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THURSDAY, MAY 11, 2006

VOL. 11 NO. 3

50 cents

NEWS HEADLINES TOP HONOR - The Delmarva Poultry Industry honors a local man with its most prestigious honor. Page 10 OPENING DAY - It’s now official - Nanticoke Little League has its opening day. Page 20 DAY OF PRAYER - Residents turn out to pray during a national event. Page 21

Players in the Nanticoke Little League

THE TOPS - A city of Seaford employee receives an honor during a ceremony at Delaware Tech. Page 24

NEW TRAIL - With bikers waiting, a new trail opens at Trap Pond State Park. Page 26 STRIKE OUT - The committee is making final plans for the annual Western Sussex Relay for Life. Page 30 MOTHER’S DAY - Still looking for that special gift for mom? Here is some help. Pages 33-35

The Palmer house on Phillips Street in Seaford has been flying two flags with yellow ribbons for their son and brother, Cpl. Cory Palmer. Photo by Ronald MacArthur Bikers are ready to hit the new park trail

THE HOSTS - Local Soroptimists pull out all the stops to host the regional spring conference. Page 42 SEAFORD EAGLES There was a time when Minor League ball was anything but minor in this area. Page 44

Seaford Eagles display at the Seaford Museum

SPRING SPORTS - The high school spring sports season is winding down. Inside sports

INSIDE THE STAR BEHIND PAGE ONE BUSINESS

3 6

BULLETIN BOARD CHURCH CLASSIFIEDS CROSSWORD ENTERTAINMENT GOURMET HEALTH LETTERS

28 16 56 29 31 41 38 55

LYNN PARKS MOVIES OBITUARIES OPINION PEOPLE POLICE JOURNAL SNAPSHOTS SPORTS TIDES/WEATHER TODD CROFFORD

15 7 17 66 15 14 65 45-53 67 17

Seaford’s Cory Palmer dies in service to his country By Lynn R. Parks and Ronald MacArthur Cory Palmer’s birthday was yesterday. The 2002 Seaford High School graduate would have been 22. But there was no celebration. Palmer, the son of Charles and Danna Palmer of Seaford, died this weekend after being wounded May 1 in a roadside bombing in Iraq. Palmer’s uncle, Ralph Palmer, also of Seaford, said on Monday that one Marine was killed outright in the explosion and that Cory was badly burned. He added that Charles and Danna Palmer were in Texas, where they flew to meet their son after learning that he had been injured. Cory died while being flown from Germany, where he was taken after the incident, to a burn treatment facility in San Antonio. Cory joined the Marine Corps in February 2003, after attending West Virginia University. He was a corporal, stationed at Camp LeJeune, N.C. He had been in Iraq for five weeks, on his

second tour there as a member of the 2nd Recon Battalion, A Company, 1st Platoon. He is the second Seaford High School graduate to be killed in Iraq. Ryan Long, who Cpl. Cory Palmer graduated in 1984-2006 1999, was killed April 3, 2003, when a car at a checkpoint where Long was a guard exploded. Since the start of the war in Iraq, more than 2,420 soldiers and Marines have been killed. More than 17,600 soldiers and Marines have been wounded. Montine Willin of Seaford is Danna Palmer’s sister and Cory’s aunt. She

described her nephew as a “lively, fun and life-loving young man.” “Anything Cory did, he did wholeheartedly,” added his grandmother, Kristina Swain, also of Seaford. Willin said that everyone in the family is experiencing “deep grief.” “The loss is too great to bear,” she added. “There was so much more that everybody had planned with Cory.” Palmer and Michael Bleile were classmates and played on the Seaford High soccer team. Bleile, who is a student at Salisbury University, Salisbury, Md., said that he saw Palmer about two years ago, after Palmer had completed his basic training. “He told me all about being in boot camp, and I was pretty much amazed at what they put you through,” Bleile said. “He told me that he wanted to be a guard at Camp David,” the presidential retreat west of Washington, D.C. Bleile said that Palmer, who played midfield, had to work hard to make the soccer team in his senior year. “He worked his tail off, running and everyContinued to page 12


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MORNING STAR

PAGE 3

BEHIND PAGE ONE

State prepares for execution By Ronald MacArthur The Delaware Department of Correction is preparing for the court-ordered execution of Robert W. Jackson III. The execution is scheduled between 12:01 a.m. and 3 a.m. on Friday, May 19. Jackson was found guilty of the April 3, 1992 murder of a Hockessin woman. He was also found guilty of trying to arrange the murder of James Burton, one of the men who testified against him during his 1992 trial. The Hockessin woman surprised Jackson and his accomplice Anthony Lachette as they were leaving her home after breaking in and stealing items to sell and purchase drugs. Lachette fled the area but Jackson remained and killed the woman with an ax. He was arrested on April 9, 1992. According to a court spokesperson, the pending court case in California regarding the legality of using lethal injections will not delay the scheduled execution in Delaware. His stay of execution was denied by the Delaware Superior Court on April 5. DERBY WINNER - For the second year a row, a horse with Delaware ties has won the Kentucky Derby. The winner Barbaro has won six straight races, a streak that started last fall at Delaware Park. The trainer, Michael Matz of West Grove, Pa. trains and races horses at Delaware Park, including the Derby winner. Matz, who is an Olympics equestrian medal winner for the U.S., also survived a plane crash 17 years ago and is credited with saving three children from the crash. They were reunited at the race.

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MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

City officials not happy with proposed road By Lynn R. Parks The city of Seaford is expressing its displeasure with a state proposal for a permanent business entrance off U.S. 13, just north of Elks Road. The Delaware Department of Transportation is proposing allowing the property at the northwest corner of 13 and Elks Road to have access to the dual highway. But city manager Dolores Slatcher said that allowing such access would only confuse an intersection that has just recently been reconfigured to be less confusing. “Do we want to create another situation like the one we just got rid of?” she said. “I think they are just asking for accidents again,” added councilwoman Grace

Peterson. According to the state plans, a church is being proposed for the south corner of the land. Slatcher admitted that a temporary access from U.S. 13 to the property will probably be necessary. But she said that as the land is developed and a proposed service road is built along the west edge of the property, giving any buildings built on it access to Elks Road, any U.S. 13 entrance should be eliminated. Slatcher will send a letter to DelDOT, expressing the city’s concerns. While the property is not in the city limits, the state, realizing that the city is moving in that direction, wanted its comments on the proposal.

Seaford Mayor Edward Butler hands Grace Peterson her nameplate during Tuesday night’s meeting. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

Newcomer Carlton Cannon wins Seaford board seat

Grace Peterson comes out of retirement to fill council seat

Newcomer Rev. Carlton L. Cannon Sr. won a seat on the Seaford Board of Education on Tuesday, topping two other candidates, including incumbent Jim Van Vleck, who had served one five-year term on the board. Cannon was the top vote-getter with 192 votes. Dr. Richard Sternberg received 129 votes and Van Vleck garnered 109 votes. Cannon will take his seat in July.

By Lynn R. Parks

Delmar man killed in accident at U.S. 13 intersection

Just two months after retiring from the city council seat she held for 12 years, Grace Peterson returned to the council chambers Tuesday night. She was sworn in to fill the seat left vacant by the death of Larry Miller, who was elected to his eighth term as councilman in March. Miller died April 11. At the last city council meeting he attended, he was named vice mayor by Mayor Ed Butler. Councilman Rhea Shannon, who was elected to the council in March, is the city’s new vice mayor. He is also serving

as police commissioner, a position Miller held for years. Peterson is the council liaison with city operations, councilwoman Pat Jones is the liaison with the parks and recreation department and councilman Mike Vincent is electric and fire commissioner. Councilwoman Leanne Phillips-Lowe, who was named to the council to fill the seat left vacant when Butler was elected mayor, is liaison with city administration. Peterson, with her husband Ben at her side, was sworn into her seat by city clerk Sharon Drugash. “It is so good to have her back,” said Butler.

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William C. Carr, 87, of Delmar was killed in an accident on Tuesday at 4:50 p.m. at the intersection of U.S. 13 and Rt. 54. According to Delaware State Police, Carr was traveling south on U.S. 13 and as he turned onto Rt. 54 he collided with a 1999 Dodge Durango driven by William K. Hearn Jr., 40, of Laurel, who was traveling north on U.S. 13. Police said that Carr was not wearing a seat belt and Hearn, who was wearing a seat belt, refused medical treatment. Police are asking anyone who witnessed the accident to call Cpl. Mike Nelson at 302-645-8221. Police are trying to determine which vehicle had a green light at the time of the crash.

Seaford High School presenting ‘Grease’ on stage The Seaford High School senior class will present the musical “Grease” this weekend in the Seaford High School Madden Auditorium. Shows are at 7 p.m. on May 11, May 12, May 13 and May 15. A special Mother’s Day matinee will take place at 2 p.m. on Sunday, May 14. Tickets are $5 for adults and $4 for students and will be available at the door.

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MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 5

Western Sussex back roads considered for new scenic, historic byway By Ronald MacArthur Anyone who travels on the back roads of western Sussex County knows there are some special roads that not only get you where you are going, but also provide access to beautiful scenery and historic spots. Because of that, groups in western Sussex have begun the process to possibly get a route designated as a Delaware Scenic & Historic Highway in western Sussex (tentatively called the Western Sussex Historic Byway). There are currently two roads in New Castle County with the designation - with no roads in southern Delaware. Members of the Seaford and Laurel chambers of commerce and the historical societies have met twice with Maria Andaya, a project planner with the Delaware Department of Transportation to learn more about the program. Last Thursday, the group met to pinpoint locations on a map that have special significance to the area - either historically or as points of interest. The next step is to devise a

route to connect as many of the locations as possible. Locations listed included the Ross Mansion, Trussom Pond, Bethel and Portsville, the Woodland Ferry, etc. Debbie Mitchell of the Laurel Chamber pointed out that some of the work has been done because the area has the Southern Delaware Heritage Trail already in place. The trail, opened in 2002, links many of the places listed by the group with roads throughout western Sussex - from Greenwood to Delmar. Andaya explained that a Scenic and Historic Highway offers an alternative route away from major highways, while helping to tell a story about the area’s heritage, recreational activities or beauty. She said that in order for a road (or route) to receive the designation and become part of the state and federal system, it must meet one of the following criteria: scenic, historic, cultural, recreational, natural or archaeological. “And what is there must be seen by travelers,” she added. “There is no question there are

roads in this area that meet this criteria,” she added. She will join with group members this week to ride part of the existing Heritage Trail to help develop a possible route. A sponsor also must be found for the project, which is usually a non-profit organization. Once a route is designated as a Scenic and Historical Highway, several things can happen, according to Andaya. Those include possible increased funding from

the state and federal governments, protection for the roadway and other resources along it that might be threatened, improved road maintenance, access to resources, identification on highway maps and assistance from the state offices of economic development and tourism. Once a route is selected, the group will have to write a corridor management plan. That plan will be evaluated by a committee with the final decision being

“Nanticoke received the 2005 HealthGrades® Gastrointestinal Care Excellence Award™ for being the top hospital for gastrointestinal care in Delaware. It’s especially gratifying for me. I’m part of the team. We ranked

This mission is possible thanks to Caitlin Wasson The first major fund raiser for “Mission: Possible” will be at Mt. Olivet United Methodist Church on Saturday, May 13, at 7 p.m. “Mission: Possible” is an organization started by Caitlin Wasson, a 10th grader at Seaford High School. She plans to contact area churches, schools and music teachers to identify those youth who could use these funds for their musical education. The concert will have a wide variety of musical styles performed by local talent. These performers range in age from 14 years old to retirement age. Pastor Tom Gross of Mount Olivet will begin the concert with several praise and worship songs. Cindy Bennett, accompanist of the Southern Delaware Choral Society, will perform “I Have Found a Hiding Place” on piano. Brenna James, who has been a member of the all-state band will play flute. Lori Jones a leader of the praise and worship team for Laurel Wesleyan Church will sing “Jesus Take the Wheel” and “In My Life.” The Christian rock band

“Undying Trust” with members Matt McCreary, Drew Graham and Jordan Kellermyer will play several numbers. Lori Miller, a leader of the Gethsemane Church praise and worship team will entertain with “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” and “Fields of Mercy.” Katie Hickey will perform “You Raise Me Up,” Jessica hearn will sing “My Redeemer” and Wasson will sing “Untitled Hymn (Come to Jesus)” and “I Don’t Know How to Love Him.” The Choral ensemble of the Southern Delaware Choral Society will appear as well as vocalist Beverly La Fazia. Vital Signs, a band made up of several area physicians and medical personnel, will keep everyone rocking to some oldies but goodies. Tickets, which are $10 for adults and $5 for students, are on sale at the Mt. Olivet Church office, Heritage Jewelers and the night of the concert (while seating is still available). Donations are also being accepted. Contact Caitlin Wasson at 629-6304.

made by the secretary of transportation. She said that state officials in Maryland designated 31 byways as Scenic and Historic - all state sponsored. “Our program is different in that we working from the grassroots asking local groups to sponsor,” Andaya said. “We are working to expand and add more byways.” Rt. 9 along the Delaware Bay and the route that follows the Underground Railroad are on the list.

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PAGE 6

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

Business BUSINESS MIX Print Shack, Inc. wins ninth consecutive award Print Shack, Inc. of Seaford received a Carlson Craft® award recognizing exemplary dealer excellence for 2005 for the ninth consecutive year. Every year, Carlson Craft® (the nation’s leading wholesale printing company) presents only a few select dealers with this award for outstanding performance and exceptional sales achievements. Started in 1987, Print Shack, Inc. has provided printing and promotional products to businesses large and small throughout the Delmarva Peninsula.

Home Team Realty announces top producers for month of April Frank Parks and Rob Harman, brokerowners of Home Team Realty, announce that Angie Zebley was the top listing agent and Mike Procino was the top selling agent for April 2006. The Home Team Realty office is located at 1258 Norman Eskridge Highway, behind McDonald’s, in Seaford.

Public reminded of dangers during Electrical Safety Month Delmarva Power employees and others who work with electricity year-round are acutely aware of the need for safety at all times. Since May is Electrical Safety month, and also a time to do work around your property, Delmarva Power reminds everyone to be careful when working with or near electricity. “Contact with electricity can cause serious injury or death,” says Larry Larimore, senior safety coordinator for Delmarva Power. “Electrical contact causes thousands of injuries and hundreds of deaths each year. Most of these injuries and deaths can be avoided with an increased awareness of electrical safety, such as noting locations of power lines when working outside.” When trimming trees or working around your home, know where the electric wires and equipment are and how to work safely around them. Avoid unnecessary risks when working

with electricity by calling a licensed contractor or electrician. If you are planning to dig, notify Miss Utility of Delmarva at 1-800-441-8355 to make sure the underground utilities are located and marked in advance as a safety precaution. Here are some additional electrical safety tips to follow this spring and yearround: • Remind children to stay away from electric facilities such as substations, transmission towers and transformers. • When carrying long or tall items, such as ladders, tree saws and pool cleaning equipment, hold them parallel to the ground. Look up before you raise them into the air to be sure they’re clear of any power lines. • Remember that electricity can move through conductive materials, such as water, metal, wood, aluminum, string and plastics. • Stay away from overhead lines. Be very watchful if you are trimming trees or work on near the electrical connection to your property. If you need to work near overhead wires, call Delmarva Power at 1800-375-7117. For more information on using electricity safely, visit www.delmarva.com.

Poultry and Soybean Industries want you to enjoy chicken tonight Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc. (DPI), the trade association for the Delmarva Peninsula’s broiler chicken industry, and the Delaware Soybean Board and Maryland Soybean Board, groups working for the state’s soybean farmers, have announced the creation of a new promotion to benefit both segments of agriculture. The soybean boards’ “thankachicken. com” promotion that began last year is intended to help the soybean farmers’ largest customers, which in the Delmarva region is the chicken industry. In other parts of the nation soybean farmers are promoting other sectors of animal agriculture. By helping their largest customers, soybean farmers benefit because it maintains or increases demand for their products. The Delaware and Maryland soybean boards are funded by farmers through the

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national soybean checkoff program. Through the checkoff one-half of one percent of the net market value of soybeans is assessed at the first point of sale for soybean research, marketing and education. During the campaign kick-off, DPI President Roger Marino noted the important relationship between the poultry industry and soybean growers. “We are very happy to be partners once again with America’s and this region’s soybean growers. They are an essential part of the three-legged stool that is needed to sustain Delmarva’s chicken industry. Those three legs are the poultry growers, the poultry companies, and the farmers who grow the feed ingredients needed by our chickens.” In a press recent conference near Georgetown, Susanne Zilberfarb, representing the Delaware Soybean Board, and Roger Schmick, vice chairman of the Maryland Soybean Board, and Marino announced the theme for this year’s promotion. “We wanted a message that would be effective and appropriate at this time. The message we chose is that chicken is a safe, nutritious, and delicious product to eat, as it always has been. “But right now the message is being overlooked by some people who are concerned about the Asian strain of influenza

that has been circulating in Asia and Europe.” Marino stressed that the United States is free of the Asian-Strain H5N1 influenza. Using soybean farmers’ money, 1,000 signs have been printed carrying the message, “Safe, Delicious, Nutritious…Eat chicken Tonight.” The signs were distributed through DPI to its members, starting at DPI’s annual membership booster banquet on April 25. These 24- by 18-inch signs are intended for display on farms, in members’ residential areas, and at poultry-related businesses to assure consumers that chicken is safe to eat. During his remarks, Marino stressed the unprecedented health surveillance of Delmarva’s chicken flocks. He assured consumers that chicken products will never come from houses where an avian influenza virus has been found. All birds in an avian influenza-positive house will be humanely destroyed and composted in the chicken houses. Marino said, “Consumers can be assured that Delmarva birds exposed to any type of avian influenza virus will not get into commerce.” Persons wanting new ways to prepare chicken can find them at the DPI website www.dpichicken.org and by contacting the Delmarva Poultry Industry office at 1-800878-2449.


PAGE 7

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17 , 2006

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The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 5/12 THRU THURSDAY, 5/18 Mission Impossible III . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . .1:05, 1:35, 3:50, 4:25, 6:25, 7:00, 9:05, 9:35 Hoot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:50, 4:00 The Sentinel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:25, 4:05, 6:50, 9:20 Silent Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:05, 9:40 Scary Movie 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:15, 4:45, 7:10, 9:20 An American Hunting . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4:40, 7:20, 9:45 Stick It . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:00, 4:45, 6:50, 9:05 United 93 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:20, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 The Wild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40 Just My Luck . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45, 4:20, 7:10, 9:30 Ice Age: The Meltdown . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 3:40 RV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:30, 4:10, 7:00, 9:10 Akeelah and The Bee . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 3:45, 6:30, 9:00 Poseidon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 4:50, 6:35, 7:15, 8:45, 9:30 Swimmers** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .not rated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:05, 4:15, 6:45, 8:50 **Brought to you by Rehoboth Beach Film Society

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 5/12 THRU THURSDAY, 5/17 Poseidon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . .Fri-Thu(12:10, 1:30, 2:40, 3:40, 4:30, 5:10) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6:45, 7:20, 7:50, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30 Just My Luck . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu(1:20, 4:10) 7:15, 9:50 Art School Confidential . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu(1:05, 4:05) 7:05, 9:35 Mission Impossible III* . . . . .PG13 . . . . . .Fri-Sun(12:40, 1:10, 1:40, 3:50, 4:20, 4:50) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:40, 10;10, 10:40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mon-Thu(12:40, 1:10, 1:40, 3:50, 4:20, 4:50) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:40, 10:10 Hoot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu(12:15, 2:45, 5:00) 7:55, 10:20 An American Haunting . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu(12:15, 2:40, 5:00) 7:55, 10:20 United 93 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu(1:00, 4:00) 7:20, 10:05 Stick It . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu(12:00, 2:30, 4:55) 7:45, 10:15 RV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu(12:25, 2:50, 5:15) 6:40, 7:35, 9:55 Akeelah And The Bee . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu(1:25, 4:15) 6:55, 9:45 Silent Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu 7:25, 10:25 The Wild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu(12:35) Scary Movie 4 . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu(1:15, 3:15, 5:20) 7:40, 9:50 Ice Age 2: The Meltdown . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu(12:05, 2:20, 4:40) () Discounted showtimes in Parenthesis * Pass/Discount Restrictions Apply AUTHENTIC MEXICAN

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PAGE 8

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 4 - 10, 2006

County EMS services takes time off to present awards The Sussex County EMS (SCEMS), Sussex County Paramedic Association and Sussex County Volunteer Ambulance Association held their annual EMS banquet on Friday, May 5, at the Baywoods Clubhouse in Millsboro. During the banquet a number of awards were given for professionalism and achievement, including awards for shift excellence, EMT, EMS nurse, EMS physician, emergency communications specialist, and Paramedic of the Year. As part of this year’s event, the 15th anniversary of paramedic service in Sussex County and Sussex County EMS was celebrated. State Rep. Pete Schwartzkopf was the guest speaker for the evening. The following awards were presented: Paramedic of the Year - Stuart Hensley, member, SCEMS paramedic competition team chairman, and public information education and relations committee. Field Excellence - Fred Haas, hazardous materials medical response team leader and field training officer. Administrative Excellence - Robert Stuart, deputy director interim director 2000 2001 and chief financial officer. Field Training Officer - Joseph Hopple, member, SCEMS paramedic competition team, public information officer, field training officer and hazardous materials medical response team duty officer. Emergency Communication Specialist of the Year - Chris Moore, certified emergency medical dispatcher. EMS Physician of the Year - Dr. Monte Remember

Spangler, M.D. chairman, Milford Memorial Hospital Emergency Department Physicians, former EMS medical director and former volunteer firefighter, Leipsic Fire Department. EMS Nurse of the Year - Fran Needham, director of emergency and ambulatory care, Beebe Medical Center. Shift excellence awards: Each year one paramedic from each of the four shifts is selected for shift excellence by their Supervisor for outstanding dedication by improving their clinical skills or outstanding achievement during their participation or leadership in departmental projects or activities. Lars Granholm, A-Shift, past chairman, Phoenix Committee and member, Lewes Volunteer Fire Department John Jacobs, B-Shift, field training officer. Lorri Bradley, C-Shift, special events team member, public information education and relations committee member and chart review committee member member, Laurel Fire Department Danny Tilghman, D-shift, Paramedic of the Year, 2004 and Safety committee chairman. Basic life support awards Each SCEMS selects an EMT from each of the seven paramedic districts to be honored as EMT of the Year for consistently displaying a high level of professionalism and dedication to excellence. Milford/Lincoln area - Mike Love,

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The following awards were presented for exemplary service and heroism Valor Award — On Sept 23, 2005, while attending a football game at Sussex Technical High School, Sussex County paramedics Glenn Marshall and Mark Sheridan, along with Laurel volunteer firefighters Todd Smith and Jason Boyce, and Blades volunteer firefighter Dustin Hamilton, responded while off-duty to a crash involving a small car that had been struck from behind by a full size pickup truck, causing the smaller car to catch fire. The driver was able to get out of the vehicle, however, three young women remained trapped. Without regard for their own safe-

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ty, paramedics Marshall and Sheridan and firefighters Hamilton, Smith and Boyce entered the car, and were able to remove all three remaining passengers prior to the arrival of fire and EMS resources, thus preventing any further injury to the victims of the crash. Department Achievement Award: Stuart Hensley, Holly Donovan, Robert Mauch and Joseph Hopple, members of the SCEMS paramedic competition team, were presented with the Department Achievement Award for their excellence in clinical expertise and teamwork, as evidenced by their gold and silver medal performances at the JEMS Games International Paramedic Competition in 2005 and 2006 respectively. Their outstanding demonstration of knowledge and ability in these international competitions has brought great credit and recognition to Sussex County EMS and to themselves as leaders in emergency medical services excellence. Certificates of recognition were presented to Chuck Snyder and Robert Stickels. Sussex County Volunteer Ambulance Association Awards: Fire Chief of the Year - Chief Dennis Swain, Georgetown. . Ambulance Captain of the Year - Capt. Paul Baker, Millsboro EMT of the Year - Barbara Walls, Roxana. Paramedic(s) of the Year - Jay Shine and Mark Murphy.

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PAGE 10

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

Charles Allen III receives the top DPI honor Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc. (DPI), the trade association for the Delmarva Peninsula’s chicken industry, held its 50th annual Booster Banquet April 25 in Salisbury and recognized 20 persons for outstanding work in or for the chicken industry. The J. Frank Gordy, Sr. Delmarva Distinguished Citizen Award, DPI’s highest honor, was presented to Charles C. Allen III, president and CEO of Allen Family Foods, Inc., a family-owned integrated poultry company based in Seaford. Allen has been a leader in Delmarva’s and the nation’s poultry industries, serving as chairman of the National Chicken Council in 1992-1993 and chairman of the National Chicken Cooking Contest in 2003. He is a regular contributor of ideas and policy recommendations to DPI and active in the political arena. His community contributions include service on the University of Delaware board of trustees, the Delaware Community Foundation and Nanticoke Health Services, Inc. He is a third generation poultry producer for a company that began operations in 1919. DPI’s Medal of Achievement awards were presented to Maryland Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich, Jr. and Delaware Secretary of Agriculture Michael T. Scuse. Gov. Ehrlich was honored for his efforts to strengthen the Maryland chicken industry and for reversing a negative attitude about the chicken industry in the highest echelons of the Maryland government. Specifically he was cited for his many contributions to help the poultry industry and all of agriculture during his three years as governor. His Poultry Issues Action Team in 2003, the reaffirmation of an avian influenza memorandum of understanding last year, an environmental agreement with Delmarva’s poultry companies in 2005, upholding an administrative law judge’s ruling against an illegal co-permitting scheme that his predecessor tried to foist upon the chicken companies, and this year’s Governor’s Agricultural Forum are among the governor’s accomplishments that were cited. It was noted that he was the first Maryland governor to attend the DPI

CHEER Center plans open house May 16 The Georgetown CHEER Center, located at 546 S. Bedford Street, Georgetown is having an open house on Tuesday, May 16, 10 a.m.1:30 p.m. The entertainment will be provided by the Bay-Tones beginning at 10:30 a.m. Lunch will be served at 11:45 a.m. for a donation of $2.50 for those 60+ and $4.50 for those under 60 years of age. Mark your calendar and plan on joining the fun. For more information or to RSVP call 856-5187.

Booster Banquet in its 50-year history. Michael Scuse was recognized for the many initiatives he has undertaken during his five years as Delaware secretary of agriculture. Of particular note was the leadership he has shown on avian influenza response and preparedness matters. During Delmarva’s 2004 avian influenza episode, he was involved in day to day activities and decision making. In the intervening years he has continued that aggressive involvement to help protect

Delaware’s and Delmarva’s chicken industries. Additionally, his work to protect the rights of farmers, to slow federal government intervention in the chicken industry, to investigate alternative electric sources for Delaware poultry growers, and his work to preserve farmers and farmland were lauded by DPI. Additionally, DPI recognized the following outstanding poultry producers. Selected by their companies from Delmarva’s 2,000 poultry growers, this year’s re-

cipients are: Wendy Bingham, Delmar, Del. - Tyson Foods, Inc.; Hand Me Down Farm (Jody and Donna Brown and Vickie Lambden), Bridgeville - Allen’s Hatchery, Inc.; Janet and Charles Postles, Milford - Perdue Farms Inc.; John and Diane Robbins, Milford - Allen’s Hatchery, Inc.; Frank and Dolly Timmons, Delmar, Del. - Mountaire Farms of Delmarva, Inc.; and Norris, Phyllis and Kevin West, Laurel - Allen’s Hatchery, Inc.

Utility Rates are Changing …So is the Plan to Help You Adjust T

he plan to allow Delmarva Power customers in Delaware to phase in new electricity rates has changed, to make it consistent with our plan in Maryland. We recognize and regret that recent changes may be confusing. At Delmarva Power, we want to help you make the right choice and explain how the phase-in plan will affect your monthly electricity bill. As we work across multiple states, it is our desire to ensure that all our customers feel they are well informed and treated fairly.

N

By participating in the phase-in plan, customers will pay lower rates now but pay the full increased cost of electricity plus the deferred amount later.

We invite you to ask questions, take action and visit our Web site. Your decision will affect what you pay for electricity for many months to come.

Delaware customers originally had until April 28th to make a decision whether to opt out of the phase-in plan or accept automatic enrollment. Customers who want to change their status can now take as long as they need to do so. We do, however, urge you to act quickly given that the new rates are already in effect.

Additional information will arrive soon in your mail, but if you have questions now, Delmarva Power is here to help. Visit our Web site at www.delmarva.com.

Similarly, if you originally opted out of the phase-in plan and remain comfortable with that decision, no further action is required. N If you are in the phase-in plan and wish to “opt out” or, N If you previously “opted out” of the plan and now wish to enroll, contact us by visiting www.delmarva.com or by calling 1-877-285-9316. Please have your account number handy.

Under the phase-in plan, your total bill will increase relative to your current bill as follows:

Interest charges have also been eliminated for customers choosing to phase-in the new rates. What hasn’t changed is the fact that customers in the phase in plan ultimately will pay the full increased cost of electricity plus the deferred amount beginning January 1, 2008.

Step 1: 15% on May 1, 2006;

We suggest the following:

Step 3: 19% on June 1, 2007, assuming no further changes in wholesale price;

N

If you are in the phase-in plan and wish to remain enrolled, no further action is required.

Step 2: 25% on January 1, 2007;

Step 4: Customers will begin to pay back the amount deferred from January 1, 2008 through June 1, 2009. This balance will be spread and billed equally during these 17 months.


MORNING STAR

Norris and Phyllis West of Laurel, poultry growers for Allen’s Hatchery, Inc., were honored by Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc. (DPI) as Outstanding Poultry Producers.

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 11

Hand Me Down Farm in Bridgeville, a poultry grower for Allen’s Hatchery, Inc., was recognized by Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc. (DPI) as an Outstanding Poultry Producer. The award was accepted by farm owners and operators, Donna and Jody Brown and Vickie Lambden.

Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc. (DPI) President Roger Marino (center) congratulates award recipients following the recent Delmarva Poultry Booster Banquet in Salisbury. DPI’s highest honor, the J. Frank Gordy, Sr. Delmarva Distinguished Citizen award, was given to Charles C. Allen III, (right) president and CEO of Allen Family Foods, Inc. in Seaford. DPI’s Medal of Achievement for a non-elected official was awarded to Delaware Secretary of Agriculture Michael T. Scuse (left).

Nanticoke Rotary Golf Tournament taking place May 19

During the recent Delmarva Poultry Booster Banquet in Salisbury, DPI’s 2006 Medal of Achievement for an elected official was presented by DPI President Roger Marino (right) to Maryland Gov. Robert Ehrlich.

The annual Nanticoke Rotary Golf Tournament is scheduled for Friday, May 19, at the Seaford Golf & Country Club. There will be a 9 a.m. shotgun start. Cost is $95 per player and includes a continental breakfast, golf, cart, lunch, prizes and contests. Fun contests include longest drive, closest to the pin, and putting. Support of the annual Hero’s Scholarship Golf Tournament has allowed Nanticoke Rotary to provide over $100,000 to fund scholarships funds for the youth of western Sussex County. Sponsorships are still available. Contact Tom Brown at 302-629-6611, ext. 2405 for more information. Donations of golf tournament gifts are also welcome. Contact Don Hollenbeck at 628-9900 about gift donation opportunities

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PAGE 12

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

Area mourns the loss of a ‘true hero’ Continued from page 1

thing else,” he said. But that work paid off, Bleile added: “I remember when he scored the game-winning goal against IR, and we finished the game 2-1. He loved every second of it, and we all loved it because of him. It couldn’t have happened to a better person at the time. We had a saying, that good things happen to good people, and that was a good thing that happened to him.” Bleile said that Palmer was changed after he went through his basic training. “There was a major difference in him after he was in the Marines,” he said. “The mil-

Seaford flags at half-mast Seaford Mayor Edward H. Butler Jr. has announced that flags at all city of Seaford facilities will be lowered to half mast in memory of the death of Cpl. Cory L. Palmer of Seaford. Cpl. Palmer was serving his country in Iraq in 2nd Recon Battalion, A Company 1st Platoon when he was mortally wounded. “Our thoughts and prayers are with the family during this difficult time. It is a small token of our gratitude for Cory’s service to our Country that we lower our flags in his remembrance, and we encourage all local entities to do the same,” said Butler. It is with the governor’s blessing that the state flag be lowered. The White House has advised that the U.S. flag also be lowered in conjunction with the governor’s decision. Flags will remain at half mast until following the services, which have yet to be announced.

itary made him a man. You could tell that. If he had gotten out of the service, there is no doubt that he would have done something very meaningful with the rest of his life. “ “He was a great kid, and the Marines gave him the mechanism to become that wonderful man that he became,” added Willin. Tim Lee, a Seaford High School teacher and soccer coach, remembers Palmer as a free spirit. Lee said that he spent time talking with Palmer this past November during the annual alumni soccer game. “I was impressed with his maturity,” he said. “I guess that came from being older and serving in a war zone. He had turned into a man. There is no doubt that he was proud of what he was doing. “He was very much into the military mindset and he knew that this was the right thing for him to be doing. He had found his niche in life. It’s sad that it has to come to an end like this,” he added. Lee remembers Palmer as a unique student. “When he was in school, he was a handful, but a likable handful. There was something about him that made you like him. During his senior year, he matured somewhat and ended up playing on the varsity team. “My memory of Cory as a high school senior was that of a prankster,” the coach said. “It was great to see how he had turned out. He was one of our success stories.” The news of a loss of a young person is becoming too frequent in Lee’s life. Over the past three to four years, five young

people from Seaford whom he has coached have passed away — three in accidents and two in the military. “If this is a reflection on the U.S. how many young people die, it’s very sad. Events like this bring it home to all of us,” Lee said.

In addition to his parents, Palmer is survived by two brothers, Thad and Kyle, both of Seaford, his paternal grandparents, Byron and Phyllis Palmer, and his maternal grandmother, Kristina Swain. As of press time, information about his funeral service was unavailable.

Two Seaford youth have died in Iraq By Lynn R. Parks Cory Palmer, who died Friday from injuries he received in an explosion in Iraq, was the second Seaford High School graduate to be killed in the war. Army Spc. Ryan Long, 21, a 1999 graduate of Seaford High School, was killed near Baghdad April 3, 2003, in a suicide bombing. Both men were killed just days before their 22nd birthdays. Long was the son of Rudy and Donna Long. Like Palmer, Long played on the Seaford soccer team; when Long was a senior, Palmer was a freshman. Long also played on the school’s golf team. At the time of his death, he was a member of the Army’s Rangers, an elite lightinfantry unit charged with carrying out special missions. He was serving with the 3rd Battalion of the 75th Ranger Regiment, based in Fort Benning, Ga., According to reports released after Long’s death, he was killed at a checkpoint northwest of Baghdad. A woman, who appeared to be pregnant, jumped out of a stopped car and was screaming. When

the soldiers approached the car, it exploded. Two soldiers in addition to Long were killed and two were injured. Also killed were the woman and the driver of the car. The Long family moved to Seaford in 1989. Rudy Long was a career Army officer and retired after 23 years as a major with the Army Reserves. He said after his son’s death that Ryan always wanted to join the military, following in the footsteps not only of his father but of his grandfather and great-grandfather as well. At Seaford High, Ryan Long was a member of the Junior Naval ROTC program. He joined the Army on Sept. 7, 1999, just four months after graduating from high school. He underwent his training, including the Ranger course and paratrooper training, at Fort Benning. Before going to Iraq, he served two tours of duty in Afghanistan. Services for Long were held April 12, 2003, in Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church, Seaford. He was buried April 16 in Gockel Cemetery at St. Mary Help of Christians Roman Catholic Church, Glen Haven, Wis.

NOTICE Residents of Delmar Delaware School District

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✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

MORNING STAR

Tickets are going fast for tribute to Rep. Tina Fallon The Seaford Women’s Republican Club and the city of Seaford will have a community tribute for 39th District Rep. Tina Fallon on Saturday, May 20, at the Seaford Volunteer Fire Hall starting at 5:30 p.m. The celebration will be the official farewell party to Fallon who has served 14 consecutive two-year terms in Delaware’s House of Representatives. Fallon announced on Monday, Nov. 14, 2005 that she will not seek another term. Anyone willing to participate as a corporate sponsor and those wishing to make presentations should contact Trish Booth at 629-9173. Tickets are $25 and available at the city hall.

Seaford Mayor’s Right Choice Award deadline nears The City of Seaford is proud to announce that nominations for the Mayor’s Right Choice Award are now being accepted. This award is given to a high school senior who resides in the Seaford School District and has made the right choices in life, exhibited a positive influence on the Seaford community and maintained a drug free lifestyle. This award will be presented at the regular meeting of mayor and council on May 23. The winner will receive an engraved plaque and $500. Applications can be picked up at city hall, 414 High St., Monday through Friday (8 a.m. to 5 p.m.) or from the guidance offices of Seaford High School, Sussex Technical High School and Seaford Christian Academy. The deadline for submitting completed applications is May 12. They may be sub-

PAGE 13

mitted by mail (P.O. Box 1100, Seaford, DE 19973) or by fax (629-9307) to the attention of Amy Walls. Questions should also be directed to Walls at 629-9173.

