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VOL. 13 NO. 36

THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 2009

50 cents

News VIVA LAS VEGAS! - The annual Nanticoke Memorial Hospital auction was held last Saturday, April 4. Page 10 ELEctIonS - The recent Laurel elections brought no new faces to the Council or Mayor’s office. Page 5 tAx DAy tEA PArty - Local Sussex County towns will join national protests against excessive taxation on April 15. Page 58 WE thE PEoPLE - On March 6, Laurel High School’s Honor Civics/Economic students competed as two teams at the state level in the “We the People” competition for the first time. Page 18 communIty WALk - Annual community walks were held throughout the county Saturday. In Woodbridge alone, 453 people attended the event. Page 10

Sports thIrD WIn - The Delmar varsity girls’ soccer team earned its third win of the season with a victory at home against Tatnall last Saturday. Page 43 StArS of thE WEEk - A Laurel track and field athlete, a Delmar soccer player, a Sussex Tech baseball player, and a Sussex Tech softball player are this week’s Laurel Stars of the Week. Page 45 mIkE mccLurE - Page 47

INSIDE THE STAR Business Bulletin Board ChurCh Classifieds eduCation entertainment final word frank Calio Gaslines Gourmet health letters lynn Parks

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21 26 32 40 30 59 38 20 42 14 58 17

mike Barton m ovies oBituaries oPinion Pat murPhy PeoPle PoliCe Journal Puzzles s oCials snaPshots sPorts tides tony windsor

© 57 7 29 58 25 52 54 24 57 56 43 7 39

McGruff, the crime dog, Miss Delaware 2008 Galen Giaccone and over 200 others join Laurel Mayor John Shwed in the “Spring into Health” community walk held on Saturday, April 4 at Laurel High School. Photo by Pat Murphy

Laurel council proposes changes to town code on residential fencing

By Lynn R. Parks

Concerns about the concertina barbed wire at the top of fencing surrounding a parcel of land recently purchased by the town of Laurel has led to a proposed change in fencing ordinances in the town.

On Monday night, April 6, Laurel Town Manager told council that he had been approached by two citizens regarding separate issues concerning appropriate fencing used by property owners in the town. Fasano said given the recent concern expressed by members of the

town council about the type of barbed wire that existed around the property on the corner of Central Avenue at the Five Points intersection, he thought this would be a good time to review fencing ordinances and also get rid of this type of concertina barbed wire. continued on page 4

Delmar Council awards Water treatment plant contract By Mike McClure The Delmar Council (Del.) voted to award the bid for the town’s water treatment plant upgrades during its meeting Monday night. The Council also agreed to allow Town Manager Sara Bynum-King pursue the sale of a town owned parcel. The Utility Commission, which met prior to the Delmar Council, recommended the acceptance of a proposal by Davis, Bowen and Friedel to award the water treatment plant upgrade bid to Bearing Construction of Sudlersville, Md. At a cost of $5,884,000. The Delmar Council voted, 4-0, to approve the proposal.

Bearing Construction had the lowest bid for the project. The town received a request to purchase a town owned property at 201 East Jewell Street. A neighbor asked to buy the vacant lot to use as a garage and additional lot. The lot has been deemed by the town as an unbuildable lot. While there was a house on the lot prior to the town’s purchase, the Council said there is not enough room to put a house on it and meet the setback requirements. The Council voted, 5-0, to pursue selling the lot. The Council received an update on the Delmarva Inn, which is located on the Maryland side.

The Delmar Commission (Md.) did not renew the hotel’s business license because of multiple violations. The issue will be discussed further at the Commission’s meeting on Monday, April 13. Bynum-King said the town recently received information that the property is in foreclosure. A pair of first readings were held during Monday night’s meeting: one for an ordinance approving the annexation of 1.19 acres of land and another relating to the well head protection ordinance. The Council approved both first readings and will hold second readings during its meeting on Monday, May 4.


MORNING STAR • ApRIl 9 - 15, 2009

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Bike Summit riders brave storm to deliver message By Lynn R. Parks

It takes more than a little rain to send true cyclists scurrying for shelter. And so, when volunteers with the Delaware Bicycle Council and Bike Delaware and bicycling enthusiasts with the Delaware Department of Transportation said that they would arrive by bicycle in Seaford Monday afternoon, they did, despite wind, lightning and heavy showers. “This is really a good lesson for Delawareans, that you can bike no matter what the weather is,” said a wet Amy Wilburn, chairwoman of the Delaware Bicycle Council. “As long as it isn’t icy, you can get out on your bicycle.” The group of six cyclists rode from Bethany Beach to Rehoboth, then through Georgetown to Seaford City Hall to promote the upcoming Delaware Bike Summit, set for April 24 in Dover. On Tuesday, they headed north toward Harrington and Milford. They were set to conclude their journey Friday afternoon in Bellevue State Park at the north end of the state. “We could have sent out press releases and just left it at that,” said Wilburn. “But we wanted to bring our message to the people on our bicycles.” “I felt every donut I’ve eaten in the past five years,” joked DelDOT spokesman Jim Westhoff. Although not a regular cyclist, he joined in the effort to spread the word about the summit. Westhoff said that the focus of the summit is to encourage people and agencies throughout the state to work together to

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make Delaware a bicycle-friendly state. “We are really trying to get everybody in the state on the same page in terms of working to be better for cyclists,” added Wilburn. Westhoff said that during their journey from Bethany to Seaford, the cyclists saw several situations in which the roadways could be more bike-friendly. In particular were bicycle lanes that abruptly ended. Westhoff predicted that within the decade, gasoline prices will rise to the point that much of the population is using bicycles for transportation. “People will want to get around without using gasoline,” he said. “Will we be ready when 30 or 40 percent of our population starts using bikes for transportation? We need everybody working together, the state, counties and cities, to prepare.” Wilburn said that there are numerous reasons to ride bicycles. Bicycles are nonpolluting, more cyclists mean less traffic congestion, taking pressure off the state’s infrastructure. In addition, a biking community is a friendly community. “When you are out on your bike, you see other people in your neighborhood,” she said. “And the community is safer with all those eyes and ears out.” The Delaware Bike Summit will be opened by Gov. Jack Markell, whose platform included a plan to make Delaware a bicycle-friendly state. Keynote speaker will be Mike Ronkin, Salem, Oregon. Ronkin, who until 2006 was bicycle and pedestrian program manager for the Oregon Department of Transportation, is own-

Six cyclists rode into Seaford Monday, to promote the upcoming Delaware Bike Summit. Standing in front of the Seaford City Hall, from left: Delaware Department of Transportation spokesman Jim Westhoff, Amy Wilburn, chairwoman of the Delaware Bicycle Council, her daughter Maria Wilburn representing Bike Delaware, Anthony Aglio, bicycle and pedestrian coordinator with DelDOT, Claire Cunningham with DelDOT and Carol Ireland, a member of the White Clay Bicycle Club. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

er of Designing Streets for Pedestrians and Bicycles, a consulting and training firm. The agenda includes presentations by Congressman Mike Castle and Sen. Tom Carper. Representatives of regional bicycle programs will also speak. The summit is being put on without the expenditure of any state funds. Costs are being paid by donations from a variety of sponsors. “We encourage all people to join us to talk about cycling in our state,” Wilburn

said. “People from [western Sussex] need to be a part of this discussion. That’s why we rode 40 miles in the rain today, to encourage them to come.”

For your information The Bike Summit will be Friday, April 24, at Delaware Technical and Community College in Dover. Admission is free, but pre-registration is required. For details, call the Delaware Bicycle Council, (302) 760-BIKE, or visit bike.deldot.gov.

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MORNING STAR • ApRIl 9 - 15, 2009

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Council reviews residential fencing code The property is an approximately one-quarter acre parcel of land located at the intersection of “Five-Points,” along Central Avenue, has been used traditionally for the storage of automobiles. Laurel’s 2004 Comprehensive Land Use Plan included “the framework and visualization” of the future use of property, including consideration for the Five-Points location as a potential location for the design of a “gateway” that would spotlight where Laurel “begins and ends.” The town purchased the property to be developed in the future as a “gateway park.” An ordinance drafted as “Ordinance 2009-X,” would amend Chapter 175 of the town’s Code regarding residential fencing. The proposed amendment includes raising height regulations from three feet to three and a half feet and up to four-feet for fencing that includes decorative scalloped tops and is located in the front yard. The proposed amendment also includes prohibiting the use of “barbed wire, barbed tape or concertina wire on any fence or wall located in a front yard or adjacent to a public street.” The amendment also states that in a front yard only decorative fences will be permitted, “stockade and chain-link styles are prohibited.” Councilwoman Robin Fisher asked whether fencing that is prohibited by the new ordinance, but already exists at the residence, will be in violation or will it be grandfathered in. Fasano said anything already in place will be considered grandfathered in unless it falls into a state of disrepair and requires significant changes

or replacement. Laurel resident Frank Calio was in attendance at the meeting and told the council that he recently purchased fencing, but has been unable to get it installed due to the wet weather. “I bought and paid for 200-feet of fencing under the current code. Will I be able to have this grandfathered in or am I stuck with it,” he asked? Fasano said the proposed Ordinance amendment must be referred to Planning and Zoning for its review and recommendations to the full council. He said this would most likely occur in May and come back before the council in June for approval. Fasano told Calio that since he bought the fencing under current codes he “should be fine. “There are a lot of strong opinions on Planning and Zoning, so I am confident that even with an aggressive schedule this will not be enacted before June,” he said. Councilman Don Phillips suggested that there be consideration of how such an ordinance may affect people who have swimming pools installed on their property. Fasano said the ordinance would not impact swimming pool fencing because the town has a separate code which deals exclusively with those types of mandatory fencing. Mayor John Shwed said he liked the idea of the proposed Code amendment encouraging the use of decorative fencing by residents. “I think this will help make the community look better and also help get rid of any concertina wire,” he said. The council voted to send the proposed Code amendment to Planning and Zoning for its review.

