTER KIT. CENTER, blender, mixer, grinder, dough maker, slicer/shredder, all in 1. 875-2028. 4/1 CROSSBOW, Barnett Wildcat, w/36 bolts & carrying case, $250. 875-1862. 4/1 COFFEE & END TABLES, matching, glass, blond rattan frame, $30 firm. 410641-5260. 4/1 FUTON BUNK BED in fair cond. w/Futon mattress in great cond., white frame. $75 firm. 628-8309. 4/1 FULL SIZE BED. 841-3992. 4/1

ANIMALS, ETC. 20-GAL. FISH TANK, all access., $50. 628-0502. 5/6 20 CHICKENS, 2 yrs. old, laying. $5 ea. 875-7323. 5/6 PUT-TOGETHER KENNEL 7.5x7.5x4’, very good cond., $125 OBO. 745-1911 before 8:30 p.m. 4/29

1 MALE PEACOCK for sale, $25. 875-4952, lv. msg. 4/15

MORNING STAR

LEGALS NOTICE

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: This is to advise that Charles W. Griffith of 31 N. Pine St., Ext., Seaford, Sussex County, Delaware, will be filing with the Prothonotary in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, an application for License to Carry a Concealed Deadly Weapon, according to the Laws of the State of Delaware. 5/6/1tp

TOWN OF LAUREL NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Please take notice that a public hearing will be held on: Monday, May 17, 2010 at 7:00 p.m. Laurel Town Hall 201 Mechanic Street Town of Laurel Laurel, DE The public hearing will be conducted by the Mayor and Council of the Town of Laurel, to consider the request of Samanda Properties of Delaware II for a special development district financing for the Village Brooke-East, West and North developments (tax map #’s 2-32 12.0065 & 74, #2-32/12.00/39, 1-32 12.00-111, 111.01, 111.02 & 111.03, 109, 118, 119) and the introduction of Resolution creating the Village Brooke Special Development District; and introduction of Ordinance authorizing the issuance of the Town’s special obligation bonds for the Village Brooke Special Development District and related matters. All interested persons are invited to attend said public hearing and present their views. Additional information, including copies of the annexation requests and other pertinent documents, may be obtained at Town Hall during regular business hours. Mayor and Council of Laurel, Delaware 5/6/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING

Seaford Hundred Case No. 10628 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a special use exception as provided by: Chapter 115, Article IV, Subsection 115-23, Item C(5) of said ordinance of DAPHNE COULBOURN who is seeking a special use exception to operate a day care center, to be located north of Road 547, southwest of Road 553. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, JUNE 7, 2010, at 7:00 P.M. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 5/6/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING

Broad Creek Hundred Case No. 10631 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a special use exception and a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article XXI, Subsection 115-159.5, Item B(2)(3) of said ordinance of HERTRICH PROPERTIES V, LLC who is seeking a special use exception to replace billboards, a variance from the maximum allowable square footage for a billboard, and a variance from the setback requirement from a dwelling, church, school, public lands or another sign, to be located southwest intersec-

TAG SALE

For Estate of Hazel Wheatley 522 Liberty Rd., Federalsburg, MD

May 7 - 8 • 7 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Antiques, collectables, furniture, many tools & practical housewares. Accumulation of 60+ years! Sale includes many large collections including toothpick holders, salt shakers, pitchers, a huge antique doll collection & more.

SEcond TAG SALE June 4 - 5 • 7 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Sale will include many similar collections, antiques, collectables, tools, furniture & items too numerous to mention. These items are in storage and there is too much to display at one sale. All sales are final. Cash or check with identification.

• MAY 6 - 12, 2010 tion of Road 485 and U.S. Route 13. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, JUNE 7, 2010, at 7:00 P.M. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 5/6/1tc

LEGAL NOTICE

ON MAY 18, 2010 at 11:00 a.m., Laurel Storage Center, Road 468, Laurel, DE will conduct a sale pursuant to Title 25, DEL. C. ANN. 4904-4905. The Contents of the following Bins will be sold: Bin(s): #2 Farlow, Annie V; #8 Massey, Edward; #20 Blades, Randi N.; #25 Stewart, Margie; #34 Palmer, Ambriah; #43 Dulis, Kathy; #57 Robinson, Joseph; #58 James, Beulah; #60 Copley, Michael; #63 Walker, Cleo; #70 Eudy, Susan; #77 Winder, Audrey; #85 & #94 Kenyon, Gregory; #104 Culver, John; #110

Oney, Veronica; #114 Crockett, Megan; #115 Frisby, Jamie; #116 Nutto, April; #141 Sparks, Nadine; #151 Vanbrunt, Martha; #160 Gaines, Alicia; #164 Jones, Shenika; #165 Farlow, Paula; #176 Andrews, Edna; #185 Willis, Falisha; #187 Andrews, Edna; #204 Culver, John; #221 Raynor, Nancy; #223 Ellis, Beverly. BIDDERS: Call office on day of sale to confirm, (302) 875-5931. 4/29/2tc

NOTICE

On Saturday, 5/29/10 at 11:00 a.m., Peninsula Mini Storage, located at 40 S. Market St., Blades/Seaford, DE will hold a public auction pursuant to the State of Delaware Self-Storage Facility Act Title 25 Chapter 49. The following storage units will be sold or disposed of for Non-Payment of storage rent. Tenants name and last known address are listed below. Jon Spicer, Unit 263, Seaford, DE; Pamela West, Unit 259, Seaford, DE; Cheryl Dinenna, Unit 204265, Seaford, DE. Peninsula Mini Storage Frank Passwaters, Storage Manager 302-629-5743 4/29/2tc

THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS FOR THE STATE OF DELAWARE IN AND FOR SUSSEX COUNTY

In Re Change of Name of: Adam Mace to Adam Gerstorff. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Adam Mace intents to present a Petition to the Court of Common Pleas for the State of Delaware in and for Sussex County to change his name to Adam Gerstorff. Petitioner desires this change for social reasons. Adam Mace Petitioner 4/22/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Cora L. Snelling, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Cora L. Snelling who departed this life on the 16th day of December, A.D. 2009, late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Melody Jones on the 21st day of April, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and See LEGALS—page 37

PUBLIC AUCTION • SAT., MAY 15, 2010 • 10 AM LAUREL AUCTION MARKET - Corner of Rts. 13 and 9 in Laurel, DE

ITEMS FROM THE LATE ERIC “FROGGY” DUKES OF LAUREL TRACTOR: C.I.H. MX120, F.W.A., C/H/, A/C, shows 1937 hours, weights, quick hitch 18-4-38 duals, just serviced, clean one owner tractor COMBINE, HEADS, AND HEADER CART C.I.H 1660, w/mud hog, shows 3551 engine hours, clean used to cut beans last fall, C.I.H 1020, 15 ft floating table, C.I.H 1063, 6R, 30in, corn head All will be sold separate and then offered as a package and sold how ever produces highest bid. Hoover 6 ton header cart GRAIN TRUCK 1999 I.H. 10 wheeler, DT466, 9 speed, 5ft x 20 ft body new rear tires PLANTING JD 7000 6R planter w/dry fert., CIH 5300 DDO w/ P/W, Ashcraft stainless auger body w/ Briggs engine mtd on Knowles 4 wheel running gear TILLAGE MF 520 16 ft disk w/ new blades, Brillion 18 ft crowsfoot w/transport, JD 6-16 semimount plow, Brillion 11 ft chisel plow, Unverforth 14 ft Perfecta field cultv. MISC. Spread Master 14 ft spreader-just serviced, Dayton 25 KW PTO generator set, Case 4 wheel flat wagon, Long 6 ft mower, JD 15 ft Gyro mower, MF 440 6R30 S tyne cultv., Brillion 4R36 S tyne cultv., Bush Hog 2400 Qt loader-was on MF 290 tractor, 3 ph post hole digger, 1 shank sub soiler, 2 axel homemade trailer, OTHER ITEMS TO BE SOLD AT SALE FROM OTHER CONSIGNERS: JD 950 w/75 loader for parts, piles of lumber, MF 135 g mp clean tractor, Cub Lo-Boy w/ mower, Kruger 4 axel trailer, chicken house trusses, green house frame and doors, New Idea 3 beater spreader, Reid 3 axel trailor, 1990 Ford F350 Dual 5.8L auto, MW funnel body on Case running gear, 4 wheel wagon w/new bedders and salt treat body, JD side dresser, IH 370 14 ft disk-new blades, Dunham 12 ft land conditioner, IH 10 ft 3ph chisel plow TERMS: CASH OR GOOD CHECK DAY OF SALE WITH BANK LETTER, PROMPT REMOVAL.

EVERYTHING SOLD AS IS. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCIDENTS. NO BUYERS PENALTY.

Many items still coming in. Brief listing. Consignments accepted May 8th to May 14th, 8:30am till Dark

Lee Collins Auctioneer

302.846.3936(H) • 302.236.0344(C)


LEGALS - from Page 36

present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 16th day of August, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Melody Jones 128 Collins Ave. Smyrna, DE 19977 Attorney: Howard W. Hudson Jr., Esq. Haller & Hudson 101 S. Bedford St. Georgetown, DE 19947 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 5/6/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of H. Calvin Wheatley, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of H. Calvin Wheatley who departed this life on the 21st day of April, A.D. 2010 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Bruce Wheatley on the 26th day of April, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administrator without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administrator on or before the 21st day of December, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administrator: Bruce Wheatley 3 Caney Ct. Kenner, LA 70065 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 5/6/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Hillary M. Robinson, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Hillary M. Robinson who departed this life on the 27th day of March, A.D. 2010 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Albert Jerry Robinson on the 15th day of April, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administrator without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administrator on or before the 27th day of November, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administrator: Albert Jerry Robinson 10595 Chestnut Lane Seaford, DE 19973 Attorney: David W. Baker, Esq. 109 South Race St.

MORNING STAR Georgetown, DE 19947 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 4/29/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Granville J. Ellis (Jr.), Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration WWA upon the estate of Granville J. Ellis (Jr.) who departed this life on the 19th day of February, A.D. 2010 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Wayne Ellis on the 8th day of April, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administrator WWA without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administrator WWA on or before the 19th day of October, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administrator WWA: Wayne Ellis 31594 Fred Adkins Rd. Parsonsburg, MD 21849 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 4/22/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of C. Lanice Bullis, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of C. Lanice Bullis who departed this life on the 21st day of March, A.D. 2010 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Tammy L. Alexander, Gloria J. Kelly on the 13th day of April, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Executrices without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Executrices on or before the 21st day of November, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Executrices: Tammy L. Alexander 30931 Crepe Myrtle Dr., Unit 73 Millsboro, DE 19966 Gloria J. Kelly 31436 East Trap Pond Rd. Laurel, DE 19956 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 4/22/3tc

Enjoy the Star? Don’t Miss A Single Issue Call Today!

629-9788

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being located in the CITY OF SEAFORD, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe found on the Easterly right of way line of North Front Street, said point being located 231.68 feet to Third Street, at a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Anna Mae Buchert; thence with the Easterly right of way line of North Front Street North 09 degrees 31 minutes 47 seconds East 31.84 feet to an iron bolt found at a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Peggy J. Geradi; thence turning and running with lands now or formerly of Peggy J. Geradi South 80 degrees 58 minutes 05 seconds East 132.17 feet to an iron rod found at a corner for this lot, lands now or formerly of Peggy J. Geradi and in line of lands now or formerly of William Shockley, Heirs; thence turning and running with lands now or formerly of William Shockley, Heirs South 09 degrees 04 minutes 50 seconds West 32.23 feet to an iron pipe found at a corner for this lot, lands now or formerly of Anna Mae Buchert and in line of lands now or formerly of William Shockley, Heirs; thence turning and running with lands now or formerly of Anna Mae Buchert North 80 degrees 53 minutes 52 seconds West 132.45 feet to the point and place of beginning said to contain 4,239 square feet of land, be the same more or less, together with improvements, as shown on a survey prepared by MillerLewis, Inc., dated October 18, 2006. BEING the same lands and premises which Kevin L. Jefferson, by Deed dated October 19,2007 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3512, Page 206, did grant and convey unto Antwaneshia Blake. Tax Parcel: 4-31-5.0077.00 Property Address: 319 FRONT STREET, SEAFORD

• MAY 6 - 12, 2010 Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 21, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 25, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ANTWANESHIA BLAKE and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 5/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situated on the development of Country Glen, Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware being known as Lot 26 of said subdivision and being located and on the northerly side of Glen Circle (50 feet wide) a short distance West of Glen Road ( 50 feet wide) and bounded on the South by said Glen Circle, on the West by Lot 25 of said Country Glen Subdivision on the North by Knotts Landing Subdivision and on the East by Lot 27 of said subdivision,

PAGE 37 being more particularly described in a recent survey by Homewood Engineering, Ltd., Gary B. Homewood, Registered Professional Engineer, dated February 21, 2004, as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe set, said iron pipe being the following two (2) courses and distances from the physical centerline intersects of Glen Circle and that of Glen Road: (1) from said intersect point of Glen Circle and Glen Road following the centerline of Glen Road North 65 degrees 36 minutes 34 seconds West 363.9 plus or minus feet to a point, (2) North 24 degrees 23 minutes 26 seconds East 25.00 feet to said point; thence from said beginning point on the northerly line of Glen Circle and following said line of Glen Circle North 65 degrees 36 minutes 34 seconds West 105.00 feet to a capped rebar found at a corner for Lot 25 of said subdivision; thence with a line of Lot 25 North 24 degrees 23 minutes 26 seconds East 122.54 feet to a capped rebar found at a corner in land of Knotts Landing Subdivision; thence with lands of Knotts Landing Subdivision South 65 degrees 36 minutes 34 seconds East 105.00 feet to an iron pipe set at a corner for Lot 27 of Country Glen Subdivision; thence with a line of Lot 27 South 24 degrees 23 minutes 26 seconds West 122.50 feet to the point and place of Beginning having within said metes and bounds 12,867 square feet or 0.2654 acres of land, be the same more or less. BEING the same lands and premises which Delmarva Homes Land Management, L.L.C., by deed dated December 14, 2004 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware in Deed Book 3067, Page 18, did grant and convey unto JEFFREY J. DALTON and PAMELA M. DALTON, in fee. Tax Parcel: 4-3019.00-95.00 Property Address: 11885 GLEN CIRCLE, BRIDGEVILLE Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 21, 2010. Sale

subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 25, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JEFFREY J. & PAMELA M. DALTON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 5/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware being designated as Lot No.7, of the development known as GREENWOOD MEADOWS, a plot of which is of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Georgetown, Delaware, in Plat Book 78, Page 48. AND BEING the same lands and premises which Merie Lister, Sr. and A. Pauline Lister, by deed dated October 11, 2006 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 3375, Page 113 did grant and convey unto GUINELL JACQUES, in fee. Tax Parcel: 5-30-3.0019.10 Property Address: 12001 BLANCHARD ROAD, GREENWOOD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check See LEGALS—page 38


PAGE 38 LEGALS - from Page 37

payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 21, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 25, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of GUINELL JACQUES and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 5/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece and parcel of land known as 317 East Sixth Street, in the Town of Laurel, Little Creek Hundred, County of Sussex and State of Delaware, more particularly bounded and described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a coordinate point on the West side of a 5 foot sidewalk on the East side of East 6th Street North 39 degrees 00 minutes West 39.25 feet to an iron; thence along a line between these lands and lands now or formerly of James Brock, North 50 degrees 57 minutes East 5.0 feet to a pipe; thence

MORNING STAR continuing along the same line 274 feet to a concrete monument; thence along a line between these lands and lands now or formerly of George Figgs South 39 degrees 04 minutes East 38.75 feet to an iron; thence along a line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Orlando Joseph South 50 degrees 50 minutes 40 seconds West 279.00 feet to the point and place of beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. AND BEING the same lands and premises which Aurore A. Siphavanh k/n/a Aurore A. Neal by deed dated July 25, 2006 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 3361, Page 51 did grant and convey unto AURORE A. NEAL and SHANE NEAL, wife and husband. Tax Parcel: 3 - 3 2 1.11-51.00 Property Address: 317 EAST 6TH STREET, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 21, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 25, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of AURORE A. & SHANE NEAL and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 5/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain, lot, parcel, or piece of land known as 10940 4th Fourth Street, lying on the southerly side thereof, between White Street and King Street, being the 3rd Third parcel, address, or property west of White Street, situated in the Town of Laurel, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, the State of Delaware, and being more particularly located and ascertained in the following metes and bounds description, as of a plan and survey by the PELSA Company, Inc., Land Consultants and Surveyors, dated April 18, 2007, referenced and filed M007-0448, thus, bounded and described, as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a point and place being marked and made known by a concrete monument situate in the southerly side of 4th Fourth Street (a.k.a. “the Highway leading from Laurel to Broad Creek Bridge”) located at a common corner in the division line for the said lands herein being described and lands lying westerly now or formerly of “Boyce,” hence, the point and place of Beginning; Thence, Commencing from the said point of Beginning and running along the said southerly side of 4th Fourth Street South 69 degrees 00 minute East 32.00 feet to a point; Thence, turning and leaving said 4th Street and running along the division line for lands lying easterly now or formerly “Moore,” being with the centerline of a driveway leading to a double garage intersecting a “party wall,” passing through the centerline of the same, and by the extension thereof South 22 degrees 30 minutes West 141.25 feet to a point; Thence, along the division line for lands lying southerly now or formerly of the “White heirs” North 69 degrees 00 minute West 49.50 feet to a point; Thence, along the division line for the aforesaid lands lying westerly of “Boyce” North 29 degrees 30 minutes East 142.75 feet to the aforesaid southerly side of 4th Fourth Street and the first mentioned point and place of beginning. Be the contents thereof what they may.

• MAY 6 - 12, 2010 AND BEING the same lands and premises which Arlie H. Wooters, Jr., by his attorney in fact, Gordon A. Ramey, Jr. and Marion L. Wooters, by her attorney in fact, Gordon A. Ramey, Jr., husband and wife by deed dated July 5, 2007 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 3481, Page 167 did grant and convey unto JAMIE O’CONNOR. Tax Parcel: 3-321.07-326.00 Property Address: 10940 E. FOURTH STREET, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 21, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 25, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JAMIE E. O’CONNER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 5/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State

of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Bridgeville, Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a pipe found on the East right of way line of Main Street at a corner for these lands and lands of William G. Passwaters Heirs; thence with said right of way line of Main Street the following three (3) courses and distances North 07 degrees 34 minutes 30 seconds West 8.78 feet to a pipe found; thence South 82 degrees 25 minutes 30 seconds West 6.62 feet to a pipe found; thence North 07 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds West 66.14 feet to a pipe found on the East right of way line of Main Street at a corner for these lands and lands of Marybeth Lewis; thence with lands of Marybeth Lewis North 81 degrees 18 minutes 56 seconds East 307.03 feet (passing over a found pipe at 305.17 feet) to a point at a corner for these lands, lands of Marybeth Lewis and in line of lands of The Delaware State Housing Authority; thence with lands of The Delaware State Housing Authority South 08 degrees 32 minutes 19 seconds East 75.18 feet to a concrete monument found at a corner for these lands, lands of The Delaware Slate Housing Authority and in line of lands of Maurice J. West, et ux; thence with said West lands South 80 degrees 41 minutes 19 seconds West 113.42 feet to an iron rebar found at a corner for these lands, lands of Maurice J. West, et ux and lands of William G. Passwaters Heirs; thence with lands of William G. Passwaters Heirs South 81 degrees 44 minutes 14 seconds West 188.26 feet to a pipe found on the East right of way line of Main Street located at the point and place of beginning, be the same more or less, as shown on a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr., DEL. P.L.S. No. 242, dated December 4,2002. BEING the same lands and premises which Z3, LLC by Deed dated March 21, 2007 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3429, Page 131, did grant and convey unto Theresa M. Patchett. Tax Parcel: 1-3110.20-123.00 Property Address: 419 SOUTH MAIN STREET, BRIDGEVILLE

Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 21, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 25, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of THERESA M. PATCHETT and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 5/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece and parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the CITY OF SEAFORD, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, known and designated as LOT NUMBER THIRTY-SIX (36), in Section “A” of Westview Extended, and being more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a pipe found on the Easterly right of way line of Hickory Lane (50 foot right of way), at a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Mary See LEGALS—page 39


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 38 Ellen Hough, said point of beginning be 180 feet more or less to Allen Avenue; thence with the Easterly right of way line of Hickory Lane (50 foot right of way) North 00 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds East 60.57 feet to a pipe found at a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Karen L. Hopkins; thence turning and running with lands now or formerly of Karen L. Hopkins South 88 degrees 57 minutes 40 seconds East 163.04 feet to an iron rod found at a corner for this lot, Lands now or formerly of Karen L. Hopkins, lands now or formerly of Allen Wix and lands now or formerly of Frances S. Beers; thence turning and running with lands now or formerly of Frances S. Beers South 02 degrees 44 minutes 25 seconds West 60.32 feet to a pipe found at a corner for this lot, lands now or formerly of Mary Ellen Hough and in line of lands now or formerly of Frances S. Beers; thence turning and running lands now or formerly of Mary Ellen Hough North 89 degrees 03 minutes 25 seconds West 160.68 feet to the place of beginning, together with all improvements thereon, as surveyed by Miller-Lewis, dated June 21, 2006. BEING the same lands and premises which Frank Parks and Leigh Ann SpicerParks by Deed dated July 31, 2006 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3348, Page 94, did grant and convey unto Kara L. Usilton. Tax Parcel: 5-31-13.0945.00 Property Address: 307 HICKORY LANE, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 21, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 25, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by

the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of KARA L. USILTON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 5/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, more particularly described in accordance with a survey prepared by MillerLewis, Inc., dated October 19,2004, as follows: BEGINNING at an iron pipe in the westerly right of way line of First Street at a corner for this land and lands now or formerly of Geneva D. Jackson, said beginning point being 1,150 feet more or less from County Road 589A; thence, by and with the westerly right of way line of First Street South 21 degrees 32 minutes 56 seconds West 110.88 feet to an iron pipe, a corner for this land; thence, by and with Red Pine Drive North 66 degrees 19 minutes 06 seconds West 276.78 feet to an iron pipe, a corner for this land; thence, along a line between this land and lands now or formerly of Willis Franklin Savage North 21 degrees 27 minutes 16 seconds East 150.81 feet to an iron rod, a corner for this land and lands now or formerly of Martha Alexander Distance; thence, along a line between this land and lands now or formerly of Martha Alexander Distance South 70 degrees 28 minutes 37 seconds East 140.97 feet to an iron pipe, a corner for this land; thence, along a line between this land and

lands now or formerly of Geneva D. Jackson South 21 degrees 30 minutes 20 seconds West 60.00 feet to an iron pipe; thence, along another line between this land and lands now or formerly of Geneva D. Jackson South 70 degrees 28 minutes 37 seconds East 136.00 feet to the place of beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. AND BEING the same lands and premises which Delmar Homes, Inc., by deed dated September 9, 2005 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 3201, Page 265 did grant and convey unto JANINE A. WILLIAMS AND BRUCE A. WILLIAMS, husband and wife, in fee. Tax Parcel: 5-30-10.0025.00 Property Address: 9169 RED PINE DRIVE, GREENWOOD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 21, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 25, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JANINE A. & BRUCE A. WILLIAMS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 5/6/2tc

Subscribe Today!