Last two days of spring clean-up are May 11 and 12 Seaford’s annual clean-up week is scheduled for May 8-12. The following is the pick-up schedule remaining for the week: Thursday, May 11 - Martin Farms, Westview and Parsons Village; Friday, May 12 - Woodside Manor. Public works employees will haul away unwanted materials at no charge for city residents only. Bags and containers should not be more than 50 pounds and containers will not be returned. Do not place leaves, limbs, twigs or grass clippings on the curbline during clean-up week. Normal pick up of these items will continue the following week. No household garbage or hazardous chemicals will be picked up, including freezers, refrigerators, air conditioners or other appliances which contain, or many have contained freon. Debris created by private contractors (trees, construction, etc.) will not be picked up and is the responsibility of the contractor. All materials for pick up must be placed on the curbline no later than 8:30 a.m. on the day scheduled.; employees are not permitted to go on private property. Once a street has been cleared, the trucks will not return. For more information, phone 6299173.

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PAGE 14

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

Mother, son charged in series of burglaries On May 3, Delaware State Police detectives at Troop 4 completed an investigation into an alleged interstate burglary ring involving Everett L. and Lois E. Pack of Pot-Nets Bayside. According to Cpl. Jeffry C. Oldham, public information officer, the investigation began on April 19, when a detective from the Lancaster Police Department in Pennsylvania contacted Troop 7 to inquire about the Packs, whom they believed were living in Millsboro. The Lancaster police told Delaware police the mother and son were driving a silver PT Cruiser with stolen Pennsylvania tags, and the car had been seen at a burglary scene. It was also reported that they were pawning numerous items in pawn shops in Pennsylvania. Additionally, Lois Pack was wanted on violation of probation in Lancaster County, and Everett Pack was wanted for violation of parole by Pennsylvania State Police. Detectives confirmed that the Packs were residing on River Road in Pot-Nets Bayside. They also confirmed that the silver PT Cruiser was present, but the registration plates had been switched. This plate had been stolen from a different vehicle in the Lancaster area. Detectives

from Troop 4 contacted multiple police departments in the Lancaster area, according to Oldham, and with their help received pawn lists. From these lists it was determined that the Packs had allegedly pawned items that had been stolen from self storage units and vehicles that were burglarized in the Millsboro and Milton areas. On April 28, detectives along with troopers from Troop 7, attempted to execute a search warrant at their residence. However, the Packs refused to come to the door, and barricaded themselves inside with a pit-bull, according to Oldham. During a brief standoff, Everett Pack attempted to flee from the residence through a back door. However, he was taken into custody without incident. Officers then entered the residence and took Lois Pack into custody. During the execution of the search warrant, officers located a small amount of marijuana, drug paraphernalia, hypodermic needles, a stolen stereo, and numerous stolen vehicle registration plates. The subsequent investigation has linked the Packs to three home burglaries and three residential shed burglaries in PotNets Bayside, 18 self-storage unit burgla-

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ries (which occurred at Longneck Mini Storage, Sentinel Self Storage, and Peninsula Self Storage), vehicle burglaries, and the theft of a utility trailer. A total of $35,472 in property was stolen during these burglaries, and $1,520 worth of damage was caused. The stolen utility trailer was recovered in Lancaster. The Packs have also been linked to more than 20 burglaries and thefts in Pennsylvania. Some of these crimes included the theft of firearms and vehicles. Everett L. Pack, 30, of River Road, was arrested on 103 criminal charges including burglary, conspiracy, theft, attempted theft, criminal mischief, receiving stolen property, resisting arrest, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, and possession of a hypodermic needle. He was committed to the Sussex Correctional Institution in lieu of $64,500 cash bail. Lois E. Pack, 68, of River Road, was arrested on 100 criminal charges including burglary, conspiracy, theft, attempted theft, criminal mischief, receiving stolen property, and resisting arrest. She was committed to the Women’s Correctional Institution in lieu of $59,500 cash bail.

Female law officers attend conference in Rehoboth In early May, nearly 200 female law enforcement officers from the region joined for the Mid-Atlantic Association of Women in Law Enforcement 20th annual conference at the Atlantic Sands Hotel & Conference Center in Rehoboth Beach. All training focused on leadership in homeland security. Classes were directed to law enforcement officers and executives alike, and included Trends in Suicide Bombers, Terrorism for the Next Generation: Lessons Learned from Chechnya, Prevention and Responding to Post Traumatic Stress Disorders, and panel discussions on information sharing and women in law enforcement. On Tuesday, May 2, a reception was held at the Cape May-Lewes Ferry Terminal to honor the Founders and Past Executive Boards of MAAWLE. The reception was held to honor those who had the vision and initiative to establish this organization 20 years ago, as well as past executive boards which sustained those dreams and promoted additional growth. The Mid-Atlantic Association of Women in Law Enforcement is a professional organization of law enforcement officers promoting women in the field from Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Washington, DC. MAAWLE strives to develop and encourage the professional development of law enforcement officers and affiliates of both genders.

“Meet Your Realtor...” Fran Ruark, REALTOR (302) 629-4514, Ext. 214 - Office (302) 536-6014 - Direct • (302) 745-5582 - Cell fran@cfmnet.com Fran, who describes herself as a “transplant” to Sussex County, grew up in nearby Federalsburg, MD. She moved to Seaford while in the tenth grade when she met her husband Ron. After high school they married and have just celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary. She and Ron are the parents of three sons, Troy, Todd, and Trent, who all live locally with their families. She is the proud grandparent of eight children ranging in age from nearly 18 years down to 4 months. Fran has been actively selling real estate since 1979. She managed Chandler Heights Apartments for 13 years, a job she enjoyed so much that she and Ron started purchasing rental properties after Ron retired from DuPont in 1996. (Ron is also a licensed real estate agent). The couple has purchased several “fixer-uppers” that they have totally refurbished and either lived in, rented out, or sold. Since returning to real estate full-time in 1995, Fran has been a top producer every year in both her office and in western Sussex County. She adheres to a strong code of ethics in real estate and as a way of life. Fran believes that everyone should live by the “Golden Rule.” Though totally immersed in her career as a REALTOR, she believes that family and helping others is what life is really about. Her pastimes include decorating, reading, and being with her husband and family. Fran serves on the Board of Directors at Callaway, Farnell and Moore. She is a member of the Sussex County Association of REALTORS, where she serves on the Professional Standards Committee, as well as the state and national Associations of REALTORS. She is also a member of the Nanticoke Rotary Club, is President of Williamsburg Manor and Yorktown Woods Board of Directors (elderly housing), and is a member of the Atlanta Road Alliance Church. If you are looking for someone totally informed about the real estate market, who enjoys helping people, and who lives by a strong code of ethics, look no further! Call Fran today at 629-4514, Ext. 214; or her direct line at (302) 536-6014, or her cell phone at (302) 745-5582. You may just catch her enthusiasm as she eagerly tries to help you!

25322 Church Rd., Seaford (Rt. 20A in Concord)

302-628-8114

500 W. Stein Highway • FAX (302)629-4513 • 22128 Sussex Highway • Seaford, DE 19973 • Fax (302)628-8504 (302)629-4514 • (302)628-8500 • (800)966-4514 • www.cfmnet.com


MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 15

Danger lurks in even the most peaceful gardens We had never seen the groundYNN ARKS hog before. But it was obvious I arrived just in time to from his lack of circumvention see her holding the poor that he had been creature in her teeth and here before: His shaking him, in the same journey from the woods to our way that she shakes her shed was stuffed animals. straight, with nary a turn to the feet away. left or the right. And still he came, undeterred We first spotted him — and I by two humans and a very interuse “him” here just because he ested dog who were watching. He struck me as male. I have no dicrossed the yard and disappeared rect knowledge of the groundhog’s gender — when he was just under the shed, safe from even a brown spot in the field, lumber- the most curious canine. We did not see him again. But ing toward our home. Through binoculars, my husband and I de- Maisey knew he was there. For days, she circled the shed nearly termined that he was indeed a continuously, running when she groundhog, then watched his caught the scent of something. steady travel. He stopped on occasion, to eat something from the When she was confined to the house, she walked from window ground, probably corn left from to window, hoping to catch a last year’s harvest. He ran someglimpse of her new acquaintimes, other times he stood up to tance. She even gave up sleepcheck his surroundings. But mostly he walked, wobbling back ing, very strange for a dog who typically naps between and forth in the way of creatures naps. that are short and wide. Five days after we saw the My husband shortly gave up groundhog’s arrival, I witthe watch — groundhogs, after nessed his unhappy end. I was all, are not exactly rare. But I on my way to the lawn mower continued to observe through the and Maisey, running ahead of binoculars his journey across the me, suddenly dashed around brown field. the corner of the shed. I ran Suddenly, he crossed into after her, but I was too late. I green and I realized that he had arrived just in time to see her hit the edge of our yard. Binocuholding the poor creature in lars can trick you that way — her teeth and shaking him, in you think that things are far the same way that she shakes away, but large because of the her stuffed animals. magnification, then you realize When I called her, Maisey that they are so large because reluctantly left her prize and they are near. When I took down slunk over to me. The groundthe glasses, I saw that the hog tried to get up from his groundhog was no more than 20

L

P

back, then fell back. Within minutes, he was dead. I felt sick. Foolishly sick, I scolded myself as I gave up on cutting the grass and went back inside. Groundhogs are a dime a dozen — we see them all the time, walking on ditch banks, foraging along the side of the road, squashed on the highway. And Maisey was only acting out of instinct — killing to eat despite the fact that she had inside a bowl full of food and that she too wobbles when she walks. But my yard is a sanctuary. It is where I go, not to encounter but to escape from the world of violence and needless death. It is the place where there are no newspapers, no newscasts, no daily announcements of war dead and bombs. Where beauty and quiet can cover man’s willingness, even after tens of thousands of years of civilization, to turn to

weapons to solve disputes. In tribute to the groundhog, I read about his kind in our faithful guide to the natural world, the “Fieldbook of Natural History” by Laurence Palmer and Seymour Fowler. I skimmed over the part about spring litters of two to eight, “blind, naked and helpless,” and focused on the animal’s range, more than half of the United States, and on its habits. “Fights most effectively,” the book says. “Whistles when alarmed.” Oddly enough, in the scientific classification of things, order primates falls just before order rodentia, of which the groundhog is a member. In my book, the entry on man, a primate, is on the page previous to that of the groundhog entry. I found myself reading about the natural history of Homo sapiens, and of our accomplishments in science, art, literature, archi-

tecture and music. Then in a chapter called “Man, the Destroyer,” Palmer and Fowler conclude their entry: “We have enslaved weaker races and weaker individuals of our own race and of our own families. We have kept people in ignorance of how they can avoid disease, of how they can live within their incomes. In part as a result of these practices, we find a world of recurring, increasingly destructive wars. For this, our generation will be considered as lacking in intelligence by our successors. We shall justly deserve this condemnation.” The groundhog has been buried. Maisey has turned her attention back to rabbits, which she has no hope of catching, and to lying in the sun while I pull weeds. Our garden, as long as I don’t think about the groundhog, is peaceful again.

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PAGE 16

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

CHURCH BULLETINS Gospel Talent Search The ninth annual Mountaire Gospel Talent Search will take place Thursday, Friday and Saturday, May 11-13, at Bayshore Community Church in Gumboro. Last year more than 120 churches sent singers, musicians and songwriters to perform for $30,000 in prize money in adult, youth and children divisions. This year, Mountaire will again offer $30,000 in prizes for the winners.

Mother’s Day service at Central Central Worship Center (formerly Epworth Fellowship Church) in Laurel will have a special Mother’s Day Service on May 14. Joyce Thomas from Seaford will be speaking at the 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. services. All ladies will receive a special gift for Mother’s Day. For more information, call 875-7995.

Concord Mother’s Day concert Susie Luchsinger, multiple CCMA winner and Dove Award nominee (sister of country singer Reba McIntire) will be in concert on Sunday, May 14, Mothers’ Day, at 7 p.m. at Concord United Methodist Church, 25322 Church Road, Seaford. For more information call 628-8114.

Mount Olivet classes on DVD The story of Jesus on DVD was recently mailed to every home in the Seaford area. If it has stirred your interest to know more about the real Jesus, Mount Olivet Church, at 315 High St., in Seaford is offering classes for that purpose — “Who is this Jesus?” The class will be held on Sundays at 9:45 a.m., starting May 21 and on Tuesdays at 7 p.m., starting May 23. This investigative Bible study explores Jesus’

beginnings, his ministry as teacher and healer, and his role as redeemer and lifegiver. The class will meet for six sessions. All are welcome at either of these classes. Call the church office at 629-4458. There will be an outdoor Memorial Day concert on Saturday, May 27, from 1 to 3 p.m. at Victory Tabernacle Church of God, U.S. 13A, between Seaford and Laurel. For information phone 629-8070.

dinner music will be provided during dinner by Jerry Jones and Mark Lowery CD Specials with live performances by “Lights of Home” and musical memories by Charles Michel (music from the 1940s to 1980s). The price is $18 a person with advance tickets only with 200 tickets available. Groups of six or more must reserve a table in order to sit together. Call Ruth Rhoades at 629-0789 for tickets and table reservations. All adults are welcome with proceeds going to missions projects.

Mary & Martha Tea Room

Concert at Trinity United

The Mary & Martha Tea Room, a program for women sponsored by Take My Hand Ministry, will be on May 17 from 2 to 4 p.m. at 102 Maryland Ave. in Greenwood. The guest speaker will be the Rev. Sarah Stephens of Felton. A love offering will be taken for the speaker, and a light luncheon will be served. For further information contact Dr. Michaele Russell at 349-4220.

Everett Warrington and the Gospel Gents will be in concert at Trinity United Methodist Church (near Trap Pond) at 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, May 21. A fellowship dinner preceeds the service at 5 p.m.

Memorial Day concert May 27

River of Life Video series

The JC Block Party in downtown Laurel will have free games for all ages, entertainment on stage all day and free lunch provided on Sunday, May 21, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., on Market Square Park and Janosik Park in Downtown Laurel. The event is sponsored by Laurel Wesleyan Church. For details call 875-538.

A video series on love, sex, marriage and romance which consists of six 60minute sessions addressing the art of attraction, dating, courtship, intimacy, conflict, romance and commitment is being presented by Tommy Nelson, pastor of Denton Bible Church, Denton, Texas. He has been featured on Focus On The Family radio broadcast. Sessions will be held Saturdays, May 27 through July 1, at 11 a.m., at River of Life Christian Center, 17 West Market St., Greenwood. For more information call 349-9420.

Fun and fellowship dance

Concord special events

St. John’s United Methodist Church will have a fun and fellowship dance on Saturday, June 17, from 5:30 to 10 p.m. The dinner (choice of steak or baked chicken breast) will be catered by the Seaford Men of the Moose. Christian and

Concord United Methodist Church, 25322 Church Road, Concord, Rt. 20A east of Seaford has the following upcoming events: Saturday, May 13, 7 a.m. to noon, yard sale and flower sale. Refreshments.

JC Block Party May 21

Sunday, May 14, 7 p.m., Susie Luchsinger in concert, for Mother’s Day. A free will offering will be taken. proceeds to benefit Concord’s local ministries.

Drama, Book of Esther June 4 Messiash’s Vineyard Church, Laurel, will be performing the Book of Esther. The drama is entitled “Esther and the King.” Plan to attend on Sunday, June 4, at 9:30 a.m. and our evening performance at 7 p.m. This exhilarating account of the Book of Esther involves a beautiful young orphan girl who rises from obscurity to become queen. She even hides a secret that could be her demise. There is an ambitious villain whose passion is to destroy the innocent. For details call 875-4646.

Mt. Calvary Mother’s Day There will be a Mother’s Day Prayer Breakfast at Mt. Calvary United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall, 28 Church St., Bridgeville, on Saturday, May 13, at 8 a.m. Guest preacher will be the Rev. Faye Corbin of Brotherly Love House of Praise, Manokin, Md. Sister Mary L. Grant, the Mother of the Church and wife of the late Rev. Roland Grant (a pastor from the old Delaware Conference) will be honored. Menu will consist of sausage, scrambled eggs, home fries, scrapple, grits, biscuits with jelly or butter, mixed fruit, coffee or orange juice. Cost of tickets is $7 and must be purchased by May 10. Take out orders may be purchased at a cost of $7.50 and can be picked up from 6:30 a.m. until 7:30 a.m. Call ahead for orders (302) 337-7090. Sponsored by the Women’s Day Committee of Mt. Calvary. For details, contact Vera Smack at 2451861 or Betty Murray at 337-8880.

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Trap Pond, CHURCH NearLaurel, Del. 875-7715 Sun. School 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pastor Tina Whaley

“A caring church, a giving church, a sharing church; showing love, warmth and friendship to all.”

St. John’s United Methodist Church Pine & Poplar Sts., Seaford 302-629-9466 Web site: http://home.dmv.com/-stjohns/ E-mail: stjohns@dmv.com NURSERY & HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

SUNDAY WORSHIP 8:30 & 11:15 am Traditional 9:45 Sunday School 9:50 am Contemporary Come as you are… and be transformed in the love of Christ!

Centenary United Methodist Church “Making Disciples of Jesus Christ for Over 200 Years” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Every Sunday Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m.

Rev. John W. Van Tine, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1010 S. Central Ave., Laurel Phone: 875-7748 Donny Weimar, Minister Worship Services: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Bible Study: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m.

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching Youth Group Sunday Night 7 pm

In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

Worship 11 a.m. • Sun. School 10:00 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Bethel Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

HARVEST CHRISTIAN CHURCH

510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Fred Duncan Church: 875-4233 Parsonage: 875-3398 Sunday Services: 8:30am Praise 9:30am Sunday School,11am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church 600 S. Central Ave., P.O. Box 293 Laurel, DE 19956 ~ (302) 875-3644 Rev. Rita B. Nelson, Rector Mid Week Eucharist & Healing Service - Wed. @ Noon Holy Eucharist & Church School Sunday @ 9:30 am

“Heart Felt Praise” Relevant Bible Teaching Children’s Ministry Midweek Bible Study Tom Birowski, Pastor Seaford, Del. • 628-7771

Church Of The Nazarene

94 Walnut Street, Laurel, DE 19956

Phone 875-7873 SUNDAY WEDNESDAY Morning Worship 10:45 a.m. Prayer & Bible Study Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. 7 p.m. God’s Big Back Yard THURSDAY 9:30 a.m. Underground - 6:00-8:00 Evening Service. - 6:00 p.m. “Investing in People”

Central Worship Center 4 Mi. East of Laurel, Del. (on Sycamore Road)

875-7995 - Pastor Bob Miller SUNDAY Adult Classes..................9 a.m. Worship/Kid’s Ministry. .....................9:00 & 10:30 a.m. Youth.........................6:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY Bible Study................7:00 p.m. Nursery Provided

EPWORTH CHRISTIAN SCHOOL PRE-SCHOOL-GR. 8 Featuring A Beka, Traditional Program For More Information Call

302-875-4488

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road 68, South of Laurel Laurel, Del. Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m. www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

Christian Church of Seaford Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298 Minister: John Herbst SCHEDULE OF SERVICES Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love


MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 17

Why the fuss over the facilities? By the Rev. Todd K. Crofford Laurel Wesleyan Church

PASTOR’S PERSPECTIVE

Ever have an embarrassing moAre there individuals ment? One of the classics is being preoccupied and accidentally findwho actually don’t ing yourself strolling into the wrong bathroom. Well, if that is a know whether they are concern for you, more confusing days may lie ahead. a boy or a girl? This just in from an Online news service... A task force at Colorado University in Boulder is recommending that the school convert following questions for me? Will you feel more bathrooms into unisex facilities in safe sending your 10-year-old daughter order to prevent discrimination against into a bathroom where there could possi“gender queer” individuals on campus, ac- bly be a 35-year-old man lurking? Now cording to the Daily Camera. will you be required to go into the stalls The Transgender-Gender Queer task with your kids at every age just so they force says more “all-gendered,” multi-stall are safe? Who thinks that’s a good idea? bathrooms need to be created. The new Are there individuals who actually bathrooms, if they are built, will be desigdon’t know whether they are a boy or a nated by a special icon, half of which is girl? Are there those who look at the two wearing a dress and the other half wearing signs and can’t figure out which way to pants. go? I am not asking whether they “feel” First, I want to say that I am aware that like a girl or a boy. To this day, gay men homosexuals at time face unkindness and use men’s rooms and lesbian women use abuse at the hands of mean-spirited peowomen’s rooms. Are we guilty of being ple. There is no place for that in any nainsensitive to ask the transgendered to just tion anywhere. It is wrong to be unkind, pick? derogatory, or violent toward any and Ultimately the question is whether acevery person. tions like this further blur the lines of genYet I question the claim that having der that remain important in our world. only men’s and ladies’ rooms is discrimiBoys and girls are not identical and were natory. Your gender is the very first fact never intended to be. My wife is my equal, established upon your birth. Your doctor my complement, my partner and my takes one look and says, “It’s a boy” or everything; but she is not identical to me. “It’s a girl.” Gender is anatomic fact. I have four daughters and a son. They For as long as municipalities have been are equal in my heart but far from identiproviding restrooms we’ve been providing cal. And so far, they understand which equally for men and women (Except bathroom they need to use. The day may women’s rooms are almost always nicer.) be coming when they won’t even be able It is not discriminatory to make such a to translate the sign on the door well distinction; it is simply a nod to a distincenough to know which bathroom to enter. tion God already made. I hope not. What kind of irrational thinking beThe Rev. Crofford is Senior Pastor at Laurel Wesleyan lieves that unisex bathrooms are a step Church. His views do not necessarily represent the views of the congregation or Wesleyan Church International. You forward? Can someone please answer the may email pastortodd@laurelwesleyan.org

OBITUARIES Edith Jane Smack, 81 Edith Jane Smack died at her home near Laurel, on Monday, May 1, 2006. She was born on Aug. 18, 1924, in Laurel, a daughter of Eben Thomas Ennis and Melinda Jane Brown Ennis. She retired after working as a seamstress for many years for the Delmar Pant factory. She was a member of St. Matthew’s First Baptist Church in Laurel. She was preceded in death by her parents. She was the youngest and last of 11 children. She is survived by her husband, Leon Lee Smack; and three step-children, Leon Smack and William Harvey Smack, both of Wilmington, and Mary Drummond of Bridgeville; two foster children, Elijah Dixon and Dante Tingle, both of Laurel; and many nieces and nephews. Her funeral service was May 6 at St. Matthew’s First Baptist Church in Laurel, with the Rev. Nathan McCoy officiating. Interment was in the church cemetery.

C. Victor Williams, Jr., 81 C. Victor Williams, Jr. of Federalsburg, died at Dorchester General Hospital in Cambridge on Saturday, April 29, 2006.

Obituaries are run without charge thanks to the support of area churches.

He was born August 17, 1924 in Salisbury, Md., the son of Clarence V. Williams Sr. and Iva Phippin Williams. He joined the Army in March of 1943 and was discharged in January of 1946 after serving in the Pacific theatre. He received the Asiatic Pacific service ribbon with bronze star and the Philippine liberation ribbon with one bronze star and the World War II victory ribbon. Mr. Williams worked as a bricklayer before retiring after 42 years. He then worked for M&M Refrigeration for a few years and later worked for M & L GMC in Federalsburg. He was a member of Christ United Methodist Church where he served as head usher for many years, sang in the senior choir and was a member of the United Methodist Men. He was a member of Federalsburg VFW Post 5246. He also umpired local baseball games for area leagues for many years. He played bass guitar and also sang for more than 20 years with the Christian Troopers gospel group while singing in area churches. He was an avid NASCAR fan and faithfully attended races in Daytona and Continued on page 18

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor MON. Youth Meeting SUNDAY 6:30 - 8 p.m. Sunday School ..... 9:45 a.m. WEDNESDAY Worship...............11:00 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m.

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel 302-875-4646 PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

Dr. Carl G Vincent, Senior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes, Music Minister Sunday 9:30 am Wednesday 7:00 pm Children’s Church • Nursery

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30-5 p.m.; Sun. 8-8:25 a.m.

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Youth: Ben Colegrove Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

Laurel, Del.

LAUREL-MT. PLEASANT CHARGE

“Come and Experience JESUS!”

Passing on God’s Love and Grace in Laurel, Delmar & Surrounding Area

Sunday Morning: Worship 10:00 AM Wednesday: Prayer & Praise 7:00 PM Located in Hickman Commercial Park www.LivingWaterLaurel.org 302-875-7814

YOU ARE INVITED! Come into This Church and Gather in Christ’s Name to Worship Him! Psalm 95:6 Sun. School 9:45 a.m. • Worship 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. Bible Study 7:30 p.m. Pastor, Stacey Johnson

VICTORY TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD

“A Growing Church For All Ages”

2 miles N. of Laurel, DE on Alt. 13

302-877-0443 410-957-4696

The Atlanta Road Alliance Church 22625 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE (302) 629-7693 • www.atlantaroadcma.org Rev. Ron Mayers • Rev. Andrew Kerr SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 8:30 Worship 6:45 Pioneer Clubs (age 3 9:45 Sunday School to grade 6) & Divorce Care 11:00 Worship/Kids Church 7:00 Prayer Service & 7:00 Evening Service Youth Group (grades 7-12)

To Come! Revelation 2 ime 2:1 T The Ark 7 It's Seaford Wesleyan Church

United Methodist Churches

Worship Sun. Sch.

King’s Gordy Rd. .......... 8:50....10:00 St. George’s St. George Rd. .... 10:10..... 9:00 Mt. Pleasant Mt. Pleasant Rd...11:30....10:15 Pastor Barbara Auer

River of Life Christian Center 17 W. Market St., Greenwood, DE 302349-9420 Pastors Joseph & Yvonne Dixon WORSHIP SERVICE: SUN. 11 AM BIBLE STUDY: WED. 7:30 PM

Proclaiming Faith 4 pm Sunday on WKDI 840 AM Radio

Food Outreach Emergency Food

www.river-oflife.org

Sailor’s Bethel United Methodist Church Bethel, DE Rev. Ron Wuest, Pastor Sunday School - 10 am Praise Service 10:45 - 11 am Worship - 11:15 am Nursery Provided office 875-3628 parsonage 875-2996

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby, Rector

Sunday School - all ages 9 a.m. Worship 9 a.m., 10:15 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Rainbow Day Care / Pre-School Rt. 13 South, Seaford, DE 302-628-1020

Mount Olivet United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School Pastor: Rev. Thomas Gross • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel Sunday School - 9:30 & 10:45 Worship - 9:00 & 10:45 Sunday Evening Worship and Children’s Ministries 6 p.m. Wednesday Youth Ministries 6:30 p.m. Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Todd Crofford Assistant Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor/Youth: Sue Boyce Children’s Pastor: Marilyn Searcey

Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Front & King St., Seaford, DE 629-7979

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - Anthony Melakian - 629-3633 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

Connecting People with Christ since 1804

CONCORD

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 25322 Church Road, Concord Seaford, DE 19973 Sunday Worship - 9 am Sunday School (all ages) - 10:30 am For More Information call 302-628-8114 Rev. Diane E. Melson, Pastor


PAGE 18

MORNING STAR

OBITUARIES Continued from page 17

all of the races in Dover for many years. He is survived by his wife of almost 60 years, Dorothy Collins Williams, who he married on May 24, 1946; two daughters, Joyce W. Collins and Laurene Lord and her husband Gerald of Federalsburg; nine grandchildren, Brent A. Williams and Lisa of Denton, Md., Greg W. Williams and wife Suzanne of Lake Elsinore, Calif., Elwin F. Collins, Jr. and wife Mary Ann of Woodbine, Ga., Ira W. Williams, Jr. of Rhodesdale, Md., Eric W. Lord and Heather of Hurlock, Md., James V. Collins and Mary and Michael A. Lord all of Federalsburg, Geri K. Moxey and husband Joe of Church Road, Va., and Troup Lord of Trappe, Md.; 12 great-grandchildren; a sister, Florida Lea Sullivan of Delmar, Md. and several nieces, nephews and cousins. Besides his parents, he was preceded in death by a son, Ira Wayne Williams, Sr., on Dec. 27, 2005, and also a sister, Norma Faye Jefferson. His funeral service was May 6 at Framptom Funeral Home, P.A., in Federalsburg with the Rev. Dale Evans and the Rev. Dan Walker officiating. Interment of cremains with military honors was at Hill Crest Cemetery on May 9. The family requests donations in his memory to Caroline Hospice Foundation, P.O. Box 362, Denton, MD 21629.

John G. Irons, 82 John G. Irons of Laurel died Monday, May 1, 2006 at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury, Md. He retired after 32 years of service with Alvan Tractor in Salisbury as a mechanic. He is predeceased by his parents Edwin and Jeanette Irons; a brother, Milford Irons, and a sister, Eileen Drum. Mr. Irons is survived by his wife of 53 years, Mary Irons of Laurel; a step-daughter, Joyce Vincent of Laurel, and a stepson, Fred Joseph of Houston; three sisters, Emogene Pancoast of Erie, Pa., and Helen Lucia of Warren, Pa., and Marie Nichoals of Morristown, Tenn.; four grandchildren; five great-grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews. His funeral service was at Centenary United Methodist Church, Laurel, on May 4, with the Rev. John Van Tine and Dr. Carl Vincent officiating. A committal service was Friday, May 5 at the Chapel of McKean Memorial Park Cemetery in Bradford, Pa. Contributions can be made in his name to Centenary United Methodist Church, 200 West Market St., Laurel, DE 19956. Arrangements were by Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Inc., Laurel.

Joseph S. Triglia, Sr., 94 Joseph S. Triglia, Sr. of Delmar died Tuesday, May 2, 2006, at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury, surrounded by his loving family. He was born on Oct. 27, 1911 in Jamestown, N.Y., a son of Angelo F. Trigila, Sr. and Joseph Triglia Maria Sacca Triglia. He started driving a truck in 1933 before starting Triglia Transportation, which he and his family have owned and operat-

Obituaries are run without charge thanks to the support of area churches.

ed since 1947. In the ’50s, he started Triglia Lumber Company. In the late 1960s he took over the family restaurant, Triglia’s Country House. In addition to the trucking and restaurant businesses, he was involved with many other enterprises over the years. He shared the founding of Holy Redeemer Catholic Church and supported St. Francis de Sales Catholic School since its inception. He was a charter member of the Knights of Columbus - St. Francis de Sales Council 3489, a charter and lifetime member of the Loyal Order of the Moose Lodge, Chapter 1280 in Salisbury, a charter member and past-governor of the Loyal Order of the Moose Lodge in Delmar and a charter member of the Sons of Italy of Salisbury. He was also a long-time member of the Seaford Elks Club, and helped form various Moose lodges throughout the Eastern Shore and one of the founders and officers of the Delmar Republican Club. Mr. Triglia enjoyed the camaraderie of playing cards with his friends, Pinochle was his favorite. Most importantly, he will be remembered as a man who was a devoted father, husband and grandfather, who believed in spending time with his family. He was a quiet, compassionate humanitarian, helping many in need. He is survived by six children, Joseph S. Triglia, Jr., and his wife Barbara, Vincent A. Triglia, Antoinette V. Hastings, Rosemary T. Lynch, and her husband George, Anthony P. Triglia, and Theresa T. Trader and her husband Donald, all of Delmar; a granddaughter, Alisa J. Bloodsworth and her husband David; 12 additional grandchildren; 14 great-grandchildren; his longtime companion, Celia Ann Shaner of Delmar; a brother, Angelo F. Triglia; and a sister, Angeline Beauchamp. He is also survived by many nieces and nephews. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his loving wife, Mary Antoinette Bellomo Triglia, who died in 1992; a son, Angelo “Bebe” Triglia; daughter, Mary “Dolly” Melvin; two brothers, Vincent C. Triglia and Sebastian “Bennie” Triglia; and two sisters, Stella Nichols and Rosie DelSignore. Prayer services were on Tuesday, May 9, at Short Funeral Home, Delmar. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated at Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, Delmar. The Rev. Edward M. Aigner, Jr. was celebrant. Interment followed the mass at St. Stephen’s Cemetery in Delmar.

THANK YOU It is with heartfelt gratitude that we thank all those who have supported and lovingly cared for our family during the illness and passing of our beloved husband, father and pop pop, Huey West Jr., “Pop”. Special thanks to Dr. Mousavi and his staff, Dr. Jain and his staff, Dr. Ferber, Dr. Gorgui, Nanticoke Memorial Hospital and the 5th floor nursing staff; Delaware Hospice and the caregivers who attended Pop’s needs at home, a very special thanks to Pop’s Hertrich Pontiac Buick family. All the cards, flowers, calls, visits and food shared with us show how many people Pop touched in is life. He was the best! Sincerely, Joyce, Huey III, Amy, Ricki and Jeri West

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006 Memorial contributions may be made to St. Francis de Sales Parish Center, 514 Camden Ave., Salisbury, MD 21801; or to Coastal Hospice at the Lake, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, MD 21802.

Beatrice Simonds, 74 Beatrice “Bea” Simonds of Whit’s Point near Millsboro died Thursday, May 4, 2006, at home. Mrs. Simonds was born in Georgetown, a daughter of William Pusey and Ida Florence Pusey. She graduated from Georgetown High School (now Sussex Central) in 1932. She was preceded in death in 1982 by her beloved husband of 43 years, Major Sterling Simonds, a State Police Administrator, who was second in command at the time of his retirement in 1962. She was a secretary for I.D. Short II, and also a certified court reporter until 1951 when her husband was transferred to State Police Headquarters, New Castle. In 1964, she and her husband returned to Sussex County and lived at Gravel Hill. In 1973, she and her husband moved into her parents’ summer home on Whit’s Point along the Indian River, where she lived until the time of her death. Mrs. Simonds officially retired in 1969, but shortly thereafter was named chairwomen of the Governor’s Advisory Council on the Blind and continued the lobbying she had done throughout her career in Legislative Hall. For 54 years, she was the driving force behind the increased awareness of the unique needs of legally blind Delawareans. She and her husband started the annual party for the blind in Wilmington and

Union United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 Handicap Friendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.) “We may not be Dairy Queen but we have Great “Sundays”.

Welcome… SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

701 Bridgeville Sunday School Road 9 am 629-9077 Morning Worship 10 am

after moving to Sussex County chaired the first event for the clients of Kent and Sussex. Every June, she delivered an apple pie purchased by the Business Enterprise program of the DVI to each legislator in appreciation for their support. In addition to her dedication to the causes of the visually impaired she also was one of the original directors of and served as fund raising chairperson of the Delaware State Police Museum, Inc. She also was a highly respected local historian of Georgetown, having written the history of postal service in Georgetown. For her life-long commitment and dedication to improving life for others, She was inducted as a member of the Delaware Women’s Hall of Fame on March 18, 1998, and was presented the Order of the First State in 2000 by then Gov. Thomas R. Carper. She was a member of Grace United Methodist Church in Georgetown. The Rev. Wayne Grier officiated at her service on May 8 at Watson Funeral Home, Millsboro. Interment was in Union Cemetery, Georgetown. She is survived by several cousins, many special friends, all of her beloved friends at the state police and the Division for the Visually Impaired. She loved flowers and flowers were welcomed. However, for those who wish to contribute to a charity, contributions may be made to the Division of Visually Impaired, Biggs Building Holloway Campus, 1901 N. DuPont Highway, New Castle, DE 19720; or the Delaware State Police Museum, P O Box 430, Dover DE 19901.

PORTSVILLE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH “ALL WELCOME”

Worship 8:50 am Dogwood Lane - South of Bethel, DE “The Church on the HIll Showing God’s Love to ALL” Gospel Concert every 2nd Sun. Evening 6:30 pm

Rev. Dr. Ronald Wuest Office 302875-3628

BETHEL WORSHIP CENTER 9431 Ginger Lane, Seaford (2.4 mi. north of Wal-Mart on US 13) 628-4240 Recorded Info 628-4241 Church Office

Pastor Joseph Lecates - 875-2059 Adult Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:30 am Nursery 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Youth Meeting Sun. 7 pm Promise Keepers Tues. 7 pm Wed. Night Bible Study 7 pm “We’re not building a church, we’re building God’s Kingdom!”

FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH

Christ Lutheran Church

Located halfway between Seaford & Bridgeville, turn off Rt. 13 East at Cannon Rd. light, 4th place on left.

Corner of Shipley & Spruce Sts.

1611 KJV, Independent, Fundamental, Soul Winning

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 10:00 Sunday School 7:00 Prayer Service 11:00 Worship Service 6:00 Evening Worship Nursery Provided Rev. William Goslee - Ph. 349-0190

A Family Friendly Church Home for You Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 11 am Phone: 629-9755 www.ChristLC.net Bible School for the Mentally Challenged Saturday at 10 am

“Welcome Home!”