The Laurel Fire Dept. Auxiliary is currently participating in a fund raiser sponsored by Avon called “Bentley the Bear.” This fundraiser will continue until May 31. The cost of “Bentley the Bear” is $19.99 and the intention of this fund raiser is to ask individuals or organizations to consider purchasing a minimum of one of these bears which can be donated to either a local fire department, police department, hospital or nursing care facility to help put a smile on a child’s or senior citizen’s face. Your purchase and donation of “Bentley” is tax deductible and you identify what type of facility, location or organization you wish to donate a “Bentley” to. If you wish to purchase “Bentley the Bear” for yourself or to be donated, contact any member of the Laurel Fire

Department Auxiliary, send you check or money order payable to the Laurel Fire Department Auxiliary in the amount of $19.99 to 207 W. Tenth St., Laurel, DE 19956. Include where you would like “Bentley” donated. If you wish to purchase “Bentley” for yourself, include the telephone number where you can be contacted so that you can pick your order up from the Fire Department once it arrives. Also, the Laurel Fire Department Auxiliary is currently seeking new members. Anyone interested in joining, contact any current member of the Auxiliary, or leave your contact information by contacting the Laurel Fire Department at 8753081 and someone will contact you to discuss the application process.

Continued from page one

SEAFORD UNITED METHODIST MINISTRIES

Holy Week Services Bethel UMC

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7 p.m. Good Friday • 7 a.m. Easter Sunrise 7 a.m. Breakfast • 9 a.m. Easter Worship

Blades UMC

306 S. Market St. • Blades, DE • 302-629-9513

7 p.m. Maundy Thursday @ Asbury UMC (26146 Asbury Rd., Seaford) 11 am Easter Worship @ Blades UMC

Concord UMC

25322 Church Rd. • Concord, DE • 302-628-8114

Laurel F.D. Auxiliary fundraisers

Laurel Star Published by Morning Star Publications Inc.

951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243 The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 951 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Seaford, DE. Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown and Federalsburg, Maryland; $29 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Laurel Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

7 p.m. Maundy Thursday 6:30 a.m. Easter Sunrise & Breakfast 9 a.m. Easter Worship

John Wesley UMC

3rd & Chandler St. • Seaford, DE • 302-628-9215

11 a.m. Easter Worship

Mt. Hope UMC

Rt. 392 • Finchville, MD • 410-754-9207

7 p.m. Maundy Thursday • 8:45 a.m. Easter Worship

St. John’s UMC

Pine & Poplar Sts. • Seaford, DE • 302-629-9466

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Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals Seaford postage paid at 302 Seaford, DE. 629.9788 Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent Pickand UpNew Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharp-town and Federalsburg, Maryland; $29 elsewhere. A FREE Postmaster: Send address changes to Laurel Star, P.O.

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9 p.m. Maundy Thursday 15 hour Prayer Vigil 7 p.m. Good Friday Service 8:30 a.m. & 11:15 a.m. Traditional Easter Worship 10 a.m. Contemporary Easter Worship

Wesley UMC

22025 Atlanta Rd. • Seaford, DE • 302-629-3029

7 p.m. Maundy Thursday • 7 p.m. Good Friday 6:30 a.m. Easter Sunrise Service & Breakfast 10:30 a.m. Easter Worship

Woodland UMC

5123 Woodland Church Rd. • Seaford, DE • 302-629-5404

7:30 p.m. Maundy Thursday 9 a.m. Easter Cantata & Worship


MORNING STAR • ApRIl 9 - 15, 2009

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No changes to town administration after Laurel elections By Tony E. Windsor Recent Laurel municipal elections resulted in no change to the makeup of the council table. On Monday night, April 6, three council members and the town’s mayor were officially sworn in. The three council members, Robin Fisher (2nd Ward), Bill Trujillo (3rd Ward) and Don Phillips (at-large) were unopposed in the recent elections. Laurel Mayor John Shwed retained his seat in a runoff against newcomer Joshua Duryea in the March 26 elections. With 146 votes cast, the results were Shwed 126 votes to Duryea’s 20 votes. On Monday night Shwed was sworn back into office with Town Manager Bill Fasano administering the Oath of Office. Shwed was surrounded by his family, including his two daughters, Susan Whaley and Nancy Shwed. His grandchildren, Zach, Sara Jo and Garrett Whaley helped to hold the Bible during the ceremonies. Shwed’s wife, Bobbi, was absent due to recovering from a recent medical procedure. Shwed told the council chamber audience that he was happy to be able to once again serve the citizens of Laurel as Mayor and expressed his appreciation for his support. “I want to thank everyone who supported me in the election,” he said. “For those who did not support me I want you to know that I will always be willing to listen to critical voices. By listening to everyone’s viewpoints as we deal with the critical issues I can learn in some

cases how to make the best decisions.” As the mayor looked out into the audience at his grandchildren he remarked that the reason he desired to serve the town was largely “for those young people seated in the back of the room. They are the future of our nation.” Shwed expressed his appreciation to his colleagues on the council and congratulated and thanked Fisher, Trujillo and Phillips for maintaining their seats at the council table and their willingness to stay on the council. “Thank you all for re-joining me on the council and I appreciate your dedication,” he said. “Everyone at this table is dedicated to making Laurel one of the best small communities in Delaware, and we are well on our way. The citizens of Laurel can expect some amazing and great things in the not so distant future.” Councilwoman Fisher also expressed her excitement for beginning her third term on the Laurel Council. She said she was looking forward to “being a part of the journey” as the town meets the challenges of growth. She also challenged people in the community to become “more involved.” Fisher said she knows there are concerns in the community and encourages citizens to take advantage of the twice monthly council meetings. “I know there are phone calls and opinions shared in the community, but I rarely see anyone at the meetings,” she said. “We serve the community and I encourage you to bring your concerns to us as a body. We do not

Laurel mayor John Shwed receives the oath of office from Laurel Town Manager Bill Fasano. With Shwed, from left, are daughter Susan Whaley, grandson Zach Whaley, grandaughter Sara Jo Whaley, grandson Garrett Whaley and daughter Nancy Shwed.

want to be perceived as making decisions in a box. We would like to see members of our town in attendance at the meetings and serving on committees.” Councilmen Phillips and Trujillo echoed Fisher’s sentiments and also recommended citizens bring their concerns before the Mayor and Council. They expressed the importance of community input as the town moves forward with its plans for a state mandated five-year review of the town’s Comprehensive Land Use Plan. The town plans to have public hearings to discuss the future planned growth of the town. Phillips said, “I would ask people to not just talk at the Dutch Inn or out in

the streets, come up here and share your thoughts with us. We want to make sure we have your input and that we all are operating out of the same game book. The more we can talk out ahead of time the better we will be. This has never been more important than now.” Trujillo said the town “depends” on the community’s input. “Small towns like ours depend on the input of the community and we would like to hear more from our people about what you are thinking.” On Monday night the council also held an internal election and unanimously voted to retain Councilwoman Terry Wright as Laurel Council President.


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MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

Business i.g. Burton holds celebration

Donna Greenway of Milton was the latest winner of a new centennial license plate from the Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV). Her name was pulled from thousands of entries recently that were deposited in i.g. Burton and Company’s five dealership locations in Milford and Seaford, and at Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV) locations statewide. The DMV and i.g. Burton partnership drawing highlighted a celebration of the new BMW and Mercedes-Benz dealerships, the 100th anniversary of Delaware license plates, and the 100th anniversary of the i.g. Burton dealership family on Delmarva. Centennial plates are available for purchase for $100 from www.dmv.de.gov or in-person at any DMV office. For more information, call 302-744-2503.

Allen joins Insurance Market

The Insurance Market has partnered with Key Financial Corporation to offer a new service to current and potential customers — mortgages, whether it be new, refinancing or commercial. Scott Allen, who has closed more than 10,000 loans and has more than 10 years of experience, will be handling mortgages from the Financial Services Center. A Sussex County native, Allen is a graduate of Laurel High School and Salisbury University. To reach him, call 875-8310.

Shore Dog Magazine

A new magazine, Shore Dog Magazine, a free publication catering to discerning dog enthusiasts and their pampered pets has made its debut. Publisher Hope Thomas of Ocean City, Md. wants to produce a magazine that will benefit all dog lovers from the show dog owner to the pampered pup. A mission of Shore Dog is to raise awareness and funds for local shelters. In the current economy, more pets are being dropped off at local shelters or abandoned for reasons ranging from

health expenses to downsizing to an apartment that does not allow pets. Shore Dog adoption pages, shelter event listings and upcoming fundraisers is just the start to helping local shelters. The magazine will reach over 10,000 people living or visiting Salisbury, Md., Berlin, Md., Ocean City, Md., Fenwick, Bethany, Dewey, Rehoboth and Lewes. A downloadable version is also available online. To learn more, visit www.myshoredog. com or contact Thomas at 410-925-6932 or hope@myshoredog.com.

Del Tech offers workshops

Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus, will offer weekly workshops for prospective small business owners. These sessions will meet on select Wednesdays from 6 to 9 p.m. “Choosing the Right Business for you” on April 22 will present valuable information and tools for researching small business ideas, business size, renting office space and the need for employees. “Business Ownership vs. Franchising” on April 29 discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these two business types and which is best for you. “Is a Business Partnership a Right Choice for You?” on May 6 explores the pros and cons of sole proprietorships, general partnerships, and limited liability partnerships. “Business Plan Basics” on May 13 provides information needed to prepare a complete, concise business plan. Learn what bankers and investors want to see and where to find industry specific information, facts and figures about the market and your competition. The courses are taught by Brenda Whitehurst who is employed by the Delaware Center of Women’s Entrepreneurship. She was previously the executive director of the Delaware Small Business Foundation. To participate, contact Corporate and Community Programs at 302-854-6966.

