Page 1

THURSDAY, AUgUST 6, 2009

vol. 14 No. 16

50 cents

News Eastern Shore

AFRAM Festival Coverage begins on page 19

FRENCH FRIES - Jeff Fuller and Mike Ruggiero are developing the first commercially-viable french fry vending machine. Page 8 CAMPOUT - Relatives of members of the 262nd component repair company of the National Guard, activated in May and deployed Friday, July 17, were treated to a campout at Trap Pond. Page 14 TRIBUTE - Gov. Jack Markell kicked off his first Governor’s Day at the Delaware State Fair by honoring the late Senate President Pro Tem Thurman Adams Jr. by signing the Bridgeville Democrat’s final bill into law. Page 60

Sports NEw COACH - Former Laurel coach Ed Manlove is the new Woodbridge head coach. See full story on page 45.

REAdy FOR SERvICE - The Tina Fallon, Woodland’s newest ferry, will be back in service today (Thursday) if she passes inspection by the U.S. Coast Guard. The Tina Fallon was put into service last fall, but has been unable to operate due to mechanical and other problems. The annual Woodland Ferry Festival is scheduled for the second Saturday in September and organizers are hoping the ferry stays in ship-shape for this special occasion. Photo by Phil Livingston

GOING TO CONNECTICUT The Woodbridge Junior League all-star softball team will begin Eastern Regional play on Friday after winning the state championship last week. Page 45

Joe Booth wins Special Election

Ed Manlove

Index Ask the Doc Bulletin BoArD Business church clAssifieDs eDucAtion entertAinment finAl WorD GAs lines Gourmet heAlth

17 23 6 26 35 58 18 63 54 55 16

letters lynn PArks movies oBituAries PAt murPhy PeoPle Police JournAl Puzzles sPorts tiDes tony WinDsor

62 42 7 27 30 52 54 51 39 7 57

State Representative Joe Booth won the Special Election Monday for the state Senate seat of the late Thurman Adams Jr. Total vote breakdown is as follows: Joseph W. Booth, 4,335 Polly Adams Mervine, 2085 Matthew A. Opaliski, 408 Gwendolyn M. Jones, 56 Booth was elected to the Delaware State House of Representatives in 2002 and is serving his fourth two-year term. Booth is a lifelong resident of Sussex County. His family residency goes back 300 years. His grandfather served in the Senate in the 1930s. Owner and operator of Thoro-Kleen Dry Cleaning Inc., Booth has served as a town councilman and mayor of Georgetown and on the Indian River School Board. He said Thurman Adams, the person whose seat he will be taking, was a political giant in the Delaware landscape. “Delaware will miss him,” he said. A special election will now have to be held in the 37th Representative District to fill Booth’s seat in the House.

wORk ETHIC - Shirley Bowden, the mother of nine, worked the 11 to 7 shift to make money “while my kids were sleeping.” Bowden celebrated her 74th birthday on Monday. A couple of weeks earlier, co-workers at the Methodist Manor House in Seaford held a surprise party to mark her 40th year as a licensed practical nurse with the continuing care facility. “I don’t have any plans to retire,” she says. See article on page 43. Photo by Lynn Parks


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STAR • AUGUST 6-12, 2009

PAGE 3

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Sussex County Supply Campaign for 2009 begins With poverty levels at 60 percent and up, there are many children in need of the basics or the start of the school year. St. John’s U.M. Church started the Sussex County School Supply Campaign in 2001 to address this need. This is the eighth year or this project, and donations have more than tripled since its inception. Our hope is that the program will spread throughout Delaware and beyond! The need is greater this year than ever before. With many communities participating, however, and everyone working together, the need can be met. Most important; supplies collected for your community stay in your community. Example of how the program works St. John’s UMC in Seaford has worked together with seven or more churches the past few years to collect school supplies. In 2008, we were blessed with $3,800 worth of supplies for eight schools in the Seaford School District and the Mission of Hope classes. Supplies were brought to St. John’s by participating churches by the closing date of the campaign, to be divided and boxed for the schools to be served. School personnel then picked up the supplies, and they were distributed to qualified students by their own guidance counselors. This method should work for any community. St. John’s 2009 closing date is Aug. 16. Packing will be done on Monday, Aug. 17. For more information, call Ruth Rhoades at 629-0789, or write in care of St. John’s U.M. Church, P.O. Box 299, Seaford, DE 19973. School Supply List Crayons (16-24 count); markers; ball-point pens (black, blue, red); rubber erasers; glue sticks; blunt scissors; #2 pencils; colored pencils; hi-liters; spiral notebooks (single); composition books; zippered pencil cases / pencil boxes; binders — 1-1/2 inch, red, blue, black & green; large bags of cough drops; notebook dividers; notebook binder paper, reinforcements; pocket folders with fasteners – 3 prongs; 12-inch wooden rulers; inexpensive calculators; Kleenex tissues (large box for classroom) & Pocket Size tissues; paper towels; box of Ziploc bags (quart, sandwich, snack); protractors (for middle school students).

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PAGE 4

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

Teen Challenge in Seaford receives national honor By Carol Kinsley

Inspectors from the national office visited Delaware Teen Challenge in Seaford recently to go through files and check to see that the local affiliate meets all fire, OSHA, safety and food service codes. Delaware Teen Challenge passed with flying colors, reported Executive Director Bob Carey, who displayed a certificate stating the facility is in full compliance with Teen Challenge U.S.A. standards and is accredited with honors as a long-term residential center for three years. Carey said the facility scored 97 out of 100 possible points and is one of only a few facilities in the country to ever score that high within the first year of operation. Pastor Doug Lance, accreditation manager, wrote, “Your program, in achieving the Honors rating, is a symbol of excellence both in your community and in the broader community of Teen Challenges throughout the country.” Quoting Second Corinthians 8:21, he added, “For we are taking pains to do what is right, not only in the eyes of the Lord but also in the eyes of men.” Carey explained that as an affiliate of Teen Challenge USA, the facility must meet certain criteria, follow standards of

ethical practice and demonstrate integrity of files and fiscal management. All this, “as well as careful attention to our students’ needs,” he said. Carey attributed the high score to the fine staff and board of directors that surround him, and having gone through the program himself in 1992. “I learned the importance of doing things with excellence and learned, as a student of Teen Challenge, to give God the glory in everything we do,” he said. “My hope is that the people of the community and the state of Delaware will see a viable faith-based solution to help men with life-controlling issues.” Sixteen men have graduated from the program since it opened in November 2008, taking over the facility of the former Seaford Mission. Fifteen are currently enrolled. The first two graduates will be returning from an additional year of training in Detroit at the end of October; Mark Geniese to pursue gainful employment and Tony Pate to enter the internship program at Delaware Teen Challenge. Carey noted that four crack houses in the neighborhood of Third and North Streets had been closed down in recent months. Delaware Teen Challenge plans to open an adult women’s center on the site of the existing campus within the next

MURAL MOVES - Howard E. Hardesty, president of the Bridgeville Historical Society presented a check for $2,000 to Karen Johnson, director of the Bridgeville Public Library, on Thursday, July 23, to cover most of the expenses of moving the Jack Lewis “Storybook” mural from the old library to the new Bridgeville Public Library on South Cannon Street. Lewis painted the mural in 1976.

Seaford Star

Published by Morning Star Publications Inc.

951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243 The Seaford Star (USPS #016-428) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 951 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Seaford, DE. Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown, and Federalsburg, Maryland; $29 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Seaford Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

Laurel Star Planning A Wedding?

951 Norman Highway 951 Stop bySeaford, theEskridge DE 19973 Norman (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243 Eskridge Star office The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is Highway Published by Morning Star Publications Inc.

published weekly by Morning Star Seaford Publications Inc., 951 Norman Eskridge 302 629.9788Seaford, DE 19973. Highway, Periodicals postage paid at Seaford, DE. Pick Up Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent and New Castle A FREE Counties, Delaware, Delmar, SharpcopyandofFederalsburg, Maryland; $29 town the Stars’Postmaster: Send address elsewhere. changes to Laurel Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000. RIDAL LANNER

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Executive Director Robert Carey displays the certificate of accreditation that Delaware Teen Challenge recently received from Teen Challenge U.S.A. The local affiliate scored 97 out of 100, one of only a few facilities in the country to ever score that high in the first year. Photo by Carol Kinsley

two years. The Nehemiah House across the people,” Carey said. “We look forward to street, which will be finished by fall, will serving Seaford and the surrounding combe used to house Delaware Teen Challenge munity with integrity and love.” graduates and disenfranchised families of The facility is open for tours by individuals or groups on Thursdays from 7 to local churches who need short-term hous8 p.m. through the end of September. To ing. arrange for the tour, hors d’oeuvres and “We’ve also acquired land for a proa brief presentation, call Sue Bramble at posed education facility, cafeteria and chaCSA-9166-A02F AD1 5x6.25 7/24/09 5:23 PM Page 1 629-2559. pel which will accommodate 200 to 300

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MORNING STAR • AuGuST 6 - 12, 2009

PAGE 5

DNREC holds annual awards ceremony at State Fair The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control’s annual awards ceremony was held at the Delaware State Fair recently with special guest Governor Jack Markell. Winners were honored from three annual DNREC competitions – the Kids for Conservation Poster Contest, the Youth Fishing Tournament and the Young Environmentalist of the Year Awards. The Kids for Conservation Poster Contest invited Delaware students in grades K through 12 statewide to combine artistic talent with their thoughts on conservation to create posters based on this year’s theme, “Color Your Footprint Green.” Through artwork, a catchy slogan and a short conservation message, posters emphasized how students and their families can take action to reduce their environmental impact on their community and our natural environment. First place winners were: grades K-1 first grader Autumn Davis of Lewes; 2-3 – third grader Furkan Kose of Newark; 4-6 – sixth grader Michelle Sanchez of Seaford; and 7-9 - seventh grader James Wilson of New Castle. James also won best in show for his colorful and creative Incredible Hulk-themed work. The four winners were presented with ribbons, certificates and special “green” prize packages at the ceremony. Second and third place winners, who also will receive prizes, are:

Second place: K-1 – kindergartener McKenna Breeding of Felton; 2-3 – second grader Leslie Webb of Greenwood; 4-6 – sixth grader Tuyet-kha Thi Nguyen of Georgetown; and 7-9 – eighth grader Elizabeth Biddle of Townsend. Third place: K-1 – first grader Yusuf Kose of Newark; 2-3 – second grader Riley Tracy of Wyoming; 4-6 – fourth grader Drew Harris of Harrington; and 7-9 – eighth grader Melanie Litten of Newark. The Division of Fish and Wildlife held its Annual Youth Fishing Tournament on June 6, drawing nearly 350 young anglers to three sites - Lums Pond in New Castle County, Wyoming Pond in Kent County and Ingrams Pond in Sussex County. The three county winners were presented with trophies and prizes. Danny Blaasch, 11, of Middletown, was this year’s New Castle County and overall statewide winner with two large carp weighing a total of 12.54 pounds. R.J. Degano, 12, of Magnolia, took top honors in Kent County and second place statewide with 4.04 pounds of fish including a Citation-sized bluegill weighing 1.05 pounds. Julia Ballard, 6, of Millsboro, took home the trophy for Sussex County and third place statewide with 3.8 pounds of fish. Governor Markell also signed a proclamation declaring Saturday, Sept. 26, National Hunting and Fishing Day.

Michelle Sanchez of Seaford won first place in the grade 4-6 category for DNREC’s Kids for Conservation Poster Contest.

The 2009 Young Environmentalist of the Year Awards were presented to Samuel Piascik, 17, of Dover, high school winner; Matthew Nickle, 14, of Viola, middle school winner; and Yusuf Kose, 7, of Newark, elementary school winner. Established in 1993 in honor of former DNREC Secretary Dr. Edwin H. Clark II, the Young Environmentalist of the Year Awards are presented annually to Dela-

ware students who have worked to protect, restore or enhance our state’s natural resources through environmental stewardship, innovative projects and promoting public awareness. Nominations for next year’s awards will be accepted in May 2010. For more information on the program, call Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-7399902.


PAGE 6

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

Business Briefs Turner joins bank board

Edward M. Thomas, president of The Bank of Delmarva, has announced the election of Jeffrey F. Turner to the Bank’s board of directors. Turner was also elected a director of the Bank’s holding company, Delmar Bancorp and will serve on the board’s Loan committee. Turner has been an active member of Jeff Turner the region’s banking community for 35 years. Most recently, he served as president and CEO of Mercantile Peninsula Bank, a $1.4 billion community bank, which was acquired by PNC. A Salisbury, Md. native, Turner, and his wife Dottie, reside in Chance, Md. They have two children and three grandchildren.

King participates in program

Ruth Briggs King, executive vice president of the Sussex County Association of Realtors, recently joined 68 women from around the world in completing the 2009 Women’s Campaign School at Yale, the nation’s premier five-day campaign school for women. There were students from the United States, Afghanistan, Somaliland, Sudan, Kenya, SloRuth Briggs King vakia and Russia. Founded in 1993, the Women’s Campaign School at Yale is a non-profit, non-partisan, issue neutral political campaign training program. The school is designed to train women for political campaigns and to advance their careers in public service. Participants were chosen as leaders capable of building relationships regardless of political pointof-view.

AAA CEO retires

AAA Mid-Atlantic announces the retirement of its executive chairman and former chief executive officer, Allen J. DeWalle, after 45 years of service. As of Aug. 1, DeWalle will serve as chairman of the AAA Mid-Atlantic Board and AAA Club Partners. Throughout more than four decades, DeWalle held various management positions with AAA Iowa, AAA Nebraska and AAA Virginia and AAA Mid-Atlantic, which employs more than 2,700 associates in Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia. DeWalle has orchestrated three mergers and the acquisition of an AAA-affiliate organization as well as founded AAA Club Partners, an auto club holding company, which has doubled AAA Mid-Atlantic’s membership to almost 5.5 million members. DeWalle’s career with AAA began in the mailroom at AAA Iowa in 1964, where he has said, “it’s amazing how much you learn about

a company if you just pay attention.” In 1969, DeWalle volunteered to learn about a new device called a “computer” and became the organization’s first ever manager of Data Processing. He then moved to Omaha, Neb. where he helped to automate AAA Nebraska spending several years at the helm of Information Technology, eventually spinning off the department to a separate company and building the largest computer service bureau in the Midwest, which is still operating today as a software development company. Upon his retirement, DeWalle and his wife, Nancy will split their time between Wilmington and Williamsburg, Va.

Law to prevent workforce fraud

Governor Jack A. Markell has signed landmark legislation that will prevent workforce fraud in the construction services industry. House Substitute 1 for House Bill 230, sponsored by House Speaker Rep. Robert F. Gilligan, D-Sherwood Park, will allow the state Department of Labor to hold construction businesses accountable and ensure that they are following the letter of the law and contributing to the state’s unemployment insurance, workers’ compensation and state withholding funds. Rep. Gilligan said the legislation will level the playing field for all construction businesses in the state and will protect law-abiding companies.

Bill passed to help post office

The Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee has passed legislation to help address the dire financial situation facing the United States Postal Service. The Postal Service Retiree Health Benefits Funding Reform Act of 2009, S. 1507, was introduced by Subcommittee on Federal Financial Management, Government Information, Federal Services, and International Security Chairman Tom Carper, D-Del., and co-sponsored by full committee Chairman Joe Lieberman, ID-Conn. It passed by a vote of 11-1. Recently, Postmaster General Jack Potter and Postal Service Board of Governors Chairman Carolyn Gallagher notified Congress and officials at the Treasury Department that the Postal Service will not make its $5.4 billion retiree health, pre-funding payment by Sept. 30, as required by law. The bill also gives the postal service more borrowing authority to meet its financial obligations and get through this current fiscal year and next. The Postal Service expects mail volume to be roughly 175 billion pieces this fiscal year, a decline of 38 billion pieces since 2007. The Postal Service is also projecting a loss of $7.1 billion in FY 2009 despite its success in working toward $6.1 billion in cost cutting in one year. Sen. Carper hopes this bill will be enacted into law before Congress adjourns in August.

State changes payment system

Governor Jack Markell has announced reforms in the way the State of Delaware pays its vendors, reimburses state employees and tracks state credit card usage. The new reforms consist of the following: • Reimbursements made to state employees will be paid by direct deposit. When fully implemented, this will eliminate up to 50,000 checks per year. • The top 10 vendors that have been identified as receiving multiple checks per day from the State will be paid via credit card or electronic fund transfer when possible. This will reduce the production of up to 28,000 checks a year. • Payments to the next 300 vendors will be transitioned in batches over the next year to either electronic fund transfers or the state credit card. If the vendor can only process checks, then state agencies will combine their expenditures and make single consolidated payments. This move will eliminate up to 36,000 checks. • The implementation of new systems to reconcile and monitor credit card usage by state employees, reduce the number of cards in circulation and review internal controls and cardholder agreements at each agency. By moving the top 10 vendors to credit card payments instead of checks, as much $600,000 could be added to state coffers.

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PAGE 7

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

MO V I E S

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 8/7 THRU THURSDAY, 8/13 (500) Days of Summer . . . PG13 . . (Midnight Screening 8/6 12:50, 3:05, 5:05, 7:10, 9:20 G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . (Midnight Screening 8/6 1:35, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 Juie & Julia . . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . (Midnight Screening 8/6 1:30, 4:00, 6:35, 9:10 A Perfect Getaway . . . . . . R . . . . . . (Midnight Screening 8/6 1:00, 3:05, 5:10, 7:25, 9:35 Funny People . . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:20, 4:10, 7:00, 9:50 The Collector . . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:35, 9:45 Aliens in the Attic . . . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:50, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00 G-Force (Digital 3D) . . . . . PG . . . . . . 1:05, 3:50, 6:20, 8:35 (not 3D) 1:40, 4:30 The Ugly Truth . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:00, 3:10, 5:15, 7:20, 9:30 The Orphan . . . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:25, 4:05, 7:05, 9:35 Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince . . . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:40, 3:45, 6:50, 9:50 Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs. . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . .(Digital 3D)1:10, 4:05, 6:35, 8:50 Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:45, 6:45 The Proposal . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:40, 9:05 The Hangover. . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 9:40 Ponyo, The Goods: Live Hard, Sell Hard. . . . . . . . . . . Midnight Screening 8/13

all shows subject to change and availability

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 8/7

G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:00, 1:05, 2:00, 2:40, 3:55, 4:50, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:30, 6:50, 7:40, 8:30, 9:40, 10:30 Julie & Julia . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:15, 4:15, 7:30, 10:20 A Perfect Getaway . . .R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:40, 3:00, 5:25, 7:50, 10:10 Aliens in the Attic . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:25, 2:50, 5:05, 7:25, 9:35 The Collector . . . . . . .R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:55, 3:10, 5:30, 8:00, 10:10 Funny People . . . . . . .R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:20, 1:00, 3:25, 4:10, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:40, 7:20, 9:50, 10:25 G-Force . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:30, 2:45, 5:00 G-Force Disney Digital 3D . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:55 am, 2:15, 4:30, 7:00, 9:15 Orphan . . . . . . . . . . . .R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:10, 9:55 The Ugly Truth . . . . . .R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:35, 5:15, 7:45, 10:05 (OC) 12:10 Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:15, 3:30, 6:45, 10:00 Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:05, 2.:30, 4:45 Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:35, 3:50, 7:05, 10:15 OC = Open Captioned For additional dates and showtimes go to www.fandango.com/21804_movietheatershowtimes

TIDE CHART 08/07 08/08 08/09 08/10

SHARPTOWN

L-12:35A L-1:12A L-1:51A L-2:30A

H-6:47A H-7:20A H-7:53A H-8:27A

L-1:04P L-1:36P L-2:08P L-2:42P

08/11 L-3:13A H-9:04A L-3:20P 08/12 L-4:01A H-9:46A L-4:03P 08/13 L-4:55A H-10:35A L-4:53P

H-7:09P H-7:44P H-8:19P H-8:56P

H-9:37P H-10:22P H-11:16P

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Open 7 p.m. - Closed Sundays Corner of Rt. 313 & Rt. 348, Sharptown

Congratulations On Ladies Auxiliary’s 60th Anniversary Oyster Sandwiches, Crab Cakes, Ice Cream Cones, Funnel Cakes, Soft Crabs, Homemade Hamburgers, French Fries, Candy Apples,

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PAGE 8

MORNING STAR • AuGuST 6 - 12, 2009

Fry machine business could employ hundreds By Lynn R. Parks Americans love their potatoes: On average, each citizen in the United States consumes 126 pounds of potatoes every year. And 26 pounds of those spuds are in the form of french fries. “It’s our favorite fast food,” says Mike Ruggiero, Laurel. Ruggiero and Jeff Fuller, also of Laurel, hope to build a company on the foundations of Americans’ love affair with the french fry. A patent is pending on the men’s fry vending machine, the first such machine, they said, that will be commercially viable. “There are a lot of places that don’t sell fries but would like to,” Fuller said. Keeping a large vat of oil hot for the occasional french fry order can be very expensive, Ruggiero added. Already, they said, several convenience store chains have expressed interest in the machine. “A lot of people have tried and failed” to make a fry vending machine, said Ruggiero, 57, a 1970 graduate of Seaford High School and a mechanical engineer. “I’ve put a lot of my own money into this,” added Fuller, 42, who graduated from Laurel High School in 1985 and is a metal crafter. “I really believe it’s going to work.” Ruggiero and Fuller are owners of Fry Manufacturing, which they founded in October 2007. This month, they plan to present their first fry vending machine to state officials, in hopes of qualifying for money through the Delaware Development Office to help get a manufacturing plant up and running. Eventually, Ruggiero said, Fry could employ up to 350 people turning out 1,000 vending machines a month. In three years, he added, the company could have 5,000 vending machines in the field, using 9 million pounds of potatoes a year. Already, Fry Manufacturing has received $50,000 in state funding, to help get the prototype

engineered and built. That money, part of the state’s bond bill approved June 30, has generated some controversy because the senator who requested the funding, Bob Venables (D – Laurel) is Ruggiero’s next-door neighbor and is the uncle of Ruggiero’s wife, Robin. While no one is questioning the legality of Venables’ request — legislators are barred from participating in bills that could affect “close relatives” only, defined as spouses, parents or children — some are suggesting that it could lead to an appearance of impropriety. During a discussion about the state grant, a host of an area talk show referred to Ruggiero and Fuller as “buffoons” and wondered how they could come up with a French fry vending machine when so many others have failed. “This has taken us a lot of money, time and development,” Ruggiero said. “We knew the problems others have had and we have solved them.” “What we have done is just like building a better car, or a better computer,” added Fuller. “Basically, we have refined earlier designs, got their problems cleaned up and made the design more viable.” The Fry vending prototype, about 30 inches tall, 30 inches wide and 13 inches deep, is designed to sit on a countertop. Eventually, Fuller said, the company will develop a full-size vending machine that could sit outdoors and that will have a ketchup dispenser. The machine creates fries out of potato “pearls” that will be made from Russet potato starch, according to a proprietary recipe developed just for this purpose. For each order, the dehydrated pearls are reconstituted and then extruded into the classic shape of a french fry. The fact that the machine uses dehydrated potatoes eliminates the need for a freezer. “Having a freezer and a cooker in the same machine creates a lot of me-

For more information please call

1-800-404-7080 or visit www.dswa.com

Jeff Fuller (left) and Mike Ruggiero are owners of Fry Manufacturing, which has developed what the men say is the first commercially-viable french fry vending machine. They hope to secure state funding to help set up a manufacturing plant. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

chanical problems and makes the vending machine too expensive to manufacture,” Ruggiero said. Each individual order is cooked in a small vat of watersoluble rice oil. It will be possible, Ruggiero said, to add flavor — jalapeno, perhaps, or cheese — to the fries. From the time the money is

put in the machine to the time the fries tumble out will take 48 seconds, Ruggiero said. The whole operation in the Fry vending machine requires only four motors; other, unsuccessful vending machines have used up to 40 motors, he added. In addition to manufacturing the vending machines, Fry would

also make some of the tiny potato pearls that are remade into fries. Ruggiero and Fuller hope to have both the manufacturing plant and the pearl production plant in one location, in the Laurel or Seaford area, they said. “We are both Delaware natives and we want this to stay here,” Ruggiero said.


MORNING STAR • AuGuST 6 - 12, 2009

Longaberger bus trip planned for August 29 Local Longaberger Branch Leaders Renee’ Morris and Ruth Ann Gray and Home Consultant Michele Bell are hosting a one day bus trip to Boyds Bear in Gettysburg, Pa. on Saturday, Aug. 29. Guests will have the opportunity to shop for Longaberger products from the Factory Store and Homestead at this special event in Gettysburg. Members of the Longaberger family will be at Boyds Bear and signing baskets. Guests may also weave their own Longaberger event basket for an additional cost. Trip includes a filled Longaberger tote, refreshments and door prizes. Cost is $59. To learn more and to register, contact: RGMorris93@comcast.net (302-2458842); RuthAnn1@verizon.net  (302-423-8851) or Michele.Bell@ comcast.net (302-628-8801).

PAGE 9

Delaware drivers feel less safe on the highways Thirty-five percent of drivers say they feel less safe than they did five years ago, according to the 2009 Traffic Safety Culture Index released by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. Eighty percent of motorists rate distracted driving as a very serious threat to their safety. Delaware drivers agree. In a recent, separate poll of Delaware AAA members, 71

percent, cite distracted driving as one of their top three safety concerns. Highlights of AAA Mid-Atlantic Poll Results (Delaware) • 71% cite distracted driving  as one of their top three safety concerns. • 63% said that text messaging while driving posed the biggest danger (chosen from a list of distracted driving activities).

• 29% said drivers using a  cell phone without hands-free device posed the biggest danger (chosen from a list of distracted driving activities). “We don’t feel any safer – in fact, many of us feel less safe - on our roads. Distracted driving threatens safety on our highways,” noted Catherine L. Rossi, manager of Public and Affairs for AAA Mid-Atlantic.

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PAGE 10

MORNING STAR • AuGuST 6 - 12, 2009

Jewelry sale at Look-In Glass at Nanticoke Hospital

Shop for gold, silver and diamond jewelry in the lobby at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital on Thursday, Aug. 6 and Friday, Aug. 7, from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Look-In Glass Shoppe (located within Nanticoke Memorial Hospital) is hosting an “Alter’s Gem Jewelry Sale” with a jeweler on site to assist with your purchases. Payroll deductions are available for eligible NHS employees. All proceeds from The Look-In Glass Shoppe benefit Nanticoke Health Services.

Hospice benefit planned at Methodist Manor House in Seaford

Methodist Manor House in Seaford will hold a Chicken Barbecue and Antique Car Show to benefit Delaware Hospice on Saturday, Sept. 12 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tickets are $7 per person. Proceeds will support Delaware Hospice’s programs and services, including the free community outreach programs such as New Hope, support for children who have lost loved ones, and Transitions, support for seriously ill individuals who are not appropriate for hospice. For more information about this event or the Methodist Manor House, call Erin Steele, 302-629-4593.

Plans advancing for Woodland Ferry Festival in September

The 16th annual Woodland Ferry Festival, celebrating the Nanticoke River and the historic ferry, is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 12. An “all you can eat” country breakfast, served by the Galestown Ruritan Club, will start off the day at 7 a.m. and will be serving until 10 a.m. This hearty breakfast includes scrambled eggs, pancakes, home fries, sausage gravy, scrapple, the Ruritan’s famous sticky buns, biscuits, orange juice, and coffee, all for $7. Opening ceremonies begin at 9 a.m. with the combined Seaford and Laurel High School Bands, and raising of the flags by the Marine Corp League. There will be demonstrations and displays throughout the village, including chair caning, artwork, an animal rescue group, Orrell’s Famous Maryland Beaten Biscuits from Wye Mills and much more. Entertainment will begin with dulcimer player John Kisela, followed by gospel singer Jerry Jones performing from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and ending with Tony Windsor singing his country/western and pop hits. Jack & Carolyn Knowles will have their “Days Gone By” museum open showcasing memorabilia from Woodland and Seaford.The new ferry, (the “Tina Fallon”), will be closed to vehicle traffic, but will provide free rides across the river to pedestrians during the day. Craft and flea market spaces are available to rent for the day at $25 for a 10’ by 10’ space and $40 for a 10’ by 20’ space. Please call Donna Angell at 629-8077 for additional information or to have forms mailed to you. You may also email woodlandangell@hotmail.com.

Three free workshops teach skills to help improve job search

Three free workshops are available to help people search for and find new jobs. These workshops are to be held at the Sussex County Emergency Operations Center, 21911 Rudder Lane, Georgetown, on Tuesday, Aug. 11, from 1 to 4 p.m.; Tuesday, Aug. 18, from 1 to 4 p.m.; and Tuesday, Aug. 25, from 1 to 4 p.m. Topics for the first workshop will be “Overcome the Trauma of Job Loss” and “Maximizing Resources for Your Job Search.” The second workshop will cover “Resume Writing” and “Understanding the Interview Process.” The final workshop will consist of one-on-one consultations and mock interviews. Registration is limited to 20 participants per workshop. Call RSVP at 856-5815 to register. The workshops are sponsored by Delmarva SHRM, Delaware Innovation at Work and the Sussex County Retired and Senior Volunteer Program.

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Festival Hispano returns Aug. 23 Millsboro will showcase the best of Latin America from noon to 6 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 23, during the 15th annual Festival Hispano, which is organized by the nonprofit group, El Centro Cultural. Sponsors are needed. Sponsorships may be acquired through donations of $100, which entitles all donors to a 15 by 15 display space; $300, which includes an advertisement in the Festival Hispano Program Booklet; or $1,000, which acknowledges the donor in all publicity and includes the donor’s business logo on the Festival

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Hispano color flyer. All donations are tax deductible. This year’s program includes a marimba band, traditional Mexican and Flamenco dances and music from the Andes. The event is free for the whole family and conveniently located at the Little League Complex on State Street in Millsboro. Sponsors should contact festivalhispano@hotmail.com. or call 302-745-6828. For more information, visit www.elcentrocultural.org.

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PAGE 12

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

IN LOVING MEMORY OF

BRIAN R. FRANCESCHI

SEPT. 1, 1986 - AUGUST 6, 2005

ReSTORE OFFERS ITEMS - Sussex County Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore has recently received some items of interest for college students or anyone furnishing a first-time apartment. Items include bedroom furniture, sofas, lamps, tables and bar stools that may be perfect to furnish an off-campus apartment or a dorm room. They also have fitness equipment. Traditionally, ReStore sells donated new and gently used appliances, cabinets, furniture, doors and windows at their warehouse store located near the railroad station at 107 Depot St., Georgetown. Hours are Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. To volunteer with ReStore or to donate items, call or e-mail Denise Jackson at 302-855-1156 or through the website, www.sussexcountyhabitat.org.

Hrs: M-F 8:30-8 Sat. 9-3, Sun. by Appt.

God called you home four years ago, Our most precious gift from God. Although we cannot see or touch you, We feel your presence every day. You are always in our prayers and thoughts. Not a day goes by when you are not missed. You will always be remembered by us, your family, friends and all the people whose lives you touched. We love you and miss you so. Your memory will be forever etched in our hearts. Love, Mom and Dad & Nana and Pop-Pop and family

CONVENIENT LOCATION RT. 13 N - LAUREL


OPENING

ADULT/YOUTH SIGN UP SHEET

Since this our first year, we are looking to the bowlers to dictate the times, days and types of leagues to be formed. If you are interested in bowling in more than one league, please fill out additional sign up sheets. If you have a full league of 14 teams (fantastic!!), please fillout a sign up sheet for each team and the contact bowler can be the main organizer or the captain of each team. We will form the leagues based on the most bowlers for the specified day and times. We will be using the date received as the leagues fill, so please return your sign up sheets as soon as possible by mailing to the above address. Thank you to all the bowlers who have expressed their interest and good wishes. Our best, Pete & Lee

: E T A D UP

MIDDLE OF AUGUST

Monday @ 6:30 is Men (5); Tuesday @ 6:30 is Mixed (4); Friday @ 6:30 is Mix-ups (5); Sunday @ 6:30 is Mixed (4); Wednesday (day, time?) is Seniors (3); Wednesday @ 6:30 is Men (4 or 5); Thursday @ 1:00 is Mix-ups (4), Thursday @ 6:30 is Mix-ups (4).