Call 629-9788

• MAY 6 - 12, 2010 SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: The one half interest of David James Gilmore in all that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being part of Lot #11 of Nanticoke Estates, more particularly described on a survey plot prepared by Donald K. Miller dated July 27, 1998, as appearing in Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, Deed Book 2311, Page 086. Being the same land conveyed unto George R. Gilmore and Elizabeth F. Gilmore, co-trustees under revocable trust agreement of George R. Gilmore and Elizabeth F. Gilmore dated May 16, 1991, of 156 Rivershore Drive, Seaford, Delaware 19973, and David J. Gilmore and Jodi L. Gilmore, then his wife, by Deed of George R. Gilmore and Elizabeth F. Gilmore on August 6, 1998, and filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 2311, Page 085. Tax Parcel: 1 - 3 2 6.00-2.00 Property Address: 7447 RIVERSHORE DRIVE, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 21, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 25, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax

PAGE 39 is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DAVID JAMES GILMORE, INDIVIDUALLY AND AS CO-TRUSTEE OF THE GEORGE R. GILMORE AND ELIZABETH F. GILMORE UNIFIED REVOCABLE TRUST U/T/A DATED MAY 16, 1991 and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 5/6/2tc

TAX SALE

By virtue of a writ of Venditioni Exponas Monition, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece or parcel of land, lying and being in the Town of Bridgeville, County of Sussex and State of Delaware, fronting on Main Street 50 feet and bounded on the south by lands now or formerly of J.E. Layton, running back with line thereof about 184 feet to lands of the Trustees of the Bridgeville M.E. Church; thence north with the line of said Trustees lands and 59 feet to lands now or formerly of Harry L. Cannon; thence east with the line of the said Cannons lands about 178 feet to said Main Street. BEING the same lands conveyed unto Walter Flowers and Janet F. Simmons Flowers by deed of Charles E. Foulke, Sr. dated February 5, 1980 and recoreded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 994, Page 33. The said Janet F. Simmons Flowers departed this life intestate on or around May 17, 2000 leaving her husband, Walter Flowers sole owner. Tax Parcel: 1-31-10.1610.00 Property Address: NOT AVAILABLE Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash

or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 100 percent of the purchase money will be demanded at the time of sale. Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 25, 2010 and also subject to the owner’s right of redemption pursuant to 9 Del. C. § 8728. Also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser and subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of WALTER FLOWERS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 5/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, together with the improvements thereon, situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, known as REVISED LOT NO. FIVE (5), on a re-subdivision plan for Lots 5 and 6, SUNSET MEADOWS, Prepared by Adams-Kemp Associates, Inc., Registered Surveyors, on July 8, 1994, as recorded in the office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 52 at page 294. BEING the same lands and premises which were conveyed unto Own Your Own, Inc., by deed of Manufacturers & Traders Trust Company, Trustee dated July 28, 2003, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, DELAWARE, on September 10, 2003, in Deed Book 2881, Page 301. See LEGALS—page 40


PAGE 40 LEGALS - from Page 39 SUBJECT to any and all restrictions, reservations, conditions, easements and agreements of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware. BEING the same lands and premises which were conveyed unto Michael L. Butler, by deed of Own Your Own, Inc. dated September 13,2004, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, DELAWARE, on September 15,2004, in Deed Book 3034, Page 195. Tax Parcel: 4-30-20.0010.04 Property Address: 18399 W. CHAPLAINS CHAPEL, BRIDGEVILLE Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 21, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 25, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MICHAEL L. BUTLER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 5/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Com-

MORNING STAR plex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Sussex Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being known as LOT 12 AND THE SOUTH HALF OF LOT 13, as shown on a plot of lands of Charles G. Friedel appearing in Plot Book 1 at page 132, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware, and more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument (found) on the easterly right-of-way line of Elm Street at a corner for these lands and lands of Paul E. Harris, et ux., thence with the easterly right-of-way line of Elm Street North 27 degrees 08 minutes 00 seconds West 74.96 feet to a concrete monument (found) on the easterly right-of-way line of Elm Street at a corner for these lands and lands of Connie L. Henry; thence with said Henry lands North 62 degrees 38 minutes 55 seconds East 147.95 feet to an iron rebar (found) at a corner for these lands, lands of Connie L. Henry and in line of lands of Van W. Milligan, et ux., thence with said Milligan lands the following two (2) courses distances South 27 degrees 44 minutes 34 seconds East 74.98 feet to an iron rebar (found); thence South 62 degrees 37 minutes 35 seconds West 74.43 feet to a PK nail in a landscape tie (found) at a corner for these lands, lands of Van Milligan and lands of Paul E. Harris, et ux., thence with said Harris lands South 62 degrees 41 minutes 10 seconds West 74.33 feet to a concrete monument (found) on the easterly right-of-way line of Elm Street being located at the point and place of beginning, containing 11,124 square feet of land be the same more or less as shown on a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr., Del. P.L.S. No. 242 dated March 20,2007. SUBJECT to any and all restrictions, reservations, conditions, easements and agreements of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware. Being the same lands conveyed to Connie Lee Henry by Deed from Myers Ronald Johnson and Esther Ann Johnson, dated November 11, 1983, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County in Deed Book 1223, page 105. Being the same lands conveyed to Matthew E. Gaskill

and Sara Gaskill by Deed from Connie Lee Henry, dated March 30,2007, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County in Deed Book 3440, page 150. Tax Parcel: 3-31-6.00267.00 Property Address: 24053 ELM STREET, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 21, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 25, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MATTHEW E. & SARA GASKILL and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 5/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All, that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, more particularly described as fol-

• MAY 6 - 12, 2010 lows; to wit: Beginning at a concrete marker on the western right of way line of County Road No. 481 also known as Brickyard Road, a corner of lands and other lands of Florence E. Thomas; thence back 57 1/2° West 291’ to a Concrete marker, thence North 42° West 150’ to a concrete marker; thence North 57 112° East 291’ to a concrete marker and the aforesaid County Road; thence along said county Road South 42° East ISO’ back to the place of beginning, containing one (1) Acre of land, be the same more or less. Being a part of the lands conveyed to Florence E. Thomas by Deed of Thomas D. Thomas and Santa Thomas, his wife, dated December 8, 1953, and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds at Georgetown, in Deed Record Volume 427, Page 187. Being the same lands and premises by which John Thomas and Florence Thomas by Deed dated May 13, 1968 and recorded in the Office of the recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware as book 630, Page 500, did grant and convey to Lloyd A. Jewell and Shirley A. Jewell. Tax Parcel: 1-32-2.00288.00 Property Address: 10026 BRICKYARD ROAD, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 21, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 25, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with

these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ESTATE OF LLOYD A. JEWELL & SHIRLEY A. JEWEL and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 5/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece and parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being known and designated as Lot No.4 on a plot of lands entitled “Lands of Norris Niblett and Donald Ralph”, prepared by Miller-Lewis, Inc., Registered Surveyors, filed for record in December 12, 1989, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 43, Page 136, and being more particularly described according to a survey prepared by Simpler Surveying & Associate, Registered Surveyor, dated April 21, 2005. BEGINNNING at a concrete monument situate on the westerly right of way of River Road (50’ R/W), said monument being 1,051’, more or less, northerly of the center line of County Route No. 496 and being a corner for these lands and Lot #3; thence, by and with Lot #3, North 78° 16 minutes 24 seconds West, 216.26’ to a 5/8” re-bar, said re-bar being a corner for these lands, Lot #3 and a point on line of Lot #4, Phillips Landing Estates; thence, by and with Lot #4, Phillips Landing Estates, North 12 degrees 16 minutes 22 seconds East, 150.12’ to a concrete monument, said monument being a corner for these lands and Lot #5; thence, leaving Lot #4, Phillips Landing Estates and by and with Lot #5, South 78° 09 minutes 14 seconds East 215.01’ to a concrete monument situate on the westerly right of way of River Road (50’ R/W), said monument being a corner for these lands and Lot #5; thence, by and with the aforesaid westerly right of way of River Road South

11 ° 47 minutes 41 seconds West, 149.66’ to the point and place of beginning, being and containing 32,321 square feet of land, more or less. BEING the same land conveyed unto David C. Mederios by Deed of Brett Alan Jones and Jennifer L. Jones, his wife, dated April 27, 2005, and filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 3136, Page 015. BEING the same land conveyed unto David C. Medeiros by Deed of David C. Maderios (also known as David C. Medeiros), dated July 25,2005, and filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 3177, Page 262. Tax Parcel: 4-32-2.0053.00 Property Address: 30804 RIVER ROAD, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 21, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 25, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DAVID C. MEDERIOS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 5/6/2tc See LEGALS—page 41


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 40

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece, parcel and tract of land lying and being situate in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County, and State of Delaware, comprising all of Lot #6, as designated on the plot of Tull Subdivision II, filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, in Plot book 87, Page 107, and being described more particularly in accordance with a survey plat, dated July 26,2005, and revised on January 19,2005, prepared by Miller-Lewis, Inc. as follows to wit: BEGINNING at a point on the northeasterly rightof-way line of Sussex County Road #590 (50’ RIW); said point being situate 1,140 feet, more or less, northwesterly from Sussex County Road #583; thence with said right-of-way line, the next two (2) courses and distances; 1) North 17° 07 minutes 46 seconds West 40.47 feet to a point 2) North 17° 08 minutes 53 seconds West 109.53 feet to a point; thence with lands of Tull Group, LLC, now or formerly, the next two (2) courses and distances; 1) North 72° 52 minutes 14 seconds East 253.60 feet to an iron pipe (found), passing over an iron pipe (found) at 5.00 feet; 2) South 17° 07 minutes 46 seconds East 150.00 feet to an iron pipe (found); thence with Lot #5 South 72° 52 minutes 14 seconds West 250.00 feet, passing over an iron pipe (found) at 245.00 feet, home to the point of beginning, said to contain 37,500 square feet of land, be the same more or less. SUBJECT TO ANY AND ALL RESTRICTIONS, RESERVATIONS, CONDITIONS, EASEMENTS of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware. BEING the same lands conveyed to Silver Star Builders, Inc., by deed of Toll Group, LLC, a limited liability company of the State of Delaware, deed dated August 2,2005, and filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware,

in Deed Book 3179, Page 154. BEING the same lands conveyed to Sharon E. Strand, by deed of Silver Star Builders, Inc.” deed dated February 3, 2006, and filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 3268, Page 199. Tax Parcel: 5-3013.00-10.08 Property Address: 13955 MILE STRETCH ROAD, GREENWOOD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 21, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 25, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of SHARON E. STRAND and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 5/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN

LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED, LYING AND BEING IN L1TILE CREEK HUNDRED, SUSSEX COUNTY, DELAWARE AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, TO WIT: BEGINNING AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT IN THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF ROAD NO 64,150.00 FEET EAST OF A PIPE FOUND AT THE CORNER OF LOT 1 AND LANDS NOW OR FORMERLY OF RAYMOND STRICK; THENCE TURNING AND RUNNING NORTH 18 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 300.00 FEET TO AN IRON REBAR; THENCE TURNING AND RUNNING SOUTH 71 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 150.00 FEET TO AN IRON REBAR; THENCE TURNING AND RUNNING SOUTH 18 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 300.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOUND AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER AT THESE LANDS IN THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF ROAD NO. 64 150;00 FEET WEST OF A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOUND AT THE CORNER OF LOT NO.3; THENCE TURNING AND RUNNING NORTH 71 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 150.00 FEET TO THE PLACE AND POINT OF BEGINNING; SAID TO CONTAIN 1.03 ACRES OF LAND, MORE OR LESS, AS MORE FULLY SHOWN ON A SURVEY PERFORMED BY BRAD A. TEMPLE, DATED MAY 19, 1993. Being the same lands and premises which Norris L. Niblett, did grant and convey unto Kevin A. Gross, Sr. and Leah A. Gross, by deed January 5, 1996 and recorded on January 5, 1996 the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2099 at Page 144. Tax Parcel: 5-32-7.0050.04 Property Address: RT 1 BOX 476B, COUNTY ROAD 64 NKA 12841 WHITESVILLE ROAD, DELMAR Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The

• MAY 6 - 12, 2010 balance is to be paid on or before June 21, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 25, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LEAH A. & KEVIN A. GROSS, SR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 5/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being more particularly described as follows to wit: Beginning at a concrete monument (found) on the northeasterly right-of-way line of Road No. 516 at a corner for these lands and land of Aretha D. Brown; thence with the northwesterly right-of-way line of Road No. 516 the following two (2) courses and distances; South 48 degrees fifteen minutes West, 98.47 feet to a concrete monument (found); thence with a curve to the left an arc distance of 280.35 feet (said arc having a chord of South 47 degrees 45 minutes West, 280.30 feet), to a concrete monument (found) on the Northwesterly right-of-way North 52 degrees 04 minutes West, 15.99 feet to a concrete monument (found) on the Southeasterly rightof-way line of Road No. 525; thence with the South-

PAGE 41 easterly right-of-way line of Road No. 525 with a curve to the left an arc distance of 407.60 feet (said arc having a chord of North 27 degrees 55 minutes East, 407.00 feet) to a concrete monument (found) on the Southeasterly right-of-way line of Road No. 525 located at a corner for these lands and lands of Arlethe D. Brown; thence with said Brown lands South 41 degrees 45 minutes East, 154.70 feet to a concrete monument (found) on the Northwesterly right-of-way line of Road No. 516 located at the point and place of beginning, containing 30.960 square feet of land be the same more or less as shown on a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr. DEL. P.L.S. No. 242 and December 28,2000. For informational purposes only: The APN Assessor as 2-31 13.0024.02; source of title Document No. 43873 (Recorded 01/23/01). Being the same lands and premises which The Bank of New York, did grant and convey unto Michael L. Hotten, by deed dated January 16, 2001 and recorded on January 23, 2001 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2559 at Page 67. Tax Parcel: 2-31-13.0024.02 Property Address: 24344 CONCORD POND ROAD, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 21, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 25, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days

of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MICHAEL L. HOTTEN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 5/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the Town of Blades, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe located on the Northerly right of way line of Second Street, said pipe being a corner for this land and land now or formerly of B. J. Hardin; thence running along said line of Hardin North 02 degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds West 119.36 feet to an iron pipe, said pipe being a corner for this land and lands now or formerly of Hardin, Kemp and Handley; thence running along the line of Handley, James and Hurd North 89 degrees 40 minutes 25 seconds East 119.93 feet to an iron pipe, said pipe being a corner for this land and land now or formerly of Hurd and Ellis; thence running along the line of Ellis south 02 degrees 14 minutes 20 seconds East 119.00 feet to an iron pipe located along Second Ii street; thence running along Second Street south 89 degrees )0 minutes 00 seconds West 120.00 feet to an iron pipe, the point! and place of beginning. Said to contain 14,290 square feet, more or less, together with the improvements located thereon, as surveyed by Thomas A. Temple, Jr., Registered Surveyor, April 15, 1995. Being the same lands and premises which Andrew M. Cuomo, Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, of Washington, D.C., acting by and through the Federal Housing Commissioner did grant and convey unto David Vannewkirk by deed dated December 8, 1999 and recorded on See LEGALS—page 42


PAGE 42

MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

Police Journal There is a concern for homeowners who have unoccupied or seasonal dwellings which are supplied by natural or LP gas. Be cautious and examine your gas lines before turning your gas on. Anyone with information concerning the theft of copper lines or copper wiring should contact the Delaware State Fire Marshal’s Office at 856-5600, the Delaware State Police Troop 4 856-5850, or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-Tip-3333.

Police seek suspects in thefts Pizza King is offering a cash reward for the arrest of two suspects who robbed their Laurel location recently.

Pizza King offers cash reward

On April 24 at 10 p.m., Laurel Police responded to the Pizza King on North Central Avenue, Laurel, in reference to a robbery that had just occurred. Two black males armed with firearms entered the store and demanded money. The suspects were able to get an undisclosed amount of cash before fleeing on foot. Both suspects are described as black males between 5’6” and 5’8”. Suspect 1 was wearing dark colored pants and a dark jacket with white piping on the collar and sleeves. Suspect 1 also had on a dark colored ski mask and was armed with a long gun. Suspect 2 was wearing a dark colored jacket and pants. Suspect 2 was also wearing some type of Halloween mask and was armed with a long gun. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Laurel Police Department at 875-2244 or Delaware Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333 or online at www.tipsubmit.com. You may remain anonymous. Pizza King is offering a cash reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the suspects involved in the robbery.

Copper theft causes explosion

The Delaware State Fire Marshal’s Office has determined that the house explosion that occurred on Monday, April 26, on the 31000 block of Dogwood Lane, Laurel, was due to a propane leak. This leak was caused by the copper gas lines located beneath the dwelling being cut and stolen before the victims moved into the residence. LEGALS - from Page 41

December 13, 1999 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2445 Page 254. Tax Parcel: 1-32-1.11115.00 Property Address: 10 SECOND STREET E, BLADES Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be

Delaware State Police are investigating a rash of copper wire thefts from farm irrigation equipment in Sussex County. Between March and April, troopers have investigated approximately 24 incidents involving the removal of copper from farm irrigation systems. The thefts involve the removal of 200 to 1,000 feet of large copper wire from large industrial irrigation systems located throughout Sussex County. The thefts appear to be occurring at night. State police investigators are searching for evidence and are asking for the public’s help. Anyone that may have any information as to the identity of the suspects is asked to call Troop 4 in Georgetown at 856-5850. If anyone sees trucks or people hanging around farms or irrigations systems at night, they are asked to call “911” immediately. Do not approach the individuals but do try to obtain a tag number. All information will be kept confidential. Callers may also call Delaware Crime Stoppers and remain anonymous. Tips may also be forwarded to law enforcement through tip lines maintained by Delaware Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333 or online at www.tipsubmit.com.

Car crash kills driver

Delaware State Police are investigating a single car crash that killed a 36-year-old Millsboro woman. The crash happened at 7:35 a.m. on April 30, when Tricia A. Stress’ Oldsmobile Delta was traveling westbound on Harmon’s Hill Road approximately 4/10 mile east of Hollyville Road near Millsboro. The Oldsmobile failed to negotiate a moderate right curve causing the vehicle to rotate clockwise as it slid off the north edge of the road. After leaving the road,

demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 21, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 25, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax

is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DAVID VAN NEWKIRK and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 5/6/2tc

the vehicle struck a tree with the driver’s side door and continued west through the front yard of a residence. The vehicle then struck another tree causing it to roll over. The vehicle came to rest on its roof. Speed is believed to be a factor in this collision. Stress was not wearing her seatbelt at the time of the crash. The investigation is continuing.

Charged with copper thefts

Delaware State Police have arrested Charles Toomey, of Laurel, for thefts of copper from farm irrigation systems. Troopers arrested Toomey on Friday, April 30, for thefts of copper from three farmers located between Gumboro and Delmar in Sussex Toomey County. During the course of the investigation of copper from farm irrigation systems, evidence was found linking Toomey to three thefts. Toomey has been charged with felony theft, criminal mischief, criminal trespass and conspiracy. He was arraigned at Court 2 and committed to the Department of Correction in default of $19,300. The investigation is ongoing.

Three arrests for copper theft

On May 4 at 3:37 a.m., a Seaford Police officer on patrol was conducting a property check of the Seaford Utility Building located on Herring Run Road in Seaford when he observed three individuals removing copper related products and throwing them over the fence. As the officer approached, the three defendants fled to the east side of the complex, scaled the fence and fled on foot where a foot chase ensued. The officer and responding Seaford officers set up a perimeter of the area and located Robert L. Cooper, 26, of Milton and William J. Forbes, 22, of Frankford, in the Mears Field Housing Development next to the Seaford Utilities Building where they were apprehended. A Delaware State Police K9 was requested from Troop 5 to search the area for Michael C. Elliott, 29, of Frankford. The K9 was able to track Elliott to a wooded area where he was apprehended. Elliott was transported to Nanticoke Memorial Hospital where he was treated for dog bites and released. All three defendants were arrested and charged with attempted theft over $1,500, second degree trespassing, second degree conspiracy and resisting arrest.