Senior Pastor

Harold Daniels

Wesley United Methodist Church 22025 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE Pastor Ed Kuhling Contemporary Worship 9 am Sunday School & Bible Education 10 am Traditional Worship 11 am Wednesday Worship 6:45 pm 302-629-3029 * Info Line 302-628-0112

7046 Seashore Hwy. Bridgeville, DE 19933

302-337-3044

Church of God

Fax 302-337-8769

Worship Services: Seeker Service 8:30 am • Sunday School 9:30 Morning Worship 10:45 am • Wed. Night 7 pm


MORNING STAR

Claudell Sammons, 88 Claudell Sammons of Oak Grove, near Seaford, died on Thursday, May 04, 2006 at home after a courageous battle with cancer. Mr. Sammons was born March 10, 1918 near Bridgeville, a son of Jerry Sammons and Mary Banning Sammons. He spent the majority of his life within a 20mile radius of western Sussex County, only leaving to defend the country and the family he loved during World War II. He served in the U.S. Army and earned three bronze stars and multiple ribbons and awards. He retired from the Eastern Corporation in Federalsburg, Md. Besides his parents, his beloved wife, Marguerite O’Neal Willin Sammons, and his siblings, Robert, Jerry, Pauline and Nellie, preceded Claudell in death. He is survived by two sons, Bill Sammons and his wife Ann, Ray Sammons and his wife Candice, all of Seaford; a daughter, Peggy Jester and her husband, Paul of Greenwood; a sister, Jeanette Allen of Seaford, and a brother, Roland Sammons of Seaford. Also surviving are eight grandchildren, Wayne Sammons, Wendy Sammons, Erin Sammons, Mary Beth Christhilf, Elliott Sammons, Michelle Wheatley, Kathy Wheatley and Dawn Hurley, and 11 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild. His funeral service was on May 7, at the Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford. Burial was in Bethel Church Cemetery, Oak Grove. The family suggests donations to Delaware Hospice Inc, 600 S. Dupont Hwy, Georgetown, DE 19947 or the American Diabetes Association, 100 West 10th Street, Suite 1002, Wilmington, DE 19801.

Col. Richard M. Quimby, Jr., 82 Richard Morrell Quimby, Jr. of Seaford died on Sunday, April 30, at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. He would have been 83 on June 15. Born in Philadelphia and educated in public schools there, he enlisted in the Army after high school graduation in 1942, joining the armed forces of World War II. As an Air Corps Cadet, he attended navigation school and was assigned to a B-24 bomber squadron with the Mighty Eighth Air Force. He flew 30 missions from Hardwick, England over German-occupied territories from which only half of his crew returned. For his efforts he was awarded four Air Medals and the Distinguished Flying Cross. In 1946 he married Jean Rogers of Reading, Pa. They were a devoted couple through 57 years of marriage, sharing a 30-year Air Force career, raising two children, and traveling extensively through very active early retirement. In 1994, they moved to the Methodist Manor House community in Seaford,

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

where they lived in what Jean Quimby called their “enchanted cottage.” Mrs. Quimby died in 2004 and Dick Quimby remained, surrounded and comforted by the lovely home she had created, and where he shared a weekly “cocktail and dinner date” with his daughter from Easton, Md., by whom he was adored. Col. Quimby is survived by a sister, Virginia Dolvin of Oak Harbor, Wash.; a daughter, Karin Quimby Counts of Easton; and three beloved grandchildren, Meredith Quimby Counts of New York City, and Richard L. Counts, IV and Catherine Rogers Counts of Easton. Sadly, he was preceded in death by his son, Richard M. Quimby, III in 1968. By his request, memorial services will not be held. Rather, it was his wish that his life be acknowledged by family and friends in the raising of a glass and a toast to “Dick Quimby, a very lucky man.” Interment was private. Col. Quimby asked that memorial donations be made to the Methodist Manor House Benevolence Fund, 1001 Middleford Road, Seaford, DE 19973.

Catharine L. Conaway, 89 Catharine L. Conaway of Georgetown passed away Friday, May 5, 2006, at Milford Center, Milford. Mrs. Conaway was born in Georgetown, a daughter of Roy E. and Lillie Mae Hickman Wilkerson. She was an assembly line worker for Arrow Safety Device in Georgetown, retiring in 1979 after 20 years. She attended Georgetown Wesleyan Church. She loved to quilt, garden, and camp. Her survivors include a son, Leroy Conaway and wife Mary Ellen of Laurel; two daughters, Patricia F. Foraker and husband, Curt of Lincoln; Carolyn L. Watson and husband Ralph of Georgetown; one brother, Dallas Wilkerson of Millsboro; eight grandchildren, several great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandchild. Her service was on May 9, at Watson Funeral Home, Millsboro. Interment was in Henlopen Memorial Park, Milton. Letters of condolence may be emailed to: Delmarva obits.com.

with her flowers and vegetables. She enjoyed crocheting and fishing with her family. She was a member of the Salvation Army Senior Center and was one of the first five people active in the exercise program. Singing for residents at area nursing homes alHelen McFarlane ways brought her a lot of joy. Predeceased by her father, she is survived by her mother. She is also survived by her husband of 54 years, Franklin James McFarlane; four children, Jimmy McFarlane and his wife Cindy of Vienna, Phyllis A. Majors and her husband Joe of Allen, Bobby McFarlane and his wife Gail

PAGE 19 of Mardela Springs, and H.L. McFarlane and his wife Sharlotte of Mardela Springs; 11 grandchildren, Kristin McFarlane, Jamie McFarlane, Kelli McFarlane, Melissa Jo Jones, Katie Majors, Robbie McFarlane, Heather McFarlane, Ryan McFarlane, Brandon McFarlane, Allison McFarlane and Hunter Gebert; a great-grandchild, Kelsea Mae Jones; a sister, Marg Mitchell and her husband Herman of Salisbury, Md.; and a sister-in-law, Ann Brumbley and her husband Barry of Bethel. She is also survived by several nieces and nephews. A service is Thursday, May 11, at 11 a.m., at the Short Funeral Home, Delmar, where family and friends may call from 10 to 11 a.m. The Rev.s Edwin Dennis and Gary Tyndall will officiate. Interment will be in Athol Baptist Church Cemetery, Mardela Springs. Casket bearers will be her sons, grandsons and a son-in-law.

Blanche Mason Sept. 3, 1917 - Oct. 14, 2005 I Did Not Die Do not stand at my grave and forever weep. I am not here; I do not sleep. I am a thousand winds that blow. I am the diamond glints on snow. I am the sunlight on ripened grain. I am the gentle autumn’s rain. When you awaken in the morning’s hush I am the swift uplifting rush Of quiet birds in circled flight. I am the soft stars that shine at night. Do not stand at my grave and forever cry. I am not here. I did not die.

Helen Ann McFarlane, 71 Helen Ann McFarlane of Mardela Springs, Md., died Sunday, May 7, 2006 at Coastal Hospice At the Lake in Salisbury. She was born Aug. 31, 1934 in Salisbury, a daughter of Oma J. Wesley of Salisbury and Harold D. Wesley. Mrs. McFarlane was an active member of Athol Baptist Church in Mardela Springs. She worked for more than 20 years as a certified nursing assistant at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. She loved gardening and working

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is h Mom th c u m o s re you t. You we We miss s e b e th e r one Day. You’ in-law any r r e th Mother ’s o M ed! You other and the best M ave, we were bless very r h elievable e It b n u could eve s a w indness sions! love and k t on special occa happy. jus e us day, not ed to mak v li u o y e it took a seemed lik be a mother, but r an Mom. You a e b to Anyone c u son like yo illed. We special per ves can never be f ith Jesus r li void in ou d trust you’re now w eased. sc an nd pain ha union have faith a g in r e f f u ur s our re to d r and all yo a w r o of days. oking f lo d n e e r a e th e t W a in Heaven 88 years what a with you of . your life ecial friend p s d n a Through m o person, M ver. wonderful hearts fore in e v li ll ’ You e. All our lov rista Mason Ch Kevin and


PAGE 20

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

NANTICOKE LITTLE LEAGUE OPENING DAY

OPENING DAY - Russ Neal, vice president of the Nanticoke Little League, gets the opening day ceremony started on Saturday morning. He announced that 744 youth ages 5-18 are playing on 56 teams this season. Photo by David Elliott

DEDICATED UMPIRE - Nanticoke Little League president Nick Lloyd, right, presents umpire Tom Disharoon with a plaque for his dedicated service to the league during the opening ceremony on Saturday morning. Photo by David Elliott

Ma

y2

6

GET THE SEASON STARTED - Real little Nanticoke Little Leaguers toss up their hats to officially open the season in Seaford. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

READY TO TOSS - Cindy Mumford, former Nanticoke Little League president, gets the players fired up to toss their hats in the air. Photo by David Elliott

“Only Imagine”

Shiloh House of Hope 1st Annual Friend-Raiser THE PLEDGE - Members of the Pat Knight Major League Stars recite the Little League pledge during opening ceremonies for the Nanticoke Little League on Saturday. Photo by David Elliott

500 W. Stein Highway • FAX (302)629-4513 • 22128 Sussex Highway • Seaford, DE 19973 • Fax (302)628-8504 (302)629-4514 • (302)628-8500 • (800)966-4514 • www.cfmnet.com

NEW G LISTIN

Friday, May 26th, 2006 Silent Auction - 6:00p.m.; Dinner - 7:00p.m. Sam Yoder Community Building Tickets: $50/person Come enjoy an evening of food, entertainment, and Chinese and silent auctions. See what God is building to help heal the hurts of Delmarva’s teens, and be inspired by special guest speaker, Sara Trollinger, Founder and President, National House of Hope in Orlando, FL For more information or for ticket orders, call 302.629.5331 or email shilohhouseofhope@msn.com. Auction items accepted.

OUT WHERE THE REST BEGINS! Enjoy restful living on this 1 acre country location bordering State of DE Wildlife. Stoned circle drive, back yard patio & mature woods grace this 2-3 BR ranch w/2 full baths. (MBR overlooks patio & woods) Newly decorated formal DR w/pocket French doors, custom shelving, & parquet floors are a delight. Large country kit. can handle family dinners. Call Joan to view MLS#535641 $182,500

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS

OFFICERS

Wayne Dukes, Owner’s Choice Glen Urquhart, Urquhart and Associates Christian Hershey, Hershey Design Group Marianna Baker, Retired Herb Troyer, All-Span, Inc.

Robyn Sturgeon, President Lori Rider, Vice-President Ivy Ulrich-Bonk, Director Bonnie Kendall, Secretary


MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 21

NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER

The Rev. Leon Williams of the Refuge Temple, Seaford.

The Rev. Richard Bridge of Woodland U.M. Church.

The Rev. Drew Christian of Gethsemane United Methodist Church, Seaford.

The Rev. Mike Hopkins of the First Baptist Church, Seaford.

Seaford Mayor Edward Butler welcomes people to the Seaford National Day of Prayer ceremony.

Carol Lynch sings “It Is Well With My Soul” during the 55th annual National Day of Prayer ceremony in front of Seaford City Hall on Thursday, May 4. Sponsored by the city of Seaford, the annual event is part of the national event taking place in cities and towns throughout the United States. Prayers were offered for public officials, those serving in the military and town leaders. Photos by Ronald MacArthur

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL AGRICULTURAL

Seaford Councilwoman Pat Jones leads off the National Day of Prayer last Thursday.

BUILDINGS

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PAGE 24

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

Seaford’s Jeff Deats selected 2006 Operator of the Year By Lynn R. Parks Jeff Deats, superintendent at Seaford’s wastewater treatment plant, has been named this year’s State Wastewater Operator of the Year. He was honored at a ceremony last Wednesday at Delaware Technical and Community College, Georgetown. Deats was nominated for the award by Charles Anderson, city director of operations, and Dolores Slatcher, city manager. Their nomination letter cites Deats’ innovation at the treatment plant, finding new ways of doing things to save the city money, and his willingness to go beyond what is required. He served barbecue at a City Safety Committee class on using fire extinguishers, for example, and volunteered as grounds and logistics chairman for the city’s Riverfest. The nomination letter also cites the federal EPA operations and maintenance excellence award that the plant received in 2004. Deats, 43, started work at the treatment plant in 1990. He was named superintendent in 1997, when he was 35. “I am appreciative that the city gave me an opportunity at such a young age,” he said. “Probably the biggest thing I had going for me was just a passion to do well and to learn more.” When Deats started as superintendent,

the Seaford plant was in the process of installing its biological nutrient removal system, which at the time was one of the most advanced systems in the state. That upgrade, completed in 1998, enabled the plant to be licensed to treat 2 million gallons of waste a day. Currently, the plant treats about 1 million gallons per day, half of its capacity. But that does not mean that Deats and the plant’s other five employees can just kick back and take it easy. If all the homes that are planned for construction in the city are actually built, the plant will have to treat 4 million gallons of waste a day. In addition, state regulations regarding nitrogen and phosphorus that are dumped into the Nanticoke River are getting stricter. While the plant can now released treated water with 8 milligrams of nitrogen and 3 milligrams of phosphorus per liter, the state will require that those numbers be reduced to 4 milligrams for nitrogen and less than 1 milligram for phosphorus. The plant’s license renewal is currently pending; Deats guesses that the licensing renewal will come with a mandate that the plant expand and improve within five years. He was unable to say how much that expansion will cost. Deats said that the service that the wastewater treatment plant provides is invaluable to the effort to clean up the Nan-

Jeff Deats, superintendent of Seaford’s wastewater treatment plant, with his plaque as Operator of the Year. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

ticoke River. “A lot of people think of wastewater treatment plants as polluting, but we don’t see ourselves that way,” he said. “We are first-line environmentalists. We are doing this work to protect the environment.” He praised the workers at the plant. “I feel very fortunate to be able to work with the group of guys that I work with,” he said. “They recognize that good working conditions take a lot of work and they ac-

cept each other and appreciate each other’s talents and abilities. It is hard to find a group of people like that.” Deats is a 1981 graduate of Dover High School He and his wife Lexie have four daughters, Breanna Bly, Seaford, Crystal Goins, Cincinnati, Ohio, Samantha Deats, a student at Seaford High School, and Brittany Deats, a student at Seaford Middle School.

Bridgeville Memorial Day service at 9:30 a.m. The town of Bridgeville will host a Memorial Day celebration on Monday, May 29, at 9:30 a.m., at the Veterans Memorial in the Bridgeville Cemetery.

Postal workers to collect food on May 13 The U.S. Postal Service in conjunction with the National Association of Letter Carriers, will be collecting non-perishable food items on Saturday, May 13, for distribution to food banks in Delaware. All food items collected in the Seaford area will remain in Seaford to be distributed among several churches and the Seaford Mission. Although Items will be collected from mailboxes on May 13 only, donations of non-perishable items can be made in the lobby of the Seaford Post Office until Monday, May 14. Items for pick up at homes or businesses should be placed in or near the mail box for your letter carrier. Any questions may be addressed to Postmaster Rob Kern at 6283441.

Church sponsoring annual Community Day On Saturday, May 20, the Clarence St. Church of God in Seaford will be hosting its second annual Community Day on the church grounds. The purpose of this outreach is to establish camaradie, celebrate the community, instill pride and strengthen community relations. It will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be free food, giveaways, games, cultural exhibits and kid’s events. Special attractions are the Seaford Police Dept. and Delaware State Police, who will provide fun activities and resources. etc. Seaford Police will have Safety Sam Robot. A special highlight will be a free giveaway of four bikes, donated by Seaford Wal-Mart.

PNC Bank is the #1 Small Business Lender and #1 SBA Lender. We lent more dollars to small businesses in Delaware than any other bank.* With credit decisions on PNC Bank business loans in one business day or less1 and a wide range of loan solutions, including SBA loans, PNC Bank makes it possible for you to get the capital you need. Having the #1 bank for small business lending serve your business. Easy as PNC.∑ Milford Dana Bijj VP Business Banking 119 South Walnut Street 302-422-1008

Rehoboth Jennifer Joseph VP Business Banking 19745 Sea Air Avenue 302-227-5013

Kiwanis Foundation Golf Tournament June 16 The Seaford Kiwanis Club is preparing for its 20th annual Kiwanis Foundation Golf Tournament. The proceeds from this anniversary event will go to the club’s foundation endowment, which provides scholarships to needy senior students each year. This year, the tourney is scheduled for Friday, June 16, at the Seaford Golf & Country Club. Any business wishing to sponsor a special event or donate a door prize is encouraged to get involved. Anyone wishing to play should call immediately. The entry fee will include buffet lunch, golf fee, cart, hospitality cart and awards party. Every participant will receive a bag of goodies and one of the numerous door prizes. Awards up to $250 of merchandise, certificates for closest to the pin and straightest drive, plus a new car and other fabulous prizes for a “hole-in-one” will be available to all golfers. The tourney is limited to the first 96 entrants. For more information may contact Ron Breeding at 629-9173 (day), or 629-3964 (night).

Coming Fall 2006, a new PNC Bank branch in Lewes

All loans are subject to credit approval. *PNC’s Small Business Lending Rankings are based on fiscal year 2004 according to the most recently released government statistics for 2004 for small business loans of $100,000 or less. Rankings based on CRA small business data for Delaware and as obtained from the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC) web site (www.FFIEC.gov). PNC’s SBA rankings are based on dollar volume reported by the SBA for the Delaware District for the period from 10/1/04 to 09/30/05. 1 Credit decisions in one business day or less on loan requests of $100,000 or less. PNC Bank, Delaware. PNC Bank, National Association. Member FDIC. ©2006 The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc.


MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 25

HOT FISHING SPOT - John Quick, along with his father John Quick, reels in another fish during a Saturday-morning fishing stop on Trap Pond State Park. The two caught numerous crappies in a hot spot near the shoreline. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

Summer Fun Club registration ongoing

Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club members Shannon Holbrook and Eddie Wright go airborne as they jump rope. Jessica Hennessey and Ti’Asha Johnson took turns swinging the rope for the jumpers, who were taking advantage of the warm spring afternoon last week. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

Registration is open for the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club Summer Fun Club in Seaford and Laurel for youth ages 5-13. Summer Fun Club hours are from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday, starting on Monday, June 12. There are 12 weeks this year with a different theme each week including Super Heroes, Armed Services Salute, Water World, Talent Showcase and Survivor. Several trips are planned including visits to Frontier Town in Ocean City, Rehoboth Beach, Killen’s Pond State Park, Lancaster, Pa., Inner Harbor in Baltimore and Jungle Jim’s Waterpark. Summer Fun Club members will spend time reading, doing educational work on computers, doing arts and crafts and sports and recreation as well as special projects. The cost is based on a sliding scale according to household income and the number of weeks attending ranging from $75 to $95 (for eight or more weeks) to $95 to $115 (one to three weeks). Lunch and a snack are provided each day. For more information, contact the club at 6283789.

Cooper Realty Presents…

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PAGE 26

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

With bikers in line, new trail opens at Trap Pond State Park By Ronald MacArthur With several dozen bike riders on the new Trap Pond State Park bike trail bridge ready to take part in the third annual Get in Gear Bike Rally, Ann Allen, president of the Trap Pond Partners, cut the ribbon Saturday morning to officially dedicate the

Bike riders get ready to take off in the third annual Get in Gear Bike Rally at Trap Pond State Park on Saturday. The event is coordinated by the Trap Pond Partners volunteer group. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

5-mile trail. Several state park officials also took part in the dedication ceremony, including David Small, deputy secretary of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC), and Greg Abbott, deputy director of the Delaware State Parks. The new bike and walking trail encircles the 3,245-acre park located east of Laurel. The idea for the trail was initiated by State Sen. Robert Venables (D-Laurel) who could not attend the dedication because of other commitments. “Even with all of the improvements at the park, Sen. Venables thought something was missing,” Abbott said during the brief ceremony. “It was a bike trail - a multi-use trail. He told us to build a first-class trail and he would find the way to fund it.” Abbott explained that the final cost of the trail was $2 million, with funding from several sources. He also thanked Rep. Biff Lee (R-Laurel) and State Sen. Tina Fallon (R-Seaford) for their support of the trail. Allen told the group that a donation of 20 bicycles was being made to the park to be used on the new trail. She explained that the bicycles will be loaned on a firstcome basis free of charge to park users. There is access to the trail from the dayuse area and the campground in the park. Funds to purchase the bikes came from proceeds from last year’s Get in Gear Bike Rally and 21st Century funds from Delaware State Parks. Abbott offered some history about Trap Pond State Park, the state’s first park, dat-

Surrounded by members of the Trap Pond Partners, taking part in the ribbon cutting to officially open the new bike-walking trail at Trap Pond State Park are, from the left, Greg Abbott, deputy director of Delaware State Parks, John Shwed, mayor of Laurel, Ann Allen, president of the Trap Pond Partners, John McMillon, park superintendent, and David Small, DNREC deputy secretary. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

ing back to the early 1950s. The pond was created to provide power to a saw mill in the late 1700s. The pond with 1,000 acres was turned over to the federal government in the 1930s with the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) working to turn the area into a park. In fact, the pavilion where the dedication ceremony took place was built by the CCC in the 1930s. The park was turned over to the state in 1951 and more land

has been added over the years to the current 3,245 acres. The park contains the northern most stand of bald cypress trees in the United States. “There is not a prettier place in Delaware,” Abbott said. With that the contingient walked over to the new bridge built for the trail and cut the ribbon, which also signaled the start of the bike rally.

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Gordon Ramey, Broker of Tull Ramey Real Estate in Seaford, DE would like to congratulate the top two agents for the month of April, 2006. Jessica Bradley (left) Top Sales Agent and Brenda R. Rambo Top Listing Agent.

“Keep Up The Good Work”

Honor your father and mother. Then you will live a long, full life in the land the Lord your God will give you. Exodus 20:15 LANDSCAPE DESIGN & MAINTENANCE OPEN MONDAY - SATURDAY, CLOSED SUNDAY 35239 SUSSEX HWY., LAUREL, DE 302-875-2507


MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 27

Towne & Country Fair Prayer Breakfast

Sandy Adams of Laurel lives near Trap Pond State Park and frequently rides her bike in and around the park. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

Volunteers needed for Senior Victim Advocate Program Recognizing that the criminal justice system can be frightening and overwhelming to older victims of crime, the attorney general’s office began the Senior Victim Advocate Program in 2000. Applications are now being accepted for the training program. The training will provide volunteers with information about crimes to which senior citizens most often fall prey as well as community resources and victim services available to assist elders. A tour of the Sussex County Courthouse will also be conducted. Volunteers will offer telephone support and court accompaniment to elder victims. Interested parties can call Kerry McElwee at (302) 739-4211 ext. 261 or visit our website at www.state.de.us/attgen.

GOSPEL CAFE Centenary United Methodist Church Corner of Poplar & Market Sts., Laurel, Del.

EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT ~ 6-7 P.M. Featuring: Bruce & Nancy Willey Music Ministry

Live Christian Music • Fellowship • Refreshments May Guest Singers:

May 13: Bob & Cheryl Jones & Todd McMasters May 20: Denise Harper Every Week: Mary Ann Young sings your Gospel favorite. For more info contact church, 875-3983, 8-noon, or Bruce Willey, 875-5539 Psalm 150: “Let everything that has breath praise the Lord.”

The Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce, Seaford Historical Society, Seaford Ministerium and the Seaford Kiwanis are holding a Prayer Breakfast at the Towne & Country Fair on Saturday, May 27, beginning at 8 a.m. The Prayer Breakfast will be held in a tent on the grounds of the Governor Ross Plantation, North Pine Street Extended, Seaford. A limited number of tickets are available at $12 each. The breakfast is being catered by Jimmy’s Grille. To obtain tickets to the prayer breakfast contact Bryant Richardson at Morning Star Publications, 6299788, or visit the office of Morning Star Publications at 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford. Pastors from area churches will offer prayers for our schools, families, businesses, governments and communities. Representatives from a number of area churches will form a choir that will help emphasize the desire of the planners to promote unity. All the money netted from the Prayer Breakfast will be donated to the Seaford Mission. Morning Star Publications will match the proceeds up to $500. Businesses interested in helping support the Prayer Breakfast may contact Richardson at Morning Star Publications. Call now for Prayer Breakfast Tickets

629-9788


PAGE 28

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD BENEFIT EVENTS MISSION POSSIBLE CONCERT Mission Possible benefit concert, Saturday, May 13, 7 p.m., Mt. Olivet U.M. Church, High Street, Seaford. Featuring local talent to raise money to help musical education in the community. Tickets are $10. Contact Caitlin Wasson at 6296304.

WESTERN SUSSEX RELAY FOR LIFE Annual Western Sussex Relay for Life “Strike Out Cancer,” Friday, May 19, Saturday, May 20, to support the American Cancer Society, Cancer Care Center, Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Seaford. Starts at 6 p.m. For more information, contact Mary Catherine Hopkins, 875-7308.

NANTICOKE PANCAKE BREAKFAST Nanticoke Little League pancake breakfast fund raiser, Sunday, May 21, 8 to 10 a.m., Applebee’s, U.S. 13, Seaford.

SHILOH HOUSE FUND RAISER Shiloh House of Hope “friend raiser,” Saturday, May 26, 6 p.m., Sam Yoder’s community building, Greenwood. The cost is $50 a person with a silent and Chinese auction and entertainment. Auction items are needed. Phone 629-5331 for tickets or more information.

LYNYRD SKYNYRD BENEFIT CONCERT Tickets are on sale for the July 4th Lynyrd Skynyrd benefit concert at Perdue Stadium, Salisbury. Proceeds will benefit the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club. Fireworks will follow. For information, phone 410-219-3112.

SUPPORT THE JULY 4TH FIREWORKS The 4th of July Laurel fireworks celebration fund raising is taking place. All contributions should be mailed to: Laurel Fireworks Celebration, PO Box 934, Laurel, DE 19956.

MEETINGS ACORN CLUB INSTALLATION GFW-Acorn Club of Seaford installation banquet, Eastern Star building, Thursday, May 11, 5:30 p.m. Hostesses for this special event are Phyllis Nelson and Joyce Whaley.

COAST GUARD AUXILIARY Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12-04 meets the second Thursday of each month at Nanticoke Yacht Club in Blades. This month’s meeting is Thursday, May 11, at 7:30 p.m. Anyone interested in promoting safe boating and would like to work with men and women who do vessel inspections, safety patrols and teach public safety courses, are welcome to join the Flotilla. Boat ownership is not required. Call Wayne Hickman at 629-6337 or Jim Mullican at 732-1163.

AARP ANNUAL BANQUET AARP Seaford Area Chapter 1084 annual banquet, at Bridgeville Fire Hall, Friday, May 12, 5:30 p.m. DJ dance music. Cost is $15 per person. Members and guests must make reservations before May 5. Call hospitality chairman, Betty Martens, 629-9789.

EQUINE COUNCIL MEETING Delaware Equine Council meeting, Monday, May 15, Harrington Public Library at 7 p.m., it will be preceded by a board of directors meeting at 6 p.m. All those interested in horses are invited to attend. For more information or directions, contact Nyle Callaway, 422-4094.

Submit Bulletin Board items by Friday at noon. E-mail: publisher@seafordstar.com Mail: 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 Items appear in both the Seaford and Laurel Stars. Mail to: Star Newspapers PO Box 1000 Seaford, DE 19973 BEST BET: Nanticoke Women’s Health Day, Saturday, May 13, Laurel High School, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

FEDERAL EMPLOYEES MEETING Chapter 1992 (Georgetown) of the National Association of Active and Retired Federal Employees meeting, Monday, May 15, at noon at The Flight Deck Restaurant, Georgetown Airport. This month’s program will be provided by Larry Kelley, a director of the Delaware Aviation Air Museum. A tour of the museum, located at the airport, will follow.

MOAA MEETING

cludes use of weight training machines and free weights as well as treadmills, bikes, and elliptical trainers for cardio workouts. The gym complex features a stretching area, mirrored aerobics room, and fully-equipped locker rooms. A variety of spring classes are offered to help promote total fitness. For details on available courses, times, and fees, contact the corporate and community programs office at 854-6966, or visit www.dtcc.edu/owens and look for the Fitness & Fun link.

and Melson Church Road, east of Delmar, Md. from 8 to 10 a.m. Eggs, Sausage, scrapple, home fries, toast and beverage; $5 per person.

FOOD

Chicken barbecue, Saturday, May 27, 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., O’Neal’s Antiques, U.S. 13, Laurel, sponsored by the Laurel Ruritan Club. The cost is $5 and benefits local charities.

ROTARY PIG PICKIN’ HOEDOWN The Harrington-Felton-Greenwood Rotary Club “Pig Pickin’ Hoedown, “ Friday, May 12, 6:30 to 10 p.m., Robbins Farm on Paradise Alley Road near Felton. The evening will feature roast pig plus the bluegrass music of the Dave Kenton Group and Pink Grass. A silent auction and games will be a part of the evening mix. Tickets are $25 per person. For tickets, call 302-3494243 or email interiorsforyou2@comcast.net.

SANDWICH SALE AT CHURCH

WIDOWED PERSONS MEETING

BI-STATE RURITAN BREAKFAST

Reliance Grange 58 covered dish supper, Monday, May 22, 6:30 p.m. at Gethsemane United Methodist Church, Stein Highway in Reliance. Following the supper, Layton Wheeler from the Delaware Electric Co-op will speak on member regulation. For more information call 337-3615.

DEMOCRATS SPECIAL MEETING There will be a special meeting of the District 39 Democratic Committee on Thursday, May 25, at 7 p.m. in the Acorn Room of the Seaford District Library on Porter Street. The purpose of the special meeting will be to elect a new chair (current committee members may vote on the nominee” and to elect new committee members to any vacant seats). All registered Democrats are encouraged to attend. After the business meeting there will be refreshments and an informal discussion on the 2006 elections. For addition information, contact Lynne Betts, vice chair, 6295198.

COURSES AARP DRIVING COURSE Laurel Senior Center is sponsoring an AARP driver safety program refresher course, Thursday, May 18, at 9 a.m. The cost is $10. Call early to reserve a space. For reservations call 8752536.

FITNESS COURSES AT DEL TECH Fitness courses at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus, Georgetown. Fast Track to Fitness option and customize an exercise regimen with a one-month membership at the college’s gymnasium complex. Cost in-

CHICKEN BARBECUE IN LAUREL

Seaford Class of 2008 chicken barbecue, Saturday, June 3, at Dover Pools on U.S. 13, 10 a.m. until all the chicken is gone. Chicken meals can be bought on site for $6 or reserved via ticket purchse from any class of 2008 member or at the high school main office. Contact Jason Jeandell, 629-4587 ext. 368, or email jjeandell@seaford.k12.de.us.

Sandwich sale, Saturday, May 13, starting at 9 a.m., Delmar Church of God of Prophecy, featuring oyster, crab cake, soft crab, cheesesteak, chicken salad sandwiches and baked goods. Church is located on U.S. 13 and Dorthy Road (three miles north of state line). Phone 8757824.

RELIANCE GRANGE SUPPER

Chicken barbecue at Christ Lutheran Church, Shipley Street in Seaford, Saturday, May 27, starting at 11 a.m. Price is $6 a platter that includes chicken, cole slaw, chips, roll and drink. Proceeds to benefit the new building fund.

CLASS OF 2008 BARBECUE

Southern Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), meeting Tuesday, May 16, 11:45 a.m., at LaRosa Negra, 1201 Savannah Road, Lewes. The guest speaker will be John West, WO4, U.S. Navy (Ret.). He is the president of the Old Antarctic Explorer Association. Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service meeting, Tuesday, May 16, 12:15 p.m. at Golden Corral, U.S. 13, Seaford. The Guest speaker will be Karl Van Tine, who will speaking on the prison system. All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend.

CHICKEN BARBECUE

Bi-State Ruritans breakfast Saturday, May 13, at Melson United Methodist Church, Melson Road

REUNIONS WOODBRIDGE CLASS OF 1976 Woodbridge High School Class of 1976, 30-year class reunion meeting, Woodbridge Elementary School library, Monday, May 22, from 7 to 9 p.m. Meeting is open to any member willing to help plan reunion. Contact Dottie (Dorothy Breeding Bauguess) or Sheila (Clarkson) Clough at Woodbridge Elementary School, 349-4539.

2ND ANNUAL

Super Basket Bingo Sponsored by the Delmar VFW 200 W. State St., Delmar, MD (on the left before the Old Mill Restaurant)

to benefit Chantay Christoper with medical expenses

Saturday, May 13

Doors open at 5 pm and games will begin at 7 pm Limited number of tickets will be sold - RESERVE NOW! Price: $30 in advance • $35 at the door

All baskets filled with goodies!! The Kitchen Will Be Open, So There Will Be Plenty of Good Food & Snacks Available for Purchase -- So Come early For Dinner! Over $3,400 worth of Longaberger® products to be given away!!

Includes: Newspaper®, Large Boardwalk Basket®, Vanity w/ Wrought Iron Shelf®, 13” Bowl Basket®, Cake Basket Set®, Personal File®, Scalloped Waste Basket®, WI Hurriance®, 37 6 9 8 0 41 Lg. Storage Solutions®, Large Picnic®, Medium Waste®, nis in G c M Med. Storage Solutions®, Work Around®, Med. Wash Day®, Nancy 3 6 4 4 Wrought Iron Hurriance w/Woven Base, WI Bowl Stand®, 4 4 3 - 2 3 5 rner u Housekeeper®, Scalloped Bouitique Bathrom Bundle®, Dawn T 4 8 1 -2 Lattace Hamper®, Lg. Picnic Basket Set® 410-726 This bingo event is in no way affiliated with the Longaberger® company.

all VFW Tickets c 22

REMINDER

SUPER BINGO EVERY TUESDAY!


MORNING STAR

SPECIAL EVENTS BETHEL MUSEUM IS OPEN The Bethel Maritime Museum on First Street, Bethel, will be open to the public every Saturday and Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m. Admission is free.

AUXILIARY BASKET BINGO Seaford Volunteer Fire Company Ladies Auxiliary Longaberger Basket Bingo, Thursday, May 11, 7 p.m., Seaford Volunteer Fire Company. Advance tickets are $20 per person; $25 at the door. Advance ticket includes a chance to win one of nine door prizes. Refreshments will be provided. For ticket information phone 245-9463, 629-2378 or 410-376-3005.

LADY OF LOURDES MAY FAIR Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church, Stein Highway, Seaford, annual May Fair, Saturday, May 13, 8 a.m. till noon. Clothing, attic treasures, linens, jewelry, furniture, books, toys, flowers, plants, baked goods and Mother’s Day table, raffle tickets and food.

WOMEN’S HEALTH DAY Nanticoke’s Women’s Health Day, Saturday, May 13, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Laurel High School. Featuring author Stephanie Marston, sessions on women’s health, free screenings, lunch available with free admission. Phone 629-6611, ext. 2401.

SEAFORD CHAMBER MIXER Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce after business hours mixer, Thursday, May 18, 5 to 7 p.m. at the Golden Corral Family Steak House, U.S. 13, Seaford. There will be refreshments and door prizes. RSVP to the chamber (629-9690) by May 15.

COMMUNITY DAY Community Day, Saturday, May 20, Clarence Street Church of God, Seaford, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free food, games, giveaways, police demonstrations, children’s activities. Four bikes will be given away.

TRIBUTE TO REP. FALLON Tribute to retiring State Rep. Tina Fallon, Saturday, May 20, Seaford Fire Hall, 5:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 and available at Seaford City Hall (6299173) or Anne Nesbitt (628-7788).

ANNUAL CHAMBER DINNER Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce’s annual spring membership dinner, Thursday, May 25, at the Seaford Fire Hall with the presentation of the John A. Jr. and Helen Moore Community Service Award and volunteer recognition. Social time will begin at 6 p.m. with dinner at 6:30 p.m. Reservations by Friday, May 19. Tickets are $20 a person. Phone 6299690.

TOWNE & COUNTRY FAIR 13th annual Towne & Country Fair, Gov. Ross Plantation, Seaford, May 27-28. Events scheduled throughout the two days, refreshments, children’s activities, pageants, living history demonstrations and more. Phone the Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce, 629-9690.

MEMORIAL DAY CELEBRATION Memorial Day celebration, Monday, May 29, Bridgeville Veterans Memorial in Bridgeville Cemetery, 9:30 a.m.

TASTE OF LEWES Second annual “Taste of Lewes,” Sunday, June 4, noon to 3 p.m., Virden Center, Pilottown Road, Lewes, featuring cuisine ad wine and ale selections from 14 of Lewes’ restaurants, brewer and vintner, complemented by live Reggae music and a special auction. The $30 ticket, which includes all food stations and two beverages, may be purchased by calling the Lewes Canalfront Park at 302-645-2795.

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

Music Theater, Aug. 19, to celebrate Red Hat Society Week. Cost is $75 which includes transportation, show and dinner. Leave Christ United Methodist Church, 510 S. Central Ave., Laurel at 10 a.m. For more information call 875-3278.

TRIP TO INNER HARBOR The Seaford Department of Parks and Recreation trip to the Inner Harbor in Baltimore, Saturday, May 13, leaving the back parking lot of the high school at 8:30 a.m. and leaving Baltimore at 4 p.m. The cost is $18 a person; there are 46 seats available. Call 629-6809.