Check (1) box in each column: Number of Bowlers ¸ Individual ¸ Partial Team (2) (3) (4) ¸ Full Team (4) (5) ¸ Full League (14 Teams of 4 or 5)

The Name

r e v O s I Wait

g n i n Ope st u g u A Mid

League Type/Bowlers ¸ Mix-ups (5) ¸ Mixed (4) ¸ Men (4) ¸ Men (5) ¸ Women (4) ¸ Seniors (3) Daytime ¸ Seniors (4) Daytime ¸ Point (4) ¸ other ______ YOUTH

¸ Ages 4-5 Bumpers ¸ Ages 8 & Under ¸ Ages 9-12 ¸ Ages 13 & Over

Day ¸ Sunday ¸ Monday ¸ Tuesday ¸ Wednesday ¸ Thursday ¸ Friday ¸ any day

Saturday Saturday Saturday Saturday

Time ¸ 10:00 am M-F ¸ 12:00 pm M-F ¸ 6:30 pm ¸ 9:00 pm ¸ any time ¸ other ______

9:00 am 9:00 am 10:30 am 1:00 pm

Address

*If you have any questions about 2. _____________________________________________________________________________ this form, call 302-875-7400, 3. _____________________________________________________________________________ leave message and one of us 4. _____________________________________________________________________________ will return your 5. _____________________________________________________________________________ call as soon as we can. Contact Name & Phone#: _________________________________________________________ 1. _____________________________________________________________________________

1103 S. Central Ave. Laurel, DE • 302-875-7400


PAGE 14

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

American Legion treats kids to camping weekend By Lynn R. Parks

Zack Hall, 11, of Seaford, is worried about his brother, Jordan Davila, a member of the 262nd component repair company of the National Guard, based in Dagsboro. Davila, a gunner, is among the 144 members of the company who are serving overseas. They were activated in May and were deployed Friday, July 17. But for last weekend, at least, Zack, who will start the sixth grade at Seaford Middle School in September, had things to think about other than his brother. He was among about 30 kids who were invited to a campout at Trap Pond State Park near Laurel, sponsored by the American Legion Post 24 in Dagsboro. “I’m sleeping on a cot, just like my brother,” said Zack, sitting on the Armyissue cot that the Legion borrowed from the Dagsboro armory for the occasion. Volunteers with the Legion also borrowed three large field tents, which by Friday morning were set up on Cypress Point in the park. “And I packed just the way they do in the Army,” added Zach, pointing to his rucksack in which all the clothes were rolled instead of folded. “I’m glad to be here,” he said. “It keeps my mind off my brother.” Skylar Peacock, 10, of Millsboro, is the daughter of Starlene Mercer, a member of the 262nd. Skylar’s cot, set up in the girls’ tent, was colorful, with bright green, blue and yellow sheets and a blanket that she

had brought from home. “I’m excited,” Skylar said. She was looking forward to planned activities, including hiking, boating and fishing. Angelina Griffee, Laurel, is a member of the Post 24 auxiliary and, with commander Russell Frye, helped to organize the campout. It is one of several things, including back-to-school shopping and a Christmas party, that the post is planning for the children during the year their family-members are overseas. Griffee said that businesses and other American Legion posts donated more than $5,000 to help out with the campout. Money that is left over will go toward the other events the post has planned, she added. Food that is left over is being donated to Meal on Wheels. “The Legion cares about its community and it cares about our kids,” Griffee said. “We do a lot for the people who are deployed. But we wanted to do this for the kids, so that they know that they aren’t forgotten.” Saturday afternoon, volunteers with the USO visited the camp site and led the children in singing “I’m Proud to be an American.” “There was a lot of emotion with that,” Griffee said on Monday. Several children cried, she said, others asked Legion volunteers whether they thought their mom or dad would return home from the deployment. “That was really hard,” Griffee said. “Our volunteers talked with them and told

Zack Hall, 11, of Seaford, was one of about 30 kids ages 6 to 12 who participated in a campout at Trap Pond State Park near Laurel. The campout was sponsored by the American Legion Post 24, Dagsboro, for relatives of members of the 262nd component repair company of the National Guard, based in Dagsboro. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

Skylar Peacock, 10, of Millsboro, sits on her cot in the girls’ tent during the campout at Trap Pond State Park for relatives of members of the 262nd component repair company of the National Guard, based in Dagsboro. Peacock’s mother, Starlene Mercer, is deployed overseas with the rest of the company. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

them how important the job their mom or dad is doing, and that they should be more proud of them than scared.” Except for a thunderstorm on Saturday night, one splinter and one fishing hook

through a finger, Griffee said, the weekend was a success. “I am pretty happy with the way it went,” she said. “We hope to do a campout for the kids again next year.”

Governor signs adult abuse bill

EVENT OF THE YEAR - At the recent Conference of Safe Kids, Delaware Safe Kids Sussex County was recognized as the “Chapter Event of the Year.” Safe Kids Sussex promotes pedestrian, child passenger and bike safety throughout the year. From left are Marie Renzi, State Safe Kids Board member; Mike Lowe, Delaware State Fire School & Sussex Safe Kids; Mike Love, highway safety coordinator & Sussex Safe Kids; and Mary Betts State Safe Kids Board member. For more information, contact Mike Love at 856-7303 or Mike Lowe at 739-4773. Picture by Alan Robinson

Governor Jack A. Markell signed legislation into law last week that will provide greater protection for senior citizens and Delawareans with disabilities. Sponsored by House Majority Whip Rep. Valerie J. Longhurst, D-Bear, House Bill 165 will give the public online access to the Adult Abuse Registry. Delawareans seeking to hire someone to help care for their elderly loved one will be able to easily go online and check the job applicant’s name against the registry. As a member of the Delaware Nursing Home Residents Quality Assurance Commission, Rep. Longhurst heard the discussion on the Adult Abuse Registry and how difficult it is for an individual to gain access to the list. An individual who has an elderly rela-

tive that they want to get home care for must submit a signed affidavit to gain access to the registry, which could take weeks. “People have to jump through hoops to get this vital information, which helps families make important health care decisions,” Rep. Longhurst said. “This bill would put the registry online. We already do this for sex offenders to protect children, why not do the same to protect seniors from those who have already been proven to financially exploit or abuse seniors?” Between the years 2000 and 2030, the US population over 65 is expected to double while Delaware’s over-65 population is expected to grow by almost 134 percent.

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PAGE 16

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

Health Get fit at Delaware Tech

Get in shape this fall with programs offered at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Release tension and stress through a series of meditation, breathing, and stretching exercises in yoga on Monday evenings beginning Sept. 21 or Wednesday evenings beginning Sept. 23. Want to exercise at your own pace? Become a member of the Delaware Tech Fitness Center by signing up for the monthly or 16-week program. Training sessions with Jim Edgerton, certified personal trainer, are also available for individual help reaching fitness goals. The state-of-the-art gymnasium complex is open five nights per week until 7 p.m. and includes a basketball court, fitness center complete with a cardio/weight training room, exercise room, and locker rooms for men and women. Special discounts are available for seniors. For more information or to sign up for a program, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 302854-6966.

duPont Hospital holds raffle

Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children is holding a raffle for a HarleyDavidson motorcycle. The motorcycle, a Soft-Tail Fat Boy in Black Denim that includes a riding gear safety package, was donated by Concordville Nissan-Subaru. Tickets are $25 each or five for $100 and proceeds benefit the hospital. The drawing will take place in the hospital lobby on Sept. 11 at 2 p.m. For ticket information, contact Kate Handling at 302-651-4383 or khandlin@nemours.org.

Nemours receives award

At its inaugural “Weight of the Nation” Conference, July 27-29, in Washington, D.C., the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) honored Nemours Health & Prevention Services of Newark, as one of eight national organizations at the forefront of advancing policies and environmental strategies to prevent and control obesity. Nemours earned the Pioneering Innovation award on the basis of its work to improve the health and well-being of children through an integrated system that includes community-based prevention and medical care. Through statewide work in schools, child care, primary care, youth-serving organizations and the built environment, Nemours has reached more than 100,000 Delaware children with its healthy behavior change initiatives.

Health care info sessions

Looking for opportunities with a great starting salary in the expanding health care field? Attend a free information session on Monday, Aug. 17 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Discuss new and existing health career certificate programs at Delaware Tech including certified nursing assistant, polysomnography technician, medical coding and billing, medical transcriptionist, health information coding specialist, and health information clerk. For more information or to sign up for

this info session, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 302-854-6966.

Occupational Health is moving

On Monday, Aug. 17, Nanticoke Memorial Hospital’s Occupational Health Services will be moving to a new location at 543 N. Shipley St., Suite F in Seaford. The new location is dedicated to only Occupational Health clients. From treatment for work-related injuries and illnesses, DOT screenings, post incident testing, pre-employment physical examinations, to drug testing, Nanticoke’s Occupational Health Services has been operating for over 20 years. For more information, contact Occupational Health Services at 302-629-6875.

Stroke Support group to meet

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital’s next Stroke Support Group meeting is Thursday, Aug. 20 at 1:30 p.m. at Nanticoke Memorial’s 2nd Floor Cancer Care Center Conference Room. The support group is designed for individuals who have survived a stroke as well as their families and caregivers. The two-hour support group meetings will consist of guest speakers and breakaway sessions, in which caregivers and stroke survivors will meet in two groups to discuss concerns, provide support and allow for networking. Refreshments will be provided. Pre-registration is not required for this free support group. For more information, contact Nanticoke Memorial Hospital at 302-629-6611, ext. 8626.

Dr. Wingate joins NMH

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital welcomes Michael Wingate, MD, FACS to its active medical staff. Dr. Wingate, specializing in general surgery, is accepting new patients at his practice located at 701 Middleford Road, Suite 201, Seaford. Dr. Wingate is Board Certified by the American Board of Surgery and Dr. Wingate graduated from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He completed his residency at West Virginia University, Ruby Memorial Hospital in Morgantown. His professional memberships include Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, The American Society of Breast Surgeons and the Surgical Infection Society. To reach Dr. Wingate’s office, call 302-6283294.

Dr. Olowo joins NMH

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital welcomes Abimbola O. Olowo, MD to its active medical staff as a hospitalist. A hospitalist is a physician who specializes in the care of patients while they are in the hospital. Hospitalists work with specialists, nurses, or others involved with the patient’s care, are available to the patient and their family for questions, and communicate with the patient’s primary care physician.

Dr. Olowo is board certified in internal medicine and completed his residency at Christiana Care Health System in Newark. He earned his medical degree at Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine in Rootstown, Ohio.

Dr. Olowo

Vascular Center opens at NMH

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital (NMH) announces the opening of The Vascular Center at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. Nanticoke has assembled a team of physicians, nurses and technologists to provide the best care possible at The Vascular Center for conditions such as peripheral artery Dr. Chong disease, deep vein thrombosis, abdominal aortic aneurysms, coronary artery disease, and carotid artery stenosis. Nanticoke Memorial Hospital also offers the latest technology for the diagnosis and treatment of vascular conditions, in-

cluding an advanced 64-slice CT scanner, ultrasound imaging devices and angioplasty equipment. The practice of Vascular Surgeon, Nyen Chong, MD, (currently accepting new patients) vascular testing (previously performed at the Mears Campus and Radiology), and vascular screenings have all relocated to the new Vascular Center suite located on the grounds of Nanticoke Memorial Hospital next to the Wound Care & Hyperbaric Center. For more information, contact The Vascular Center at 302-629-0452.

Certificate programs offered

Enroll in one of the new health career certificate programs offered by Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. New certificate programs include medical coding and billing, health information clerk, health information coding specialist and medical transcriptionist. “Medical terminology” is a prerequisite course for all of the health career certificate programs. Students will learn basic terminology in this 16-hour online course; the first session is Monday, Aug. 24 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Owens Campus. In “Medical Coding and Billing” students will utilize basic medical terminology to understand the medical insurance claims process and reimbursement procedures; learn to identify and use special terms, marks, abbreviations and symbols used in the ICD-9 coding system. The course begins Tuesday, Sept. 22 at 6 p.m.


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009 “Health Information Clerk” prepares students for technical positions in health information management departments, physician’s offices, long-term, home health and other health care settings. The course begins Monday, Nov. 2 at 6 p.m. In “Health Information Coding Special-

ist” students are trained to analyze patient health records in order to abstract information necessary to assign accurate ICD-9 and CPT codes. Course prerequisites are medical terminology and medical coding and billing; the health information coding specialist por-

PAGE 17

tion of the course begins Monday, Nov. 2 at 6 p.m. Prepare to be a medical transcriptionist by obtaining basic knowledge, understanding and skills required to transcribe medical dictation with accuracy, clarity and timeliness including medical terminol-

ogy, human anatomy and physiology. The course begins Monday, Nov. 2 at 6 p.m. For more information or to sign up for courses, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 302-8546966.

Patients need to be evaluated before antibiotics can be given By Dr. Anthony Policastro Patients must be evaluated before antibiotics are given The last time I was on call for a weekend, I received three calls asking me to prescribe an antibiotic without seeing the patient. The parents all felt that they knew what was wrong with the child. They did not want the child to be seen and just wanted to go pick up a prescription. I offered one of them an appointment to meet me at the hospital. I went to the hospital to meet them but they did not show up. Writing prescriptions for antibiotics without evaluating the patient has many associated problems. The first is that the patient’s diagnosis may be wrong. The best example of this is ear pain. Ear pain can be due to an ear infection which means oral antibiotics. It can also be due to swimmer’s ear which means ear drops. It can be due to TM joint pain which means pain relievers or it can be due to dental pain which means a visit to the dentist. Giving antibiotics only causes the patient to suffer longer if they do not have an ear infection.

I have treated many children with meningitis. Quite a few of them had been given an antibiotic by their parent because an old prescription was still sitting around the house. The problem then becomes trying to figure out what is actually causing the meningitis. The antibiotic will mess up the culture but not cure the problem. The result was a longer course of IV antibiotics in the hospital. A second problem that can occur is allergic reactions to the antibiotics. Many people have allergic reactions to antibiotics. You are not born with an allergy to something; you develop the reaction after exposure. Thus the more times you take an antibiotic, the more likely you are to have an allergic reaction to it. A third problem is related to side effects from the antibiotic. Side effects are different than allergies. They are problems that someone develops to taking a certain drug. For example, some antibiotics cause abdominal pain while others cause diarrhea. Some even cause a form of colitis that needs to be treated with a different antibiotic. If it is not treated, the colitis can be fatal. A third problem is related to resistant

Healthy Advice From Your Community Health Providers Western Sussex Family Medicine 116 East Front Street, Suite C Laurel, DE 19956 302-875-2127 Joseph Kim, D.O. Board Certified Family Medicine

Q: What is Mononucleosis? A:

Mononucleosis (commonly known as mono or the kissing disease) is a viral infection cause by the Epstein Barr virus. The most common signs and symptoms include fever, sore throat, fatigue, weakness, swollen glands, and night sweats. It is contagious and is usually spread by coughing, sneezing, sharing utensils, or kissing. It is typically seen in people fteen to thirty ve years old but recently I have seen cases in children as young as ten. There is no cure for mono. There are blood tests child that can help diagnose mononucleosis. It is treated with supportive care including plenty of uids, rest, and pain relief with Tylenol or Advil. Symptoms usually last for several weeks. Physical activity and sports are restricted due to the rare possibility of splenic rupture. Signs of splenic rupture include left sided belly pain, feeling lightheaded, feeling confused, and fainting. For more information about mononucleosis, call your healthcare provider.

email your questions to: askthedoc@nanticoke.org or mail them to: Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Marketing Dept. 801 Middleford Rd, Seaford DE 19973

bacteria. The more we use antibiotics, the more bacteria become resistant to them. Most people have viral illnesses. Antibiotics will not kill the virus. What they will do is kill all the bacteria in someone’s body that are sensitive to that antibiotic. What is then left are resistant bacteria. If that patient is going to go on to get an infection, it will be with something that is harder to treat. The classic example of this is the burn patient. We know that burned skin is more likely to get infected than normal skin. For that reason, we used to give antibiotics to prevent those infections. However, we learned that patients still got infections

anyway. They just got them with resistant bacteria which made them harder to treat. There are many reasons to be cautious about antibiotic use. Because of that, I like to evaluate patients to make sure we are doing things correctly. Some patients prefer the short cut which can be more dangerous. As we look at controlling the costs of medical care in this country, one of the things we need to do is only prescribe medications when the evidence suggests that we do. Using antibiotics for viral illnesses is not supported by evidence based medicine.

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PAGE 18

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

Entertainment SCCA holds membership drive

The annual Wheat Threshing, Steam & Gas Engine Show will be held on Aug. 7-9 on Route 313 between Denton and Federalsburg, Md.

Threshermen Show to start this week The Eastern Shore Threshermen & Collectors Assoc., Inc. will hold their 49th annual Wheat Threshing, Steam & Gas Engine Show on Aug. 7-9, at their showgrounds on Route 313 between Denton and Federalsburg, Md. The show includes free admission and free parking and opens at 10 a.m. each day. There will be steam engines, antique tractors, gas engines, antique cars and steam models in operation. Among the demonstrations will be wheat threshing, shingle sawing, sawing with a miniature and full size sawmills, and rock crushing. A daily parade of all equipment will be held at 5 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and at 4 p.m. on Sunday. Kids of all ages enjoy riding “Smokey Joe,” a miniature steam train which is a replica of the Civil War era “General” locomotive. There will be something for everyone in the large flea market with over 125 dealers.

Don’t miss the “Evolution of Threshing” which will demonstrate how threshing grain evolved from using the flail to the modern day combine on Saturday at 2 p.m. Friday evening will feature the classic country music sounds of “The Mel Price Band” and “Nite Shift” will perform country music on Saturday evening. Sunday will feature “The Rescue Team” with gospel music at 5 p.m. All shows are free. Exhibitors of antique tractors and steam engines can test their driving skills in the tractor games where they will compete for trophies. There will be plenty of food with fried chicken dinners, crab cakes, hamburgers and hot dogs. Exhibitors of all kinds of antique equipment are welcome. There is no charge to exhibit. All times are subject to weather conditions. For more information, call 410-7548422 or visit www.threshermen.org.

Let Tony Windsor perform for your event Tony Windsor

Guaranteed affordable! Portions of proceeds will benefit the Newspapers in Education program.

Tony Windsor is accepting bookings for entertaining any size event, from the living room to the great outdoors! Singing classic country and rock, with special 50s, 60s and 70s hits! Also, gospel and holiday music available. Booking now for Christmas parties and beyond. Call: 302-236-9886 for info.

The Seaford Community Concert Association presents their 61st concert season beginning in September. The membership drive began Aug. 1 and runs through Aug. 29. If you are a current subscriber, you will receive the schedule and membership form in the mail. If you do not receive the form and are interested in becoming a member, call 302-629-6184 for more information. This year’s season includes: Sept. 16 - Daniel Rodriguez, former NYC policeman; Nov. 13 - the Russian Seasons Dance Company; Jan. 25, 2010 - Rudolf Budginas, a pianist giving classical music a broader audience appeal; Feb. 24 - the Hunt Family Fiddlers; and April 29 - the Canadian Tenors. There will be no price increase this year and if you respond by Aug. 15, you will receive the early bird price. Prices are: adults - $45 ($50 after Aug. 15); family $95 ($110 after Aug. 15); students - $12 or ($15 after Aug. 15). All performances are held in the Seaford High School auditorium with free parking. There are no single ticket sales, you must be members to see the concerts. For more information, visit www. Seafordconcerts.org.

Harrington Heritage Day is Aug. 29 Harrington will welcome visitors to its 31st Annual Heritage Day celebration on Saturday, Aug. 29, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The day will begin with a parade through downtown Harrington and be filled with activities and entertainment for everyone. A “Harrington Idol Contest” will spotlight talented performers competing in two divisions - ages 12 to 18 and those 19 and older. “A Moment in Time Costume Contest” will star children up to 11-years-old, and a “Pet Contest” will look for the Most Terrific Pet Trick and the Most Adorable Pet. Harrington’s museums, including the Taylor & Messick Agricultural Museum, will be open for the day, and visitors will be able to enjoy a classic car show plus a display of antique tractors. In the center of town, there will be exhibitors, craft demonstrators, a flea market and a food court. A stage, where opening ceremonies will be held and live entertainment will continue throughout the day, will also be located in this area. Special activities for kids - moon bounces, a little train and more - will be found on Liberty Street on the grounds of the Recreation Center and in the parking lot at Asbury United Methodist Church. The Century Club building on Dorman Street will be the site of a children’s stage where live entertainment will be featured all day long. Free shuttle buses will run from Walt Messick Road to Liberty Street from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free parking is located throughout town. For more information, call Harrington Parks & Recreation, 398-7975.


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

PAGE 19

Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival

12th Festival offers something for everyone By Lynn R. Parks

Jada Evans, Seaford, reads the Maya Angelou book, “Life Doesn’t Frighten Me At All,” during the pageant at the 11th annual Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

Conserving our Future by Preserving the Family

The Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival Committee is proud to present these Two Extraordinary Days of Celebration within this great City of Seaford, in Nutter Park. Come Friday for an evening of fun-filled family entertainment, great music and food. Saturday kicks off with the AFRAM Parade, followed by LIVE MUSIC and Entertainment, throughout the day, including authentic African drumming and dance, and fabulous cultural foods and vendors. AFRAM looks forward to your presence at our Best Festival Yet! Join us as we celebrate African American culture - a rich legacy of Unity, Success, Diversity and Pride – here, on the Eastern Shore.

Councilwoman Pat Jones AFRAM Festival Executive Director

Seaford’s annual AFRAM Festival is not just for African-Americans. “There’s something at AFRAM for everybody,” said Desiree Laws-Moore, president of the festival organization and chairwoman of its parade. “It’s a festival that showcases a unique culture, but it’s music, art and food are for everyone.” The 12th annual AFRAM (AfricanAmerican) Festival takes place Aug. 6, 7 and 8 in Nutter Park, Seaford. It features a parade, pageants and a Family Feudtype competition among teams from area churches. The annual community recognition award will be handed out to the Rev. Dianne Lofland of New Coverdale Outreach Ministries. “This is a chance for people to see something positive in our community,” Moore said. “There are a whole lot of positive things going on in east Seaford. This festival is good for the community and good for the children. They need to see that there are people who grew up in east Seaford and who live here who are working hard for their community.” AFRAM will get under way Thursday evening with a basketball challenge and fish fry, both starting at 5 p.m. Jeff Johnson, a long-time Seaford basketball coach, will run the tournament; the fish fry will be provided by Curtis Hinds, owner of Catering by Curtis. Activities will pick up again Friday evening at 5 with the Battle of the Churches. Three churches will have teams of five members each that will compete in answering general and Bible-based questions. The winner will come away with $50. Last year’s winner was the Tabernacle of Praise in Seaford.

At 5:30, students in an east Seaford day-care center operated by Tanya Ricketts will perform songs and skits. The AFRAM pageants, for children in kindergarten through the fifth grade, will get under way at 6 p.m., ending in the crowning of Junior Miss AFRAM, Junior Mr. AFRAM, Little Miss AFRAM and Little Mr. AFRAM. “We really need boy participants,” Moore said. Participants are required to showcase a talent and to answer one question asked by the moderator. At 7 p.m., the festival’s talent show will take the stage. People are welcome to apply to be in the show by submitting a video or CD. “We are really proud of the fact that this is a family-friendly event,” cautioned Moore. Acts for the talent show must keep that in mind. From 8 to 10 p.m., the Zion Reggae Band will perform. “They are awesome,”

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PAGE 20

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival

During the 2008 Opening Ceremonies Seaford Councilwoman Pat Jones, the AFRAM Festival executive director, gets the activities started. Photo by Cassie Richardson

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Moore said. The band frequently plays in Ocean City, Md. Saturday’s events will kick off at 10 a.m. with a parade in which Lofland will act as grand marshal. The parade will start at Frederick Douglass Elementary School and go down King Street to Front Street, Front to Walker, Walker to North and North to Collins and Nutter Park. Organizers will hand out at random certificates for free food at the festival to people watching the parade. “We are really proud of our parade,” Moore said. “We grow every year; last year we had more than 30 entries. We wish more people would come out and watch it.” The festival’s opening ceremony, during which Lofland will receive her award, will be held at 11:15 a.m. Following that, Sankofa, a dance and drum troupe from Dover, will perform. At 1 p.m., the Lone Ranger and his horse, Silver, will show off their best tricks. The festival’s children’s hour, highlighting children’s crafts, an obstacle course provided by the Delaware National Guard and moon bounce-type activities, will go from 2 to 3. The Gospel Power Hour will be from 3

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to 4. At 4, hip hop and rhythm and blues bands will take the stage. The TNT Steel Band will close out the festival from 6 to 8 p.m. For more information, or to register to participate in any of the festival’s activities, visit the AFRAM website, www. easternshoreafram.org, or call 628-1908 or 628-9432.

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PAGE 22

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

Festival Schedule THURSDAY, AUGUST 6, 2008

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PAGE 23

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

Community Bulletin Board day, Aug. 25. Toddler Tales, a story time for walkers, will resume at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 26. Story Time for ages 3-5 will resume at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, Aug. 27. For more information, call 629-2524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us.

Pancake & sausage breakfast

The Friends of the Seaford District Library will host a pancake and sausage breakfast at Applebees in Seaford on Saturday, Aug. 15, from 8 to 10 a.m. Tickets are $5 and all proceeds will support the capital campaign for the new Seaford Library & Cultural Center. Tickets are now available at the circulation desk at the library.

Kids Fishing Derby & picnic

Enjoy a great Saturday morning outing with your kids. Fishing, food, fun and free. The Nanticoke River Yacht Club is sponsoring a free fishing derby and picnic on Saturday, Aug. 8 for kids ages 5 to 16 and their parents or guardians. Also, this year a new category for organized youth groups such as church, scouts or sport groups will be initiated. Mandatory registration will be held at NRYC in the Blades Marina at 9 a.m. Saturday morning. Fishing registration and rules will be explained and tickets for the picnic will be distributed. Adults will register for great door prizes. At 10 a.m. we will head for the arranged fishing area at Riverwalk, where each fish will be recorded and released for catching another day. Prizes will be awarded based on the number of fish caught. Ties will be settled by drawings. Adult prizes will be by drawing. Youth groups will be judged by total number of fish caught by a group. At noon everyone will return to the clubhouse for the picnic and awarding of prizes. For more details go to www.NRYC.US or call chairman, Bernie Warshow at 6294204 or Sandy Blackwell at 629-7038.

SHS Class of 1974 reunion

Seaford High School class of 1974 will celebrate their 35th class reunion on Saturday, Oct. 10 at the Seaford Fire Hall. Contact Jan at Jan@gjmej@yahoo.com for more information.

Seaford Library

• “Lights, Camera, Action!” The Seaford District hosts movie night on Thursday, Aug. 6 at 5:30 p.m. For more information, call the library at 629-2524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us. • There will be a Seaford Library Board meeting on Monday, Aug. 10 and Tuesday, Aug. 11 at 6 p.m. • The “Science and Religion” book discussion will be held on Monday, Aug. 17 at 6 p.m. For more information, call 6292524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us. • “Lights, Camera, Action!” The Seaford District hosts movie night on Thursday, Aug. 20 at 5:30 p.m. For more information, call the library at 629-2524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us. • Baby Bookworms, a story time for infants, will resume at 10:30 a.m. on Tues-

Farmers and Artisans Market

Seaford’s Farmers and Artisans Market will be open for the 2009 season until Saturday, Sept. 26 in Kiwanis Park on Saturday mornings from 8:30 a.m. to noon. Kiwanis Park is located at the intersection of Atlanta Road and Stein Highway. We encourage local growers to join us by bringing your locally grown and/or organic fruits, vegetables, cut herbs, plants and cut flowers. For registration information, visit www.seafordmarket.vpweb.com or email or call the Market Master, Sonja Mehaffey at 2cats-sonja@comcast.net or 302-2459494.

‘Send a Kid to Camp’

Morning Star Publications, publishers of the Laurel Star and Seaford Star newspapers, is joining the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club to help send area kids to summer camp. The “Send a Kid to Camp” project features a series of “parking lot” performances by local singer, Tony Windsor. Any business interested in hosting the performances in their store parking lot can contact Maria Motley at the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club by calling 6283789.

Mentors can meet during school lunch time or after school. Mentors and students meet at the Laurel Public Library and enjoy the benefits of scheduled field trips and events. Mentors are asked for a one hour per week commitment for 12 months. For details contact Shawn Phillips at 629-7790, ext. 17.

AARP Driving Course

Laurel Senior Center, 113 N. Central Ave., will be holding an AARP Driving Course, Sept. 21 & 22, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost is $12 for AARP members and $14 for non-members. To register call 8752536.

Ride for … Kidsake Dice Run

Laurel Police Department’s 7th annual Ride For… Kidsake Dice Run will be on Sunday, Aug. 30. All motorcycles are welcome. First 200 riders receive a free “7th” Annual Ride for … Kidsake event pin. Registration will be held at HarleyDavidson of Seaford, from 9 -11 a.m.; cost is $10 per person. The ride begins and ends at HarleyDavidson of Seaford with several “Dice Stops” in between. At the conclusion, food and drinks will be provided at HarleyDavidson of Seaford. For additional information, contact Chief Jamie Wilson or Sgt. Derrick Calloway, from the Laurel Police Department at

302-875-2244. All proceeds benefit: Laurel Police Department Community Based Programs.

Bethel Bazaar

Count on Me Club of Bethel will sponsor a bazaar on Saturday, Sept. 17, starting at 9 a.m. Lunch will be served from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Community House in Bethel. Vendors welcome - table rent $10, space limited. Call Janet 875-3971.

Basket Bingo fundraiser

The Laurel Historical Society will host its annual Basket Bingo fundraiser on Tuesday, Aug. 25 at Laurel Fire Hall with doors opening at 5:30 p.m. and games beginning at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20. Desserts and drinks will be offered free of charge and hot dogs are $1. Double bingo cards will also be offered. Two specialty Longaberger baskets will be raffled off with one chance included with the price of the ticket. More raffle tickets and the 50-50 ticket can be purchased the night of the games. Tickets may be purchased at the door, or advanced tickets can be reserved by calling 302-875-7665 or 302875-4217.

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Seaford Historical Society raffle

The Seaford Historical Society is offering a raffle featuring a day on the Nanticoke River in the spring of 2010. This allday excursion accommodates a party of six people on a boat ride that leaves from the Marina at Nanticoke River Marine Park in Blades, Seaford. Other festivities included with this trip are mid-morning snacks on-board ship, lunch in Vienna, Md., a self-guided walking tour of historic Vienna, a visit to the Vienna Heritage Museum and refreshments on the ride back to Seaford in the afternoon. A raffle ticket costs only $5 or five tickets may be purchased for $20. Tickets are available at the Seaford Museum which is open Thursdays through Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m., or at the Ross Mansion which is open Saturdays and Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m. At other times call the Seaford Historical Society office at 628-9828 for tickets. The drawing will take place at the Victorian Christmas at the Ross Mansion on Dec. 13, 2009. The income from this raffle helps with the maintenance of the Seaford Museum and the Ross Mansion.