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PAGE 7

MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

MO V I E S

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200

SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 4/10 THRU THURSDAY, 4/16 I Love You, Man . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:25, 9:40 Race to Witch Mountain . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:05, 4:00 Adventureland . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:05, 4:30, 7:00, 9:15 Hanna Montana The Movie . . . . . . . . . . . . G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 4:05, 6:35, 8:50 Knowing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 4:10, 6:40, 9:20 Taken . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40, 4:35, 7:10, 9:30 Fast & Furious . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:35, 4:15, 6:50, 9:05 Sunshine Cleaners . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:10*, 3:15, 5:15, 7:20, 9:45 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .*no 1:10 on Fri ., Sat . or Sun . The Haunting In Connecticut . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:00, 3:10, 5:20, 7:30, 9:40 Observe and Report . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:25, 3:20, 5:10, 7:15, 9:35 Monsters vs Aliens (not 3D) PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:20, 3:50, 6:30, 8:45 Duplicity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 4:00, 6:40, 9:20 12 Rounds . . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:10, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 Dragonball Evolution . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45, 4:20, 6:30, 9:10 Art House Theater The Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:25, 4:05, 6:35, 9:10 all shows subject to change and availability

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370

SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR THURSDAY, 4/9 Adventureland . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11:45, 2:15, 4:55, 7:30, 10:20 Fast & Furious . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:00, 1:45, 2:30, 4:30, 5:15, 7:05 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8:00, 9:45, 10:40 12 Rounds . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:05, 2:35, 5:05, 7:45, 10:15 The Haunting in Connecticut . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . 12:10, 12:50, 1:30, 2:25, 3:05, 3:50, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:50, 5:30, 6:30, 7:35, 8:15, 8:55, 9:55, 10:30 Monsters vs . Aliens 3D PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:00, 2:20, 4:40, 7:00, 9:20 Monsters vs . Aliens . .PG . . . . . 12:20, 12:40, 1:20, 2:40, 3:00, 3:40, 5:00, 5:20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:00, 7:20, 7:40, 8:20, 9:40, 10:00, 10:35 Duplicity . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:30, 3:30, 6:40, 9:30 I Love You Man . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9:45, 2:15, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05 Knowing . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:00, 3:45, 6:50, 9:35 The Last House On the Left . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11:55, 2:35, 5:10, 7:50, 10:25 Race To Witch Mountain . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11:50, 2:10, 4:35, 6:55, 9:25 FRIDAY, 4/10 Hannah Montana: The Movie . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:45, 2:15, 5:00, 7:40, 10:10 Observe and Report . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:50, 3:10, 5:25, 8:10, 10:30 Showtimes for additional dates can be viewed on line at www .fandango .com/21804_movietheatershowtimes

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pAGE 8

MORNING STAR • ApRIl 9 - 15, 2009

Nanticoke auction brings a taste of Vegas to Bridgeville

By Daniel Richardson The annual Nanticoke fund raiser/ auction had a Las Vegas theme this year. Held again at Heritage Shores, the auction, entitled “Viva Las Vegas” gave attendees a chance to put their money on a good cause. All proceeds go to benefit the community hospital.

Last year’s auction brought in $94,000 and the funds were used to help build the hospital’s stroke center. The item that brought in the most amount of money during the live auction this year was appropriately a Las Vegas vacation package. The winning bid for the vacation was $3,000.

Elvis (Tony Windsor) made a special appearance at Viva Las Vegas to get the crowd ready for the live auction. Photo by Daniel Richardson

Seaford student Lauren Price shows the crowd the puppy that was up for auction that night. The puppy went for $2,400 which was the second highest bid for the evening. Photo by Daniel Richardson

We would like to invite you to come join us to celebrate the Resurrection Power of Jesus Christ

r e t s a E unday SApril 12th at 9:30 a.m.

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Come and join us as we celebrate the life, death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus Christ. It is Jesus who gives us our purpose, gives us new life, gives us joy, gives us healing and understanding of who we are and why we are here. Come and experience worship with us as Pastor Barry Dukes ministers a message of the Three Crosses and the power that was completed there for you and I.

Service Times: Sunday, Worship 9:30 a.m. (Children’s Church following worship); Youth Group – Wed. at 7:00 –8:30 p.m. Small Groups – (Call for time and location)

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Rt. 13 and Discountland Rd., Laurel • 875-4646. Sr. Minister - Dr. Carl G. Vincent Sr. Pastor Barry B. Dukes Visit website at www.messiahvineyard.org

Dr. Anthony Policastro sang a song for the crowd. A performance of Policastro’s band, made up of all doctors, was up for auction at the event. Photo by Daniel Richardson

Hop, skip or jump over to our annual…

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Easter Sunday April 12th 1:30 pm Ages 12 and Under Plenty of Candy & Prizes For Everyone

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MORNING STAR • ApRIl 9 - 15, 2009

pAGE 9

DAME donates expertise to Relay efforts

DAME, the Delaware Association of Mobile Entertainers, will again donate its expertise to the American Cancer Society with entertainment, public address systems, sound support, music programming, and emcee services for three Relay For Life fundraisers in May and June. “Each Relay For Life event is about 18 hours long,” said Alex Vaughan, president of DAME. “It’s a pretty big time commit-

ment, but the owners of DAME member companies feel strongly that we should give back to our community.” DAME is a statewide trade group of professional Disc Jockey Entertainment companies. The eight member companies have agreed to work with organizers at three ACS fundraisers, one in each of Delaware’s counties. The first event is the Relay For Life of West Sussex at Nan-

ticoke Mears Health Campus off Route 13 between Bridgeville and Seaford. This event runs from 6 p.m. on Friday, May 15 to 10 a.m. on May 16. Frank Soucek, owner of Jukebox Entertainment in Milford, will coordinate DAME member company activities and schedules so there will be an uninterrupted program of music and announcements for the entire event. Last year, this event raised $134,100.

CAPITAL CAMPAIGN BEGINS - During the week of March 22, the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club kicked off its annual “Fund One” Campaign to raise $100,000 for youth development programming at its club sites in Seaford and Laurel. The two Boys & Girls Club sites serve over 1,500 young people. Pictured here are Carolyn Calio, Laurel and Connie Mitchell, Seaford who will be heading up the campaign effort. Anyone interested in contributing to the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club “Fund One” campaign may contact Maria Motley at 628-3789 or e-mail mmotley@bgclubs.org.

Paramedic station gets a green light to protect the environment By Ronald MacArthur

The new Laurel paramedic station project has been given the green light to go, well, green. Located off Sycamore Road and near Route 13, Sussex County Emergency Medical Services Medic Station 102 will incorporate solar electric generation, geothermal heating and cooling, tankless hot water and energyefficient building techniques. Sussex County Council voted 5-0 Tuesday, March 24, to allow a committee to proceed with green initiatives on the building. There is a lot of interest in getting the bid for the project. Bobby Schoonover, county technical services division manager, told the county council 24 contractors attended the pre-bid meeting. Bids were opened April 1. The total cost of the station is expected to be around $250,000. The environmental initiatives qualify for state and paramedic grants that would help offset costs of the geo-thermal and solar systems. Schoonover said the estimated cost of solar equipment is $51,000, but it’s eligible for $25,500 state energy and $10,200 state paramedic grants, reducing the cost to $15,300. The estimated cost of the geothermal system is $27,900, which would be reduced to $8,370 thanks to $13,950 state energy and $5,580 state paramedic grants. There is also a savings in energy costs using the systems. Schoonover said the estimated average annual savings using the solar system would be about $1,500, which translates to a 10-

year payback of the cost of the system. There would be a $900 estimated annual savings using the geothermal system, which translates to a 7-year payback. A tankless, on-demand hot water heater, would see a payback in about six years. In addition, the request for proposals for the station, which will resemble a single-family house with a two-car garage, include energy-efficient insulation, framing, window and door glass, use of natural lighting as much as possible and installation of Energy Star appliances. In all, with grants included, the extra green initiatives would add about $24,000 to the cost of the project. Without the grants, the cost would have increased more than $70,000. Schoonover completed a detailed analysis of the environmental impact in relation to the proposed green initiatives. He said there would be 15 fewer tons of carbon dioxide and 240 fewer pounds of sulfur dioxide emissions per year based on the energy efficiency initiatives taken to operate the station. He said, according to the U.S. Department of Energy, that’s equivalent to driving 26,000 less miles or planting 620 pine trees to absorb pollution. Councilman Sam Wilson, RGeorgetown, questioned those figures. “That’s reaching a little,” he said. Wilson, who is a farmer, said removing some chemicals from the air is actually hurting farmers. “There is a sulfur shortage in Sussex County. It used to come in the air, and now we have to buy it,” he said.