Smoking materials cause fire

The Delaware State Fire Marshal’s Office investigated a dwelling fire that occurred on Friday, April 30, at 12:35 p.m. on the 200 block of North Street in Seaford. The Seaford Fire Department, assisted by the Blades, Bridgeville and Laurel Fire Departments, responded to the scene. Two occupants, home at the time of the fire, were notified by a passerby and were able to escape without injury. The home was equipped with working

smoke detectors. Damages have been estimated at $50,000. Delaware State Fire Marshal’s Office Investigators have determined that the fire was caused by discarded smoking materials at the rear of the dwelling.

Arrested for hunting violations

Kirk M. Willey, 54, of Greenwood, was arrested and charged with hunting from a motor vehicle, carrying an unlawfully loaded firearm in a vehicle, shooting from a roadway and possession of unlawfully taken game (turkey). Willey was taken to Justice of the Peace Court No. 3 in Georgetown, where he pled guilty to all charges, was fined $545 and released. Citizens are encouraged to report fish and wildlife violations to the Delaware Fish and Wildlife Enforcement Section at 302-739-4580.

Neighbor interrupts burglary

Delaware State Police have arrested Brad Donaway, a 30-year-old Maryland man, after he broke into a house on Bethel Road in Millsboro and had his tire shot out by a neighbor. Donaway turned himself into troopers on Tuesday, April 27, after his car tire was shot out and he fled back to Maryland. The incident started around 11:30 a.m. when a neighbor observed activity in the house next door. The concerned neighbor called the victim to make sure no one was supposed to be home. When the homeowner said “no,” the neighbor retrieved a gun and went next door. The neighbor confronted Donaway and told him to get out of the house. Donaway then entered his vehicle and was attempting to drive off when the neighbor fired a round on the suspect’s left front tire. Donaway continued to flee and headed back to Maryland. Troopers were able to make contact with Donaway and he returned to Delaware to turn himself in. State troopers would like to remind the public not to confront any suspect during a crime, instead call 911 immediately. Donaway was charged with second degree burglary and possession of burglary tools. He was committed to the Department of Correction in default of $10,500 bail.

Agents recover body

DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife Enforcement agents on Sunday morning, May 2, recovered a body from the Delaware Bay that the Delaware Medical Examiner’s office has positively identified as David R. Whitehair, age 40, of Felton. Mr. Whitehair and his son, David Whitehair Jr., age 17, had been missing since an April 24 fishing trip. A passing boater spotted the body in the water near Ship John Shoal Lighthouse on the New Jersey side of the shipping channel. Delaware Fish and Wildlife marine agents who were continuing the search for the missing pair responded to the report and brought the body back to Port Mahon, where it was turned over to the Medical Examiner. DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife Enforcement agents are continuing to search for David Whitehair Jr.


MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

PAGE 43

Recruiter works hard to promote the National Guard By Tony E. Windsor

When students in the western Sussex area see Michael Cook around town or at school, he is offering them more than simply a chance to be a soldier. Sgt. Cook is a recruiting officer for the Delaware Army National Guard. He operates out of the 1049th Transportation Detachment located on Bridgeville Highway in Seaford. Cook, along with fellow guardsman, Sgt. Steve Rebman, is assigned to recruit young people from school districts from Farmington to Delmar. Working in “recruitment and retention,” Cook’s primary goal is to help assure that the state’s military support stays at maximum strength. The National Guard has a history that dates back to 1636 when English colonists in North America established militias to protect the citizenry from tribal attacks and foreign invaders. This same militia was responsible for winning the Revolutionary War. In 1776 the Constitution provided a means for Congress to allow states to arm, train and discipline their militia. Each state was given the power to appoint officers and train the militia. In 1825 the New York militia gave themselves the name “National Guard.” In 1916 all state militias formally adopted the term as the name of their military units. Cook explains that the Army National Guard operates at the discretion of the Governor of the state. In time of war, or other emergency, the President of the United States can request from the Governor to utilize the state’s National Guard. Guard units will then take their deployment orders from the United States military. The National Guard has been involved in many world theaters of operation, including most recently Iraq and Afghanistan. In the past 20 years such natural emergencies and military operations include: the invasion of Iraq in 1991; the volcanic eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington State in 1980; NATO peacekeepers in the former Yugoslavia and Macedonia during the Peace Treaty of 1996; the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks in New York in 2001; Iraq and Afghanistan in 2002; and in 2005 during Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana.

Safe medication disposal offered

Testing by the Division of Public Health’s Office of Drinking Water has found traces of medications in water supplies statewide. Delawareans can help protect the environment and their families from the hazard of unwanted medications by dropping them off for safe disposal on Medicine Cabinet Clean-Out Day on Friday, May 14. Organized by Delaware’s Division of Public Health, area health professionals and police agencies, Medicine Cabinet Clean-Out Day will accept prescription, non-prescription, hygiene and veterinary products from 8 a.m. to noon at the Tunnell Cancer Center in Rehoboth Beach or Bayhealth Medical Center in Dover. For more information, call the Delaware Helpline at 1-800-464-4357 or visit DelawareHealthyHomes.org.

Cook, a 20-year veteran of the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, decided to take some time off from his regular job and serve as a recruitment officer with the National Guard. A native of Lewes, he graduated from Cape Henlopen High School in 1986 and joined the Army Reserves where he was a Military Police Officer (MPO). His new job requires a very flexible schedule and an extreme commitment to his message. Talking to Cook there is no doubt that he believes strongly in the career he is recommending to high school students. At a time when the economy is still struggling and jobs are less than plentiful, Cook feels confident that the National Guard is a great option. He feels the opportunities to be trained in a job skill and receive college financial support are two great reasons to take advantage of the National Guard. “The Guard provides a great opportunity to train to be a soldier, but do it while still at home,” he said. “The National Guard will pay you while you are going through basic training and job training. There are also opportunities to get money to obtain a college degree and get paid while you do it. There are opportunities with the Guard that are just too good to resist.” Cook himself has been educated through the support of the military. He has obtained a bachelor’s degree and is now working on his master’s degree with plans to become a teacher; all through the financial support of the Army Reserves and the National Guard. Cook said being a recruiter is more than simply promoting the National Guard as a career choice. It is a job that requires full commitment to the recruits that enlist. “You have to have good time management skills as a recruiter,” he said. “I need to meet with recruits as their schedule allows. It can involve late nights, weekends, whenever they have the time to meet with me.” He likens his job to that of a counselor. He works with the recruit from the point of enlistment throughout the entire process of becoming a soldier. He will personally take the recruit to Fort Meade in Baltimore where physicals are given and the soldiers are sworn in. He will also work with the soldier to help them get settled in their assigned unit and stays in contact to help the soldier learn how best to be promoted through the ranks of service.

RAM DELI MARKET & Central Ave. Package Store

302

875-9233

511 North CeNtral ave. laurel, De 19956

Full Line of Groceries Beer - Wine - Liquors hot & CoLd deLi

New Releases Starting at & Hot Movie $ 4.99 Hits VIDEO GAMES Starting at $

7.99

Nintendo Wii Play Station 2 • Play Station 3 X Box • X-Box 360

OVER 600 TITLES!

We Receive New Titles Every Month!

Michael Cook, a recruiting officer for the Delaware Army National Guard, strongly believes in the National Guard and what it has to offer.

Cook sets up National Guard promotional displays in schools in the Woodbridge, Seaford, Laurel and Delmar school districts. He also visits schools during lunch and answers questions that students may have about the National Guard. He said students can access, www.1800-GO-GUARD.com, or call 1-800-GOGUARD to learn about the benefits of being in the National Guard. He also said

they can call him direct at 854-7637 (office) or 354-3439 (cell). “The National Guard is a product I believe in,” he said. “That is why I am a recruitment officer. There is no way I could be where I am today without the military. This is a great opportunity for young people.” Cook resides in Bridgeville with his wife and two children.

Messiah’s Vineyard Church presents

A Walk Thru The Bible Maze

Saturday, June 19, 2010 10 am - 1 pm

For ages 2-12 • Parents Welcome Our Sanctuary will be transformed into a Bible Maze filled with Bible Stories like Adam & Eve, Noah and the Ark, Daniel and the Lion’s Den, Jonah & the Whale, and more as well as games, crafts, snacks, and a pizza party! Join us as we travel back in time and become eyewitnesses to the greatest stories ever told. Please pre-register your child for this event. Contact: kyle@messiahsvineyardchurch.com or 875-4646 for a registration form.

Rt. 13 & Discountland Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 302-875-4646

www.messiahsvineyard.org

Dr. Carl G. Vincent- Senior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes – Senior Pastor


PAGE 44

MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

Dinner-Auction raises over $70,000 for Women’s Health

The 24th Annual Dinner and Auction, hosted by Nanticoke Health Services, was held April 17 at Heritage Shores. Proceeds from this year’s auction benefit Women’s Health Services at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital and the Charitable Endowment Prescription Fund. The dinner and auction raised more than $70,000. At top left, Steve Rose, president/CEO of Nanticoke Health Services, speaks with Sally Higgins (left) and Dr. Judith Tobin. At top right are auctioneer Don Moore, Tom Brown (Nanticoke Health Services Sr. Vice President), Dr. Joseph Olekszyk

May 29 & 30, 2010

Presented by the Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce and The Seaford Historical Society, Seaford Heritage Weekend is May 29 & 30, 2010. Held at the historic Governor Ross Mansion grounds in Seaford, this threeday event features dynamic glimpses into Civil War era life, complete with reenacted battles, living camp exhibits, period craft demonstrations and music, children’s games, and lots of food and fun. Morning Star Publications, Inc. is preparing a magazine that will be inserted in the May 27, 2010, edition of the Seaford and Laurel Star newspapers. The magazine has a glossy cover and full process color throughout. Those advertising in the Seaford Heritage Weekend magazine may pick up the same ad in the Annual Nanticoke Riverfest magazine to be published in July for a 20% discount.

Phone: 629-9788 Or Fax: 629-9243 email: sales@mspublications.com 302

302

and Bruce Holmquist (BNY Mellon). Below is Lauren Price, who volunteers each year for the dinner and auction. She was a cruise greeter as guests boarded Nanticoke of the Seas and displayed the live auction items during the bidding. At left is the MG Midget MK1, donated by Cherryl Peterson and Carol Greene of Bridgeville. The car was purchased by Jeff and Ronda Banning of Seaford. Plans are already underway for the 2011 dinner and auction, which will be celebrating 25 years. Photos by Bryant Richardson

Mother’s Day May 9th

Color Your World

Dazzle Her Day! LAUREL, DE SALISBURY, MD OCEAN PINES, MD

302

875-7600

Toll Free 800-252-8897

204 Delaware Ave. Next to Towne Pkg. Store Mon. - Fri. 9am - 5pm, Sat. 9am - 1pm

WWW.KITTYSFLOWERS.COM

with annuals, perennials, bedding plants, hanging baskets, vegetable plants, vegetable seed, berry bushes and more. GREAT PRICES HUGE SELECTION

Ed Collins’ GREENHOUSES TonhTeheBSheorse t

Near Preston, MD Open Mon.-Sat. 9-5, Closed Sunday

Call 410-673-7361 for directions or visit our website www.edcollinsgreenhouses.com


MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR- Mike Smith, president of Nanticoke Little League, presents Mike Kraft, left, with the 2009 Nanticoke Little League Volunteer of the Year award during Saturday’s opening ceremony. Photo by Lynn Schofer

PAGE 45

FIRST PITCH- Josh Bell throws out the first pitch during the Woodbridge Little League opening day ceremony which took place last Saturday in Bridgeville. Photo by Mike McClure

JUNIOR LEAGUE CHAMPS- Shown (not in order) is the Nanticoke Junior League allstar baseball team which won the District III championship last year: Anthony Johnston, Cameron Satchell, Cody Herr, Danny Rayne, Dustin Seymore, Evan Absher, Jeremy Elliott, Jordan Stanley, Kyle Mister, Miguel Hernandez, Nick Usilton, Scott Donovan, Tyler Waggoner, Zachary Garand, coaches Chad Herr and Steve Mullin, and manager Frank Garand. Photo by Lynn Schofer RETURN HIT-

TOP SELLERS- Shown with Woodbridge Little League volunteer Jose Vazquez are fundraiser top sellers Nicolas Messick, left, and Kristen Reid and R.J. French. Photo by Mike McClure

seafordstar.com

Dustin Venables returns a backhand in the second doubles match against Caesar Rodney on Monday. Venables and Zak Parks won their match but the Blue Jays fell, 3-2. See story on page 51. Photo by Lynn Schofer


PAGE 46

      MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

Vince Borders flies over the High Jump bar at the Greenwood Mennonite School Track Invitational. Borders won the event with a jump of 5’8”.

Greenwood Mennonite School hosts track invitational

Students from nine schools (grades 6-12) participated in the Greenwood Mennonite School Track Invitational on April 19. The results for GMS are: Junior High girls: Sherissa Gehman and Shannon Hill placed second and third respectively in high jump. Senior High girls: The GMS team placed second overall. Amy Jones placed second in 100 Meters with a time of 14.58; Olivia Davis finished first in high jump (4’ 2”); Jones came in first in the long jump (13’ 3 1⁄4”); and Laura Van Kampen finished second in the long jump (13’ 2”). The 400 meter relay team of Van Kampen, Jones, Davis and Terra Tatman placed second with a time of 1:00.51. Senior High boys: The GMS boys placed third overall. Vince Borders placed first in the long jump (16’ 11 1/2”); Joel Bontrager was second in the long jump (14’ 11 3/4”); Borders came in first in the high jump (5’ 8”); Ricky Anderson finished third in the 100 meters (12.34); Cody Bowman was first in the shot put with a throw of 35’ 10 1/4”; DJ Sharp placed second in the shot put with a throw of 35’ 4 1/2” and came in first in the discus with a throw of 91’11”; and Bowman came in second in the discus with a throw of 91’ 1”.

FIRST TITLE- The Delmarva Drillers 11U baseball team won the Second Annual Backyard Brawl in Laurel last weekend. The Drillers won three games on Sunday to win their first championship of the season. The team topped the Diamond Dreams OE, 11-1; the Diamond Dreams Shockley, 4-2; and defeated the Delaware Rebels, 13-5, in the championship.

SHORE THUNDER DAWGS- Shown (l to r) are members of the 10U Shore Thunder Dawgs, which won the Second Annual Back Yard Brawl Travel Ball Tournament last weekend: back row- Braham Walridge, Perez Nichols, Eric Nichols, head coach Scott Venables; middle row- Perez Nichols Jr., Austin Venables, Mitchell Moyer, Cory Evans, Noah Walridge; bottom- Mike Covey, Gage Wootten, K-ci Widdawson, and Dustin Rolph.

SEAFORD TRACK- Lashonda Lawson of Seaford throws the discus during her team’s home meet last Friday. Lawson and the other senior members of the track and field team were honored prior to the Blue Jays’ final home meet. Photo by S.D. Smith

STAR SPORTS- Laurel’s Paul Elliott, left, delivers a pitch during last Thursday’s home game while Seaford pole vaulter Zach Hearn is shown in action during last Friday’s meet. Photos by Mike McClure and S.D. Smith


MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

PAGE 47

Seaford Stars of the Week

Female Co-Athlete of the Week- Leslie Deroche

Woodbridge’s Leslie Deroche netted one of her team’s two second half goals in a win over Lake Forest last Tuesday. DeRoche also had three goals in a home win over Laurel on Thursday.

Seaford pitcher Katie Hitch comes home with a pitch during last Thursday’s home loss to Dover. Hitch allowed two runs on four hits and doubled for the Blue Jays. Photo by Mike McClure

Seaford softball team unable to come back in loss to Dover

The Seaford varsity softball team scored a run in the bottom of the third inning during last Thursday’s home game against Dover, but the Senators scored two in the fifth for the 2-1 win. Katie Hitch doubled and allowed two runs on four hits in the loss.

Female Co-Athlete of the Week- Maria DeMott- Seaford

Seaford’s Maria DeMott scored two goals and dished out two assists in her team’s win over Laurel last Tuesday. Honorable mention- Danielle Griffin- Woodbridge; Katie Hitch- Seaford; Haley Quillen- Seaford; Rachel Doyon- Woodbridge; Ivana DeShields- Woodbridge; Savannah Jones- Seaford; Macey Cordrey- Seaford; Elizabeth Perciful- Seaford; Kellen Cannon- Sussex Tech; Maxine Fluharty- Sussex Tech; Sarah Samaha- Sussex Tech; Katina Stamat- Sussex Tech; Amber Callahan- Sussex Tech; Emily PentoneyDelmarva Christian; Emily Ritter- Sussex Tech; Paige Morris- Sussex Tech; Andre Washington- Seaford; Jordan Stanley- Seaford; Anthony Johnston- Seaford; Micah Idler- Woodbridge; C.J. Pleasants- Woodbridge; Adam Caldwell- Seaford; Ethan Lee- Seaford; Phillip DeMott- Seaford; Cory Darden- Seaford; Tyrek Camper- Seaford; Zak Parks- Seaford; Dustin Venables- Seaford; Vincent Glover- Seaford; Lee Mayer- Seaford; George Blanchard- Seaford; Patrick Davis- Woodbridge; Korian Majette- Woodbridge; Dustin Miller- Sussex Tech; Tim Gaskin- Sussex Tech; Shane Marvel- Sussex Tech; James Smith- Sussex Tech; Justin Allen- Sussex Tech; Eric Sharff- Sussex Tech; John Powell- Sussex Tech; Casey Zitvogel- Delmarva Christian; Tyler Troyer- Delmarva Christian; Jamie Price- Sussex Tech

CONGRATULATES

THE ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

SEAFORD 629-6003 LAUREL 875-4477

HOURS: SEAFORD 5:30 AM - 11 PM LAUREL 10 AM - 10 PM

Woodbridge baseball team falls to Milford in final innings The Woodbridge varsity baseball team lost to Milford, 16-9, last Friday after scoring six runs in the bottom of the fifth to knot the score at 9-9. Milford answered with four in the sixth and three in the seventh for the win. C.J. Pleasants had two hits and Trez’mon Kane-Grant had two RBIs for the Raiders.

Seaford baseball team loses home contest against Dover

The Seaford varsity baseball team fell to Dover, 18-0, in a home contest last Thursday. Jordan Stanley and Anthony Johnston had hits for the Blue Jays.

Seaford girls’ tennis team tops Lake Forest, 4-1 Seaford shortstop Haley Quillen steals second base during her team’s 2-1 loss to Dover last week. Photo by Mike McClure

Woodbridge softball team falls to Milford, 15-3 The Woodbridge varsity softball team lost to Milford, 15-3, last Friday. Danielle Griffin struck out seven for the Raiders. Griffin, Morgan Parker, and Amanda Hutchison scored runs for Woodbridge.

Subscribe to the Star for the best local sports coverage.

The Seaford varsity girls’ tennis team defeated Lake Forest, 4-1, last Thursday in Seaford. The win gave the team its second victory of the season. Whitney Wright won the first singles match, 6-4, 6-4; Emily Phifer took second singles, 6-4, 6-2; and Beatriz Gomez won third singles, 6-0, 4-6, 6-1. Seaford’s first doubles team of Victoria Popova and Jessica Phifer also won (6-2, 6-0) while the the second doubles team of Daniella Hernandez and Miranda Mitan was edged, 7-6 (7-2), 6-4.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.


PAGE 48

  MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

MAKING THE LEAP- Seaford’s Lee Mayer leaps over the bar during the high jump competition at last Friday’s home meet against Milford. Photo by S.D. Smith

Seaford boys’ track team loses to Milford, 108-38 The Seaford varsity boys’ track team lost to Milford, 108-38, last Friday in Seaford. Vincent Glover won the 100 meter run (11.1), Lee Mayer placed first in the 300 meter hurdles (41.7), Cody Revel came in first in the long jump (18’ 8”), George Blanchard finished first in the shot put (44’ 8”), and Zach Hearn won the pole vault (13’).

Seaford girls’ track and field team drops meet to Milford The Seaford varsity girls’ track and field team lost to Milford, 100-38, last Friday in Seaford. Elizabeth Perciful won the 3,200 meter run (16:47); the Blue Jays; 3,200 meter team of Alfreline Cetoute, Marie Bien-Aime, Cindy Lamontagne, Christina Albury placed first with a time of 13:09.5 and the 1,600 meter relay team (Eugenie Gabriel, Bien-Aime, Alexis Spence, Kyra Hanzer) came in first with a time of 4:59.4.

Seaford, Woodbridge track and field teams visit Caesar Rodney The Seaford and Woodbridge track and field teams visited Caesar Rodney High School last Tuesday for a meet. The boys’ results follow (no results were submitted from the girls’ meet): Caesar Rodney 101, Seaford 45; Caesar Rodney 128, Woodbridge 17- 100- 1. Vincent Glover, Seaford, 11.2; 400- Korian Majette, Woodbridge, 53.5; 300 hurdlesLee Mayer, Seaford, 42.1; 200- Rashawn Church, Seaford, 23.2; high jump- Mayer, Seaford, 5’ 10”; pole vault- Patrick Davis, Woodbridge, 11’ 6”; shot put- George Blanchard, Seaford, 42’ 10

TAKING A CUT- Seaford’s Katie Hickey takes a cut during her team’s home softball game against Dover. Photo by Mike McClure

Woodbridge girls’ soccer team defeats Laurel, 8-1 The Woodbridge varsity girls’ soccer team picked up an 8-1 win over Laurel last Thursday in Bridgeville. In the first half, Ivanna DeShields scored two goals and Kaylee Metzger and Leslie Deroche each had one goal. DeRoche netted a pair of second half goals and DeShields and Metzger each had a goal. DeRoche and DeShields scored three goals and Metzger had two in the Raiders’ win. Woodbridge took 38 shots on goal and had a 4-1 edge in corner kicks.