THERAPY DOGS BINGO Lower Delaware Therapy Dogs group Longaberger basket bingo, Wednesday, June 7, 7 p.m., at the American Legion, located in Millsboro. The evening will consist of 20 games. Advance tickets are $20; $25 at the door. Advance ticket includes a chance to win one of the several door prizes. Refreshments will be available. For ticket information phone 732-3634.

DAY IN THE PARK VENDORS Delmar’s 30th annual Day in the Park is looking for food and craft vendors for the Saturday, June 3 event. Booths start at $35. Call 846-3336.

YARD SALES POND HAVEN DEVELOPMENT

PAGE 29

TRIP TO CAPE COD Laurel Senior Center trip to Cape Cod and the islands, June 19-23. Cost: $599 per person which includes round trip motor coach, four nights at Heritage House Hotel, four buffet breakfasts, four full dinners, guided tours to Martha’s Vineyard, Hyannis and Nantucket Island, harbor cruise, taxes and tips, baggage handling. For more information call 875-2536.

ORIOLES VS. YANKEES The Seaford Department of Parks and Recreation Orioles vs. Yankees trip, Friday, June 2, to Camden Yards. The

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Multi family yard sale and flower sale, Saturday, May 13, 7 a.m. to noon, at Concord United Methodist Church, 25322 Church Road, Seaford. Refreshments for sale. For more information call 628-8114.

BRIDGEVILLE TOWN SALE The town of Bridgeville will host a community-wide yard sale on Saturday, May 20, starting at 7 a.m. There will be bargains at many homes throughout the town.

YACHT CLUB YARD SALE

An indoor yard sale, with tables available to rent, $15 per table or two for $25, will be Saturday, June 3, 7 a.m. at Woodland United Methodist Church. Sponsored by church youth group. Call 629-8775 or 629-4930 .

TRIPS RED HATTERS BUS TRIP The Chatter Hatters of Laurel are sponsoring a bus trip to the American

STAY AND PLAY FOR KIDS Parents and children from birth through age three can play together and network with other families. Free. Seaford Parks and Recreation, 320 Virginia Ave., Seaford. Mondays, 10:30 a.m.-noon, birth to 24 months; Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m.-noon , 25 months to 48 months, to May 22.

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Pond Haven development community yard sale, Saturday, May 13, 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Development is located off Rt. 20 east on Baker Mill Road. Some items available: boat and trailer, furniture, household items. Berber rug, eel pots, other items too numerous to mention. Call 628-1033 for directions.

Nanticoke River Yacht Club yard sale, Saturday, May 20, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. (raindate is Saturday, June 3), $10 per table. Call 629-2122 or 875-7143.

cost is $44 for each ticket and the bus. Tickets are in section 86 by the bullpen. The bus leaves the rear parking lot of the high school at 4 p.m.

CLUES ACROSS 1. Removed 8. Ballroom dance 13. Fix 14. Flower 15. Gardener’s work place 19. E (note) 20. Tract space 21. Finger millets 22. Auction offer 23. Get with difficulty 24. Covering of some seeds 25. Mid Infrared Instrument

26. Musical compositions 30. Insert mark 31. Ardors 32. Comic imitation 33. Opposition 34. ___s Major or Minor 35. Washes 38. Telephone ____ 39. Legislative body 40. Aspects 44. Czech River 45. __ Clapton, musician 46. Products of creativity

CLUES DOWN 1. Fruits 2. __ Shields, actress 3. Written message 4. Appropriate 5. Thai 6. Sea eagle 7. Lowers in status 8. Pouches 9. Burned residue 10. Metric ton 11. Soiled with mud 12. Barrenness 16. Exposes 17. Protects the chest 18. Nothing 22. Pen trademark 25. __ Tomei, actress 27. Gush 28. Wife of Amphion 29. God of war 30. Gives whippings

32. __ Alto, California city 34. Classical musics 35. Coating for wood 36. Sri Lanka port 37. Grates 38. Thomas __, American patriot 40. Bow of a ship 41. Young lady 42. Fiery or inflamed 43. Rocks 45. Pride 48. Brews 51. Federal savings bank 52. ___dola-boat 53. Keyboard command 54. Herb 56. Morning

SOLUTIONS TO LAST WEEKS PUZZLE


PAGE 30

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

Relay for Life’s aim is to strike out cancer Western Sussex event is taking place at Cancer Care Center on May 19 and 20 By Lynn R. Parks The reasons for participating in the May 19 and 20 Western Sussex Relay for Life to benefit the American Cancer Society are simple, said chairwoman Mary Catherine Hopkins. “Do you want to help make the world a better place?” she asked. “Do you want to help find a cure?” And, “Do you want to make some wonderful friends?” added relay volunteer Dena King. King’s father-in-law, John Palen, and father, Peter King, died from cancer about a year apart, one in 2004 and the other in 2005, and she said that participating in the relay has helped her family through the grieving process. She and 12 family members will make up one of the

For your information: The Western Sussex Relay for Life, “Strike Out Cancer,” will start Friday, May 19, at 6 p.m. and will end Saturday, May 20, at 8 a.m. Volunteers will accept registrations for all events through the start of the relay. For details, call chairwoman Mary Catherine Hopkins, 875-7308, or visit the Web site www.acsevents.org/seaford. teams that will take part in this year’s relay. Organizers hope to raise $150,000 in this year’s relay, which will be held in the Nanticoke Cancer Care Center, Seaford, Friday evening through Saturday morning. Hopkins expects more than 500 people to participate.

The theme of this year’s relay is “Strike Out Cancer.” In addition to team members walking laps around a track, the relay will include a silent auction, entertainment and raffles. Rock band Barren Creek will perform, as will gospel group 4Given. Evelyne Colegrove will sing the Star-Spangled Banner and Emily Wasson and Katie Hickey will sing “If You Believe.” Guest speaker will be Gov Ruth Ann Minner. Tom Chapman, a teacher at Seaford High School, will serve as master of ceremonies. The Survivors’ Lap, the first lap of the evening, will start at 6:30 p.m., featuring people who have survived cancer. That will be followed by the Caregivers’ Lap. The Luminaria Ceremony, in memory of

people who have died, will start at 9 p.m. Throughout the evening, there will be games and refreshments. At 8 p.m., Mindy Wheatley will open her hair-cutting booth, where she will take donations for Locks of Love. The program provides wigs for people who have lost their hair because of chemotherapy. The event’s closing ceremony will be at 8 a.m. Saturday, and will feature a surprise giveaway. Winners of the grand prize have to have participated in the relay and have to be present at the closing ceremony. Hopkins said that organizers have worked to get young people involved in the event. Children at Blades Elementary School made placemats that will be given Continued to page 36

House of Hope ‘friend-raiser’ on May 26 Sara Trollinger, national House of Hope president and founder, is scheduled to speak at the Shiloh House of Hope’s first “friend-raiser,” Friday, May 26. The event will be at the Sam Yoder community building with Chinese and silent auctions scheduled for 6 p.m. and dinner at 7 p.m. Seventeen years ago, Trollinger, a former school teacher, was led by the Lord to establish a faith-based ministry called House of Hope, a residential home where hurting, troubled, throw-away teens could learn to accept responsibility, submit to authority, and to get along with peers and adults. The emphasis is on a holistic approach to heal the spirit, soul and body and to heal and restore teens and their families. She started the faith ministry with five people praying and $200 and today, House of Hope has changed the lives of thou-

Sara Trollinger

sands of young people, their families and countless friends. The 10-acre campus is debt free and consists of six homes, chapel, Hope Academy School, gymnasium, counseling center, cafeteria, administrative offices, three staff houses and a ministry house. The cost of the friend-raiser is $50 per person. For ticket orders or additional information, contact shilohhouseofhope@msn.com or call 629-5331.

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MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 31

ENTERTAINMENT Winners galore during Beast of the East Custom Bike Show Seven days after challenging her friends if they were real bikers or not, Josie Daigle was rewarded for her exuberant motorcycle spirit. The 40-year-old Abingdon, Md., resident was at Iron Core Custom Motorcycles, reluctantly on four wheels dragging a trailer, to pick up her new ride. Daigle had won the Iron Core Custom Motorcycle, one of two John and his fellow employee Bobby Alderman had designed just for the Beast of the East Custom Bike Show. For the record, Daigle liked the red-striped, ape-hanger bobber

Josie Daigle picks up her new Iron Core Custom Motorcycle from Bobby Alderman and owner John Visco Saturday in Virginia Beach. She won the bike as the main door prize at The Beast of the East Custom Bike Show.

that Bobby had poured his heart into. The cleaner, muscular-looking white model John had built now sits for sale in the Virginia Beach show room Not that it was a contest between the two men, they each helped one another in their areas of expertise, but Bobby was proud, it was his bobber getting all the attention. But let’s back up to April 22, the middle of three days of the Beast of the East Custom Bike Show in Salisbury, Md. Daigle insisted that her group ride to the show, a complete exhibition featuring more than 20 professional builders with their eyes on $15,000 in prize money, a ride-in bike show (in the rain), two charity rides and even custom cars and stunt shows thrown in for flavor. Joining Daigle on the 138-mile ride in the rain was Brenda Hartmann, Gregg Hartmann and Gary Hartmann. The bubbly blond, seen flashing a peace sign to local photographer Big Brad as her group headed out – in the rain – to return home Saturday, was the lucky name drawn first Sunday afternoon. While Linda from Jolly Roger Customs held her name aloft in anticipation while the second and third place awards were handed out; a $1,000 off a 2006 Harley-Davidson from Harley-Davidson of Ocean City and $500 off a Polaris ATV from Harley-Davidson of Seaford. Once it was apparent Daigle was not present, the challenge of tracking her down started – she had forgotten to write down her phone number. But Benet McCormick, the promoter for the Beast of the East Custom Bike Show found her Sunday evening to let her know of her special door prize. A chance for winning the Iron Core

Towne & Country Fair has events, activities for all ages ■ 13th annual Towne & Country Fair, Friday, May 26, and Saturday, May 27. Phone the Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce, 629-9690

The 13th annual Towne & Country Fair on May 27-28, at the Gov. Ross Plantation in Seaford, is featuring games and activities for kids of all ages. Children’s carnival games will be set up the entire day under the leadership of Amy Walls and Leigh Ann DePope. Seaford Interact Club from the Seaford Christian Academy will be helping out with the games. The Seaford Pet Emporium is loaning wading pools for the “fishing tournament” games. The Boys & Girls Club of Western Sussex will be offering face painting. Jason Lee will be entertaining the children with his Gymboree and musical instruments. The Seaford Mission and the Seaford Kiwanis have some surprises in store for everyone.

“Snippy Doodles” from Cheswold will offer balloon entertainment and a magic show that is sure to please. Sandy Mitchell of Dagsboro is planning four pageants again this year for girls age three to 18. For more information call the Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce at 629-9690 or 800416-GSCC. The Historical Vintage Car Club of Delaware is holding a car show from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the 13th annual Towne & Country Fairin Seaford on Saturday, May 27. Registration is scheduled from 9-11 a.m. and the entry fee — pre-registration is $5 per car, or $8 day of show. Commemorative dash plaques will be given to the first 50 entrants registered and trophies will be awarded at the 3 p.m .ceremony. For more information call Ginny Cannon at 4248279, or Don Weaver at 6299756.

Winners Jolly Roger Customs collects the admiration of its peers and the $10,000 top prize at the Beast of the East Custom Bike Show, held April 21-23 at the Wicomico Youth & Civic Center in Salisbury, Md.

Custom Motorcycle was part of the $5 admission to the Beast of the East Custom Bike Show, sponsored by Coors Light, The Grand Hotel, Tri Supply & Equipment, The Daily Times and Harley-Davidson of Ocean City, Seaford and Rehoboth Beach. Not to be overshadowed by Daigle’s good fortune was Jolly Roger Customs. Making the trek from Milford, Mich., for the second year in a row, the builder’s Cyclone bike took the top prize of $10,000. Judging was done by the other 24 builders

who had bikes in the contest. Taking the second price of $3,000 was Star Custom Creations while third place and $2,000 went to Design Worx. The People’s Choice award went to an extremely clean, white beauty from Cycle Creations in New Church, Va. All four builders will be at Delmarva Bike Week®, Sept. 14-17 at Ocean Downs Racetrack outside of Ocean City, Md. For more information on the event, visit www.delmarvabikeweek.com.


PAGE 32

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

20th annual Greenwood Spring Festival taking place in June ■ Greenwood Spring Festival, Greenwood Mennonite School, Saturday, June 3. Events include breakfast, auction, run-walk, entertainment, car show, refreshments. Phone 629-4084 for more information.

The Greenwood Mennonite School (GMS); in Greenwood is celebrating its 78th anniversary with the return of the Greenwood Spring Festival. This “rain or shine” event features family fun and entertainment. Greenwood Mennonite is the oldest, continuously operating Mennonite elementary school in America. Once just an elementary school, G.M.S. now offers classes for students from Kindergarten through 12th grade and has an enrollment of around 280 students. Since it receives minimal federal and state funding, the school relies on a variety

of events to help offset the costs of tuition for its families. One of the largest of those fund raisers is the Greenwood Spring Festival, returning for its 20th year on Saturday, June 3. The festival begins with an all-you-caneat breakfast from 7 to 9 a.m. It features pancakes, sausage, sausage gravy, scrambled eggs, juice, and coffee and is $6 for adults, and $3 for children ages 2-10. At 8:30 a.m., a 5K run/walk kicks off from the school. Persons interested in participating should contact Grace Scott at 398-8349 for registration information. Again this year, sports tournaments are being offered. Contact Curtis Yoder for registration information. A car show will also be featured this year, along with antique tractors, softball, volleyball and basketball tournaments, the Spring Festival auction and helicopter

rides. The booths open at 9 a.m. and are open until 4:30 p.m. Food booths include baked goods, chicken barbecue, pork barbeque, milkshakes, homemade doughnuts, hamburgers, French-fries, fruit smoothies, seafood, strawberries, strawberry pie and homemade ice cream. Exhibits and events include children’s games and rides, a petting zoo, an antiquetractor-run ice cream machine, crafts, handcrafted items, books, plants, garden décor, a quilting demonstration and a white elephant booth. Entertainment on the main stage will feature the Jim Hitch family from Martell, Neb. Jim, Kathy, and their eight children offer a variety of Christian music, including selections from bluegrass, traditional, gospel, country, folk and original pieces. Among other performances will be the

GMS band with leader Lowell Bechtel, The Troyer Tumblers, the Eagle’s Nest Praise and Worship Band, Southern Blend and more. The auction begins at noon. To donate an item for the auction, contact Kevin Troyer at 422-0745. In observance of the 78th anniversary of the Greenwood Mennonite School, a limited umber of baskets have been produced by the American Traditions Basket Company and they will be on sale at the festival. The Greenwood Spring Festival is held on the grounds of the Greenwood Mennonite School, on Mennonite School Road, just off routes 16 and 36, east of Greenwood. For more information contact Curtis Yoder at 629-4084. The festival and parking are free.

Possum Point Players to perform farce ‘Moon Over Buffalo’ ■ “Moon Over Buffalo,” presented by Possum Point Players, June 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11. 8 p.m. and matinees (June 4, 11). Call the ticketline at 856-4560.

Possum Point Players are in rehearsal for the comedy “Moon Over Buffalo”, by Ken Ludwig. The show opens at Possum Hall in Georgetown on June 2. Director Jim Hartzell of Georgetown is taking on this production. “Moon Over Buffalo is a true ‘Situation Comedy’,” he explains, “The humor genuinely rises out of the situations involved in each moment.

It’s very physical, fast-paced, and full of confusion!” “Moon Over Buffalo” depicts through farcical slapstick humor the mix-ups that happen in a close-knit theatrical family. These seem more dramatic to those involved, as the mix-ups are taking place in an aging repertory theatre company and those connected with it. One ongoing “situational comedy” begins when the leads in the company are informed that the great director Frank Capra will be in the audience. They’ve never before met Capra, and so there is some mis-

taken identity. Another “situational comedy” involves the eternal question of marital fidelity. Has George been philandering? Will Charlotte leave with the wealthy Richard? The answers to these questions are revealed in bits and pieces throughout the show, and it’s anybody’s guess who will be with whom at the end. As people come and go before the big performance, other questions arise among the troupe: Will Frank Capra make it all the way to Buffalo? Will George be sober enough to perform? Does anyone even

know which show they should be performing? The resulting performance, ostensibly before one of the greatest movie directors in history, is a culmination of the day’s catastrophic events, and is a humorous performance for all the wrong reasons. “Moon Over Buffalo” will be presented June 2, 3, 9 & 10 at 8 p.m., and on June 4 and 11 at 2 p.m. Tickets are on sale now and can be obtained by calling the Possum Point Players ticketline at (302) 856-4560. Tickets are $15, or $14 for seniors or students. Directions are available by calling the Possum ticketline.


PAGE 32

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

20th annual Greenwood Spring Festival taking place in June ■ Greenwood Spring Festival, Greenwood Mennonite School, Saturday, June 3. Events include breakfast, auction, run-walk, entertainment, car show, refreshments. Phone 629-4084 for more information.

The Greenwood Mennonite School (GMS); in Greenwood is celebrating its 78th anniversary with the return of the Greenwood Spring Festival. This “rain or shine” event features family fun and entertainment. Greenwood Mennonite is the oldest, continuously operating Mennonite elementary school in America. Once just an elementary school, G.M.S. now offers classes for students from Kindergarten through 12th grade and has an enrollment of around 280 students. Since it receives minimal federal and state funding, the school relies on a variety

of events to help offset the costs of tuition for its families. One of the largest of those fund raisers is the Greenwood Spring Festival, returning for its 20th year on Saturday, June 3. The festival begins with an all-you-caneat breakfast from 7 to 9 a.m. It features pancakes, sausage, sausage gravy, scrambled eggs, juice, and coffee and is $6 for adults, and $3 for children ages 2-10. At 8:30 a.m., a 5K run/walk kicks off from the school. Persons interested in participating should contact Grace Scott at 398-8349 for registration information. Again this year, sports tournaments are being offered. Contact Curtis Yoder for registration information. A car show will also be featured this year, along with antique tractors, softball, volleyball and basketball tournaments, the Spring Festival auction and helicopter

rides. The booths open at 9 a.m. and are open until 4:30 p.m. Food booths include baked goods, chicken barbecue, pork barbeque, milkshakes, homemade doughnuts, hamburgers, French-fries, fruit smoothies, seafood, strawberries, strawberry pie and homemade ice cream. Exhibits and events include children’s games and rides, a petting zoo, an antiquetractor-run ice cream machine, crafts, handcrafted items, books, plants, garden décor, a quilting demonstration and a white elephant booth. Entertainment on the main stage will feature the Jim Hitch family from Martell, Neb. Jim, Kathy, and their eight children offer a variety of Christian music, including selections from bluegrass, traditional, gospel, country, folk and original pieces. Among other performances will be the

GMS band with leader Lowell Bechtel, The Troyer Tumblers, the Eagle’s Nest Praise and Worship Band, Southern Blend and more. The auction begins at noon. To donate an item for the auction, contact Kevin Troyer at 422-0745. In observance of the 78th anniversary of the Greenwood Mennonite School, a limited umber of baskets have been produced by the American Traditions Basket Company and they will be on sale at the festival. The Greenwood Spring Festival is held on the grounds of the Greenwood Mennonite School, on Mennonite School Road, just off routes 16 and 36, east of Greenwood. For more information contact Curtis Yoder at 629-4084. The festival and parking are free.

Possum Point Players to perform farce ‘Moon Over Buffalo’ ■ “Moon Over Buffalo,” presented by Possum Point Players, June 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11. 8 p.m. and matinees (June 4, 11). Call the ticketline at 856-4560.

Possum Point Players are in rehearsal for the comedy “Moon Over Buffalo”, by Ken Ludwig. The show opens at Possum Hall in Georgetown on June 2. Director Jim Hartzell of Georgetown is taking on this production. “Moon Over Buffalo is a true ‘Situation Comedy’,” he explains, “The humor genuinely rises out of the situations involved in each moment.

It’s very physical, fast-paced, and full of confusion!” “Moon Over Buffalo” depicts through farcical slapstick humor the mix-ups that happen in a close-knit theatrical family. These seem more dramatic to those involved, as the mix-ups are taking place in an aging repertory theatre company and those connected with it. One ongoing “situational comedy” begins when the leads in the company are informed that the great director Frank Capra will be in the audience. They’ve never before met Capra, and so there is some mis-

taken identity. Another “situational comedy” involves the eternal question of marital fidelity. Has George been philandering? Will Charlotte leave with the wealthy Richard? The answers to these questions are revealed in bits and pieces throughout the show, and it’s anybody’s guess who will be with whom at the end. As people come and go before the big performance, other questions arise among the troupe: Will Frank Capra make it all the way to Buffalo? Will George be sober enough to perform? Does anyone even

know which show they should be performing? The resulting performance, ostensibly before one of the greatest movie directors in history, is a culmination of the day’s catastrophic events, and is a humorous performance for all the wrong reasons. “Moon Over Buffalo” will be presented June 2, 3, 9 & 10 at 8 p.m., and on June 4 and 11 at 2 p.m. Tickets are on sale now and can be obtained by calling the Possum Point Players ticketline at (302) 856-4560. Tickets are $15, or $14 for seniors or students. Directions are available by calling the Possum ticketline.


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Red Bicyclette, Chard, Merlot, Syrah 750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Barefoot,

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750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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9

99

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Sutterhome,

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7 99

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5 99 Zin 99

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1.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pinot Grigio

750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$

+PLUS DEPOSIT

$

6 99

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10 99

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23

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32 99

Grand Mariner 750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$

99

10 99

Titos Vodka 1.75 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

All Varietals

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Fisheye,

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Rancho Zabaco Dancing Bull,

750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Malibu Rum 1.75 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$

20 99

$

37 99 18 99

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PAGE 36

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

Local honorees attend the American Mothers convention The American Mothers Inc. had their annual National Convention in Bismark, N.D. There were six persons who attended from Delaware and two from Seaford. The two from Seaford were Betty Daudt, 1988 Mother of the Year, and Joyce E. Schaefer, 2002 Mother of the Year. The other Delaware attendees were, Janet Bauman, 2005 National Young Mother of the Year, Mary Kegleman, 2004 National Mother of the Year, 2006 Mother of the Year, and 2006 Jennifer Cathey Young Mother of the Year. There were many mothers from other states and during the recent convention a new National Mother as well as a National Young Mother were selected. The purpose of American Mothers, is to strengthen the moral and spiritual foundations of the family and home.

Besides selecting a mother of the Year and a Young Mother of the Year other projecs include making baby quilts for mothers at risk and there were 220 brought to convention, children’s books for orphanages, national music contest, (vocal, piano or violin), National Art Contest, Literature Contest, fifth grade essay, “What my Mother means to me,” and mother mentoring. Also this year Mothers, Inc. are asking peple to call or ask a friend to donate blood. The motto is “Donate blood to save a life in honor of your mother who gave you life.” In this area, mothers have been Goldie Cannon Walker, 1976 MOY; Dr. Judith Tobin, 1984 MOY; Betty Daudt, 1988 MOY; Dusty Betts, 1994 MOY; Joyce Schaefer, 2002 MOY, and Wendy Daudt, 2004 YMOY.

Tickets on sale for benefit concert at Perdue Stadium Tickets are now on sale for the July 4th Lynyrd Skynyrd benefit concert scheduled for Perdue Stadium in Salisbury. Proceeds will benefit the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club. Tickets are available at the stadium box office, on-line at www.theshorebirds.com or by calling 410-219-3112. Tickets are $35.50 for general admission, $42.50 for VIP reserved seats and $47.50 for general admission field access. There are also special packages available for catering and groups. A fireworks show will follow the concert.

Mary Catherine Hopkins, with the bat, Dena King, the baseball, and Mary Lee Groton are ready to strike out cancer. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

Shore Thunder Starz try outs upcoming at Rt. 9 gym

out at the Survivors’ Dinner Thursday night at Atlanta Road Alliance Church, Seaford. Placemats that are not given out will be on display during the relay. A relay team from the Seaford Middle School Honor Society will have 87 participants, Hopkins said. And she also expects three teams from Seaford High School to

The Shore Thunder Starz competitive cheerleading and dance/hip hop teams are looking for new members for the 2006-07 season. Tryout dates (for members ages 4 and above) are May 17, 23 and 25 from 6 to 8 p.m. and Saturday, May 20, from 10 a.m. to noon. Late registration will be Saturday, July 8. Tryouts will take place at the Shore Thunder gym located at the intersection of Rt. 9 and Asbury Road, about two miles west of Sussex Tech High School. For more information, contact Lisa Horsey at 875-0533 or 856-6832. There will be an open house on Saturday, March 25, from 10 a.m. to noon.

Relay for Life taking place May 19-20 Continued from page 30

participate. Registrations will be accepted for all events as well as for teams through Friday evening. And organizers hope that people in the community will attend just to enjoy the activities planned. “It’s very emotional,” said Hopkins. “But it is also a lot of fun. People like to have fun.”

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MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 37

Oh brother, where art thou? It’s not often you get to write or talk about your brother and it AT URPHY should be a special time when I get to do it. It is and he is going to Congratulations Jerry on probably kill me for doing this. Jerry Murphy is a very private your retirement. That person and he just retired after more than 30 years as a Department of Natural Resources employ- ‘Gone Fishin’’ sign is now ee. As I go through life I am amazed at how different we all are a bigger part of your life. and Jerry and I certainly are different. To further prove my point, of your life. Jerry and Marsha are but two look at the Whaley family. Everyone of more of the interesting people we have in them is different, right? Now you are with Laurel and Jerry just happens to be my me and I can go on. brother! Growing up in the 1950s in Laurel, fishing and hunting just weren’t in my voOne of the highlights of the end of the cabulary. But Jerry, with friends such as year recognition banquet at the Laurel Bob Lamden, Bruce Harrington, David School District was a talk by Delaware Lecates, Lane Joseph and others, loved Teacher of the Year Garrett Lydic. He reboth sports from his very early days. I can counted memories of his year as represenremember well, Jerry getting up at 5:30 or tative for Delaware and at the White 6 a.m. on cold winter mornings before House reception that honored all state school, to go check his muskrat traps, ofteachers of the year. Lydic’s amusing story ten skinning them before school, then putting the hides on a stretcher before sending had an attentive audience, particularly as he told of using the White House restthem to western New York for maybe $1 room. or less per pelt. Jerry learned his fishing Lydic has made Laurel very proud this talent from his dad, Tom, a lifelong fisherman. His growing up days were full of vis- past year and he certainly represented the its to the local ponds and salt-water fishing school and community well. That was told to me by several of his fellow colleagues, with Dad, as well as hunting squirrels, and that is a top compliment when you are birds, rabbits and later deer. Jerry is just recognized by your peers. one of the reasons Dick Whaley cannot Now, congratulations to the 2007 kill a rabbit today — he got them all. Teacher of the Year of Laurel — from After Jerry graduated, he went through North Laurel Elementary again — Yvette a spell when motorcycles were his thing F. Bourne. and he went on trips to Florida, where he became acquainted with Evel Kanevel, the A&K Enterprises has pen and ink prints famed motorcyclist stunt man. Yes, Jerry, so I am told, has even done a few of these. of the old Delmar High School for sale. The prints were done by Brad Spicer and I guess Jerry’s wife, Marsha Hastings, and Jerry were made for each other, as she I’m sure many people in Delmar have great memories of that great school that too loved fishing and camping. Marsha served the students of Delmar from 1928 also has little use for the limelight, so to through 2000. A print would make a great speak, so they enjoy the water and a few gift for someone! special places they go to be near it today, as much as they did more than 30 years Do you have a used cell phone you ago. If you have ever been to one of Mardon’t know what to do with? Donate it to sha’s and Jerry’s outdoor fish fries, you the Laurel High School to help raise monwon’t forget it and Jerry has kept me supey for the school yearbook. This is not plied with fresh fish all these years. I sure only going to be done this year but for the hope he doesn’t blackball me for doing foreseeable future. this, as I will owe him a lot! The yearbook costs have soared to a Well this is more than enough, but conrecord $20,000 to produce and the yeargratulations Jerry on your retirement. That book staff is looking for creative ways to “Gone Fishin’” sign is now a bigger part pay for the publication of it. I think a year-

P

M

book costs the students $30 to $35 now, maybe more, but the books are the best recorded memory of their school days. I remember the cost of the yearbook in my era was $5 and it was in that range for several years back in the early 1960s. Of course, a loaf of bread was 29 cents, too. Find an old yearbook at a flea market or at a sale and it’s still a joy to read some of the comments made from one classmate to another. I hope that the yearbook continues. Call Julie Lewis at the high school for information on helping, or you may also leave your discarded cell phones at Christ United Methodist Church. Tom Kates, a retired DuPonter and a loyal Star reader in Felton, says the DuPont car photo with Joe Hall in it several weeks ago, also featured a gentleman by the name of Harry Hill. Sooner or later we usually get most of the people in those old photos identified. Good to hear from you Tom and don’t give up on our Phillies! There was a very large group of guests who attended the dedication of the new Elbert N. and Ann V. Carvel Research and

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Derrick Lofland, coach of the Woodbridge baseball team, should be very proud of the supporters for his program. Enthusiasm ran high for the Laurel game, with signs and all and a very vocal fun group. The Raiders hand out a very nice program to people who attend the games. The program features the Raiders schedule and the seniors’ picture on the front, and is very nice. It’s something we need to do in Laurel next year. See you at the Odd Fellows’ Yard Sale Saturday on Poplar Street.

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PAGE 38

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

Health Wood ticks, plentiful in summer, can carry disease By Dr. Anthony Policastro Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Medical director

Summer is a time for being outside. That carries with it a variety of risks. One of those risks is a disease that is carried by ticks. Ticks are common in this area. One of the ticks that we see commonly is the dog tick. It is also known as the wood tick. These ticks are relatively large. They are often 1/4 inch in length. The dog tick can carry Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. It got its name because that is the location where the disease was first discovered. However, the disease is much more common along the Atlantic Coastal areas. The time frame for it is in the summer months. That is when people go into wooded areas. That is when ticks are more plentiful. In years with a mild winter, ticks survive better. We had a mild winter this year. That would mean we could expect to see more ticks. As its name would suggest this disease often has a high fever. The fever frequently reaches 103 to 104 degrees. It also has a rash associated with it. The rash frequently begins on the palms and soles. The rash is reddish colored. The rash does not consist of blisters. A viral condition called hand, foot and mouth disease causes blisters on the palms and soles. It also occurs during the summer. As its name suggests, it also has blisters in the mouth. It is a minor illness. Thus, just having a rash on the palms and soles does not necessarily mean Rocky

Mountain Spotter Fever. The third symptom is bad headache. The headache is often the most severe headache the patient has ever had. When a patient shows up with a bad headache, fever and rash after a tick bite, the diagnosis is easy. However, many patients do not always have the history of tick bite. Some do not have the rash when they first come in. There are a lot of things that can cause headache and fever. For that reason, the diagnosis is not that easy in these situations. The good news is that Rocky Mountain Spotter Fever can be treated successfully with antibiotics. The bad news is that if the treatment is not started early, it can be a serious illness. Not every one with a tick bite develops the illness. The tick has to be one that carries the illness. It must be attached long enough to transmit the illness. Therefore, there is no reason to use antibiotics for every tick bite. There is a need to start them when the symptoms occur. Wood ticks can cause local infections as well. They can cause an inflammation at the site of the attachment. Some times a tick can be hidden in a child’s scalp. The only clue might be swollen glands at the back of the child’s neck. There are multiple ways suggested of removing ticks. However, the one recommended by most experts is use of a tweezers. The tick is grabbed as close to the head as possible. Then, gentle pulling of the tick with the tweezers will usually result in removal. You might want to add a

Author to speak at Women’s Health Day event Nanticoke’s Women’s Health Day will be Saturday, May 13, at Laurel High School from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Stephanie Marston, author of “Chicken Soup for the Soul, Life Lessons for Women,” will be

the featured speaker. Other sessions on women’s health issues and free screenings will be available. Lunch is provided and admission is free of charge. For details and reservations, call 629-6611, ext. 2401.

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lent. Therefore, looking carefully at the skin after going through a wooded area is the best advice. We may spend more time outside during the summer. But so do the ticks.

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MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 39

NMH to celebrate National Cancer Survivors Day Nanticoke Memorial Hospital will celebrate National Cancer Survivors Day (NCSD) on Sunday, June 4. Seaford will honor cancer survivors who are living with and beyond cancer and will also recognize those healthcare professionals who are helping to fight the battle against cancer. Nanticoke Health Services is hosting a cancer survivor recognition to commemorate NCSD. More than 700 communities throughout the United States, Canada and other participating countries will celebrate life as part of the 19th annual NCSD, the world’s largest cancer survivor event. “Cancer survivors are an inspiration to all of us. Learn why surviving cancer is an attitude about life and living each day to the fullest. This event will lift your spirit,” says Terri Clifton, coordinator for Nanticoke Health Services. “You will find our community’s NCSD event overflowing with joy, camaraderie, hope, compassion, faith, and love as we honor cancer survivors and those who support them, and call attention to the issues of cancer survivorship.” This local event is part of a worldwide celebration coordinated by the National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation and sponsored by “Coping” magazine and Lilly Oncology. A cancer survivor is defined by the NCSD Foundation as anyone living with a history of cancer — from the moment of diagnosis through the remainder of life. Ten million Americans are now living with and beyond a diagnosis of cancer. In the United States, half of all men and one third of all women are expected to be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lives. Many forms of cancer

Miss America 1999 to speak on fight against diabetes Nicole Johnson Baker, Miss America 1999 and an international advocate for the fight against diabetes, will speak at Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury, Md., on Thursday, May 11, in an event co-sponsored by the Medical Center and its diabetes outpatient education program. Johnson Baker, who travels extensively promoting awareness, prevention and early detection of the condition she shares, will speak on “How You Can Be Successful With Diabetes” at the 1 p.m. presentation in the Avery W. Hall Educational Center auditorium on the Peninsula Regional campus in Salisbury. When not lecturing, Johnson Baker spends much of her time engaging lawmakers at both the state and federal levels on all diabetes-related matters. She serves as the first ambassador for the International Diabetes Federation’s “Life for a Child” program, which advocates for endangered children with diabetes around the world. Johnson Baker co-hosts the weekly CNBC diabetes talk show, “dLife,” writes monthly columns for “Diabetes Health” magazine and has a Web column on Georgetown University’s MyCareTeam Web site. Her three books include her autobiography, “Living with Diabetes,” which, in part, chronicles her experiences as Miss America 1999. Her fourth book, a new cookbook, “Mr. Food Diabetic Dinners in a Dash Featuring Nicole Johnson Baker,” was released in March. Johnson Baker is working on her fifth book, her story of her successful diabetes pregnancy. She and her husband Scott live with his three children and new little Ava Grace Baker in Pittsburgh, Pa. There is no charge to attend the May 11 event. However, space is limited and reservations are required. Call the Peninsula Regional Medical Center Diabetes Outpatient Education Program at 410-543-7061 to reserve a seat. Light refreshments will be served.

can be prevented and most can be cured if detected early. Major advances in cancer prevention, early detection and treatment have resulted in longer survival and therefore a growing number of cancer survivors. However, a cancer diagnosis can leave a host of problems in its wake. Physical, financial and emotional hardships often persist after diagnosis and treatment. Survivors may face many challenges such as hindered access to cancer specialists and promising new treatments, inadequate insurance, financial hardships, employment problems and psychological struggles. In light of these difficulties, attention needs to be focused on improving the critical aspects of longterm care for cancer survivors. “Despite the adversities they face, cancer survivors continue to show resilience by living active, productive

lives,” says Clifton. “They face each day with courage and dignity in their fight against cancer.” The idea for NCSD originated in Kansas City when cancer survivor Richard Bloch, co-founder of H&R Block, and his wife, Annette, held their first Cancer Survivor Rally to demonstrate that a cancer diagnosis is not an automatic death sentence. The idea soon caught on in other communities and has come to be known as National Cancer Survivors Day. This year’s local National Cancer Survivors Day celebration of life will be held in at the Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Cancer Care Center on Saturday, June 4, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. For more information contact Nanticoke’s Cancer Care Center coordinator at (302) 629-6611, extension 2577.