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MORNING STAR • ApRIl 9 - 15, 2009

Hundreds participate in annual community walks Woodbridge walkers tops again By Lynn R. Parks

For the third year in a row, the Woodbridge School District and the town of Bridgeville are tops in getting people out for a walk. Annual community walks were held throughout the county Saturday and 453 people attended the Woodbridge event, more than were at any of the other four walks. Community walks were also held in Seaford, Laurel, Cape Henlopen and Sussex Central school districts. The walks were sponsored by the Sussex Child Health Promotion Coalition, which was organized by the Nemours Foundation in order to promote awareness of the benefits of exercise. The average elementary school child in Delaware gets about 14 minutes of physical activity a day, according to coalition representative Ron Breeding. Through its 5-2-1-Almost None program, the coalition is encourag-

ing children to get at least an hour of exercise a day. Saturday’s walks lasted about an hour. Participants could walk as quickly and as far as they wanted. Among the 453 people in the Woodbridge walk, held at the high school track north of Bridgeville, was William Jefferson, president of the Bridgeville Town Commission. In a proclamation that Jefferson read before the walk, he declared that Saturday was Bridgeville Community Health Day. “This is a new beginning for healthy lifestyles,” said Jefferson, who walked with his dog, Molly, despite having had heart bypass surgery in December. “We encourage all citizens to start getting healthy with exercise and a good diet.” Breeding, who attended the Woodbridge walk, told participants that the Woodbridge School District is known throughout the state as a model for encour-

Cody White of Laurel Intermediate School gets an autographed photo of Miss Delaware Galen Giaccone at the community walk in Laurel. Photo by Pat Murphy

Brock and Rachel O’Day of Seaford are bundled up for the Seaford walk. They were escorted around the track by their mom, Robin. Photo by Bryant Richardson

One walker at Woodbridge does a couple of laps around the track backwards because of the high winds. Photo by E.W. Faircloth

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aging students to exercise. In fact, he said, “even in the halls of Congress, Woodbridge has been set up as an example of good things.” When Breeding asked for Woodbridge students and staff members participating in the walk to raise their hands, more than

half of the crowd did so. “That says it all right there,” he said. “There is a great thing going on here.” District superintendent Kevin Carson, who participated in the walk, told the crowd that the Woodbridge track is open to the community. “We want to support

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A strong rate from a strong bank. That’s what we call strength in numbers. Brittany Dempsey, Miss Delaware in 2007, leads the crowd in warm-up exercises before the start of the walk. More than 450 people attended the Woodbridge walk. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

healthy lifestyles for our children and for ourselves,” he said. Before the start of the walk, school board member Bill Dewey, his wife, Clara, and their children Remington, 11, and Kayla, 9 anticipated walking eight times around the track for a total of two miles. “This is great!” Clara said. “I love seeing all these people out getting fresh air.” PNC Bank sponsored a beanbag toss and former Miss Delaware Brittany Dempsey led the crowd in a series of warm-up exercises before the start of the walk. In Seaford, 340 people showed up for the walk, which was held at the Seaford High School track. Representatives from Nemours were there and Dr. Paula Rose, director of health services at Allen Family Foods, Seaford, handed out information about the company’s employee health program. Jessica Leigh Hadon, the 2009 MarDel Watermelon Queen and a student at the University of Maryland College Park, led children’s games. Warm-up exercises were led by Jason Drake from Powerhouse Gym, Seaford, assisted by the Easter Bunny and the Fitness Chicken from Allen Family Foods. Organizer Nancy Mears said that she was very pleased with the turnout, which included about 185 students from Seaford public and private schools as well as a

number of families. “We want to target childhood obesity,” Mears said. “But we realize that to help children, we have to reach their families.” About 250 people attended the Laurel walk, held at the high school. Among them was Mayor John Shwed. “Events like this put awareness out there in front of everybody about the need to remain physically active,” said Shwed, who walked a mile. “That is especially important at a time when our young people play video games more than they play outside. It is so important to plant the idea in young minds that they need to get outside and play and get away from the TV.” Miss Delaware 2008, Galen Giaccone, attended the Laurel walk. Also there was Bill Yoast, author of the book “Remember the Titans.” McGruff the Crime Dog made an appearance, as did the Easter Bunny. Warm-up exercises were led by James Evans from Diamond Dreams gym in Delmar. Walker and former marathon runner Larry Allen, Laurel, who put in a mile, said that it is important for communities to encourage their young people to exercise. “Adults have to be a role model for younger kids,” he said. The Cape Henlopen School District had about 250 people at its walk, held at the high school track in Lewes. About 80 people attended the Sussex Central High School walk in Georgetown.

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MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

New Outstanding Teen crowned Danielle Marshall, a sophomore at Appoquinimink High School, earned the title of Miss Delaware’s Outstanding Teen 2009 on Sunday, March 29. Danielle was crowned at Sussex Central High School in Georgetown by Amanda Debus, Miss Delaware’s Outstanding Teen 2008. The pageant marked the fifth anniversary of Miss Delaware’s Outstanding Teen. Danielle competed with 18 other Delaware teens, performing an acrobatic-jazz dance to “Urban,” Cirque du Soleil. The 19 contestants competed in interview, talent, evening gown, on-stage question and scholastic achievement. Danielle will represent Delaware in August at the Miss America’s Outstanding Teen 2010 Pageant in Orlando, Fla. Danielle will spend her year advocating her platform, “Active and Able: Empowering Children with Special Needs,” serving as a role model for teens, and making appearances throughout Delaware. Additional awards were earned by: First Runner-Up, Nikki Laws, a junior at William Penn High School; Second RunnerUp, Krista Clausen, a sophomore at Sussex Central High School; Third Runner-Up, Kristen Juhrden, a sophomore at Ursuline Academy; and Fourth Runner-Up, Valerie Lane, a junior at Cab Calloway School of the Arts. Scholarships were also given for: Outstanding Community Service, Julianne Dominelli, a junior St. Marks High School; Outstanding Scholastic Achievement, Chelsea Huang, a junior at Middle-

NWPG PRESENTS DONATION - Nanticoke Watershed Preservation Group (NWPG) treasurer, John King, recently presented The Nature Conservancy (TNC) with a check for $500. The Delaware chapter of The Nature Conservancy is trying to raise at least half of $125,000 (by April 31) to purchase 25 acres of property adjacent to the 440 acre Middleford North Preserve that has been under their protection since 1998. To make a tax deductible donation, contact Debbie Heaton, TNC, at 302-6544707, ext. 124. Danielle standing Amanda standing

Marshall, Miss Delaware’s OutTeen 2009, being crowned by Debus, Miss Delaware’s OutTeen 2008

town High School; Outstanding Scholastic Achievement Runner-Up, Valerie Lane, a junior at Cab Calloway School of the Arts; Non-Finalist Talent Award, Katelynn Mayers, an Eighth-Grade Student at Cab Calloway School of the Arts; and NonFinalist Interview Award, Julianne Dominelli, a junior at St. Marks High School. Ashley Tiedgen, a freshman at Polytech High School, was chosen by her fellow contestants as Miss Congeniality.

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PAGE 13

The Good News The Easter message is the core of the Gospel. The good news of Christianity is that death is not the last word, but rather a transition to our true home with God. Death may seem invincible; after all, each of us will die, having little control over the details of when, where and how we will die. On the surface, death looks both inescapable and permanent. However, we should not be fooled by the external appearance of death. For death affects only our bodies. At the core of our being is our immaterial soul, the eternal spirit which we share with our Heavenly Father. Although we tend to identify ourselves with our earthly bodies, the Easter message reminds us that this is a mistake. Our physical bodies are nothing more than transient shadows and not our true selves. Easter is a celebration of our true selves, our eternal souls. The Bible tells us: “The Good News was promised long ago by God through His prophets… It is about His Son, our Lord Jesus Christ: as to His humanity, He was born a descendant of David; as to His divine holiness, He was shown with great power to be the Son of God by being raised from death.” (Romans 1:2-4).

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pAGE 14

MORNING STAR • ApRIl 9 - 15, 2009

Health Sometimes it may be better to leave the kids at home By Dr. Anthony Policastro I would like to offer a new take on the old saying that children should be seen and not heard. It is very important for young children to have many different experiences. I have written before about how that helps the brain develop. Those experiences might include going to restaurants with the family. It offers a chance to spend time with the family. It offers a chance to recognize that behavior is different than at dinner time at home. Those experiences might include taking them to church. The bible talks about how we should become as innocent as children. They might not always behave. However, the experience is good for them. Those experiences might include taking them

shopping with you. They can learn about at least PG. That means they are no place having to pay for things. for very young children. They can learn that you The language may not cannot afford everybe appropriate. The The attention span thing in the store. violence may not be of children under age There are many appropriate. other experiences One might argue five is measured in that come to mind. that the child is too minutes not in hours. It is young too underThese all offer an opportunity for chilimportant for the parents stand what is going dren to learn how to on. If that is the to think ahead of time behave in public. case, then they are However, there also too young to be as to whether their child are situations in there. might interfere with the which it would be Children that are better to leave young not entertained by a enjoyment of others. children home. movie will become One example of this bored. That boredom is the movie theater. Most movies are rated leads them to think it’s time to play. That results in disruption to the other movie goers. At today’s prices it is not fair to cause those other individuals to have their enjoyment spoiled. One easy rule to remember is that children under age two do not belong at the theater. This is in line with the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation becoming a hospice volunteer on Monday, that children under two should not have April 27; Wednesday, April 29; Monday, any screen time. There are other situations May 4; and Wednesday, May 6 from in which very young children might be12:30 to 4:30 p.m. The training will be come bored. These include concerts. They held at the Cancer Care Center, second floor Conference Room of Nanticoke Hos- include stage plays. The attention span pital in Seaford. Volunteers must be at least 18 years old, submit to routine background checks and participate in 16 hours of specialized training. Compassionate Care Hospice supports patients and families throughout Sussex County so volunteers can work in their own community. Volunteers are able to work according to their schedule and preference. In addition to supporting patients and families in the patients’ home, volunteers can also make phone calls from their own home and/or provide office clerical support. Volunteers are encouraged to participate in monthly support meetings and exchange phone numbers to build a support network. For more information, contact Felicity Lavelle at 302-934-5900 or flavelle@cchnet.net.

Health Briefs Advance Directive Open House

Delaware Hospice will host an Advance Directive Open House on Thursday, April 16, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Delaware Hospice Center in Milford. Representatives will provide information and help visitors obtain or complete an Advance Directive form. Beth Zane, MSW, senior social worker for Delaware Hospice, will give a presentation at noon, explaining the importance of completing your advanced healthcare directives. An Advance Directive enables individuals to make legally valid decisions regarding future medical treatment, in the event that they are unable to speak for themselves, and ensures that those wishes are carried out in the manner they have chosen. This document records your medical care preferences for your physician, loved ones, and clergy, and relieves the decision-making burden from your family members. For more information, call Luanne Holland at 302-519-1075 or email lholland@delawarehospice.org.