Woodbridge varsity golf team loses to Caesar Rodney The Woodbridge varsity golf team fell to Caesar Rodney, 162-237, last Thursday at Wild Quail Country Club. Eric Pearson and Terrence Roberts each shot a 61 and Kara Dunnigan added a 62 for Woodbridge.

Seaford golf team falls to Milford in road match The Seaford varsity golf team lost to Milford, 179-211, last Thursday at the Shawnee Country Club. Adam Caldwell led the Blue Jays with a 45, Josh Hamilton shot a 53, Tyriek Merritt had a 56, and Justin Elliott added a 57.

HATS OFFNanticoke Little League players toss the hats in the air at the end of the league’s opening day ceremony which took place last Saturday in Seaford. Photo by Lynn Schofer OPENING DAY- Ethan Bender, right, caught the first pitch from Josh Bell during the Woodbridge Little League opening day ceremony. Photo by Mike McClure


MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

PAGE 49

YOUR NEWSPAPER ... STILL THE BEST BUY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD.

In today’s world, fifty cents doesn’t buy a heck of a lot — except of course, when it comes to your newspaper. For less than the cost of a bus ride, you can get word from across town or across the nation. For less than the price of a cup of coffee, you can get your fill of food, politics, or whatever else News is your cup of Seaford school News referendum tea. From passes 475-222 cover to cover, Sports Laurel School Board plans to hold your newspaper public meetings on referendum is still the most Sports “streetwise” buy Inside in town! VOL. 14 NO. 37

hEROES - Desire to help youth excel in life is John’s goal. Page 8

COUNCIL RACE - Seaford City Council election Saturday. Page 5

at RISK - DOE’s Business in Education program may be cut next year. Page 5

HEROES - Desire to help youth excel in life is John’s goal. Page 8

By Lynn R. Parks

BRIDGE - Public invited to ‘open house’ of Indian River Bridge project. Page 11

SCAMS - IRS says to be aware of these latest tax scams. Page 14 ENFORCEMENT - OHS and State Police partner on speed enforcement initiative. Page 15

GREEN - Del Tech’s first Energy House to be built on Georgetown campus. Page 28

FINAL WORD - What is your share of the national debt? The answer may shock you. Page 51

BRIDGEVILLE CELEBRATES - Fire company member Doug Jones drives the Bridgeville volunteer Fire Company’s 1936 REO Speedwagon fire engine in the Bridgeville volunteer Fire Company’s 100th anniversary parade. Story and related photos about Saturday’s celebration on page 47. Photo by Lynn Parks

BURGESS INvITATIONAL - The Seaford, Woodbridge, and Sussex Tech track and field teams take part in the Keith S. Burgess Invitational. Page 39

BACK IN ACTION - The local high school teams return to action this week. See page 42 for results from Mondays and Tuesdays games.

STARS - A baseball player and a track and field athlete are this week’s Seaford Stars of the Week. Page 41

Contact us

Subscriptions

kcherrix@mspublications.com

Seaford Star Sports

mmcclure@mspublications.com sales@mspublications.com

Seaford and Laurel Star Bridgeville Food lion royal Farms Yoders Shore Stop greenwood Craft deli dollar general delmar Stop & Shop Boulevard Beer rite aid dough Boys Happy Harrys X-press Food mart Food lion Bi-State Pharmacy SPRING SPORTS- Shown (clockwise from top left) are scenes from the high school spring sports season: Seaford’s Eddie Hicks awaits the pitch; Seaford second baseman Katie Wesselhoff nabs a infield fly ball on the run to prevent a run from scoring; Seaford’s Whitney Wright competes in a first singles match; Woodbridge’s Dixie Magadan heads the ball; and the Raiders’ Ivana DeShields throws the ball in. Photos by Lynn Schofer and Mike McClure

Business Report

Bulletin Board Business ChurCh Classifieds eduCation final Word Gas lines Gourmet health letters lynn Parks movies oBituaries oPen houses PoliCe Puzzles sPorts tides tony Windsor

BRIDgE - Public invited to ‘open house’ of Indian River Bridge project. Page 11

The Seaford School District got an OK says to be aware of these latest SCaMS - IRS taxhike scams. Page from its residents for a tax to pay for14 gOIn’ WEStERn - The Laurel Lions show band practices for their 49th annual variety show, “Lets Go Western,” which will new roofs and elevators. Tuesday’s referbe held April 22 - 24 at 7:30 p.m. at the high school. From left are Jim Littleton on drums, Linda Premo on piano, Bob Murphy on guitar and Cheryl Jones on keyboard. Jeff Premo on saxophone is not pictured. Tickets are $6 for adults and $5 for youngins endum won with 68 percent of the vote. (under 12). Nearly 700 people voted in the referendum, according to unofficial results posted laDy BullDOgS - The Laurel varsity softball by the Sussex County Department of Electeam hosted Caravel last Thursday in a non-confertions. Of those, 475 voted for battle. the measure ence Page 39 and 222 voted against. BaCK aCtIOn - The local high school teams “We won!!!” said an e-mail sentInout by returned to action this week following spring break. district spokeswoman Bonnie Johnson. See page 43 for results from Monday and Tuesday’s games.in the disFor the average homeowner trict, approval of the referendum will StaRS OFmean thE WEEK- A Laurel varsity softball By Mike McClure meaning Laurel would have to start the trict’s current facilities. That study was an additional $10 a year.player Property andowners a Laurel track and field athlete are this process of requesting state funding all commissioned by the Laurel School The Laurel School Board met last week’s Laurel Stars of the Week. Page 41 pay school taxes based on county assessover again at the end of the year. District and was conducted by Studio Thursday afternoon to discuss the Discussion of the current plan and JAED, a third party architect and engiments. Average property assessment in the major capital improvement plan which the scheduling of a new referendum neering firm. failed, 1444-1241, in a vote on March district is about $16,000. each died for lack of a motion during According to Marinucci, if the cost 31 and to act on a possible second refContact The additional revenue will helpus pay INSIDE of renovating a school is 50 percent of erendum. In the end, the board chose to Thursday’s meeting. The district plans for new roofs for Central Elementary, Seato hold a pair of public hearings in the the cost to build a new one or more, get more input from the public before Subscriptions Bulletin Board 16 future. the state asks districts to build new ford Middle and West Seaford Elementary setting a second and final vote. kcherrix@mspublications.com Business 6 “If the majority wants us to come facilities (unless the structure has hisschools, as well as a new roof for the gym The Laurel School District had the back with the same thing (plan) we toric, cultural, or architectural signifiChurCh 21 option of sending the proposed plan, LaurelItStar at the Seaford Middle School. will News also will. I’m not saying we will do that,” cance). The district planned to retain which included the construction of a Classifieds 30 pay to replace elevatorseditor@mspublications.com in Seaford Middle said Laurel School Board President the 1920’s/30’s section of the middle middle school/high school complex eduCation 36 Jerry White. “We will not be shooting school and build four new schools with School and Seaford High School. and elementary school complex, back Laurel Star Sports final Word 51 for a May 20 referendum.” the middle school and high school and The state will pay 73sports@mspublications.com percent of the to the public in mid May. A successful John Marinucci, Education the two elementary schools each sharGas lines 36 referendum could have meant funding cost of the roof replacement and elevator Associate for Facility Planning ing a complex. Gourmet 38 in the FY 2011 state budget, but an Advertising projects. and Management with the state “The cost to renovate in some cases unsuccessful one would have sent the sales@mspublications.com health 24 Department of Education (DOE), was The district will also build a wing on were actually above the cost of a new board back to the drawing board. l etters 50 on hand to explain the process and to school,” Marinucci said. “Going from Central Elementary School to accommoSchool districts can only send an Business Report answer residents’ questions. Marinucci lynn Parks 29 four buildings to three buildings would issue to referendum twice in a 12 date elementary studentsbusinessreport@mspublications.com who are orthopediscussed the study that was used to save money.” mike Barton 49 month period and the district’s cerdically handicapped. Those students curdetermine the need to build new buildBusiness Journal tificates of necessity run out Oct. 31, movies 7 Continued on page 4 rently meet in four classrooms in Frederick ings rather than renovating the disbrichardson@mspublications.com oBituaries 22 Douglass Elementary School. The state oPen houses 10 will pay 100 percent of the cost of that PoliCe 12 construction. Puzzles 20 Screenings and Total project cost will be about $6.6 soCials 49 Health Symposium Activities for the million. Of that, the district will pay 9am - 2pm s Ports 39-45 $1.172 million and the state the balance. ENTIRE family. tides 44 Atlanta Road Alliance Church, Seaford, DE tony Windsor 37 FREE Snack Bag - Information Booths - Door Prizes

16-19 6 21-22 30-35 36 51 SEAFORD CELEBRATES - State Rep. Danny Short presents the Seaford 36 volunteer Fire Department’s Ladies Auxiliary with a proclamation from the House of Representatives in recognition of their 75th anniversary. The presenta38 tion was made during SvFD’s annual banquet. Receiving the proclamation are 24-27 Ginny Tice (left), vice president, and Donna Bennett, president of the auxiliary. 50 More photos from the banquet on pages 46 and 48. Photo by Chuck Snyder 29 7 22 10 Screenings 12 Health Symposium 20 9am - 2pm 39-45 44Atlanta Road Alliance Church, Seaford, DE 37FREE Snack Bag - Information Booths - Door Prizes

NEWSSTAND LOCATIONS

Seaford Star News

editor@mspublications.com

Advertising

50 cents

KIDS FIRSt - Children’s health is the focus of two weekend events. Page 3

KIDS FIRST - Children’s health is the focus of two weekend events. Page 3

CLASS PLAY - Seaford Middle School students presenting Beauty and the Beast Jr. musical. Page 49

THURSDAY, APRIL 15, 2010

ItalIan nIght - The Laurel Fire Department Auxiliary hold their first Italian Night on April 17. 50 will cents The buffet will be at the fire hall on 205 W. Tenth Street, from 5 - 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 per person or $25 per couple. Children 10 and under are free. For tickets contact Ann at 875-4789 or Sandy at 875-2164.

THURSDAY, ApRil 15, 2010

vol. 14 No. 51

businessreport@mspublications.com

Business Journal

brichardson@mspublications.com

“A Healthy Family Affair” MAY 1, 2010

“A Healthy Family Affair” MAY 1, 2010

and

geOrgeTOWN Bodies market laurel ram deli Shore Stop Britts’ rite aid Stop & Shop Food lion dollar general Bargain Bills laurel exxon royal Farms Sandy Fork Sussex machine Works

NEW LOCATION

SeaFOrd rite aid Shore Stop dollar general Super Soda Center royal Farms uncle Willies Frans dairy de-lux dairy middleford deli

if you are a business and would like to sell the Seaford or laurel Star, call 302-629-9788.

DELMAR

WAWA


PAGE 50

     MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

Delaware Technical and Community College baseball wins four games

The Delaware Technical and Community College- Owens campus baseball team won four of six games in last week’s action. The Roadrunners split a doubleheader with Cecil Community College on Friday. Del Tech won the first game, 15-10, as Kyle Lindstrom went 3-5 with a double and an RBI and Tony Messina homered. Lindstrom went 4-5 with a double and an RBI, Luis Barrientos hit a home run and drove in three, and Eric Reiske went 3-4 with a double in Del Tech’s 8-7 loss in game two. Delaware Tech won both ends of a doubleheader against Burlington County College on Saturday. J.R. Reeser allowed to runs and struck out four in seven inning and Lindstrom had two hits including a double and drove in a run in the 3-2 win in game one. The Roadrunners added an 8-5 victory in game two behind a pinch hit grand slam by Cory Hendrick in the seventh inning. Jordan Fisher also went 2-5 with a double and two RBIs. On Sunday, Del Tech won the opening game against Montgomery Germantown, 7-2. Messina allowed no runs and four hits and struck out six in five innings for the win. Sammy Farnell went 2-3 with a home run and three RBIS. Barrientos homered in his team’s 4-3 loss in the night cap.

Delaware Technical and Community College softball splits doubleheader The Delaware Technical and Community College- Owens campus softball team split a doubleheader last Saturday. The Roadrunners fell to Burlington College, 14-3, in game one. Leah Bowman went 2-2 with a triple and an RBI; Ashley Ivory doubled and drove in a run; Kristine Jackson was 2-3 with a double and two RBIs; and Megan Bilbrough tripled and knocked in a run in the loss. Del Tech bounced back with a 7-5 win in the second game as Hannah Rust earned the win and Bilbrough and Jackson each had a pair of hits.

Woodbridge softball team tops Delmarva Christian, 11-1

The Woodbridge varsity softball team defeated Delmarva Christian, 11-1, in a nonconference home game last Thursday. Danielle Griffin struck out 14 in five innings and Alicia Hashman scored three runs for the Raiders. Emily Pentoney paced the Royals with a hit and a run. Delmarva Christian baseball team defeats Woodbridge, 11-1- The Delmarva Christian varsity baseball team handed Woodbridge an 11-1 non-conference loss last Thursday in Bridgeville. Tyler Troyer had two hits and two RBIs, Aaron Moore went 2-3 with three RBIs and allowed one run on five hits on the mound, Evan Urgo collected two hits including an RBI single, and Casey Zitvogel doubled for the Royals. Trevor Wescott singled in a run and C.J. Pleasants doubled for the Raiders.

Zitvogel collects three hits for Delmarva Christian in loss

Delmarva Christian’s Casey Zitvogel had three hits in his team’s 15-1 loss to Red Lion last Wednesday. Tyler Troyer also doubled for the Royals. Delmarva Christian boys’ lacrosse team edged by Red Lion- The Delmarva Christian boys’ lacrosse team lost to Red Lion, 11-10, last Wednesday in Georgetown. Tom Catalfamo recorded five goals and James Mohr made 15 saves for the Royals in the loss. Delmarva Christian boys’ lacrosse team falls to Salisbury School- Tom Catalfamo netted four goals in the Delmarva Christian boys’ lacrosse team’s 13-4 loss to Salisbury School last Friday. James Mohr recorded 16 saves for the Royals. Delmarva Christian girls’ lacrosse picks up win over Red Lion- The Delmarva Christian girls’ lacrosse team defeated Red Lion, 8-3, last Wednesday in Georgetown. Jessica Stratton had three goals and an assist; Lexi Shaub netted two goals; and Christie Betts, Olivia Esposito, and Sarah Betts added goals.

OLD Address

CHANGE YOUR ADDRESS TODAY. DON’T HESITATE! Name: _________________________________________ Old Address: ____________________________________

By Mike McClure The Sussex Tech varsity girls’ lacrosse team defeated St. Thomas More and lost to Ursuline in games last week. The Ravens picked up a 15-11 win over St. Thomas More, 15-11, last Thursday as Maxine Fluharty contributed six goals and two assists, Kellen Cannon had three goals and an assist, and Haley Clayton-Moyer and Heidi Perez each had a pair of goals. Taylor Kieffer added one goal and one assist and Taylor Quillen had a goal in the win. Sussex Tech lost to Ursuline, 18-10, on Friday. Fluharty scored four goals, Cannon had three goals and an assist, Moyer netted two goals and dished out an assist, Quillen scored a goal, and Hannah Small had an assist. Boys’ track team tops Polytech, loses to Lake Forest- The Sussex Tech boys’ track team defeated Polytech, 90-49, and lost to Lake Forest, 92-62, in a tri-meet last Tuesday. Jamie Price placed first in the 1,600 meter run (4:56) and the 3,200 meter run (11:24), Aaron Betts won the 800 meter run (2:03), and Dylan Pepper came in first in the pole vault (11í). The Ravens’ 3,200 meter relay team of Betts, Beau Warrington, Ricky Hernandez, and Price also placed first with a time of 8:49. Lady Ravens earn a pair of wins- The Sussex Tech girls’ track team defeated Polytech, 79-54, and Lake Forest, 80-66, in last Tuesday’s meet. Sussex Tech’s Emily Ritter placed first in the 1,600 (5:56) and the 800 (2:38); Isabel Wharton won the 3,200 meter run (12:31); Paige Morris came in first in the shot put (37’ 1”), discus (94’), and the long jump (17’ 4”), Whitney Handy won the 400 (1:00.6), and Shani Wells finished first in the high jump (4’ 10”). Sussex Tech also won the 3,200, 1,600, and 400 relays. Sussex Tech baseball team picks up a pair of wins- The Sussex Tech varsity baseball team defeated conference foes Indian River and Lake Forest before being edged by Caravel in a non-conference contest last week. The Ravens topped Indian River, 17-4, last Wednesday as Justin Allen collected three hits including a home run and scored three runs; James Smith had three hits, four runs, and two RBIs; and Shane Marvel added three hits including a pair of triples and had three RBIs and four runs. Scott Smart also collected four hits including a double and knocked in a pair of runs. Allen went 3-3 with two triples, a home run, three runs, and three RBIs in Sussex Tech’s 11-2 win over Lake Forest on Thursday. Eric Sharff also had two hits and Smith notched 17 strikeouts in the victory. On Friday, Sussex Tech scored one run in the fourth for a 3-2 lead over Caravel. The Bucs scored three in the fifth and the Ravens came back with one in the sixth but fell, 5-4. Sharff had three hits including a double and a home run and Hunter Absher collected a pair of doubles and drove in a run to help his own cause. Boys’ lacrosse nets three wins- The Sussex Tech varsity boys’ lacrosse team defeated Sussex Central, Appoquinimink, and Concord in games last week. The Ravens topped rival Sussex Central, 20-2, on Wednesday behind eight goals by John Powell. Quinn Stewart had one goal and six assists, and Drew Stewart and Ben Bateman each added two goals and two assists. Dylan Fox made six saves in the win. Sussex Tech also outscored Appoquinimink, 18-1, on Thursday. Powell had four goals and two assists and Jordan Dill netted four goals. The Ravens edged Concord, 7-6, on Friday after taking a 3-1 lead into half-time. Bateman netted two goals; Drew Stewart had one goal and one assist; and David Fluharty, Powell, Jacob Bernier, and Orlando Theiss each had a goal. Fox also made 16 saves in the win. Varsity softball team earns pair of conference wins- The Sussex Tech varsity softball team defeated Indian River and Lake Forest in game last week. On Wednesday, Amber Callahan went 3-3 with three runs and two RBIs; Logan Pavlik had two hits and two RBIs; Devon Bitler scored three runs; and Cassidy Taylor in Sussex Tech’s 13-1 win over Indian River. Kim Smith allowed one run on two hits in the win. The Ravens held off the Spartans, 5-4, on Thursday. Kelsey Doherty had two hits including a home run and drove in two; Melissa Trout had two hits and an RBI; and Cassidy Taylor tripled and drove in a pair of runs. Girls’ soccer team ties Concord- The Sussex Tech girls’ soccer team lost to Smyrna, 2-0, and tied Concord in games last week. Maggie Lee made four saves in the loss to Smyrna and had five saves in the scoreless contest against Concord. Gaskin leads golf team to win- Sussex Tech’s Tim Gaskin was the medalist with a score of 41 in his team’s 179-195 win over Indian River last Thursday. Dustin Miller and Josh Mohun each shot a 45 and Trey Jewell and Ryan Fletcher shot 48 apiece.

LetTony TonyWindsor Windsor perform perform for Let foryour yourevent event! Tony Windsor

_______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ NEW Address

MOVING?

Covering all the local sports teams- the Seaford/Laurel Star.

Raven Roundup- Sussex Tech track teams host tri-meet

Name: _________________________________________ New Address: ___________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________

Mail to the Seaford/Laurel Star Circulation, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE or call Karen direct at 752-4454

Guaranteed affordable! Portions of proceeds will benefit the Newspapers in Education program.

Tony TonyWindsor Windsorisisaccepting accepting bookings for entertaining any bookings for entertaining size from the living anyevent, size event, from the room to the great outdoors! living room to the great outdoors! Singing classic Singing classic country and country and rock, with rock, with special 50s, 60s special 50s, 60s and 70s and 70s hits! hits! Also, gospel and Also, gospel and holiday music holiday music available. available. Booking now for Christmas parties and beyond. Call: Booking now for 2010. 302-236-9886 forfor info. Call 302-236-9886 info.


MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

Star Monday/Tuesday high school sports scoreboard

Girls’ soccer- Sussex Tech 11, Laurel 1 (Monday)- Katina Stamat and Amanda Sava each had a pair of goals to help lead the Ravens. Sophie Ilera netted a goal for Laurel. Lake Forest 3, Woodbridge 2 (Monday)- Ivana DeShields tallied a pair of goals and Megan Sirkis made 11 saves for the Raiders. Polytech 6, Woodbridge 1- Kim Albanese scored on a penalty kick for Woodbridge. Delmar 10, Laurel 2- No information provided. Milford 2, Sussex Tech 1- No additional information provided. Golf- Delmar 184, Layton Prep 259 (Monday)- Corey Phillips was the medalist with a 44 and Josh Wood and Jonah Vincent each shot a 47. Sussex Tech 173, Lake Forest 173 (Monday)- Sussex Tech’s Dustin Miller was a co-medalist with a score of 40. Woodbridge 203, Seaford 225- Seaford’s Adam Caldwell was the medalist with a 41 while Colby Christopher paced the Raiders with a 49. Caesar Rodney 159, Delmar 203- Corey Phillips shot a 42 for Delmar. Caesar Rodney 159, Laurel 201- Eric Hastings had a 46 and Colby Watts chipped in with a 47 for the Bulldogs. Baseball- Red Lion Christian 7, Delmarva Christian 1 (Monday)- Casey Zitvogel collected a pair of hits including a double for the Royals. Sussex Central 10, Woodbridge 7- Trez’mon Kane-Grant homered and C.J. Pleasants doubled in the loss. Lake Forest 11, Seaford 1- Ryan Shockley singled in a run for the Blue Jays. Sussex Tech 11, Delmar 1- No information provided. Softball- Laurel 14, Cape Henlopen 0- Brooke Evans collected three hits and drove in a pair of runs, Kelsey Oliphant went 2-5 with four runs, and Jenna Cahall had two hits including a double and drove in three for Laurel. Kelsey Willey and Breada Boyce added a hit and two RBIS and Alexis Hudson and Logan Green each had a hit. Stephanie Wheatley (six strikeouts) and Logan Green (four strikeouts) combined to toss a three-hit shutout. Sussex Central 5, Woodbridge 0- Danielle Griffin recorded 12 strikeouts for the Raiders. Lake Forest 14, Seaford 4- Seaford’s Brittany Walters went 3-3 in the loss. Wilmington Christian 12, Delmarva Christian 10- Emily Pentoney doubled and homered to lead the Lady Royals. Sussex Tech 1, Delmar 0- No information was provided. Boys’ lacrosse- Sussex Tech 17, Salisbury School 3 (Monday)- Drew Stewart netted five goals, John Powell had four goals, and David Fluharty added three goals and three assists for the Ravens. Boys’ tennis- Seaford 5, Polytech 0- Tim Halter, Ethan Lee, Phillip DeMott, Cory Darden and Tyrek Camper, and Zak Parks and Dustin Venables earned wins Boys’ track- Milford 98, Sussex Tech 48 (Monday)- Desmond Sivels placed first in the 100 (11.1), Aaron Betts won the 800 (2:05.6), Emir Laroya took the long jump (22’ 2”), and Tyler Belle came in first in the high jump (6’). Girls’ track- Cape Henlopen 104, Sussex Tech 37; Milford 89, Sussex Tech 55 (Monday)- Paige Morris won the discus (110’ 4”) and Shani Wells came in first in the high jump (5’) for the Ravens. See next week’s Star for Tuesday’s track and field results.

PAGE 51

Seaford varsity boys’ tennis team loses to Caesar Rodney By Lynn Schofer

Seaford High School boys’ tennis coach Phil Burtelle said Monday’s match with Caesar Rodney was very important and the team needed the win. Unfortunately, the Blue Jays fell to CR, 3-2, giving the team their second loss of the season. “They just are not on top of their game, the boys are much better than they are playing today,” Burtelle said during Monday’s match. Tim Halter was hitting the ball hard and seemed at times to be in control of the match but little mistakes were costly and he fell 6-4, 4-6, 6-3. The first doubles team Corey Darden and Tyrek Camper fell in two straight sets, 7-5, 6-4. It would be safe to say that Seaford lost focus on Monday and CR took advantage of Seaford’s mistakes. A solid performance by Phillip DeMott gave Seaford one of the match wins. DeMott lost the first set, regained his composure on the court and won the next two sets 6-4, 6-4. Dustin Venables and Zak Parks won their first set 6-4 and fell victim in the second set, 6-0. The doubles team came back in the third set, 6-4, to win the match. Seaford’s overall record is 9-2. As the Blue Jays go into the final two matches of the season and prepare for tournament play they hope to regain the focus and bring their ”A” game to the courts.

Phillip DeMott fought a battle with CR opponent and needed to put forth an outstanding effort to come back from a 6-2 loss to win his match 2-6, 6-4, 6-4. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Kenny Brightbill captures Kyle Dixon Memorial Race

BULLDOGS AND RAVENS- Laurel’s Taylor Johnson, left, and Sussex Tech’s Leanne Rowe battle for the ball during Monday’s varsity girls’ soccer game in Laurel. Photo by Mike McClure

TIDE CHART

SUDOKU ANSWERS:

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

RESULTS: NAPA Big Block Modified Feature: 1. Kenny Brightbill; 2,. Jamie Mills; 3. Robert Dutton; 4. Matt Jester; 5. Joseph Watson; 6. Norman Short Jr.; 7. Beau Wilkins; 8, Jordan Watson; 9. Tim Trimble; 10. Brad Trice; 11. Scott Van Gorder; 12. Chad Clark; 13. George Richardson; 15. HJ Bunting; 16. Dale Hawkins; DNS: Jeff Brown; Billy Collingsworth. AC Delco Modified Feature: 1. John Curtis; 2. Shawn Ward; 3. Matt Hawkins; 4. Joseph Tracy; 5. Brandon Blades; 6. Danny Smack; 7. Ted Reynolds; 8. Billy Carr; 9. Scott Calhoun; 10. Garrie Bostwick; 11. Westley Smith; 12. Brandon Perdue; 13. Kyle Fuller; 14. Tom Moore; 15. Ryan Anderson; 16. Herbie Hempel; 17. Corey Cohee; 18. Taylor McCracken; 19. Brandon Sturgis; 20. Nate Benson; 21. Greg Taylor Jr.; 22. Scott Hitchens; DNS: Scott Baker Mod Lite Feature: 1. Steve White; 2. Brandon Dennis; 3. Kevin McKinney; 4. Tyler Reed; 5. Curt Miles Jr.; 6. Tim White; 7. Billy Thompson; 8. Chris Jestice; 9. Kirk Miles Sr; 10. Ray Gulliver; 11. Chad Passwaters; 12. Alan Passwaters; 13. Jason Musser; 14. TJ Williams; 15. Scott Tessman; 16. Trent Willey; 17. Shawn Weber; 18. Stacy Roberts; 19. Rick Wheatley; DNS: James Hill

SHARPTOWN

05/07 H-12:31A L-6:58A 05/08 H-1:29A L-7:57A 05/09 05/10 05/11 05/12 05/13

H-2:22A H-3:10A H-3:54A H-4:36A H-5:17A

L-8:50A L-9:38A L-10:22A L-11:04A L-11:46A

H-12:55P L-7:20P H-1:50P L-8:07P H-2:43P H-3:31P H-4:16P H-4:59P H-5:41P

L-8:50P L-9:32P L-10:13P L-10:55P L-11:37P

See more tides at www.saltwatertides.com


PAGE 52

       MORNING STAR • MAY 6 - 12, 2010

Seaford Bowling Lanes

Wednesday AM

Bee Movie 39.5-28.5 Lefty Left 39-29 Seaford Lanes 38.529.5 Lucky Strikes 38-30 Jean and the Guys 36-32 ABC of It 35-33 Two Plus One 33-35 High games and series Brandon Hopkins 330, 774 Paulette Sammons 244 Irene Foxwell 672

Eastern Shore Men

DAZK 28.515.5 Who Cares 24.519.5 3 Men and a Handicap 23-21 Spicer Electric 22-22 Hoobers 20-24

Always Second 19-25 Pain 4 16-28 High games and series Kenneth Garrett 290 Todd James 792

Tuesday Early Mixed

Vacationers 41-23 Down N Out 36-28 Seaford Moose 34.529.5 Empty Pockets 34-30 Killer Bees 31-33 Cross Fire 31-33 Bass Awkwards 31-33 Just Chillin 30-34 B Attitude 27.536.5 Dreamers 24-40 High games and series Buzzy Watson 269, 670 Linda Taylor 250 Erin Baull 675

Seaford City Ruff Ryders

50-18

Seaford Lanes 45-23 Phillips Construction 41-27 Git-R-Done 34-34 Guardian Angels 32.535.5 Palmers Construction 32-36 Easy Pickins 30.537.5 High games and series Garrett Sammons 286 Ronnie Bradley 771 R.A. Jester 771

Christian Fellowship

WWJD 37-19 Grapes of Wrath 37-19 Apostles 37-19 Ten Commandments 33-23 Alpha and Omega 23-33 High games and series Richard Wyatt 270 Jennings Pusey 635 Terri Hayes 232, 628

Friday Trios

3-Da-Hardway 38-18 Norma’s Crew 35-21 Terry’s Tigers 35-21 7-Up 34-22 Woodworkers 33-23 BKB FAB 32-24 Comebacks 30-26 Strikes and Spares 30-26 Three Alive 30-26 James Gang 29-27 Fear the Handicap 27-29 All in the Family 26.529.5 Touch of Class 26-30 Wolf Pack 25.530.5 Sugar and Honey 25-31 Pins Astounding 20-36 The Uh Ohs 18-38 High games and series Michael Pendexter 244 Will Chandler 656 Deborah Hawrylyshyn 254 Ronell Brown 642

SEAFORD BOWLING LANES Home of Galactic BowlinG

629-9778

302

Nylon Capital Shopping Center Seaford, DE

AWARD WINNER- Evan Gallo, right, receives the J.D. Stoker Sportsmanship Award for baseball from Jose Vazquez and Jesse Helmick during the Woodbridge Little League opening day ceremony. Photo by Mike McClure

Shown (l to r) are members of the Seaford High School after school bowling team (team one) which placed first in the Lower Delaware High School Bowling Tournament: Michael Cherrix, Katie Hickey, and Tyrek Camper.

Seaford High Bowling Club places first in Lower Delaware Tournament IN MEMORY- April Fletcher, right, receives the J.D. Stoker Sportsmanship Award for softball from Jesse Helmick. Fletcher accepted the award on behalf of her daughter, the late Jocelyn Butler. Photo by Mike McClure

Delmarva Drillers golf tournament to take place June 19

A golf tournament to benefit the Delmarva Drillers 11U travel baseball team will take place on June 18 at the Wood Creek golf course in Delmar. Registration will take place at 7:30 a.m. with an 8 a.m. start time. The cost is $50 per golfer which includes a buffet lunch. There will also be beer for sale and a 50/50 raffle. Golfers are asked to dress appropriately (collared shirt, slacks, no steel spikes). Proceeds from the event benefit the 1020 Delmarva Drillers. Make checks payable to Delmarva Dawgs. Also, send checks and golfers’ names in groups of four to Delmarva Drillers, 34631 Bi-State Blvd., Laurel, DE 19956. Please contact Shawn Phillips at delmarvadrillers@yahoo.com for more information.

Seaford Recreation Department selling tickets for Orioles-Yankees game

The Seaford Recreation Department is now selling tickets for the organization’s annual Orioles/Yankees trip. The game is on Friday, September 17 at 7 p.m.. The cost of the trip is $65 per ticket and includes great seats to the game and transportation on a charter bus. Call 629-6809 for more information or to reserve your seat.

Seaford High School has been home to an after school bowling club for four years now, and the talent has risen to the top this year. Under advisor Dawn Cherrix, 12 high school and five middle school students have enjoyed the sport of bowling for the past three months with the cooperation of the Seaford Bowling Lanes and its owners Gerald and Paulette Sammons, staunch supporters of a high school bowling program. Last year a Lower Delaware High School Bowling Tournament was held for the first time, and Seaford High had one three-member team participate. This year the Second Annual High School Bowling Tournament was again held at Millsboro Lanes on February 27, and Seaford sent two teams. Team one consisted of Katie Hickey, Tyrek Camper, and Michael Cherrix; team two was made up of Joey Mitchell, Charles Michel, and Aaron Robinson. Both teams represented Seaford High School proudly. Katie Hickey bowled a 255, 201, and 224 for a total of 680 scratch; first year bowler Tyrek Camper bowled a 109, 145, and 144 for a total of 398 scratch; and Michael Cherrix rolled a 206, 169, and 203 for a total of 578 scratch. Their team total was 1656; and with a handicap of 420, their final team score was 2076. This team took first place in the tournament and brought home a large trophy for Seaford High. Also each member will receive an individual trophy. Hickey was the outstanding bowler for the day, having both the high game and series for both men and women. The officers for the club are: president: Michael Cherrix; vice president: Aaron Robinson; secretary: Adrienne Gaydos; and treasurer: Katie Hickey.

This Week in Star Sports History will return next week.


MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

PAGE 53

Mother’s Day recipe for a long and healthy life By Lynn R. Parks

M

argaret Lord Cade’s mother, Helena Lord, died as a young woman, leaving two small children to be cared for by her husband, Joseph Jr. The newly-widowed father was apparently worried that Margaret, who was 3, was sickly, because he started giving her vitamins and raw eggs stirred up in milk. “I was puny as a little girl,” says Cade. “But my father made me healthy. I have taken vitamins ever since.” Cade, who grew up in the Seaford area and lives with her husband, Edwin F. Cade Sr., in Delmar, Del., will be 84 in June. She does all of her own housework and regularly visits the YWCA in Salisbury, where she takes water aerobics. On Sunday, Mother’s Day, she’s not sure what she’ll be doing. She knows she doesn’t want to cook, so dinner out seems probable. And it’s also probable that she’ll gather with some members of her family, including maybe her great-great grandchildren. Cade is the matriarch of a family that extends for five generations. Recently, she and her daughter, granddaughter, great-granddaughter and great-great-granddaughter gathered for a family photo. “It feels pretty good to have such a family,” says Cade. “The Lord has blessed me to live this long. And I’ve got a very nice family. They are happy, loving and kind and always good to me.” “My grandmother is a very strong person,” says Cade’s granddaughter, Lisa

Miller, 44, of Seaford. “And she is the person who holds us all together. I feel very blessed to have so many generations in our family that we can all turn to for support and guidance.” Cade was born in June 1926. Her father owned and operated the Rip Van Winkle restaurant on alternate U.S. 13. Cade attended Seaford schools through the 11th grade, when she dropped out to go to work at the DuPont Co.’s nylon plant near Seaford. She worked there for 18 months, then started her own beautician shop. The Lisa Kay Beauty Salon was located at the corner of Tharp Road and U.S. 13, where the Exxon station now stands. Cade lived in Seaford for 69 years. Fourteen years ago, she and her husband moved to Delmar to be closer to their two children, Edwin Jr. “Eddie,” Delmar, Md., and Kay Curry, 64, who lives in Salisbury and who is Miller’s mother. Eddie has two children. His daughter, Melissa Ashley, Spencer, Va., has two young sons, Xavier and Zander, and his son, Edwin III, Salisbury, has two teenage stepchildren, Emily McIntyre and Jake McIntyre. Miller, 44, who is an only child, lives in Seaford. She has two children, Kristopher Bell and Ericca Petoney, both of Seaford. Ericca, 24, has two children, a son, Aidan Bell, 5, and a daughter, Addison Petoney, 3. Addison represents the fifth generation in the family photograph. While all of the adults in the picture are dressed in black, she is wearing pink. One small hand holds onto her great-great-grandmother’s sleeve.

Addison Petoney, 3, in the front of the photo, is the youngest member of this family, which spans five generations. From left: Addison’s great-grandmother Kay Curry, her great-greatgrandmother, Margaret Lord Cade, her grandmother Lisa Miller and her mother, Ericca Petoney. Photo by Studio Four Photography.

that you can with your life. And always love the Lord. “That is a good recipe for a good life,” she adds. “It has always taken care of me.”

Cade has simple advice for young mothers of today. “Be happy,” she says. “Being happy is the best medicine for whatever’s wrong. Be good. Do the best

The

Hen House

11465 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE (1/2 mi. from Rt. 13) 302-875-6922

7 DAYS A WEEK U-PICK OPEN Hrs: Mon.- Sat. 10-5:30 OR WE PICK Sun. 12-4:00 Everyone Has Fun Picking STRAWBERRIES at the Hen House

Perfect Gifts for Her

sPecial day!

ee S e m o C s New! What’

Over 40 Yankee Fragrances

Mother’s day gift ideas

Bauble & LuLu Interchangeable Beads Large Selection of Garden Flags - New Garden Statuary Colorful Marie Osmond & Donna Sharp Handbags Framed Sentiments - Willow Tree - Spring Wreaths Camille Beckman Bath & Body - Handcrafted Jewelry Jim Shore, Home Grown and Forever in Blue Jeans Collectibles Check our website for valuable coupons -www.thehenhousede.com


Massage Therapy r e h t Mo

y a ’s D

l a i c e 7 or Sat., Ma p y y8 S Ma , Fri.

Off

1/2 Hour

Schedu

$

Or Purchase a

Bellanina Facelift Massage for $65

15 Off 1 Hour

Give your Mom the Gift She Deserves!

(reg. $75)

302-628-6824

Cathie Jo Jones, LMT, NCTMB Jamie Rodocker, LMTech

22585 Bridgeville Hwy., Seaford, DE

we have all of her favorites and a few of our own. Join us for a memorable meal

Kids Menu Available

In Honor of MOM Stuffed Lobster

3 Courses for MoM Tail $1899 soup or salad, Stuffed Snapper $1399 entree & Dessert Prime Rib $999

& Moms get a

complimentary carnation on us

RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED

!

TREAT MOM TO HER FAVORITE

$

SURF & TURF

21 39

99

for one Filet Mignon 1 lb. Lobster 1 Ear of Corn $ 99 Little Red Potatoes for two Steamed Asparagus & 1 Rose NEw ENgLANd CLAM BAkE 2- 1 lb. Lobsters, 1 doz. Clams, $ 99 1 lb. Lg. Shrimp, 2 Ears of Corn, Little Red Potatoes & 1 Rose

39

5 LB. Lg. STEAMEd SHRIMP & 1 Rose

$

59

Local Crab Meat, Chesapeake Blue Crabs (Live or Steamed), Clams, Scallops, Snow and Dungeness Crabs

95

Bring Mom a Rose Courtesy of Bayside Seafood with any Mother’s Day Order

17 Seafood Platters and Homemade Salads

Now Serving Snowballs, Bong Balls, Hand Dipped Ice Cream and Shakes 302

Seafood & Produce

Regular Menu Also Available Call In Orders Welcome

It’s MOM’S DAY Off

875-3639

302

Rt. 13 N. Laurel

Next to Oasis-Hardees Travel Plaza

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

875.0700

Rt.13 North Halfway between Laurel & Seaford We Accept EBT, (Independence Card), VISA & MC

Open MOn-Sat 9 aM - 7 pM, Sunday 9 aM - 5 pM


The Best People In Our Lives, Deserve The Best Things!

Just for Mom!

25% Off

The Bath & Body Shop 628-1601

Wed, Thur, Fri, & Sat 11-4

Happy Mother’s Day - Come to Our CuSTOmer AppreCiATiOn DAy

SATurDAy, mAy 22nD 10-5 1st State Antique Tractor Club on site Free Hot Dogs, CHips & Drinks Rita’s Italian Ice Dan Gaffney from WGMD Live Friday, May 21st 10-12

O’Neal’s Antiques

& Estate Jewelry

Wine Tasting Friday 3-6

Open Tues. thru Sat. 10 am to 5 pm 302875.3391

8

$ 99 1.5

Sutter Home Sweet Red & Wt. Zin.

7

$ 49

Dennis N. O’Neal

1.5

St. Michelle Riesling & Harvest ........ 750 $899 Schmitt Sohne Riesling ................ 1.5 $1499 Little Penquin all Varietals................ 1.5 $899 Lindemans all Varietals ........................ 1.5 $899 Bully Hill Sweet Walter

6 1099 $ 99 8 $ 1299

Red & White.................................................... 750

337 Cab & 181 Merlot ................... 750 Alamos

$ 99

$

chard, Melbec, Torrontes ......................... 750

Moon Mountain cab ..................... 750 Barefoot Bubbly all Varietals

7 7 $ 1099

NEW Moscato & Pinot grigio .................. 750

$ 99 $ 99

Concha Y Toro Frontera............... 1.5 Cavit Pinot grigio ................................. 1.5 Martini & Rosi Asti Spumonte..................................750 $1199 Woodbridge ........................................ 1.5 $1099

109 Central Avenue, Downtown Laurel 302-875-4444

JEWELER

O’Neal’s Jewelry Store

MERNIE’S MARKET D BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS & FLORAL HANGING BASKETS OUR SPECIALTY ASPARAGUS and STRAWBERRIES Vegetables • Fruit • Crafts OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 628-1110

Mon.- Sat. 9-6, Sun. 10-5

1/2 Mi. South of Blades on Rt. 13A

Carry O u Availab t le

Three Olives Vodka ..................... 1.75 $1999 Paul Masson Brandy .................. 1.75 $1699 Jose Cuervo Margaritas Mango & Pomegranate ....................... 1.75

Fire Fly Sweet Tea ...................... 1.75 Bailey Irish Cream ........................... 750 Chambord ............................................. 750 Pinnacle Vodka................................. 1.75 Tanqueray ........................................... 1.75 CLC.............................................................. 1.75 Seagram's VO .................................. 1.75 Jim Beam ............................................... 1.75 Crown Royal ...................................... 1.75 Malibu Rum .......................................... 1.75 MILLER LT & COORS LT.

1399 $ 2699 $ 1999 $ 2499 $ 1599 $ 2999 $ 1249 $ 1799 $ 2299 $ 3999 $ 2099 $

1699+ $ 99+ 6 $ 1299+ $ 1299+ $ 99+ 6 $

lOOSe caSe. ...........................................

EVOLUTION 6 PK BTl. ......................... CORONA, LT 12 PK BTl. .................

MIKES HARD 12 PK. .......................... SAM ADAMS 6 PK.................................. + PLUS DEPOSIT

We’ll MatCh COMpetitOrs lOCal priCes. Just Bring in the ad.

10% Off Mixed Cases Of Wine RegulaR PRice Only.

We reserve the right to limit quantities. Not responsible for typographical errors. Local pricing.