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under 60 people

Tickets on Sale Tuesday Night

*Based on the number of people. No one under the age of 18 allowed to play.

DOORS OPEN 5 PM GAMES 6:45 PM Community mentors needed

The Laurel Kids Connection Mentoring Program seeks adult volunteers to mentor a middle school-aged child.

410

Delmar VFW Bingo

896-3722

200 West State St., Delmar, MD

410

896-3379

Dinner to start back in september


PAGE 24 cember, the Laurel Pizzaria is generously helping the Bethel Historical Society with an on-going fundraiser. You can pick up a coupon at the restaurant and when you pay the society will receive 10 percent.

Miller family reunion Aug. 8

The 25th family reunion of Samuel & Elizabeth Miller will be at St. George’s Church Hall, near Laurel, on Saturday, Aug. 8, at noon. Dinner will be served at 12:30 p.m. Each family should bring meat, vegetable, salad or dessert. Phone 8462133 for more information.

Reading program party

Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2 p.m. - End of the Summer Reading Program party. All children who read at least 10 books receive a book of their choice and a prize from the Friends of the Laurel Public Library. For entertainment, the Children’s Acting Club will present “Sleeping Beauty” and “Sideways Stories from Wayside School.” Refreshments will be served. For more information, call the Library at 875-3184, or email Becky Norton, Youth Services librarian, at rebecca.norton@lib.de.us.

Summer Reading Program

The Greenwood Public Library’s adult summer reading club, “Book a Summer Getaway @ Your Library,” will be going on until Aug. 17. The summer reading club is open to anyone 18 years and older or those who have graduated from high school. To participate, register at the library and start reading or listening to your favorite books. Entry slips are filled out for each book; these entry slips enter you in weekly prize drawings and a grand prize drawing on Aug. 17. In addition, $1 worth of fine forgiveness will be granted for each week’s participation. For more information, contact the Greenwood Library at 349-5309.

Health Fair

Join us at the Greenwood CHEER Activity Center for a Health Fair on Tuesday, Aug. 11, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Lunch will be available. There will be free glucose testing, information about free cancer screenings and treatment for Delaware residents, assistive devices from Independent Living Services of DVI and many informational tables including CHEER Home Services, Marketing and Nutrition Program; Sussex County Mobility Consortium, ElderInfo, Nemours, American Cancer Society, RSVP, Caregiver Resource, Greenwood Public Library and the Alzheimer’s Association. For table space or more information, call Susan Welch at 302-349-5237.

Luau Dinner

The Greenwood CHEER Activity Center will host a Luau Dinner on Wednesday, Aug. 26, from 5 to 7 p.m. Cost is $5 for members and $7 for non-members. Musical entertainment will be provided by Side by Side. The public is invited to attend. For more information, call Susan Welch at

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009 302-349-5237.

Killen’s Pond Nature Center

The Greenwood CHEER Activity Center will visit Killen’s Pond Nature Center on Tuesday, Aug. 25. Bus departs the center at 10 a.m. Cost is free for members and $4.50 for non-members plus lunch donation. For reservations or information, call Susan Welch at 302-349-5237.

Book discussion

On Tuesday, Aug. 11, from 6:30 to 8 p.m., Greenwood Library’s Bound by Books discussion group will discuss the book, Tara Road, by author Maeve Binchy. An Oprah Book Club selection, Tara Road is the tale of two women, one from Ireland, one from America, who switch lives. The discussion will be held in the library meeting room. Refreshments will be served. For a copy of the book, stop by the Greenwood Public Library or call Robin Miller at 302-349-5309.

by flights according to handicap. Hole sponsorships are available for $125. The single-player registration fee for the tournament is also $125. To become a sponsor or to register for the golf tournament, contact Peggy Smith at 337-7135.

People’s Place fundraiser

The Red Hat Lady Bugs of Bridgeville are sponsoring a fashion show fundraiser for the People’s Place, an abused women’s shelter. The event, which will take place on Thursday, Oct. 29 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Heritage Shores Clubhouse, includes a fashion show (clothing courtesy of Peebles), lunch, chinese auction, 50/50 and door prizes. Tickets are $20 per person. For ticket information, call 337-9733.

Scrapbook classes

Scrapbooking classes will be held at the Greenwood CHEER Activity Center on the first and third Thursdays each month from 1-2:30 p.m. For more information call Susan Welch at 302-349-5237.

Friends fundraiser

The Friends of the Bridgeville Library have another delicious fundraiser to promote. All you have to do is enjoy a meal at the Seaford, Dover, Rehoboth, or Salisbury IHOP locations, any day, any meal. Take and fill out the comment card, staple your reciept to the comment card and drop it off at The Bridgeville Library, Bridgeville Town Hall, or The Providence Sales Cottage at Heritage Shores. For details call Pat McDonald at 337-7192.

New library to open

Join us as we celebrate the opening of the new Bridgeville Library located at 600 S. Cannon St. in Bridgeville. On Monday, Aug. 17 at 10 a.m. a ribbon cutting and dedication will be held. Tours will be available. Family Fun Day is Saturday, Aug. 22 from noon to 4 p.m. The event includes tours, food, fun and crafts. For more information, contact Karen Johnson at 337-7401, Ruth Skala at 337-3678 or Cathi Hochstedler at 228-4892.

Charity Open golf tournament

The Town of Bridgeville’s third annual benefit golf tournament, the Charity Open, is scheduled for Friday, Oct. 9, at Heritage Shores Club in Bridgeville. Registration and a continental breakfast begin at 8 a.m. with the shotgun start for the four-player scramble starting at 9 a.m. sharp. A luncheon and awards ceremony will follow the tournament. Proceeds will be used to support the Bridgeville Kiwanis Foundation, the Bridgeville Lions Foundation and the Bridgeville Senior Center. This year’s tournament will have a new format whereby more players will have a chance at winning a prize. The event will feature a scramble, but the field will be separated

‘Silent No More Rally’

support to bring conservative values back to our state government and to be ‘Silent No More.’

National Guard Plane Pull

On Sunday, Sept. 13, the Delaware Air National Guard will host the Delaware National Guard Plane Pull to benefit Special Olympics Delaware. Teams of 20 pit their strength against a 100,000 lb. C-130 aircraft to see who can pull the plane the fastest. Over 40 teams are expected to compete in 2009. The cost is $500 for the adult divisions, $250 for high school teams. Awards will be given for fastest pull and lightest team in each division. Team members receive an event T-shirt with their team name on the back and a 5x7 team photo in front of the enemy, The Plane. Teams are made up of a variety of people, including clubs, organizations, sports teams, church groups, businesses, corporations, or just 20 friends. For more information, visit www.sode.org or call 302-831-4653.

Woodland Ferry Festival

SCCOR (Sussex County Community Organized Regiment) will participate in the ‘Silent No More Rally’ on Saturday, Aug. 8 in Dover on the Legislative Mall from 2 to 6 p.m. A number of conservative groups are forming an alliance for the event including the Delaware TEA party, Campaign for Liberty, the Conservative Caucus of Delaware and the 9-12 Delaware Patriots. Come to Dover on Aug. 8 to show your

The Woodland Ferry Association is busy planning the 16th annual Woodland Festival on Saturday, Sept. 12. Craft and flea market spaces are available to rent for the day at $25 for a 10x10’ space and $40 for a 10x20’ space. For more information and forms, call Donna Angell at 629-8077 or email woodlandangell@hotmail.com.

All-day camps at Delaware Tech

Limited spaces are still open in “All Day All Stars” camps in August for chil-

Tony Windsor’s

‘Parking Lot Tour to Send a Kid to Camp’

Sponsored by Morning Star Publications in partnership with the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club

Tony will be performing Country music, Motown and the classic rock sounds of the 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s in area store parking lots. Visit your favorite store and stop by to make a donation to help send a local child to the WSB&G Club’s “Summer Fun Club.” For more information about the “Send a Kid to Camp” project, including how to have your store featured in the tour, call Maria Motley at 302-628-3789.

Tax deductible contributions can be made to: Send a Kid to Camp, W.S. B&G Club, 310 Va. Ave., Seaford, DE 19973


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009 dren ages 6 to 11 at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. From 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., these camps include science, math, history, computers, arts & crafts, games, fitness, and nutrition in a theme-based, fun-filled atmosphere. Each camp includes a field trip to enhance what has been learned in class. Children should wear comfortable clothes and sneakers each day and bring a bag lunch. Children will gain an appreciation for science and how the body functions in “The Amazing Human Body” from Aug. 3 to 7. Students can increase their cultural appreciation and understanding in “Celebrating Holidays from Different Countries” from Aug. 10-14. For more information or to register call 302-854-6966.

Relay for Life cruise

Dr. Marie Wolfgang is at this time accepting enrollments for her annual Relay for Life cruise, scheduled for Jan. 24, 2010. This is a 10-night cruise out of New York City (bus transportation to the dock included), visiting San Juan, St. Thomas, Antigua, St. Maarten and Tortola. Call 629-4471 for brochure.

See ‘Jersey Boys’ with Del Tech

The Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus, is taking reservations for a fall trip to see the musical “Jersey Boys.” Witness the rise of four of the most famous blue-collar kids in pop music history, The Four Seasons, in the Tony-award winning Best Musical “Jersey Boys” on Thursday, Oct. 8 at the National Theatre in Washington, D.C. A special discount rate is available for Adult Plus+ members. For more information or to reserve orchestra seats, contact Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus+ program at 302-856-5618.

Seaford AARP trips

Seaford AARP Chapter 1084 is offering the following trips to the public. Sept. 2 - Rainbow Dinner Theater - a comedy called “Uncle Chick’s Last Wish.” Many laughs are on the menu after your

buffet lunch. Cost: $70. Sept. 12-18 - Mackinac Island, Michigan. Two hot meals per day. You’ll visit Christmas Wonderland in Frankenmuth with time to explore the unique shops around town before dinner. The following afternoon take the hydrojet ferry ride to the island for a two night visit with a lunch included at the Grand Hotel. A guided tour of the island by horse and carriage with a stop off at Arch Rock. There are many points of interest on this island to explore by foot, bicycle, or horse and carriage, as there are no cars. Cost: $790 pp double. Oct. 16 - Strasburg, Pa. Lunch served on the train. Afterwards, visit the railroad museum. Cost: $69. Nov. 16-20 - Christmas at The Biltmore Estates in Asheville, N.C. Visit the grounds, the Farm Village and the winery. A candlelight tour of the estate after your candlelight dinner. Christmas shows at two dinner theaters. A visit to Chimney Rock Park, Smith McDowell House and a tour of Asheville. Also a stop at the Farmer’s Market and the Moose Cafe. Cost: $589 pp double. For more information, contact Rose Wheaton at 302-629-7180.

Vacation with Delaware Tech

Take a vacation this fall or winter with the Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Delight in the charm of Cape Cod during a five-day motorcoach tour from Sept. 15-19. View the fall foliage in New York during a four-day motorcoach tour from Oct. 6-9. Highlights include sightseeing in Cooperstown with a stop at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and the Fenimore Art Museum, a voyage on the Catskill Mountain Railroad, and a guided tour of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Explore Egypt in the 12-day “Splendors of the Nile” trip from Oct. 22 through Nov. 2. The group will travel on a luxurious threenight cruise including visits to ancient temples at Aswan, Kom-Ombo, Edfu and Luxor. Take an 18-day trip “down under” to Australia, New Zealand, and Fiji from Oct. 21 through Nov. 7. Experience the joy of the season during the nine-day “Christmas Cruise on the Danube” trip to Germany and Austria from Nov. 30 through Dec. 8. Travelers will explore cathedrals and several Christmas markets including Germany’s oldest and most famous, Nuremburg’s Christmas Market, which began in 1628. Celebrate the Christmas season during the seven-day “Nashville Country Christmas

PAGE 25

at the Opryland Hotel” from Dec. 2-8. Experience the joy of Christmas during the four-day “Christmas Extravaganza” trip to Washington, D.C. and the Homestead Resort in Hot Springs, Va. Take a Christmas tour of Washington, guided by author/ historian Antony Pitch. To sign up for a trip call 302-856-5618.

Travel with Delaware Tech

Enjoy summer day trips sponsored by the Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. On Wednesday, Aug. 12, view the exclusive world appearance of “Galileo, the Medici and the Age of Astronomy” at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia. Enjoy a guided tour, independent time at the museum and lunch after the exhibit. On Saturday, Aug. 15, watch “Damn Yankees,” a musical comedy about a fan who sells his soul to the devil to become the world’s greatest baseball player and lead his favorite team to victory against the New York Yankees. Enjoy dinner before the show at Toby’s Dinner Theater in Baltimore on Wednesday, Aug. 19. Seats are limited so register early. On Tuesday, Aug. 25, book lovers will delight in a trip to Baldwin’s Book Barn, a five-story bookstore housed in a dairy barn that was built in 1822. The store is filled with 300,000 used and rare books, manuscripts, maps, fine paintings, prints, estate antiques and other valued collectibles. On Friday, Aug. 28, savor summer as a tropically inspired Jimmy Buffet tribute band whisks you away to Margaritaville with its stage show “Parrots of the Caribbean” at the Rehoboth Beach Theatre of the Arts. To sign up call 302-856-5618.

Rails & Trails

Escorted motor-coach trip to Waterville Valley, New Hampshire sponsored by the Seaford WPS, Sept. 21-24. Four days and three nights - cost $639 per person, includes lodging, three breakfasts, three dinners, entertainment, cruise on Lake Winnipesaukee, Castle in the clouds, Rock Estates, Mt. Washington Cog Railway, dinner on Lake Winnipesaukee Railroad, Wolfeboro Village, all gratuities, taxes and baggage handling. For details contact Frances Horner at 629-4416.

Branson trip

Nanticoke Senior Center and Curran Travel are providing a trip to Branson on

Tuesday, Oct. 13, to Wednesday, Oct. 21. The trip includes: round trip Motorcoach transportation, eight nights accommodations, great sightseeing tours, admission to nine great shows including Mickey Gilley, Lee Greenwood & the Bellamy Brothers and Shoji Tabuci. Cost is $1,075 per person-double occupancy, $1,355 single occupancy. A $200 deposit is required. Call 629-4939 for details.

Knitting Guild Association

The “Sea Purls” chapter of the Knitting Guild Association meets on the first Wednesday of each month from 10 -2 p.m. at the Cheer Community Center in Georgetown on the corner of Route 9 and Sand Hill Road. For details, call 302-854-6776.

Georgetown AARP

Join Georgetown AARP Chapter 5340 at their monthly luncheon meetings held on the first Monday of each month at 11:30 a.m. at the Sussex Pines Country Club. For details contact Dee Richards at 302-841-5066.

Delaware Equine Council

The next meeting of the Delaware Equine Council is Monday, Aug. 17 at 7 p.m. at the Harrington Public Library. Everyone who is interested in horses is welcome to attend. For more information, contact Stan at 302-684-3966 or Peggy at 302-629-5233.

39th District Democrats

The 39th District Democrats will hold their monthly meeting on Aug. 20, at 7 p.m., at Pizza King in Seaford. For details call Maggie Callaway at 629-4846. Submit Bulletin Board items by noon, Thursday. Send to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, email to editor@mspublications.com or drop off at 951 Norman Eskridge Hwy., Seaford (Home Team Bldg.)

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PAGE 26

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

Church Bulletins Macedonia A.M.E. Church

Summer schedule for Macedonia A.M.E. Church: 9 a.m. church school; 10 a.m. worship service. All denominations welcome. The Rev. Dania R. Griffin is Pastor. Church is located at 431 North St., Seaford. Call 629-3116 for more information.

Gospel group performs

The “Sounds of Joy” a local gospel group will be appearing at First Baptist Church, 501 Bi-State Blvd., in Delmar, Md. on Sunday, Aug. 9, at 6 p.m. Come enjoy an evening of gospel music and great fellowship. For more information, call the church at 410-896-3284.

Rainbow Rally & Joyfest

Rainbow Rally & Joyfest featuring a variety of soloists, local choirs, and praise dancers. Everyone is welcome - A free will offering will be taken. It will be held at the Eastern Shore Campgrounds, 14192 Cokesbury Road, Georgetown, (near Middleford), on Sunday, Aug. 9, at 5 p.m. Attire: Colors of the Rainbow. Host church: Booker Street Church of God, Pastor: Bishop Marvin Morris. Call Sister Peggy at 856-3404; Sister Marlene at 684-0370 or the church at 856-9097 for more information.

VBS for mentally challenged

Christ Lutheran Church, 315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, will host Vacation Bible School on Aug. 10-15 for mentally challenged youth and adults. Our theme is “God’s Always Doing Great And Wonderful Things.” Light dinner from 6-6:30 p.m. Class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Bible stories will

be told by a storyteller, puppets, music, games and crafts. For further information, call Leona at 629-2770 or Donna at 629-4183 before Aug. 3.

Anti-Alcohol & Drug tent services

Booker Street Church of God, Georgetown, holds 16th annual Anti-Alcohol & Drug tent services, Aug. 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, at 7 p.m. nightly, and 11:30 and 5 p.m. Sunday. Tuesday, Aug. 11: Apostle Ivory Hopkins, Pilgrims Ministry of Deliverance, Georgetown. Wednesday, Aug. 12 – Tag Team – The Rev. Tony Neal, Minister Dolly Morris, Booker Street Church of God, Georgetown. Thursday, Aug. 13 – Bishop Jamie Hazzard, welcome full Gospel Holiness Church; Slaughter Neck, Del Saturday, Aug. 15 – Annual Community Anti-Drug March & Rally begins 11 a.m.; The Rev. Anthony Cannon, Dominion Church of Delaware, Georgetown. Youth Explosion. The march will begin at 11 a.m. from the grounds of the Booker Street Church of God, located on Booker Street near the Richard Allen School. Participants will carry signs and spread their antidrug messages through the streets of Georgetown. The march will return to the church grounds, where Fun Day activities will be held from noon to 4 p.m. There will be games, food, a dunking booth, moon bounce, train rides, drill teams, creative dance teams and more. Everlasting Hope Ministries will provide free t-shirts. Sunday, Aug. 16, 11:30 a.m. - Pastor Marvin Morris, Booker Street Church of God, Georgetown. At

5 p.m., Pastor Arlene Taylor, Chosen Generation, Grasonville, Md. Sponsored by the Rev. Tony Neal, Booker Street Church of God, Bishop Marvin Morris, Pastor. For more information, Contact the Rev. Tony Neal at 856-9097 or 8546692.

day, Aug. 15, from 5 p.m. till 9 p.m. Admission is free - A love offering will be taken. Food and refreshments will be for sale. Bring a lawn chair. For more information call 875-2273 or 8750449.

The No Name Band

The No Name Band will be at Union United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall, Laws Street, Bridgeville, on Friday, Aug. 7, at 7:30 p.m. For further information, contact Everett Warrington at 337-7198.

A chicken BBQ fundraiser will be held on Saturday, Aug. 15 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., on Route 13 north next to Dover Pools, to benefit Mt. Olivet UMC Preschool. For $6, you get a BBQ chicken half, chips, pickle and roll. For more information or to pre-order, call 302-629-3701.

Vacation Bible School

Three day song revival

Join the fun at “Water Works Park,” a vacation Bible School, at Delmar Church of God of Prophecy, corner of Rt. 13 N and Dorothy Road, on Aug. 12, 13, and 14 from 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Free Community Luncheon

Laurel Baptist Church will be hosting a Free Community Luncheon (hot dogs, corn-on-the-cob, salad & dessert), from noon to 2 p.m., on Saturday, Aug. 15. The church is located at 33056 Bi-State Blvd. (west side of 13A, approximately 2 miles south of town). Any questions, call Shirley at 875-2314.

Benefit Gospel Concert

Benefit Gospel Concert for St. George’s United Methodist Church, 34894 St. George’s Road, Delmar, Del. M.C. and performer, Joe Dawson “Music Ministries,” also featuring “God’s Country Crossroads,” “Good News Tour Ministries,” “Crossroad Christian Band” (Contemporary youth group), on Satur-

Chicken BBQ

Join us for all or part of our three day ‘song revival’ featuring Eddie Piper on Sunday, Aug. 16 at 10:45 a.m. and 7 p.m. and at 7 p.m. on Monday and Tuesday, Aug. 17 and 18. In addition to his song ministry spanning a number of years, Eddie hosted a daily local radio broadcast for 13 years and appeared on a weekly television broadcast in central Pennsylvania for many years. Come and join us for what promises to be a ministry that will renew our spirit through song and worship. For more information, call 302-349-4047.

VBS at Christ Church

Christ Evangelistic Church will hold Vacation Bible School, Crocodile Dock, Aug. 17-21 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. The church is located at 9802 Camp Road in Laurel. Pre-registration is helpful. Transportation is available to some local communities. For more information, call Mrs. Niblett at 875-4299 or the church office at 875-2915 (leave a message for a return call).

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship CHURCH OF CHRIST

Sunday Family Worship 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. 94 Walnut Street, Laurel, DE (across from GameZone) 302-875-7873 www.laurelnazarene.org

A church you can relate to

1010S.C entral Ave., Laurel Ph: 875-7748 Minister: Ian J. Drucker Worship Services: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. BibleS tudy: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m. In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Donna Hinkle, Pastor Church: 875-4233 Sunday Services: 8:30 am Praise 9:30 am Sunday School,10:45 am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

Centenary United Methodist Church

“Where Caring is Sharing” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m.

Rev. K. Wayne Grier, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church 600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956

(302) 875-3644

The Rev. Dr. Howard G. Backus, Rector www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing Sunday ~ 8:30 & 10:30 am Church School ~ 9:30 am

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching

Youth Group Wednesday 7:00 pm

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

Christian Church of Seaford

Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love

Centrally located at 14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956

Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road68, South of Laurel Laurel,D el.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m.

Delmar Wesleyan Church www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

800 East Street Delmar, MD 21875 “The Church That Cares” 410-896-3600 Pastor James C. Hitch

Sunday: Sunday School 10 M Worship 11 AM & 6 PM

Wednesday: BibleS tudy 7P M


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

PAGE 27

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor

WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel

302- 875-4646

PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

Sun. 9:30 am Wed. 7:00 pm

Children’s Church • Nursery

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Senior Minister: Dr. Carl G Vincent Senior Pastor: Pastor Barry B. Dukes wwwmessiahsvineyard.org

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

VICTORY TABERNACLE

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 4:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD

PRESCHOOL WELCOMES TEACHERS - Mt. Olivet Preschool announces the addition of Kaye Moynihan and Kathy Young to its teaching staff. Both women are professional educators with experience in working with young children. Kaye will work with the 2-yearold kids who attend on Tuesday and Thursday mornings. Kathy’s experience in teaching reading will be a blessing for the 4-year-old students. Mt. Olivet offers classes for children ages 2, 3, and 4; classes meet Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday mornings from 9 to 11:30 a.m. The first day of school is Tuesday, Sept. 1. For information and registration, contact Linda Stephenson at 629-2786 or the Mt. Olivet Church Office at 629-4458.

Obituaries Roderick Marsland Conn, 54

Roderick “Rod” Marsland Conn of Blades and formerly of Cape Cod, Mass., died Friday, July 24, 2009, due to injuries sustained in an automobile accident. Rod was born in Columbus, Ohio and due to his military career, was able to live in many different areas during his lifetime. He retired from the U.S. Army as Sgt. 1st Class after 20 years of faithful service. He loved his work. He was part of the 58th Engineers, Delta Company as a combat engineer, the group that paved the way for the safety of their fellow soldiers in Desert Storm. He could build almost anything with his hands and enjoyed woodworking and gardening. Fishing was a passion for Rod and he cherished the times spent fishing and having morning coffee with his close friend,

Welcome…

SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

701 Bridgeville Road 629-9077

The Gift of His Love Let others know where you are and when you meet. To advertise in this directory,cal l

629-9788

SUNDAY WORSHIP

11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT

Ministry for the wholef amily 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson

28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

22625 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 - www.atlantaroadcma.org

Dr. Moore. He loved being a grandfather and was very close to all of his grandchildren, who he loved with all of his heart. He is survived by his wife, Barbara Ann Conn; four sons, Patrick Conn and his wife, Tabitha of Boca Raton, Fla., Todd Conn of Falmouth, Mass., Christopher Conn and his wife, Kimberly of Falmouth, and Bradley Conn and his wife, Allison of Newport News, Va.; nine grandchildren, Tyllah, Aliviah Jean, Alec, Azialynn, Madison, Kayleigh, Annabel May, Benjamin Joseph and Lucas Bradley; and good friends, Dr. Charles Moore and his wife, Helen and Miss Mimi. Services will be private at the request of the family. Arrangements are being handled by the staff of Short Funeral Home in Delmar. Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.shortfh.com.

Union

United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 Handicap Friendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

22606 Sussex Hwy. Seaford, DE

302-359-6331 Weekly Services: Sunday: 10 am Tuesday: Prayer 7-8 pm Thursday: Bible Study 7 pm

Sunday

Wednesday Evening

9:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Worship, Nursery, Classes for Kids-Adults 7:00 p.m. Evening Service

6:45 Catalyst Youth (grades 7-12), DivorceCare 7:00 Prayer Meeting, Men’s Group, KidStuf 103 (K-6 Kids & their parents, 1 & 3rd Wed.)

COKESBURY CHURCH All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE (302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburywc.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

Mount Olivet

United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School

Pastor: Rev. Jim Sipes • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

27225 Kaye Road Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.thelighthouselaurel.org Timothy P. Jones, Pastor Sunday Family Worship - 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Family Ministries - 7:00 p.m.

“Shining His Light”

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel

Sunday School - 9:30 Worship - 9:00 & 10:45 Sunday Evening Worship Wed. 6:30 p.m. - Youth Ministries & WKID, The Zone, Children’s Ministries

Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor: Rev. Rick Green; Youth: Kyle Horton Children’s Pastor: Marilyn Searcey

CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH

315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-9755

Pastor: Rev. Andrew C. Watkins www.christlutheranseaford.com

Praise Worship 8:15 AM • Sunday School 9:45 AM • Traditional Worship 11:15 AM

Laurel Baptist Church, SBC Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 LBC Sunday School ~ 10:00 Morning Worship ~ 11:00 Wednesday Bible Study ~ 7:00 P.M. NurseryP rovided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Music Director: Linda Lewis

302-875-7998

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

Front & King St., Seaford, DE 629-7979 Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - G. W. Cliver - 629-6206 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10 a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

743 E. Clarence St., Seaford, Del. Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Paster

629-9443, Cell: 448-0852 • cogclarence@verizon.net

Sunday: Midweek Activities: Church School........9:45 am Call for Details Morning Worship......11 am Children’s Church & Youth Explosion ........6 pm Nursery Provided Evening Worship.........7 pm *Counseling by appt. only Tuesday: Thursday: Bible Study & Family Corporate Prayer.........7 pm ‘Come and Grow with Us!’ Training Hour...........7 pm

Thank You to the churches that sponsor these pages. Your contribution makes it possible for the “Good News” to be published each week.


PAGE 28

Betty Ann James, 77

Betty Ann James of Seaford, went to be with the Lord on Wednesday, July 29, 2009, at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. She was born in Delmar, Md., a daughter of the late James Edward Parsons and Thelma Haddock Parsons. She was a 1951 graduate of Delmar High School and a 1954 graduate of Delaware Division Nursing School where she was valedictorian and received her registered nursing degree. She worked as an RN for many years, including for Nanticoke Hospital, The Stockley Center, Geriatric Services, and later retired from the Methodist Manor House. Betty Ann was a member of Laurel Nazarene Church. She is survived by her husband of 55 years, Harry “Bob” James Sr. of Seaford; sons, Bob James and wife Brenda of Laurel, Edward Allen James Sr. and wife Rose Marie of Seaford, Kevin James and wife Janice of Seaford and Kenneth James and wife Elizabeth of Middletown; daughter Melinda Huffman and husband Dave of Bethel; brother, Allen Parsons Sr. of Seaford; 12 grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by two brothers and one sister. The funeral service was held at Laurel Nazarene Church on Saturday, Aug. 1. Pastor Ralph Fraser officiated. Interment followed in Laurel Hill Cemetery. Contributions may be made in her honor to Laurel Nazarene Church, PO Box 705, Laurel, DE 19956. Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home in Laurel is serving the James family. Online condolences may be sent at www.delmarvaobits.com.

Elba B. Wheatley, 90

Elba Blanche Wheatley of Galestown, Md., died Monday, July 27, 2009. Born on July 28, 1918 in Oak Grove, Caroline County, she was the daughter of the late Albert Wheatley and Velma Coulbourn Wheatley. For many years she worked as a seamstress for Mardela Manufacturing and Delmar Sportswear. She was a member of Wheatley Church and was very proud of her perfect attendance of 87 years at the Wheatley Family Reunion. She is survived by three daughters, Beverly Wheatley of Galestown, Kay Lankford of Sharptown, Md. and her husband Allen, and Joy Baker of Galestown and her husband Gary; four grandchildren, Jason Lankford, Christopher Lankford, Scott Baker and Jill Baker; and several nieces and nephews. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Emerson Wheatley who died on March 24, 1976; a brother, Darrell Wheatley and a sister, Edith Wheatley. Funeral services were held on Saturday, Aug. 1 at Wheatley Church in Seaford. The Revs. Ruth Tull and Dan Walker officiated. Interment followed in Cokesbury Cemetery. Allen Lankford, Gary Baker, Jason Lankford, Christopher Lankford, Scott Baker and Richard Bruner served as pallbearers. Donations in memory of Mrs. Wheatley may be made to the Wheatley Church

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009 Preservation Fund, c/o Beverly Wheatley, 5833 Wheatley Church Road, Seaford, DE 19973.

Lillie D. Campbell, 86

Lillie D. Campbell, of Laurel, went home to be with the Lord on August 2, 2009 at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. She was born in Laurel, a daughter of the late Albert Dickerson and Katie Ellen Cordrey Dickerson. She was a 1940 graduate of Laurel High School. She worked for the DuPont company of Seaford in the 1950s. Lillie was a wonderful homemaker, wife, and mother. She was well known in Sussex County for her delicious cooking. Many of her specialties include homemade cornbread, yeast rolls, and a coconut cake that would attract the most attention at the Mt. Pleasant church auctions. She was a lifetime member of Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church where she taught Sunday school for many years. She is survived by her sons, Dean Campbell Esq. and wife R. Alaine of Milton, Dr. William Campbell and wife Carlene of Laurel; a brother, J. Robert Dickerson of Laurel; grandchildren, Jonathan Campbell and wife Heather, Megan Campbell, Michael Campbell, and David Campbell. In addition to her parents she is preceded in death by her husband, Nelson Campbell; a brother, Joe Dickerson; and a sister, Pearl Northam. A funeral service was held at the Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church on Mt. Pleasant Church Road on August 5. The Reverend Dale Evans officiated. Interment was in Mt. Pleasant Church Cemetery. Contributions may be made in her honor to the Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church c/o Ellen Hearn, 36197 Susan Beach Road, Delmar, DE 19940. The Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home Laurel, is serving the Campbell Family. Online condolences can be sent by visiting www.delmarvaobits.com.

Robert L. Joseph Sr., 77

Robert L. Joseph Sr., 77, of Laurel, passed away on Thursday, July 30, 2009 at Christiana Care due to various health complications. Mr. Joseph was born on July 15, 1932 in Laurel, a son of the late Arthur and Mollie Joseph. Mr. Joseph, a veteran of the Korean War, worked at Crisscraft building ships until the factory shut down. He then

Special Thanks I would like to thank the BVFD, SVFD, VFW #4961, friends and family for the cards calls, visits, food, flowers and especially the prayers since my accident. Your concern for me has reached my heart. Thanks again!