Volunteers needed for MS events

The Delaware Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society needs volunteers to help with two spring fundraising events: • Friday, April 24, Bridgeville — Walk MS: Twilight at Heritage Shores • Friday, May 29, Long Neck — Walk MS: Twilight at Baywood Greens Volunteers are needed on the day of the event from 4 to 8 p.m. and may choose from a range of activities, including registering event participants, supporting participants at rest stops, distributing t-shirts, loading and unloading supplies, setting up refreshments, and cheerleading at the finish line. For more information, contact Jenna Wagner at 302-655-5610 or email jenna.wagner@MSdelaware.org.

Hospice volunteer training

Compassionate Care Hospice is offering training for anyone interested in

Look Good, Feel Better program

Women undergoing chemotherapy or radiation treatment for cancer can receive free professional help to cosmetically disguise the appearance-related side effects of their treatments. LOOK GOOD...FEEL BETTER, a program developed by the Cosmetic, Toiletry, and Fragrance Association Foundation, the American Cancer Society, and the National Cosmetology Association, trains volunteer cosmetologists to help women with cancer, conceal loss of hair, skin problems, and other side effects that can result from cancer therapy. The program is geared towards helping people look their best, even as they are undergoing cancer treatment. Although almost all of the appearance-related side effects of cancer treatment are temporary, they can be very distressing. The program will be hosted by the Cancer Care Center at Nanticoke Memo-

of children under age five is measured in minutes not in hours. It is important for the parents to think ahead of time as to whether their child might interfere with the enjoyment of others. I frequently have parents bring younger siblings to their child’s office visit. Sometimes those younger children occupy a good deal of the parent’s attention. Since I see so many children with ADHD, a little disruption is routine to me. However, I sometimes wonder whether the parents really hear the explanations I give. I wonder whether they are hearing the correct directions for the medication that I am prescribing. I would hate to have the child come back because of a drug overdose caused by the distraction of a sibling who attended the visit. It is difficult to find a baby sitter. It is expensive to hire one. However, there are other difficulties and costs associated with bringing a child to a public place. Parents need to weigh all of those things before they make the decision to bring the child in the first place. They need to look at the needs of the child. They need to look at their own needs. They need to look at the needs of the other people in attendance. Only then can they make the decision to do what is correct in that particular situation.


MORNING STAR • ApRIl 9 - 15, 2009 rial Hospital on Monday, April 13 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Cancer Care Center’s 2nd floor conference room. The program is free to all patients in active cancer treatment. Registration is required and space is limited. To register, contact Nanticoke Memorial Hospital’s Cancer Care Center at 629-6611, ext. 2588.

CHEER plans healthy living expo

On Tuesday, April 21 the CHEER Community Center in Georgetown will host a free Healthy Living Expo from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Healthy Living Expo, which is open to the public, has room for more vendors to set up a table at the expo. The fee is $75 or $50 if you offer a health screening. For registration or more information, call 302-854-9500.

Diabetes education classes

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford will hold a four-session diabetes educational program beginning Wednesday, April 8 and continuing April 15, 22 and 29 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the hospital. Registration is required and the cost of the four-session program may be reimbursable by insurance. This four-session program includes weekly education sessions and individualized meal planning for diabetes selfmanagement. Family members/significant others are welcome to attend. For more information and to register, contact Nanticoke Memorial Hospital’s Diabetes Education Department at 6296611, ext. 2446.

Caregiver training available

The Alzheimer’s Association Delaware Valley Chapter sponsors The Family Caregiver Education Series four times a year in each of Delaware’s three counties. Delaware Hospice Center at 100 Patriots Way in Milford will host the training on Friday, April 24 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The program includes a medical overview, legal and financial issues, challenging symptoms, daily care issues and information on getting the help you need. Training for family caregivers is free and lunch will be provided by Delaware Hospice. Pre-registration is required by Friday, April 17. For more information or to register, call Jamie Magee at 302-8549788.

Race for Autism is April 26

The Lower Delaware Autism Foundation’s 7th Annual Race for Autism is

Jona Gorra, M.D. FACP

Sunday, April 26 at Cape Henlopen High School. The race features a half marathon, two person relay, 5K run, 5K family fun walk and a kiddie fun run. The half marathon will begin at 8:10 a.m. and if you register on or before April 25 the cost is $40. All other start times and registration fees vary. Pre-registration is requested. Pre-race packet pick up will take place on Saturday, April 25 from 5 to 9 p.m. at the Greene Turtle in Lewes. The Greene Turtle will donate a portion of the proceeds of sales from 5 to 9 p.m. Fundraising is highly encouraged but not mandatory to run/walk. Those who raise more than $100 will receive a Race for Autism Bag; over $500, a $50 Walmart gift card; and those who raise more than $1,000 will receive a $100 American Express gift card. A grand prize will be given to the person who raises the most money over $1,000. “We are hoping that families and friends of those affected will begin forming teams and walk and fund raise together,” said Mary Landon Green, LDAF program and event coordinator. Many volunteers are needed for this event. Church groups, civic groups, high school sports teams, businesses and families are encouraged to help. For more information or to register for the race online, visit www.ldaf.com or call Green at 302-644-3410. The Wellness Community of Delaware offers a “General Cancer Networking” support group the third Monday of each month from 4:30- 6:30 p.m. held at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital’s Cancer Care Center second-floor library, Seaford. Professionally led cancer support programs offer hope, education, and emotional support for adults with cancer and their loved ones who want to fight for recovery and the quality of their lives. Learn how to feel less isolated and more in control. All programs offered through The Wellness Community of Delaware are free of charge to people affected by cancer. For further information, or to register, call 645-9150.

Laurel Depression Support Group

There will be a free bimonthly Depression Support Group meeting in Laurel on the second and fourth Wednesday evenings from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Any person who has signs and symptoms of depression and is under the care of a professional counselor/MD is

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welcome to attend. To register, call Life Matters Counseling and Consulting at 302-465-6612.

Safe Sitter Class offered

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital is offering a Safe Sitter class for girls and boys ages 11 to 13. The one day course will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday, April 10. The Safe Sitter program teaches youngsters how to handle emergencies when caring for younger children. The cost is $35 and participants are to bring a bagged lunch. All medical information will be taught by a certified professional. Students get hands-on practice in basic life-saving techniques so they are prepared to act in a crisis. Instructors also provide tips to make sitters more confident caregivers. They teach safety and security precautions, such as what to do if a stranger comes to the door and when and how to call for help. They give information on child development and suggest age-appropriate activities. Participants will also learn

about the business aspects of babysitting. To register, call 629-6611, ext. 2540.

Nurses’ assistant program

Become a member of the rapidly expanding health care field by taking the evening nurses’ assistant course, offered through Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Instruction will be given at LifeCare at Lofland Park in Seaford and Delaware Tech in Georgetown from April 27 to June 25; classes will meet on Monday through Thursday from 5 to 10:30 p.m. This 150-hour course teaches students to safely perform basic nursing skills under the supervision of a licensed nurse. Graduates will be prepared to take the Nurse Aid Competency Exam for certification. All nurses’ assistants must take this exam to be certified to work in Delaware. Funding through the Department of Labor and limited scholarships are available for this course. For complete information, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 302-854-6966.

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A bad case of stripe fever: beige, mustard and purple

I have been dreaming about stripes. Not because my husband ynn arks and I have recently acquired a zebra, but wouldn’t the cats be happy! Or because either one of us I had never painthas been promoted to any type of ed stripes before. sergeant or confined to a prison. Rather, my dreams, in full color, But I wasn’t going are as a result of our back porch renovation project, still ongoing af- to let inexperience ter nearly a year of demolition and stop me. construction. The end of the project is in sight — my husband predicts that all will be complete by the first More recently, my dreams are less of June — and as part of the wrapping up specific, more surreal. I am wandering of things it was my job to paint the small through stripes, the outside of our house bathroom we have built. is suddenly striped, I’m wearing a striped I could have painted the whole thing suit. I’m glad we don’t have a zebra bemustard to match the rest of the back cause now, after three nights of striped porch and been done with it. I could have dreams, I would want to paint it plaid. elected to paint it honey beige, a chip of I am, though, sensing some healing which I brought home after more than from stripe fever. This morning, I walked an hour in the paint department at a local into the downstairs bathroom and felt no store, or even chilled wine, another wonrush of apprehension. No urge to pick up derful color that I found. But standing in a ruler to make sure a stripe is exactly an the back porch and looking into the bathinch wide, no compulsion to scrape off an room, holding several paint chips in my errant speck of purple or mustard. The day hand, I had an inspiration. is coming, perhaps, when I can gently at Stripes! Brown mustard, chilled wine first, then with more determination, conand honey beige, one following the other sider that pink, white and green scheme in tall, straight columns, marching around about which I dreamt several nights ago. the bathroom. But I don’t think I’ll ever go for that I had never painted stripes before. But striped suit. In any combination of colors, I wasn’t going to let inexperience stop me. it wouldn’t be flattering. And if I wore it It is a small room, after all. And how hard could it be? There weren’t going to be any into our newly striped bathroom, I would be lost forever. curves involved, or fruit, or faces. Just stripes, each an inch wide. First step, I decided, was to paint the Seaford resident wins the Lottery whole room honey beige. That accomWouldn’t it be nice if you got a phone plished, I measured from the floor to the call from the Delaware Lottery every top of the sink’s counter and put a wide time you needed a new car? That’s what piece of painter’s tape at the same level, happened to Seaford resident Eric J. The all around the room. Below the tape, I lucky 45-year-old was selected on March painted chilled wine. 5 as the winner of the Delaware Lottery’s Then, making good use of a pencil, a Jeep instant game second-chance drawing. tape measure and a four-foot level, I drew He and his wife will soon be sharing a vertical lines, two inches apart, on the Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon. walls, above the chilled wine where the The win couldn’t have come at a better honey beige was still showing. time. “Our car was on its last leg when the On each line, I laid out an inch-wide Lottery called me with the good news,” piece of tape — not as easy as it sounds. according to Eric. “My wife and I were The tape has no interest in going straight worried about what we were going to do and needs constant monitoring to keep it when it finally died. This really takes a running along the pencil mark. weight off our shoulders.” An elementary So far, I had put about two days of school teacher for 10 years, Eric does not work into the painting project. Nothing, I call himself a regular Lottery player but told myself sternly when on the morning he’s won some cash prizes in the past. of the third day I had trouble getting out of bed, compared to the time other great artists have devoted to their craft. Finally, it was time to start painting stripes. According to my plan, every mustard stripe was to be followed by a honey beige stripe, as would every chilled wine stripe: Beige, mustard, beige, purple, beige, etc. Four days later, when I was beginning to think that if I had to paint another stripe I was going to go mad, I made a final inspection, shining my husband’s Bath & Body Shop bright work light along each wall to check 302 628-1601 for missed spots. At last, I decided, it was time to peel off the tape. www.2cats.ws It was that night, after I saw the fin110 S. ished product and was almost reassured Conwell St. that it had been worth all that work, that Historic I started dreaming about stripes. In one Downtown dream, I was repainting our upstairs bathroom in pink and white stripes. In another, Seaford I added a green stripe and in the third, I Open 10-5, Wed., Thurs., Fri. & Sat. discounted the green in favor of brown.