Nanticoke

WOMEN’S HEALTH DAY

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PAGE 40

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

Hospital is accredited by association of Blood Banks Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Seaford, has been accredited by the American Association of Blood Banks. “Accreditation follows an intensive onsite inspection by specially trained representatives of the Association and establishes that the level of medical, technical and administrative performance within the facility meets or exceeds the standards set by the AABB,” said Nanticoke Health Services CEO/president Daniel J. Werner. By successfully meeting those requirements, Nanticoke Memorial Hospital joins more than 1,800 similar facilities across the United States and abroad that have earned AABB accreditation. According to Dr. William A. Diedrich Jr., laboratory medical director at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, “The AABB’s inspection and accreditation procedures are voluntary. For more than 30 years, Nanti-

coke has achieved this accreditation by meeting strict requirements on a daily basis and completing numerous assessments when units of blood are handled. “Nanticoke Memorial Hospital has sought AABB accreditation because this program assists facilities around the country in achieving excellence by promoting a level of professional and medical expertise that contributes to quality performance.” “Through the dedication of all Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Laboratory employees, our community receives the necessary blood products when they are needed,” said Nanticoke blood bank clinical leader Brenda Lewis. Since 1958, the AABB has been engaged in the accreditation of blood banks and transfusion services. The Accreditation Program assists blood banks and transfusion services in determining whether

methods, procedures, personnel knowledge, equipment and the facility meet established requirements. Established in 1947, the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB) is the professional society for approximately 2,000 community, regional, and Red Cross blood centers; hospital-based blood banks and transfusion services; and more than 8,000 individuals engaged in blood bank and transfusion medicine. Its member facilities are responsible for collecting virtually all of the nation’s blood supply and for transfusing more than 80 percent of the blood used for patient care in the United States. The AABB sets standards, assesses and accredits blood collection and transfusion facilities, and provides continuing education and information.

“Nanticoke Memorial Hospital has sought AABB accreditation because this program assists facilities around the country in achieving excellence by promoting a level of professional and medical expertise that contributes to quality performance.”

Brenda Lewis Nanticoke Blood Bank clinical leader

Insurance commissioner warns of Medicare deadline Delaware Insurance Commissioner Matt Denn recently reminded all eligible seniors and others with Medicare that they must decide whether to join one of the new federal Medicare prescription drug plans by May 15 or face higher costs if they choose to sign up later. “The Medicare prescription drug plans are not right for everyone and the decision to join or not must be based on a person’s specific situation,” Denn said. “But anyone who is eligible to sign up now and

chooses not to will likely have to pay higher premiums or higher co-pays if they sign up for a plan later. And the next open enrollment won’t be until the end of the year.” To help seniors evaluate and compare the almost 50 drug plans offered in Delaware, Denn has scheduled the “Reality Check Express” — a bus/mobile office with internet-connected computers and trained staff — to travel around the state offering one-on-one help to seniors.

“I urge all those Medicare recipients who have not yet performed a plan comparison and evaluation to come to one of the Reality Check Express stops scheduled in the next two weeks,” Denn said. No appointment is necessary for a Reality Check Express counseling session and there is no charge. Those who come should bring the full name of any prescription drugs they currently take; whether it is liquid, tablet or capsule; strength and dosage (for example, 100 mg, two times a

“I can hear, but I can’t always understand.” It may only be earwax. Come see for yourself.

day); number of doses in 30 days for each prescription; the cost of the prescription to them under any current drug coverage; and their Medicare card. A list of remaining Reality Check Express stops in the area can be found online at www.state.de.us/inscom/realitycheck. shtml The van will be at Happy Harry’s, Georgetown, Friday, May 12, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

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MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 41

The perfect recipes for Mother’s Day breakfast in bed On a lovely, sunny Mother’s Day not long ago, a friend’s husband took her out to brunch. Being the spontaneous sort, reservations were not something he’d considered. Arriving at his chosen eatery, the husband and his honored guest were reluctantly turned away — there wasn’t a table to be had. Jumping back in their vehicle, they proceeded to travel south, stopping at other dining spots that seemed worthy of the occasion. Their standards decreased somewhat as brunch time turned to the dinner hour but their luck didn’t change. Having to be content with a nice Sunday ride, they returned home to leftovers. My Mother’s Day dream would not be anything so ambitious as to drive to a restaurant but to sleep in and wake to a brunch lovingly prepared by someone close to me. “Dream” is the operative word since the reality is that it is I who wake to lovingly prepare the brunch for someone close to me: “You love to cook, you’d do it so much faster, it would taste so much better, I’ll clean up.” I’d do anything to get out of doing the dishes. Here’s a menu for a brunch easy enough for anyone with time for a short trip to the market and a couple of free hours on Sunday morning. If you’re lucky, that someone won’t be you. If you’re so inclined, start with a Kir Royale: Pour a bit of Crème de Cassis or Chambord in a champagne flute and top with a not too expensive dry champagne. Drop a few fresh raspberries in.

The Practical Gourmet Herb and Egg Scramble with Garlic Toast and Sliced Tomato Serves 4 12 eggs, beaten 4 ounces garlic and herb cheese (such as Boursin or Alouette) or cream cheese, cut or crumbled into small pieces 3 tablespoons chives, chopped – about 12 blades Salt and black pepper A few drops hot sauce 2 tablespoons butter or extra-virgin olive oil 4 plum or Roma tomatoes, sliced lengthwise Smoked salmon, sliced ham or salami, chopped – optional additions for the eggs Toast: 8 slices white, wheat, soft sliced Italian or whole grain bread 2 large cloves garlic, cracked away from skin 4 tablespoons softened salted butter Whisk eggs with cheese and chives and

Dunn family welcomes baby son Shane Ryan Dunn was born April 4, 2006, at 5:29 p.m., at Peninsula Regional Medical Center. He weighed 7 pounds, 8 ounces. He is the son of Nathaniel Dunn and Jeannie Dunn of Delmar, Md. He was welcomed home by sisters, Shelby Dunn and Bethany Dunn, and a brother, Cole Dunn. His maternal grandparents are John and Mamie Hastings of Delmar, Md.; Miriam

Carey of Fort Myers, Fla., (great grandmother, Stella Hastings of Delmar (great grandmother) and Gussy Elliott of Eden, Md., (great-grandmother). His paternal grandparents are Carroll and Tam Dunn of Hebron, Md.; Mary Dunn of Hebron (great grandmother), and Carolyn Moore of Hebron (great grandmother).

season with salt and pepper and a few biscuits (10 count) drops hot sauce. 1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese Preheat a large nonstick skillet over 1/2 cup (1 stick) melted butter medium heat. Add butter or extra-virgin 1 cup sifted confectioners’ sugar olive oil to the pan. Heat butter or oil, then 2 tablespoons fresh orange juice add eggs. Add the optional addition, if desired, at this point. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Scramble to deIn a small bowl, sired consistency and combine the granuserve with a sliced lated sugar, pecans, My Mother’s Day dream would plum tomato per perand zest; set aside. son, seasoned with Separate the bisnot be anything so ambitious as salt and pepper, cuits. Place about alongside the eggs. 3/4 teaspoon cream Pass garlic toast at cheese in the center to drive to a restaurant but to table: rub hot toast of each biscuit. with cracked garlic, Fold each biscuit sleep in and wake to a brunch then butter as usual. in half over the From Rachel Ray cheese, pressing the lovingly prepared by someone edges to seal. Dip Top off this delithe biscuits in meltcious egg and toast ed butter, then close to me. dish with something dredge in the granusweet — lated sugar mixture. Place the biscuits, curved-side down, in Nutty Orange Coffee Cake a single layer in the hollows of a lightly Serves 10 to 12. This “monkey bread” greased 2-cup bundt pan, spacing them recipe comes from a single mom, the irre- evenly (do not stack). Place any remaining pressible Paula Deen, who raised two sons biscuits around the tube, filling any gaps. while building a successful career in the Drizzle any remaining butter over the restaurant business. She’s now the author biscuits, and sprinkle with any remaining of best-selling cookbooks and a television sugar mixture. Food Network star. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes, until golden brown. Immediately invert the cake onto a 3/4 cup granulated sugar serving platter. Combine the confectioners’ 1/2 cup chopped pecans sugar and orange juice, stirring well; driz2 teaspoons orange zest zle the glaze over the warm cake. Serve 2 (12-ounce) cans refrigerated buttermilk warm.


PAGE 42

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

Seaford club hosts Soroptimist International spring conference The Soroptimist North Atlantic Region Spring Conference 2006 was held April 28 through April 30 at the Sheraton Hotel in Dover. Soroptimist International of Seaford hosted the event. Conference chairs were Michele Procino-Wells and Shannon Sapna. Regional Gov. Diane Thompson said this is a “…time to gather and learn about Soroptimist programs and share ideas and successes. We will also have region business to take care of, the most important of which is to elect our leaders for the next biennium. There are some proposals for changes to the bylaws and the budget for the next biennium to discuss and approve also.” The North Atlantic Region, Soroptimist International of the Americas, has four districts with clubs in Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and West Virginia. Friday featured a first-time attendees reception and a friendship diner followed by opening ceremonies and the first business session. Then the host club presented “A Vegas Show — SI of Seaford Style” with appearances by “Tina Turner,” “Elvis Presley,” “Frank Sinatra” and more. Saturday was filled with Soroptimist business, free workshops and time to explore Dover. Saturday evening brought out everyone in formal attire for the “Living Their Dream” banquet. The host club opened the hospitality room after the banquet to continue the festivities into the night. An ecumenical service was held Sunday morning, followed by breakfast

and the final business session. Throughout the conference scrapbooks and press brooks were on display and silent auctions and memorabilia for sale was available to SI members. Wanda Price, SI of Five Points Magenta, Philadelphia, Pa., was installed as north Atlantic Region Governor at the spring conference. She is a resident of Philadelphia and works for Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company in Horsham, Pa. as a benefits administrator. Her community involvement includes serving as a board member for the Girl Scouts of Southeastern Pennsylvania, a mentor and youth group leader for the d’Zert Club, seminar facilitator for AARP University in Philadelphia and activities in the New Pentecost Christian Church and Ministries. She served in numerous positions for multiple terms in her local club; served as director, District II on the N.A.R. board 2002-2004, as well as serving as district secretary, foundation workshop presenter, and registration vice chair; served as delegate to at least five regional conferences, was a workshop presenter at the 1999 spring conference, was on the nominating committee 1999-2000, was youth forum chair 1994-1998, and was foundation chair 1998-2002. At the federation level she attended youth forums in Japan and Mexico and she attended SIA conventions in Calgary, San Diego, Hawaii, New York and Phoenix. And she also attended the international convention in Sydney, Australia in 2003. She is a doctoral candidate in manage-

Wilgus Associates, Inc. 210 W. Market St. P.O. Box 750, Georgetown, DE 19947

CALL TERESA ROGERS FOR YOUR “PEEK”!

Michele Procino-Wells, SI of Seaford president, left, and Shannon Sapna were conference co-chairs.

ment/organizational leadership, University of Phoenix, with an anticipated completion date of August 2006. She earned her MBA in management from Eastern University, St. Davids, Pa., in 1999 and her bachelor’s of arts degree in human resource management at Temple University in 1985. 2006 Women’s Opportunity Award winners are: Cynthia V. Soto-Santiago is the $5,000 winner, submitted by SI of Staten Island. Stacy L. Bobak is SI of Seaford’s entry and a $3,000 recipient. She is the divorced mother of 5-year-old Hanna. In 1987, she received her state cosmetology license and

worked as a hair dresser. In 1992, she fell in love and, shortly before marrying, he told her he probably would be going to prison. She vowed to stand by him. They married and he was sentenced to 9-1/2 years. The physical, emotional and sexual abuse began just after his release almost five years later. On the day she delivered a still born son, her husband left the hospital to party. Bobak was left to handle all the arrangements. She filed for divorce. She has an associate’s degree in criminal justice and is a year away from obtaining her BS in behavioral science. She hopes to work in the field of alcohol and drug ad-

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(Market Sq Park & Janosik Park) Sponsored by Laurel Wesleyan Church For more information call 302-875-5380 or log on to www.jcblockparty.com


PAGE 42

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

Seaford club hosts Soroptimist International spring conference The Soroptimist North Atlantic Region Spring Conference 2006 was held April 28 through April 30 at the Sheraton Hotel in Dover. Soroptimist International of Seaford hosted the event. Conference chairs were Michele Procino-Wells and Shannon Sapna. Regional Gov. Diane Thompson said this is a “…time to gather and learn about Soroptimist programs and share ideas and successes. We will also have region business to take care of, the most important of which is to elect our leaders for the next biennium. There are some proposals for changes to the bylaws and the budget for the next biennium to discuss and approve also.” The North Atlantic Region, Soroptimist International of the Americas, has four districts with clubs in Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and West Virginia. Friday featured a first-time attendees reception and a friendship diner followed by opening ceremonies and the first business session. Then the host club presented “A Vegas Show — SI of Seaford Style” with appearances by “Tina Turner,” “Elvis Presley,” “Frank Sinatra” and more. Saturday was filled with Soroptimist business, free workshops and time to explore Dover. Saturday evening brought out everyone in formal attire for the “Living Their Dream” banquet. The host club opened the hospitality room after the banquet to continue the festivities into the night. An ecumenical service was held Sunday morning, followed by breakfast

and the final business session. Throughout the conference scrapbooks and press brooks were on display and silent auctions and memorabilia for sale was available to SI members. Wanda Price, SI of Five Points Magenta, Philadelphia, Pa., was installed as north Atlantic Region Governor at the spring conference. She is a resident of Philadelphia and works for Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company in Horsham, Pa. as a benefits administrator. Her community involvement includes serving as a board member for the Girl Scouts of Southeastern Pennsylvania, a mentor and youth group leader for the d’Zert Club, seminar facilitator for AARP University in Philadelphia and activities in the New Pentecost Christian Church and Ministries. She served in numerous positions for multiple terms in her local club; served as director, District II on the N.A.R. board 2002-2004, as well as serving as district secretary, foundation workshop presenter, and registration vice chair; served as delegate to at least five regional conferences, was a workshop presenter at the 1999 spring conference, was on the nominating committee 1999-2000, was youth forum chair 1994-1998, and was foundation chair 1998-2002. At the federation level she attended youth forums in Japan and Mexico and she attended SIA conventions in Calgary, San Diego, Hawaii, New York and Phoenix. And she also attended the international convention in Sydney, Australia in 2003. She is a doctoral candidate in manage-

Wilgus Associates, Inc. 210 W. Market St. P.O. Box 750, Georgetown, DE 19947

CALL TERESA ROGERS FOR YOUR “PEEK”!

Michele Procino-Wells, SI of Seaford president, left, and Shannon Sapna were conference co-chairs.

ment/organizational leadership, University of Phoenix, with an anticipated completion date of August 2006. She earned her MBA in management from Eastern University, St. Davids, Pa., in 1999 and her bachelor’s of arts degree in human resource management at Temple University in 1985. 2006 Women’s Opportunity Award winners are: Cynthia V. Soto-Santiago is the $5,000 winner, submitted by SI of Staten Island. Stacy L. Bobak is SI of Seaford’s entry and a $3,000 recipient. She is the divorced mother of 5-year-old Hanna. In 1987, she received her state cosmetology license and

worked as a hair dresser. In 1992, she fell in love and, shortly before marrying, he told her he probably would be going to prison. She vowed to stand by him. They married and he was sentenced to 9-1/2 years. The physical, emotional and sexual abuse began just after his release almost five years later. On the day she delivered a still born son, her husband left the hospital to party. Bobak was left to handle all the arrangements. She filed for divorce. She has an associate’s degree in criminal justice and is a year away from obtaining her BS in behavioral science. She hopes to work in the field of alcohol and drug ad-

Join Us & Celebrate Life

JC Block Party Sunday, May 21 • 10 am - 3 pm

PEEK AT WHAT’S NEW AND...... the price is nice, too $154,900! 2 BR, 1 bath with huge 1st floor laundry/mud room & nice back yard deck w/hot tub! GREENWOOD MLS#535697

Lakeside

t’s a h W e Se loom In B ther’sGREENHOUSES for Moay Rt. 24, Laurel, DE D 302-875-2457 (1/8 mile East of Rt.13)

4” Fancy Annual Bedding Plants Hanging Baskets Geraniums 4” to 12” Baskets and Pots filled with Beautiful Blooming Flowers & Assorted Perrennials Over 35 Years Experience Having Plant Problems? Bring Us A Sample and We’ll Try To Help!

Free Box Lunch Free Games Free Entertainment Fun for all ages Community Agencies & Additional Food venders will be available

Qualify to win a $500 Wal-Mart gift card as well as gift cards to Laurel merchants

Downtown Laurel Our Customers tell us we have the best plants anywhere!

(Market Sq Park & Janosik Park) Sponsored by Laurel Wesleyan Church For more information call 302-875-5380 or log on to www.jcblockparty.com


MORNING STAR diction and mental health. Karen Fahnestock was entered by SI/Solanco and is receiving $3,000. Rebekah James is receiving $3,000 and was entered by SI/Columbia County. Angela Rodriguez is a $3,000 winner submitted by SI/Lebanon County. The SIA North Atlantic Regional Making a Difference for Women Award winner is: Kristi Nickerson a nominee from SI Seaford. She is the domestic violence advocate for Families in Transition, within the Division of Family Services in Sussex County. The project is designed to improve court, law enforcement, and social services to families in which domestic violence has been identified as a risk factor

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 43

for the women and/or children. Nickerson was the country’s first domestic violence liaison with the Division of Family Services in Sussex County and developed/expanded the program as she networked with police, courts, counseling and supportive community services to provide wraparound services to women in or leaving a violent relationship. As a victim of domestic/sexual abuse herself, Nickerson was able to motivate and inspire the women with whom she works to establish a safe life for themselves, their children, find employment, and continue their education. She is very clear that the abuse she endured during her childhood is what made her who she is today.

Louise Hanson, a 35-year member SI of Seaford, enjoys the spring conference.

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PAGE 44

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

SEAFORD’S BASEBALL HISTORY: 1946-1949 WERE THE YEARS OF THE EAGLES - FIRST IN A SERIES

Minor League baseball was major pastime for people in this area By Mike Lambert This is the first installment of a series of six articles that I am going to write about a short and exciting period of time in Seaford’s rich baseball history. For those of you who remember the Seaford Eagles; sit back and enjoy the memories and for those of you who have never heard of this team, I believe that you will find reading about the Eagles and this wonderful era very enjoyable. Beginning in the spring of 1946 and ending after the 1949 season, the Seaford Eagles Baseball Club was a class “D” professional minor league baseball team that represented Seaford as a member of the

Eastern Shore Baseball League (ESL). Other teams from Delaware that participated in this league were the Milford Red Sox, Rehoboth Beach Pirates and the Dover Phillies. The Maryland clubs entered in the Eastern Shore League were the Salisbury Cardinals, Centreville Orioles, Easton Yankees, Cambridge Dodgers and the Federalsburg A’s. The Centerville club was a member of the Eastern Shore League only in 1946 (and won the ESL championship). While the Milford and Dover teams played from 1946-1948, and Rehoboth Beach from 1947-1949. Each of the other teams played in all four seasons that the Eastern Shore League existed.

The centerpiece of the Seaford Eagles display at the Seaford Museum is a rare Eagles uniform, which was given to Mike Lambert. Photos by Ronald MacArthur

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In early 1946 the Seaford Baseball Club was incorporated and shares of stock were sold at $10 each with many of the prominent local businessmen in charge of selling the stock and promoting the ball team. A contest was held to select a team moniker and the lucky winner (Arnold Spicer) received a free pass to all of the home games during the exciting inaugural season. The Seaford Eagles operated as an independent minor league baseball team for the 1946 season. During the 1947 and 1948 seasons, the Eagles had a working agreement with the National League New York Giants, and in 1949 the Eagles were a farm club of the Philadelphia Phillies. Seaford’s home games were played in a newly-constructed ballpark on Middleford Road, where Soroptimist Park is now located. During those four seasons, there were many ballplayers that traveled to and through Seaford to play professional baseball, and a few of these young men ultimately married local ladies and made Seaford their permanent home. There were also a number of Eastern Shore natives who saw action with various teams in the Eastern Shore League, including Seaford. With a variety of former major league players as well as future major league players on the Seaford Eagles roster at one time or another, the Seaford Baseball Club was a big hit with the local citizens. From years of researching the Eagles, interviewing many former players and becoming enamored with them all; I have realized two things about this wonderful era.

The local citizens totally embraced their ball team, and those men who wore the Seaford Eagles uniform genuinely loved to play the game of baseball. The next installment of this series will cover the inaugural 1946 season of the Seaford Eagles baseball club. E-mail questions or comments to seafordeagles@comcast.net

Mike Lambert adds the finishing touches to a Seaford Eagles baseball display at the Seaford Museum. The display is open during museum hours which are 1 to 4 p.m. on Thursday - Sunday (special requests are also considered). The museum is located on High Street in downtown Seaford.

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MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 45

Seaford Star Sports

Terry Hood clears 5’8” in the high jump during the Seaford-Milford match last week. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

Seaford High track team hurt by lack of numbers By Ronald MacArthur Heading into the final week of the regular season, the Seaford High boys’ track team has gone 2-3 over the past two weeks. Overall, the team is 3-6. The Blue Jays beat Woodbridge 10044 and Sussex Central 116-23 but fell to Milford 98-48, Lake Forest 78-67 and Caesar Rodney 103-43. “We lost five members of the team at the break because of grades,” said firstyear coach Art Doakes. “That really hurt us, especially in the relays. With all of our team together, I think we could have won the Southern Division title and probably finished second in the conference.” In the May 4 meet against Milford, Seaford was almost shut of victory lane. Jimmy Senatus won the 800-meter run and Zach Hunt won the pole vault with the 4x400 relay team of Gernie Purnell, Allandson Simon, Corri Turnage and Senatus taking first. Purnell was also second in the 100-meter and 400-meter runs. In

the field events, Elizer Dorelus was second in the triple jump, Derek Page was second in the high jump and third in the long jump, Midelen Jules was second in the shot put and Eric Fisher was second in the discus. Taking thirds in the field events were Tony Linton in the high jump, Derek Babinski in the shot put and Mike Ruehr in the discus. Dorelus was third in the 110-hurdles and the 300-hurdles and Wybean Titus was third in the 800-meter run. Seaford dominated action in the win over Sussex Central on May 2, winning every event but the 3200-meter run and taking every place but one third place in the field events. Purnell won the 400-meter, 100-meter and 200-meter runs and Dorelus won the 300-hurdles, 110-hurdles, the long jump and triple jump. Rob Urell won the 1600-meter run, Senatus won the 800-meter run and in the relays, the 4x800 team of Titus, Gary Andrews, Simon and Senatus won as did the Continued on page 48

Seaford High’s Eric Kimpton returns a serve during a recent match against CR. He suffered his first loss of the season in the match, as did the team. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

Seaford High tennis teams head into post season with one loss The Seaford High tennis teams picked up two more wins in action this past week beating Indian River 5-0 on Monday afternoon and Smyrna last Thursday. On Monday for the boys, Eric Kimpton won 6-0, 6-1, Shane McLaughlin won 6-2, 6-0 and Trevor Lee won 6-1, 6-2. In doubles, the team of Jeremy and Andrew Halter won 6-3, 6-4 and the team of Steve Kieffer and Josh Miller won 6-2, 6-3. The boys are 12-1. For the girls (11-1), Laura Riddle won 6-0, 6-0, Darian Libby won 6-0, 6-1 and Kelly Kimpton won 6-1, 6-0. In doubles, the team of Amanda Cox and Haley Workman won 6-1, 6-0 and the team of Jeanmarie Ferber and Tish Thomas won 6-3, 7-5. The tennis teams won on Thursday with the boys topping Smyrna 3-2 in a thriller and the girls winning 4-1. For the boys, Kimpton won 6-2, 6-1, McLaughlin won 6-2, 63 and Lee lost 0-6, 6-4, 3-6. Lee has a broken left wrist and missed the last two weeks of play. In doubles, the Halters lost 0-6, 6-3, 4-6 but the second doubles team of Kieffer and Josh won 7-6 (7-3), 5-7, 6-4 to clinch the match. For the girls, Riddle won 6-0, 6-0, Libby won 6-1, 6-0 and Kimpton won 6-3, 6-2. The first doubles team of Workman and Cox won 6-2, 6-2. The teams will compete in the conference tournament this weekend at Sea Colony in Bethany Beach.

Seaford varsity softball team riding a four-game winning streak The Seaford High softball team is heading into the final quarter of the season with high hopes of making the state tournament. With a 12-0, five-inning victory over Woodbridge on Friday, the team made it four wins in a row with an 8-4 record. “I figure it will take 12 wins to get into the state tournament,” coach Dave Rogers said. “Our goal is to get into the state tournament; it’s been awhile since a Seaford team has made it. And we are a young team so that will give us something to build on because we are only losing one player.” Against Woodbridge, Heather Draper pitched a one-hitter with seven strikeouts. At the plate, sophomore Danielle Haldeman paced the team going 3-3, hitting two home runs in the third inning. She finished the game with four RBI. Keri Bergh was 3-3 with two RBI, Kelsey Riggleman was 2-3 with one RBI, Bitty Hood had two hits with one RBI and Amanda Swift had two hits. “We need to keep playing like we have the last week or so,” the coach added. “We need to keep playing at the same level we are right now. We are starting to hit the ball.”

Seaford soccer girls drop a match in overtime to Sussex Tech

Seaford’s Keosha Gibbs prepares to throw the shot put during a meet last week. Gibbs enters the conference meet as the defending conference and state champion in the event. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

In a season of close matches, the Seaford High girls’ soccer team fell 2-1 to Sussex Tech on Thursday, May 4. The two teams played to 0-0 tie in regulation time. Sussex Tech scored a goal in each of the two 10-minute overtime periods. Lindsay James scored Seaford’s goal with time running out in the second overtime period. Kylee Richards scored Tech’s first goal in the first overtime period and Regina Flacco scored Tech’s second goal with an assist from Ally Mohun. Seaford’s Jessica Ruehr had 24 saves during a busy night in the goal and Tech’s Katie Nennstiehl had 10 saves. Seaford’s senior night is this Thursday, May 11, before the start of the match with Cape Henlopen in a make-up match from March 25. It’s also the final match of the season for the team.

This Tuesday’s scores can only be found on page 52 of the Star.


PAGE 46

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

HE’S SAFE- Laurel’s Trent Passwaters slides home safely on a wild pitch as Woodbridge reliever Ryan Messick covers home on the play. Laurel went on to win the game by the score of 10-6. Photo by Mike McClure

PUTTING IN A LITTLE OT- Delmar’s Erin Keenan keeps an eye on the ball as Sussex Tech’s Amanda Palmer, left, moves in during last Tuesday’s game in Delmar. Palmer had one of the Ravens three goals in the second overtime period in a 4-1 win over the Wildcats. Photo by Mike McClure

Local players to take part in annual Blue-Gold football game The rosters for the 51st annual Blue-Gold all-star football game were released last week. The following local players were named to the Gold team: Jacques Bowe, Sussex Tech; Matt Daudt, Seaford; Blake Field, Woodbridge; Tykie Hill, Laurel; Joe Holland, Delmar; Rodney Simmons, Laurel; and Anthony West, Laurel. The game, which benefits individuals with cognitive disabilities from throughout Delaware, will take place on June 24 at the University of Delaware football stadium.

Delaware Tech-Owens falls in Region 19 baseball playoffs The Delaware Tech-Owens baseball team (27-18) was ousted from the Region 19 playoffs losing to Sussex County Community College (NJ) 9-3 in the second day of the best-of-three. Ken Misal got the loss pitching allowing five run on four hits. The Roadrunners were held to just nine hits. Delaware Tech scored one run in the third on an RBI double by Josh Wagner and Jesse Jamison drove in two runs in the fifth. Delaware Tech held Sussex scoreless until the fifth when they erupted for seven runs and held Delaware Tech scoreless the rest of the game. Delaware Tech split its first two games on Fri., May 5, falling to #1 seed Brookdale 6-3 in their opener, before coming back to beat #3 seed Lackawanna 9-3.


MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 47

Seaford Stars of the Week

Female Co-Athlete of the Week- Wendee Killmon- GMS Male Co-Athlete of the WeekElizer Dorelus- Seaford During a tough track season for Seaford High, Elizer Dorelus has been a constant top performer for the team. In several meets this season, he has won four individual events with victories in both hurdle events and the long and triple jumps. He accomplised that feat against Sussex Central and Lake Forest on May 2. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

Male Co-Athlete of the WeekMatt Bowman- Woodbridge Woodbridge senior Matt Bowman continued to swing a hot bat last week. Bowman went 2-for-4 with a double in the Raiders’ win over Sussex Tech last Tuesday. Bowman singled in a run against Laurel on Wednesday before hitting a two-run home run against St. Michaels on Saturday. Photo by Mike McClure

CONGRATULATES THE ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

SEAFORD 629-6003 LAUREL 875-4477

HOURS: SEAFORD 5:30 AM - 11 PM LAUREL 10 AM - 10 PM

Female Co-Athlete of the Week- Katie Nennstiehl- Tech

Greenwood Mennonite’s Wendee Killmon excelled in two sports last week. Killmon had three hits and four RBIs in a win over Salisbury Christian before collecting two hits and scoring two runs in a win last Thursday. Wendee also placed first in the 100 meter, 200 meter, and long jump in the conference track and field championships at Shippensburg University last Wednesday. Photo by Mike McClure

Sussex Tech goalie Katie Nennstiehl of Bridgeville was on the winning side of two overtime games last week. Katie had 10 saves in a 2-1 win over Seaford last Thursday. Nennstiehl and the Ravens defeated Delmar, 4-1 in overtime, last Tuesday. Photo by Mike McClure Honorable mention- Paul Widerman- Seaford; Derrik Gibson- Seaford; Derek Page- Seaford; Josh Miller and Steve Kieffer- Seaford; Gernie Purnell- Seaford; Jake Lee- Greenwood Mennonite; T.J. Wisseman- Greenwood Mennonite; Machelle Williams- Woodbridge; Cory Richards- Woodbridge; Wagner Matos- Woodbridge; Colin Jackson- Sussex Tech; David Demarest- Sussex Tech; Jesse Kitchen- Sussex Tech; Jerilyn Idler- Woodbridge; Ashley Nichols- Woodbridge; Leah Bowman- Woodbridge; Hannah Rust- Greenwood Mennonite; Charla Benton- Greenwood Mennonite; Regina Fiacco- Sussex Tech; Rhonda Warrington- Sussex Tech; Lauren Correll- Sussex Tech; Lindsay James- Seaford; Alyssa Casey- Seaford; Keosha Gibbs- Seaford; Megan Torbert- Seaford; Heather Draper- Seaford

Lady Raiders earn non-conference win over St. Thomas More The Woodbridge varsity softball team picked up an 11-1 win over St. Thomas More in a non-conference game on Monday. Charlotte Goodman earned the win on the mound, allowing one unearned run and striking out four. Grace Reardon had two hits including a double, Jenna Schrock doubled and tripled and drove in two, Shiann Miller had two hits including a triple, and Leah Bowman homered in the Raider win.

Seaford recreation department tennis programs start in June The Seaford Department of Parks and Recreation tennis programs for youth and adults will begin in June. The USA Tennis Free-For-All afternoon of fun to kick off the programs will take place on Sunday, June 4, from 3 to 5 p.m. at the public courts behind Seaford High School. Offered this year will be Little Smashers (ages 4-7) June 12-16 for $25, clinics from June 19 to July 12 from 8:30 to 10 a.m. for ages 6-12 for $40 and USA Team Tennis from June 20 to July 13 for ages 6 to adult. Phone the recreation department at 629-6809 for more information.

Woodbridge and Nanticoke coaches need to send in results CLEARING THE BAR- Seaford’s Alyssa Casey clears 8’6” in the pole vault taking first place and also getting a personal record in a meet against Milford last week. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

GMS varsity softball tops Salisbury Christian, St. Peter and Paul The Greenwood Mennonite School softball team defeated Salisbury Christian School, 15-8, on Monday May 1. GMS followed with a 9-1 win over St. Peter and Paul (MD) on Thursday. On Monday, the Flames scored four in the first, two in the second, six in the third, and three in the sixth in the win. Hannah Rust (7-3) pitched five and one third innings and allowed one hit to pick up the win for GMS. Charla Benton led the GMS offense with a triple, home run and 3 RBI’s. Wendee Killmon went 3-4 with 4 RBI. Miranda Conaway lined ball to the gap in left center field and circled the bases to lead the way to a four run sixth inning for SCS. On Thursday, Taylor Rigby picked up an outfield assist to end a St. Peter and Paul threat in the bottom of the third and blasted a two-run triple over the right fielder in the top of the fourth to break open a close game. Wendee Killmon added two hits including a double and scored two for GMS. Hannah Rust picked up her eighth win of the season, allowing three hits and striking out 11.

Nanticoke and Woodbridge Little League coaches (and other youth sports coaches) are asked to send scores and results to the Star by noon on Monday. Results can be sent by fax (302-629-9243) or e-mail (publisher@seafordstar.com). If you don’t get the information to us we can’t put it in the paper and give your players the recognition they deserve.

GMS track team competes in conference championships The Greenwood Mennonite School boys’ and girls’ track teams competed in the conference championships at Shippensberg University (PA) last Wednesday. The girls placed second out of 17 teams. The GMS results are as follows: Girls- 100 meter- 1. Wendee Killmon, 13.2, 4. Ashley Ivory, 13.74; 200 meter- 1. Killmon, 28.1, 6. Ivory, 29.1; 800 meter- 1. Killmon, 2:44.4; 4X100- 1. GMS (Taylor Hamilton, Ivory, Laura Jones, Kaila Tatman), 58.9; 4X200- 4. GMS (Kassie Attix, Hamilton, Ivory, Jones), 2:09.1; 4X400- 6. GMS (Kelly Green, Hamilton, Jones, Tatman), 5:31.2; high jump- 4. Tatman, 4’2”, 5. Attix, 4’; long jump- 1. Killmon, 14’9 1/2” (school record) Boys- 4X100- GMS (Joshua Gregory, Kendall Landis, Aaron Outten, Isaac Suarez), 51.77; 4X400- 5. GMS (Gregory, Jake Lee, Aaron Outten, Merv Yoder); high jump- 5. Lee, 5’2”; long jump- 5. Lee, 17’3 1/2”; shot put- 4. Gregory, 34’10”


PAGE 48

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

Blue Raider rally falls short in 10-5 loss to Bulldogs By Pat Murphy Whenever the Bulldogs and Raiders get together for a baseball game it is usually a hard fought game and an unpredictable battle. Such was the case as the Bulldogs visited Woodbridge on May 3 and came away with a 10-5 victory over Raider ace Justin Bailey. The Bulldog win raised their record to 9-7 and kept them very much in the chase for a playoff spot. The Raider loss put them at 9-8, dimming their chances for a spot in the playoffs. “It could put a dent in our chances for the state tournament,” said Raider coach Derek Lofland. The Raiders jumped out to a 1-0 lead in the second inning when Anthony Gamba was hit by a pitch by Laurel starter David Bartee with two outs. Wagner Matos followed with a line drive double to right center that scored Gamba for the first run of the game. Bailey mowed the Bulldogs down the first three innings, facing just two hitters over the minimum. The Raiders scored another run in the bottom of the third on a single by Derek Nennstiehl, a steal, and a run batted in single by Bailey. Ryan Messick then singled and Laurel coach Jerry Mears wasted no time bringing in Taylor Jones who recorded a save the day before. Jones induced a ground ball out to get out of the jam. In the top of the fourth, after a strikeSeaford track continued 4x400 team of Urell, Simon, Senatus and Purnell. Jeff Alfreide was third in the 100 and 200-meter runs, Dan McCluskey was third in the 3200-meter run, Titus was third in the 400meter run and Charles Larrimore was third in the 800-meter run. Taking seconds were Panalosky St. Fort in the 110-hurdles, Simon in the 400-meter and Tyler Delgado in the 3200-meter. In the field events, Page won the high jump and was second in the long jump, Fisher won the shot put, Ruehr won the discus and was second in the shot put and Hunt won the pole vault. Tony Linton was second in the triple and high jumps, Jules was second in the discus and Larrimore took second in the pole vault.Terry Hood was third in the long, triple and high jumps, Babinski was third in the discus and McCluskey was third in the pole vault. In the close loss to Lake Forest on May 2, Dorelus was a fourtime winner again taking firsts in the 110- and 300-hurdles, long jump and triple jump. Purnell won the 100- and 400-meter runs and was third in the 200-meter and Page won the high jump and was second in the long jump. Urell was second in the 1600-meter, St. Fort was second in the 300-hurdles, Linton was second in the triple and high jumps, Fisher was second in the shot put and Hunt was second in the pole vault. Hood was third in the triple and high jumps and Larrimore was

out of the dangerous Antwon Trimball, Bailey’s control failed him. Bailey plunked Trent Passwaters on the first pitch, followed by a single by Matt Dodson. Two wild pitches moved the runners on the corners with Passwaters scoring on one of the wild pitches. Jones promptly stole second to put two in scoring position and senior Tyler Schreiber delivered a two run single making it 3-2 Laurel. Matt Parker then drew a walk and Brandon Hearne drove in a run on a ground out. Jeff Taylor worked yet another walk to set the stage for what might have been the key hit of the game. After fanning twice in the game Lance Kelley singled to right field scoring two runs and giving the Bulldogs a 6-2 lead. Trimball fanned to end a 40 pitch inning for Bailey. The never say die Raiders scored three runs in the bottom of the fifth inning against Jones but it was not enough as the tying run was left at third. The inning began as John Rutkowski reached on an error and the next hitter (Nennstiehl) was hit by a pitch. Matt Bowman then laced a single to score a run to make it 6-3. Bailey walked to load the bases with no outs. Messick and Dustin Richards both grounded to second to knock in two runs to bring it to 6-5 before a strikeout ended the rally. The Bulldogs went down quietly in the fifth and sixth before tacking on four

third in the pole vault.Senatus was third in the 800-meter and Delgado was third in the 3200-meter. In the win over Woodbridge on April 25, Page won the long jump and high jump, Purnell won the 100-, 400- and 200-meter runs and Urell won the 1600- and 3200-meter runs. Larrimore won the pole vault and Dorelus won the triple jump and was second in the 110hurdles and 300-hurdles. Linton was second in the high and triple jumps. In the loss to CR on April 25, Purnell won the 400-meter, was second in the 200-meter and third in the 100-meter. Page won the high jump and was second in the long jump. Fisher won the shot put and Ruehr won the discus and was third in the shot put. Dorelus was second in the 110- and third in the 300-hurdles and triple jump. Urell was third in the 1600-meter, Simons was third in the 800-meter and Jules was third in the discus. Personal records for team members are as follows: Page, 6’2” in the high jump; Hood, 5’8” in the high jump; Dorelus, 43.0 in the 300-hurdles and 15.3 in the 110hurdles; O’Benson Oscar, 5:57 in the 1600-meter run; Senatus, 2:15 in the 800-meter run; Josh Sample, 2:14 in the 800-meter run; Fisher, 40’6” in the shot and 106 feet in the discus; Ruehr, 99 feet in the discus; Jules, 98-feet in the discus; Clayton Lester, 84-feet in the discus; Zach Hunt, 10’6” in the pole vault; Titus, 2:15 in the 800-meter run; Andrews, 2:18 in the 800-meter run; and Purnell, 11.3 in the 100-meter run.