NyloN Package Store 730 Sussex Ave., Seaford, DE (Stein Hwy., Behind PNC Bank) • 302-629-8875

SALE PRICES GOOD THURSDAY, MAY 6 THRU SATURDAY, MAY 15, 2010 THURS. FRI. SAT. SUN. MON. TUES. WED. MAY 6 MAY 7 MAY 8 CLOSED MAY 10 MAY 11 MAY 12 MAY 13 MAY 14 MAY 15

on’t Forge t Mom !

LOCAL

Corner of Rt. 13 & Sycamore Rd, Laurel, Del.

Beringer Wt. Zin. & Pinot Grigio

6999

$

introducing three of our MoSt PoPular StyleS in Sterling Silver.

Body Mists, Eau de Toilette & Eau Fraiche

302

May 9, 2010

Starting at

May 1st - 8th

110 S Conwell St. - Seaford

Mother’s Day

411 N. Central Ave. Laurel, DE 302 877-0660

MOTHER’S DAY SPECIALS

Sunday, May 9th

anyone Homemade JUMBO LUMP (ask who’s tried Crab Cakes - Prime Rib them!)

Se afood Alf redo Supreme Yes - We Se afood Plat ters Still Have Our Pizza Pasta Specials Specials! Homemade Soups

1/2 Price Wine, withp urchase of 2 pasta entrees, on Mother’s Day

Desserts:

RESERVE A TABLE TODAY!

Tiramisu, Cheesecake, Rice Pudding , Cannoli Baklava & Chocolate Cake

Beer & Wine Available


Laurel Dutch Inn South Central Ave., Laurel, DE

Breakfast Buffet $ 7 am - 11 am

699

504 Bridgeville Rd. Seaford, DE 19973

Mother’s Day

302-629-0444 800-492-0444 Fax 302-629-0745

Includes: Eggs, Ham, Pancakes, French Toast, Bacon Scrapple, Sausage, Home Fries, Chip Beef and Beverage

DINNER BUFFET

$

1299

Includes: Turkey, Ham, Baby Pork Ribs, Dressing, Vegetables, Soup, Salad Bar and Beverage Kids 6 & Under Eat FREE Please call ahead to make reservations: 875-7158

Get Hooked on The Freshness

You take care of them

LET US

TAKE CARE OF YOU

INC.

DINNER SPECIALS

Prime Rib ................. $12.99 Petite Delmonico & 1/4lb Steamed Shrimp ....... $14.99 T-Bone Steak ............ $13.99 1/2lb Steamed Shrimp ....................... $9.99 Stuffed Shrimp ......... $15.99 Fried Jumbo Shrimp . $14.99 Fried Seafood Combo ...................... $15.99 Eastern Shore Platter ...................... $14.99 Fried Oysters ............ $11.99 Broiled Scallops ........ $11.99 Stuffed Flounder....... $15.99

629-3244

324 E. Stein Hwy., Seaford

Gift Cuts, Perms, s te a c fi ti r e C Color, Highlighting, Foiling, Facial Waxing, Ear Piercing

MEN • WOMEN • CHILDREN Day & Evening Hours

Walk-Ins Welcome

Mother’s Day

Specials

www.harborhouseseafood.com

Open Sunday, May 9th 10 am - 4 pm Sale Thursday May 6th thru Sunday, May 9th

2500 2 Lbs. Hard $ 00 Crabs Any Size Shrimp 1 OFF $ Clams 25 100 Count Available Now! $ 00 Crab Claws 5 A Bag $ 00 Cold Water Lobster Tails 16 oz. 25 Ea. Lump Crab Meat

$

per lb.

Little Necks or Top Necks

Now Accepting The New Food Stamp Card

Se Habla Español

Specials Include 2 Vegetables

Free Flower for MOM

Thank her for everything she does by treating her to a home-style meal without the usual dishes

with Breakfast

EST.

WEDNESDAY SENIOR NIGHT 10% OFF

BreakfasT Lunch Dinner

1978

SEAFORD 629-6003 LAUREL 875-4477

DINE-IN ONLY

Newly Expanded Seating in Millsboro Now Offering Full Breakfast Menu

MILLSBORO 934-8699

Because She Deserves A Gift Every Week Of The Year, Give Her A Subscription To

The Seaford / Laurel Star

Mother’s Day Subscription Special One-Year Of Home Delivery Plus we’ll send a Gift Card

For Only $21.00 CALL 302-629-9788


MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

PAGE 57

Beware of email hoaxes and don’t pass them on Lawson is in fact just who the e-mail said he is, however he did not send the e-mail

Everyone who owns a computer and an e-mail address most likely receives unsolicited electronic mail. It may be from overzealous marketers and business owners, or perhaps a chain letter warning of health dangers if you break the chain, or a blessing from God if you comply and send the e-mail to multiple friends. Also in the mix are stories appearing to be genuine, issuing an urgent warning to get the posting to as many people as possible to avoid falling into a dangerous life-threatening snare. There have

been warnings of gang related initiation shootings being carried out arbitrarily at the neighborhood Wal-Mart and individuals hiding under store clothing counters slashing the ankles of innocent shoppers as they walk by. There have been reports of business travelers to major cities who have fallen asleep in their motel rooms and awaken to find themselves in bathtubs filled with ice cubes and missing one of their kidneys; reportedly harvested by gangs trafficking in illegal body parts. All of these have one thing in common, they are untrue and nothing more than myths and online hoaxes. Such is the case with a more recent hoax that is making its way over the electronic mail lines of the Intranet. This involves an urgent plea to take heed of a new crime resource known as “Burandango.” The e-mail, which has been

Delaware Technical & Community College, Jack F. Owens Campus will hold its 42nd annual Commencement on Tuesday, May 11, at 6:30 p.m. on the east lawn of the William A. Carter Partnership Center. The speaker will be John A. Martin, vice president and general manager of PATS Aircraft Systems, located in the Sussex County Airpark in Georgetown. An experienced aviation executive, Martin has more than 30 years in the commercial aviation business, previously employed with such companies as Spirit Aerosystems, Aviation Management Systems, and Goodrich Corporation. Ushered seating for commencement will begin at 5 p.m., and a blue ticket is required for all guests sitting under the tent.

Seats cannot be reserved, and ticket holder seats cannot be guaranteed after 6 p.m. Guests without tickets may sit or stand outside the tent or view the ceremony via live television in room 529 in the Carter Partnership Center. The commencement ceremony will be held rain or shine. In case of severe weather, the decision to implement separate indoor commencement ceremonies will be made by 2:30 p.m. The indoor commencement ceremony information will be announced on local radio and television stations or attendees may call the campus Hot Line at 302-856-5555. Receptions for the graduates, their families and friends will be held immediately after Commencement.

By Tony E. Windsor

Delaware Tech, Owens Campus graduation schedule for May 11

Brauncy Lee Jenkins Jr. graduates from Southern Wesleyan University Mr. and Mrs. Brauncy Jenkins are pleased to announce the graduation of their son, Brauncy Lee Jenkins Jr., from Southern Wesleyan Brauncy Lee University in Jenkins Jr. Central South Carolina on May 6, 2010. He earned his B.A. degree in business administration from the school of business with a concentration in marketing.

Jenkins graduated from Seaford Senior High School in 2005. In addition to his studies, he has played two years of collegiate baseball for Clark University in Atlanta Georgia. In his freshman year he became rookie of the year in the SIAC athletic conference at Clark. Jenkins has been in several leadership positions while attending Southern Wesleyan. He has also earned a National Golden Glove Award in 2009 for his defensive skills in center field for Southern Wesleyan University in South Carolina.

received in mass locally, starts with a hook that immediately creates a sense of urgency. It states, People are R E A L L Y crazy! If you are a female, take heed! If you are male and have a significant female in your life who you care about, whether it’s your wife, your girlfriend, your daughter, your sister, your niece, your cousin, your next door neighbor; whomever ... pass this along! Always, “Better safe than sorry!” The e-mail goes on to tell about a woman who is pumping gas at a service station and is approached by a man offering his services as a housepainter. The woman says she does not need a painter, but the stranger gives her a business card anyway. The woman takes the card and gets back into her car and drives off. A short time later she detects a strong odor and begins to feel faint. She notices that the man and a colleague are following her vehicle. Realizing that the odor is coming from the same hand that she accepted the business card with, she becomes fearful that she is indeed the victim of a criminal ploy. She pulls into a neighborhood driveway and begins honking her horn. The men following her hastily drive away. This of course avoids any chance that

there may have been a police incident to report giving this story any concrete credibility. In lieu of this, the e-mail does have an actual law enforcement officer as the individual who has issued this urgent warning about what is called “Burundanga,” which is a drug that is allegedly “four times stronger than a date rape drug and transferrable on simple cards.” In this case, the sender of the e-mail is identified as Detective Michael Lawson of the Wilmington Police Department’s Criminal Investigation Division. Lawson is in fact just who the e-mail said he is, however he did not send the e-mail. On Friday afternoon, April 23, Lawson responded to a call about the veracity of the e-mail. “This email is a hoax and was not disseminated by me,” he said. “This has been circulating for the past three weeks. Please reply to the person that sent it to you and let them know this email is false.” Lawson also made a suggestion that may very well be the first course of action anyone should take before reacting to e-mails which cause immediate alarm and that is to visit the website, www.snopes.com. Snopes. com was started in 1996 by David and Barbara Mikkelson as an “online encyclopedia of myths

and urban legends, building off the couple’s hobby of studying urban legends.” After the attacks of 9-11, conspiracy theorists used the e-mail as a source to promote anti-government sentiments and Snopes.com became a clearinghouse for skeptics seeking to separate reality from hoaxes. In the case of the Burundanga scare, Snopes.com calls it “false.” The site says the hoax dates back as far as May 2008. While the drug burundanga, which contains the alkaloids scopolamine and atropine, is actually used for treatment of such things as Parkinson’s disease, prevention of motion sickness and as a sedative, Snopes.com says the drug must be ingested and is odorless and cannot be transferred through simple exposure to the skin. While the drug burandanga is used illegally as a date rape drug in mainly Columbia, Snopes.com said research indicates no use of the drug in the United States. So, as electronic mail seems to be one of the ever-growing ways to reach friends, family and potential masses of prospective business clients, when it comes to questionable communications like “burundanga on business cards,” when in doubt, check it out. Snopes.com is a good place to start.

Embracing an Active & Worry Free Lifestyle!

. . t A

1203 Walker Road Dover, DE 19904 (302) 735-8800

500 S. Dupont, Milford, DE 19963 (302) 422-8700

With all of the senior housing options available, Assisted Living at Genesis HealthCare provides versatility AND freedom. Our apartments are easy to maintain, convenient, private and secure.

www.genesishcc.com You’ll ask yourself why you didn’t move in sooner. Because when you move into one of our Communities, you wake to a variety of activities and personal support that make each day a pleasure.

Call about our Spring move in Specials


PAGE 58

MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

Will the disaster in the Gulf be a wake-up call? As I write this, millions ynn arks of gallons of oil are drifting We simply cannot be toward the Gulf of Mexico coast, as selfish and greedy the result of the explosion on and as all that oil gushing subsequent sinkinto the Gulf of Mexico ing of the exploratory oil rig would indicate. the Deepwater Horizon. Governors in Florida said advisor David Axelrod. and Louisiana have declared (Meanwhile, I’ll bet BP, which states of emergency. No word on operated the Deepwater Horizon, how the bird, marine mammal and fish populations are handling is still making money. At the end of the most recent quarter, the the disaster. company posted profits of $5.65 More than 6 million gallons billion, a 135 percent jump over of oil have spilled into the Gulf the previous quarter.) already. And oil is still pumping I know what will come next: into the water from the DeepwaPictures, heartbreaking and inter Horizon’s ruptured pipes, at the rate of 850,000 gallons a day. furiating, of birds, coated in oil and unable to fly. Stories from It may be months before the sea anglers whose livelihoods depend of oil stops growing. on the health of the fisheries, While reiterating his support telling us how all the shrimp are for off-shore drilling, includgone. Articles about the estuaries, ing drilling in the Atlantic off already fragile, and the devastathe Delaware coast, President tion the spill has caused. Obama has issued a moratorium This is what I hope happens on new offshore drilling permits. after that: a mass uprising against “No additional drilling has been the whole concept of drilling off authorized and none will be until the coast of the United States and we find out what happened and a consequent about-face by politiwhether there was something cians, including President Obama unique and preventable here,”

L

P

Family recovering from explosion in their home Two funds to help the family are established By Carol Kinsley Jason Bradford Jr., who just turned 7, thinks he is a superhero because when his home on Dogwood Lane in Laurel exploded last week, sending all his family members flying, he was able to climb out of the rubble by himself. Unfortunately, when the house was destroyed, so were all of his birthday presents — along with everything else the family owned, including one vehicle which had been parked just outside. The family had just finished moving in. Mercifully, his father, mother and two younger brothers also survived, although with injuries. His father, Jason Bradford, a roofer by trade and family tradition, remains in Christiana Hospital with severe orthopedic injuries following surgery to his spine. His brothers, Austin, 4, and Logan, 2, both have broken limbs and are in lower body casts. Their mother, Heather Bennett, released after two days in the Burn Center at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, is just thankful they are all alive. A family spokesman said they are overwhelmed with the support already received from family,

neighbors and community. The community is pitching in to help with prayers and more. Two funds have been established. One is at PNC Bank at 1200 West Stein Highway in Seaford. Checks can be made payable to “Help the Bradford Family.” The other is the “Bennett Assistance Fund,” c/o Wilmington Trust Company, Att: Nancy West, 509 West Stein Highway, also in Seaford. Either bank will accept donations at any of its locations. All of the money will go directly to the family. There is also a Web site, www.helpthebradfordfamily. com, with links to a Facebook account where dialogue is posted. A friend of the family is working on facilitating donations by PayPal upon request of some would-be donors. Gail Bradford, Jason’s sister, has opened her home at 10929 East Fourth St. in Laurel for anyone who wants to provide donations of clothing or other material goods. She said the boys wear sizes 6, 4 and 3. Their petite mother wears pants size 0 and shirts size small. Jason needs pants size 36 waist, 34 length, and 2X shirts. Most of all, the family is asking for everyone’s prayers for the recovery of Jason, Heather and the children.

and our own senator Tom Carper, who have supported it. “Oil rigs today generally don’t cause spills,” President Obama said in early April during a speech in Charlotte, N.C. “They are technologically very advanced.” How wrong he was. There simply isn’t enough oil off our coasts to justify this kind of environmental and social disaster. In total, the United States, coastal areas included, has only three percent of the world’s oil reserves. We cannot drill our way out of the energy crisis. And after politicians have united in their opposition to offshore drilling — see what an optimist I am? — this is what I hope happens: People the world over come to the realization that our addiction to oil is killing the planet on which we depend for

life and turn to other sources of energy to power our lives. The dangerous and environmentally-risky processes of harvesting fossil fuels, coal as well as oil, from the Earth are only the beginning of the problems with using them. To use the fuels, we have to burn them, a process that releases pollutants into the air, including carbon dioxide, a major player in climate change. And climate change, something that 97 percent of the world’s climate scientists agree is happening and is manmade, is no joke. We are already seeing its ramifications: increased sea levels, disrupted weather patterns, tropical diseases breaking out in Oregon, flowering plants blooming before the migrating species that depend on them for sustenance arrive. “The State of the Birds: 2010 Report on Cli-

mate Change,” just released by the Department of the Interior, says that nearly a third of the nation’s 800 bird species are endangered, threatened or in significant decline. Already dealing with habitat loss, invasive species and pesticides, they are “facing a new threat — climate change — that could dramatically alter their habitat and food supply and push many toward extinction,” said Interior Secretary Ken Salazar. We have unleashed the monster. But we can rein it in again. We must summon the will to curb our energy consumption. And we must work hard to develop sources for that energy other than fossil fuels. I have hope that in the end, we will do what’s right. We simply cannot be as selfish and greedy as all that oil gushing into the Gulf of Mexico would indicate.

Clean Up Week May 10-14, 2010

Annually, the City of Seaford schedules a clean-up week in order to improve the appearance of the City. During this week, Public Works will haul away unwanted materials at no charge for CITY RESIDENTS ONLY. HEAVY MATERIALS: Stoves, furniture, cement pipe, etc. will be collected separately as special equipment may be needed. WEIGHT LIMITS: When filled, bags and containers shall not weigh more than 50 lbs. CONTAINERS: Please use disposable containers as they will not be returned. PLACEMENT: All materials to be picked up must be placed on the curb line no later than 8:30 a.m. on the day scheduled for your area’s pick up. Our employees are not permitted to go on private property. Once a street has been cleared, the trucks WILL NOT RETURN. PRIVATE CONTRACT WORK: Debris from any work done by a private contractor (cutting trees, construction, etc.) is the responsibility of the contractor. Do not place on curb line for the City to remove.

DO NOT PLACE LEAVES, LIMBS, TWIGS OR GRASS CLIPPINGS ON THE CURBLINE DURING CLEAN-UP WEEK. NORMAL PICKUP OF THESE ITEMS WILL RESUME THE WEEK AFTER CLEAN-UP WEEK. NO HOUSEHOLD GARBAGE, PAINTS OR HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS WILL BE PICKED UP. CALL DELAWARE SOLID WASTE AUTHORITY FOR PROPER DISPOSAL OF HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE AT 800-904-7080. NO FREEZERS, REFRIDGERATORS, AIR CONDITIONERS OR OTHER APPLIANCES WHICH CONTAIN, OR MAY HAVE CONTAINED, FREON WILL BE PICKED UP.

REMEMBER: SPRING CLEAN-UP WEEK IS FOR CITY RESIDENTS ONLY!!

Call Delaware Solid Waste Authority for proper disposal of household hazardous waste at 800-904-7080.

Pick-Up Schedule:

Monday, May 10th

East of Front Street, Mearfield

Tuesday, May 11th

Front St., to the RR tracks, including Virginia Commons, Wimar Village

Wednesday, May 12th

RR tracks to Nylon Blvd.

Thursday, May 13th

Martin Farms, Westview and Parsons Village

Friday, May 14th

Woodside Manor, Belle Ayre, Governor's Grant


MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

PAGE 59

Cigar and a bomb threat: normal day in my young life Dennis Morgan and I were tight. When I was about 15, the two of us ony indsor were inseparable. It was the early 1970s when Dennis and I hung out Police officers were everytogether. He was a product of the 1960s complete with bell-bottom where, searching for pojeans, tie-dyed headband and no shoes. His record collection boasted tential explosive devices Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, John Prine and Simon and Garfunkel. and there we sat like mice Dennis and I never wasted any in a garden salad. time getting started on our journeys every weekend. First light of Saturfour would always start in the middle of day morning found us ready to head to the big city – Salisbury. I remember one the song that was supposed to be the last song on the previous track. day Dennis and I and a couple of friends, So, anyway, this one day the four of us Jimmy Doggett and Jimmy Ford, decided headed to the Salisbury Mall. When we to head for the Salisbury mall where we would “hang out” until heading over to the got there we walked into the lobby and it was eerily desolate. store on Bateman Street where we would We noticed as we walked into the buy bootleg eight-track tapes. building there was a large crowd of people These tapes were great. They only cost about $2. The titles of the songs and name standing and milling around the parking lot. To anyone else this would have of the bands were typewritten on the front seemed unusual, but Jimmy Ford had alof the tape. Sometimes the actual album ready rationalized that because it was the cover would be photo copied and stuck to middle of December, it was obvious that the front of the tape. the mall was planning its annual airlift of I was lucky to listen to the complete Santa Claus into the parking lot. tape once before it either stretched or Any minute the bearded fellow would sounded like the sound track from the exbe parachuting down to the joy of the orcism scene in “The Exorcist,” or it simwaiting crowd. So, being the typically igply snapped and broke. It was obvious these tapes were bootleg norant corn-feed mules that we were, we because no matter what tape you got it was went on into the mall, oblivious to the fact that “something was wrong here.” guaranteed that the tracks would run out We walked into the area of the mall before the songs did. Tracks two, three and

T

W

where the water fountain was and the four of us sat on the edge. Looking around we could see what appeared to be people in each of the stores bent down among the aisles of clothing, electronics and whatever else was being peddled. These people moved quickly so it was difficult to see what they were doing. The one thing we did quickly realize was that we were definitely alone. Out of the corner of my eye I saw the familiar shape of a dog. It was huge German shepherd dog. I saw it attached to the end of a leash, sniffing under a counter in the McCrory’s store. I followed the dog’s leash back to a hand. The hand was attached to a rather rugged looking state trooper. It seems that we had walked into the mall during a bomb threat. Police officers were everywhere, searching for potential explosive devices and there we sat like mice in a garden salad. Needless to say, we left the mall. The ride home turned out to be what I will always consider one of the worst days of my life. Dennis picked up a couple of packs of “fine” cigars on the way back to Marion Station. It was the four of us in Dennis’ yellow Rambler, a car just a few inches bigger than Barbie’s Pink Camaro. We all lit up and began puffing. Seeking to appear “cool” I sucked on my cigar like an Oreck vacuum cleaner on a bowling ball. By the time we got to Princess Anne, we couldn’t see one another inside the car

Laurel Council supports ‘Pride in Gas Lines Bloom’ and special worship event By Tony E. Windsor

The Town of Laurel is once more gearing up for what has become one of the Mayor’s favorite local events. During a recent Mayor and Council meeting, Mayor John Shwed signed a town proclamation naming Saturday, May 22 as “Laurel Pride in Bloom Month.” Now in its fourth year, the event is showcased with a special “Strawberry Festival” held at St. Phillip’s Episcopal Church on Central Avenue. Shwed said the day will start with a breakfast, also served at St. Phillips, and will include lunch, crafts and strawberries. The event will run from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tours of some of Laurel’s “beautiful areas” will take place as part of the Laurel Historical Society’s Cemetery Tour. Mayor Shwed is urging all residents to use this as an opportunity to begin sprucing up for the spring and summer seasons. “This will be an opportunity for residents and merchants to spruce up their properties and flowers will be placed in the town’s parks,” he said in the proclamation. “I would encourage everyone to set out flowers on their properties. I am pleased to support this event.” Also in Council business, Pastor Andre Mollock of the Living Word Christian Center, located on Discount Land Road, addressed the Mayor and Council regard-

ing a special event request. Mollock said his church would like to receive permission from the town to hold Sunday morning worship services in the lot located at the intersection of Webbs Avenue and 7th Street, near the basketball courts. Mollock said he would like to hold the services every Sunday, weather permitting, throughout the spring and summer months. He said he sees this as a wonderful Christian outreach. “There are a lot of souls on the streets who need to receive encouragement,” he said. I am only 33, so I can relate to a lot of the young people who are out on those streets. I know what life can be like on the streets. I thank God for what he has done in my life and I want to give testimony to support the people.” Mollock said he will hold the Praise and Worship services from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and include preaching, one-on-one ministering and gospel singing. “This is free to all and we want to have a good time and allow God to make a change,” he said. Mayor John Shwed said he supports the Praise and Worship services. “I think anything that uplifts the spirit of our people is a worthy cause,” he said. The Mayor and Council unanimously supported Mollock’s request to hold the Sunday morning church services.