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May Days at Manor House Time to Lunch & Learn more about us!

Thinking about moving to a retirement community but have questions about the money, the move, the lifestyle? We’ll help you understand the benefits of community life, how to protect your assets and your future. You’ll also learn about our FREE MoveSmart program, designed to make your move simple, cost effective, and—best of all—worry-free! Each event includes a delicious lunch prepared by our Manor House chef, and community tours. Join us for our

MAY DAYS LUNCH & LEARNS MAY 1

Strategies to Best Manage your Assets, with PNC

12:30 pm MAY 8

Make Sense of Investing in Today’s Economy, with Edward Jones

MAY 15

Make the Transition to Manor House, with resident Charlotte Conway

RSVP by Friday, April 24 to let us know which events you can attend. 302.628.5622 or 800.775.4593 or by email to jmacinta@pumh.org


pAGE 18

MORNING STAR • ApRIl 9 - 15, 2009

Laurel High students compete in ‘We the People’ On March 6, Laurel High School’s Honor Civics/Economic students competed as two teams at the state level in the “We the People” competition for the first time. Eileen McAnulla coached these two classes. “We the People” is a program where students participate in a simulated Congressional hearing based on Constitutional issues and law.

Laurel students went up against five Lake Forest teams. Laurel Team – Period 1 was awarded Delaware’s runner-up coming in second place. Laurel Team – Period 4 had “Unit 5” win as “Best Unit.” This unit was made up of Ryan Boyce, Samantha Dize, Eric Hastings and Roosevelt Jionvil. Not only did these students win the “unit 5” competition, they outscored all of the other units.

Laurel Team, Period 4, “Unit 5” won “Best Unit.” The team consisted of Ryan Boyce, Roosevelt Jionvil, Eric Hastings and Samantha Dize.

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MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

PAGE 19

Scrap Tire Drop-off Day to be held April 18 in Harrington duty truck tires – can be dropped off per Delaware household; larger tires, tires on rims or bicycle tires will not be accepted. Scrap tire drop-off is limited to residents; tires from commercial dealers will not be accepted. Proof of residency is required – either a driver’s license or utility bill. Residents should enter the Delaware State Fairgrounds through the main gate on Route 13 and follow the signs to the dropoff site.

Wildlife stamps to be chosen

Wildlife art enthusiasts, stamp and print collectors, waterfowl hunters, birdwatchers and wetland conservationists will gather at 9 a.m. on Saturday, April 18 at the Delaware Ducks Unlimited Greenwings’ Event at Owens Station in Greenwood for the judging of Delaware’s annual Duck Stamp and Trout Stamp contests. A panel of judges consisting of an artist, a waterfowl collector, an art teacher, a biologist and the chair of Delaware Ducks Unlimited will select Best of Show winners for the 2010 Delaware Duck Stamp, the 2009 Junior Duck Stamp and the 2010 Delaware Trout Stamp. Judges will base their decisions on originality, artistic composition, anatomical accuracy and suitability for reproduction as a stamp and print. Delaware’s 2010 waterfowl stamp will mark the 30th anniversary of the contest, which began in 1980 to raise funds for waterfowl conservation, including acquiring and improving the wetland habitats that are vital for the survival of migratory waterfowl. To date, more than $2.5 million has been raised. The artwork chosen for the 2010 stamp will be second in a new series which must include one or more Delaware Native species as the dominant feature and may include any other objects including man-made objects. The Junior Duck Stamp Program provides an opportunity for students throughout Delaware to participate in a national art competition keyed to native waterfowl and wetland values. Students learn handson activities in waterfowl, wetland and habitat education and conservation while completing duck stamp art entries. Artwork is judged in K-3, 4-6, 7-9 and 10-12 grade categories, with various prizes. The Best of Show will move on to the National Federal Junior Duck Stamp Competition. Artists from across the nation will submit paintings of rainbow, brown or brook trout for the competition to choose the illustration for the 2010 Delaware Trout Stamp, which must be displayed by all trout anglers. Some 6,500 trout anglers and stamp collectors support this program annually, generating approximately $25,000 in annual revenues to stock trout in six northern New Castle County streams, Tidbury Pond in Kent County and Newton Pond in Sussex County. For more information, contact the Division of Fish and Wildlife at 302-739-9911 or visit www.fw.delaware.gov.

“Our first drop-off event last October was very successful,” said Laurene Eheman, administrative manager with DNREC’s Solid and Hazardous Waste Section. “More than 1,600 old tires were dropped off, which were later recycled and reused.” Delaware produces more than 750,000 scrap tires a year. While many of these tires are recycled or properly disposed, some end up in

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stockpiles or in illegal dumps around the state. The Delaware Scrap Tire Cleanup and Control Program is funded by a state fee of $2 per tire on the sale of new tires. Enacted Jan. 1, 2007, the fee is diverted to the Scrap Tire Management Fund, a matching fund and program created to clean up existing scrap tire piles statewide. For more information, contact DNREC, 302-739-9403 or 800-662-8802.

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Delaware residents are invited to recycle scrap tires, free of charge, during Scrap Tire Drop-off Day from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., rain or shine, Saturday, April 18 at the Delaware State Fairgrounds in Harrington. The event, which is being held during Earth Week, encourages citizens to take actions to recycle scrap tires that can pose hazards to human health and the environment. Up to 10 tires – passenger car or light

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PAGE 20

MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

Governor shares great plans for state tourism industry By Carol Kinsley “I want to be Delaware’s chief salesman,” Gov. Jack Markell told some 150 tourism professionals gathered for the Governor’s Tourism Conference at the Heritage Shores Club in Bridgeville on April 2. Focusing on creative marketing techniques and innovative ideas, the conference is designed to reinforce existing tourism development efforts and plan for future initiatives by increasing visitation and profitability. “My administration is committed to do as much as we can to be sure the tourism industry thrives,” said Markell. “I am willing to be deployed on behalf of your business. When your business does well, the state does well.” Delaware attracted 8 million visitors last year, bringing 1.5 billion dollars into the economy. “That recognizes the impact of tourism within our state,” Markell said. “A lot of you rely on tourism,” he continued, admittedly straying away from prepared remarks. “Delaware does not do as much as some states; we don’t have the dedicated revenue,” he began, interrupted by applause. “I truly understand your business and your business functions,” he said. “We do

Gas Lines Crude oil inventory is high

Last week began with crude oil below $49 a barrel. Then, oil saw its largest one-day percentage gain (9%) in three weeks on Thursday, trading at $53 per barrel. This, after world leaders at the G20 summit reached an agreement to combat the deepest economic downturn since the Great Depression. The U.S. unemployment rate reached its highest level in a quarter-century after 663,000 jobs were lost in March, the 15th consecutive month of job losses. News of the U.S. unemployment report pushed oil prices down during trading on Friday to close at $52.51 per barrel. Inventories of crude oil continue to build despite both OPEC and domestic producers slowing oil production. U.S. crude oil storage facilities are as full as they have been in almost 16 years, with more than a billion barrels of oil in storage.

not have the same resources at our disposal as other states.” He added, however, “it’s a conversation worth having over a period of time.” The state recently released a new travel guide, available not only in printed form but an interactive guide online at visitdelaware.trellist.com. “Whether your interest is a day trip to the museum or a week at the beach, you can explore the state and make reservations,” he noted. “My favorite way to explore is by bike. It’s an incredible experience to see Delaware at that level. It’s easy to see why people come here — the fertile farmland, wildlife, forests. What we really want them to do is come and stay!” Markell also announced that Travelocity will be adding a hotel booking engine for Delaware hotels. “These are historically challenging times in Delaware,” he continued. He recognized the efforts of Alan Levin, former CEO of Happy Harry’s, and the Economic Development Office which Levin now heads. “Both are totally focused on creating jobs and turning the economy around,” Markell said. “The only way out for Delaware is to create more good, high-wage jobs. We want to create a climate where business can thrive, including tourism.” “The rise of gas prices above the $2.00 mark has many motorists wondering if we’re going to see a re-run to the $3.00 level or higher again this summer,” said Catherine L. Rossi, manager of Public and Government Affairs, AAA Mid-Atlantic. “And, the answer is probably not. We expect gas prices to continue to rise by pennies, but we do not expect a return to the record gas prices we saw last summer. If crude oil prices hover around $50 a barrel in the coming months, demand remains flat and the economy doesn’t worsen, gas prices should not increase dramatically.” Barring a significant increase or falloff in economic activity heading into the summer, crude oil prices are forecasted to remain somewhere near $50 per barrel in the short term. Local pricing Locally, one station in Seaford was selling regular gasoline for $1.899 a gallon on Tuesday, 5 cents a gallon less than a week ago.