Wayne Merritt 71-30 BVFD

worked as a carpenter for Lee Littleton until he retired in 1997. In addition to his parents he is preceded in death by two brothers, William and Junior Joseph, and a sister, Alice Robinson. He is survived by his wife of 31 years, Irene Joseph of Laurel; two sons, Robert L. Joseph Jr. and Daniel W. Joseph; two daughters, Loretta L. Butler and Jennifer M. Joseph, all of Laurel; two grandchildren, several nieces and nephews as well as cousins, brothers-in-law and sisters-inlaw. Service was held at Bennie Smith Funeral Home, Wednesday, Aug. 5. Burial was in Bethel Cemetery, Bethel. Arrangements were being handled by Bennie Smith Funeral Home, Seaford.

Christine McCabe Hudson, 85

Christine McCabe Hudson, of Seaford, died peacefully August 2, 2009 at the Delaware Hospice Center surrounded by her daughters. Born on May 17, 1924 in Roxana, she was the daughter of the late Raymond and Myrtha H. McCabe. Christine graduated from Selbyville High School in 1942 and was a homemaker, loving mother and devoted wife. She was a member of St. John’s United Methodist Church in Seaford, and was a member of the Seaford Acorn Club. Her husband, Elwood E. Hudson, died in 2002. She is survived by four daughters, Suzanne Morrow and her husband Bill of Ocean View, Cathy Deppa of Cushing, Wisconsin, Sheree Draucker and her husband Bill of Salisbury, MD, and Melinda Oriani and her husband Steve of Landenberg, PA; 11 grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. She also leaves behind her sisters, Marguerite Bunting of Fenwick Island, Neva West of Bethany Beach, Janice Smith and her husband Oliver of Bishopville, MD,

Loraine Cromer of Millville, and Debbie Clendaniel and her husband Howard of Georgetown; two brothers, Raymond McCabe, Jr. and his wife Janet of Fenwick Island, and J. Robert McCabe and his companion Barbara of Selbyville; and many nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be on Thursday, August 6, at 11 a.m. at St. John’s United Methodist Church, Pine & Poplar streets, Seaford, where friends may call from 10 to 11. Burial will be in the Delaware Veterans’ Memorial Cemetery, Millsboro. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in her memory to the American Cancer Society, 1138 Parsons Rd, Salisbury, MD 21801 and the Delaware Hospice Center, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963. Arrangements were by the Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford.

Richard Walmsley, 80

Richard Walmsley passed away surrounded by his family and friends at his home in St. Augustine on July 17, 2009. Richard retired from the U.S. Navy after 20 years of service. He then worked for the Department of Corrections at Florida State Prison for 25 years and finished his long career working for the St. John’s County Sheriff’s Office for five years. Visitation was held on Monday at Craig Funeral Home. Funeral services were held Tuesday at noon at Craig Funeral Home Chapel, followed by burial at Craig Memorial Park with full military honors. He is survived by his son, Richard and wife Julie Walmsley Jr.; two daughters, Toni W. Crawford and Marian Walmsley; three sisters, Marian Monaco, Naomi June Downs and Justilienna D. Beard; six grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren. His mother, Marian DeHainaut, wife, Norma G. Walmsley, and daughter, Pamela Ann Kish preceded him in death.


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

It seems like just yesterday you were starting school. Now you’re leaving home!

PAGE 29

Delaware Hospice helps kids at Camp New Hope By Beverly Crowl Thirty-two children and teens at Camp New Hope in Milford last week had a busy schedule. They did yoga, painted and constructed arts projects, hugged rabbits, pet a miniature horse, and participated in team sports and water games. Most importantly, they confronted their grief. Delaware Hospice offers this free, fourday camp experience to youth who have lost someone close to them. Camp New Hope provides participants a safe environment where they are encouraged to express their emotions and concerns with others who have suffered a similar loss. Traditional camp activities are balanced with those which invite the campers to remember and talk about their loved one. For example, campers decorated wooden ornaments to hang on a memory tree to honor their special person. They also painted and decorated memory boxes, then filled them with special photographs or mementos. One particularly effective bereavement activity is the metaphor of using a flower pot as a symbol of life, and then smashing the pot to represent how your life feels broken after the loss of a loved one. By gluing the pot back together, it helps the children see that although their lives are forever changed, they can become whole again. The cracks in the pot represent the scars on their hearts. Then by placing a plant in their pot, they can see that new life and good things can come from their rebuilding. Their hearts, like the rebuilt flower pot, can still support New Hope and new life. On the final day, a Memorial Service is held to honor the loved ones. The campers’ families, Delaware Hospice staff and volunteers are present at the service to show their support. Each camper stands

up, shares his or her story and memories and their memorial project which they created for their loved one. After the service, a memorial tree is planted and decorated with the children’s ornaments in remembrance of their loss. Camp New Hope is made possible through fundraising efforts in the community, donations of materials and food, and the incredible commitment of volunteers— some of whom take vacation time from their jobs to attend Camp. To learn more about New Hope, call 1-800-838-9800, or write to lsexton@delawarehospiceorg. To learn how you can support Delaware Hospice’s programs and services for the community, call Manny Arencibia, 1-800838-9800, or go to www.delawarehospice. org

Off To College

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Jeremy Breeding of Greenwood makes a new four-footed friend at Delaware Hospice’s Camp New Hope. Photo by Beverly Crowl

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Mail To: The Star, Circulation P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973 or Call The Star Office 302 Tyra Bartsch of Bridgeville, Rajine Bowe of Ellendale, Spring Vasey of Milford, and Rachael Breneman of Millsboro share their love with baby rabbits at Delaware Hospice’s Camp New Hope. Photo by Beverly Crowl

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PAGE 30

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

Memories of country stores and slower times I must tell you this is a week of mixed emotions for me as my time with Morning Star Publications will end on Tuesday, Aug. 18. I have certainly mixed emotions about this as I said, and a lot of advice along the way. I will talk to you more fully on this in my next column. No, the Phillies have not called and offered me a job. I would take it of course.

Pat MurPhy

Ronnie [Barron] was just another of the special people who made Laurel unique.

Walt’s Barber Shop in Laurel will close at 3 p.m. on Aug. 10, 11, 13, 14. I would like to think Walt is closing early on the 13th for my birthday, but I’m afraid it’s more important than that as he is going to Roxana to watch Laurel play in the Senior League Softball World Series. Walt has a granddaughter on that team, Brooke Evans, and another is playing the Pat Knight series there. Walt, I don’t blame you. I may be there, too. Fred Melvin’s hair cut may have to wait an extra day and it doesn’t matter anyway.

John Reagan called the Star the other day to talk to me and Monday morning we did have a nice conversation. John’s request was that I write something about the old store, (Bill Oliphant’s) on Sharptown Road next to Horsey’s Pond. The store is long gone now, but if you talk to people, the memories are there. One person I did not get to talk to was Harvey Holland who I was told would have a lot of memories of it. The store was a gathering place for residents of that side of town. They could get their Gulf and later Sinclair gas, bread, milk, some canned goods, ice cream, sodas, you know a little bit of everything, but not too much of anything. As Paul Barron, brother of Ronnie Barron said, farmers stopped there, youngsters, just a lot of people. “It was a time when people took the time to talk, a soda pop, pack of crackers, a halfhour’s conversation and go home.” Some of the youngsters who were frequent visitors to the store included John Reagan of course as well as Mike Ellis, Barry Carmine, Barry Hastings, Craig Littleton, Horace Pepper, the Kirk boys, Sonny Evans, the Spicers, John Ritchie, Ben Paradee, Bruce Harrington, and many more teens. John Reagan particularly remembers cold winter days when they would go in and put their gloves on the old wood stove. The kids and grown-ups played cards, played the bowling, pin ball and other amusements that drew people to the store. John’s memories

are total recall as he describes the old black and white television in the store. Sunbeam bread and Copes candy truck pulling up to restock the store. There was one other memory of this store that all of us of that era will always remember and that was the late Ronnie Barron. Whether it is at school or at the store, Ronnie made an impression. You see Ronnie had some extreme form of paralysis and Ronnie had it to deal with all 32 years of his short life. Ronnie attended Laurel school but his situation caused him to struggle greatly and his frustration sometimes came to the surface. Strong as a bull Ronnie, never-theless, accepted the teasing and was as wellliked as anyone there. Paul Barron said Ronnie attended a summer camp for paralyzed victims, where he learned to swim and played in sporting events. It was at the store where he was best known, however, and Paul said he swept floors, pumped gas and later got so he could wait on people. John Reagan says he can still see him tallying up a bill on a cigarette carton, many paid by credit but they always did pay. Ronnie was just another of the special people who made Laurel unique even if he and some of his friends threw a few soda bottles into near by Horsey’s Pond. Yes, everybody remembers those days. Ronnie went to work for the Town of Laurel in 1970 and in a tragic accident was killed at Chipman’s Pond in a car accident in 1972. Nearby the old store was the Blue Hen Farm owned by Howard Dickerson and across the pond lived the legendary character, Archie Perry and son, Bill. Archie was the one that had thousands of colorful glass pieces on poles in his yard. Many were electrified with Christmas bulbs and gave a brilliant array of color for all to see. John Reagan says there were many packages wrapped with old newspapers some dating back to 1916 in the house.

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Both the Perrys were also great storytellers and according to John, Bill Perry told him that the famous gangster John Dillinger picked tomatoes out of his garden. Yes, they were unique people and I know I’ve only scratched the surface, but I do know Phil Sheridan and I “sneaked or snuck” back there to look at his casket with the skeleton in it. While there, the irresistible urge to break a couple of bottles came to our 10-year-old minds. Yeah we did! You ask what happened to the old store, and Paul shared the story with me. On a Saturday around 1974, Paul cut the bolts on an air compressor in the old store, watering the sparks as he worked. After getting the compressor out, he went to town only to learn the fire whistle was for his place, the old store had burned. Today as I look at Laurel there are only two country stores left, the Bethel Store and Sandy Fork General Store. With these long gone country stores were interesting people, unique surroundings, and a slower life and for many of us we didn’t realize what a treasure we had. May the Bethel and Sandy Fork stores be here 100 years from now. They have still got time to make you feel like a valued customer. Thanks John. A couple of stories for you — and being we haven’t heard from “Sure Shot” Dick Whaley lately and I saw him in the drug store the other day, they are about him. I needed to get some information from my wife and he loaned me his cell phone to make a call. First one I’ve ever seen with a

coin slot for the calls. Dick is also very upset that another year has gone by and no election to the rabbit hunters “Hall of Fame,” as he got edged out by the great outdoorsman, Joe Hitchens, 502 to one in the voting. Dick’s wife Connie also voted for Joe. Dick also mentioned “my buddy” Al Simple, over to Seaford, saying they both were going to sue me. “Temple” Dick, not “Simple,” I told him. Lastly, there is no truth to the rumor that Rita Baker of Food Rite Hall of Fame is going to open a grocery store. Just kidding Rita, but a lot of people do ask about you. Now you know that’s a great story. Jack Dickerson and his International Tractor pulling the world’s biggest John Deere enthusiast’s tractor the other day. The camera caught the action and I am sure Jerry Warrington wishes it didn’t. Everyone in Laurel knows Jimmy Green. Jimmy was involved in a very serious auto accident a few weeks ago. Here’s wishing for a recovery for Jimmy. As many know Jimmy was employed by the Doctor Moyer family in the 1950s and 1960s and beyond that probably. Charlie Moyer keeps close tabs on Jimmy and as he said, he could use our prayers. Jimmy is definitely one of the good guys in Laurel. Have a great week everyone. I’m going to miss you!


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

PAGE 31

Festival Schedule

Preserve Your Family History

SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 2008

20610 Sussex Hwy. Rt. 13 North of Seaford

10 a.m. PARADE - King Street to Front Street to Walker Street to North Street to Nutter Park. Grand Marshal is the Rev. Diane Lofland. 11:15 a.m.

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PAGE 32

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

AFRAM Festival

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

PAGE 33

AFRAM Festival

Best Wishes for a Successful AFRAM Festival

Clifford “Biff” Lee Jeff Johnson, Seaford, was last year’s recipient of the Community Recognition Award. The award is given out each year during the opening ceremonies of the AFRAM festival to an individual who is making a difference in the community. Photo by Cassie Richardson

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PAGE 34

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival

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MORNING STAR

• AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

PAGE 35

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YARD SALE MULTI-FAMILY YARD Sale, Sat., 8/8, 8 a.m. - ?. 23841 German Rd., Seaford. 8/6

‘92 88 OLDS, motor & trans good, good for parts, $800 neg. 875-9401. 6/25

CAMPERS/ TRAILERS UTILITY TRAILER, 18’x83” wide 2 yrs old, $2000 OBO. 245-2278. 8/6 ‘95 RIALTO MOTOR HOME, fully equipped, $10,000. 875-3656. 7/23

FOR SALE NIGHT STAND, 13.5” x 17.5”, $10. Air Cond., 110 KW, $25. 875-5366. 8/6 TOOLS: DeWalt 12.5” thickness planer, new, $350. New Craftsman 1 1/2 hp Router & table w/set of 5 carbine bits, $120. New Porter Cable combo set in carrying case, drill, rotary & sabre saws, light & charger & 2 batteries, $115. 2368133. 8/6 LIKE NEW Mec 600G 12 gauge progressive loader & cover, over $600 new, asking $450. RCBS 1010 powder scales, like new, $50. Box of reloading equip., 4 die sets, case trimmer, Pacific balance scales, powder tricolor trigger, full gauge, primer flipper, powder funnel, etc., $100. 236-8133. 8/6 DBL. BOWL SS SINK w/ strainer baskets & 1-yr-old Moen single lever faucet w/spray nozzle, $60. 6280611. 7/30 OLD HAND SAWS, 24, $48 for all. Old wood horizontal lap barn siding, clean, no nails, about 500’. $450. 846-9788. 7/30

LR CURTAINS, 106x72, 70x72, heavy and lined. Kit. Curtains, 60x40. 875-3744. 8/6

18’ KAYAK BARGAIN, top of the line, comes with everything, a must see Easily a $2000 value. Asking $1100. 875-9775. 7/30

SWIMMING POOL, Lg. 18’ above ground, 4’ deep, portable, simple to erect, like new, 1 yr. old, with pump & instructions. $295. 410490-2415. 7/23

‘03 BASS TRACKER 17’, 40hp Outboard and Trailer, $4000. 443-845-9770. 7/30

ELEC. STOVE, Whirlpool, like new, almond color, $225 OBO. Mike, 245-2278. 7/23

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES

2-WHL. BASEBALL PITCHING Machine, batting cage, L-screen & ball feeder, $1700. 875-0768. 7/23

ANGEL FOOD MINISTRIES

1957 WHITEY FORD BB Card, in plastic cover, $50. 841-9274. 6/25

Laurel Nazarene Church, 875-7873 Lifeway Church of God, 337-3044

Extra Order Date: Sun., Aug. 9, 1-2 p.m.

2-MAN CROSS CUT SAW, orig. cond., $75. 841-9274. 6/25

For more info or to order on-line (with credit or debit card) see: www.angelfoodministries.com

Call 629-9788

August Order Date: Wed. Evening, Aug. 12 Distribution & Order Day: Sat. Morning, Aug. 29

Our Lady of Lourdes, 629-3591

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GUITAR - “72” Martin D35, appraised $2000. Sell for $1700. 629-4195. 7/16 OAK DINING TABLE & 6 chairs, 1 leaf, good cond., $125. 629-4427. 7/16 INTL. 2 BTM PLOW on rubber, new paint, great shape, $270. 846-9788. 7/16 ATLAS 12” BAND SAW on coaster stand, extra blades, $170. 846-9788. 7/16 CHIPPER/SHREDDER, Craftsman, 7.5 hp Briggs eng., used 2 seasons, exc. cond., $399. 628-0471. 7/9

FLY FISHING ROD & Reel, Martin Reel, teal ultra-light 8’ rod. $40. 875-8677. 7/9

MOHAWK CANOE, 16’, fiberglass, $100. 236-8133. 8/6

Balanced nutrition & variety with enough food to feed a family of four for a week for $30.

POWERHOUSE GYM SET w/competitor weight bench & weights, $70. 629-4195. 7/16

COMPLETE SURF FISHING OUTFIT: 5 rods w/ reels, sand spikes, tackle box w/rigs, etc., 2 rod racks: 1 chrome, 1 PVC. All $400. 875-7434. 7/30

BICYCLE FRONT WHEEL Assembly suitable for 26 x 1.95 tire. 629-6802. 8/6

OUTBOARD MOTOR, 25 hp, good working cond., 875-7119. 7/23

52” CEILING FAN, white Bellagio, by Harbor Breeze, 3 spd., with light kit. Can be used outdoors. Still in box, 30 yr. warranty, asking $50. 410-754-9564 7/16

TROY-BILT RIDER, 17.5/ 42” cut, in exc. cond., asking $750 OBO. 337-7872. 7/9

BOATS

WANTED: CHINA, handpainted by Etta D. Barker of Delmar, c. 1950’s or before. 410-546-2934. 7/23

BUZZ-AROUND SCOOTER, Battery operated, cost $1200 new. Selling for $500. 875-4570. 7/16

TWO 5200 BTU AIR COND., 110V, like new, slightly used, $60 ea. 8758677. 7/30

WANTED

10 OLD 6-PANE WOODEN WINDOW Sashes, $5 ea. 846-9788. 7/23

CORNINGWARE French white 1 1/2 & 2 1/2 qt. round casseroles w/covers, two 7-oz. ramekins, $17. 236-9075. 7/23 SKI TRIP TICKETS. Vail, CO., Jan. 23-30, 2010. Incl. air fr. BWI, lodging & 5/8 day lift pass at 5 resorts.

SHERRY LYNN’S

$1449 pp. 302-228-9825 or 410-546-5551. 7/16

CARTER STARTER Pedal Steel Guitar, accessories & case. Brand new cond., $575 OBO. 337-7872. 7/9

Just For Kids

“ A Distinctive Resale Shop ”

BACK-TO-SCHOOL CLOTHING Lowe red That Won’t Pric Break The Budget! es! Brand Names! Sizes NB - Jrs.!

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Delmar, DE 19940 • 302-875-4717 3 Mi North of Delmar WaWa Hrs: Wed.-Fri. 10-5; Sat. 10-3

AIR COND., 5200 BTU, like new, hardly used, $60. 8758677. 7/9 MOBILE HOME WINDOWS, regular, good cond., all sizes, also screens. 6283878. 7/9 LOST IN SPACE talking robot w/alien, $25. 6281880. 7/2 SEALY POSTUREPEDIC Adjustable, twin bed. Like brand new! $475, mattress & box incl. Cherry wood headboard, remote, video instructions. Call 536-7532 or cell 443-735-9783. 7/2 GE SIDE-BY-SIDE Refrig. Freezer, 3 yrs old, $300. 337-8924. 7/2 VOIT PRO RIDER, $30. 628-8215. 7/2 WROUGHT IRON PATIO SET, 10 pc. with covers, $1850 new; asking $500. Came fr. Scott’s Furniture. 629-4427. 7/2

LOCAL FUNERAL HOME SERVING SUSSEX COUNTY FOR OVER 100 YEARS

Seeking P/T employees to assist with all aspects of Funeral Service. Great opportunity for a second job and/or retirees. Requirements: Must be available to work nights and weekends as on call personnel. Must be professional in appearance and conduct. Must have excellent DMV record. Must meet basic physical/lifting requirements (80lbs). Must pass background check. Qualified applicants please submit resume with references to:

Parsell Funeral Homes P.O. Box 358 Nassau, DE 19969 parsellfuneralhomes.com


ATTORNEYS

AUTO ACCIDENT AND PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS

Initial Consultation Free No Fee Unless You�Recover Evening and Weekend Appointments

FUQUA and YORI, P.A. ATTORNEYS AT LAW

The Circle • Georgetown • 856-7777 *Listing areas of practice does not represent official certification as a specialist in those areas.

CONCRETE

• DRIVEWAYS • GARAGES • SIDEWALKS • PATIOS

MR. CONCRETE 410-742-0134

Mark Donophan

Licensed & Insured

Free Estimates

HANDYMAN

EXTRA HANDS C. Jay Reaser

302-875-3099

jayreaser@gmail.com

40 Years of “Handy Man” Experience. Our Rates Are Great! Call us to compare!

LAWN CARE

Millstone River Lawn Care LLC

OWNER OPERATED ~ LAUREL, DEL.

Lawn Mowing, Pruning, Spring & Fall Clean Up, Bed Renovations, Garden Rototilling

302-260-2679

REMODELING

BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY

ATTORNEYS

BANKRUPTCY FREE CONSULTATION

Gerry Gray

Call For Appt. Open Tuesday thru Sunday

ELECTRICIAN

Ken’s Electrical Service All Residential Wiring

Kitchens, Baths, Offices, Floors Tubs, Showers, Shower Doors. 26836 Lewes Georgetown Hwy. (Rte 9) www.bathkitchenandtile.com

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markgandybkt@yahoo.com

Seaford, Delaware

EMPLOYMENT

629-3795

Cell 228-5435

HOME LOANS

MetLife Home Loans > $8,000 tax credits available for first-time homebuyers > Great refinancing rates and options Call: Treg Adams (302) 858-1332 * This advertisement does not constitute tax advice; please consult a tax advisor regarding your situation. All loans subject to approval. Certain restrictions may apply. Mortgage financing provided by MetLife Home Loans, a division of MetLife Bank, N.A. Equal Housing Lender. 2000 METLIFE, INC. L0509039380[exp0510][All States][DC]

LAWN CARE

GRASS CUTTING

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Sofa: $55 * Loveseat: $45

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Payday advances should be used for short-term financial needs only, not as a long term financial solution. Customers with credit difficulties should seek credit counseling.

FARM & HOME

FITNESS

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302-530-3376

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LAUREL REALTY

“Making A Difference” 1128 S. Central Ave. Laurel, Delaware

Directly Across from the Laurel Senior High School

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302-875-3000 800-887-3001

TAX SERVICE

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800-492-0444 Fax 302-629-0745 504 Bridgeville Rd., Seaford, DE Mon-Thurs. 10-6, Fri & Sat 10-7

CARPET REPAIRS UPHOLSTERY CLEANING:

PAYDAY LOANS for up to $1000

320 W. DuPont Hwy. Ste. 2, Millsboro, DE 19966

Donald L. Short, Owner 1004 W. Stein Hwy.Nylon Capital Shopping Ctr., Seaford, DE

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Up to 5 rms: $99.95 2 rms: $54.95 Scotchgard: $10/room $10/furn. item

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CARPET CLEANING Traffic Areas

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M-F 7:30-6; Sat. 8-4 Full Service Nursery:

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Healthy Hair Clinique

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BARBER/BEAUTY

Independently Owned & Operated 320 W. DuPont Hwy. Ste. 2 31A Creamery Lane Millsboro, DE 19966 Easton, MD 21601

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To Advertise In This Directory Call

302-629-9788

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Also Offering Premium Spring Water

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MORNING STAR BENCH PRESS, $50 OBO. 337-7628. 7/2 TORO MOWER, self-propelled, 6.5 hp, rear bag, key start, like new $300. 841-9274. 6/25 MOVIE DVDs. SciFi & horror, $2.50 ea. $65 for all 32. Books - mostly mystery & romance, $2 bag. 8753744. 6/25 TOOLS: Planer $175; Miter Saw $150; Jointer $200; Radial Saw $150; Band Saw $150. 745-5649. 6/25

ANIMALS, ETC. STUD SERVICE Available: A 1 1/2 - yr - old, long-haired Bluepoint Siamese (3/4) male cat (Doesn’t spray). $100. 302-430-2040. 8/6 BARNYARD CHICKENS, full grown. 875-2893. 7/30 LIMOUSINE HEIFER approx. wt. 525 lbs $425, and Holstein steer approx. wt. 350 lbs. $210. 875-4952

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LEGALS PUBLIC NOTICE

The Mayor and Council of the Town of Laurel, Delaware will sit as Court of Appeal for hearing of appeals from assessment list for FY-2010. The hearing will be held in the Mayor and Council Chambers, located at 201 Mechanic Street, on Monday, August 17, 2008 beginning at 7:00 p.m. or as soon as possible thereafter. MAYOR AND COUNCIL OF LAUREL 8/6/1tc

PUBLIC HEARING

The Commissioners of Bridgeville will hold a Public Hearing to afford interested parties of 603 N. Cannon Street, Bridgeville, Delaware, an opportunity to show cause why the building investigated by the Dangerous Building Inspection Committee should not be declared to be a hazard to life and property and why it should not be ordered to be demolished. The Public Hearing is scheduled for 7:00 P.M., or as soon as possible thereafter at the monthly Commission Meet-

• AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

ing on Monday, August 10, 2009, at Town Hall, 101 N. Main Street, Bridgeville, Delaware. COMMISSIONERS OF BRIDGEVILLE TOWN MANAGER BONNIE WALLS 7/30/2tc

NOTICE

Estate of Irma Jean Hastings, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Irma Jean Hastings who departed this life on the 5th day of July, A.D. 2009 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Lee Hastings, Gary Hastings, Ricky J. Hastings, Joan G. Davis on the 22nd day of July, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Executors without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Executors on or before the 5th day of March, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Executors: Alton Lee Hastings

Large Public On-Site Single Estate Auction Sale Allen & Marshall Auctioneers is pleased to offer the lifelong Living Estate of Richard Hasting

Saturday August 15th, 2009 at 9:33 AM

36241 Providence Church Rd., Delmar, Delaware ALL ITEMS SOLD ABSOLUTE WITH NO MINIMUM AND NO RESERVE!! ANTIQUE and MODERN FURNITURE, GLASSWARE, TOOLS, LG SELECTION OF COSTUME JEWELRY, LAWN MOWER & MORE!

Directions: (From Salisbury and Points South) Travel North on US 13 for 3 miles to the Intersection of RT 13 and DE Rt 54. Turn left onto DE Rt 54 and travel 2.5 miles to Providence Church Rd on right. Turn right on Providence Church Rd and travel 1 mile to 36241 Providence Church Rd on right. Signs Posted. Glass/China/Collectibles (9:30 AM): Enormous amount of costume and sterling jewelry to include: sterling & amethyst ring, sterling bracelets, watches, cameos, beaded necklaces, pins, brooches and moreamber double globe table lamp, hand painted double globe vanity lamp, approx. 50pc American Limoges “Bridal Banquet” pattern china set, LG pattern glass punch bowl and cup set with under tray, Currier and Ives “the Old Grist Mill” pattern china, LG Qty of dolls to include: Effanbee, Noble Arts, Designers Guild and more- vintage Dr. Pepper clock, approx. 48pc W. M. Rodgers silver plate flatware set, ironstone china, silver overlay cream and sugar, Pyrex mixing bowls, hand painted Italian lamps, brass pedestal telephone, Amberina oil lamp, pattern glass pitcher and glass set, etched champagnes, Taylor barometer, amber compote, corning ware, kitchen wares, LG qty of Christmas ornaments, LG Qty of artificial flowers and more. Furniture (11 AM): Emperor W. German Cherry broken arch grandfather clock w/ hand painted working automatum, 3pc wrought iron porch set, Rockport maple dining table and 4 chairs, carved Oak single drawer over 2 door server, antique Oak 3 drawer chest, Oak 5 drawer lift top jewelry chest, Maple dinette set with Windsor back chairs, Temple Stuart Maple step back hutch, Cherry Armoire w/ carved clamshell design, Sumpter Cabinet Co. Maple dresser with mirror, Sumpter Maple double bed, Depression era cedar chest, Mersman Maple two tier lamp table, Maple rocker, Poplar single drawer open face end table, Mahogany tri-fed plant stand, Cavalier cedar chest, Pr Oak cushion top bar stools, La-Z- Boy upholstered sofa and chair, redwood picnic table and benches, porch table and chairs and more! Lawn Mowers/Tools/ Misc (12 noon): Troy-Bilt 6.75 HP 21” self propelled push mower (like new), Dynamark 12HP 38” riding lawn mower with bagger, Murray 3 ½ HP 22” push mower, 30ft aluminum extension ladder, 16ft aluminum extension ladder, 3’x3’ yard cart, Weslo speed training tred mill, Sanyo Vizon 27” TV, Electrolux 4000 upright vacuum, Kenmore Powermate vacuum, vintage cruiser bicycle, wheel barrow, Davidson 6ft aluminum step ladder, extension cords, Homelite XL 16” gas chain saw, McCullah electric chain saw, Skil saw, hedge trimmers, Sears model 500 13ft 3pc surf rod and reel combo, vintage Penn and Kmart boat rod and reel combos, Shakespeare Alpha 12ft surf rod, Ortho lawn and garden sprayer, wire wheel lawn wagon, Schauer battery charger, oscillating floor fan, BBQ grill, and still discovering! Terms Personal Property: Cash Or Approved Check Day of sale. Visa/MC/Amex/Discover. 13% Buyer Premium. 3% Discount for cash or check. Everything Sold “As Is” with no warranties of any kind. Auction conducted onsite. Two Auctioneers. Some seating provided. Food served .

View Website for Additional Information & Pictures!