Although gas prices remained steady for most of April, the national average price for regular grade gasoline reached a new 18-month high Friday at $2.88 a gallon. Prices began the month at $2.80 a gallon and gained 8 cents (3%) over the past 30 days. Current prices are 83 cents higher than a year ago, but still $1.23 less than the record high set in July 2008. Crude Oil Prices After trading below $82 a barrel earlier in the week, crude oil rose on Friday to its third straight monthly gain (2.5%), despite bulging U.S. oil inventories, Greece’s financial troubles, Iceland’s volcanic eruption, a lawsuit against Goldman Sachs and pending

for the smoke. I began to feel like Grant’s troops had pitched tents in my stomach. My stomach began to turn and churn like Mom’s old wringer washer. I still to this day begin to break out in a sweat and feel nauseous just thinking about it. I was in such bad shape; all I could do was pray that prayer that we all have said at least once in our life, “Oh, dear Lord, if you will just get me over this, I will never smoke another cigar.” When we pulled into the driveway at my house, my good friends opened the door and pushed me out onto the ground like bag of mail. I lay there looking up at the stars, dreading the long crawl up the front steps. It was truly misery, but you know what? I never did smoke another cigar.

Pepperbox Road pipe work

The Department of Transportation (DelDOT) announces the closure of Pepperbox Road between Whitesville Road and Brittingham Road in Delmar for the replacement of a crossroad pipe. The road closed on Monday, May 3 and will reopen by 3 p.m. on Friday, May 14, weather permitting. Traffic will be detoured as follows: Southbound: Pepperbox Road to Whitesville Road onto Brittingham Road and back to Pepperbox Road Northbound: Pepperbox Road to Brittingham Road onto Whitesville Road and back to Pepperbox Road. government regulation of financial markets. A massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico will be a major concern perhaps months to come. The Louisiana Offshore Oil Port, which, handles more than one million barrels a day of crude imports and is connected by pipeline to the biggest U.S. refining region, said it did not expect any effect on its operations. While no disruptions have occurred yet, oil traders are bracing for potential freight restrictions that could curtail crude oil imports. Local pricing On Wednesday gas stations from Delmar to Greenwood were selling regular gasoline in a range from $2.799 to $2.919 a gallon. The high is seven cents higher than a week ago, the low one cent higher.

Regular Unleaded Gasoline & Crude Oil prices National

Delaware

Oil Barrel

5/2/10

Week Ago

Year Ago

$2.88

$2.85

$2.06

4/30/10

Week Ago

Year Ago

$86.15

$85.12

$51.00

$2.83

$2.81

$2.01


PAGE 60

MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

Woodbridge School Board candidates answer questions By Cathy Shufelt

Candidates for the upcoming May 11th Woodbridge Board of Education election met last week to offer insight into themselves and answer any questions members of the community might have. Incumbent Walter Gilefski along with Darryn Harris and John Poe provided answers to a number of PTO prepared questions to start “Meet the Candidates” Night. Each candidate brings a different background and life experiences to the position. Gilefski is a retired educator, having worked for the Woodbridge School District as both a teacher and principal for a total of 34 years. He has served on the Woodbridge Board of Education for the past five years. Harris is a 2004 graduate of Woodbridge High School and will graduate in May with his bachelor’s degree in education specializing in physical science from Delaware State University. Poe is semi-retired and has worked as a chef and in food service management for many years. Question: “What motivates you to be a school board member?” Gilefski: “I still feel as though I have something to offer. I was an educator here for 34 years. I have been retired since 2003, and ran for the board successfully five years ago. I don’t know a lot of stuff, but I know quite a bit about how the state system and education in general in Delaware, and the Woodbridge School District, works. I still have a desire to bring what I can bring to help the district work better.” Harris: “As a graduate of the Woodbridge School District, the one thing I took with me was civic responsibility, and during my time at Woodbridge I was afforded a lot of opportunities, and I feel that this is a way for me to give back to a community that has given me more than I could enumerate or even possibly thank them for. From my experiences since I left Woodbridge, working with teacher preparation at Delaware State University, I am not only sympathetic to the needs of the students but also to the needs of the teachers.” Poe: “Well, I am interested in budget things and finances a little bit. I was especially taken aback when I heard that only 50% of the stimulus money was going to go to school districts and the rest was going to go to the Department of Education. So, I am very interested in seeing that the majority of the money gets to the classrooms. I am also interested in improving the reputation of the district. I am selling my house now and I have had some folks tell me that they didn’t want to live in the Woodbridge School District. They didn’t want to buy my house because it’s within the Woodbridge School District, and I really couldn’t believe that. I couldn’t understand that, so I am interested to find out more about that.” Question: “Being a board member requires a lot of volunteer time, what types of volunteer activities do you currently participate in?” Harris: “Currently in the school district I do serve as a volunteer assistant marching band director at the high school. I am also involved in many activities in the community, in my church, and working with the youth at the church. I am very engaged in the community in my volunteer work. Poe: “I am involved at my church in a few men’s groups that are working to get some other men’s groups started on Del-

marva, and I am involved in the Republican Party a bit on different issues related to things going on in the community.” Gilefski: “As I said before I have been retired since 2003, and I try to get into the schools as much as I can, and attend as many of the after school activities and evening activities as I can. It was not voluntary at the time, but for eleven years in the 1980s I was Commissioner in Bridgeville, and it was a different set up. We were like most towns and not as well off as Bridgeville is currently, so the commissioners did a lot of volunteering such as cutting grass and other activities. I attend Our Lady of Lourdes in Seaford, but since I was most welcomed by the Union United Methodist Church here in Bridgeville I attend some of their activities to keep in touch with friends that made me feel at home when we first came to Bridgeville. I do have the time to do whatever is needed.” Question: “What is your opinion on the consolidation of school districts?” Poe: “I am not really in favor of the idea of three districts, one district per county, I think that’s overkill. There may be room for some consolidation, but with consolidation you lose local control and the ability to really have a place in the community. So, I am not really in favor of consolidation.” Gilefski: “Definitely opposed. I think it would be a big mistake. Big mistake. I have a little letter to the editor a month or so ago that I ended with ‘small is beautiful’ because big necessarily isn’t. Most people pushing it (consolidation) think it’s going to save money, and believe me from knowing education and truly knowing how it works, you can have one superintendent in Sussex County but you will not have just one assistant superintendent. You are going to have all kinds of assistants. You just definitely wouldn’t save money. It sounds good on the surface, but it’s as Mr. Poe said, you would definitely lose the closeness, the local control. All of the board members at Woodbridge and those at other districts are available to the residents they represent, and it gets harder to see your constituents when there is a board of five people and you represent an entire county.” Harris: “I personally think that consolidation of the districts would not work and I am opposed to it. It is not only a disservice to our students but also to our staff and faculty members. If you look at the concept of consolidation, take Sussex County for example, you have teachers in the Cape Henlopen School District who make more than other teachers, and whether or not we level up or level down, we are treating our teachers and our students in such a way that if we level down we lose quality teachers because they leave due to pay cuts. If we level up we are taking money from other areas and putting funds into teachers’ salaries so then programs get short funded. In the end, it’s just not a good idea.” Question: “What is your primary vision for education in our community?” Gilefski: “To continue the excellence that I have experienced and most people have come to notice recently in the Woodbridge School District. It saddens me a little bit, although it’s not much of a surprise that our high school, in particular, is a low performing school and is on ‘academic watch.’ We are not seeing those

students do as well as we would like to see them do. Fiscal responsibility is important. I think Dr. Carson can certainly crunch numbers, but as a math teacher I know I can, and with my fellow board members we want the district to prosper, and you literally can’t prosper if you don’t mind the dollars and the cents. I would like to contribute in that respect. Districts have to watch the money with many pairs of eyes, and asking a lot of questions, but in particular, as far as the system goes, helping high school students achieve more is important. There is an awful lot more that goes on in schools than test scores show.” Harris: “My primary vision for education in our community is to move Woodbridge forward to more greatness than it has already attained. Like I said, as a graduate I understand where our high school is currently in terms of achievement, and I also understand the potential that our high school students and our faculty at the high school have, and it is my ultimate goal to serve the Woodbridge School District so that when you think of excellence in education in Delaware, you think Woodbridge. The people who come out of Woodbridge are amazing; students have the talent and the capabilities. The potential is there. We just need to foster that by developing programs that get students to the level where we know they can be. Poe: “In connection with what these gentlemen said, I would like to see the high school achievement be better and work on that. I’d like to let high school folks know that there is no reason to leave Woodbridge or Sussex County for something better. I’d just like to continue what they have started at the elementary school on through to the high school.” Question: “What could the board do to encourage positive community participation in the event of a future referendum?” Harris: “I think that the board could be more transparent in terms of what they expect from the community, and engaging the community in a more positive manner. For years, when there were referendums, the board put it out there that this is what we want to do, but there really wasn’t much give and take from the side of the community’s view. If the board could come up with better strategies in terms of how to better present the information to the community, then they would be more successful.” Poe: “Like Mr. Harris said, the term referendum has a bad feeling with it, so I think the board and the district needs to try and come up in a more positive manner, and more positive give and take, and open the process up to the community. It would be better if the district didn’t use the kids as an excuse, if you will, to close programs and say it’s for the kids. It’s not really for the kids; it’s for the community. It’s for more than just the kids. It’s for community and people coming into the community as well.” Gilefski: “In my experience at Woodbridge different boards have approached referenda in different ways. One particularly good way, I thought, was that every board member got to nominate five people to form a committee to have some input, some give and take, and with a relatively small number of people, 25 or 30 people, that was done. Other boards have chosen to go other directions, but I do know the major capital improvements, when we renovated this auditorium, built the auditorium at the high school, and did a lot of

other physical renovations, it took a lot of selling the idea to the community. As you make approaches to community groups, board members themselves, and not necessarily “the” superintendent or “the” assistant superintendent could lead the discussions because I certainly think we have five capable board members, capable of standing up in front of a group of their friends and neighbors and explaining why we are asking for money.” Question: “What long-range plan would you want to implement for our district to encourage students and parents to want to remain in our schools through graduation?” Gilefski: “I know that administrators are doing more and more to encourage 8th graders to choose Woodbridge over schools like Sussex Tech. They have done some simple but pleasant things to encourage students who are deciding where they want to attend high school, such as sending personal letters to students who are still unsure, and sweatshirts with letters to those students who have chosen to attend Woodbridge welcoming them to the school. “I think nothing would be a bigger draw to our students to finish their education at Woodbridge than a new high school. Kids look at the building. It’s beautiful, it’s always been very clean, but it’s eighty years old. They see an eighty-year-old building. Then they look at the new Cape Henlopen or Sussex Tech buildings, and just from the look of it, they have, perhaps, to a 13 or 14-year-old, a more appealing look.” Harris: “I guess I would have to agree with Mr. Gilefski about a new high school. When I came through Woodbridge, people said Sussex Tech has this, Sussex Tech has that. I believe we need to market Woodbridge High School better, showing parents and students the programs we have here. We need to shift their mindset away from the stigma that has been labeled in recent years of Woodbridge being a high school on ‘academic watch,’ and if the parents and students have that assurance that they are still getting a top rate education at Woodbridge, they would be more open to coming here.” Poe: “I think that getting the high school off of ‘academic watch’ would certainly help a lot. I’d like to think that the look of the high school doesn’t matter as much as what goes on there, but maybe that’s a little different in today’s society. I think that also marketing the things that Woodbridge High School has added on would help. I think that people think that they can find anything they want at Sussex Tech as far as their vocation goes. They don’t realize what Woodbridge has developed over the last few years, so I think a little bit of marketing and getting the high school off ‘academic watch’ would certainly help. I think here students get a little better sense of community, and maybe we could sell that sense of community to them.” Candidates also answered questions from the audience regarding dress code for teachers, private vs. public education, teacher recruitment, student retention, educational funding, curriculum development, nutrition, community outreach, and student discipline. In their closing statements, all three candidates mentioned the importance of combining common sense with justice, fairness, respect, and mercy in making decisions impacting students, teachers and the community.


MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

PAGE 61

Seaford School Board candidates participate in debate By Lynn R. Parks

The two candidates for the Seaford School Board see different causes behind improved behavior at the middle school. Board president John Hanenfeld credits the school’s policy of zero tolerance for reducing bad behavior. But challenger Frank Parks cites the Spotlight on Success (SOS) program at the school, a program that rewards good behavior and that is being honored by the state chamber’s Superstars in Education later this month. “Six years ago, the middle school had one of the highest expulsion rates in the state,” Hanenfeld said during last week’s forum featuring the two candidates, sponsored by the Seaford chapter of the American Association of University Women (AAUW). “Now, it is decreasing. Why? Because students know the consequences we will put on them if they misbehave.” “I give a lot of credit to the middle school and [principal] Stephanie Smith, but I don’t think it’s all because of zero tolerance,” Parks said. “Students have always had rules to abide by and does making more rules make a difference? The SOS program rewards kids for good behavior. The best way to encourage kids to behave is to give positive reinforcement.” In his introductory remarks, Hanenfeld, who is running for his second five-year term, listed as one of his primary accomplishments improved security in the district’s school. “All schools are locked and secure,” he said. Frederick Douglass Elementary School has a buzz-in system, he added, and the interior doors at West Seaford Elementary are locked, forcing all visitors to go to the school office. But Parks wondered if all that security is a good thing. He criticized what he called a “prison mentality” at the high school, saying that it is one reason parents are electing to send students to other schools. “I don’t agree with more security and

Page by Page

bers of the board and district staff is gone. The board is more transparent: Each board member is assigned a school to regularly visit and e-mail that is sent to the board now goes directly to each member instead of to members through the district office. Hanenfeld has addressed the last two graduating classes and talks to the staff at the beginning of each school year. “When I get calls from teachers, I respond,” he said. “When I get calls from coaches, I respond. To say that we do not reach out to faculty members is not the case.” During his tenure, the district has raised its requirements for student promotion and will increase the rigor of its curriculum even more starting in the fall, he said. In answer to a question about increasing the accountability of the district superintendent, Hanenfeld said that the board “has taken initial steps” to enforce superintendent priorities and goals. More broadly, administration hiring practices have changed so that one board member sits in on the initial interview and the full board conducts a final interview. All administrator compensation packages are reviewed annually by the board. In his closing remarks, Hanenfeld said that it is an unavoidable fact that the demographics of the Seaford community have changed. The district is now among the poorest in the state. “We have to deal with students who come to our schools,” he said. “We have to embrace them and teach them.” “Ten or 15 years ago, people wanted to come to Seaford for its schools,” Parks said. “Now, it seems many want to go to other areas. Turning our schools around will not be easy. But with good positions and a great outlook, we can do it.”

discipline,” Parks said. “I think we have all the discipline we need. If a student gets into a fight at the high school, he is taken away in handcuffs. How much more disciplined can you get?” The two candidates also disagreed over the district’s new, stricter dress code, set to go into effect in the fall. Hanenfeld, who said that the board labored for two years over the policy, said that if he had his way, the district’s students would wear uniforms. Only “economic constraints” kept board members from enacting a uniform, he added; the district would be required to pay for uniforms for students who could not afford them. The district’s new dress code will lead to improved social interaction and improved behavior, Hanenfeld said. “Making everyone look the same is unAmerican,” countered Parks. “We need to celebrate our diversity, not squash it. And there are so many other things you can do to improve the school. My feathers get a little bit ruffled when you tell me that I have to buy certain clothes for my children because you aren’t doing a good enough job.” About 70 people attended the forum, which was held in the auditorium at Central Elementary School. Moderator was Ron MacArthur, a reporter with the Cape Gazette newspaper in Lewes and former editor of the Seaford Star. The candidates answered questions that were submitted by AAUW members. They also answered questions that were submitted by members of the audience and read by MacArthur. Parks spelled out several ideas he has for improving the district. He would like to see an incentive system, through which teachers whose students do well get a little extra money. That money, he said, could in turn be used to reward the students. Such a program would accomplish several things, he said. It would improve morale and increase test scores and would also boost enrollment, because parents would be more inclined to keep their chil-

dren in the district. That in turn would mean more money coming into the district, Parks said. “For every 100 kids that we lose, that means $1 million [in state funding] that we lose,” he said. Parks would also like to see afterschool tutoring offered at the high school and buses available to take students home following athletic practices and other afterschool activities. And he would like the district to start a program through which seniors could serve three-week internships at community businesses. Such a program would help the students decide what career paths to take and would also acquaint members of the community with the students and establish a relationship with the schools. “It would be a great way to get the community involved,” he said. Parks also suggested that the district’s fifth-graders be moved into the middle school and its eighth-graders, now in the middle school, be sent to the high school. This would alleviate over-crowding in the elementary schools and at the same time would permit fifth-graders to take additional classes like band and language. Eighth-graders in the high school would be able to take advanced classes that aren’t offered in the middle school. “I think that we are holding our children back because of the limitations of our buildings,” he said. “All of our students would be able to perform better if they had more opportunities.” In addition to improved school security and the stricter dress code, Hanenfeld, who has endorsements from the four other school board members, counted among his accomplishments a more effective board. “During my five-year tenure, I have led a transformation of a truly fragmented group of individuals into a cohesive team,” he said. He said that the board and the teachers and other staff members are the district’s strongest asset. He said that the old “us vs. them” mindset that used to exist between mem-

completed in school. The schedule runs from June 23 through August 11. Movies are Mondays from 1 to 3 p.m. All Tuesday programs are at 6:30 p.m. All Wednesday programs are at 1:30 p.m. All programs are held in the Children’s section at the Seaford Library and Cultural Center at 600 North Market Street, Extended in Seaford. They are free and open to the public. A complete schedule is available on the circulation desk at the library. This column will list each week’s activities at the specific time period. The range is extensive. They go from watercolor painting to Rehoboth Summer Children’s Theater presentation of “Robin Hood.” The Children’s Summer Program encourages lifelong learning and a love of books. For more information call Christina Poe at 629-2524.

SCRAP TIRES COLLECTED - The recent Scrap Tire Drop-off event at the Seaford Boat Ramp parking lot netted 22 tons of scrap tires – more than 1,700 old passenger vehicle tires that could have ended up in an unsightly, scrap tire pile or left to decompose in a Delaware landfill. The event, the fourth held over the last two years, provided Delaware residents with the opportunity to recycle scrap tires free of charge and help reduce the environmental and health hazards of scrap tires in our communities. The City of Seaford partnered with DNREC to host this event by allowing the use of a section of the parking lot at the Boat Ramp facility. The Delaware Scrap Tire Cleanup and Control Program is funded by a state fee of $2 per tire on the sale of new tires. Enacted Jan. 1, 2007, the fee is diverted to the Scrap Tire Management Fund, a matching fund and program created to clean up existing scrap tire piles statewide. For more information, visit www.awm.delaware.gov/Info/Pages/ScrapTire.aspx, or contact the Scrap Tire Control and Cleanup Program at 302-739-9403.

For your information: The Seaford School Board election will be Tuesday, May 11. Voting will take place from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. in the district office at 390 N. Market St. For details, call the district at 629-4587.

News from the Seaford Library and Cultural Center

By Anne Nesbitt In the interest of maintaining children’s reading skills and literacy levels during the summer months, the Seaford Library has planned an active Children’s Summer Reading Program. Children of all reading levels and abilities are welcome. These programs expand a child’s world of knowledge and enlightenment while providing entertainment. The official registration and opening is set for June 23 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. A child may attend any session without being registered but if the child is not registered he or she is not eligible for prizes, T-shirts, certificates or a reading log on which the child records the number of minutes spent reading during the summer months. A child can be registered any day until July 23. The registration form requires only name, address, telephone number and grade just


PAGE 62

MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

In an effort to help shine more light onto the race for the Seaford School Board seat, the Star is printing the following statements from the two candidates.