“My administration is committed to do as much as we can to be sure the tourism industry thrives,” said Gov. Jack Markell, right, appearing at the Governor’s Conference on Tourism in Bridgeville on April 2. Spearheading the effort are Alan Levin, left, secretary of the Delaware Economic Development Office, and Linda Parkowski, tourism director. Photo by Carol Kinsley

TOP PRODUCER FOR FEBRUARY

The Porter Marshall Group of Long & Foster® Real Estate, Inc. & Marshall Auction-Marketing Co, Inc. congratulate Pam Price for achieving the status of Top Producer for the month of February. Pam sold 7 properties and had nearly $2 Million in Volume for the month.

Pam Price is ranked in the Top 40 of 13,643 agents in Long & Foster. Her first year in real estate, Pam Price was rookie of the year and has been a consistent producer ever since. Just this weekend, Pam sold 7 units! Pam’s office is conveniently located on Route 13 in Salisbury, across from Chili’s, along with the 10-agent Porter Marshall Group of Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc., as well as the Marshall Auction - Marketing Co, Inc. & Marshall Estates Services team.

Call Pamela Price, Realtor® for your Real Estate listing needs at 302-249-2546 cell or email pamsellshouses@longandfoster.com For your Estate & Real Estate Auction needs, call Marshall Auctions 302-856-7333, 410-749-8092 or email info@marshallauctions.com

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PAGE 21

MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

Community Bulletin Board Library. Participants that raise $50 or more  in pledges will receive a complimentary  event t-shirt. Prizes will be awarded for  the most money raised in various age  categories. Questions may be directed to  629-2336.

Seaford Library

• The Seaford District Library will be  closed on Friday, April 10. We will open  for our regular business hours on Monday,  April 13. • There will be a Seaford Library Board  meeting on Monday, April 13 and Tuesday, April 14 at 5:30 p.m. • “Lights, Camera, Action!” The Seaford District Library hosts “Movie Night”  on Thursday, April 16 at 5:30 p.m.  • Baby Bookworms, an infant story  time, Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m., no registration required • Toddler Tales Story Time, Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m., no registration required • 3-5 Story Time, Thursdays at 10:30  a.m. Registration now required, and opens  two weeks before the story time date. Call  the library for details. • Love a good murder mystery? Who is  Sam Spade? Find out this and much more  with your free copy of The Maltese Falcon  written by Dashiell Hammett. Get your  copy at the Seaford District Library while  supplies last.   • The Seaford District Library has  joined IHOP to raise money for the Library. Eat a meal at the Seaford, Dover,  Rehoboth or Salisbury, Md. IHOP and return an itemized receipt along with a comment card to the Seaford District Library.  We must have the comment cards with  itemized receipts in order to receive the  reimbursement. The Seaford Library will  receive 10% of the total receipt. • The Seaford District Library hosts a  Book Discussion on the “The Maltese Falcon” on Saturday, April 18 at 1 p.m.  • The “Science and Religion” book  discussion will meet on Monday, April 20  at 6 p.m. • There will be a Seaford Library Board  meeting on Tuesday, April 28 at 5:30 p.m.  For more information on library events  call 629-2524.

Relay for Life yard sale

Delaware National Bank will hold a  yard sale on Saturday, April 11 from 8  a.m. to noon at the Seaford branch located  next to Burger King on Route 13. Rain  date is Saturday, April 25. We will have  various items including clothes, books and  toys. Items can be donated at the Seaford  branch from April 6-10. All proceeds benefit Relay for Life.  

Seaford-walk/run

Join us on Saturday, April 25. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. (rain date is Sunday, April 26 at 1 p.m.) We invite you to walk, run, push, pull  or pedal around the site of the new library.  All funds raised will support the Seaford  Library & Cultural Center.  Refreshments provided. Collection envelopes may be picked up at the Seaford 

for May 7, 8 and 9. Those boats being  auctioned will be sold on May 9. Applications may be obtained at the marina  office or by calling 628-8600.

Fitness classes

Come join us in fitness classes: Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, at 9 a.m.;  The Member Services Committee of the  Tuesdays, Thursdays, 5:30 p.m. We meet  Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce  in St. John’s UMC Fellowship Hall in Seabrings you the annual Administrative  ford. (Sponsored by St. John’s but open to  Professionals’ Appreciation Luncheon at  the public.)  noon, Wednesday, April 22, at the Seaford  Beginners to intermediate participants  Golf and Country Club. Cost is $20 each –  are welcome in this fun, faith-filled, coincluding gratuity. There will be gift bags,  ed, non-competitive, resistance training,  buffet lunch, and door prizes. A presentastretching, high/low aerobic class. For  tion by: Dr. Warren Chen, Medical Direcmore information call Carol Lynch at 629tor of Radiology, Nanticoke Health Servic- 7539. es. (Women’s Health & Prevention; latest  developments in early detection of disease. By reservation only – RSVP no later than  April 17 — name of business, number  attending, at $20 each . Make checks payable to the Greater Seaford Chamber of  Commerce. No payments will be accepted  at the door. No substitutions are allowed.

Luncheon

Wee Learner Enrollment begins

Wee Learner Christian Prepschool is  now accepting enrollments for the school  year September 2009 to June 2010. Classes are 8:15 to 11:45 a.m. for children ages  3-4; and 12:30 to 4 p.m. for children ages  4-5. You may call the school for an appointment or for more details at 629-6261.

Attention Active Duty Veterans

The American Legion Post 19 of Laurel  is actively recruiting new members for the  post. Membership eligibility dates: WWI,  April 6, 1917-Nov. 11, 1918; WWII, Dec.  2, 1941-Dec. 31, 1948; Korean War, June 

‘Foods for Thought’ seminar

“Foods for Thought” seminar, presenting the latest research on how nutrition  affects mood, memory, learning and behavior will be held April 28, 30 and May 5  and 7, on Tuesday and Thursday evenings  at 6 p.m.  An opportunity to mingle and  taste delicious healthy foods and participate in interactive break-out sessions each  evening. A seminar workbook, including  healthy recipes, will be available for $20.  This free health seminar is being hosted  by the Seaford Seventh-day Adventist  Church. Seating is limited so register  early. For further information or to make  reservations visit www.lifestylematters. net, or call 875-3743 to register with Delta  Nichols.

BEDCO Boat Show & Auction

BEDCO, operator of the Blades Marina, announces a Boat Show & Auction 

Easter egg hunt

Laurel American Legion Post 19 will  be holding their Annual Easter egg hunt  on Easter Sunday, April 12, at 1:30 p.m. at  Laurel Middle School.  All children up to age 12 are invited  and there will be plenty of candy and  prizes for all.

Used book sale

The Friends of the Laurel Public Library will hold a used book sale in the  library’s community room from April 1318, with hundreds of gently used books for  children, teens and adults available. Some  CD’s, VHS tapes and DVD’s will also be  available.  Hours are Monday and Tuesday, 10 

delmar VFW

Higher Ground Youth Ministry

Centenary United Methodist Church’s  Higher Ground Youth Ministry is hosting  a golf tournament on Saturday, May 16, at  Seaford Golf & Country Club.  The tournament will raise funds for  Higher Ground’s mission trip and outreach programs. Registration for the golf  tournament is $85 per golfer or $330 for  a foursome. Spots are also available for  sponsors. The tournament begins at 9:30  a.m. on May 16, register before April 30.  Contact Blair Hall at 875-8106 or visit  www.highergroundgolf.webs.com for registration or for more information about the  tournament.

25, 1950-Jan. 31, 1955; Vietnam War, Feb.  28, 1961-May 7, 1975; Lebanon/Grenada,  Aug. 24, 1982-July 31, 1984; Panama,  Dec. 29, 1989-Jan. 31, 1990; Gulf War,  Aug. 2, 1990-Cessation of hostilities as  determined by the U.S. Government. Any  member serving today is eligible if they  are on active duty.  Proof of service (DD-214) is required.  Call Bettylou Evans, membership chairperson at 875-0167 for more information  or fax 875-1943 or send a note of interest  with your name, address and phone number to P.O. Box 329, Laurel, DE 19956.

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PAGE 22 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.; Wednesday and Thursday, noon to 7:30 p.m.; Friday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; and Saturday 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Hardbacks will be sold for .50 and paperbacks for .25. Proceeds benefit the library’s children and teen programs. For more information, call the library at 8753185.

Hope Lodge oyster roast

Hope Lodge #4 will be having an oyster roast at its 6th street location, Laurel, on Saturday, April 18. Oyster sandwiches, crab cakes, and homemade cream of crab soup will be available. This will be the last oyster roast until September. Hours are from 11 a.m. till 2 p.m. All are welcome.

Laurel F.D. Auxiliary fundraiser

The Laurel Fire Dept. Auxiliary is currently participating in a fund-raiser sponsored by Avon called, “Bentley the Bear.” This fundraiser will continue until May 31. The cost of “Bentley the Bear” is $19.99 and the intention of this fund-raiser is to ask individuals or organizations to consider purchasing a minimum of one of these bears which can be donated to either a local fire department, police department, hospital or nursing-care facility to help put a smile on a child’s or senior citizen’s face. Your purchase and donation is tax deductible. If you wish to purchase “Bentley the Bear” for yourself or to be donated, contact any member of the Laurel Fire Department Auxiliary, send you check or money order payable to the Laurel Fire Department Auxiliary in the amount of $19.99 to 207 W. Tenth St., Laurel, DE 19956. Include where you would like “Bentley” donated. If you wish to purchase “Bentley” for yourself, include the telephone number where you can be contacted so that you can pick your order up from the Fire Department once it arrives. The Laurel Fire Department Auxiliary is currently seeking new members. Anyone interested in joining, contact any current member of the Auxiliary or leave your contact information by contacting the Laurel Fire Department at 875-3081 and someone will contact you to discuss the application process.

Laurel Chamber seeks food vendors Laurel Chamber of Commerce is accepting applications for food vendors for its 4th of July celebration.