Woodbridge’s Wagner Matos, left, and talks things over with coach Derek Lofland during a home game last week. Matos doubled in a run in his team’s loss to Laurel. Photo by Mike McClure

more runs in the seventh on only one hit against reliever Ryan Messick. After back to back walks to Taylor and Kelley, Trimball had a chance to redeem himself after two rare strikeouts but coach Jerry Mears called on him to bunt. Trimball laid down a perfect sacrifice bunt which put two runners in scoring position. Passwaters was intentionally walked to load the bases. Matt Dodson then hit a Baltimore chop single through a drawn in infield which scored two runs. Jones rolled out for another run and Passwaters

scored on a wild pitch to give the Bulldogs a final 10-6 lead. “It’s (the team) what it’s all about,” Trimball said of the bunt. The Raiders went down in order in the seventh. Woodbridge coach said the loss was not all starting pitcher Justin Bailey’s fault. “We made mistakes, breakdowns,” Lofland said. “This is a very good rivalry. It was a great win for Laurel.” “When Bailey is on, he’s tough. He had a complete game against Seaford,” continued Lofland.

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MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 49

Mac’s World By Ronald MacArthur

Cory Palmer was proud to be a U.S. Marine Just when you think things are going well, sad news takes the wind of your sails. Our sympathy goes out to the Palmer and Swain families in the loss of their loved one, Cory Palmer, who died from wounds suffered while on duty in Iraq. His mother Danna (Swain) and father Charles are both lifelong Seaford residents. I got to know Cory pretty well during his spin through Seaford High school as a member of the cross country team for two seasons and the soccer team during his senior year (2001-2002). Anyone who knew Cory knew that if anyone was a free spirit, he was one. He marched to his own drummer and seemed to reject authority whenever he could. But even so, you couldn’t help but like the small-framed guy. I was skimming through some back editions and found an article about the first goal he scored as a member of the soccer team. That was a proud moment for him. He was a talented athlete, but he enjoyed life a little too much to really knuckle down and work hard at sports. Running came naturally to him so any sport with running involved interested him. He seemed to be searching for something to hold on to. Knowing his background, I was shocked when his mother Danna called me to tell me that he had enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps and was actually in training to join an elite unit in the Marines. She was proud as any mother could be - proud that her son (one of three sons in the family) had found his niche. For a guy who seemed to shy away from authority, joining the most authoritative military force on earth was a surprise. But he excelled and became one of the best of the best. He came home during the Thanksgiving holiday and played in the Seaford High alumni soccer game. Coach Tim Lee said that his transformation from high school prankster to U.S. Marine was good for him. Everyone who knew Cory said that he was proud to be a Marine and was proud of what he was doing. The bitter tragedy is that Cory struggled to find his way and

once he found his mission in life, his young life was cut short. SEASON WINDS DOWN - It’s hard to believe that the high school sports season is just about over. The track and tennis teams have conference tournaments this weekend. Most teams end their regular season play May 16 or 18. Looking ahead the last week of the season is an important one to the Seaford High softball and baseball teams. Both teams are a little on the bubble as far as the state tournament is concerned. Seaford’s last conference game at home against Cape Henlopen this Thursday falls in the “must win” category. The Jays finish the regular season with two non-conference games on May 13 and 16. The softball team finishes at home against Cape and then plays out a tie game with Delmar on May 15. The game was called because of darkness on March 30. Both games are critical for Seaford. The tennis teams are going into the post-season with impressive records. As of May 9, both teams had only one loss. The boys lost to Caesar Rodney 3-2 and the girls fell to Dover 4-1. The girls’ 3-2 win over Caesar Rodney last week was a big one. Girls’ coach Bob Hastings was really crying the blues at the start of the season, saying that a .500 season was about the best that could be hoped for. He told me that he had said that in the past, but he really meant it this season. The team is 11-1. OFF TRACK - The Seaford High track team really needs a big shot in the arm. Over the past few years, there has been a steady decline in the number of athletes going out for the boys’ and girls’ track teams. This year, the numbers are as low as they have ever been - in a sport where numbers are needed to fill out relay teams and the multitude of other events. It’s a real shame because coach Rob Perciful is one of the top track coaches in the state. His background and knowledge of the sport is unmatched in this area. I hope that the declining numbers is not a sign of the times, but I feel that it is. It’s harder and harder to get high school students to commit to a sport - and committing to more than one sport is nearly impossible.

Blue Jays pull out another victory in the seventh inning Seaford High baseball coach Kenny Cummings is growing old before his time. This year’s team has a history of waiting to the final innings to make a move. On Friday, the Blue Jays went into the seventh inning behind 2-1 to Milford in a must-win game. The team went on to score three runs in the seventh for a 4-2 win to push its record to 10-6 (as of May 8). In the seventh, the Jays manufactured three runs on just one hit. Matt Terry led off with a single followed by three straight walks to Derrik Gibson, Paul Widerman and Leon Lahman. Terry scored on Lehman’s walk and Gibson scored on a fielder’s choice hit by Matt Daudt. Widerman scored on a wild pitch for the insurance run. Widerman also picked up this second win (he came within a run of a third win) going all seven innings allowing just one run on four hits with five strikeouts and two walks. At the plate, Gibson was 2-3 with two doubles and he scored two runs. Seaford ends the regular season this week playing at home against Cape Henlopen on Thursday, May 11, and at Concord on Saturday, May 13, and at St. Mark’s on Tuesday, May 16 (the final two games are non-conference games). “We really need to win three of our last four games for a good seeding in the state tournament,” Cummings said.

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PAGE 50

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

Sussex Tech boys’, girls’ track teams top Woodbridge, Smyrna

Raven Roundup- Girls’ soccer team wins another one in OT

The Sussex Tech track and field teams hosted Woodbridge and Smyrna in a meet last Tuesday. The Raven boys beat Smyrna, 93-54, and defeated Woodbridge, 115-28, while Smyrna earned a 109-35 win over the Raiders. The Sussex Tech girls earned wins over Smyrna (99-37) and Woodbridge (125-3) with Smyrna topping Woodbridge, 93-15. The local results from the boys’ and girls’ meets are as follows: boys- Sussex Tech 93, Smyrna 54- 800 relay- Sussex Tech (Parker, Bowe, Furbush, Hall), 1:38.7; 400- Shawn Holland, 52.0; 800- David Demarest, 2:04; 200- Holland, 22.9 3,200- Ken McCallum, 11:06.9; 1,600 relay- Tech (Demarest, Townsend, Parker, Collins), 3:46.4; shotput- Desmond Cephas, 48’5”; discus- Cephas, 128’9”; long jumpBrandon Krause, 20’2”; triple jump- Jacques Bowe, 38’8”; high jump- Hall, Tech, 5’10”; pole vault- Krause, 11’6” Sussex Tech 115, Woodbridge 28- 3,200 relay- Sussex Tech (McCallum, Spear, Demarest, Shepherd), 8:56; 110 hurdles- Parker, Sussex Tech, 16.7; 100- Holland, Sussex Tech; 800 relay- Sussex Tech; 400- Holland, Sussex Tech; 300 hurdles- Machelle Williams, Woodbridge, 42.9; 800- David Demarest, Sussex Tech; 200- Holland, Sussex Tech; 3,200- McCallum, Sussex Tech; 1,600 relay- Sussex Tech; shotput- Cephas, Sussex Tech; discus- Cephas, Sussex Tech; long jump- Krause, Sussex Tech; triple jumpBowe, Sussex Tech; high jump- Hall, Sussex Tech; pole vault- Krause, Sussex Tech Smyrna 109, Woodbridge 35- 400- Daniel Daisey, 55.0; 300 hurdles- Williams, 42.9; shotput- Kyle Gibbs, Woodbridge, 44’5” girls- Sussex Tech 99, Smyrna 37- 3,200 relay- Sussex Tech (Peabody, Rowe, Correll, Mahoney), 10:54; 100 hurdles- Tiamia Black, 17.0; 1,600- Nicole Mahoney, 5:39; 400 relay- Tech (Cunningham, Black, Savage, Adams), 55.8; 400- Lauren Correll, 1:03.9; 300 hurdles- Black, 53.8; 800- Mahoney, 2:36.4; 3,200- Tiffany Roles, 13:57; 1,600 relay- Tech (Rowe, Mahoney, Peabody, Correll), 4:41.6; shotput- Leonard, Sussex Tech, 28’3”; long jump- Savage, Tech, 14’9”; triple jump- Black, 30’7”; high jumpThompson, Tech, 4’4”; pole vault- Rowe, 6’6” Sussex Tech 125, Woodbridge 3- 100- Savage, Sussex Tech, 13.9; 800 relay- Tech, 2:00.1; 200- Cunningham, Sussex Tech, 27.7 Smyrna 93, Woodbridge 15- 400- Sarah Judy, 1:08.6

By Mike McClure After topping Delmar in overtime last Tuesday the Sussex Tech girls’ soccer team was at it again on Thursday. The Ravens edged Seaford, 2-1 in overtime, to improve to 9-2 in the Henlopen Conference and 9-5 overall. The game was scoreless through regulation with Sussex Tech’s Kylee Rickards scoring her team’s first goal in the first overtime period. Once again Regina Fiacco scored the game winning goal for Tech, taking a feed from Ally Mohun in the second overtime period. Katie Nennstiehl had 10 saves in goal for the Ravens. Raven golf team tops Polytech- The Sussex Tech golf team advanced to 9-1 with a 164-209 win over Polytech last Thursday. Jesse Kitchen was the medalist with a score of 37 followed by Clayton Bunting (39), Eric Scott (43), and Mike Cunningham (45). Kyle Messick and Richard Adkins each shot a 47 in the win. Sussex Tech lacrosse team cruises past Sussex Central- The Sussex Tech lacrosse team earned a 16-2 win over Sussex Central last Wednesday to move to 8-5 overall. Colin Jackson netted six goals and Joel Termotto and Ian Stewart each had three goals in the win. Wil Heuring, Stephon VonBonk, Josh King, Craig Foster added one goal apiece for the Ravens. Lady Ravens notch 14th win- The Sussex Tech softball team advanced to 8-3 in the Henlopen Conference and 14-3 overall with a 14-4 win over Caesar Rodney last Thursday. Hope Cornell had three hits and three RBIs, Brittany Joseph and Melony Thompson each collected two hits including a double, and Rhonda Warrington added a pair of hits. Kim Owens earned the win on the mound for the Ravens. Small, Sturgeon collect hits in loss to CR- Mike Small doubled and Chad Sturgeon singled in the baseball team’s 12-1 loss to Caesar Rodney on Thursday. Sussex Tech’s Regina Fiacco kicks the ball as Delmar’s Maribeth Beach defends during last Tuesday’s game in Delmar. The Ravens won the game, 4-1, in overtime. Fiacco also scored the winning goal in an overtime win over Seaford last week.

Sussex Tech goalie Katie Nennstiehl boots the ball during one of her team’s two overtime wins last w e e k . Nennstiehl allowed one goal and dished out an assist in the field for the Ravens.

Photo by Mike McClure

Photo by Mike McClure

Sussex Tech’s Sydnee Yeary of Laurel has the ball against Delmar’s Haley Keenan, left, during last week’s game in Delmar. Photo by Mike McClure

Select Financial Welcomes Billy Johnson


MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 51

Seaford Bowling Lanes Senior Express

Lillie Magee

High games and series Chuck Laws 293 Carl Young 827’ Kat Friedel 276

787

Friday Night Mix Ups

Sunday Nite Mixed

High games and series Marty Wample 306 Andrew Motyka 791 Tammy Peck 268 Glenda Abrams 714

High games and series Buddy Tharp 298 Jason French 781 Dolly Shifflett 283, 768

Thursday Nite Mixers High games and series Claude Nock 289, 759 Tori Carey 268

Donna Ashley

731

Sunday Nite Special High games and series Jamie Hall 291 Bruce Fraser 735 Sandy Colubourne 274, 738

Middleford Speedway results The following are the results from the Middleford Speedway races which were held on May 5: Mod Lite Jr.- 1. Justin Breeding (27); 2. Jerron “C.J.” Faison (Oj); 3. Billy Mellon (56); 4. Brandon Mullins (3); 5. Jimmy Willis (22W); 6. Tyler Reed (72); 7. Kristin Keys (13K); 8. Curtis Miles (21); 9. Donald Ackenbrack (946) Mod Lites- 1. Steve White (1W); 2. Richie Wilson (1); 3. Jon Calloway (95); 4. Kirk Miles (21); 5. Erik McKinney (V75); 6. Jerron Faison (2J); 7. Jody Cahall (77); 8. Mr. Wilson (7) 250- 1. Luke Thomas (2T); 2. Cameron Merriman (8X); 3. Tyler Reed (38sp); 4. Jake Wilkerson (4); 5. Andrew Mullins (2); 6. Mark Landwher (55); 7. Kyle Lloyd (70L); 8. Dylon McMahon (79); 9. Zachary Short (9) 270- 1. Andrew Mullins (2); 2. Josh Rohlman (3J); 3. Ken Lester (29); 4. Mike Baker (3D); 5. Ronny Hays Jr. (27); 6. Eric Heath (20H); 7. Kevin Wilkerson (68) 600- 1. “Nitro” Nick Sapp (29); 2. Eric Brobst (26); 3. Scotty Smith (20); 4. Eric Vent (6); 5. Kenny Vincent (97); 6. Glenn Heverin (98); 7. Drew Richmond (81); 8. Jordan Watson (30); 9. Joseph Watson (39); 10. Brent Sutton (3); 11. Jason Warfield (19); 12. Andy Best (88); 13. Chris Neibert (68N); 14. A.J. Mitchell (11s); 15. Matt Esham (18m); 16. Bruce Hibbs, Jr. (17); 17. Kevin Darling (9D); 18. Kevin McKinney (25); 19. Mark Maloney (8M); 20. Jeremy “Jay Dogg” Lynch (91); 21. Chad Clark (8); 22. Matt Minton (14)

TURN OFF THE TELEVISION Turn on their minds. In school or at home, the newspaper is a textbook for life. Encourage your children to make reading the newspaper a part of their everyday routine for lifelong learning. The following individuals and businesses support the Star’s Newspaper In Education program. Local classrooms receive the Seaford and Laurel Stars for classroom use.

Delaware Riptide 14U softball team plays in Smyrna tournament The Delaware Riptide 14U softball team, after a tough start, was eliminated in the quarterfinals of the Smyrna Clayton Stars NSA qualifier this past weekend. The Riptide was led by Yasmin Davis, whose hitting and fielding led to her selection to receive the team most valuable player award for the tournament. Pitcher Melissa Trout tossed a shutout in the opening game of the elimination rounds and also battled the Lady Cats to a tie in pool play. Defensively, outfielders Kelsey and Alexis Oliphant continue to be defensive stalwarts with outstanding catchers. Yasmin Davis also made several spectacular plays at shortstop as did Sarah Wilson at third base. The Riptide, playing without two starters for this tournament, were tested at the plate all weekend against some very tough pitching. Brittany Thompson, along with Davis, Wilson, and Trout, all had key hits to keep the games competitive. The Riptide’s next tournament will be the NSA Heat at the Beach on May 20 in Georgetown.

American Legion Auxiliary Unit 6 B-Line Printing and Computer Repair Bon Appetit Restaurant

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to publisher@seafordstar.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

Manlove Auto Parts Maria Heyssell Mercantile Peninsula Bank O’Neal’s Antiques

Bridgeville Kiwanis

Pizza King

Coldwell Banker Broadcreek Realty

Sam Yoder and Son, Inc.

Cora Selby

Scott’s Furniture

Delmar Kiwanis

Seaford Kiwanis

French’s Supermarket

Soil Service

Home Team Realty, LLC

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Laurel Lions

Bridgeville Commissioners

Friends For Lee

STORM PLACE FIRST- The Delaware Storm 13U travel baseball team recently placed first at the Spring Beach Classic IV tournament at Sports at the Beach. Shown (l to r) are: first row- Cody Bradford, Mike Baglieri, Joe McGinnis, Evan Urgo, Justin Allen; second row- Branden Fischer, Drew Pianka, Coby Royston, Ethan Coffey, James Smith, Marshall Betts; third row- coaches Mike Baglieri, Sr., Dave Fischer, Dan Urgo, and Jon Coffey.

Laurel Civic Club

Integra Administrative Group Johnson Polymer

Soroptimist Int. of Seaford Southern DE Foot and Ankle - Bradley T. Lemon, D.P.M., F.A.C.F.S. Trinity Transport / Trinity Foundation

It’s not too late to become an NIE sponsor. Call The Star Office (302) 629-9788


PAGE 52

MORNING STAR

âœł MAY 11 - 17, 2006

Bulldog baseball rally falls short, Dover wins 8-6 By Pat Murphy The Laurel Bulldog baseball team batted around in a big seventh inning on Tuesday, May 9, scoring four runs on four hits against the Dover Senators at Laurel. The only thing is the Senators batted around in the top of the seventh to score three runs to build an 8-2 lead and hold on for the win. Matt Dodson suffered the loss and Dover’s Matt Esslinger got the win. The loss about closed the Bulldogs chances of making the state tournament in 2006. The Bulldogs have a 9-8 record with three games left in the season. Bulldog coach Jerry Mears, obviously upset with the loss, was still positive about his team. “Hey, seven out of 10 is not too bad,� said Mears. Both the Bulldogs and Senators scored two runs in the second inning. The Senators scored on a leadoff walk to Tyler Burns, a single by Mike Argyhoa, Tony Gatto’s single to score Burns, and an error allowing the second run to score. For the Bulldogs, Dodson reached on an error, Taylor Jones doubled, and Ethan Callaway hit a vicious one hopper up the middle for a single that scored both runs. The Bulldogs eventually loaded the bases but Antwon Trimball rolled out to end the rally. The score remained 2-2 into the fifth inning when the Senators went ahead 4-2. Bradie Snapp doubled, Dominic Gatto singled him home, and Esslinger reached on a fielder’s choice and scored moments later on a single by Burns. The Bulldog bats remained silent in the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth innings. The only hit off Esslinger was a Matt Dodson single. In the seventh, Joe Diana led off with a walk, Snapp singled, and both moved up on stolen bases. Dodson fell behind Dominic Gatto 3-0 so he was intentionally walked to load the bases with no outs. Andrew Esslinger promptly helped his own cause doubling in two runs on a 1-2 curve ball off reliever Taylor Jones. Burns then singled in another run followed by a sacrifice fly by Argyhoa to give Dover an 8-2 lead. The Bulldogs got things going for themselves in the bottom of the seventh but fell short after scoring four runs. Jeff Taylor reached on an infield single, Lance Kelley took a third strike, and Trimball reached on a fielder’s choice. With two outs Trent Passwaters singled, Dodson walked, and Jones got his second hit of the game scoring two runs. The Senators brought in Dominic Gallo. Callaway reached on an error scoring the third run and Dontez Horsey laced a single to right center to score the fourth run. Gatto brought the heat and fanned Brandon Hearne to end the game. The Senators improved to 10-6 in the heartbreaking loss for the 9-8 Bulldogs. Bulldog Notes: Horsey retired the last two Dover batters, racing to the right field corner for a fine running catch to get the Bulldogs out of the long inning. Laurel plays Delmar in Delmar on Friday and at Indian River on Saturday before closing out their season at St. Thomas More on Monday, May 15. Tuesday’s loss brought the Bulldogs’ home record to 3-5 for the year.

Local high school teams compete in golf, lacrosse on Tuesday Golf- Dover 150, Seaford 186- Freshman Matthew Lank had the best round the Blue Jays shooting a 41 followed by Cory Ewing (48), Mike Zakrewsky (48), Jared Elliott (50), Shane Brinson (52) and Ryan Budke (53). Lake Forest 190, Laurel 207- Laurel’s Scott Lee was the medalist with a 45. Smyrna 185, Delmar 186- Brennan Ralph (43) and Devon Scott (44) paced Delmar. Lacrosse- Sussex Tech 17, Newark 6- Joel Termotto scored eight goals, Colin Jackson and Will Heuring each netted three goals, and Tyler Humpton had eight saves. GMS softball blanks Riverdale Baptist- Charla Benton went 3-for-3 with a triple and four RBIs and Hannah Rust picked up her 10th win and third no-hitter in the Greenwood Mennonite softball team’s 10-0 win over Riverdale Baptist on Tuesday. Corey Green added two hits and three RBIs.

CLEARING THE HURDLE- Woodbridge’s Machelle Williams clears a hurdle during the 300 meter hurdles Tuesday at Lake Forest. Williams placed first in that event and also helped lead the 1,600 meter relay team to a win. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel/Seaford Star Tuesday Night high school scoreboard Baseball- Seaford 5, Smyrna 2- In a must-win game, the Seaford High baseball team topped Smyrna 5-2. On the mound, Matt Daudt picked up the win pitching a twohitter with seven strikeouts. Derrik Gibson continued his hot hitting streak going 3-4 with two runs scored and two stolen bases. Daudt helped his own cause going 2-4 with three RBI. Seth Hastings was 2-3 and Leon Lahman knocked in a run. The team is 116 overall and 7-5 in the conference. Milford 13, Sussex Tech 9- George Godwin had two hits including a double in the Ravens’ loss. Sussex Central 7, Delmar 2- David Pollitt had Delmar’s lone hit in the loss. Caesar Rodney 10, Woodbridge 0- John Rutkowski and Dustin Richards each had a hit for the Raiders. Girls’ soccer- Seaford 3, Sussex Central 0- Rachel Horsey scored all three goals as the Knights blanked the Jays. Sussex Tech 0, Cape 0 (OT)- Katie Nennstiehl made seven saves in another Sussex Tech overtime game. Polytech 6, Woodbridge 2- Jerilyn Idler and Rachel Hovermale each scored a goal for the Raiders. Softball- Woodbridge 12, Caesar Rodney 7- Chelsea Grant had three hits including a double and a home run and Leah Bowman collected a pair of hits for Woodbridge. Sussex Central 5, Delmar 0- Brittany Williams doubled for Delmar. Laurel 10, Dover 1- Amanda Horsey and Brittney Brittingham each homered to pace the Bulldogs, who scored eight runs in the sixth inning. Caitlin Dolby struck out nine and gave up two hits for the win. Sussex Tech 3, Milford 2- Brittany Joseph notched the win for Sussex Tech. Seaford 1, Smyrna 0- In another must-win game, Bitty Hood had the big hit in Seaford’s victory over Smyrna. Hood doubled in Danielle Haldeman in the bottom of the sixth inning for the lone run in the game. Heather Draper hurled a three-hitter with 13 strikeouts and two walks to get the win.

*OEPLAY E

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MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 53

Laurel softball collects nine hits in win over Woodbridge By Mike McClure The Laurel varsity softball team moved to 6-5 in the Henlopen Conference and 10-5 overall with a 9-2 win over Woodbridge last Wednesday in Bridgeville. Laurel left two on base in the top of the first as Miranda O’Neal walked and reached second on an error with Amanda Horsey reaching on the fielder’s choice. Woodbridge’s Leah Bowman reached first on an error but was stranded in the bottom of the inning. Laurel put three on the board in the second inning when Brittney Brittingham reached first on an error, moved up to second on a sacrifice bunt by Chaniqua Kellam and scored with Kelsey Gordy (walk) on a triple by Miranda Dickerson who scored on an error. Amanda Horsey led off the third with a single, went to second and third on a sac bunt by Ashlyn Booth, and came home on a single by Brittingham to make it 4-0. Woodbridge’s Jenna Schrock picked up her team’s first hit against Laurel starter Amanda Riggins in the bottom of the third. Schrock was later caught trying to steal second on a throw from Booth to Horsey. Schrock, who was playing second base, made a nice leaping grab on a ball hit by Krista Scott before throwing Dickerson out at first to end the top of the fourth inning. Woodbridge scored one in the bottom of the inning before Laurel scored one in the fifth and two in the sixth to make it 7-1.

Derek Page has been a consistent winner for the Seaford boys’ track team this season. He clears 5’10” for a second-place finish in the team’s loss to Milford. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

Henlopen South high school baseball standings as of 5/8

Laurel starter Amanda Riggins comes with a pitch during her team’s win over Woodbridge last Wednesday. Riggins allowed two runs on four hits for the win. Photo by Mike McClure

The Raiders added one more run in the bottom of the sixth. The Bulldogs tacked on two more runs in the seventh for the 92 score. Laurel had nine runs on nine hits while Woodbridge scored two runs on four hits. Horsey paced Laurel with three hits and two runs and Dickerson collected two hits, scored two runs, and drove in a run. Ashley Nichols had a double and an RBI and Bowman scored two runs and collected two hits for Woodbridge.

Team Conference 1. Indian River 7-4 2. Seaford 6-5 Laurel 6-5 4. Delmar 4-6 5. Woodbridge 4-7 6. Lake Forest 3-7 7. Smyrna 1-10

Non-conference 3-1 3-1 3-2 3-2 5-2 4-1 2-2

Overall 10-5 10-6 9-7 7-8 9-9 7-9 2-12

HAC Games Left Lake, Milford Smyrna, Cape Dover, Delmar SC, Milford, Laurel CR, Polytech IR, CR Seaford, SC

Henlopen South high school softball standings as of 5/8 Team Conference 1. Indian River 10-1 2. Delmar 8-2 3. Smyrna 7-4 4. Seaford 6-4 Laurel 6-5 6. Lake Forest 1-10 7.Woodbridge 0-12

Non-conference Overall HAC Games Left 5-0 15-1 Lake, Milford 3-2 11-5 SC, Laurel, Seaford 3-2 10-6 Seaford, SC 3-1 9-5 Smyrna, Cape, Delmar 4-1 10-6 Dover, Delmar 1-3 2-13 IR, CR 5-0 5-12 CR

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JOIN US! Sunday, May 21, 2006 Pancake Breakfast & Bake Sale Woodbridge second baseman Jenna Schrock tosses the ball to first baseman Ashley Nichols during her team’s loss last Wednesday. Schrock made some nice plays in the field and collected the Raiders’ first hit in the game. Photo by Mike McClure

Woodbridge girls’ soccer team defeats Lake Forest, 6-2 The Woodbridge girls’ soccer team earned a 6-2 win over Lake Forest last Saturday as Jerilyn Idler netted two goals and dished out three assists. Heather Solomon, Olivia Pristavec, Samantha Richey, and Jenn Tribbett each scored a goal for the Raiders.

Youth golf lessons to be offered at Wood Creek Golf Course Interested youth, ages 8-14, can learn the fundamentals of golf including swing techniques, stance, grip, aim and much more this summer. Classes will be taught by golf pros Art Scott and Kevin White at the Wood Creek Golf Course in Delmar. They will run each Thursday from June 22-July 13. There are specific classes offered for each age group, times will vary. Registration is underway and is $25 per golfer. For more questions or more information contact Lee Steffey at 410-548-4900 ext 105. Visit the Civic Center Box Office to register your child or call 410-548-4906.

Book

7:30 - 11:30 a.m. Fair 9 a.m. - 1 p.m., in the Library &

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Morning Star Publications recently received six awards from the Maryland, Delaware, D.C. (MDDC) Press Association in the organization’s annual advertising and editorial contests. The Star placed first, second, and third in the 2005 advertising contest. Karen Cherrix and Rick Cullen placed first in the 10 lbs. of Stuff in a 5 lb. Bag category for the Jessica’s Body Shoppe- “1/2 Price Massage” ad. The composition and advertising departments had a second place finish for the Nanticoke Riverfest book (annual special section). Cherrix and George Beauchamp also placed third in the local retail color (half page or more) category for the Ride n Slide “Catering to Horses” ad. The Star placed first and second in the 2005 editorial contest. “Seaford Man Arrested”, stories by Ronald MacArthur and Tony Windsor which appeared in the April 14 Laurel and Seaford Star, came in first in the spot news category. The Stars’ articles on the Delaware student testing program (September 15 edition), written by Lynn Parks, Mike McClure, and MacArthur, placed first in the education category. Articles on “Poverty in Western Sussex” by MacArthur and Parks also placed second in the public service category. Morning Star Publications is celebrating its 10th year in business .


MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 55

Letters GUEST COLUMN

Proposals to cope with gas price spikes By Richard Livingston Suddenly, we are awash with angry comment because of the daily climb in retail gas prices. Prime time is loaded with equal amounts of finger-pointing and unlikely solutions. There is no mystery about this problem: prices rise when demand exceeds supply. Worldwide demand will continue growing. U.S.A. domestic drilling is shrinking. We have to bid for petroleum in a world-wide market controlled by foreigners. Prices will continue to rise until we either reduce our demand or increase our domestic supply. Several stop-gap solutions are being considered by Congress. Mostly, they are aimed at reducing price at the pump as a means of applying salve to the backhome wounds. Such actions have

Letters Policy for Seaford & Laurel Stars All letters should include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Names will be published. No unsigned letters will be published. No letters which the management deems to be libelous will be published. The Star reserves the right to edit or reject any letters. Send your letters to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or email morningstarpub @ddmg.net to be temporary in duration and limited in scope. The worthwhile proposals, which actually are aimed at a permanent solutions, unfortunately require years (if not decades) to expand sufficiently to have a significant impact on “our addiction to oil.” Hybrid cars are well started toward providing a piece of the solution. Plug-in hybrid cars are definitely on the horizon to provide a much bigger piece of the solution. Ethanol will be available only as a fractional additive for octane control. Even forecast expansions in distillation capacity will not generate enough ethanol to equip all U.S.A. vehicles with the 10 percent blend (E10), to say nothing about an 85 percent blend (E85). Domestic ethanol is

a midget completely inadequate to replace the monster, gasoline (10.6 million barrels / day for autos). Cars are being infused with fuel from bottled hydrogen or hydrogen via fuel cells. Large problems in technology and distribution make these routes unlikely to replace significant amounts of gasoline for several decades at best. None of the above solutions will lower gas prices at the pump immediately. One action by Congress was effective in the mid 1970s. They lowered the national speed limit to 55 miles per hour. Why hasn’t this route been mentioned anywhere? The lower speed limit, coupled to a national conservation mentality, resulted in a significant reduction in petroleum

consumption thereafter. Crude oil prices fell to about 1/7 of the crisis peak. Over the next few decades we gradually lost our focus on conservation and now we are in a mess again. We, the people, have an important part to play and we have the potential to make an early contribution while waiting for Congress and the scientists to do their thing. • Consolidate your day trips • Hold to 55 on the highway, 25 in town • Accelerate gently • Don’t idle, turn it off • Keep tires at standard inflation • Next time, buy a smaller vehicle.

Thank you, Tina for your years of dedicated service History is made and a consensus is reached — Republicans, Democrats and Independents have all agreed to meet in Seaford on Saturday, May 20, and say “thank you Tina.”

Everyone will have the opportunity to give a much deserved tribute to Tina Fallon who has served us all well in the Delaware House of Representative for the past 28 years. In November 2005, Tina announced her retirement. Her work ethic and dedication to her community has become a legacy. She is extremely respected by not only her constituents, but also by her peers. She is a great lady with a great personality, so please take the opportunity to pay homage to this great lady. The tickets are only $25 each. There will be many dignitaries there who are coming to honor Tina and many who want to give their personal thanks. It will be a night you won’t want to miss — great food, good friends, music and a couple of surprises as well. You can buy tickets at the city of Seaford office in downtown Seaford, 629-9173, or by call Anne Nesbitt 628-7788. We look forward to seeing you all there. Daniel B. Short, Former mayor City of Seaford

Do you have a copy of the Seaford Banner? We are looking for a copy of the first edition of the Seaford Banner, which would be dated April 25, 1984. If you have a copy, we would like to buy it from you. Call Bryant Richardson at 629-9788 if you can help us out.

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The Delaware Air Toxics Assessment Study (DATAS) measured air toxics in the Seaford area. The results and the human health risks from exposure to the air toxics will be presented at this forum. The public may view exhibits and meet with scientists and educators anytime during the open forum from 5:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. For more information, contact

Melanie Rapp, Public Affairs Office at (302) 739-9902. Funding for the DATAS outreach and education made possible by the Delaware Cancer Consortium. DNREC received significant technical advice from the Department of Health and Social Services’ Division of Public Health to complete the human health risk assessments for this study. Doc. No. 40-01-05/06/04/02

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MORNING STAR

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✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

Classifieds FREE CLASSIFIEDS* (For Personal Use Only) *Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

Deadline: Monday, 3 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch ($9.00 minimum)

Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.30/inch Legals: $6.30 per inch LOST 14 YR. OLD BLACK MALE CAT with 1 eye. Lost in West 8th St. area, Laurel. Reward offered. Family pet. 875-9228. 5/11 ORANGE PENCIL BOX containing addresses. Possibly lost in Wal-Mart parking lot. 875-2342. 5/11

GIVE-AWAY ELEC. STOVE, bisque color, good cond. 6294072. 4/27 FREE TO GOOD HOME: 2 outdoor kennel Beagles as pets, not good for hunting. Will separate if needed. 398-0756, afternoon or eve., no morning calls pls.

HELP WANTED MARKETING REP Outpatient Imaging Facility in Seaford is looking for a FT Marketing Representative. Interested candidates please fax resume to 302628-9024. 5/11/1tc PARAPROFESSIONAL The Laurel School District is seeking applicants for a Paraprofessional part time (temporary May 29, 2006 thru June 7, 2006) at Paul Laurence Dunbar School for the remainder of the 2005-06 school year. Interested applicants should apply by submitting a Letter of Interest, Resume, District application, Associate’s degree verification, and 3 letters of professional reference to Judy Evans, 1160 South Central Avenue, Laurel, DE 19956, (302) 8756108. The application can be obtained on-line at LaurelSchoolDistrict. org. All documents must be received by 3:30 p.m. on May 15, 2006. An open and continuous search will be conducted until this position is filled. 5/11/1tc

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY LOVE TO DECORATE? Earn $30-$50 per hour for part time fun. Call Debbie at 629-0402. 5/4/4tnc

NOTICE CAN’T LOSE WEIGHT? THEN DON’T WAIT! Get the Training & Help you need! Finally, a system that really works! Call today! 302-875-3099 http://healthieryou. transitionslife.com

SHERRY LYNN’S JUST FOR KIDS “ A Distinctive Resale Shop ”

Pre-Owned Ralph Lauren, Gap, Gymboree & More Children’s Clothing; Newborn - Junior, Accessories Available.

We only look expensive, but we’re not! Large Selection Of

Spring & Summer Clothes

New & Used - Name Brand 302-846-3037 Rt. 13A Bi-State Blvd., Delmar, DE 19940 Hrs: Wed.-Sat. 10:00 -3:00

YARD SALE COMMUNITY SALE, Sat., May 13, 7 am - until. Little Acres Development, north of Delmar, Rt. 13 & Rt. 30. Jewelry, quilts, baby items, furniture, etc. 5/11 MOVING SALE - May 13, 8 til. Rain or shine. Tools, cast iron tub, glassware, porcelain wood burning cook stove, furniture, many other items. Everything Must Go. Cash only please. 28405 Seaford Rd., Laurel. 5/11 YARD/BARN SALE - May 13, rain or shine, 8 am until? Many sale items. 25566 Green Briar Rd., West Seaford. 5/4/2t CHARITY LODGE YARD SALE - Sat., May 13, 7 am1 pm. Members cleaning their attics to pay for repairs to lodge Bible. Bargains! Oyster sandwiches, home made ice cream. Poplar St., Laurel, Del. 4/27 NANTICOKE RIVER YACHT CLUB Yard Sale, May 20, 8 am-2 pm. Rain date: June 3, $10 per table. 629-2122 or 875-7143. INDOOR YARD SALE, June 3, 7 am, at Woodland U.M. Church. Tables available to rent @ $15 ea. or 2/$25. Sponsored by church youth group. Light breakfast & lunch items & bake sale. Call 629-8775 or 629-4930 to reserve space.