Allen & Marshall Auctioneers and Appraisers, LLC

“The Auction Experts”

Auctioneer: Dave Allen 410-835-0384 • www.AllenMarshallAuctions.com

31435 Mount Pleasant Rd. Laurel, DE 19956 Gary Hastings 32463 Bi State Blvd. Laurel, DE 19956 Ricky J. Hastings 11393 Taylor Mill Rd. Laurel, DE 19956 Joan G. Davis 31179 Shady Acres Ln. Lot B18 Laurel, DE 19956 Attorney: Stephen P. Ellis, Esq. Elis & zabo LLP P.O. Box 574 Georgetown, DE 19947 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 8/6/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Yvonne Frances Coleman, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Yvonnne Frances Coleman who departed this life on the 19th day of June, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Kimberly Malone on the 20th day of July, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administratrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administratrix on or before the 19th day of February, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administratrix: Kimberly Malone 3501 Woodhaven Rd., Unit 620 Philadelphia PA 19154 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 7/30/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Nather Lee Page, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Nather Lee Page who departed this life on the 19th day of June, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Verdie Page Burris on the 8th day of July, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administratrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administratrix on or before the 19th day of February, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administratrix: Verdie Page Burris 709 Woolford St. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 7/23/3tc

PAGE 37 SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: Lot 88 Phase 1 in the Subdivision known as “HERITAGE SHORES” Town of Bridgeville, recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Northwest Fork Hundred, State of Delaware recorded at Plat Book 88, Page 6 in Revised Plat by McCrone Engineering & Environmental Sciences, filed on September 17, 2004. BEING the same lands and premises which U.S. Home Corporation, by Deed dated October 31,2005 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3229, Page 47, and re-recorded in Deed Book 3271 and 230, did grant and convey unto Grace Angelier. Tax Parcel: 1-31-14.00136.00 Property Address: 106 Will’s Island Drive, Bridgeville, DE 19933 Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 21, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 25, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days

of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of GRACE ANGELIER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece or parcel of land lying and being situate in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, in the State of Delaware, being known and designated as Lot 594E3, Parcel “C”, Newberg Lots, as shown on a survey prepared by Coast Survey, Inc., registered surveyors, dated August 6, 1992 lying on the Southeasterly right of way line of County Road #594 adjoining Lot #594E-2 and also lands now or formerly of Adison Tatman and Thurman Adams, and being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a point on the southeast right of way line of County Road #594 (50 feet wide) a corner for this lot and being the front point of a new line dividing the original lot in half and being located 936 feet more or less northeast from the extension of the centerline of County road #602; thence continuing with said right of way line along a curve to the left having a radius of 3,113.45; an arc distance of 164.20 feet (Chord =North 31 degrees 36 minutes 29 seconds East, 164.18 feet) to an iron pipe set; thence leaving said right of way line and with Lot #594-E-2 (Parcel “B”) South 72 degrees 36 minutes 24 seconds East, 150 feet to an iron pipe set and continuing with same bearing 402.53 feet, a total of 552.53 feet, to a point in the center of Gum Branch Ditch; thence with said ditch South 34 degrees 39 minutes 43 seconds West 251.31 feet to a point; thence leaving said ditch and with the aforesaid new line dividing the original lot in half, North See LEGALS—page 38


PAGE 38 LEGALS - from Page 37 63 degrees 44 minutes 33 seconds West 524.51 feet to the point of beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. AND BEING the same lands and premises conveyed unto Dennis A. Collins by deed of Dennis A. Collins and Heather K. Collins f/k/a Heather K. Joseph, dated September 14, 2005 and of record in the office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Deed Book 3205, Page 188. Tax Parcel: 4-30-10.0020.01 Property Address: 14461 Oak Road, Greenwood, DE 19950 Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 21, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 25, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DENNIS A. COLLINS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/6/2tc

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629-9788

MORNING STAR SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate in the County of Sussex, State of Delaware and being more particularly known and designated as Lot 4 as shown on a Plot prepared by Kercher Engineering, Inc., dated December 9, 2004 and filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Georgetown, Delaware in Plot Book 101, Page 40, reference thereto being had and will more fully and at large appear. AND BEING the same lands and premises which Dickerson, Inc., by deed dated August 30, 2007 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware did grant and convey unto BARBARA L. DICKERSON. Tax Parcel: 4-30-16.0021.11 Property Address: 12427 Redden Road, Bridgeville, DE Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 21, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 25, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days

• AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of BARBARA L. DICKERSON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, more particularly bounded and described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a concrete marker on the southerly right-of-way of Delaware Route 20, said highway having a right-of-way of 60 feet, said corner also being the northwesterly comer of lands of Douglas Miller, thence with the Miller lands South 03 degrees 25 minutes 41 seconds East, 229.09 feet to another concrete marker, a comer for these lands and lands now or formerly of Eugene Thackara, thence with the lands of Thackara, South 86 degrees 34 minutes 19 seconds West, 100.00 feet to a concrete marker on the line of lands and a comer now or formerly of Joseph Koski, thence with the Koski lands South 86 degrees 34 minutes 19 seconds West, 100.00 feet to an iron pipe found, thence running with the lands now or formerly of Robert Reed, North 03 degrees 25 minutes 41 seconds West, 230.00 feet to a concrete marker on the right-of-way of Delaware Route 20, thence with the right-of-way of said road North 86 degrees 34 minutes 19 seconds East, 98.00 feet to a point of curvature with a curve to the right with a Delta of 1 degree 01 minute 36 seconds and a Radius of 5694.64 feet and a chord bearing of North 87 degrees 05 minutes 07 seconds East and a distance of 102.00 feet home to the point and place of beginning as surveyed by John L. Conner and Associates, Land Surveyors.

AND BEING the same lands and premises which Scott Brendon Lafayette and Harold Lafayette by deed dated July 19, 2006 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Record 3347, Page 259 did grant and convey unto SCOTT BRENDON LAFAYETTE, in fee. Tax Parcel: 5-31-12.0076.02 Property Address: 4480 Stein Highway, Seaford, DE Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 21, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 25, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of SCOTT BRENDON LAFAYETTE and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/6/2tc

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SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece and parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, and more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument set on the westerly side of Sussex County Road 585, being a corner for these lands and lands now or formerly of Nora M. Marvil, and being 0.45 miles more or less in a northerly direction from Road 32; thence north 79 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds west a distance of 21 0.00 feet to a pipe set, being a corner for these lands, lands now or formerly of Nora M. Marvil and lands nor or formerly of Dalton B. Pratt; thence north 10 degrees 49 minutes 38 seconds west a distance of 197.81 feet to a pipe set, being a corner for these lands and lands now or for-

merly of Dalton B. Pratt; thence north 79 degrees 10 minutes 22 seconds east a distance of 183.97 feet to a pipe set at the westerly side of Sussex County Road 585 aforesaid; thence south 10 degrees 49 minutes 38 seconds east a distance of 122.99 feet to a point; thence with a curve south 15 degrees 50 minutes 27 seconds east a chord distance of 152.64 feet back to the concrete monument marking the place of beginning, said to contain 1.000 acres of land, more or less, as shown on the plot prepared from a survey made by Miller-Lewis, Inc., in July 1980, a copy of which is attached to and made a part of this deed. BEING the same lands and premises which Dalton B. Pratt and Gabby G. Pratt, by Deed dated August 8, 1980, and recorded in the Office for the Recording of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 1019, Page 38, did grant and convey unto Jeffrey C. Passwaters and Kay N. Passwaters, in fee. Tax Parcel: 5-30-9.0035.01 Property Address: 12986 Woodbridge Road, Greenwood, DE 19950 Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check See LEGALS—page 39

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the Town of Laurel, Delaweare (herein called the “OWNER”) at the offices of the Mayor and Council, Town Hall, 201 Mechanic Street, Laurel, Delaware 19956 until 2:00 p.m. local time on WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009. Bids will be publicly opened at said location and read aloud.

PHASE 3 WATER MAIN IMPROVEMENTS CONTRACT DURATION: 120 CALENDAR DAYS

Work consists generally of the installation of approximately 3,000 feet of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) water main including valves, hydrants, water services, meter pits and appurtenances. Paveent restoration consists of approximately 7,400 square yards of milling and 7,400 square yards of 2 inch bituminous pavement overlay. Contract documents may be examined at the offices of the Mayor and Council, Town Hall, 201 Mechanic Street, Laurel, Delaware 19956, and George, Miles & Buhr, LLC, 206 West Main Street, Salisbury, Maryland. Copies of the Contract Documents may be obtained at the offices of GEORGE, MILES & BUHR, LLC, 206 West Main Street, Salisbury, Maryland 21801 upon payment of Ninety Dollars ($90.00) for each set, non-refundable. Checks made payable to George, Miles & Buhr, LLC. Each Bid must be accompanied by a BID BOND payable to the OWNER for ten (10) percent of the total amount of the BID. No bidder may withdraw his bid within ninety (90) days after the actual date of the opening thereof. The right is reserved, as the interests of the Town of Laurel may appear, to reject any and all bids, to waive any informalities in bids received, and to accept or reject any items of any bid. A pre-bid meeting will be held at 2:00 p.m., local time on WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12TH, 2009, at the Offices of the Mayor and Council, Town Hall, Laurel, Delaware, to allow Contractors an opportunity to obtain information on the project from the Consulting Engineer and the OWNER. Attendance at the prebid meeting is mandatory for BIDDERS on this project. Town of Laurel reserves the right to extend the time and place of Bid Opening on not less than 2 calendar days notice by certified delivery. Town of Laurel John Shwed, Mayor


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 38 payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 21, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 25, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JEFFREY C. & KAY N. PASSWATERS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, tract, piece and parcel of land and being situate in City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being part of Lots 159 and 160 of Nanticoke City, and more particularly described in a recent survey by Brad A. Temple, Professional Land Surveyor, dated May 30, 1995, attached hereto and made a part hereof, as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at an iron rebar set in the westerly right-of-way of Walnut

Street; said iron rebar set marking a common corner for the lands herein and the remaining portion of Lot 159; thence running along and with the right-of-way of Walnut Street South 12 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds East 100.00 feet to a set iron rebar; thence turning and running along and with the line of lands herein and with the northerly right-of-way of Harrington Street South 78 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West 75.00 feet to a set iron rebar; thence turning and running along and with the line of lands herein North 12 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West 100.00 feet to a set iron rebar, said set iron rebar marking a common comer for the lands herein and the remaining portion of lot 160; thence turning and running along and with the line of lands herein and Lots 160 and 159 North 78 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds East 75.00 feet home to the point and place of BEGINNING. BEING the same land and premises that Abbott and Abbott Construction, Inc. by deed dated June 9, 1995 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2055, Page 294, did grant and convey unto Keith H. Hubbard and Deborah J. Hubbard, in fee. Tax Parcel: 5-31-13.10134.10 Property Address: 410 Harrington Street, Seaford, DE 19973 Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 21, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 25, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at

SHERIFF SALE

PAGE 39

• AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of KEITH H. & DEBORAH J. HUBBARD and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/6/2tc

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain parcel of land lying and being situate in Sussex County, Delaware, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at an iron pipe located in the Westerly right-of-way line of U.S. Road #13A, being the Southeasterly corner of the herein being conveyed, and also being 0.56 mines +/- Northerly from County Road 4931; thence running along the lands now or formerly of Dathiette M. Hearn South 74 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 547.15 feet to an iron pipe, said iron pipe also lying in the Eastern right-of-way of Con Rail Railroad; thence turning and running with the Easterly right-of-way line of Con Rail Railroad North 17 degrees 47 minutes 42 seconds West 88.75 feet to an iron pipe; thence turning and running along the lands now or formerly of Rose H. Foskey North 74 degrees 39 minutes 02 seconds East 550.45 feet to an iron pipe; thence turning and running along the Westerly rightof-way line of U.S. Road #13A, South 15 degrees 39 minutes 57 seconds East 88.50 feet to the point and place of beginning. Said to contain 1.115 acres of land more or less, as shown on a survey by D.A. Morris, dated December 13, 1989. BEING the same lands conveyed to Bankers Trust Company of California, N.A., as trustee for Vendee Mortgage Trust 1994-3 by the Administrator of Veteran’s Affairs, dated September 22, 1994, recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex

County, Delaware at Deed Book 2011, page 147. BEING the same lands conveyed to Carl W. Allen, III from Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, by Deed dated June 29, 2005, and by a Trustee’s Deed from Deutsche Bank National Trust Company as Trustee, formerly known as Bankers Trust Company of California, not in its Individual Capacity by solely as Trustee on behalf of Vendee Mortgage Trust 1994-3, dated August 12,2008, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware at Deed Book 3607, page 57. Tax Parcel: 1-32-12.0043.00 Property Address: RD 4 Box 383, Laurel DE 19956 Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 21, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 25, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of CARL W. ALLEN, III and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/6/2tc

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SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot piece and parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the Town of Seaford, County of Sussex and State of Delaware and being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at an iron stob at the intersection of Shipley Street and Juniper Street in said town; thence by and with Juniper Street, South 79 degrees 33 minutes West, 185 feet to an iron spike at the curb base on Juniper Street, a corner for this lot and lands of W.R. Breasure; thence by and with these lands and lands of said W.R. Breasure, South 12 degrees 00 minutes East, 95 feet to a pipe, a comer for this lot and lands of Albert E. Rosenbauer thence by and with these lands and lands of said Rosenbauer, North 79 degrees 30 minutes East 175 feet to an iron stob on the southwesterly side of Shipley Street; thence by and with the sidewalk of Shipley Street, North 12 degrees 00 minutes West 49.80 feet to the iron spike, the place of beginning. Be the contents thereof what they may. Tax Parcel: 5-31-13.1025.00 Property Address: 218 North Shipley Street, Seaford, DE 19973 Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 21, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 25, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the

Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOANNE WESCOTT and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain piece and parcel of land being known as part of Lots 43 and 44 of “NANTICOKE CITY” situated In the City of Seaford, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, and as shown on survey of Temple-Sellers, Inc., dated June 21, 2005 and more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a pipe found at a corner for these lands and those of Chas. S. Lankford and on the northerly side of Harrington Street; thence with Harrington Street South 78’ 0’ 00” West a distance of 75.00 feet to a rebar found; thence with Maple Street North 12” 00’ 00” West a distance of 100.20 feet to a rebar found thence with lands of Heritage Investment Properties, Inc., North 78’ 00’ 00” East a distance of 75.00 feet to a rebar found; thence with lands of Lankford South 12’ 00’ 00” East a distance of 100.20 feet home to the point and place of beginning, and containing 7,515 square feet, more or less. Tax Parcel: 5-31-13.10156.00 Property Address: Not Available Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid drivSee LEGALS—page 40


PAGE 40 LEGALS - from Page 39 er’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 21, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 25, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RICHARD A. ASHBY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being known and designated as LOT ONE (1), ABINGTON LAKE, more fully shown on the subdivision plot of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 86, page 81, together with any and all improvements located thereon, together with access via the 50-foot rightof-way shown in Plot Book 86, page 81. This property is located

MORNING STAR in the vicinity of land used primarily for agricultural purposes on which normal agricultural uses and activities have been afforded the highest priority use status. It can be anticipated that such agricultural uses and activities may now or in the future involve noise, dust, manure and other odors, the use of agricultural chemicals and nighttime farm operations. The use and enjoyment of this property is expressly conditioned on acceptance of any annoyance or inconvenience which may result from such normal agricultural uses and activities. SUBJECT to any and all restrictions, reservations, conditions, easements and agreements of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware. 3. Street Address of Property: Lot 1, Abington Lake, Seaford, Delaware 19973 (26827 Adams Road, Seaford, Delaware 19973) Lot 1, Abington Lake, Seaford, Delaware 19973 (26819 Adams Road, Seaford, Delaware 19973) Office of the Recorder of Deeds, Sussex County Deed Record Book 3029, Page 77 Tax Parcel: 2-31-21.0016.04 Property Address: Lot 1, Abington Lake, Seaford, DE 19973 Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 21, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 25, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with

• AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOSEPH W. & KIRSTEN K. ROBINSON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, and State of Delaware, more particularly described according to a survey prepared by Thomas a. Temple, dated September 25, 1997, as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron marker found on the easterly right of way line of U.S. Route No. 13, North bound lane, at a point located 51.0 feet east from the easterly edge of the pavement, being a common corner for this lot and Lands of William Squillante; thence, by and with the easterly right of way line of U.S. Route No. 13, North bound lane, North 18 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West, 100.00 feet to a pipe found marking a common corner for this lot and Lands of Anthony P. LeCompte; thence, by and with Lands of Anthony P. LeCompte, North 72 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds East, 200.00 feet to an iron rebar marking a common corner for this lot, Lands of Anthony P. LeCompte, and on line of Lands of Robert Howard; thence, by and with Lands of Robert Howard, South 18 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds East, 100.00 feet to an iron rebar found marking a common corner for this lot and Lands of William Squillante; thence, by and with Lands of William Squillante, South 72 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West, 200.00 feet, home to the point and place of Beginning, containing 20,000 square feet of land, more or less, with all improvements located thereon. BEING the same lands and premises which Peter A. Wedderien, by Deed dated August 28, 2002 and recorded in the Office of

the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book-2744, Page 203, did grant and convey title unto Alan S. Collins, Jr. and Angela M. Collins. Tax Parcel: 2-32-12.00132.02 Property Address: 30661 Sussex Highway, Laurel, DE 19956 Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 21, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 25, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ANGELA M. & ALAN S. COLLINS, JR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece, parcel and lot of land lying and being situate in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex

County, Delaware, and being part of a larger tract of lands originally owned by Lewis J. Swartzentruber and Naomi Swartzentruber, his wife, which larger tract was located generally North 3,300 feet more or less from the road from Greenwood to Owens Station and which larger tract was originally bounded on the North by a private road which separated these lands from lands now or formerly of Laban Swartzentruber, on the South by lands now or formerly of Harold Mervine, on the West by a ditch that separated these lands from the lands now or formerly of Mark Swartzentruber, and on the East by lands now or formerly of Mark and Eli Swartzentruber, and being more particularly described as follows: BEING the same lands and premises which John M. Swartzentruber, Sr. and Marjorie G. Swartzentruber, his wife, by Indenture dated February 20, 2002, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, in Deed Book 02679, Page 342, did grant and convey unto John M. Swartzentruber, Jr., party in fee. Tax Parcel: 4-30-5.0066.00 Property Address: 6.66 acres of unimproved land, situate north of the road from Greenwood to Owens Station, also known as tax parcel no. 4-30-5.00-66.00, Kent County, Delaware. Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 21, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 25, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed

is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOHN M. SWARTZENTRUBER, JR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: For All That Certain Piece, Parcel, Lot, Or Tract Of Land Designated County District Parcel 5-30 10.0077.00, Addressed And Known 63 Duck Creek Lane, Being Lot 63 As Shown On A Record Major Land Development Plan: Recorded In And For Sussex County In Record Plot Book 59 Page 209 For The Subdivision Lots Of The Cove, Phase I, Situated North West Fork Hundred, Sussex County, The First State: Delaware, Being More Particularly Located And Ascertained By The Following Metes And Bounds Description, Written By The P.E.L.S.A. Company, Inc., Land Consultants And Surveyors In Accordance With The Location Given For Lot 63, As Shown On Said Record Plan Above, Thus. Bounded And Described, To Wit: Beginning At A Point And Place Situate In The Westerly Side Duck Creek Lane (50.00 Feet Wide R.O.W.) Located At A Common Corner In The Division Line For Lots 63 And 64, Being Found The Following Single (1) Line And Course From The Easterly End Of A 25.00 Feet Radius Junction Curve Joining At Its Westerly End With The Southeasterly Side Cart Branch Circle (50.00 Feet Wide R.O.W.): Along An Arc Of Curve Turning Right On A Radius Of 495.00 Feet: Delta 06 Degrees 58 Minutes 00 Seconds Arc Length 60.18 Feet To The Point And Place Of Beginning; Thence, Commencing From And Leaving Said Place Of Beginning And Running Along Said See LEGALS—page 41


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 40 Westerly Side DI Ck Creek Lane Along An Arc Of Curve Turning Right On A Radius Of 495.00 Feet: Delta 09 Degrees 42 Minutes 09 Seconds - Arc Length 83.83 Feet To A Point; Thence, Along The Division Line For Lois 63 And62 South 57 Degrees 30 Minutes 06 Seconds West 100.00 Feet To A Point: Thence, Along The Division Line For Lots 63 And 54 Along An Arc Of Curve Turning Left On A Radius Of 395.00 Fee 1 “: Delta 09 Degrees 42 Minutes 09 Seconds - Arc Length 66.89 Feet To A Point: Thence, Along Aforesaid Division Line For Lots 63 And 64 North 47 Degrees 47 Minutes 55 Seconds East 100.00 Feet To Aforesaid Westerly Side Duck Creek Lane To The First Mentioned Point And Place Of Beginning. The Area Contained Herein Being 0.173 Acres Of Land, Be They The Same, More Or Less. Recorder Of Deeds Being the same lands and premises which Debbie L. May and Robert L. May, Jr. did grant and convey unto Michael B. Workman and Marie Workman by deed dated December 16, 2005 and recorded on February 3, 2006 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 03267 Page 175. Tax Parcel: 5-30-10.0077.00 Property Address: 63 Duck Creek Lane, Greenwood, DE 19950 Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 21, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 25, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at

the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MICHAEL B. & LISA MARIE WORKMAN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware and being more particularly bounded and described as follows, to wit: Beginning at a stake located among the Southeasterly right of way line of Road No. 468 leading from Laurel and Concord, a corner for this lot and lot designated as Lot 3; thence along said Road 468 Southwest 39 degrees 25’ 12” 125 feet to a concrete marker; a corner for this lot and lot 5; thence along lot 5, Southeast 50 degrees 35’ 200 feet to a concrete monument and lands now or formerly of Lloyd J. Brittingham; thence along Brittingham lands Northeast 39 degrees 25’ 125 feet to a concrete monument and the lot designated as lot 3; thence with the said lot 3 Northwest 50 degrees 35’ 200 feet back to the place of Beginning, as shown on a survey made by Harold J. Cook in May, 1974 and designated thereon as Lot No.4, Section B. Parce1# 1-32-12.00-131.03 Being the same lands and premises which John Theodore Blades and Beverly B. Blades, did grant and convey unto Roger Anthony Winston, by deed dated July 28,2000 and recorded on August 1,2000 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2507 at Page 304. Tax Parcel: 1-31-12.00131.03 Property Address: 28745 Discount Land Road, Laurel, DE 19956 Registration is required

• AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 21, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 25, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ROGER ANTHONY WINSTON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Blades, Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: Beginning at a pipe located on the southerly rightof-way of East Third Street, Town of Blades, said pipe being 523.5 feet, more or less, East of the intersection of East Third Street and Cannon Street; thence by and with the Southerly right-

of-way of East Third Street, South 89 degrees 45 minutes East 112.5 feet to a pipe; thence, South 00 degrees 14 minutes West 101.62 feet to a pipe; thence, South 89 degrees 31 minutes 37 seconds West 112.51 feet to a pipe; thence, North 00 degrees 14 minutes East 103.4 feet to a pipe marking the point and place of beginning, said to contain 11,513 square feet, more or less, as shown on a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr. dated October 1987. Being the same lands and premises which Mary F. Reed did grant and convey unto Ralph Smack and Tawanda Jenkins by deed dated November 30,2007 and recorded on December 11, 2007 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 03529 Page 279 Tax Parcel: 1-32-1.15205.00 Property Address: 213 East Third Street Blades, Seaford, DE 19973 Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 21, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 25, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RALPH SMACK & TAWANDA JENKINS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/6/2tc

PAGE 41 SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being designated and distinguished as Lot No. 35, Phase II as shown on the plat of Meadow Stream Farms, prepared by Lowenstein, Soule’ and Associates, Inc., and filed in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds at Georgetown, Delaware in Plat Book No. 39, Page 335 and Plat Book No. 54 Page 204 as reference thereto being had will more fully and at large appear. It being the same land described in a Deed from James M. Taylor, Jr. to Robert L. Hall and Lindy J. Hall, his wife, dated February 13, 1998 and recorded in Book 2266, page 193 of the Land Records of Sussex County, Delaware. Being the same land conveyed from Robert L. Hall and Lindy J. Hall, his wife to M. Renee Jones, sole owner, bearing even date and recorded simultaneously herewith. Being the same lands and premises which Robert L. Hall and Lindy J. Hall did grant and convey unto M. Renee Jones deed dated 10/19/2000 and recorded 10/27/2000 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK02533PG202. Tax Parcel: 5-32-19.0098.00 Property Address: 51235 Line Road, Delmar, DE 19930 Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 21, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 25, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and

3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MILLIE RENEE JONES AKA M. RENEE JONES and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that lot, piece or parcel of land situated, lying and being in the Town of Laurel, Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware and lying on the cast side of Brooklyn Avenue in said town, adjoining lands of Evelyn J. Hastings and Lot No.2, Beginning at a concrete post on the cast side of the sidewalk of Brooklyn Avenue and at a corner of the Evelyn J. Hastings land and run from thence an interior angle from Brooklyn Avenue of 89 degrees 10 minutes in an eastern direction 180 feet to Brooklyn Avenue, from thence with the east side of the pavement on Brooklyn Avenue, northwest 20 3/4 degrees 60 feet to the concrete post and place of beginning said to contain 10,440 square feet of land, be it the same more or less with improvements thereon. It being Lot No. 1 as surveyed by Harold L. Cook in August 1946. Being the same lands and premises which Mark D. Lowe and Michael Lowe did grant and convey unto Mark D. Lowe by deed dated 7/23/2004 and recorded 9/8/2004 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County. State of See LEGALS—page 42


PAGE 42

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

LEGALS - from Page 41 Delaware, in Deed Record BK03031PG293. Tax Parcel: 2-32-12.1963 Property Address: 128 Brooklyn Avenue, Laurel, DE 19956 Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 21, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 25, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MARK D. LOWE and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on:

Tuesday, August 18, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain tract, piece and parcel of land with improvements, thereon situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware being more particularly bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a concrete monument in the southeasterly right of way line of County Road 493; thence from said point of beginning along a line between these lands and lands now or formerly of R.F. Callawat south 52 degrees 16 minutes 02 seconds east 205.97 feet to a marked pine tree; thence continuing along a line between these lands and lands now or formerly of R.P. Callaway south 52 degrees 16 minutes 02 seconds east 5 feet, more or less, to the water line of the Fortsville Mill Pond; thence with the water line of the Fortsville Mill Road to a cedar post, which post is South 01 degrees 23 minutes 18 seconds west 114.10 feet from the last mentioned marked pine tree; thence continuing with the Fortsville Mill Pond water line in generally southwesterly direction to a point which point is south 22 degrees 44 minutes 26 seconds west 150.09- feet along a tie line from the last mentioned cedar post; thence along a line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Daniel Defelice north 62 degrees 15 minutes 39 seconds west 340.00 feet to a rebar set in the southeasterly right of way line of County Road 493 at a corner for these lands and lands now or formerly of Daniel Defelice; thence by and with the southeasterly right of way line of County Road 493 north 42 degrees 04 minutes 00 seconds east 296.74 feet to the point and place of beginning.

Being the same lands and premises which Paula A. Moore, did grant and convey unto Stephen J. Moore, by deed dated July 23, 2002 and recorded on July 26,2002 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 02733 at Page 055. Tax Parcel: 4-32-3.008.00 Property Address: 31197 Mount Pleasant Road, Laurel, DE 19956 Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 21, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 25, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of STEPHEN J. MOORE and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/6/2tc

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Be careful of what you’re doing, because a crow might be watching I’m being watched. Every move I make, each letter that I type, is ynn arks being carefully observed by an octet of eyes, staring in at me through Will they tell their chilthe kitchen window. dren and grandchildren OK, maybe that’s a tiny exagabout the woman who geration. But there really are eight spent way too much time eyes, belonging to the four hatchat the kitchen table, tapling swallows in a nest on the front ping away on some kind porch. And they are all, except when a parent flies in for a quick of thin black box? feeding, trained toward the kitchen window and on to the kitchen table in a park, walking on a sidewalk, at a softand my computer. Personal Items for ball complex where he is just one of hunThis is Sale. the second batch of chicks our dreds of people — and crows will gather resident swallows have raised this sumNo Vendors Please. to discipline him. mer. The first, readers may recall, ended “A crow looks down and he sees me in Call tragedy629-9788, when the chicks were discovand starts yelling,” McGowan said. Then ered byor a hungry black snake. Only one send to other crows will “come out of the woods chick survived, it was pushed out of P.O. Box when 1000, and circle overhead, yelling at me. And the nest by the movement Seaford, DE 19973.of the snake. I you know, you get kind of paranoid after dubbed the chick “Lucky” after my husa while, because everywhere I’d go the band removed the sated snake and put the crows would be yelling at me. And they baby bird back in the nest and its parents wouldn’t be yelling at other people, and started feeding it again. you just kind of get paranoid. So far, no snake has visited this nest. “And it’s not just being paranoid. All four chicks seem to be thriving and by It’s also — it’s lonely being hated, you this time next week, will probably have know?” taken wing. To test their theory that crows reBut what memories will they take with member faces, Professor Marzluff wore a Personal Items for Sale. them? What will they recall of their time caveman mask the next time he went bird No Vendors Please. on our front porch? banding. Will tell their children and grandCallthey 629-9788, Then he got volunteers to wear like children woman or send about to P.O.the Box 1000, who spent way masks and walk around the University of Seaford, DE 19973. too much time at the kitchen table, tapping Washington campus. The crows, recalling away on some kind of thin black box? the ugly features of the mask, squawked at Will they carry tales of cooking disasters whoever was wearing it. And if the mask (a whole pot of beets that when boiled, turned white and nearly tasteless, very sad) was being worn upside down, the crows would turn their heads, even when flying, and triumphs — a blackberry cobbler to to get a good look at it, then would start die for? The more practical among us may scoff squawking. To make sure that it wasn’t just the at such wonderings. But a story I recently rubber and fake hair of the mask that the heard on the radio gives credence to my crows were responding to, Marzluff had long-held suspicion that the birds with the volunteers walk through campus with which we share our property are more Dick Cheney masks on. aware of us than we are of them. Don’t Miss Issue! They got quite a number of An responses Kevin McGowan, a professor at Corfrom fellow students, he said, but the nell University in Ithaca, N.Y., and John OnlyApparently, /Year crows left them alone. Cheney Marzluff at the University of Washington In-County can’t add crow torturer to the long list of have devoted their professional lives to his crimes against the environment and soSubscribe Today! the study of crows. And they have noticed, ciety. Or maybe he wears a caveman mask they told Robert Krulwich, science corwhenever he ventures into the woods. respondent for NPR, that when they climb There was no indication during the up to a nest to band hatchlings, the entire NPR interview that the professors’ discovcrow community comes together to discieries about crows can be applied to other pline them. birds, in particular to barn swallows. But “When you’re holding [the hatchlings], we all know that it’s better to be safe than they don’t look any too happy,” Professor McGowan told Krulwich. “They try to bite sorry. So I won’t be bothering our baby swallows. you when they can. And then, of course, And if a big black snake comes along, the baby crow starts to squawk, which sets and once again my husband has to lift it the parents squawking and then the neighfrom the nest and put a fallen hatchling bors squawking and then the squawks atback home, I will recommend that he wear tract more squawkers.” a Dick Cheney mask during the entire proBut it doesn’t end there. The crows that cedure. Saving a baby swallow or two is a have squawked at him remember him and worthwhile endeavor. the next time they see him out and about, But encouraging the world’s barn swalthey discipline him again. The crows that low population, maybe even the world’s happen to be in the area join in and like black snake population, to chase after the crows that were at the original scene of former Vice President Cheney, wherever the crime, remember him. he might be, whatever he might be doing, Professor McGowan could be anywhere would be a feat worthy of a Nobel Prize. in Ithaca, he told Krulwich — downtown,

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MORNING STAR • AuGuST 6 - 12, 2009

PAGE 43

Retirement not part of her plans for nurse with 40 years of service By Lynn R. Parks When Shirley Bowden, the mother of nine, had young children at home, she took a job as a nurse’s aide at what was then the Peninsula General Hospital in Salisbury. “I could work the 11 to 7 shift and make money while my kids were sleeping,” she said. That kind of energy is in her genes, she added: Her mother, Hattie Moore, lived to be 102 and “was very active until she died.” Bowden, who lives in Delmar, celebrated her 74th birthday on Monday. A couple of weeks earlier, co-workers at the Methodist Manor House in Seaford held a surprise party to mark her 40th year as a licensed practical nurse with the continuing care facility. “I don’t have any plans to retire,” said Bowden, who also worked for Nanticoke Memorial Hospital for 38 years before retiring in 1997. “I come to work every morning, ready to go.” “She’s as vital a nurse as any other nurse I have on staff,” said Diana Young, assistant director of health services at the Manor House. “I have been here since 1985 and she has always been there for me.” Bowden, who is assigned to the assisted living area of the Manor House, said that several years ago, when the facility started using computers to track patient care, a couple of nurses left their jobs. “But I wasn’t going to let it get the best of me,” she said. “She never gave up,” Young added. “She took computer classes, and she aced them.” Bowden was born in Seaford and moved to Delmar with her family when she was 3. She graduated from Delmar High School in 1953 and was married shortly thereafter. In 1959, she started work at Nanticoke as a nurse’s aide. It wasn’t until 1962, just before the births of her eight and ninth children, twins Kevin and Scott, that she started nurse’s training. She became a licensed practical nurse after studying at what was then the Sussex County Vocational-Technical School. She started work at the Manor House in 1969 and worked both there and at Nanticoke for 28 years, until she retired from Nanticoke.