Franks Parks

I got involved with the Seaford School District, first as a parent, then as a coach and a volunteer with the Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Many of you know, I spent my high school years struggling because I did not have a sense of purpose in my life. After a spiritual awakening on Friday the 13th of October 1989, I spent eight months in jail and rehab. It was during this time I realized that everything has a purpose and that God had a better plan for me and I have been sober ever since. I moved to Seaford in 1990, met my wife Leigh Ann, we bought a house had two children, started a business and have been blessed beyond belief. For many years I thanked God privately for saving me from alcoholism, drug addiction and suicide. I was ashamed of my past and did not want anyone to know what I had been through. My close friends were often shocked when I would share my checkered past with them, as I am sure many of you are as well. For many years, I would reach out to area youth when I heard they were struggling with addiction or alcoholism. I would encourage them to stay sober, pray and seek help from above, as this is what helped me to turn my life around. I have served in many ways at St. John’s Church and as past president of the Seaford Lion’s Club. I have been recognized as one of the top Realtors in the nation when I was under 30 years old. I have spent much of my time coaching and participating in many sports. I enjoyed life to the fullest and thought I was doing everything I possibly could to make the world a better place. In 2006, my wife asked me to go on a spiritual retreat, I reluctantly agreed to go because I thought I was already doing a pretty good job in life. When I got there, I realized it was Friday the 13th of October, exactly 17 years to the day after I first got on my knees to ask God for help. On this weekend, I began to use my past as a positive and I began to look for ways to help young people before they got hooked on drugs. Shortly thereafter I was introduced to the Fellowship of Christian Athletes and began coaching girls Soccer at Seaford Middle School. Many think that having Christian events at school is a violation of the “Separation of Church and State.” The reality is that government cannot establish a religion nor can they prohibit the free expression of religion. Government did not estab-

Letters to the Editor

lish Christianity and by not allowing our students to express their faith during the school day, I believe they are prohibiting the free expression of their faith. Our students would like to have a rally during the school day. In the last two years they have been allowed out of class for sporting events, school plays and to give blood. We are sending our children to school to learn and we are leaving out the most important lessons in the best selling book of all time. We as a community have the right to see that our children have as much access to the Bible as they do to any other text books, if the parents and students choose. In addition to Christian education being available for those who choose, I feel strongly that we should have incentive programs for staff and students where they would be rewarded for doing a better job. We should have evening busses for those students who wish to stay after for tutoring and activities. We should move our 5th grade to the Middle School and 8th grade to the high school to ease crowding in the elementary schools and make room for pre-school programs. This would better prepare children to enter kindergarten and to overcome excessive transfers by offering more to our students sooner. Our 5th graders can have more access to band, languages, after school sports, clubs and many other programs if they were all together. Our 8th graders can become part of our High School sooner and take more challenging courses if they choose. They may be less likely to transfer out once they are part of our middle school and high school. We need to be more inviting to our community in our schools instead of locking them out. We need to have discipline but we also need to have more counseling and mentoring available to guide our students in the right direction. We should have senior internships where our students can work in the many businesses we have in the community. One of the first questions someone coming to our town usually asks is “How are the schools?” The answer used to be one of the best in the state. Now we do not have the same response. I know we can turn this around quickly but it will take a school board, staff and community that is encouraging, optimistic and willing to listen. I hope that I have the opportunity to serve as your next school board member but regardless of the outcome of the election, pray for our schools. Frank Parks

Seaford School Board Candidate

John Hanefeld

Over the past few months, many parents and staff members have asked me what I believe are the accomplishments of the board since I began my term, especially the past three years as president. During my tenure: • All schools are locked and secure - The board has increased security throughout our district. Frederick Douglass Elementary has a locked door buzz in system; all faculty members have entry swipe cards, all school exterior doors are locked and routinely patrolled. Board has directed and encourages that all schools will have similar buzz in systems as FDES. West Seaford now has interior lobby doors locked which requires all visitors to enter through the office and sign in. Solutions at our middle school are forthcoming. • We have increased transparency at  the board level. All board members are assigned schools to visit routinely. Direct email communication to all members on the board via the district website comes to each member uncensored; school leadership teams visit with the board with open dialogue without prejudice routinely. • Administration hiring practices have  changed. Today, all administrator candidates come before the board for a final interview. One board member sits on initial interview committee and all qualifications of all applicants are shared with the board. All jobs within the district are posted. • I requested the review of particular  administrator employment agreements that resulted in modifications to contract language. • We have raised our requirements for  student promotion. Starting this fall, we will increase the rigor for all students to exceed the minimum requirements of the Wagner Law. • We strive for equity among all staff  members and schools. • Reestablished board retreats for goal  and planning sessions. • I have addressed the staff as board  president at the beginning of each school year. I have addressed the last two graduating classes. • We have modified the regulation so  that all administrator compensation packages must be reviewed by the board annually. • Introduced model for Seaford School  District Community Collation to engage public services, faith based groups, district and city to tackle at risk students. Open dialogue for a Community School Platform. • Researched and presented religious  history based curriculum for consideration at SHS during Public Board session.

Morning Star Publications Inc.

President Bryant L. Richardson

Editor Daniel Wright Richardson

Seaford, DE 19973

Vice President Pat Murphy

Managing Editor Mike McClure

P.O. Box 1000 • 951 Norman Eskridge Highway 629-9788 • 629-9243 (fax) editor@mspublications.com

Secretary Tina Reaser

Editorial

• Welcomed the “Fellowship of Christian Athletes” as an elective after-school activity. • We have issued directives for additional after school activities such as lacrosse, girl’s volleyball, chess team/club, etc. • Met or have spoken with boosters  – parents – coaches, to revert start times for soccer and (hopefully basketball) next year. Starting times of all athletic events will be discussed and agreed at the board level before enactment. • I and the board are true advocates to  all stakeholders and faculty. • I have had open discussions with  DOE/governor’s office, Secretary of Education and other elected officials to discuss the enrollment practices and economic advantages of Sussex Tech. • Started land search for school expansion within the district. Currently, we are land locked. • Researched and adopted new dress  code for all students within our district beginning this fall. Continue to further evaluate school uniforms over the coming years. • We will begin discussions to increase  staff moral with board sponsored events for district family gatherings on an annual basis. • Recognize the necessity to bring back  professional development time during the school year. Board members have and will continue to attend National School Board Conferences for our professional development. • We have a Music Academy starting in  the fall. • Started turf management curriculum at  the high school’s new greenhouse. • We will have a hired a new director of  secondary education from outside the district who will start in mid-May. • Each board meeting commences with  the Pledge of Allegiance and a moment of silence. • And, most importantly, my two children have attended the Seaford Schools. Since I started my five-year term in 2005, I have led a transformation from a fragmented group of individuals into a strong, cohesive team working towards common goals with our staff. I ask the community to share my vision and help me build a stronger staff, further increase community morale and involvement, and build a community network between our governmental, nonprofit, faith-based organizations, that will more adequately meet the needs of our Seaford students and families. John Hanenfeld

Seaford School Board President

Carol Kinsley

Sales

Elaine Schneider

Rick Cullen

Kay Wennberg Composition Cassie Richardson Rita Brex

Brandon Miller Doris Shenton

Morning Star Publications Inc. Subscriptions - $19 a year in-county, $24 a year in has been serving the Delmarva Tony Windsor Circulation Treasurer Kent and New Castle, Del., and Federalsburg, SharpCarol Wright Richardson Cathy Shufelt Karen Cherrix Peninsula since 1996. town and Delmar, Md.; $29 elsewhere out of state. Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report Lynn Parks


MORNING STAR • MAy 6 - 12, 2010

Final Word

FICC ‘10 features Ellyn Herbert

The Families, Individuals and Communities Conference (FICC) is a longstanding tradition in Sussex County. The 2010 conference, “Life by Design: An Overview of Service to Help You Personally & Professionally,” will take place on Friday, May 7, at Wesley United Methodist Church in Georgetown. In an effort to continue to bring valuable information and education to families, individuals and communities in Kent and Sussex counties, the conference has a new format, a new location and a new price. The day will include four, interactive presentations, including the following: Cleansing Space; Energizing Space with Karen Barwick of Open Heart Studios; and Designing Space with Blythe McManus of Aerie Design. The featured speaker for the afternoon will be Ellyn Herbert of Herbiz, who will prepare participants for energizing and moving forward. Herbert is a professionally trained coach, certified by the International Assocation of Coaches and is the president of HerBiz, a Delaware coaching company she founded in 2004, dedicated to serving the aspirational needs of business women. Her coaching is for the professional woman that is looking to shift to a deeper, richer, wiser way of being; that wants both a professional and personal life that is inspiring, heartfelt, whole and abundant; a life that reflects both their values and greatest desires. She is dedicated to helping women succeed and feel comfortable in their own skin. There will be a variety of vendors and information available from many health agencies and there will also be health screenings conducted by Beebe Medical Center and the Alzheimer’s Association. As part of the conference, the fourth annual Ray Lloyd Memorial Award will be awarded. Mr. Lloyd was a longtime, immensely popular Delaware Tech instructor who passed away in 2007. To nominate someone or for more information on the scholarship, e-mail FICConference@yahoo. com. The cost to attend this year’s conference is $15 per person, which includes a continental breakfast and a hearty lunch. To contact the committee, e-mail FICCo-

PAGE 63

nference@yahoo.com. For more information or to register for the conference, contact the secretary/treasurer, Betty Metzler at 422-7517.

Bill enhances Internet protection

Lawmakers unanimously passed legislation recently that would protect children who access the Internet at Delaware’s public libraries. House Bill 340 would update a law first enacted in 2004 by employing more technology-neutral language, accommodating the growing use of wireless access and the inevitable introduction of other technologies. The measure would subject the use of personal mobile devices (e.g. web-enabled phones, laptops) within a public library to that library’s acceptable use policy. The bill also would enhance the original established protections for children who use library computers. Bill sponsor Rep. John C. Atkins said the legislation would serve a dual purpose of promoting wireless technology and increased Internet access while protecting children from obscene or sensitive materials. A recent study published by the Institute of Museum and Library Services reports that 45 percent of the 169 million visitors to U.S. public libraries over the past year connected to the Internet using a library computer or wireless network during their visit. Many of these individuals have Internet access at home, but chose to use library networks for a variety of reasons. HB 340 moves to the Senate for consideration.

Vital Stats

FOR ACCESS TO THE AREA’S BEST ORTHOPAEDIC PHYSICIANS,

CHOOSE NANTICOKE.

Federal Debt as of May 5, 2010 at 7:18 a.m. $12,933,445,255,196 Population of United States 308,317,956 Each citizen’s share of debt $41,948 The average citizen’s share of debt increased $133 in the past nine days. The debt increased by more than $43 billion and the population increased by 50,442.

We’re making sure you have access to the care you need, around

Submit items for Final Word by email to editor@mspublications.com. Include your name, hometown and a daytime phone number.

nurses and rehabilitation therapists can handle all of your

the clock. Our team of specialists in emergency orthopaedics provides 24/7 coverage in our emergency room. And, together with Peninsula Orthopaedic Associates, our experienced surgeons, orthopaedic needs—whether emergency or elective, from surgery to rehabilitation—right here. So you can trust us to offer the advanced

Garage Door Opener Installation

medical expertise you need with the warm, friendly care you expect.

REBATE

INSTALLED BETWEEN MAY 3 - MAY 29, 2010

Offer valid with installation from an authorized LiftMaster® dealer only. $10 offer is for a replacement control only. Offer not valid when purchased with a new garage door opener.

302-875-0663

Residential • Commercial

Route 13, Laurel, DE www.yoderdoors.com

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

nanticoke.org

Always Caring. Always Here.

801 Middleford Road, Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-6611 • 1-877-NHS4DOCS


SALE

$14,988

SALE

$8,988

SALE

$13,995

08 Harley Davidson Tail 09 TORRENT 07 HONDA CRV EX-L i.g. Burton Seaford --SoftYour Used Car Super Store! 09 CHEVY EQUINOX LT AWD 02 OLDS SILHOUETTE GLS STK 6188Q

STK# 102332A STK# 102248A

STK# 102295A STK 102362A

All Chrome, Only 1,000 Miles

Aluminum Wheels, Rear Spoiler, CD Player, MP3 Player, Auxiliary Audio Input, V6, Automatic, Power Locks & windows, PB, Satellite Radio, Engine Start PS, Cruise, Tilt,Remote CD Player/Changer

V6, Automatic, 4x4, P/Brakes, P/Steering, AC, Security System, P/Seats, P/Locks, P/Windows, Cruise Tilt, Keyless Entry, Leather, Player/Changer, V6, Automatic, AC,CD Security System,Navigation, Power Loaded, 52,100 4wd Entry, Locks P/Sunroof, & Windows, Cruise, Tilt,Miles Keyless

i.g. Burton Seaford Your Used CarUsed Super Store! i.g. Burton Seaford Your Car Super Store! SALE $24,888 $23,988 102 $16,995 FAMILY-FRIENDLY YEARS SERVING DELMARVA SALE $14,988 SALE $8,988 Mint Condition

SALE

SEAFORD SEAFORD 102 FAMILY-FRIENDLY YEARS SERVING DELMARVA

93 102 CHEVY CORVETTE CONV. 2010 TOYOTA VENZASERVING 09 FORD FLEX SEL AWD FAMILY-FRIENDLY YEARS DELMARVA STK# 6202P STK# 102356A STK# 6205P 08 Harley Davidson Soft Tail 09 TORRENT STK 6188Q

STK# 102332A

Spring Savings! Spring Savings! V8, Manual, Security System, Power, Seats, Locks & Windows, Keyless Entry, Cd Player

SALE

P/W P/L CRUISE DVD GPS LOADED All Chrome, Only 1,000 Miles

$18,988

$29,998

SEAFORD

Automatic, Security System, Power Locks, Seats & Wheels, Windows, CDSpoiler, Player/Changer Aluminum Rear CD Player, MP3 Player, Auxiliary Audio Input, Satellite Radio, Remote Engine Start

SALE SALE $16,995

SALE SALE

06 NISSAN ALTIMA 09 CHEVY EQUINOX LT AWD LT AWD02 OLDS SILHOUETTE 09 HHR 04 FORD RANGER 09 CHEVY EQUINOX 02 OLDSGLS SILHOUETTE GLS 93 CHEVY CORVETTE CONV. STK# STK# 102248A STK 102362A STK# 6130Q 6140P STK# 6203P STK# 102248A STK 102362A STK# 6202P

V6 S Key

$26,995 $24,888

04HHR CROSSFIRE 09 2010 STK 6176P VENZA STK#TOYOTA 6140P STK# 102356A

V6, Power Locks & PB, windows, V6, PB, V6, Automatic, AC, Security System, Power Privacy Glass, Windows, 68K Miles,AC, 4 Cylinder, Manual Automatic, PS,Windows, AC, Power, Locks 61,578Power Miles, 3.2L V6 Manual,CD FogPlayer, Lamps, V6, Automatic, Automatic, Power Locks & windows, Automatic, Security System, Power Privacy Glass,PB, Power CD Player, V8, Security System, Power, Seats, P/WHeated P/L CRUISE PS, Cruise, Tilt, CD Player/ChangerLocks & Windows, Locks & Windows, Tilt, Keyless Entry, MP3 Heated Player, Keyless Entry, &Manual, Windows, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry Mirrors, LeatherA/C Seat, Pwr PS, Cruise, Tilt, CD Player/Changer Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry,Cruise, MP3 Player, Keyless Entry, A/C Mint Condition Vehicle Doors, Anti-Theft System Locks & Windows, Keyless System Entry, Cd Player DVDPwr GPS LOADED Locks, A/C, CD Mint Condition Vehicle Anti-Theft

NOW $14,988 NOW $13,995 SALE $7,995 SALE $12,995 WAS $10,995 NOW $8,988 $14,988 $24,995 SALE $12,988 SALE $8,988 SALE $13,995 $18,988WAS $15,988SALE $29,998

WAS $16,988 SALE

09Davidson F250 DIESEL 08 Harley Soft Tail STK 90383A STK 6188Q

09 TORRENT 2010 TOWN & COUNTRY 06 CHEVY HHR 09 TORRENT 07 HONDA CRV EX-L 04 FORD RANGER STK# 102332A

STK# 6186P STK# 102332A

STK#102295A 6173P STK# STK# 6203P

07 HONDA CRV EX-L 09 MALIBU 06 CHEVY NISSAN ALTIMA STK# 102295A STK# 6130Q 6132P STK#

V6, Automatic, 4x4, P/Brakes, P/Steering, AC, Security 11,236 Miles, Super Duty, 4WD, P/steering, Aluminum Wheels, Rear Spoiler, CD Player, System, P/Seats, P/Locks, P/Windows, Cruise Tilt, Third & Fourth Passenger CDCD Player, Power Locks &4Windows, Cruise, 4 Cylinder, Automatic, System, V6, Automatic, 4x4, P/Brakes, P/Steering, AC,Tilt, Security Auto, MP3 Player, Audio Input, All Chrome, Only 1,000A/C Miles Aluminum Wheels, Rear Doors, Spoiler, Player, Auxiliary 68K Miles, Cylinder, Manual Automatic, PS, AC, AC, Security Power, Navigation, Locks Keyless Entry, Leather, CD PB, Player/Changer, MP3 Player, Adjustable Pedals, Keyless Entry, System, P/Seats, P/Locks, P/Windows, Cruise Tilt, Keyless Entry, CD Player/Changer Power Locks Cruise, &52,100 Windows, Keyless Entry, Satellite Radio, Remote Engine Start MP3Vehicle Player,Anti-Theft Auxiliary Audio Input, P/Sunroof, Loaded, Miles 4wd & Windows, Tilt, Keyless Entry System Keyless Entry, Leather, CD Player/Changer, Navigation, Cruise, Tilt, CD Player/Changer Satellite Radio, Remote Engine Start P/Sunroof, Loaded, 52,100 Miles 4wd

6

WAS $27,788 NOW $23,988 WAS $25,988 NOW $24,888 NOW $45,988 SALE $15,988 SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE 09 RAM QUAD CAB SLT 4X4 09 TOYOTA VENZA 99 CHEVY CAVILIER 93 CHEVY CORVETTE CONV. 2010 TOYOTA VENZASTK# 102356A 09 FORD FLEX SEL AWD STK# 6188P STK# 102315A HHR 2010 TOWN & COUNTRY 06 CHEVY

STK# 6202P

$8,995 $23,988 $7,995

$25,788 $24,888

$12,995

302-629-5514 • www.igburton.com STK# 102356A

6205P STK# 6186P

STK# 6173P

PICTURES ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. DUE TO PUBLICATION DATE SOME VEHICLES MAY BE SOLD AND NOT AVAILABLE. ALL PRICES GOOD FOR PUBLISHED DATE ONLY ON TIER ONE APPROVED CREDIT THRILDEALERS PREFERRED LENDER IN STOCK MODELS ONLY PRIOR DEALS EXCLUDED TAXES AND TAGS EXTRA CERTAIN RESTRICTIONS APPLY. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.

302-629-5514 • www.igburton.com $26,995 $29,998 $3,695

V8, AC, Power Locks & Windows, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry, Bedliner, CD Player/Changer V8, Manual, Security System, Power, Seats, Locks & Windows, Keyless Entry, Cd Player

WAS $28,995

NOW

$18,988

P/W P/L CRUISE DVD GPS LOADED

P/W P/L CRUISE DVD GPS LOADED Third & Fourth Passenger Doors, CD Player, Automatic, Security System, Power Locks, MP3 Player, AdjustableCD Pedals, Keyless Entry, Seats &Vehicle Windows, Player/Changer Anti-Theft System

WAS $31,998 NOW

$29,998

Automatic, 4 Cylinder, Power Locks

Power Locks & Windows, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry, CD Player/Changer

WAS $59,988

$26,995 $25,788

451940

$16,995

WAS $49,988

4

NOW

$8,995

PICTURESSALE ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLESALE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. DUE TO PUBLICATION DATE SOME VEHICLES MAY BE SOLD AND NOT AVAILABLE.SALE ALL PRICES GOOD FOR PUBLISHED DATE SALE ONLY ON TIER ONE APPROVED CREDIT THRU DEALERS PREFERRED LENDER. IN STOCK MODELS ONLY. PRIOR DEALS EXCLUDED. TAXES AND TAGS EXTRA. CERTAIN RESTRICTIONS APPLY - SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.

04 FORD RANGER

07 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB SLT

04 CROSSFIRE

www.igbu • 302-629-5514 302-629-5514 www.igburton.com 302-629-5514 • www.igburton.com STK# 6203P

04 FORD RANGER

06 NISSAN ALTIMA STK# 102384A

04 CROSSFIRE

STK 6176P

PICTURES ARE FOR DISPLAY VEHICLES STK# 6130QERRORS. DUE TO PUBLICATION DATE SOME STK#PURPOSES 6203P ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL STK 6176P MAY BE SOLD AND NOT AVAILABLE. ALL PRICES GOOD FOR PUBLISHED DATE ONLY ON TIER ONE APPROVED CREDIT THRU DEALERS PREFERRED LENDER. IN STOCK MODELS ONLY. PRIORPICTURES DEALSARE EXCLUDED. TAXES AND EXTRA. CERTAIN RESTRICTIONS APPLY - SEE DEALER FORVEHICLES DETAILS. FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY.TAGS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. DUE TO PUBLICATION DATE SOME MAY BE SOL

ONLY ON TIER ONE APPROVED CREDIT THRILDEALERS PREFERRED LENDER IN STOCK MODELS ONLY PRIOR DEALS EXCLUDED TAXES AND TAGS EXTR

PICTURES ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. DUE TO PUBLICATION DATE SOME VEHICLES MAY BE SOLD AND NOT AVAILABLE. ALL PRICES GOOD FOR PUBLISHED DATE ONLY ON TIER ONE APPROVED CREDIT THRU DEALERS PREFERRED LENDER. IN STOCK MODELS ONLY. PRIOR DEALS EXCLUDED. TAXES AND TAGS EXTRA. CERTAIN RESTRICTIONS APPLY - SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.


May 6 2010 S