AUTOMOTIVE PAYING MORE THAN $35 / Month for AUTO INSURANCE? 1-877-621-1030 Credit Cards accepted. tnc Cheap • Cheap • Cheap AUTO INSURANCE? 1-877-621-1030 Credit Cards accepted. tnc

EDUCATIONAL VACANCIES FOR 2006-’07: The Delmar School District is accepting completed District applications for the following positions for 2006-’07 school year: NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers of High School Language Arts/English; High School Special Education; Middle School Language Arts/English; Middle School Spanish; Middle School Integrated Studies; Middle School Special Education; and High School Intensive Learning Center Paraprofessional. Applicants must be licensed/certified by the Delaware DOE in subject matter. Salaries as per State and Local guidelines for FY ’07 based upon experience and degree of education. Closing date for application with complete documentation: 12 noon, Thursday, May 25, 2006. Mail application to Dr. David C. Ring, Jr., Superintendent, Delmar School District, 200 N. 8th Street, Delmar, DE 19940. EOE

‘95 CHRYS. CONCORDE, 3.5l, platinum metallic, alloy wheels, pwr seats, PW, 106K mi. $2695 OBO. 6293652 after 5 pm. 5/11 ‘96 MERC. GRAND MARQUIS, 68K mi., blue, CC, tilt, AC, etc., $3500 OBO. 410-924-1233. 4/27

Thank You! MOM 25% Off Sale Starts May 3rd

Strawberries U-Pick or We Do It For You Now Available At

The Hen House 11465 Sycamore Rd. Laurel, DE (1/2 mile from Rt. 13)

BOATS KAYAK 18’ Kevlar ‘Perception Sea Lion’. Must see, w/all access. Nothing else to buy. $1875. 875-9775. 18’ GLASS TRON, 115 hp Yamaha OB, EZ load trailer, $1850. 337-7861 for details. 4/13

CAMPERS/ TRAILERS ‘95 WINNEBAGO 29RQ, 52K mi., exc. cond., $21,500. 877-0231. 5/11 ‘79 DODGE CAMPER, sleeps 6 w/full bathroom, refrig. & stove, new Japer engine completely overhauled w/1 yr. warranty on eng. Less than 2000 mi. on eng., new tires, great for Nascar racing trips. Asking $5000. 629-9879 after 6 pm. 4/13

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES ANTIQUE BRASS DBL. BED, $300 OBO. 3370737. 4/20

Herbary Bath & Body Shop 110 South Conwell St. Historic Downtown Seaford 302-628-1601 ~ Wed.-Sat. 10-5

FOR SALE 18,000 - 220V AIR COND., 2 yrs old, works good, $100. 875-4358. 5/11 7 DOZ. GOLF BALLS, $7. 3 Folding boat seats, 3/$10. Craftsman lawn mower. Blade/knife sharpener, still in box, $25. 628-0617. 5/11 CRAFTSMAN LAWN MOWER, Briggs & Stratton (6.75 hp) eng., self-propelled, elec. starter, like new, $250. 628-8546. 5/11 MOVING - MUST SELL: 6 Pc. LR set, exc. cond. 4-pc. fam. rm. set, good cond. 5 pc. Kit. set, good cond. Old time stereo w/record player: 33’s, 45’s & 78’s, nice hardwd finish. 19” TV w/wooden stand. Stand alone stereo sys. w/2 3’ speakers. Men’s 18 spd. 26” mountain bike, rode twice. 245-2850. 5/4

302-875-6922 Mon.-Sat. 10-5:30; Sun. 12-4

PFALTZGRAF Yorktown pattern dishes, 23 dinner plates, many serving pcs. 629-0619. 5/4 SOFA, 2 cushion, green, $100. Pecan DR set, table w/3 leaves & 6 chairs, lg. china cabinet w/glass shelves, $600 OBO. 8755376. 5/4 ELEC. HOSPITAL BED, $450 OBO. Travel wheel chair, $100 OBO. 8755376. 5/4 GREENHOUSE FRAME, never been assembled, pd. $3000, asking $1700. 8755376. 5/4 DR SET, TABLE & 6 chairs, china cupboard, 2 buffet servers, dark wood, good cond. Made in 60s? $550 OBO. 334-4681. 5/4 MOVING - MUST SELL: Sofa, dusty rose & brn. on beige bkgr., good cond., $100. 2 dk. wood end tables, 3 table lamps, 6292795, lv. msg. 5/4

The Delmar, Delaware School District is seeking the following for 2006-’07:

MIDDLE AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL Grades 6-12 to assume the position in Delaware rated “SUPERIOR” schools. The successful candidate will be a proven leader in his/her present assignment, be familiar with Delaware Standards and school law, and hold Principal licensure/ certification as issued by the Delaware DOE. The candidate must hold a Master’s Degree, have a minimum of 3 years of teaching experience, administrative experience, favorable Criminal Background Check and Child Registry, participate in Direct Deposit of Pay, and provide Mantoux skin/PPD test documentation. Delmar is a two-school district with approximately 1,200 students located near Salisbury, Maryland. Salary and Benefits as per FY ‘07 State and Local Guides based upon experience and educational degree. Date of Employment: July 1, 2006 To obtain Delmar School District application, contact Personnel @ [302]846-9544 X111. Completed District application with documentation must be submitted by 4 pm, Thursday, May 18, 2006, to: David C. Ring, Jr., Ed. D., Superintendent Delmar School District 200 N. 8th Street Delmar, DE 19940 EOE


PAGE 58 COMPLETE HOME PII Computer System incl. CD writer, DVD ROM, 128 mb ram, 450 mhz, Windows 98 SE, STI graphics, network card, 10Gb HD, inkjet printer, NEC LCD 15” flat panel monitor w/built-in speakers, keyboard, mouse, lots of children’s & business software titles. $400. 629-9208.

BOY’S CLOTHES, 50 items, sz. 5, $50. 875-7643. 4/27

FREEZER, UPRIGHT 21 cu. ft., exc. cond., used very little. 337-0767. 4/20

PROM GOWNS (9), sz. 2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8; all colors, $10 & up. 629-2226. 4/13

110 BABY GIRL ITEMS, sz. 3-6 mos., $55. 75 Baby Girl Items, sz. 6-9 mos., $40. 875-7643. 4/27

KENNEDY TOOL CHEST, 7 drawers, 20”x47”, work top, $200. 629-6337. 4/20

BROTHER WORD PROCESSOR, WP 2450-DS, $100 OBO. 4/13

OUTGROWN GRANDBABY THINGS: crib w/mattress, sheets & bumpers, $85. Pack & Play, $35. Graco Tot Wheel Entertainer, $15. 3-level Booster Seat for chair, ages 1-4, $20. 2 door gates, $7 ea., 2/$10. Traveling fold-up booster seat, $25. 8750787. 4/20

TIME TO DECORATE for spring w/a new 42” glass top table & 4 matching chairs, must be seen! 3494103. 4/13

GIBSON REFRIG., 18 cf, 3 yrs. old, white, ice maker, $275. 410-924-1233. 4/27

OMRON 780AC Auto. blood pressure monitor, new, Easy-Wrap cuff fits arm sz. 9” - 17”. Just wrap around arm & press start. Lg. digital panel. $70. 6299208. 4/27

BBQ GRILL, fully assemb., great cond., w/charcoal, access., uten., cover. $40 firm. U-haul. 629-4665, lv. msg. 4/20 LG. STAINED GLASS Hanging Lamp, exc. cond., $75. 628-9157. 4/20

ELEC. WEED EATER, elec. hedge clippers, push mower, 1 yr. old. Will take $70 or will sell separately. All in working order. 8754358. 4/27

FANTOM THUNDER VACUUM Cleaner, upright, bagless, $65. 628-9157. 4/20

DAYBED, like new, asking $300 OBO. Soloflex, asking $100 OBO. 284-2821, lv. msg. 4/27

REAL WOOD BAR for Rec Room, beautiful, marine motif. Sacrifice $45. 410896-4287. 4/20

3-WHEEL HANDICAP SCOOTER, rode less than 1 mi. Same as new. $600. 875-5889. 4/20 KAYAK 18’ Kevlar ‘Perception Sea Lion’. Must see, w/all access. Nothing else to buy. $1875. 875-9775. 4/20

HOME SCHOOLING?

DISCLAIMER: be aware that Morning Star Publications has no control over the Regional ads. Some employment ads and business opportunity ads may not be what they seem to be.

Come see why over 1,500,000 students use . . .

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Newark, DE — June 1 Dover, DE — June 6 Seaford, DE — June 27 Frederick, MD — May 15 Rockville, MD — May 16 Columbia, MD — May 25 Annapolis, MD — June 7 Salisbury, MD — June 12 Edgewood, MD — June 14 Laurel, MD — June 15 Camp Springs, MD — June 19 Elkridge, MD — June 20 Pikesville, MD — June 21 Frederick, MD — June 22 Solomons, MD — June 26

SEROQUEL Offices in Phoenix and Tucson

(1-800-843-3245) www.1800theeagle.com

AKA BICHON FRISE Puppies for sale, 1 male $550, 1 female, $650. 628-3373. 4/27

LAND FOR SALE

LOT FOR SALE Waterfront lot, Old Meadow Rd., 3/4 acre, soil work complete. $279,000 Call Harry Wooding RE/MAX Coast & Country 302-684-3065 Office: 684-4800

WANTED TO RENT SR. LADY seeking to rent home or mobile home, areas of Laurel, Millsboro, Del. On Sec. 8, have voucher. Good housekeeper, have ref. No pets. Wants long term. Need by June 3. 846-2599. 5/11

cost $900, sacrifice $295. 875-9775. 4/14

Enjoy the Star?

Call 629-9788

Adoption PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring people specializing in matching birth mothers with families nationwide. EXPENSES PAID. Toll free 24/7 Abby's One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6292 Business Opportunity ACQUIRE FORECLOSURES! You Find, We Fund! Co-own or Cash Out! Access Over 7,500 Investors to Fund Your Deals! Training! Free Info: 1-800854-1952 ext 028 ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you earn $800 in a day? Your own local candy route. Includes 30 machines and candy. All for $9,995. 888-753-3452 Are you making $1,710 per week? All cash vending routes with prime locations available now! Under $9,000 investment required. Call Toll Free (24-7) 800963-2654 THE PAMPERED CHEF Need Extra Income? Earn $25+ per hour Be your own boss! Start up Bonus EARN FREE PRODUCTS Contact Senior Director Tom Marston at 866-570-0860, cookingtom@aol.com

HOME INSPECTION 5-day hands-on basic, advanced and continuing education for core and renewal credit. Also Mold Inspection course. Building Specs, nationally recognized HI company. 800-217-7979 www.buildingspecs.com

DONATIONS NEEDED!

®

Boats, Cars, RVs, Equipment, Real Estate, Forklifts & Wheelchair Access Vans

IRS Forms & All Paperwork Done for You. Associated Charities represents numerous non-profits in need of your property.

Call Toll Free: 866-639-8724 or 410-603-3468 E-mail: bob3416@mchsi.com

ys da 7 ek en we Op a

WET BASEMENTS STINK !!

Mold, mildew and water leaking into your basement causes health and foundation problems. What can be done to fix the problem? Allstate American Waterproofing is an honest, hardworking local company. We will give you a FREE evaluation and estimate and a fair price. We have repaired thousands of basements in the area; we can provide local references. When your neighbors needed waterproofing they called Allstate American. Why don’t you? Call now to receive a 20% discount with your FREE ESTIMATE.

MDDCȱ2x2ȱDISPLAYȱADȱNETWORKȱ



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MOVING: Sony 5 Disc dual cass., AM-FM programmable radio w/2-3’ tall speakers. Exc. working cond., $100. Sony a 1” color TV, exc. cond. w/remote, $75. Few smaller items not mentioned-- knick knacks, lamps, dressers. Call 6280115 or 228-8386, if no ans., lv. msg. 4/13

DOG KENNEL 10’x10’x6’, chain link, canvas roof. Dog house incl. Great cond. $400. 344-4681. 5/4

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MOVING - MUST SELL: Hot Point gas stove w/self cleaning oven, exc. working cond., $100. Kenmore elec. full size Dryer & Amanda heavy duty Washer, full size, both great working cond., $100 for pair or $60 ea. Full size upright self defrosting GE Freezer, exc. cond. $100. 628-0115 or 228-8386, lv. msg. 4/13

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SOFA, 3 cushion, lt green/ DONATIONS tan plaid, beautiful cond., NEEDED!

Urgent news for people who took

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✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

MORNING STAR

MEASUREȱYOURȱSUCCESSȱȱ Place your business-card-size ad in 102 MarylandDelaware-D.C. newspapers. Get your message to over 3 million readers for $1250. Statewide coverage less than $12.38 per publication. FOR MORE INFO FORMAT ATION: N: CONT NTACT THIS THIS NEWSPAPER Fr o—2x2 x2 Disp splay Networ Ne ork Coordina Coordinator or call Gay Fraustro—2 ryland-Delaware-D elaware-D.C. Press Pres Associ ciati ation Marylan 410-721410-721-4000 4000 ex ext 17; Email ail: gfrau raustro tro@mddcp cpres ress.com

Financial Services $$CASH$$ Immediate Cash for Structured Settlements, Annuities, Law Suit, Mortgage Notes & Cash Flows. J.G. Wentworth #1 1-(800)794-7310. General Merchandise ABSOLUTELY NO COST TO YOU!! ALL BRAND NEW POWER WHEELCHAIRS, HOSPITAL BEDS AND SCOOTERS. IMMEDIATE DELIVERYCALL TOLL FREE 1-888-9984111 TO QUALIFY Help Wanted NOW HIRING FOR 2006 POSTAL JOBS $18/hour Starting, Avg Pay $57K/year Federal Benefits, Paid

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MORNING STAR Training and Vacations. No Experience Needed! 1-800584-1775 Ref # P1021 Help Wanted Insurance RUN YOUR OWN BUSINESS - Local opportunity for motivated individuals. National employee benefits company that markets to employers of all sizes. Proven training system. Colonial Supplemental Insurance. Call 410-730-9331

Help Wanted-Drivers Drivers - Regional Van Drivers. $1,500 Sign On Bonus. Great Hometime & Pay. Class A CDL Required. 877-818-3745 Drivers: There is a driver shortage! We know it. You know it. So we raised driver pay rates. Our average driver earned $1,038 per week in 2005. Home weekends, too! L.J. Kennedy Trucking

LEGAL NOTICE In accordance with Delaware Code, Title 14, the Department of Elections for Sussex County canvassed the vote for the Woodbridge School District Referendum held on Tuesday, Apri1 25, 2006, and hereby declare the results to be as follows: AT ISSUE RAISING THE CURRENT EXPENSE TAX RATE FOR SCHOOL PURPOSES For the Issue 482 Against the Issue 386 In witness thereof, the Department of Elections for Sussex County has caused this certificate to be executed by its Administrative Director and Deputy Administrative Director this 28th Day of April 2006. Kenneth L. McDowell Jean M. Turner Adminstrative Director Deputy Administrative Director

Call us today! 877-5387712 www.kennedytrucking.com CDL-A Required. Accepting Trainees for Werner, Swift, CR England, others! 16 day CDL! No money down, student financing! Tuition reimbursement avail. Job placement asst. Mon-Sun 800-8830171 x7. Home Improvement HAS YOUR BUILDING SHIFTED? Structural repairs of barns, houses and garages. Call Woodford Bros., Inc. for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs. 1-800OLD-BARN. www.1-800OLD-BARN.COM MHIC# 05-121561 Land For Sale Bruceton Mills, WV- 3.6 ac w/ creek $32,900. 4.2 ac w/streamfront $41,900. 800-898-6139 A.L.S. Inc. www.landservice.com 20+ Acres featuring private, deeded river access! Only mins to historic town w/ 50 mile, 3 state mtn & river VIEWS! Nothing else compares! www.landinwv.com

RESOLUTION PROPOSING TO THE PROPERTY OWNERS AND RESIDENTS OF THE CITY OF SEAFORD AND TO THE PROPERTY OWNERS AND RESIDENTS OF THE TERRITORIES CONTIGUOUS TO THE PRESENT CORPORATE LIMITS OF THE CITY OF SEAFORD, THAT THE CITY OF SEAFORD ANNEX CERTAIN TERRITORIES AND FIXING THE TIME AND PLACE FOR A PUBLIC HEARING THEREON. Whereas, pursuant to a Resolution adopted by the City Council of the City of Seaford, a Committee appointed by the Mayor recommend in its report that certain territories contiguous to the present corporate limits of the City of Seaford be annexed to the City of Seaford. Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved, that the City Council of the City of Seaford, proposes to the property owners and residents of the City of Seaford and to the property owners and residents of certain territories located contiguous to the present limits of the City of Seaford that certain territories located contiguous to the present corporate limits of the City of Seaford be annexed to the City of Seaford, said territories being proposed for annexation being more particularly described in: Exhibit “A” - Lands of Fred W. Hertrich III, attached hereto and incorporated herein. And Be It Further Resolved, that a public hearing shall be held on the merits of annexing the territories herein before described in this Resolution at which time any property owner or resident of the City of Seaford and any property owner or resident of the territories herein before described shall have an opportunity to be heard and said public hearing shall be held on May 23, 2006 at 7:05 o’clock P.M. in the Council Chambers of the City Council at the City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Sussex County, Delaware. And Be It Further Resolved, that the City Manager of the City of Seaford, be and is hereby authorized and directed to cause a Notice which shall consist of a true copy of this Resolution to be printed in a newspaper published in the City of Seaford, in its May 11, 2006 edition, said publication being at least one week prior to the time specified in this Resolution for the said public hearing. I, Dolores J. Slatcher, City Manager of the City of Seaford, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and correct copy of a Resolution passed by the City Council of the City of Seaford at its meeting on April 25, 2006, at which a quorum was present and voting throughout and that the same is still in full force and effect. Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager, City of Seaford, Delaware Dated: April 26, 2006 RE:

Exhibit A - Lands of Fred W. Hertrich III

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 59

A 50 MILE 3 STATE VIEW! 20+ ACRES -$139,900. Private wooded parcel w/ pristine views, excellent for 2nd home, retire, camp on or just enjoy with PRIVATE DEEDED RIVER ACCESS. New roads, perc, survey. Exc. financing. WON"T LAST. CALL NOW 1-800888-1262

WEST VA FIXER-UPPER W/ STREAM Old farmhouse, restorable with lots of TLC. Sits on 6.4 rolling acres on a native trout stream. Additional restorable barns & shed. Great views, just over 3 hours to the Beltway. Only $89,500. Owner 866-403-8037.

A PINNACLE! PRIVATE RIVER ACCESS 270* MTN. VIEWS 20+ AC -$179,900 Pristine hardwoods at end of rd for unsurpassed privacy. Mins to trout lake. All just mins to town & interstate. Long- term low rate financing. CALL NOW TO SEE 1800-888-1262

NYS LAND LIQUIDATION, '06 SPRING SALE. 97 Ac. w/Cabin, Was $149,000Now $99,900. 175 Acres bordering State Land, Was $159,900- Now $125,900. 48 Acres- Trophy Hunting, Was $69,900Now $59,900. 6+ Ac. Southern Tier Hilltop Views, Was $17,900- Now $15,900. 82 Acres- Tug Hill Camp & Creek, Now $119,900. 54 Ac- Southern Tier-State Land surrounds, Now $109,900. 191 Ac.Adirondack Ponds, Borders State Land, Now $523 Per Acre. Selected as Cabela's Trophy Lands. Call C&A @ 800-229-7843 www.land andcamps.com. Over 75 New Bargains!

ASHEVILLE, NC AREA HOMESITES Sneak preview of Phase II on now. Just 25 miles from Asheville. Over 4 miles of crystal clear riverfront. Incredible mountain views. Riverwalk, custom lodge, nature trails. 866-292-5760. VA MOUNTAINS 5 acres with frontage on very large pristine creek, very private, exc. fishing, canoeing, good access, near New River Trail State Park, $39,500. owner 866-789-8535 www.mountainsofVA.com

Land For Sale

Miscellaneous Airline mechanic rapid training for high paying Aviation career. FAA predicts severe

shortage, financial aid if qualify. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 1-888349-5387 FREE DIRECTV SATELLITE, 4 rooms. FREE TiVo/DVR. Add HDTV. 220 Channels+ locals, packages fr. $29.99/mo. Cheaper than cable TV. Switch Today! 800-360-9901, Promo #14700 Mobile/Mnfctrd Hms STRETCH YOUR ADVERTISING DOLLARS!!!!! The best results come with repetitive visibility. More exposure builds awareness. Advertise in 121 newspapers across Maryland, Delaware, and DC, reach over 2.3 Million households for only $430. For more information contact this Newspaper or call Gay Fraustro, MDDC Classified Networks, 410-721-4000, ext.17 or visit our website: www.mddcpress.com. The Village of Jefferson Crossroads LAND/ HOME packages from $170's Single family homes on 3/4+ acre homesites near beaches. Move in fast. Models and closing assistance Cont. on Page 61

MONTHLY SALE LATE MODEL • CLEAN • LOW MILEAGE PRE-LEASED & REPOSSESSED CARS, VANS, TRUCKS, TRAVEL TRAILERS AND BOATS

VEHICLES AVAILABLE FOR INSPECTION ONLY 900 First State Boulevard First State Industrial Park, Stanton, DE

Monday, May 15 Noon – 7 pm Tuesday, May 16 9 am – 7 pm Wednesday, May 17 9 am – 5 pm PRELIMINARY ON-LINE BIDDING BEGINS MAY 11th All Vehicles Listed on WWW.VB2.COM

LIVE INTERNET AUCTION MAY 17 STARTING @ 6PM ON WWW.VB2.COM

VISIT WWW.VB2.COM TO REGISTER PRIOR TO AUCTION

For a complete list of vehicles for sale, call 302.636.6204 or email: vehiclesales@wilmingtontrust.com


11 Upcoming Personal Property Auctions by Marshall Auctions Spring 2006 Ocean City Surplus Absolute Auction Ocean City Impound Lot behind the Police Dept – 65th St, Ocean City, MD Saturday, May 13th, 2006 at 10:00 AM Upon entering Ocean City on Rt. 90 turn North on to Coastal Highway and follow for 1 block to 65th St. Turn left onto 65th St and follow past the Ocean City Police Department. The Ocean City impound lot is located approx. 100 yards behind the Police Dept. building on the right. Signs Posted. 1976 Ford F-150, 1978 Camper, 1982 Ford Ecno Van 41,313k , 1985 Ford Ranger, 1986 Ford F-150, 1987 Ford Ranger, 1988 Mazda Mx-6 100,591k , 1988 Honda Prelude 240,998k , 1989 Buick Lesabre 180,860k , 1989 Mazda 323 146,375k , 1989 Toyota Tercel 125,395k , 1989 Ford Taurus 88,736k , 1990 GMC Van 179,901k , 1990 Chevy Cavalier 97,488k , 1990 Chevy 146,222k , 1990 Ford Bronco 52,867k , 1990 Red VW Golf 239,875k , 1991 Honda Civic, 1991 Toyota Corolla 171,738k , 1991 Dodge Ram 114,591k , 1991 Chevy Lumina197,807k , 1992 Ford Explr 111,951k , 1992 Ford Bronco, 1992 Ford Aerostar, 1992 Chev Cavalier 146,303k , 1992 Nissan Sentra 127,052k , 1993 Subaru 132,899k , 1993 Mitsub Eclipse 146,747k , 1993 Trailer, 1993 White Acura Integra170,379k , 1994 Eagle Talon, 1994 T-Bird 136,637k , 1994 Dodge Caravan 199,151k , 1994 Chevy Cavalr 73,897k , 1994 Mazda 163,497k , 1995 Mazda 626 160,749k , 1996 Dodge Stratus, 1996 Blue Chevy Beretta 134,139k , 1997 Plym Neon 167,015k , 1997 Dodge Neon 149,402k , 1999 Red Kawasaki, 1999 Black Nissan 240sx 155,678, 2000 Kia Spectra 60,815, 2001 Ford F-150, Yamaha Jet Ski /Trailer, Lincoln Towncar, Kinetic Moped, Chevy Van, Pontiac Grd Am 172,553k , Ford Econovan 78,134k , Honda Civic 159,529k , Nissan Sentra 234,068, Isuzu Trooper 159,533k 1991 Chevrolet Flatbed 1 Ton 2 W/D (83,320k), 1994 Ford

Aerostar Van (116,182k), 1997 Ford Handicap Van (237,497k), 1997 Ford Crown Victoria (124,947k), 1995 Ford Pickup 1/2 Ton (117,807k), 1996 Jeep Cherokee 4 Wheel Drive (85,776k), 1999 Ford Crown Victoria (115,600k), 1998 Ford Crown Victoria (132,854k), 2002 Chevrolet Impala (84,156k), 2000 Chevrolet Impala (95,464k), 2000 Chevrolet Impala (93,592k) 1983 Caterpillar Loader 936 - 77U8166 (8,276k), 1990 International Dump Truck 1HTGGGJTSLH264044 (147,699k), 1993 Isuzu 16’ Box Truck JALE5B1U8P3000534 (106,519k), 1993 MGS Communication Trailer with Generator, 1995 Volvo Automated Trash Truck 4V52AFHD1SR474800 (77,145k), 1998 5 Starr Trailer PWC1500 1991 Backpack Blower, 1992 Broyhill Conveyor, 1992 Andela Glass Pulverizer, 1993 Echo Hedge Clipper, 1994 Landa Steamer Pressure Washer, 1994 Cummins Generator TK9, 1998 Tanaka Weedeater, 1998 Little Wonder Blower, 1999 Echo Blower, 1999 Northern Star Pressure Washer, 2000 Tanaka Hedge Trimmer, Five 2001 John Deere Mowers 21”, 2002 Stihl Chainsaw, 2002 Echo Auger Motor , 2004 Echo Blower, 2004 Echo Chain Saw, 2004 Echo Blower, 2004 Stihl Hedge Trimmer Cash or approved check day of sale. VISA/DISC/MC/AMEX. 10% Buyer Premium. Persons not known to the Auction Co. must bring a bank letter of credit if paying by check. Must bring valid identification to register. Everything sold “AS IS” with no warranties of any kind. Vehicle titles held a minimum of 10 days unless paid for by cash or credit card. . Preview conducted morning of the Auction from 8 to 10 AM!

Selling from the Estate of Forrest Rayfield of Pocomoke City, MD + several other local estates!

At the intersection of Rt. 50 & Forest Grove Rd., in Parsonsburg, turn North onto Forest Grove Rd. and follow for .5 miles to Old Ocean City Rd. Right onto Old O.C. Rd., and follow for 1.2 miles to Esham Rd. Left onto Esham Rd. and follow for 1.2 miles to Burgundy/Tan building on left. Signs Posted. Extremely rare incised crock “From J.H. Elliott Dealer in Dry Goods Groceries Green Hill, MD”, Incised crock from “J. F. Jester Dealer in Dry Goods ect…” from Nanticoke, MD, Flow Blue platters, plates, cups, tureens & teapots, Historical blue teapot (Dmg), yellow ware bowls, apothecary jar, ironstone coast guard plates, several oil paintings, several quilts, Elbow Beach Oyster plate, Baltimore Bernheimer Bros Mug 1907, ships plates, Rockingham pitchers & bowls, ironstone transfer tureens, pitchers & plates, stoneware canning jars, red ware, canning jars, ironstone coffee grinder, molding planes, graniteware green swirl, blue swirl and gray, EAPG, Tole floral tray, nest of 3 yellow ware bowls, blue & gray stoneware crocks, stoneware crocks & jugs, silver plate flatware & tea service, cookbooks, Federalsburg 1912 calendar plate, batter jug, Delft charger, set comical stoppers, ironstone mulberry coffee pot, pitcher, plate & tureen (dmg), lg. gone with wind lamp, ruby cut to clear lamps, sponge platter, bowls & pitchers, Eaton meeting house plate, collection of paper weights, pink luster, several clocks, several pcs. Carnival glass, Decoys, banks cast iron & china, Bohemian glass, ginger jars, soap stone, Pr. of prism lamps, blue opalescent, Smith Enfield clock, Nippon, slag glass lamp, cloisonné, covered animal dishes, collection of canes, Swords, Marble Bust, large lot of post cards many local, Vaseline glass, sterling, lots of books many early, Roseville Vases and planters, 10 Goebel Hummel’s, German oyster plates, Perdue Truck and Bobble head autographed, Perdue Hatchery Truck, Hand painted Nippon plates, Fenton, Stangle, Bob Hope , Autograph, Minton, Shawnee planter, Beer advertising, Longaberger baskets, Vintage Sunoco oil bottle, 4 NRA stamp prints.

Steinway and Sons Upright Piano, Grandfather clock, mahogany chest on chest, mahogany chest, Chippendale style sofa, wing chair, tambour desk, curly maple secretary, curly maple chest, mahogany drop front desk, Victorian Eastlake loveseat & side chair, blanket chests, blue painted blanket chest, china closet, gate leg tables, needlepoint footstool, oak sideboard, country cabinet, wood box, tester bed, game table, Windsor style chairs, painted sailing ship card table, wardrobe, 2 solid cherry Cherokee dressers, Mahogany game table, Solid cherry drop leaf table and six ladder back chairs, 2 wingback recliners, Oak wardrobe, Dovetailed blanket chest, Walnut dresser and mirror, Walnut Vanity, two 2 drawer oak dressers, 6pc wicker porch set, 25” TV & showcases. 1851 Remingtons of Illion NY .69 Caliber Percussion rifle with Maynard Primer tape system, 42” barrel & Graduated rear sight. Mid eastern black powder rifle, United commercial upright freezer, G+E Vintage refrigerator w/ top mount compressor, 2.5 hp 10” Craftsman radial saw. 2001 Lowe Mdl 1648 16’ Jon Boat with 15 HP Johnson motor, Excellent condition w/low hours, 1981 Cruisers 160 Rally fiberglass boat w/100 HP Evinrude motor & trailer, 1997 Toyota Camry, 131,461K miles, 1996 Cadillac 4 door coupe sedan, 1979 Citation pull type camper (No title), 1984 Ford F350 Bucket truck, 67K miles, Plymouth Lazer (No title for Parts), 1950 Chevrolet Deluxe 4 door sedan (Registered in Canada – No US Title), fiberglass truck cap fits (1997-2003 Ford F150 8’ bed) & more. : Cash Or Approved Check Day of sale. Visa/MC/Amex/Discover. 8% Buyer Premium. 3% Discount for cash or check. Everything Sold “As Is” with no warranties of any kind. Vehicle titles held 10 days unless paid by cash/credit card. Auction conducted inside & outside or 9,000 Sq. Ft. facility. Two Auctioneers. Some seating provided. Food served by Millie’s. 2 Hours prior to the Auction!

Marshall Auctions is honored to sell the home & contents for the Estate of Irene M. Fleetwood

Real Estate Preview: Tue. May 16th 5 – 7 PM & Sun. May 21st, 2 – 4 PM From Rt. 20 in Seaford, travel south on Rt. 13 for 3 miles to O’Neals Rd. (across from Hertrich). Turn right on O’Neals Rd. & home will be first on the left. From Rt. 24 in Laurel travel north on Rt. 13 for 4.1 miles to O’Neals Rd. Left on O’Neals Rd. & follow to home. Signs posted. Nicely maintained & updated 2-3 BR, 2 BA 1950’s bungalow style 1.5 story home on a corner lot in Seaford, DE. Home features updated vinyl windows, an 8’ x 16’ enclosed sun porch, large eat in kitchen, large living room with brick gas fireplace, pine floors, large laundry room & 2 bonus rooms. The property features a large 2 car garage and 2 other outbuildings. This property features incredible investment opportunity and is currently zoned AR1. Referred to as Sussex Co. District 1-32, Map 7,00, Parcel 66.02. This

May 20th, 2006 – 17 Acre Bldg Lot. Wicomico Co. Map 21 Parcel 92. Old Dagsboro Rd. off of Melson Rd., Delmar, MD June 1st, 2006 – 604 E. East St., Delmar, MD – Nicely maintained 2 BR, 1 BA 864’ home with a fenced yard with large deck. June 3rd, 2006 – INCREDIBLE 130 AC FARM – Home/Contents – 10070 Sharptown Rd., Mardela Springs, MD – Wicomico Tax Map 8 Parcels 7, 87 & 416. Parcel 7 is 119 Ac +/-, Parcel 87 is 9.25 Ac +/- & Parcel 416 is 1.25 Ac +/June 3rd, 2006 – 5862 Eldorado Sharptown Rd., Rhodesdale, MD – Two homes

incredible 1.63 Acre lot is zoned Commercial 1 (C1) and includes 1,105 feet +/- of frontage on the southbound lanes of Rt. 13 & frontage on Pondside Drive to the south of the lot. The lot is currently unimproved but will include the lease of the 3 billboards that are currently on the property. $15,000.00 down day of auction in cash, certified check or check acceptable by undersigned. Balance to be paid in 45 days. 2.5 % Buyer premium. Property being sold “as is”. Prospective Buyer responsible for inspection, prior to the auction, Auction Company makes no representation or warranties of any kind. . Brokers must have clients registered 48 hours prior to the auction. Contact Auction Co. for Complete Details

on a 4.68 Acre lot with Sub-div Potential June 9th, 2006 – 221 Bradford St., Seaford DE – Nicely maintained 3 BR, 1.5 BA Bungalow on a 50x150 lot in the town limits June 10th, 2006 – PERSONAL PROPERTY AUCTION – 8000 Esham Rd., Parsonsburg, MD – Glass/China/Furniture & more June 23rd, 2006 – 10596 Georgetown Rd, Laurel DE-Nicely maintained 3 BR, 1.5 BA home on a Lg 1.19 Acre lot in Laurel, DE. June 24th, 2006 – HOME & CONTENTS –101 Jacobs Ave., Bridgeville, DE – 2-3 BR, 1 BA home w/basement on a corner lot.

Five Generations of Combined Auction Experience Doug Marshall, Jr., CAI, Christal Marshall, Auctioneers Phone: 888-986-SOLD(7653) 410-835-0383 www.marshallauctions.com

View Website for Additional Information, Terms, Description & Pictures!