Bowden and her first husband, Thomas Ralph, are divorced. Her second husband, William, died in December 1998. She has nine children, Debbie Hastings, Haverlock, N.C., Donna Figgs, Delmar, Eddie Ralph, Plantation, Fla., Linda Budd, Delmar, Susan Elliott, Shirley Bowden Delmar, Kenneth Ralph, Delmar, Karen Bradley, Laurel, and the twins, Kevin Ralph, Laurel, and Scott Ralph, Delmar. She also has 18 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Bowden said that she comes from the old school of nursing. “I am very dedicated and very caring,” she said. “I get a lot of rewards from knowing that I have done something to help someone else.” Young said that Bowden has a lot to teach to younger nurses, not just about how things used to be done — about the days of glass IV bottles, for example, and sterilizing gloves — but also about the best ways to treat people. “She is a good, caring nurse and the residents adore her,” she said. “She treats the residents as she would her family. They know that if there’s any kind of issue, she will take care of it.” Coworker Penny Milligan agrees. “What really stands out about Shirley is the love you see that her patients have for her,” said Milligan, a licensed practical nurse who has worked at the Manor House for eight years. “She just has such a gift that she truly gives these people.” Bowden believes that the nursing profession is a good choice for young women and men. She is especially proud that two of her granddaughters are nurses and that one great-granddaughter is in nurse’s training. “My children are always telling me that I should retire and enjoy my life,” Bowden said. “But I do enjoy my life. Taking care of people is what my life has been about.”

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

PAGE 45

Woodbridge hires Ed Manlove as new varsity head football coach By Mike McClure

Kaitlyn Slater

Kimberly Gallo

Kassidy Gallo

Tiarra Maddox

Morgan Parker

Bethany Killmon

Devon Bitler

Joie Polite

Holly Chisenhall

Nicole Widen

Hailey Andrews

Former Laurel varsity head football coach Ed Manlove was announced as the new football coach at Woodbridge on Monday. Manlove, a former assistant coach at Middletown High School, was hired as Laurel’s coach seven years ago. Manlove said he spoke to the Woodbridge players in the weight room Monday night and received a warm response. “They made me feel right at home,” said Manlove. “I’m excited. I saw a lot of positive things from them.” According to Woodbridge Superintendent Dr. Kevin Carson, Manlove was one of six candidates who were interviewed for the position. He will also serve as a visiting teacher. “He’s done an outstanding job wherever he’s been,” Carson said. “We were excited when his application came in. We think he’ll benefit our students greatly.” Manlove said the opportunity to rebuild the Raider football program, along with the financial opportunity from the teaching position, were the reasons he chose to leave Laurel for Woodbridge. “It’s (the teaching position) something I’m familiar with,” said Manlove. “That will be exciting. You don’t get to do the same thing everyday.” As a visiting teacher Manlove will work with students and parents at each of the district’s buildings. He will serve as a truancy officer, dealing with issues such as attendance, tardiness, and dropout prevention. Carson said he will also be the primary liaison between the school district and family court. “It’s a very important position for us. We want our students to be in school,” Carson added. “We’re very excited about the possibilities.” Manlove, who led Laurel to the Division II state championship game last season, said the decision to leave Laurel was

not an easy one. “I loved the kids, that never was an issue,” said Manlove. “It’s always tough when you’ve got a change.” Manlove said he is looking forward to the challenge of turning around the football program. He plans to be there for his players and make the game of football interesting and fun. “It’s going to be a challenge to take over a program like that that hasn’t had a lot of success lately,” Manlove said. “Once you have some success that can kind of take care of itself.” While the start of the pre-season (Aug. 15) is right around the corner, Manlove is not worried about the readiness of his players, who have been working out in the off season. “They just have to learn my system. Fortunately. that program has nowhere to go but up,” said Manlove, who plans to finalize his coaching staff by the end of the week or early next week. “We want to win the South, that’s going to be out goal.” As for Laurel, Assistant Superintendent Linda Schenck has posted the position of varsity head football coach in house. The district chose to post it in house first because it believes there will be interest among the current assistant coaches. Schenck said the application process will close at noon on Aug. 11. If only one certified candidate applies for the position that person will be hired, otherwise the district will go through the interview process. If one of the assistant coaches is hired the district will then post the assistant coaching position. If a head coach is not hired prior to the start of practice, Schenck said Laurel Athletic Director Jerry Mears and the assistant coaches will run practice until Continued on page 49

Amber Callahan

Woodbridge Junior softball team wins states, moves to regionals By Mike McClure

By the time this week’s paper is out, the Woodbridge Junior League all-star softball team will be on the way to West Haven, Conn., for the Eastern Regionals. The team, led by manager Chris Andrews and coach Bob Bitler, clinched the state title with a 12-0 win over M.O.T. last Thursday.

Woodbridge outscored District I and District 2, 38-0, to remain undefeated in district and state tournament play. Woodbridge topped District I (M.O.T.), 12-0 last Monday as Nicole Widen struck out five and Hailey Andrews came on in relief to strike out six. The duo combined to toss a two-hitter. Kim Gallo collected three hits, Devon Continued on page 49

SOUTH CHAMPS- The Seaford High School girls’ tennis team was recognized at last month’s Seaford School Board meeting for winning the Henlopen Conference Southern Division championship. Shown (l to r) are: Assistant Coach Gigi Dickerson, Kelly Kimpton, Emily Nielson, Kim Graves, Tyesha Ross, Emily Hubbard, Whitley Maddox and Coach Robert Hastings.


PAGE 46

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

Winners of the best gross score in the recent Seaford Library sponsored golf tournament are shown (l to r): Sonny Clough, Rex Mears, and David Bowland. Not pictured is Bill Harper. Chick and Barbara Allen, Kris Penrod, and Dennis Cross had the highest net score at a recent tournament sponsored by the Seaford Library. See page 51.

Western Sussex’s source for local sports, the Star.

Gibson improves average in New York Penn League play Seaford graduate Derrik Gibson upped his average to .276 last week while playing for the Lowell Spinners in the New York Penn League. The following are his stats (as of 8/2): 40-for-145, .276, 30 R, 11 2B, 2 3B, 18 RBIs, 17 SB, 3 CS

2009Come Senior Softball World Series out and watch us play! Lower Sussex Little League Complex, Pyle Center, Roxana, Delaware

Hosted by Delaware District III ~ www.district3.org for more information

Ebbetts Field

Connie Mack Field

Sunday, August 9 5:30 (1) Dist. III vs. East 8:00 (3) EMEA vs. South

Sunday, August 9 5:30 (2) Central vs. LA 8:00 (4) AP vs. Southwest

Monday, August 10 1:00 (5) South vs.West 3:30 (7) LA vs. EMEA

Monday, August 10 1:00 (6) Canceled 3:30 (8) Canceled

Tuesday, August 11 5:30 (9) EMEA vs. Central 8:00 (11) West vs. LA

August 9~15

Tuesday, August 11 5:30 (10) Canceled 8:00 (12) Southwest vs. East

Opening Ceremonies

Wednesday, August 12 5:30 (14) West vs. EMEA 8:00 (16) Southwest vs. Dist. III

Wednesday, August 12 5:30 (13) AP vs. East 8:00 (15) South vs. Central Thursday, August 13 5:30 (17) LA vs. South 8:00 (19) Central vs.West Friday, August 14 5:30 (22) B1 vs. A2 8:00 (24) A1 vs. B2 Saturday, August 15 11:00am Championship Game Televised on ESPN (27) Winner Game 24 vs.Winner Game 22

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Sunday, August 9th, 3:30 Pool A Asia-Pacific (AP) District III East Southwest

Pool B Central Europe, Middle East & Africa (EMEA) Latin America (LA) South West

The Pyle Center is just north of Roxana on Rt. 20. From the north take Rt.113 to Dagsboro, go east on Rt. 26 to Rt. 20 south and follow the signs From the south take Rt.113 to Selbyville, go east on Rt. 54 to Rt. 17 east, follow Rt.17 to Roxana, turn left on Rt. 20 and follow the signs From the Beach (Rt.1) take Rt. 26 west to Rt. 17, follow Rt. 17 to Roxana, turn right on Rt. 20 and follow the signs.

Thursday, August 13 5:30 (18) Cancelled 8:00 (20) Dist. III vs. AP Friday, August 14 3:00 (21) B5 vs. A5 5:30 (23) A4 vs. B4 8:00 (25) B3 vs. A3 Saturday, August 15 8:30am (26) Loser game 22 vs. Loser game 24

Please note that all rainouts will be played the following day at 1:00 pm and 3:00 pm


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

PAGE 47

Davey Sammons is flawless in URC Sprint Series race in Delmar

The Laurel Senior League softball team is shown celebrating its win in the District III championship. The team moves on to the World Series in Roxana for the third straight year. The tournament begins with the opening ceremony this Sunday. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel returns to Senior League Softball World Series for fifth time By Mike McClure

The Laurel Senior League softball program is sending a team to the World Series in Roxana for the fifth time in six years. The majority of the 2009 team, which has played in the tournament before, is hoping the third time is a charm as they compete against the world’s elite teams for the third straight year. “You won’t get nervous your very first game because you’ve been there before,” Jenna Cahall said of the team’s experience in the Senior League Softball World Series. Cahall, Brooke Evans, Courtney Evans, Alexis Oliphant, Taylor Oliphant, Kelsey Oliphant, and Stephanie Wheatley played on the 2007 team, while Mariah Dickerson joined the group last year. Cahall said the returning players know what to expect from the opposing teams. She added that playing in the World Series is a unique experience because they get to play against teams from all over the world. “Softball’s different in Puerto Rico and Asia. They do things differently than we do,” said Cahall. The veteran players have given some of the newcomers advice on what to expect. “There’s good teams, be ready,” said Alexis Hudson, who along with Logan Green is the youngest player to play for the Laurel team. “It’s different when you get up here. When you play high school you’re playing against the same teams every year,” Kelsey Willey, Laurel High’s starting right fielder and another World Series newcomer, added. Laurel sent teams to the World Series in 2004 and 2005, the first two years Roxana hosted the event. The District III champions get an automatic bid in the World Series because the Lower Sussex Little League hosts the event. Nanticoke represented Sussex County

in 2006, followed by the Laurel team in 2007 and 2008. Jeff Evans has managed the team for the past three years and has coached many of the players in previous years. “It’s a tough program. It’s a real challenge to keep the kids together with travel ball,” Evans said. Evans and assistant coaches Robert Trout and Rodney Hearne lost starters Jenna Allen, Melissa Trout (an assistant coach this year), Brittney Brittingham, and Yasmin Davis from last year’s team. Newcomers Willey, Hudson, Green, Cassidy Taylor, and Christyana Davis bring a new style to the this year’s squad, which features more pitching depth and added speed. Laurel showcased its team speed in the District III tournament, using its bunting and base stealing skills to rattle opposing teams. Dickerson said the team is looking to outrun the opposition. “We just have to get into the other teams’ heads,” added Cahall. While the team has more speed than a year ago, it has less power. But another advantage this veteran squad has is years of playing together. “We have a lot of chemistry,” Brooke Evans said. “We know each other’s strengths and weaknesses.” The players also know what to expect from their coaches, who know how to keep the team loose in stressful situations. “It’s fun because we’ve known them for awhile. It’s easy to work for them because they’re not hard on us,” said Courtney Evans. “We’ve known him (Evans) so long, since we were little,” Kelsey Oliphant said. For some of the newcomers getting used to Evans and his humor will take a little time. “He’s different than most coaches,” Green said. “He’s crazy, he really is,” added Hud-

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Davey Sammons of Bordentown, N.J., has established himself as a threat to win any Rislone URC Sprint Series feature event. On Saturday night at the Delaware International Speedway, Sammons proved again that he was the man to beat. Just a week ago, Sammons scored his first URC win of the season at Grandview, only to return to victory lane for his second win on Taylor and Messick Night at the Delaware International Speedway. Sammons took the lead on lap seven from Chris Coyle and never looked back, collecting the $2,000 payday with ease. Twenty-six URC sprint cars turned out for the 13th event of the season with heat race victories going to Chris Coyle, Brett Schoenly and Davey Sammons as Kevin Darling won the Don Ott “B” Main. At the start of the 25 lap feature, Chris Coyle in the Dave Betts owned sprint set the early lead with Davey Sammons, Brett Schoenly and Chuck Palmucci in the chase. Coyle stretched out a comfortable lead by lap four. One lap later, the tide changed and Sammons was reeling in the leader. On lap seven in turn two, Coyle bobbled opening the door for Sammons to take the lead as Schoenly moved into second. One lap later, Coyle regained the run-

ner-up spot but his attempt to chase down Sammons was going to be the challenge. With 12 laps complete, Sammons, Coyle, Schoenly and Palmucci made of the top four. JJ Grasso, winner of the three previous URC Delaware International Speedway events, was now running in fifth. The first caution of the feature was displayed for Kevin Darling who stopped in turn two. At the same time, Kyle Purks stopped in turn four and third place runner Brett Schoenly developed a flat tire. On the restart, Sammons bolted to hide from the rest of the field with Coyle second and JJ Grasso in third. Also on a charge was Justin Collett, driving the John Pinter owned #92. Although the restart did regroup the field, there was not another car on the track that had a challenge to offer Sammons. With just five laps remaining, Sammons was in solid control with Coyle now fighting off Grasso for second. With two laps remaining, Grasso made an inside move on Coyle only to have slower traffic block the challenge. At the drop of the checker flag, Sammons was all along scoring his third career URC win. Coyle finished second with Grasso third, Justin Collett fourth and Chuck Palmucci made up the top five.

Laurel Major League softball team wins first game in regionals The Laurel Major League softball team opened the Eastern Regionals with a 5-1 in over Pequannock Little League (N.J.) on Saturday. Kortney Lee went 2-3 with a run, Regan Green was 2-3 with two runs, Sara Jo Whaley had two hits including a double and drove in a pair while scoring a run, and Alison Pusey batted 1-3 with two RBIs. Green also allowed one run on two hits and struck out nine in six innings for the win. The Delaware state champs fell to West Point Little League (Pa.), 14-0, on Sunday and were edged by St. Mary’s American Little League (Md.), 3-0, on Monday

son. Another key for the Laurel team will be the continued support of its fans. “It’s (home crowd) definitely an advantage,” said Taylor Oliphant. “They’re pretty rabid. The expectations are pretty high,” Jeff Evans said. “Laurel fans are great.” Last year’s team went 3-2 in the tournament while the 2007 team finished

third in the world with a 4-2 record. The team is looking forward to starting play (August 9). “I think we’ll have a pretty good chance,” said Kelsey Oliphant. “Every year we have a pretty good chance,” fellow triplet Alexis Oliphant added. “I just want to get there and play. I’m so excited,” said Hudson.w

Senior League Softball World Series schedule

Sunday, Aug. 9- Laurel vs. East, 5:30 p.m., Ebbets Field; Central vs. Latin America, 5:30 p.m., Connie Mack Field; EMEA vs. South, 8 p.m., Ebbets Field; Southwest vs. Asia-Pacific, 8 p.m., Connie Mack Field Monday, Aug. 10- South vs. West, 1 p.m., Ebbets Field; Latin America vs. EMEA, 3:30 p.m., Ebbets Field Tuesday, Aug. 11- EMEA vs. Central, 5:30 p.m., Ebbets Field; West vs. Latin America, 8 p.m., Ebbets Field; Southwest vs. East, 8 p.m., Connie Field Wednesday, Aug. 12- Asia Pacific vs. East, 5:30 p.m., Ebbets Field; West vs. EMEA, 5:30 p.m., Connie Mack Field; South vs. Central, 8 p.m., Ebbets Field; Laurel vs. Southwest, 8 p.m., Connie Mack Field Thursday, Aug. 13- Latin America vs. South, 5:30 p.m.,Ebbets Field; Central vs. West, 8 p.m., Ebbets Field; Laurel vs. Asia-Pacific, 8 p.m., Connie Mack Field Friday, Aug. 14- consolations and semifinals, 3 p.m., 5:30 p.m., 7 p.m., Connie Mack Field and Ebbets Field Saturday, Aug. 15- third place game, 8:30 a.m., Connie Mack Field; championship, 11 a.m., Ebbets Field

Woodbridge Pop Warner looking for Pee Wee players Woodbridge Pop Warner is looking for Pee Wee players. Players must weigh 75100 pounds and be ages 9-12. If interested please call Teresa at 382-9263. Practice started August 3 and will take place Monday through Thursday at 5:30 p.m. Bring a current physical form, your last report card, and a current picture. Players must have a parent accompany them to sign paperwork. The league is also looking for sponsors and donations.


PAGE 48

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

Seaford Star summer sports scrapbook

Shown (clocwise from top left) are scenes from the summer sports season: Colin Bergh comes home to score during the Seaford Major League baseball team’s win over Rehoboth; Nanticoke Senior softball pitcher Katie Hickey fires home a pitch; Nanticoke Junior League pitcher Tyler Baynum checks the base runner before he sets for his next pitch; Woodbridge Minor League player Riley Vickers makes contact with a pitch; Woodbridge second baseman John Keefe throws to first during a Senior League all-star baseball game; and Woodbridge pitcher Kevin Troyer goes to the plate during the Pat Knight Minor League baseball tournament. Photos by Lynn Schofer and Mike McClure


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009 Manlove continued assistant coaches will run practice until the position is filled. Manlove replaces long time coach John Parker who resigned to take a teach-

PAGE 49 ing position at Indian River High School. “John did a great job during his time at Woodbridge,” Carson said. “Change like that always opens up some opportunities. We’re confident Coach Manlove can fill that void.”

Richard Jarvis, Jr. wins three straight in Delaware Late Models By Charlie Brown

Shown (not in order) is the Woodbridge Junior League all-star softball team with the state championship banner: players- Holly Chisenhall, Kaitlyn Slater, Kimberly Gallo, Kassidy Gallo, Amber Callahan, Morgan Parker, Hailey Andrews, Joie Polite, Nicole Widen, Tiarra Maddox, and Devon Bitler and coaches Chris Andrews (manager) and Bob Bitler.

Junior softball continued Bitler had two hits including a double and a triple and knocked in three runs, Hailey Andrews doubled and had two RBIs, and Amber Callahan added an RBI double in the win. The team advanced to the state championship game with a 14-0 victory over District 2 (Suburban) last Tuesday. Widen struck out eight and threw a no-hitter. Andrews doubled and drove in four, Holly Chisenhall singled in a pair, and Bitler singled and added an RBI. Woodbridge took the state championship and earned a berth in the regionals with the win over District 1 on Thursday. “I think it (state tournament) gave us confidence because we won a lot. It boosted our energy up. If we went there (regionals) with our energy level not being up we wouldn’t do as well,” said Morgan Parker. “It gave me a lot of confidence,” Bitler added. Tiarra Maddox, Bitler, Kaitlyn Slater, Andrews, and Widen were members of the Woodbridge Major League softball team which played in the Eastern Regionals in Albany, N.Y. last year. That experience should help the team prepare for regional play this time around. “We know what to expect. We know what’s going to be there,” said Slater. “I think it will help a lot. We thought we would have easy teams but when we got up there we had good teams like us,” Maddox said of last year’s experience. “We’ll basically know how the teams

are going to be. We’re going to have a heads up this year,” Bitler said. But while the team has experience, through little league and varsity softball, the players know it won’t be easy. “We’ve got to play harder than we did in states. We’ll have more competition up there,” said Widen. Kassidy Gallo, Kimberly Gallo, and Bethany Killmon went to Connecticut to see their older sisters play with the Big League team last year, but most of the players will be seeing the area for the first time. “I’ve never been anywhere before,” Joie Polite said. “I hope it is just as pretty as New York is,” said Widen. While some of the players competed with the Major League team last year, the girls have experience playing together. “Some of us are older and some of us are a year younger,” Kassidy Gallo said. “We’ve been playing together for a while.” “We have a lot of experienced players. We’re all close and pick each other up,” Widen said. “We’ve played together for a long time,” added Andrews. The District III and state champions are scheduled to begin Eastern Regional play on Friday, August 7. The tournament will take place through August 13. “We’re prepared for it. The Major girls know more what to expect,” Polite said. “If everybody sticks together we’re going to do well.”

Richard Jarvis, Jr. remains hot as the summer temperatures as he once again came from mid-field to win his third straight Super Late Model feature and his seventh of the season on Pepsi of Delmarva Night as Delaware International. Mark Pettyjohn led the first lap of the 20-lap Super Late Model feature. The yellow as out before lap two was complete when Rick Whaley broke a drive shaft and coasted to a stop. Mark Pettyjohn went head to head with his brother David Pettyjohn on the restart. Ross Robinson was on a mission and took third on lap three. One lap later he moved to the front. David Pettyjohn got by Mark for second on lap seven and Donald Lingo, Jr. and Jarvis battled for fourth. At the halfway sign the top five were in tight formation with Robinson on the point. Lingo got by David Pettyjohn for second with Jarvis fourth and Jarvis fifth. Lingo powered on top on lap 13 just as the yellow flew as David Pettyjohn’s engine went up in flames. Pettyjohn brought the car to a quick stop and the fire was quickly extinguished. Robinson cranked it up another notch on the restart and regained the lead. All eyes turned to Jarvis who was picking his way to the front. Jarvis took second from Lingo with three laps left to go on one lap later got by Robinson for the lead. What happened next as simply amazing. Robinson went all out one final time to regain the lead going into the first turn. Robinson’s car did a 180 degree spin but Robinson never lifted the throttle and the car never stopped moving. The caution flew as Robinson spun the car back around to face the right direction and in accordance to the rules since he never stopped he was able to restart for the one lap shootout back in his second spot. Jarvis would not be topped as he drove the Mid-Coastal Siding/Kings Island Pride/ Rocket under the checkered. Robinson finished a hard earned second with Ricky Elliott making a late race charge to finish in third. Fourth went to Donald Lingo, Jr. and Dale Lingo ended a good drive in fifth. Heats went to Mark Pettyjohn and Robinson. Fourteen-year-old Amanda Whaley set the pace for the first seven laps of the Crate Model 15-lap feature before Nick Davis took the point just as the crossed flags for the halfway sign flew. The second half was all-Davis as he drove to his second win of the season in the Seaside Builders/Davis Trucking/Rocket. Whaley turned in a personal best in the division holding on to second with Ryan Walls taking third. Fourth went to point leader Joe Warren and rookie Matt Hill rounded out the top five. Top qualifier in the timed sessions was Hill.

Nanticoke’s Cody Wilkerson dives back into first base during his team’s 5-1 win over Lewes last Wednesday in Millsboro. Photo by Mike McClure

Junior League softball Eastern Regional schedule The following is the Eastern Regional schedule for the Woodbridge Junior League all-star softball team: 8/7- vs. New Jersey, 1 p.m.; 8/8- vs. Pennsylvania, 9:30 a.m.; 8/9- vs. Massachusetts, 9 a.m.; 8/10- vs. Rhode Island, 1:30 p.m.; 8/11- vs. Connecticut, 10 a.m.; 8/12semifinals, 10 a.m., championship 1, 1 p.m.; 8/13- championship 2 and 3 (if necessary)

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The District III champion Nanticoke Junior League baseball team gives manager Trey Kagey the winning treatment by showering him with the water cooler. Photo by Lynn Schofer


PAGE 50

              MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

H.J. Bunting wins one for dad in Delaware Modifieds

Cassidy Thomas, 4, of Bridgeville is shown playing Bitty Soccer at the Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club in Seaford. Several bitty programs will be offered at the club starting in September. Call Karen at 628-3789 for more information.

Local teams compete in Delmarva Swim Association championship The Delmarva Swim Association’s championship swim meet took place last Saturday. The following are the top 10 results for the Seaford Golf and Country Club and the Seaford Swim Association: Girls 8U 100 Yard Free Relay- 9. SSA (Becca Wheatley, Sarah Perdue, Lauren Stanton, Amy Venables), 1:25.59; Boys 8U 100 Yard Free Relay- 9. SSA (Ged Pearson, Nathan Venables, Collin Handy, Shane Stark), 1:29.64; Girls 9-10 100 Yard Free Relay- 6. SSA (Hannah Venables, Cailey Hastings, Victoria Dalton, Bridget Johnson), 1:07.23; Girls 8U 100 Yard Medley Relay- 6. SGCC (Jenna Beard, Claudia Carey, Hailey Merritt, Hannah Merritt), 1:35.57, 7. SSA (Lauren Stanton, Becca Wheatley, Amy Venables, Sarah Perdue), 1:40.40; Boys 8 100 Yard Medley Relay- 7. SSA (Collin Handy, Ged Pearson, Shane Stark, Nathan Venables), 2:00.48; Girls 9-10 100 Yard Medley Relay- 7. SSA (Bridget Johnson, Hannah Venables, Victoria Dalton, Samantha Cotten), 1:22.93 Girls 8U 25 Yard Fly- 1. Amy Venables, SSA, 17.75; Girls 8U 25 Yard Back- 7. Claudia Carey, SGCC, 21.61; Girls 8U 25 Yard Breast- 4. Amy Venables, SSA, 23.38; Girls 9-10 25 Yard Breast- 10. Hannah Venables, SSA, 20.58; Girls 11-12 200 Yard Free Relay- 10. SGCC (Gabrielle Alicea, Ariella Anthony, Hailey Parks, Sydney Beard), 2:16.61; Boys 13-14 200 Yard Free Relay- 3. SSA (Christopher Michel, Jacob Duke, Michael Dopler, Gray Venables), 1:50.00; Girls 15-18 200 Yard Free Relay- 9. SSA (Shanice Cannon, Morgan Swain, Taylor Swain, Paige Venables), 1:57.18; Boys 15-18 200 Yard Free Relay- 4. SSA (Cory Darden, Tim Halter, Dustin Venables, Lee Mayer), 1:34.95 Boys 13-14 200 Yard Medley Relay- 4. SSA (Christopher Michel, Michael Dopler, Gray Venables, Jacob Duke), 2:06.67; Girls 15-18 200 Yard Medley Relay- 8. SSA (Shanice Cannon, Taylor Swain, Morgan Swain, Paige Venables), 2:13.60; Boys 1518 200 Yard Medley Relay- 5. SSA (Tim Halter, Dustin Venables, Cory Darden, Lee Mayer), 1:49.08; Boys 13-14 50 Yard Fly- 4. Michael Dopler, SSA, 28.15; Boys 15-18 50 Yard Fly- 7. Cory Darden, SSA, 25.96; Boys 13-14 50 Yard Back- 8. Christopher Michel, SSA, 33.01; Boys 15-18 50 Yard Back- 9. Tim Halter, SSA, 28.28, 10. Dustin Venables, SSA, 28.64 Girls 15-18 50 Yard Breast- 4. Paige Venables, SSA, 34.39; Boys 15-18 50 Yard Breast- 8. Spencer Noel, SGCC, 30.14, 9. Dustin Venables, SSA, 30.46; Boys 13-14 50 Yard Free- 5. Gray Venables, SSA, 26.03, 10. Christopher Michel, SSA, 27.20; Boys 15-18 50 Yard Free- 4. Lee Mayer, SSA, 22.52, 10. Cory Darden, SSA, 23.88; Boys 15-18 100 Yard IM- 6. Lee Mayer, SSA, 57.77

Heritage Shores 18 Hole Ladies’ Golf Association hold tourney

The Heritage Shores 18 Hole Ladies’ Golf Association had to make the most of just “Three Clubs and a Putter” during their Wednesday round. Those who fared best were: Barb Jarkovsky, first place Flight 1; Joanie VanOostrom-Phipps, second place Flight 2; Muriel Waite, second place Flight 1; and Jeanne Deschenes, first place Flight 2.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

By Charlie Brown H.J. Bunting turned in an inspired drive to win his fifth NAPA Big Block Modified feature in Saturday night’s Pepsi of Delmarva sponsored program at the Delaware International Speedway. It was perhaps the best race of the season with a minimum of six lead changes among four drivers. George Richardson set the early pace with Bobby Watkins challenging in second. Watkins took the lead for lap four just as the yellow flew as Jeff Brown came to a stop in the second turn. On the restart, Jamie Mills, who had started in 10th, pulled past Richardson for second with Jordan Watson following into third. Watson maneuvered by Mills for second and began challenging Watkins for the lead. Mills took advantage of a slip by Watson to regain second on lap nine. Mills didn’t stop there and pulled to the front for lap 10. The final yellow was out one lap later when Ernie Lowe, making his first start of the season, spun in the fourth turn. On the restart, H.J. Bunting, who had started in ninth, worked by Watkins for second. At the halfway sign the top five were Mills, Bunting, Watkins, Watson and Matt Jester. The fans were treated to the best battle of the season in the second half of the race. With Mills in the high groove and Bunting in the low groove the two battled side by side. Bunting edged out front on lap 16 but Mills was back on to one lap later. Both maintained their lines as Bunting regained the lead on lap 19. Traffic would work in Bunting’s favor as he drove the Jake Marine/J&M Roofing/Teo to his fifth win of the season. “I didn’t know there for awhile,” said Bunting. “We raced each other good. He wanted the top and I wanted the bottom so it all worked out and we ended up having a good race.” Bunting’s legendary father, Harold, had been hospitalized after last week’s races after suffering heart problems. He was released on Friday but was home recovering. “This is the first race that he has ever missed that I can remember so I would like to dedicate it to him and hope he gets better and everything is good,” Bunting added. Mills maintained his point lead by finishing in second with Watkins turning in his best performance of the year finishing in third. Fourth went to Jester with Jordan Watson fifth. Heats were won by Watkins and Bunting. John Curtis gets first win of season in AC Delco Modifieds- The yellow was out before the first lap of the 15-lap AC Delco Modified feature was in the books when Tim Trimble got together with another car and spun with two flat tires and both Brandon Sturgis and Herbie Hempel tangled. Pole sitter Joh Curtis took off on the restart and would never look back as the race went non-stop from that point on. Curtis was chased throughout the race by teammate Jon Callaway and rookie Kyle Fuller. Callaway made a bid for the lead with two laps to go but slipped high on the outside of Curtis and Fuller shot into second. Curtis would make no mistakes as he drove his Taylor & Messick/Curtis Farms/Teo to his first win of the year. Fuller finished in the second spot with Callaway third. Mark Byram drove from seventh to finish in fourth and Matt Hawkins rounded out the top five. Fuller set fast time in qualifying. James Hill gets first career win in Mod Lites- Fourteen-year-old James Hill demonstrated a maturity far beyond his years as he started on the pole and never made a slip to win the 15-lap Mod Lite feature. A strong field of 19 cars took the green. Alan Passwaters held down second with Kirk Miles in third. Steve White climbed into third bringing Brandon Dennis into fourth. The battle for second went three wide coming off the second turn with Passwaters and White tangling. White went head on into the wall and flipped bringing out the yellow. Fortunately White was able to climb from the car once it was righted and was not injured. The race was green from the fourth lap on. Landis Musser, making his first start in a couple of seasons got by Dennis on the restart and made a bid for the lead but Hill held off the challenge. Dennis regained second and made his own challenge at the halfway sign but again Hill would hold his line and hold off the bid. Hill was flawless the rest of the distance as he took the checkered in his Hill’s Farm/Northeast Modified Lite Lightning. Dennis finished a solid second with Paul McGinley coming on strong in the second half of the race to finish in third. Fourth went to Ty Short and Musser rounded out the top five.

Delaware Magic to hold fast pitch softball tryouts August 16

The Delaware Magic girls’ fast pitch softball team will hold tryouts at St. Thomas More Academy on August 16 at the following times: 10U/12U- registration 9 a.m., tryouts 9:30-11:30 a.m. and 14U through 18U- registration noon, tryouts 12:30-2:30 p.m. Any questions should be directed to Charlie Neal (302) 353-6786 or Bill McGinness (302)249-0424 or billmcginness@comcast.net.