MORNING STAR available. (302)674-5504 x111. Or e-mail jeff@atlantishomesllc.com Move or Retire to Delaware and discover the value of manufactured housing. Gated community with homes from low 100's. Brochure avail. 1-866-6290770 www.coolbranch.com Pools SWIMMING POOLS - Pool Prices Plunging! Warehouse Sale on all above ground swimming pools. Many pools to choose from. For example: 19x31 oval pool with deck, fence and filter for only $1,180.00. Installation extra. 100% Financing Available. Call now for free backyard survey! Crown Pools 888-5906466. Real Estate New, Pre-Construction Golf Community-Coastal Georgia. Large lots w/ deepwater, marsh, golf, nature views. Gated, Golf, Fitness Center, Tennis, Trails, Oak Park, Docks. $70k's$300K. 1-877-266-7376. www.cooperspoint.com Owner's Liquidation Sale by Sealed Bid New homes and acreage homesites in the Blue Ridge Mountains of VA. Sold "As Is", 30- day close. Restrictive Covenant Community. Deadline May 27th. For details 800-4202278 or visit www.Stone ridgebentmtn.com Real Estate Wanted Wanted Real Estate Houses, comm. waterfront. Any type, location or condition. “As-Is”. Can pay cash. Family business. 866-474-7000. www.charlesparrish.com Tax Services IRS TAX DEBT KEEPING YOU AWAKE? Local CPA firm resolves all Federal and State tax problems for individuals and businesses. US Tax Resolutions, P.A. 877-477-1108. Vacation Rentals OUTER BANKS, NC -Vacation with family in Corolla. Pine Island North - Ocean to Sound. Accommodate 826 people pools, elevators, golf, pets. Corolla Classic Vacations - brochure-tollfree 866-453-9660 corollaclassicvacations.com/nyp OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservation www.holidayoc.com

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LEGALS NOTICE OF ANNEXATION AND ZONING AS COMMERCIAL & BUSINESS USE BY THE TOWN OF LAUREL NOTICE OF THE ANNEXATION AND ZONING AS COMMERCIAL & BUSINESS USE DISTRICT of certain property contiguous to the present limits of the Town of Laurel, Sussex County, Delaware, being the lands of O’Neal Brothers, Inc., tax map #232/12.00/44, containing 1.24 acres more or less, by action of the Town Council of the Town of Laurel, Delaware, at its regular meeting on MAY 1, 2006. THE TOWN OF LAUREL By: John Shwed, Mayor Attest: Jamie Smith, Asst. Town Adm. 5/11/1tc

NOTICE OF ANNEXATION AND ZONING AS COMMERCIAL & BUSINESS USE BY THE TOWN OF LAUREL NOTICE OF THE ANNEXATION AND ZONING AS COMMERCIAL & BUSINESS USE DISTRICT of certain property contiguous to the present limits of the Town of Laurel, Sussex County, Delaware, being the lands of Dual Highway Properties, LLC, East Laurel Properties, LLC, and Farvan Properties, LLC, tax map #2-32/12.00/63, 63.07, & 63.08, containing 18 acres more or less, by action of the Town Council of the Town of Laurel, Delaware, at its regular meeting on MAY 1, 2006. THE TOWN OF LAUREL By: John Shwed, Mayor Attest: Jamie Smith, Asst. Town Adm. 5/11/1tc

NOTICE OF ANNEXATION AND ZONING AS R-2, RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT BY THE TOWN OF LAUREL NOTICE OF THE ANNEXATION AND ZONING AS R-2 RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT of certain property contiguous to the present limits of the Town of Laurel, Sussex County, Delaware, being the lands of now or formerly owned by Glenn Jones, front of Broad Creek, tax map #232/12.00/13, containing 56.75 acres more or less, by action of the Town Council of the Town of Laurel, Delaware, at its regular meeting on MAY 1, 2006. THE TOWN OF LAUREL By: John Shwed, Mayor Attest: Jamie Smith, Asst. Town Adm. 5/11/1tc

NOTICE The Planning Commission of the Town of Bridgeville will hold a Public Hearing on Monday, May 22, 2006, to receive public comment concerning the Comprehensive Plan update. The Hearing will take place at Bridgeville Town Hall, 101 N. Main Street, at 7:30 P.M. The amendment is available for review on Monday - Friday, from 8:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. at the Town Hall. COMMISSIONERS OF BRIDGEVILLE JOSEPH T. CONAWAY, COMMISSION PRESIDENT 5/11/2tc

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE You are hereby notified the below matters will be before: The Mayor and Council for their determination on Tuesday, May 23, 2006, at 7:05 P.M., in the City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware: 1. KCI Technologies, on behalf of Tharp Road Acquisition Co., is requesting a preliminary site plan review of The Villages of Stoneybrook, Tax Map and Parcel 3-31 6.00 10.00, 10.01 & 11, located along Beaver Dam Drive, with the north boundary line on Tharp Road. Issued this 11th day of May 2006 pursuant to the Rules heretofore adopted by the City of Seaford. THE CITY OF SEAFORD Dolores J. Slatcher, City Manager 5/11/1tc

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE You are hereby notified the below matters will be before: The Planning and Zoning Commission for their review and recommendation on Thursday, June 1, 2006, at 7:00 P.M., in the City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware: 1. Case No. S-28-06; AAM, LLC, is requesting a subdivision of 4 acres of land from the larger parcel identified as Tax Map and Parcel 3-31 5.00 50.07, located on Bridgeville Road (formerly known as Strikemasters). 2. Seaford Village LLC, property owners of Seaford Village Shopping Center, Tax Map and Parcel 3-31 5.00 50, Sussex Highway, is seeking a site plan review for the addition of a 22,000+/- square foot building and 182 additional parking spaces. 3. Davis Bowen and Friedel, Inc. on behalf of the

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006 property owners of Tax Map and Parcel 3-31 5.00 11, locating on Bridgeville Road, (near Herring Run Professional Park), are seeking a preliminary site plan review for the residential development, Lawrence Crossing. Issued this 11th day of May 2006 pursuant to the Rules heretofore adopted by the City of Seaford. THE CITY OF SEAFORD Dolores J. Slatcher, City Manager 5/11/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Subd. #2005-46 Notice is hereby given that the County Planning and Zoning Commission of Sussex County will hold a public hearing on Thursday evening, JUNE 8, 2006, in the County Council Chambers, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on the application of BILL LINK AND ELMO SINGER to consider the Subdivision of land in an AR-1 Agricultural Residential District in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, by dividing 16.25 acres into 15 lots, located northwest of Burton Street, 0.46 miles north of Road 535. Planning and Zoning public hearings will begin at 6:00 P.M. Text and maps of this application may be examined by interested parties in the County Planning and Zoning Office, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to the public hearing. For additional information contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 5/11/1tc

NOTICE Estate of Denise C. Hedges, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Denise C. Hedges who departed this life on the 12th day of April, A.D. 2006 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Nathan E. Hedges, II on the 28th day of April, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 12th day of December, A.D. 2006 or abide by the law in this behalf.

PAGE 61 Executor: Nathan E. Hedges, II 23419 Hedges Drive Seaford, DE 19973 Attorney: Stephen P. Ellis Sergovic, Ellis & Shirey, P.A. P.O. Box 875 Georgetown, DE 19947 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 5/11/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Leonarda Rosa Bowling, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Leonarda Rosa Bowling who departed this life on the 1st day of April, A.D. 2006 late of Bridgeville, DE were duly granted unto Peter L. Bowling, Francisco M. Bowling on the 28th day of April, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Administrators without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Administrators on or before the 1st day of December, A.D. 2006 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Administrators: Peter L. Bowling 860 Winfield Rd. Petersburg, VA 23803 Francisco M. Bowling P.O. Box 158 Bridgeville, DE 19933 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 5/11/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Helen M. Hammond, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Helen M. Hammond who departed this life on the 17th day of April, A.D. 2006 late of Blades, DE were duly granted unto Shanell Wilson, Derek Hammond on the 28th day of April, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administrators without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administrators on or before the 17th day of December, A.D. 2006 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administrators: Shanell Wilson 26078 Jewett Place Calcium, NY 13616 Derek Hammond 116 E. 56th St. Blades, DE 19973 Howard Clendaniel

Register of Wills 5/11/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Richard S. Moore, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Richard S. Moore who departed this life on the 8th day of April, A.D. 2006 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Kimberly R. Insley on the 19th day of April, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 8th day of December, A.D. 2006 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Kimberly R. Insley 26546 Quantico Creek Rd. Hebron, MD 21830 Attorney: David W. Baker, Esq. 109 South Race St. Georgetown, DE 19947 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 5/4/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Beulah C. Applegate, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Beulah C. Applegate who departed this life on the 4th day of April, A.D. 2006 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Joyce A. Trolian on the 18th day of April, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 4th day of December, A.D. 2006 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Joyce A. Trolian 401 Deborah Dr. Apt.#D Salisbury, MD 21804 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 4/27/3tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of An Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont BouleSee LEGALS—page 62


PAGE 62 LEGALS - from Page 61 vard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, lying on the Easterly side of County Road 510 and being described as follows: Parcel “A” as shown on, and designated on, a survey plat entitled “Survey Parcels Near Delmar' prepared by Gene R. Littleton & Associates, dated July 1996. AND BEING the same lands and premises conveyed unto William E. Savage by deed of David C. Cox and Elizabeth R. Cox, by her attorney-in-fact David C. Cox, dated August 5, 1997 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Deed Book 2225, page 283. Tax Parcel: 5-32-19.0012.19 Property Address: 38031 Horsey Church Road, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 5, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 9, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County.

MORNING STAR Seized and taken in execution the property of WILLIAM E. SAVAGE and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 5/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of an order issued by the Court of Chancery, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN lot, piece or parcel of land lying and being situate in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, and more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a stake at the Northwest intersection of State Highway #501 leading to Laurel with State Highway #502 leading form Delmar to Mardella; thence along the Northerly right-ofway line of State Highway #502 North 75 _ degrees West 210 feet to a stake; thence for a new division line in these lands the following two courses: (a) North 22 degrees East 210 feet to a stake; (b) South 75 _ degrees East 210 feet to a stake in the Westerly right-of-way line of State Highway #501, thence along the Westerly right-ofway line of State Highway #501, South 22 degrees West 210 feet home to the point or place of beginning, containing one (1) acre of land be the same more or less. BEING THE SAME LANDS and premises which Marvin R. Smith and Betty C. Smith, by certain Deed dated the 3rd day of October, A.D., 1973 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 719, page 258, did grant and convey to Marvin Lee Smith and Shirley M. Smith, his wife, (as Tenants by the Entirety, with the Right of Survivorship), in fee. The said Marvin Lee Smith having died on July 18, 1976, the lands and premises passed to Shirley M. Smith, in fee. Tax Parcel: 5-32-19.0024.00 & 24.01 Property Address: 38080 Saint George Road, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid dri-

ver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 5, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Chancery Court on June 9, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of SHIRLEY SMITH RYALL, A/K/A SHIRLEY M. SMITH and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 5/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a Third Pluries writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN lot, piece of parcel of land with the buildings thereon erected, commonly known as 16727 Cedar Corners Rd., Cty. Rt. 638, Bridgeville, Delaware. BEING THE SAME LANDS and premises which James Owings Trustee under the Last Will and Testament of Osbourn Owings by Certain Deed dated the 6th day of January, A.D., 1994 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 1959, page 207, did grant and convey to Samuel E.

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006 Cephas in fee. Tax Parcel: 4-30-17.0048.00 Property Address: 16727 Cedar Corners Road, Bridgeville Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 5, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 9, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of SAMUEL E. & PATRICIA CEPHAS and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 5/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a First Pluries writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece, parcel and tract of land being known as Lot No 14, “Virginia Commons” (Plot Book 70, Page 173), situate in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being more par-

ticularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a pipe found on the Southerly right-of-way line of Robinson Circle (50 foot right-ofway) said point also being a common corner for Lot No. 13; thence with said rightof-way line and a curve to the left having a radius of 75.00 feet, the central angle being 29 degrees 47 minutes 05 seconds, the arc distance being 38.99 feet, the chord bearing South 81 degrees 13 minutes 28 seconds East a distance of 38.55 feet to a pipe found at a common corner of Lot No. 15; thence turning and leaving said right-of-way line and with said Lot No. 15 South 06 degrees 07 minutes 14 seconds East a distance of 158.14 feet to a concrete monument found in the line of lands now or formerly of David R. LaPrad, Jr.; thence turning and with said LaPrad, Jr. lands North 51 degrees 10 minutes 11 seconds West a distance of 96.79 feet to a pipe found in the line of said LaPrad, Jr. lands and a common corner for Lot No. 13; thence turning and with said Lot No. 13 North 11 degrees 17 minutes 06 seconds East a distance of 104.45 feet home to the point and place of beginning said to contain 7,363 square feet of land, be the same more or less, as shown on a survey prepared by Temple-Sellers, Inc. dated May 10, 2004. SUBJECT to the Restrictions filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 1981, Page 288. BEING the same lands and premises which Mary O. Hatcher, be Deed dated May 25, 2004, and recorded in the Office of the Recording of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 2983, Page 329, did grant and convey unto Derek M. Sheets and Monica N. Sheets, in fee. Tax Parcel: 3-31-5.1547.00 Property Address: 28 Robinson Circle, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is

to be paid on or before June 5, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 9, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DEREK M. & MONICA N. SHEETS and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All, that certain tract, piece or parcel of land situated, lying and being in “Westview”, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, more particularly described as follows, to wit: commencing at a stake on the west right-of-way line of Elm Drive at its intersection with the south right-of-way line of Nanticoke Street; thence with the south rightof-way line of Nanticoke Street South 85 degrees 20 minutes West 120 feet to a stake; thence South 0 deSee LEGALS—page 63

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MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 62 grees 2 minutes West 99.8 feet to a concrete marker; thence North 85 degrees 20 minute West 120.7 feet to a stake in the West right-ofway line of Elm Drive; thence with Elm Drive North 0 degrees 2 minutes East 100 feet to a stake; then point and place of beginning, being all of Lot No. 37 and the Northerly 40 feet of Lot No. 39, Section Two, as shown upon a plot of “Westview” as the same now appears of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds at Georgetown, in Deed Book 322, page 600. Being the same lands and premises which William R. Marcotte and Sarah L. Marcottte did grant and convey unto Francis M. Doughty and Miriam S. Doughty by deed dated July 29, 1964 and recorded on July 29, 1964 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 578 Page 198. Tax Parcel: 5-31-13.0513.00 Property Address: 418 Elm Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 5, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 9, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of

FRANCIS M. DOUGHTY and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 5/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Greenwood, County of Sussex and State of Delaware, located on the Southerly side of Governor's Avenue, and more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a pipe found lying on the Southerly right-of-way line of Governors Avenue (36' right-ofway), and being 64.25 feet more or less to Sussex Avenue and being a common boundary line for this land and for lands now or formerly of Victor Dipietro South 17 degrees 22 minutes 07 seconds West 145.06 feet to a pipe found; thence turning and running by and with the Northerly right-of-way line of School Lane (20' right-of-way) North 69 degrees 36 minutes 51 seconds West 64.25 feet to a pipe found; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this land and for lands now or formerly of Jay Donovan North 17 degrees 41 minute 55 seconds East 145.14 feet to a pipe found; thence turning and running by and with the Southerly right-of-way line of Governors Avenue (36' right-of-way) South 69 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds East 63.42 feet home to the place of beginning said to contain 9,250 square feet more or less with improvements thereon as shown on a survey prepared by Temple-Sellers, Inc. dated December 16, 2002. SUBJECT to any and all restrictions, reservations, conditions, easements and agreements of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware. Being the same lands and premises which Duane P. Harris and Noel C. Harris did grant and convey unto Richard L. Cooper by deed dated December 23, 2002 and recorded on December 27, 2002 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of

Delaware, in Deed Book 02787 page 176. Tax Parcel: 5-30-10.1721.00 Property Address: 204 Governors Ave, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 5, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 9, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RICHARD L. COOPER and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 5/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain parcel and tract of land lying and being situate in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being described more particularly: BEGINNING at an iron pipe (set) on the south westerly right-of-way line of

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006 Sussex County Road #544 (40' R/W); said pipe being situate easterly a distance of 1,951 feet, more or less, from the right-of-way Sussex County Road #546; thence with Sussex County Road #544 (40' R/W) South 62 degrees 44 minutes 17 seconds East a distance of 170.00 feet to an iron pipe (found) thence with Lands of Tuong T. & Mal Quan, now or formerly, South 19 degrees 12 minutes 24 seconds West a distance of 258.79 feet to an iron pipe (set); thence with Lands of Edgar B. & Carole M. Snyder, now or formerly, North 62 degrees 44 minutes 17 seconds West a distance of 170.00 feet to an iron pipe (set); thence continuing with the said Snyder Lands North 19 degrees 12 minutes 24 seconds East a distance of 258.79 feet home to the point and place of beginning said to contain 1.0000 acre of land, be the same more or less. Being the same lands and premises which Edgar B. Snyder and Carol M. Snyder did grant and convey unto Ralph W. Hudson, Jr. and Amy L. Hudson by deed dated May 4, 2001 and recorded on May 18, 2001 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 02591 Page 268. Tax Parcel: 3-31-3.00131.01 Property Address: 8010 Hearns Pond Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 5, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 9, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is

PAGE 63 presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of AMY L. & RALPH W. HUDSON, JR. and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 5/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN lot, tract, piece or parcel of land, with the improvements thereon, lying and being situate in the City of Seaford, Sussex County, State of Delaware, lying and being on the North side of Elm Street and adjoining lands now or formerly of Mark S. Hardesty, Jay Holloway and Daniel J. Nelson, lands now or formerly of Jerald S. Smith, and a 20.00 feet wide alley and being known as 616 Elm Street, and being more particularly bounded and described in accordance to a recent survey prepared by Miller-Lewis, Inc., Registered Land Surveyors, dated October 14, 1988, as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a pipe located 21.00 feet from the face of curb on the Northside of Elm Street, said iron pipe marking a corner for the lands herein and lands now or formerly of Mark S. Hardesty, Jay Holloway, and Daniel J. Nelson, and being located 95.73 feet more or less from the centerline of Willey Street; thence along and with the division line between the lands herein and lands know or formerly of Mark S. Hardesty, Jay Holloway and Daniel J. Nelson, North 11 degrees 49 minutes 27 seconds West, a distance of 79.66 feet to a pipe; thence continuing North 11 degrees 49 minutes 27 seconds West, for a distance of 0.10 feet to a nail in post along the line of lands now or formerly of Jerald S. Smith; thence turning and running along and with the division line between the lands herein and lands now or formerly of Jerald S.

Smith, North 77 degrees 56 minutes 34 seconds East for a distance of 74.13 feet to a pipe; thence continuing North 77 degrees 56 minutes 34 seconds East for a distance of 0.22 feet to a point on the Westerly right of way line of a 20.00 feet wide alley, said point marking a corner for the lands herein and lands now or formerly of Jerald S. Smith; thence turning and running along and with the line of lands herein and the Westerly right-of-way line of a 20.00 foot wide alley, South 12 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds East, for a distance of 62.92 feet to a cross mark in drive; thence turning and running along and with the line of lands herein South 65 degrees 13 minutes 48 seconds West for a distance of 76.50 feet to a pipe, being the point and place of Beginning, and said to contain 5,313.00 square feet of land, be the same more or less. BEING the same lands and premises which the Administrator of Veteran Affairs, an Officer of the United States of America, whose address is Veterans Administration, Washington, D.C., 20420, did grant and convey unto Bankers Trust Company of California, N.A., as Trustee for Vendee Mortgage Trust, 1993-2, without recourse, except as provided in a loan sale Agreement dated June 1, 1993, by deed dated June 24, 1993 and recorded on July 14, 1993 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 01922 Page 262. Tax Parcel: 5-31-13.10118.00 Property Address: 616 Elm Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 5, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 9, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, See LEGALS—page 64


PAGE 64

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

Bridgeville Commission discusses town’s comprehensive plan By Mike McClure The Bridgeville Commission was updated on the progress of the planning commission, which is working on the town’s comprehensive plan, during a meeting on Monday, May 8. The commission also discussed the pending budget which will be presented for adoption on June 5. The Bridgeville Planning Commission met last Monday to review minor changes to the town’s comprehensive plan. Town manager Bonnie Walls presented a map of the town and its future growth areas. The plan includes the addition of land to the west of the town as a future growth area. Also included on the map is a 142-acre park which Heritage Shores developers set aside in conjunction with proposed plans for an additional 2,000 homes in the development (another phase). The planning commission will hold a public hearing on Monday, May 22, at 7:30 p.m. It will make recommendations to the Bridgeville Commission which will hold a public hearing to amend, reject, or adopt the plan. The state planning office and state agencies will also review the plan. A budget workshop was slated for Tuesday (May 9) to begin the presentation of LEGALS - from Page 63 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of CHARLES & BARBARA MILLER and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 5/4/wtc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of an Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate lying, and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware and lying on the northwestern right-of-way

the budget. Commission President Joseph Conaway said a meeting would be scheduled (at the budget meeting) to introduce the budget to the public before the Commission votes on adopting it at a June 5 meeting. FIRE AT PARK - Earlier in Monday’s meeting, Conaway announced that there was a fire at a Woodbridge Little League in Bridgeville. According to Conaway, the concession stand and announcer’s booth were engulfed in flames during a league game and were destroyed. Conaway said the town would do “whatever we can do to help them (the league).” CONDEMNED PROPERTY - Commissioner Bill Jefferson presented a dangerous building committee report for a utility shed structure at 15 Oak St. Jefferson said the building’s walls and roof are rotted and there is no floor. The commission voted to condemn the property based on the committee’s recommendation. The owner of the building will be given a chance to speak at a public hearing. VOTING CHANGES - Conaway told the commission that there is legislation

of Sussex County Road #484 (50 feet wide), being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a point, said point being located on the northwestern right-ofway of Sussex County Road #484, said point also being located at a corner of these lands now or formerly of Leon J. and Ruby M. Lyndall, said point also being located 0.35 miles more or less from the intersection of Delaware road #20, and Sussex County road #484; thence turning and running from the aforementioned point by and the Tyndall lands, north 46 37' 43” west 106.00 feet through a concrete monument and five (5) feet to a concrete monument; thence turning and running north 16 59' 46” east 179.45 feet to a concrete monument; thence turning and running by and along the residue of lands of Raymond J. and Mary E. Hitch, south 61 03'06” east 137.03 feet to a concrete monument; thence turning and running by and along the northwestern right-of-way of Sussex County road #484 in a deflection to left, a delta angle of 10 26'30” with a chord distance of 201.98 feet, with a chord bearing of south 28 09'21” west 202.26 feet, home to the place of beginning, and said to contain 0.5275 acres of land, be the same more or less, as surveyed by Donald K. Miller, Registered Surveyor, on October 6, 1992. BEING the same lands and premises Raymond J Hitch, Jr. and Stacey L

Reynolds n/k/a Stacey L Hitch, did grant and convey unto Raymond J Hitch, Jr. and Stacey L. Hitch, husband and wife, by deed dated February 18, 1998 and recorded on February 23, 1998 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 02267, Page 243. Tax Parcel: 2-31-17.0064.01 Property Address: RR 2, Box 350AA, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 5, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 9, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at

proposed to change how all municipalities in the state vote. Under the legislation residents would have to bring in a utility or telephone bill to prove residency. Conaway called it a “license to steal.” He said the town could have residents sign an affidavit saying they are who they say they are. Conaway said the town is also looking at changing from at-large commission seats to districts. He pointed out that three of the five commissioners currently live on the same block. The town will have five districts based on population, Conaway said. POLICE TRAINING - Conaway also said the Sussex County Association of Towns (SCAT) has endorsed proposed legislation that would allow certified officers from other states and military officers to take a course lasting four weeks or less (on Delaware law) to become a certified officer in Delaware. Officers certified in other states or through the military currently have to go through the state’s police academy in order to be certified police officers in Delaware. He said the organization also discussed the possibility of Sussex County having its own police academy. Conway also said towns are not receivthe time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of STACEY L. & RAYMOND J. HITCH, JR. and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 5/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of an Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, tract, piece of parcel of land situate, lying on the South side of the State Highway leading from Laurel to Georgetown, and on the West side of County Road No. 474, more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument in the Southerly side of the State Highway leading from Laurel to Georgetown, now known as U.S. Route 9 formerly Delaware Route 28, where the said Southerly side of said State Highway

ing state funding when their officers are leaving their town to provide assistance to another town. Bridgeville did receive a $25,000 grant from the county to purchase a police car. Sussex County contributes money to provide 28 additional state policemen in Sussex County. Conaway said towns need to be reimbursed, possibly reducing the amount of state police officers needed. He added that such a plan would mean larger patrol areas and more men needed for towns that choose to extend their patrol areas. FLU PLANS - In other business, Conaway suggested that the town provide a list of things residents need in the event that the Avian Flu breaks out in the area and has an affect on humans, causing trucks to cease delivery to area grocery stores. Conaway asked Walls to send the list and a town cover letter to the town’s businesses advising them to be prepared just in case an outbreak occurs. MEMORIAL DAY - The town’s Memorial Day celebration will take place on Monday, May 29, at 9:30 a.m. at the Bridgeville Veteran’s Memorial Cemetery.

leading from Laurel to Georgetown, Interests the Westerly side of County Road 474; thence along the Westerly right of way of County Road No. 474 South 32 47' East 283.52 feet to a concrete monument in the right of way of said County Road No. 474, and lands now or formerly of Minnie R. Culver; thence along a line between this lot and lands now or formerly of Minnie R. Culver, S 57 07' W 155.86 feet to an iron pipe set one foot below the surface; thence N 33 11' 00” West 304.17 feet to a concrete monument in the Southerly right of way of State Highway leading from Laurel to Georgetown; thence along the Southerly right of way of said State Highway leading from Laurel to Georgetown N 64 34' E 158.78 feet home to the place of beginning, said to contain 1.0567 acres of land, more or less. BEING the same lands and premised which G. Brent Culver and Monica R. Culver Morris and Larry Morris did grant and convey unto Leonard J. Griffin and Barbara J. Griffin by deed dated November 13, 1980 and recorded on November 13, 1980 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 1034 Page 129. Tax Parcel: 2-32-1.001.00 Property Address: 28046 Dukes Lumber Road a/k/a Rt. 1, Box 127, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check

payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before June 5, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on June 9, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LEONARD J. & BARBARA J. GRIFFIN and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 5/4/2tc


MORNING STAR

âœł MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 65

COMMUNITY SNAPSHOTS

EASTER PARADE - Students at Wee Learner Christian Prepschool, Seaford, decorated Easter hats and bonnets in class and paraded for their families. Following the parade, an Easter Egg hunt was held at the school. From left are Jacob Larson, Ronnie Pleasants and Avery Morris.

HONEY BUNNIES - Showing the cotton Easter bunnies they made in class at Wee Learner Christian Prepschool, Seaford, are from left, Kennedy Harpool, Ciera Benjamin and Alissa Mercie.

AT THE PROM - Mike DiMarco and Julieanna Moore pose for a photograph in their prom finery during the Seaford High School prom on April 29. The Grand March took place at the high school and the prom was at the Seaford Fire Hall. Photos by David Elliott

SPRING RECITAL - Karen Baker’s Seaford Dance and Fitness Studio had its annual spring recital at Delaware Tech Theater on Thursday, April 13. Pictured are some of the dancers, back row from left: Olivia Kane, Gabrielle Hastings, Sydney Beard, Megan Bradley; front row from left, Kayla Booros, and Jenna Beard.

Erik Mulford and Charley Wilkerson at the Seaford High prom

Myron Thomas and Amanda Bowden are dressed up as they attend the Seaford High prom.


PAGE 66

MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

Opinion Not really a company town

VIEWPOINT Impact of war hits home with loss of Seaford Marine Cory Palmer The impact of the war in Iraq hit home again with the loss of another young person. Cory Palmer, the 21-year-old son of Charles and Danna Palmer, died this past weekend from wounds he suffered in a vehicle bombing. We see the casualty numbers (over 2,400 now) and hear the daily news reports of attacks on members of the U.S. military in Iraq and Afghanistan, but we forget that numerous families in this area have loved ones in harms way. We become desensitized to the impact of the war. Families with people serving in the military are always on alert as they deal with the reality of war on a daily basis. We can’t begin to imagine the pain the families suffer. Cory Palmer found a home in the U.S. Marines and was not shy to talk about his devotion to the principles of the Marines and the importance of fighting terrorism. Cory was the best of the best, a young man willing to put his life on the line for his country. We offer our sincere condolences to the Palmer and Swain families on the loss of their loved one. Cory Palmer, a dedicated U.S. Marine serving his second tour of duty in Iraq, gave the ultimate sacrifice. PHOTO OF THE WEEK

FIRST PITCH - Nanticoke Little League umpire Robert Davis throws out the first pitch during the league’s opening ceremony on Saturday morning. Davis, a veteran umpire, announced his retirement, but agreed to help out when needed this season. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

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I had an interesting conversation with a lifelong Milton resident over the weekend. He played sports at the old Milton High School, had a lot of pre-consolidation memories and could still recall many Seaford and Bridgeville athletes of the past. One of the things that he told me really set off the thought process. “When we came to Seaford to play, we really thought we were going somewhere,” he said. “Seaford was the leader in everything, and everyone else was following what they did,” he added. I asked what he thought of Seaford today, and his impression is probably what most non-area residents think. He said that because of the loss of DuPont the town has fallen from the stature it once enjoyed. The loss of DuPont — that is a big statement for a town called the “Nylon Capital of the World.” Think back to Seaford in the 1930s. It was primarily a sleepy town dependent on farming — not unlike any other small town in rural Sussex County. Then an event took place that changed Seaford forever — the announcement that the DuPont Co. was building its first nylon plant along the shores of the Nanticoke River. During the construction phase in 1938-39, the town began to transform in ways that most people never anticipated. It wasn’t long before new housing was being constructed for the onslaught of people coming to work at the new plant. Changes had to be made in the way the city was run to keep pace with the growth. Almost overnight, the size of the city doubled. Seaford became the focal point of the area for shopping, employment and the social life with the opening of the Seaford Golf & Country Club in 1941 — a club built by and supported by DuPont. It was one of the first country clubs to open in southern Delaware. The plant prospered and grew and at one point as many as 5,000 went to work there daily (including subcontractors). During shift changes, the town was overwhelmed with traffic coming and going to the plant. Police officers had to man key intersections to keep the traffic moving. DuPont employees became leaders in the town as members of the school board and city council. They spearheaded fund drives, built churches and new upscale housing President Bryant Richardson Vice President Pat Murphy Secretary Tina Reaser

Treasurer Carol Wright Richardson Executive Editor Ronald MacArthur

Managing Editor Mike McClure Editorial Lynn Parks Tony Windsor Kay Wennberg Cindy Lyons Taylor Circulation Karen Cherrix

developments were created inside city limits ONALD AC RTHUR and outside of town. Because of the plant, the Nylon Capital Shop- The loss of DuPont — ping Center became one that is a big statement of the first shopping centers in southern for a town called the Delaware and was a “Nylon Capital of the magnet for people from all over the area. Other World.” businesses started up and prospered thanks to the growth. Stein Highway became a strong graduate, with little or no special commercial zone. training, can go to work making a The money was flowing as the dewage double (or more) the average mand for DuPont nylon was growing. wage in the area. Thousands upon Seaford became the town with one thousands of people in and around of the first community pools when Seaford had good lives and continued members of the Jaycees raised monto prosper in their retirement because ey to build a pool behind the shopof their jobs at the Seaford DuPont ping center. Most of the Jaycees were Plant. DuPont employees. The schools have also been hurt Newcomers came to the area and with the loss of many good students called Seaford their home. They from those professional families who came from all corners of the United placed a high emphasis on education. States (and beyond) and they brought Even with the loss of jobs, the new ideas. Many of the people who community didn’t put up a “closed” came to work at DuPont were colsign and shut the doors. Seaford, a lege-educated professionals who progressive city, is still the commerwere working as engineers or recial, entertainment and social center searchers at the plant. for the area. Many of their children became the One of the city’s industrial parks top students and athletes at Seaford is filled and work on the second park High School. (Ross Business Park) is under way. The impact of the DuPont plant The downtown has gone through a on Seaford continued to be strong revitalization with a beautiful from 1939 to the late 1980s when streetscape project and a new city global competition began to erode hall; a riverwalk has been constructthe company’s market share in the ed along the Nanticoke; the Seaford nylon business. Layoffs, early retireSports Complex (with construction of ments and transfers became the catch new fields under way) is the envy of words of the day as the plant began a any small town in America; more long process to downsize throughout than a dozen housing projects (with the 1990s. more on the way) are in the works; By the start of the new century, it the U.S. 13 commercial zone is vibecame obvious that the plant would brant and growing by leaps and either close or be sold. DuPont startbounds. ed pulling up stakes in Seaford. They City leaders have never looked sold the country club to the members back as they take Seaford into the (and who would have predicted that post-DuPont era. Those leaders have the country club and DuPont would worked hard to lessen the impact. end up in court in a fight over land The city was named as the 28th use). best small city in the United States The slogan, “Nylon Capital of the — even without the major impact of World,” has been replaced with the DuPont plant playing a role. “Rich in history — focused on the For the better part of six decades, future.” Seaford was, for lack of a better Today, about 500 people work at term, a company town. The plant’s the Invista plant owned by Koch Insmokestack cast a very long shadow dustries, Inc. on the town. Of course, the loss of thousands But because of the ingenuity of its of high-paying jobs (with great benepeople and strong leadership, the fits) is the biggest loss to the area. company town did not become a Gone are the days that a high-school ghost town.

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Sales George Beauchamp Barbara Conn Rick Cullen Carole Kauffman Jimmy McWilliams Debbie Bell Composition Rita Brex Catherine Doyle

Laurel Star Advisory Board Dale Boyce Sandy Davis Toni Gootee H. Robert Hickman Jane Hudson Linda Justice Albert Jones Kendal Jones Mike Lambert

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Edward Cranston Mike Hall Nancy Harper John Hollis Karen Johnston Jan Lundquist Ron Marvel John Rittenhouse Bill Royal Steve Theis Layton Wheeler

Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR

✳ MAY 11 - 17, 2006

PAGE 67

Seven-Day forecast for Western Sussex County Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Tides Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Low 8:15 a 8:54 a 9:33 a 10:12 a 10:54 a 11:39 a 12:28 p

High 1:43 p 2:22 p 3:01 p 3:40 p 4:22 p 5:06 p 5:55 p

Low 8:04 p 8:42 p 9:21 p 10:02 p 10:47 p 11:35 p —-

Sharptown, MD Shown is Thursday’s weather. High Low Temperatures are Thursday’s highs Day and Thursday night’s lows. Thurs. 4:41 a 11:08 a Fri. 5:19 a 11:47 a Sat. 5:56 a 12:26 p Sun. 6:35 a 12:14 a Mon. 7:15 a 12:55 a Tues. 7:59 a 1:40 a Wed. 8:46 a 2:28 a

High 5:02 p 5:41 p 6:20 p 6:59 p 7:41 p 8:25 p 9:14 p

Low 10:57 p 11:35 p —1:05 p 1:47 p 2:32 p 3:21 p

High 4:24 p 5:03 p 5:42 p 6:21 p 7:03 p 7:47 p 8:36 p

Low 10:19 p 10:57 p 11:36 p —1:09 p 1:54 p 2:43 p

Cooler with periods of rain

Chance of a shower

Chance of a shower

A thundershower possible

Mostly cloudy, a shower possible

Cloudy with rain possible

Chance for rain or drizzle

68/55

68/50

70/49

68/50

69/48

66/45

65/44

Almanac Statistics through Tuesday May 9 at Georgetown, Delaware

Temperatures

Precipitation

High for the week . . . . . . . . . . . Low for the week . . . . . . . . . . . Normal high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Normal low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Average temperature . . . . . . . .

. 86° . 48° . 70° . 47° 63.6°

Total for the week . . Total for the month . . Normal for the month Total for the year . . .

. . . .

. . . .

. . . .

. . . .

. . . .

. . . .

. . . .

. . . .

0.15” 0.15” 0.96” 8.30”

Smyrna 65/54 Dover 64/55

Apogee and Perigee

Date May 22 June 3 June 16 July 1

Time 11:30 a.m. 9:42 p.m. 1:09 p.m. 4:14 p.m.

Perigee Apogee Perigee Apogee

Date July 13 July 29 August 10 August 25

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

Rise .5:54 a.m. .5:54 a.m. .5:53 a.m. .5:52 a.m. .5:51 a.m. .5:50 a.m. .5:49 a.m.

Full May 13

Harrington 66/55

Time 1:36 p.m. 9:03 a.m. 2:29 p.m. 9:24 p.m.

Milford 66/55 Greenwood 67/54

Lewes 66/57

Bridgeville 68/55

Sun and Moon Sun Thursday . Friday . . . . Saturday . . Sunday . . . Monday . . Tuesday . . Wednesday

. . . . . . .

Set .8:04 p.m. .8:05 p.m. .8:05 p.m. .8:06 p.m. .8:07 p.m. .8:08 p.m. .8:09 p.m.

Last May 20

Day Thurs. Fri. Sat. Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed.

High 1:22 a 2:00 a 2:37 a 3:16 a 3:56 a 4:40 a 5:27 a

Vienna, MD

The moon, and its relative distance to the Earth, affects tides on a monthly basis. When the moon is farthest from the Earth (apogee), tides of decreased range or currents of decreased speed occur. When the moon is closest to the Earth (perigee), the occurrence of increased range or currents of speed is more prevalent.

Perigee Apogee Perigee Apogee

Nanticoke River Roaring Point, MD

Moon Rise Thursday . . . .6:47 p.m. Friday . . . . . . .7:53 p.m. Saturday . . . . .9:01 p.m. Sunday . . . . .10:09 p.m. Monday . . . . .11:13 p.m. Tuesday . . . . . . . . .none Wednesday . .12:09 a.m.

. . . . . . .

Set .4:46 a.m. .5:12 a.m. .5:43 a.m. .6:21 a.m. .7:09 a.m. .8:07 a.m. .9:14 a.m.

New May 27

Rehoboth Beach 67/58

SEAFORD 68/55 Blades 68/55

Georgetown 69/55 Concord 68/55 Laurel 68/56 Delmar 68/54

Millsboro 68/55

Bethany Beach 65/58 Fenwick Island 65/57

First June 3

2 Great Lifestyle Choices from

The Village of Cinderberry Where dreams really do come true!

Day Thurs. Fri. Sat. Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed.

High 4:03 a 4:41 a 5:18 a 5:57 a 6:37 a 7:21 a 8:08 a

Low 10:30 a 11:09 a 11:48 a 12:27 p 12:17 a 1:02 a 1:50 a

Rehoboth Beach Day High Low High Thurs. 6:09 a 12:08 a 6:29 p Fri. 6:50 a 12:50 a 7:10 p Sat. 7:32 a 1:31 a 7:52 p Sun. 8:14 a 2:14 a 8:36 p Mon. 8:58 a 2:58 a 9:21 p Tues. 9:43 a 3:46 a 10:09 p Wed. 10:32 a 4:37 a 11:01 p

Low 12:03 p 12:42 p 1:21 p 2:02 p 2:45 p 3:32 p 4:25 p

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2006

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May 11, 2006_S