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

PAGE 51

Third highest net score at the Books and Birdies tournament went to Glen Jones, Steve Whaley, Lee Venables, and Bob Booth.

The team of Jack Riddle, John Torkelson, Larry Kaplan and Chris Carvelli (not shown) had the second highest net score at a recent tournament at the Seaford Golf and Country Club.

Inaugural Books and Birdies Golf Classic takes place in Seaford

According to Mary Pegram, coordinator for the Seaford Library and Cultural Center golf tournament, the event was a tremendous success with 15 foursomes enjoying the break in the weather on Friday, July 24. After an exhilarating day on the course, the players returned to the Clubhouse for an awards presentation, and a luncheon prepared by the Seaford Golf and Country Club kitchen. Numerous door prizes provided by a variety of local merchants and individuals were distributed by chance drawings. These included restaurant certificates, books from the library, golfing equipment, and an original painting by Woody Woodruff. The grand prize for low Gross went to Rex Mears, Sonny Clough, Bill Harper and David Bowland; low first net to Dennis Cross, Chris Penrod and Chick and Barbara Allen; second low net to Jack Riddle, Chris Carvelli, John Torkelson and Larry Kaplan; and third low net to Glen Jones, Bob Booth, Lee Venables and Steve Whaley. Kathy Boyd had both the longest drive and closest-to-the-pin for the women, Lee Venables had the longest drive for the men, and Karl Brown had the closest-to-the-pin. Chipping contest winners were Bob Boyd for the men, and Chris Penrod for the women. Putting winners were Glen Jones and Betty Wilbanks.

STAR TEAM OF THE WEEK-Send your team photo to sports@mspublications.com to be a Star Team of the Week.

SUDOKU Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

See Answers Page 54


PAGE 52

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

People

Tyler Michael and Deborah Messick

Bryan Nabb and Katlyn Glessner

Glessner,Nabb to wed Troy and Lisa Glessner announce the engagement of their daughter Katlyn Nicole to Bryan Edward Nabb Jr., son of Christine Calloway and Bryan Nabb Sr. Katlyn graduated from North Dorchester High School in 2003 and Stevenson University in 2007 with a bachelor of science degree in early childhood education. She completed her first two years of teaching at Sandy Hill Elementary School in Cambridge, Md. and is working on her master’s of education specializing in reading and literacy through Walden University. Bryan graduated from CambridgeSouth Dorchester High School in 2003 and Frostburg State University in 2009 with a bachelor of science degree in physics and engineering. He is employed with Storm Technologies in Albemarle, N.C. as a lead engineer. The couple will be married on Oct. 3 at Immanuel United Church of Christ in Cambridge. They plan to reside in Mt. Pleasant, N.C. after the wedding.

LANDSHARKS PARTICIPATE IN GAMES - The Special Olympics Landsharks recently participated in the Summer Games which were held at the University of Delaware for two days in June. Athletes competed in sporting events such as track & field, aquatics, bocce, power lifting and tennis. The program consists of approximately 90 athletes, coaches and volunteers, which covers the entire Sussex County area and then some. It is a year-round program with other sports including bowling, cycling, skiing and long distance running. The Landsharks are always looking for more athletes and coaches. To participate, contact Cherie Nolt, program director, at 302-228-5056, or Special Olympics at 302-831-4653.

Steele, Cooper to marry

Karen Steele and Shane Cooper

Ms. Karen Lynn Steele and Mr. Shane O’Donald Cooper of Laurel announce their engagement. Karen is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer and Sandy Steele of Seaford. Shane is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jack ‘Pete’ and Laura Cooper of Laurel and the late Pamela Cooper. Karen is a graduate of the University of Delaware with a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration in Operations Management and Marketing and a minor in Management Information Systems. She is employed at Cadista Pharmaceuticals, Inc. in Salisbury, Md. as Planning, Operations and Documentation manager. Shane is employed at Black Gold Farms in Rhodesdale, Md. as a farm technician. The wedding will be held on Oct. 3 at Asbury United Methodist Church in Sharptown, Md.

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Messick, Michael to wed

Liz and Keith Messick of Laurel, and Rick and Peach Michael of Millersburg, Pa., announce the engagement of their children, Deborah Lee Messick and Tyler Patrick Michael. Debby is a 2005 home-schooled graduate of SCHOLA, and recently graduated from Lebanon Valley College in Annville, PA, with a bachelor of arts degree in music with a concentration in violin performance. Tyler graduated from Millersburg Area High School in Millersburg, Pa., in 2002, and from Thompson Institute of Technology in Harrisburg, Pa. in 2004 with an associate of specialized technology degree in digital arts. Debby is employed as a teacher of violin, viola, and cello by the Community Music Institute of Annville, Pa., and also operates a private music studio in her home. Tyler is employed by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as an Information Technology technician in the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, and he operates a home business designing and programming websites and interactive CDs. Debby and Tyler will marry on Saturday, Aug. 1, on the beach at Cape Henlopen State Park in Lewes. Their home is in Steelton, Pa.

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page 54

MORNING STAR • AuGuST 6 - 12, 2009

Police Journal

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

Shortly before 3:30 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 2, Troop 4 patrol troopers were dispatched to the Sand Hill Mobile Home Park in Georgetown for the report of a domestic dispute between David C. Bethard Jr., 34, of Millsboro and his girlfriend, the 38-year-old victim. The incident began at 1 p.m. when a verbal argument ensued between Bethard, his 38-year-old girlfriend and her daughter. As the argument escalated, Bethard was asked to leave the residence but he refused. Instead, Bethward went into the kitchen and obtained several large kitchen knives. He held the knives in a threatening manner and advised that everyone was going to die. The 19-year-old fled the home and called 911. The suspect then took his girlfriend from the residence against her will. The suspect and victim entered his vehicle, a red Ford Escort, and the suspect drove away. The victim was able to call her daughter from her cellular phone and provide details of the direction in which they were traveling. The victim’s daughter could hear the suspect yelling at the victim moments before the victim’s phone went dead. Troopers were alerted with a description of the vehicle and a direction of travel. Several calls came in to 911 from concerned citizens who observed a struggle between a male and female in a vehicle matching the suspect’s vehicle in the area of Five Points. The last call, at 4:14 p.m., reported a male subject assaulting a female just outside of a vehicle on Retz Lane (off of Route 24) west of Lewes. A 29-year DSP veteran, Captain Charles Simpson, responded and observed a struggle between the suspect and the victim. When the initial confrontation with the officer ensued, Simpson gave Bethard several lawful commands for him to surrender. The suspect put his hands in his pockets and refused to take them out. Instead of coming peacefully, the suspect threatened Simpson. He lunged at the trooper and quickly withdrew his hands from his pockets while holding a black object. This object later proved to be a cellular phone. In fear for his life, Simpson fired a single round from his divisionally issued weapon, striking the suspect. Assisting troopers took the suspect into custody and provided first aid to the suspect until an ambulance arrived and transported the suspect to Beebe Medical Center. The suspect remains in stable con-

dition at Beebe Medical Center. An investigator from the Attorney General’s office responded to conduct an investigation of the shooting. In reference to the officer involved shooting, Bethard will be charged with resisting arrest and menacing (misdemeanors). In reference to the domestic situation, Bethard will be charged with the following offenses: two counts of possession of a deadly weapon during the commission of a felony (felony), kidnapping (felony), two counts of aggravated menacing (felony) and two counts of terroristic threatening (misdemeanor). Bethard will be formally charged upon his release from the hospital. As a matter of routine procedure, Captain Simpson has been placed on administrative duty. The victim was uninjured.

Two involved in crash

The Delaware State Police Crash Reconstruction Unit (CRU) investigated a late night crash involving a single vehicle on Saturday, Aug. 1 at 11:20 p.m. A 1998 Hyundai Tiberon, operated by Nathaniel Rathbone, 19, of Bridgeville, was traveling northbound on US 13 (Sussex Highway) in the right lane. For unknown reasons, the vehicle drifted off the east edge of the roadway and entered a ditch before it began to overturn several times. The right front seat passenger, Andrew K. Montigny, 18, of Greenwood, sustained a serious closed head injury and was flown by DSP helicopter to Christiana Hospital where he was admitted in critical condition. The driver and passenger were wearing their seatbelts. Rathbone was transported and later admitted to Nanticoke Hospital with non-life threatening injuries. The crash remains under investigation, and no charges have been filed at this time. Alcohol is not believed to be a factor in this crash.

Sex offender laws strengthened

Gov. Jack Markell has joined Delaware lawmakers to sign three pieces of legislation to further strengthen the State’s sex offender laws and increase the penalties for sex offenses involving children. The first piece of legislation, House Bill 136, sponsored by Rep. Brad Bennett and Sen. Brian J. Bushweller, increases the penalties for sex offenses involving a child under the age of 12 when the offender is a person who has previously been convicted of a sex offense and is currently listed on the State’s sex offender registry. The second, House Bill 206 sponsored

by Rep. Bennett, Rep. Greg Lavelle and Sen. Patricia Blevins, increases the penalties for the crime of sex offender unlawful conduct against a child when the victim is under the age of 18 and has a cognitive disability. The third piece of legislation, Senate Bill 185, sponsored by Sen. Blevins and Rep. Bennett, makes Delaware nearly 100% compliant with the federal Adam Walsh Act as mandated under the Sex Offender Registry Notification Act (SORNA). In addition, the bill amends criminal offenses of unlawful sexual contact and kidnapping and sexual solicitation of a child by increasing the age of consent from 16 to 18. It also mandates that registered sex offenders pay an annual $30 sex offender registration fee. The number of registered sex offenders within Delaware continues to increase each year. In 2002, there were 2,055 registered sex offenders. In five years, that number increased to 3,356 and there are currently 3,803 registered sex offenders. In 1994, Delaware passed Megan’s Law, which requires convicted sex offenders to register on a public website.

Two arrested for prescription theft

On Wednesday evening, July 29, troopers made contact with a victim on Coverdale Road in Bridgeville, in reference to a theft of prescription medication. The victim’s roommate, Edna Perez, 49, of Bridgeville, and Larry Vincent, 40, of Washington, D.C., stole the victim’s prescription medications, Clonazepam and Xanax. Perez obtained the medications by personally calling the drug store where the victim’s prescriptions were being filled. She made the call while the victim was sleeping and told the drug store clerk that she had permission from the victim to pick up the scripts. A short time later Perez drove Vincent to the drug store where Vincent obtained the victim’s medications. Troopers made contact with Vincent on Coverdale Road in Bridgeville where he was placed into custody without incident. A computer check revealed Vincent also had an active warrant from the Sussex County Halfway House for escape after conviction. Troopers also made contact with Perez who responded to Troop 5 in reference to the incident. Vincent and Perez were both charged with two counts of obtaining controlled substance by misrepresentation fraud, and

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one count of second degree conspiracy (both felonies). Vincent was arraigned on all charges along with his active warrant by Justice of the Peace #3. He was committed to Sussex County Correction Institute in lieu of $5,000 cash bail. Perez was arraigned on all charges by Justice of the Peace #3 where she received $1,500 unsecured bail and was released pending trial.

Juveniles arrested for vehicle theft

On Wednesday, July 29 at 1:27 a.m., troopers from Troop 5 were dispatched to the area of Sussex Highway and Dorothy Road for subjects throwing rocks at passing vehicles. Upon arrival in the area, a trooper observed a Ford Expedition pulling into a church parking lot. Due to the church being closed along with the vehicle proceeding to the rear parking lot, the trooper stopped the vehicle. As the investigation unfolded, it was discovered that the Ford Expedition had been stolen from a local business. Troopers then contacted the owner of the business who advised them he did not know the vehicle was missing. All four occupants of the vehicle - a 15-year-old juvenile from Seaford, a 14-year-old juvenile from Delmar, a 15-year-old juvenile from Laurel, and a 17-year-old juvenile from Laurel - were taken into custody and charged with: theft of a motor vehicle, second degree conspiracy, third degree criminal trespassing and receiving stolen property. All four were released to their parents pending an arraignment in Family Court.

Pay traffic citations online

The Justice of the Peace Court announces that a Web-Based payment option is now available for voluntary assessment eligible traffic citations. Thanks to the technical efforts of DELJIS, the Court began accepting ePayments for traffic tickets on July 1. It is anticipated that the ePayment project will be expanded on Aug. 1 to include the ability to make payments on payment plan agreements for cases which have already been heard. The website, https://pubserv.deljis.delaware.gov/epayment/, is accessible through both the State of Delaware and the Justice of the Peace Court home pages. There may be a delay in the ability to pay tickets that are hand written and not computer generated. on the week. Nothing suggests any dramatic price movements. Over the past four weeks, U.S. fuel consumption has dropped 4.1% from year-ago levels.

Prices edging up SUDOKU ANSWERS:

Man is shot after domestic dispute

Gas prices edged up by a few pennies this week, but are holding fairly stable compared to earlier this summer. The average U.S. retail price for regular grade gasoline climbed to $2.52 a gallon Friday, marking a 3-cent gain

Local pricing On Tuesday a few local gas stations were selling regular gasoline for $2.399 a gallon, up four cents from a week ago and 10 eents from two weeks ago.

Price comparison average for Regular Unleaded Gasoline National Delaware

8/2/09

$2.54 $2.44

Week Ago

$2.49 $2.39

Year Ago

$3.89 $3.83


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

PAGE 55

Blackberries are the sweetest gifts a friend could give Having friends in high places is a good thing. The lofty space a ceroretta norr tain acquaintance of mine inhabits includes an expansive back yard garden. He appeared at my back door one afternoon last week laden with the fruits of his labor: dusky and beautiful purple globe and Japanese eggplant; pale yellow squash and deep green zucchini; crispy cucumbers, both fresh and pickled; tiny orange tomatoes as sweet as candy; 1 1/2 cups sugar and best of all, plump, firm, dark 3 cloves blackberries picked at the perfect stage of 3 cups sour cream, chilled serves 8 ripeness. Pick over the berries, discard any bad Besides the ratatouille, grilled vegetable ones, and set aside 1/2 cup of the largest salad, Korean cucumber salad and fresh ones to use as a garnish. tomatoes with olive oil and oregano, there Place the remainder in a strainer and followed subsequent breakfasts of blackrun cold water through them. Pour the berries on cereal, blackberries mixed with washed berries into a soup kettle and add yogurt or just plain blackberries sprinkled the wine, cinnamon, sugar and cloves. with a bit of sugar. The crowning glory Place over medium-high heat and bring came with the blackberry parfaits that I slowly to a boil. Lower the heat and cook prepared as dessert for unexpected guests. gently for about 5 to 8 minutes. Strain While searching for the perfect recipe the soup into a bowl, pressing as many to serve, I came across some fun facts and of the berries through the strainer as postips. sible. Refrigerate overnight, or for at least Blackberry tea was used as a cure for 4 hours. dysentery in the Civil War. During outWhen ready to serve, fold in the chilled breaks, temporary truces were declared to sour cream. Serve at once. allow soldiers on both sides to go “blackberrying.” Blackberry Slump The ancient Greeks believed blackber4 cups fresh blackberries (1 1/2 lb) ries cured diseases of the mouth and throat 1 cup sugar and also prevented gout. 1 cup all-purpose flour Blackberry leaves were used in ancient 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder times to make hair dyes. 1/4 teaspoon salt A study done by the University of Ohio 3/4 cup whole milk found that blackberries are the most potent 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted cancer fighters of all berries by nearly Accompaniment: vanilla ice cream 40%. Preheat oven to 375°F. Freeze berries that you can’t use right Put berries in an ungreased 5- to 6-cup away. Wash and store in Ziploc bags with gratin dish or deep-dish glass or ceramic as much air removed as possible. pie plate and sprinkle evenly with 3/4 cup Below is the yummy blackberry parfait sugar. recipe I came across, plus some bonus Sift together flour, baking powder, ones to enjoy courtesy of Homestead salt, and remaining 1/4 cup sugar into a Farms in Poolesville, Md. bowl. Add milk and butter and whisk until smooth, then pour over berries (don’t worPolish Blackberry Soup ry if berries are not completely covered). From the N.Y. Times Bread and Soup Bake slump in middle of oven until top Cookbook (a favorite recipe from Homestead Farm is golden, 40 to 45 minutes. Transfer to a rack and cool 20 minutes. customer Irene Fischer) Serve warm. 3 pints blackberries Makes 4 to 6 servings. 4 cups light sweet wine Source: Gourmet, August 2002 2-inch stick of cinnamon

L

K

The Practical Gourmet

CERTO Blackberry Freezer Jam Prep Time: 30 minutes Total Time: 24 hours, 30 minutes Makes: about 5 (1-cup) containers or 80 servings, 1 Tbsp. each 2 cups prepared fruit (buy about 2 pt. fully ripe blackberries) 4 cups sugar, measured into separate bowl 1 pouch CERTO Fruit Pectin 2 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice Rinse clean plastic containers and lids with boiling water. Dry thoroughly. Crush blackberries thoroughly, one layer at a time. (Press half of the pulp through a sieve to remove some of the seeds, if desired.) Measure exactly 2 cups prepared fruit into large bowl. Stir in sugar. Let stand 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Mix pectin and lemon juice. Add to blackberry mixture; stir 3 minutes or until sugar is dissolved and no longer grainy. (A few sugar crystals may remain.) Fill all containers immediately to within 1/2 inch of tops. Wipe off top edges of containers; immediately cover with lids. Let stand at room temperature 24 hours. Jam is now ready to use. Store in refrigerator up to 3 weeks or freeze extra containers up to 1 year. Thaw in refrigerator before using. Source: KraftFoods.com

Blackberry Parfaits Yield: Serves 4 1/4 cup all-fruit blackberry spread 2 tablespoons amaretto liqueur 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1/3 cup sugar 2 tablespoons all purpose flour 2 tablespoons cornstarch Pinch of salt 2 1/4 cups low-fat (1%) milk 1 large egg 1 teaspoon unsalted butter 1/4 teaspoon almond extract 2 cups (about) frozen blackberries, thawed Whisk blackberry spread, 1 tablespoon Amaretto and 1 teaspoon vanilla in small bowl until smooth. Whisk sugar, flour, cornstarch, and salt in heavy medium saucepan to blend. Gradually whisk in milk. Whisk in egg. Add butter. Whisk over medium heat until mixture comes to boil and thickens, about 6 minutes. Boil 1 minute longer, whisking constantly. Remove from heat. Whisk in almond extract, 1 tablespoon amaretto and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla. Spoon 1 teaspoon blackberry spread mixture into bottom of each four 1-cup stemmed glasses. Top each with 4 blackberries, then with about 3 tablespoons hot pudding. Repeat layering twice more. Divide any remaining blackberries among glasses. Refrigerate until cold, about 3 hours. (Blackberry parfaits can be prepared 1 day ahead. Keep refrigerated.) Source: Bon Appétit, April 1996

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PAGE 56

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

African American Empowerment Fund of Delaware is launched

Harold Stafford, the African American Empowerment Fund of Delaware’s Kent County lead; Sylvia Banks, interim chairperson; and Bernice Edwards, Sussex County lead at the AAEFD launch in Georgetown.

County adds downtown parking

It’s a familiar routine for weekday visitors to downtown Georgetown: circle around and around The Circle in hopes of snagging that elusive parking spot. Sussex County plans to cut down on those sometimes futile searches. County Council, at its Tuesday, July 28, meeting, approved the conversion of County-owned land a block away from The Circle into an expanded parking lot, adding approximately 40 spaces to the County’s inventory of downtown parking. Construction on the $190,000 project could begin as soon as this fall, and be complete by the end of the year. Deputy County Administrator Harold F. Godwin, who for more than a year has headed the County’s efforts to ease the downtown parking squeeze, said the County already owns a half-acre lot at Harris Alley and Cherry Lane, south of the County Administrative Offices building. The parcel, adjacent to another County parking lot, would give employees

Beware of first-time homebuyer credit fraud

The Internal Revenue Service announces its first successful prosecution related to fraud involving the first-time homebuyer credit and warned taxpayers to beware of this type of scheme. To date, the IRS has executed seven search warrants and currently has 24 open criminal investigations in pursuit of potential instances of fraud involving the credit. The agency has a number of sophisticated computer screening tools to quickly identify returns that may contain fraudulent claims for the first-time homebuyer credit. Fraudulent returns may result not only in the re-

added parking, and allow other spaces closer to The Circle to be designated for those visiting the County complex. Currently, parking for visitors is limited to a handful of free spaces in front of the County building, as well as metered spaces on adjacent side streets. With the courts, other government services and numerous firms located on and around The Circle, those spaces can disappear quickly. Original plans to demolish two Pine Street houses to make way for more parking are now on indefinite hold. Godwin said the County, which owns the houses, would consider turning over those structures, free of charge, to a historic group or other suitable organization willing to relocate the buildings at their cost. “This newest plan will save those structures for the time being, while giving us an immediate, reasonable solution to a very real and very noticeable problem,” Godwin said.

quired payment of back taxes but also in penalties and interest. The First-Time Homebuyer Credit, originally passed in 2008 and modified in 2009, provides up to $8,000 for first-time homebuyers. The purchaser, however, must qualify as a first-time homebuyer, which for purposes of this credit means someone who has not owned a primary residence in the past three years. If the taxpayer is married, this requirement also applies to the taxpayer’s spouse. The home purchase must close before Dec. 1, to qualify, and the credit may not be claimed on the purchaser’s tax return until after the taxpayer closes and has purchased the home. Different rules apply for homes bought in 2008.

Nearly 50 black community leaders turned out recently for the Sussex County launch of the African American Empowerment Fund of Delaware, a philanthropic initiative of the Delaware Community Foundation to establish a permanent source of funding for causes important to African Americans throughout Delaware. “Our mission is to establish a legacy of leadership in promoting philanthropy to fund causes important to the education, social and economic empowerment of African American Delawareans,” noted Bernice M. Edwards, executive director of the First State Community Action Agency and AAEFD Sussex County Lead. “This is the opportunity to get in on the ground level; we are on the cusp of something great.”

89 2 $

The initial goal of the African American Empowerment Fund of Delaware is to obtain 100 “founders” to contribute $1,000 or more to begin to build a lasting endowment. The fund, which celebrates its 15th anniversary this year, has more than 960 founders and an endowment exceeding $2.5 million. This year they awarded $145,000 in grants to 15 nonprofit organizations. Since the fund’s official launch in June 2008, more than 70 people have pledged nearly $70,000 in gifts. The Trustees of the Longwood Foundation have committed to a dollar for dollar matching grant for up to $50,000 for every dollar raised through the end of December. For information, call 302-5718004 or visit www.delcf.org.

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

PAGE 57

Diet fads may come and go, but my weight stays At my age it is frustrating enough to deal with household ony indsor bills, taxes, vehicle maintenance and when the next meteor may It is unfair to realize as strike, but now I have to add to that list – weight control. It is a you get older you can worldwide rage. The Atkins Diet, the South Beach Diet, Weight lose your hair, teeth and Watchers, Jenny Craig and Jarod, memory, but never lose a there is a diet to fit every need. I never thought about the weight pound. issue as a child growing up. I could eat the lion’s share of a cow carcass and not gain an ounce. I per I would be an excellent candidate to suppose my body’s metabolism was much promote their weight plan. It was my first higher when I was 16. Life is not always experience with a structured diet plan. I fair. It is unfair to realize as you get older weighed in at 255 pounds and started the you can lose your hair, teeth and memory, plan. It was a great plan because it incorbut never lose a pound. porated the use of protein supplements. It seemed at age 26 the weight issue Within two months I had lost over 50 became the newest addition to my list of pounds. I was the subject of newspaper life’s stresses. I went from a slim waist and television ads. size of 32 to wearing a pair of pants ElHowever, because of the immense vis could have worn at his last concert. amount of publicity that my weight loss By the time I was 30, I was lumbering received I was stalked whenever I went around like Bigfoot. However, the word to a restaurant. I could be at the buffet “diet” seems to be the most dangerous table at a Chinese restaurant and someone word in my vocabulary. Each time I would come up behind me and try to see mention to anyone that I am attempting what I was eating; hoping to bear witness to start a diet I begin to eat three to four to my inevitable dietary failure. times more than ever. I become a modern Just like me, I see friends of mine lose day carnivore. I could eat the Big Mac off weight with the latest diet craze. But, also a McDonald’s billboard. just like me, in time, many of them gain But, at age 32 I was approached by an it back. I have learned to face the fact international diet group who thought bethat I love to eat. I eat when I am hungry cause I was connected with the newspaand I eat when I am not hungry. Yes, I

T

W

JOE BOOTH

STATE SENATOR 19TH DISTRICT

am Tony Windsor and I am a glutton. When the television comes on I have to have something in my hand ready to eat. I bought ice cream that is labeled “fat-free” and you would have thought it was a bar of gold. I got tired of walking back and forth to the kitchen filling up my bowl, so I just started eating out of the container. It is an addiction. I have realized that diet fads do help participants lose weight, however, the only way I believe the weight can stay off is to develop some sense of reasonable eating habits and at least a minor amount of exercise. I know this is the cold hard truth that causes me to go into a deep depression. There was a time in our society that no one seemed to worry

Residents recycle used phones

In the first six months of 2009, wireless customers in Delaware donated 2,175 no-longer-used wireless phones to Verizon Wireless’ ongoing, exclusive HopeLine phone recycling and reuse program to support domestic violence prevention and awareness programs. These donations enabled HopeLine to award cash grants, generated by the sale of refurbished phones, to local domestic violence agencies and organizations in the Delaware-area. Verizon Wireless’ HopeLine program recently topped 6 22128 Sussex Highway Seaford, DE 19973 Ph: 302-628-8500 500 W. Stein Highway Seaford, DE 19973 Ph: 302-629-4514

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about weight. Moms fried chicken in Wesson oil and made mashed potatoes with cream. Today, the obsession with weight control has created a major stress for us and a huge bank account for the creators of diet programs. These diet stresses are particularly hard on people like me and my family whose Sunday dinner get together resembles a pack of wolves on a dead mule carcass. Most families go to Florida to see Disney World, me and my family go to find a new restaurant. Disney World is just a fringe benefit. Oh well, I still have my own hair, my own teeth and, as best I recall, my memory. Unfortunately, I also still have all my own weight to go with them. million phones collected nationally. HopeLine accepts wireless phones and accessories in any condition from any manufacturer for reuse and recycling at Verizon Wireless Communications Stores or via mail (postage-paid label available at www.verizonwireless. com/hopelinemailinglabel. Proceeds from HopeLine are used to provide wireless phones to survivors of domestic violence who are rebuilding their lives or cash grants to local shelters and non-profit organizations that focus on domestic violence prevention and awareness.

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PAGE 58

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 10, 2009

Education Upward Bound students explore their career options Students participating in the six-week summer Classic Upward Bound, Upward Bound Math & Science, and Talent Search programs engaged in conversation with representatives from eight career fields on July 9 at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. At the beginning of the event, the students received words of wisdom from Gail Mack, Cape Henlopen teacher and community supporter, and her husband Greg Mack, musician and accountant. “I did find my passion and I truly love working with students,” said Mrs. Mack. “Your job might not be the most popular one, but that’s fine if it makes you happy.” Students then went on to explore marine studies at the University of Delaware and several Delaware Tech programs of study including radiologic technology, occupational therapy, engineering technologies, respiratory care, veterinary technology, entrepreneurship and commercial transportation. According to students, highlights of the event were boarding a commercial transportation truck, looking at x-ray slides, and using occupational therapy equipment. The career fair appeared to be an eyeopening event for the students who participated.

A rising senior in Classic Upward Bound, Zac Exume, dreams of becoming a movie director but enjoyed learning about other careers as a backup plan. “I have learned that movie directing can be plan A and other careers can be plan B and C,” said Exume of Laurel. He also is interested in occupational therapy because he likes working with children. Upward Bound Math & Science student Amber Cooper, 17, said she enjoyed exploring all the career options that she hadn’t thought of before. Cooper, of Laurel, said she is very interested in engineering and veterinary technologies. Upward Bound programs and Educational Talent Search are federally-funded TRIO programs that offer assistance to under-prepared, low-income, and first-generation college students as well as those with disabilities in order to help them reach their higher education goals. The mission of the Talent Search program is to provide assistance to participants in completing high school and undertaking a program of post-secondary education. Talent Search is fully-funded by the U.S. Department of Education in the amount of $299,510 for 2008-2009.

From left, Upward Bound students Jabias Blockson, Brenna Sagai, Gilberto Vazquez, Kevin Wallace, Michael Deonarine, and Tyler Sparrow pose next to one of Delaware Tech’s commercial transportation trucks.

BRING A WORLD OF KNOWLEDGE INTO OUR CLASSROOMS Help promote children’s literacy and education with Morning Star Publications Newspaper In Education program. The Seaford and Laurel Stars make learning more interesting for students by providing local community news. For the 12th year we are placing copies of the Seaford and Laurel Star newspapers in our local schools. Thanks to the generosity of civic minded citizens, businesses and organizations, we are able to place newspapers in local classrooms. By supporting Newspapers in Education, you can help today’s youth develop a lifelong habit of staying informed about the world around them. It’s an easy and affordable way to make a world of difference. To help provide newspapers to area classrooms, please contact Karen Cherrix today at 302-629-9788 or fill out the form below and send your donation to Morning Star publications, Attn: NIE, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973

Your Name/Business: ___________________________________________________________ Address: _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Phone: _______________________________________________________________________ Enclosed is my donation $_______

ANY SIZE DONATION IS GREATLY APPRECIATED


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 10, 2009

Sussex Tech releases quarterly honor roll The following area students have been named to the fourth quarter honor roll at Sussex Tech.

Blades: Grade 9 – Ashley D. Taylor Bridgeville: Grade 9 – Amber L. Callahan, Jenna L. Hochstedler, Mackenzie A.D. King, Margaret E. Lee, Kaitlyn M. Schirling, Lindsi J. Ware; Grade 10 – Robert K. Miller, Daly Pineyro; Grade 11 – Kristin N. Drummond, Caitlin L. Knotts, Benedict Pineyro, Taylor R. Rager, Caitlin R. Stone, Tara D. Taylor, Shelbi L. Temple, Xavier J. Thomas; Grade 12 – Angel L. Culver, Evan C. Lee, Chelsea M. Nichols, Holly A. Passwaters, Nathan J. Rider, Joshua W. Loockerman Delmar: Grade 9 – Brooke A. Faulkner; Grade 10 – Erica B. Adkins, Kenneth S. Poole, Emily F. Tull; Grade 12 – Nicholas P. Alberti, Taryn N. Townsend Greenwood: Grade 9 – Skylar A. Draper, Richard M. Gaunt, Hunter R. Murray, Ashleigh M. Sturgis, Alexander L. Trivits, Jacob B. Williams; Grade 10 – Samantha Constantine, Sara Jean Cranmer, Aaron J. Prattis; Grade 11 – Jennifer M. Bailey, Amanda L. Nichols, Kasey B. Thompson, Shani N. Wells; Grade 12 – Heather L. Fuller, Corey L. Green, Tamara L. Hanley Laurel: Grade 9 – Lucas Acosta, Garrett R. Anderson, Gulbeyaz Arslan, Alexandra L. Ash, Emily R. Bergh, Kathryn P. Bethard, Kristin T. Brown, Aaron L. Calloway, Marissa H. Graham, Travis A. Griffith, Megan E. Hayes, Erin N. Johnson, Sung H. Kang, Martina C. Major, Carlton F. Milligan III, Kristine D. Phulesar, Sudesh Singh, Hannah G. Small, Justin T. Stevenson, Briauna A. Taylor, Isabel R. Wharton, Tara C. Windels, Breanna N. Wise; Grade 10 – AnaMaria Alvarado-Ibarra, Abby F. Atkins, Jeffrey J. Bradley, Brittany M. Chesser, Taylor P. Forse, Jessica E. Hansen, Courtney R. Hastings, Melanie A. Hitchens, Joseph E. McGin-

nis, Kelly E. Mullen, Autumn R. Stevens, Cameron C. Tierno, Angela R. Wilson; Grade 11 – Justin C. Allen, Cody L. Belote, Ralph H. Day IV, Michael D. Edelin, Whitney F. Handy, Sharmaine M. Harris, Halie A. Parker, Mathew L. Parsons, Chad M. Ricci, Courtlyn C. Whaley, Daisy B. Wharton, DaNee C. White; Grade 12 – Courtney A. Bailey, Kariane L. Christophel, Dustin M. Hitchens, Sydney E. Little, Keleigh N. Moore, Kristin L. Parsons, Brandon C. Wilkins

Seaford: Grade 9 – Hunter J. Absher, Jasmine G. Anthony, Ashley L. Bean, Damira C. Bolden-Downing, Matthew B. Dopler, Margaret M. Durig, Yasmeen C. Eddy, Ryan K. Fitzgerald, Brooke A. Givens, Jenna A. Green, Bethany M. LaChance, Mahnoor Mahmood, Shane P. Marvel, Aaron A. Massey, Cole L. Messick, Morgan R. Messick, Chase C. Milligan, Kyle W. Mister, Payton E. Shirey, Shane A. Smith, Gregory B. Spera, Cassidy B. Taylor, Krista J. Whaley; Grade 10 – Dana M. Bard, Scott C. Bell, Briana R. Bolden, Taylor J. Budke, Paige E. Collins, Elizabeth A. Coulbourn, Meghan Engst, Nicole K. Esham, Alyssa M. Francus, Timothy E. Gaskin, Myles J. Gray, Tianna N. Hutchins, Taylor M. Kieffer, Chelsea A. Kimbler, Matthew S. King, Caitlin A. Liffers, Michael V. Mather, Charinel Matos, Michael D. Rhone, Brock A. Smith, Clare C. Thomas, Dennis J. Trimble, Nathan C. Truitt, Matthew D. Tull, Jessica M. Widerman; Grade 11 – Marly Arbaiza, Paul D. Asa, Andrew G. Bell, Sabree C. Burbage, Anna M.F. Dill, Whitney N. Ebron, Dana M. Farrow, Emily J. Genshaw, Emir W. Laroya, Kinjal R. Patel, Amber L. Williamson, Anna M. Yelverton; Grade 12 – Ashley M. Adams, Sara M. Adams, Ashley L. Bice, Seth M. Hastings, Ryan C. Hill, Natalie M. Justice, Tyler D. Justice, Robert G. Lehman, Rebecca A. McMillin, Kasey M. Moore, Michael G. O’Bier, Melissa D. Willey

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Subscribe Today! Call 629-9788 or go to www.seafordstar.com

Cay graduates from Kaplan

Elizabeth Cay of Seaford has been awarded a master of science degree in Criminal Justice from Kaplan University. Cay’s accomplishment was celebrated during a live graduation ceremony on July 25 in Chicago. The Kaplan University summer 2009 class of more than 2,500 students earned their associate’s, bachelor’s and master’s degrees online.

Mayercsik named to Dean’s List

Nathan Mayercsik of Laurel, was named to Dean’s List at the University of Delaware for the Spring 2009 semester. Mayercsik, a rising senior civil engineering student, is spending his summer researching blast mitigation for his department in Newark.

Event planning course offered

Considering a new career? Explore the field of event planning by enrolling in a new certificate course offered at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Learn what it takes to plan business/corporate events, weddings, and other special events. Topics include promotion, coordination, planning, design, and marketing. Participants will receive suggestions for setting up a home office, as well as determining client preferences and preparing a budget. Students will gain insight into the field through interaction with wedding/event vendors in Sussex County. Develop a team of preferred vendors, networks and target markets. Find out how to offer travel planning as an added value to clients.

PAGE 59 Course instructor Donna Duffy is co-owner of Memorable Milestones, Inc., an event and travel planning business. This course will meet on Thursday evenings from Sept. 17 through Nov. 19. For more information or to sign up, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate & Community Programs at 302-854-6966.

Area students graduate from SU

Some 16 Sussex County students recently graduated from Salisbury University. They were among the 1,435 students who received 1,269 bachelor’s degrees and 166 master’s degrees at the spring commencement ceremonies held at the Wicomico Youth & Civic Center in Salisbury, Md.The following area students earned degrees: Laurel: Kyle Boyce, B.A., history; Frances Lawrence, B.A., environmental issues; and Hanna Whaley, B.S., exercise science. Seaford: Casey Bradham, B.S., clinical laboratory science and medical technology; and Carol Crossan, B.A., psychology. Other area residents include: Sarah Pritchett, B.A., psychology, summa cum laude, Bridgeville; and Christine Melvin, B.S., nursing, of Delmar.

Two graduate from WC

The following area students graduated from Washington College in Chestertown, Md. in May: Laurel - Candace L. Gaull, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William J. Gaull, B.S., biology with a minor in chemistry, cum laude, departmental honors, recipient of the Penny J. Fall Award. Seaford - Linda R. Walls Simpson, B.A., psychology.


PAGE 60

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

Gov. Jack Markell recently honored the late Senate President Pro Tem Thurman Adams Jr. by signing the Bridgeville Democrat’s final bill into law.

Markell signs Adams’ final bill Gov. Jack Markell kicked off his first Governor’s Day at the Delaware State Fair by honoring the late Senate President Pro Tem Thurman Adams Jr. by signing the Bridgeville Democrat’s final bill into law. Markell signed the bill in the shadows of the Thurman Adams Jr. Paddock complex, just off the race track at the fairgrounds. “I can think of no better way to honor Sen. Adams today than to sign his final bill right here, next to his building, surrounded by his family and his friends at the fair whom he loved so much and who loved him right back,” Markell said. “Sen. Adams dedicated most of his life to serving the public and there’s literally not a bill in the last 30-plus years that he didn’t touch in some way.” Besides being one of Delaware’s most powerful politicians, Adams was one of the fair’s biggest boosters and was wellknown for escorting governors around the fairgrounds on Governor’s Day. All of which made the tribute especially touching, said Adams’ daughter Polly Adams Mervine.

“Agriculture is incredibly important to this state,” she said. “And he always felt that the fair is a wonderful chance for people to come and take a look and really see what our state is about.” Adams died last month of pancreatic cancer. But even from his hospital bed, Adams worked on legislation, including the bill Markell signed. Thursday’s tributes included a horse race in Adams’ honor and a special tribute during the Governor’s Day dinner. Adams’ last bill sets up a task force to look at vehicle weight regulations and puts off implementation of a new law on the subject from January 2010 to July 2011 to give lawmakers time to study the group’s reports and recommendations. The issue is important to the farming community, which Markell said made the bill signing all the more meaningful. “Sen. Adams was always a friend to the farmer,” Markell said, “especially those that he talked to in his Bridgeville office and those he worked with to build this incredible place – the Delaware State Fair.”

DNREC’s Sediment and Stormwater Program and Watershed Assessment Section seeks volunteers to mark storm drains in the town of Seaford with medallions bearing the reminder, “No Dumping Drains to Waterway.” Seaford storm drains will be marked on Saturday, Sept. 19. “Storm drains are marked to remind community residents and businesses not to dump anything down the storm drains, including oil, trash, paint or other pollutants,” said Environmental Scientist Jennifer Volk of the Watershed Assessment Section. “We are eager to work with the towns and volunteers to implement a practice that will reduce stormwater pollution that would otherwise drain into the Chesapeake Bay.” Other towns that have been marked in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed include Greenwood, Bridgeville and Laurel. Greenwood was marked on Friday, May 15 by the Peach Blossom 4-H Club led by Elaine Webb. Bridgeville’s marking was done on Tuesday, June 2 by the Woodbridge High School Key Club, led by Kelli Duncan. The Laurel event was held Saturday, June 13 with volunteers from the Delaware Surfrider Foundation, the Nan-

ticoke Creekwatchers, and representatives from the town and George, Miles, and Buhr, Inc. DNREC’s storm drain marking initiative was first spearheaded in 2007 in Lewes, where nearly 500 storm drains were marked by more than 65 volunteers. Other communities that have implemented this program since then include Milton, Georgetown and Wilmington’s Southbridge community. Funding for the projects in Delaware’s Chesapeake Bay communities has been provided in full by the Chesapeake Bay Implementation grant. Past projects have also been funded in full by grants. “This is a great program that gets communities involved and provides a positive and lasting reminder about protecting our vital watersheds,” said project coordinator Beth Krumrine of the DNREC Sediment and Stormwater Program. “We would like to continue to work with other communities in the future if the funding is available,” she added. If you are interested in volunteering with the Seaford marking event on Sept. 19, contact Jennifer Volk at 302-739-9939 or Jennifer.Volk@state.de.us.

Volunteers needed for fall storm drain marking project in Seaford

NEW OFFICERS - New officers were installed recently by the Spade and Trowel Garden Club of Seaford. From left are Mary Noel, president; Julie Dobson, treasurer; Lettie Perry, recording secretary; Jacquelyn McPeak, first vice president; and JoAnne Cooke, second vice president. Not pictured is Ann O’Dea, corresponding secretary. The club meets on the second Tuesday of each month and offers special outings of interest to gardeners, in addition to a greens sale in December. The club invites the public to attend a talk by Dr. Douglas Tallamy, chair of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware, to be held Oct. 13 at 2 p.m. at the Methodist Manor House in Seaford. Tallamy will share thoughts from his book, Bringing Nature Home. To reserve a seat or for more information about the club, call Mary Noel at 3371054.

MANOR HOUSE MIXER - Ron Redman, left, of Cavalier Business Communications and Tom Darby of Lab Products in Seaford enjoy the evening during the after hours mixer hosted by the Methodist Manor House. Photos by Rick Cullen

Rob Harman, left, and Tom Knopp, both of Sperry Van Ness enjoy the hospitality at the Methodist Manor House during a recent Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce function.


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 6 - 12, 2009

PAGE 61

Harman will lead new Nanticoke Senior Center $2.3m campaign The $2.3 million campaign to build a new home for members of the Nanticoke Senior Center got a boost recently with the naming of Rob Harman as campaign chair. Harman is a managing broker and senior adviser with Sperry Van-Ness-Miller Commercial Real Estate and co-owner of Home Team Realty in Seaford. He was named the 2008-09 Realtor of the Year and is a past president of the Sussex County Association of Realtors. Nanticoke Senior Center, which has co-occupied a facility for the past 10 years with another regional non-profit, needs to relocate by 2010 in order to meet the growth needs of both organizations, said Lora Schuler, NSC chair. In the last two months, the Senior Center has received more than $500,000 in gifts, pledges and challenge grants, giving the new campaign a solid start. NSC provides more than 33,000 meals each year to both members and homebound residents. Senior Center staff also make some 500 trips per month in Center vans and other vehicles to take members to doctors’ appointments, pick up food and medications and facilitate group outings. “There is no question that the services we provide help to defer medical expenses and save money for the state and county,” said Lora Schuler, NSC chair. The new 12,000 square foot facility to be built near the Seaford Industrial Park and Ross Mansion complex is smaller than was originally conceived, said

Bridge closed for maintenance

The Department of Transportation (DelDOT) announces that the bridge on the westbound side of Route 20/ Stein Highway will be closed between North Pine Street to North Porter Street in Seaford through Monday, Aug. 10, weather permitting. Construction began on Monday, Aug. 3. Mumford & Miller Concrete, Inc.

Rob Harman

Schuler, “but it is the right size for our current economy.” She said that the new Center will be able to serve more than 1,000 NSC members on a regular basis, and has the ability for future expansion. The Center will be constructed on land that is being provided to the NSC by the City of Seaford. “This will allow us to pursue state funding for certain infrastructure costs,” Schuler said. Harman, who is now recruiting his campaign leadership committee, promises that “no stone will be unturned” in the course of the NSC campaign, which is expected to last through 2010.

August 11, 2009

Love Always, Mom, Roger & Family

Nighttime concrete pour completed for new Indian River Inlet Bridge The Department of Transportation (DelDOT), Skanska USA Civil Southeast, Inc. and Thoro-Good’s Concrete Company teamed up recently to pour 1,000 cubic yards of concrete into the first pylon on the northside of the new Indian River Inlet Bridge. The massive concrete pour took 12 hours to complete and represents the first major concrete pour of the more than 36,000 cubic yards of cast-in-place concrete that will be used to construct the bridge. At the site, each concrete truck will discharge the concrete mix into a hydraulic concrete pump with an attached large (elephant-like trunk) hose which will dispense

will be removing and replacing a section of the bridge deck and replacing bridge joints on the westbound bridge span. Motorists traveling westbound will be directed to use the eastbound side of the bridge “contraflow” with sidewalk detours. For more information, visit www. deldot.gov or tune to WTMC-AM 1380.

Lordy, Lordy, Look Who’s 40!

Terrie Jean Murphy Williams

1,000 cubic yards of concrete were recently poured into the first pylon of the new Indian River Inlet Bridge. Photos courtesy of DelDOT

the concrete into the pylon footer. Once the concrete has been poured in the footer, two layers of black thermal blankets will be placed over the top of the footer acting as a heat insulator. The goal is to not shock the concrete by exposing the 160 degree concrete to 85 degree air temperatures. These measures are being taken to ensure that once the concrete is poured, it does not crack which could diminish the strength of the concrete. For additional information on the existing bridge or the construction of the new Indian River Inlet Bridge Project go to www.irib.deldot.gov

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MORNING STAR • AuGuST 6 - 12, 2009

Laurel Town Ordinance 2009-10

If the residents of Laurel would attend the Mayor and Town Council meetings often as I do, they would see that for most of the time the Council does a pretty good job. They spend the town’s money as though it were their own and on other issues they usually put a lot of thought into their decisions before making them. But they want to pass an ordinance now to hold property owners liable for nuisance calls made to the town police. I believe they are dead wrong about this. I’m not a property owner, so therefore I don’t have a pony in this race, but I do believe in being fair about this proposed ordinance. Our wonderful, all compassionate, wellknowing government in 1968 passed the Fair Housing Act, which was designed to correct a wrong turned into a nightmare for landlords across our land that resulted in having to rent to anyone or be faced with legal problems. My wife was a property manager for several years and she could tell you a thing or two about having to rent to unsavory characters and then facing problems later that they would cause, so the Mayor and Council should be careful about any rush to solve problems like this and put yourselves in the property owners’ shoes. Larry Calhoun

Laurel

Confused over school decision

Letters to the Editor

This past week an incident occurred at the Laurel School Board meeting that has left me shaking my head and questioning the board. On Wednesday morning a committee comprised of the assistant superintendent, two principals, an assistant principal and the athletic director interviewed two candidates for the position of Laurel Varsity Softball Coach. Late Wednesday the candidates were notified on the committee’s decision with approval coming that evening at the School Board meeting. At the meeting the candidate’s name was revealed for approval and before the approval was made a member from the audience (son-in-law of the board president) spoke on how he felt the other candidate should have the position. Approval of chosen candidate was tabled until the August 10 board meeting. My question: what is going to be different from July 29 until August 10? It sounds as though the board is questioning the credibility of the committee. These professionals were placed into their positions by the board. Is this not a smack in the face to the committee members? Why waste their valuable time if the board is not going to take the committee’s recommendation? Why even have a selection committee? The candidate chosen by the committee

Guest Column Seaford Concert Association begins

I just received the program with the attached membership application from the Seaford Community Concert Association presenting their 61st Concert season, 2009-10. Their membership drive started August 1 and ends August 29. When hubby and I moved from Berlin, Md., to Portsville nine years ago, the first thing I did was to continue buying the Salisbury Daily Times and started to buy the local daily and weekly newspapers. I also purchased a book map of Sussex County. I got to know who, what, when, where and how the communities and people of Sussex County lived. The first time I saw, in this paper, a photo and read the caption about a concert being presented at Seaford Senior High School, I was elated to know that my neighboring town featured concerts. The only problem was, there wasn’t any information on how or where to purchase a ticket. It wasn’t until months later that a fellow AARP member, Claire Andress, a retired school teacher who lives in Bethel, told me that tickets are not sold separately for each concert. Anyone can purchase a season membership pass and see all five concerts for only $45 - $50 a person; a family pass for $95 - $110 and a student pass for $12 - $15 Wow! That came to be about $7.50 per concert for me. I paid $25 and up for one concert elsewhere. Naturally, I became

has years of experience coaching sports in the district with a proven record. The other candidate, also a teacher, has never coached in the district. Does tabling the committee’s decision make sense to you? Does someone on the board or someone close to a board member have a personal gain as to the reason why the committee’s recommendation wasn’t accepted? I cast my vote for each member that sits on the board feeling that when I cast that vote they would be the best candidate for the position. I now question my decision! The board makes the decision on August 10. May the decision they make be one they can live with. School board terms do expire! Linda Wintjen Laurel

Littering with lawn clippings

I often walk or ride my bicycle through my neighborhood and downtown Seaford. In my travels, I can’t help but notice that some people when mowing their lawn direct the grass clippings out into the street and some even throw weeds they have pulled there also. This is not only ugly and stops up the drains, but is against a town ordinance forbidding this practice. If you don’t want to bag your grass, direct the cuttings back

a repeat concert member after the first season. There are many people who move into our communities that are unaware that we have these wonderful entertaining concerts in the 1200-seat Seaford Senior High School auditorium. And, the membership admission price is still the same. The first of the five concerts this season starts September 16 at 8 p.m. with Daniel Rodriguez, the former NYC policeman, featured singer at 9/11/01 events. The second concert, November 13, will be the Russian Seasons Dance Company – 20 members performing a breathtaking dance program. On January 25, 2010, Rudolf Budginas, pianist, will be giving classical music a broader audience appeal. Hunt Family Fiddlers, who performed at the Newport Waterfront Irish Festival, will entertain us on February 24. And the last concert on April 29, 2010 will feature the Canadian Tenors, dubbed “Canada’s National Treasure,” crowd pleasing, a mix of music from classical to world pop. A membership pass must be presented at the door at each concert before being admitted. It will be my pleasure to see that anyone requesting a membership application and program, receives it within three days; just phone me at 875-5086. You’ll be glad you did. Helen Skjoldager

Laurel

I saw part of a report about the disappearance of honey bees. DUH! Could the pesticides that are being sprayed all over the place, possibly be a factor? Shirley Metz

Laurel

Comments on article

Last week in the “Morning Star” dated July 23, 2009, an article on page 5 by Lynn R. Parks concerning the elimination of state municipal street aid for Seaford was written. According to the article, Seaford along with other communities lost $6 million. Seaford alone lost more than $220,000. On July 27, 2009 another article written by Harry F. Themal appeared in the News Journal on page A12. Both Mr. Themal and our district representative Dan Short asked the same question afterward: “Where were the lobbyists who should have been looking out for the needs of these cities and towns?” These gentlemen should know that lobbyists don’t vote! Our representative, Dan Short, stated he didn’t know that the Municipal Street Aid was not included in the state’s bond bill when he voted to approve it! Short has already complained that the task given the legislative session is great and the time allocated to review it is too short. (no pun intended.) If this is the case and our representative didn’t have enough time to study the budget and bond bill, he shouldn’t have voted for its approval. If it was a matter of not understanding the bill, he should have asked those persons who were more knowledgeable about the subject.

Send letters to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or email editor@mspublications.com. Editor Daniel Wright Richardson

Seaford, DE 19973

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editor@mspublications.com

Bees disappearing

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Seaford

Seaford

Morning Star Publications Inc.

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into your yard so it can help fertilize it. Whatever happened to taking pride the appearance of your property, thereby making a lovely neighborhood? Maybe the city should start fining people who ignore this rule. Also, If you don’t want the newspaper that is tossed into your yard on a weekly basis, (Sometimes missing and landing in the street), bend over and pick it up and put it in your trash can. Exercise is good for you.

Donna Huston Carol Kinsley Elaine Schneider Kay Wennberg Composition Cassie Richardson Rita Brex

Sales Rick Cullen Emily Rantz Laura Rogers Doris Shenton Brandon Miller

Morning Star Publications Inc. Subscriptions - $19 a year in-county, $24 a year in has been serving the Delmarva Treasurer Circulation Kent and New Castle, Del., and Federalsburg, SharpCarol Wright Richardson Karen Cherrix Peninsula since 1996. town and Delmar, Md.; $29 elsewhere out of state. Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR • AuGuST 6 - 12, 2009

PAGE 63

Final Word Delaware needs to do more for the business community By State Rep. Gerald Hocker

When Jack Markell was elected governor last year, there was reason to hope that our new chief executive would understand the need to cultivate a pro-business environment in the First State. Markell holds an undergraduate degree in Economics and Development Studies from Brown University and an MBA from the University of Chicago. As his bio states: “He began his career in the private sector … as the 13th employee at Nextel (a name he coined) where he served as senior vice president for Corporate Development.” That promise grew last December when Governor-elect Markell nominated Alan Levin to serve as the director of the Delaware Economic Development Office. As the CEO and majority owner of Happy Harry’s, Levin was largely responsible for growing the company into the 10th largest drugstore chain in the country at the time it was acquired by Walgreen’s in 2006. However, since being sworn in, Gov. Markell has not lived up to expectations. A recent press release boasted that all of Gov. Markell’s legislative priorities would become law “and position Delaware for long-term growth.” Yet not one of these priorities directly benefits our business community. As a Sussex County businessman for more than 30 years, I believe our state’s economic recovery is tied to the welfare of our small businesses. State government may be the single largest employer in Delaware, but more people are employed by small and medium-sized businesses than by any other sector. Thanks to the closings of both of our state’s car manufacturers, and layoffs at the Invista nylon plant in Seaford, Delaware is losing thousands of high-quality, highpaying manufacturing jobs. Currently, Delaware’s unemployment rate is 8.1 percent, more than two-and-ahalf-times what it was two years ago. I believe that if we’re going to turn this grim reality around, we need to help our businesses to keep existing jobs and create conditions that will facilitate future growth. Instead, the new administration has made bold strides to handicap businesses. One example is the governor’s recent veto of a bill to repeal the state’s ineffective and wasteful beverage bottle container law. Despite being enacted more than 25 years ago, many Delawareans are unaware of this half-hearted law, which doesn’t apply to a wide variety of beverage containers including all cans as well as bottles containing water, tea and juice. By some estimates, $3 million in bottle deposits are currently unclaimed. At a nickel per deposit, that’s 60 million bottles that were never redeemed. Despite the law’s ineffectiveness, retailers selling soft drinks are burdened with the costs of collecting and storing the bottles that are redeemed. The legislation allows retailers to receive a penny for each redeemed bottle – an amount which doesn’t come close to the expense of administering this well-intentioned, but misguided, state mandate. Of far more pressing concern for Dela-

ware’s business community is the controversial $212 million package of tax and fee increases that were recently signed into law by Gov. Markell. These hikes included a jump in the state’s Personal Income Tax (PIT) affecting anyone with annual earnings of $60,000 or more. The package also contains a new law raising the Gross Receipts Tax (GRT) by eight-percent across-the-board and an omnibus measure hiking the Corporate Franchise Tax and a host of fees imposed on companies. When fully implemented, these two measures will take more than $134 million from Delaware businesses annually. According to a February 2009 article in Delaware Business Magazine, the Marion Ewing Kauffman Foundation ranks Delaware 49th when it comes to entrepreneurial activity. Reacting to that fact in the same article, Gov. Markell said: “We’ve got to create an economic climate here where entrepreneurs and workers alike can thrive across a range of industries.” Again, the administration’s actions have thus far not matched their words. I voted against all the tax and fee increases as well as the state operating budget because of its hostility towards businesses. These higher levies will hamper our economic rebound by creating new chal-

lenges for already struggling enterprises and hurt working Delawareans by eliminating jobs and limiting new employment opportunities. I believe we need to examine our state tax structure with an eye to reform it, making it more business-friendly. These changes will not only help the First State retain our current businesses, it’ll also help us attract companies not currently operating here. We also need to re-craft our economic development efforts. We’re at a significant disadvantage with our larger neighbors in trying to lure large employers here. But our small size and ability to react nimbly gives us an edge in convincing smaller companies to set up shop. Not only would such a strategy play to our strengths, it would diversify our economy, giving us less exposure should any one business or industry experience difficulty. To their credit, I believe the Markell administration has embraced this philosophy. Gov. Markell’s “Limited Investment for Financial Traction,” which uses $5 million from the state’s Strategic Fund to subsidize the interests on small-business loans, is a

step in the right direction. Still, the business track record of the new administration, while admittedly only about six months old, has been disappointing. I urge Gov. Markell and the Delaware Economic Development Office to hold a summit with legislative and business leaders to craft a consensus pro-business development plan we can aggressively implement by the start of the New Year. I believe the welfare of our economy could rest in the balance.

Actual Business Signs

On the side of a garbage truck: “We’ve got what it takes to take what you’ve got.” On the door of a computer store: “Out for a quick byte.”

Final thought

Where do forest rangers go to “get away from it all”? Submit items by email to us at editor@ mspublications.com. Include your name, hometown and a daytime phone number.


500 W. Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Ph: 302-629-4514 22128 Sussex Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973

You’ve heard about the $8,000 stimulus tax credit available to “1st-time homebuyers.” But did you know that you can now Use That Tax Credit as an $8,000 Down payment toward your purchase of a home? Not a 1st-time buyer? Don’t Worry – any buyer who hasn’t owned a principal residence in the previous 3-year period may qualify! Just be sure to purchase before Dec. 1, 2009. This tax incentive does not have to be repaid! It is a “true” tax credit – every dollar of your tax credit reduces your income taxes by a dollar!

Fax: 302-536-6280

Call “CFM” to see if you may qualify for this tax credit. We have a “Great!” inventory of homes, and interest rates are low right now. DON’T MISS YOUR OPPORTUNITY!

Fax: 302-536-6259

www.cfmnet.com

GET YOUR $$$ NOW!

Ph: 302-628-8500

NEW LISTING NEW LISTING

APARTMENT

NEW LISTING NEW LISTING

RENTALS

Here is a nice Country Rancher with an attached In-Law Suite. Home features a total of 4 BRs & 4 BAs, an att. over- sized garage, and an att. one car garage, Walk-up attic stairs, 2 kitchens & 2 sunrooms. All for $249,900! (#570596)

4-BR ranch in Lakeside Manor, Laurel, offers LR, spacious eatin kit w/appliances, large utility room, and split-bedroom floorplan (private 4th BR w/full bath). $189,000 (#571286)

2 BR units in Seaford, Bridgeville & Georgetown Rents start at $625 per month Pick up applications at CFM’s Stein Highway office

NEW LISTING

REDUCED!

REDUCED!

REDUCED!

REDUCED!

Affordable Living in this nice 3-BR, 2-BA single wide mobile home on slightly less than ¾ acre in the country near Laurel. Enjoy the lovely above-ground pool in the spacious back yard. Two sheds included for $84,500 (#571225)

Classic Cape Cod located in Martin Farms, one of Seaford’s prettiest neighborhoods, less than a block from the golf & country club. Motivated seller! $179,900 (#550779)

This 3-BR clinker brick Colonial in town offers front porch, rear patio, & 1-car det garage. Inside you’ll enjoy the wood floors, fireplace, LR & FR. $169,000 (MLS 556116)

RIVERFRONT! Rare opportunity to acquire this spacious ranch in Snug Harbor. Apx. 1.02 acre site with replaced bulk heading & riprap. Competitively priced to sell at $465,000 (#564472)

Ready to Move In – this completely renovated home in Laurel offers new kitchen, full bath & 2 half baths, LR, DR, & 3 BRs. $159,000 (MLS 567748)

BETHEL

$5,000 SELLER ASSIST

REDUCED!

3-BR, 2-BA home w/ French doors leading to a scr. porch; kitchen w/ island, pantry, black appl’s. & birch cabinetry; double att. garage & concrete driveway, plus one of the largest, most beautifully landscaped lots in Clearbrooke Est. $239,900 (#568965)

$$$ INCENTIVES ROOM TO ROAM

$$$ INCENTIVES! In addition to the Fed. Gov’t’s tax credit of $8,000, the Sellers will contribute $5,000 toward Buyer’s closings costs! This 4-BR ranch in town also offers 2 BAs, FR, appliances, 2 stg sheds & 14’x16’ deck for just $169,900. (#550945)

WOODLAND STATION CLEARBROOKE ESTATES

Contemporary brick home on 1.48 acres offers apx. 4,000 sq. ft. and 3-car garage. 4 BRs (including 2 master BR suites), 4 BAs, “Great Room,” sunporch, and home warranty plus many special features & extras! $429,900 (#563738)

Great home in a great community! 3-BR, 2-BA ranch w/finished FR/office or even a 4th BR over the 2-car att garage. 840 sq. ft. of open area includes LR, DR, & KIT, all with no walls or barriers. Utility rm is over 15’ long & offers plenty of room for laundry & other needs. 10’x10’ kennel and 10’x16’ stg. shed are included. $280,000 (#570519)

5BR Colonial beauty in the Meadows at Shawnee near Milford. It offers 3 levels of living with finished basement w/ full bath, LR, DR, FR, & Kit on first floor and 4 BRS, 2 BAs plus laundry room on second. Many energy saving features, too. $269,900 (#570626)

RIVERFRONT!

Spacious 3,600 sq. ft. Colonial on over an acre of landscaped grounds on the Nanticoke River. Enjoy water skiing or boating on the river. Watch the sunset as you lounge in the sunroom or on the patio. Swim or relax beside the sparkling in-ground pool! At day’s end, retire to the calming 2-room master BR suite. So MUCH to offer! $595,000 (#561464)

Remarkably well-kept 3-BR, 1.5-BA rancher w/garage in quiet community near Seaford. Home offers Corian counters & glass top range in kit, insulated windows, central air, updated baths, 24’x24’ workshop enclosed by privacy fencing, and a half-acre corner lot. Priced to sell at $163,400 (#570882)

Good things come in small packages, especially when they are larger than they appear! This 1,200 sq. ft., 3-BR cutie is ready to move into with a FR, LR, eat-in kit, laundry room, scr. porch, & det. 2-car garage w/shed. $109,000 (#571207)

Own a little piece of history! This charming 4-BR, 2-BA Victorian in quaint, historic Bethel has been meticulously restored to its 1890’s character. Features original wood floors, 2 staircases, 4 elec. fireplaces, C/A & much more! $270,000 (#569524)

Newly remodeled 4-BR, 2-BA rancher in excellent condition. New kitchen & new flooring, private yard in nice neighborhood near Seaford, & seller will help pay buyer’s closing costs at the reduced price of $174,900 (#567553)

LAKESIDE MANOR HUSTON ACRES

This 3-BR, 2-BA home w/garage near Laurel, is a “Must See!” New plumbing & septic tank; new windows, siding & roof; new kit. flooring, appliances, & paint; 2 new bathrooms; fenced back yard & deck, plus much more! $179,900 (#564100)

Three restricted estate lots in this new subdivision west of Seaford on Rt. 20. Great country location, yet covenient to town. Lot 1 is 2.64 acres for $125,000. Lot 2 is 2.53 acres for $120,000. Lot 3 is 5 acres for $160,000 (MLS 551544, 551546, 551548)

August 6 2009 S  

AFRAM Festival letters 62 lynn PArks 42 movies 7 oBituAries 27 PAt murPhy 30 PeoPle 52 Police JournAl 54 Puzzles 51 sPorts 39 tiDes 7 tony W...

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