AARP Driving Course

Laurel Senior Center will have an AARP Refresher Driving Course, on April 20, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost is $12 for AARP members, $14 for non-members. To register for the course call 875-2536.

Laurel Lioness bingo

Laurel Lioness Vera Bradley bingo will be held Tuesday, April 21, at Laurel Fire Hall. Doors open at 6 p.m. Play starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are available from any Lioness or call 875-5597. Cost of tickets: advanced sales $20; at door, $25. Many door prizes and refreshments will be available.

Clean-up week

The Town of Laurel will be holding a cleanup week for town residents, begin-

MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009 ning on Monday, April 20, until Saturday, April 25. Hours of operation will be Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. until 7 p.m. and Saturday, 8:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. Residents will be required to bring their garbage, waste, etc. to the dumpster locations and are responsible for unloading their waste into the dumpsters. Items that will not be collected are: hazardous materials, fuel, gas, oil, paint, computers. Town staff will be available to assist those who need assistance with unloading waste. The dumpsters will be located across from town hall in the municipal parking lot, located on Poplar Street. In order to dump the waste, residents are required to bring a picture ID and utility bill showing registered address.

‘Laurel Pride in Bloom Month’

Since 2007, Mayor John Schwed has declared the month of May, “Laurel Pride in Bloom” month. The Public Works Department makes extra efforts to clean up the town and add new landscaping to the parks. The residents have been encouraged to cleanup by providing extra dumpsters for debris. Traditionally, the third weekend in May is the Laurel High School, Alumni Weekend and St. Philip’s Church, Strawberry Festival. This year the library is planning to offer programs throughout the month, highlighting the history and beauty of the town. The Chamber of Commerce will showcase local businesses. The Bank of Delmarva has provided funding for barrels of spring flowers for display throughout the town. Organizations, businesses and residents are encouraged to join these efforts to clean up the town and plant or display spring flowers and wreathes. For additional information, contact the Chamber of Commerce office at 875-9319, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Monday through Friday.

lunch. For more information, call Susan Welch at 302-349-5237.

Book discussion group

Greenwood Library’s Bound by Books discussion group will discuss the book, Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson, on Tuesday, April 21 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. The program will be held in the library meeting room and is free and open to all. Refreshments will be served. For a copy of the book, visit the Greenwood Public Library or call Robin Miller at 302-349-5309.

Beginning computer classes

Visit the Greenwood Public Library every Wednesday afternoon from 3 to 4 p.m. and learn the basics of a mouse and keyboard in a relaxed atmosphere. Registration is required, so call 3495309 or come by the library to sign up.

AARP Driver Safety Course

There will be a two-day AARP Driver Safety Course at the Greenwood CHEER Activity Center on Thursday, April 16 and Friday, April 17 from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. This basic two-day course is $12 per AARP member and $14 for non-members. For more information or to register, call Susan Welch at 302-349-5237.

Community-wide yard sale

The Town of Bridgeville hosts a community-wide yard sale on Saturday, May 2, from 7 a.m. until ?. You will find great bargains at many homes throughout the town. Be sure to put Bridgeville on your list of yard sale stops on May 2.

Indoor Yard Sale

Union United Methodist Church in Bridgeville will hold an Indoor Yard Sale in the Fellowship Hall on Saturday, April 18 from 7 a.m. to noon. For more information, call the church office at 337-7409.

Dinner Club

Join us at the Greenwood CHEER Activity Center on Wednesday evenings from 5 to 7 p.m. beginning in April and continuing through May for the Greenwood Dinner Club. This will be an evening of fellowship and a delicious dinner entrée, dessert and beverage. Cost for members is $6 and nonmembers are $8. For menus or more information, call Susan Welch at 302-349-5237.

CHEER anniversary

The Greenwood CHEER Activity Center will celebrate their 35th anniversary on Tuesday, April 28 from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. with all day prize bingo and door prizes. The celebration will continue on Wednesday, April 29 from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. with musical entertainment by Cathy Gorman, a basket raffle and games after

items must be curbside by 6 a.m., as M-T trash will only go down each street once. Allowable items for pick-up include: furniture, household trash, stoves, and limbs bundled in 4-ft. lengths. Items that will not be picked up include tires, batteries, oil, construction materials, dirt, rocks, bricks, etc. M.T. Trash will have a truck available to pick-up refrigerators, freezers, and air conditioners, as long as the freon has been removed.

Clean-up day

Bridgeville will hold a neighborhood clean-up day on Saturday, May 9. All AUTHENTIC MEXICAN

Troop 174 chicken barbeque

The parents of BSA Troop 174, Delmar will hold a chicken barbeque on Saturday, April 18 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Wilmington Trust Bank in Delmar. Dinners are $7 each. Profits help send our scouts to summer camp.

Beef & dumpling dinners

The Delmar High School Band hosts an AYCE beef and dumpling dinner at the Delmar VFW on State Street in Delmar on Sunday, April 19 from 1 to 4 p.m. The Delmar Teens Against Cancer Relay for Life Team will host a beef and dumpling dinner at the VFW on Sunday, April 26 from 1 to 4 p.m. Tickets are $10 for both dinners and include beef and dumplings, mashed potatoes, green beans, rolls, dessert, tea or coffee. Carry-outs are available. Walk-ins are welcome or call 410-8963195 for tickets.

Ruritans fish fry

The Bi-State Ruritans will sponsor a fish fry on Saturday, April 18 from 4 to 6:30 p.m. at Melson Church Community Hall, east of Delmar. Cost is $8 per person for fish or chicken, french fries, hush puppies, coleslaw, rolls, iced tea and coffee. Desserts will be available for a nominal fee. A chinese auction is also planned and bidders do not need to be present to win.

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MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

Easter Egg Hunt

The VFW Blue Hen Post 6483 and Ladies Auxiliary will host their annual Easter egg hunt on Saturday, April 11 at 10 a.m. Children up to the age of 12 are welcome to participate in this activity. The post home is located in Milford on Williamsville Road just past Southern States. For more information, call 4224412.

Ride to the Tide planned

The Ride to the Tide, a police-escorted motorcycle ride that benefits Special Olympics Delaware, will take place on Sunday morning, April 19. Bikers can depart from the University of Delaware football stadium parking lot at 10:30 a.m. or the Seaford Harley Davidson at 11 a.m. All riders will end at Jake’s Seafood Restaurant in Lewes. Jake’s will provide a complimentary lunch. Register before April 16 and pay $20 for riders and $15 for passengers. Day-of registration fee is $25 for riders and $20 for passengers. The ride is organized by the Delaware Blue Knights - Chapter 1, and supported by Delaware’s Law Enforcement for Special Olympics, Jake’s Seafood and WBOC. For more information or to register online, contact Special Olympics Delaware at 302-831-4653 or visit www. sode.org.

Fashion Show planned

The Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus will host a fashion show and luncheon on Thursday, April 30 at Sussex Pines Country Club in Georgetown. Adult Plus+ members and Delaware Tech staff will model the latest spring and summer fashions provided by “That Boutique” of Milford. The program will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Cost to the public is $19, which includes lunch and the show. For more information, or to purchase tickets, call the Adult Plus+ program office at 302-856-5618.

Heritage Day in Harrington

The city of Harrington extends an invitation to all those who would like to participate in its 31st Annual Heritage Day celebration on Saturday, August 28. That includes exhibitors, crafts demonstrators and vendors offering food and other merchandise who would like to reserve space for the day. Planners are also looking for anyone who would like to join the parade — individual marchers, groups, floats, organizations, vehicles, bands and others. For information or entries, call Bill Falasco, Harrington Parks & Recreation, 398-7975.

Rotary plans Pig Pickin’

The Hub Club Rotary will hold its fourth annual Pig Pickin’ Hoedown on Friday, May 1 from 6:30 to 10 p.m. at Robbins Paradise Farm on Paradise Alley

Road, Harrington. The menu includes pulled pork straight from the roaster; tender, deep fried turkey, and all the fixins. Jay Hoad will provide live music, and Dave Kenton & Friends will perform as guests arrive. There will be silent and live auctions and a 50/50 raffle plus plenty of fun and games. The public is invited to attend. Tickets are $15 and available from any Rotary member or by calling 629-5500. For more information, call 302-398-5194. Proceeds benefit Rotary’s variety of local school and community service projects. The Hub Club is a Centennial Rotary Club and represents Harrington, Greenwood and Felton.

‘Dining to Decrease Hunger’

Join the First State Community Action Agency for the fundraiser event ‘Dining to Decrease Hunger’, Tuesday, April 14, at the Roadhouse Steak Joint Restaurant in Rehoboth Beach. Take your family, friends, and neighbors out to eat between 11 a.m. and 9 p.m. and 10% of the proceeds will be donated to First State’s Food Pantry to help feed more individuals and families in need, particularly those with diabetic and other special dietary needs. While there, learn more about our Free Food Assistance program and get information on diabetes and obesity, healthy choices when eating out, and hunger in Delaware. A 50/50 raffle will be held between 6 p.m. – 8 p.m. For more information, contact Kaneisha Trott at 856-7761.

Ruritan Club

All-you-can-eat Sunday breakfast buffet served by the Galestown Ruritan Club, on the fourth Sunday of each month October to June, from 7-10 a.m. Cost is $7 for adults, $4 children 6-12 years, at The Galestown (Md) Community Hall, 5833 School House Road. Buffet features blueberry pancakes, eggs, scrapple, sausage, creamed chipped beef, biscuits, potato casserole, hominy, fruit cup and sticky buns.

lunch, enjoy a classic musical with songs like “Singin’ In The Rain,” “All I Do Is Dream Of You” and “You Are My Lucky Star.” Wednesday, Sept. 2 - Rainbow Dinner Theatre, Paradise, Pa., “Uncle Chick’s Last Wish”; $70. A comedy that will keep you laughing the entire show. Sept. 12-18 - Mackinac Island, Mich.; $790 pp, double. Your first stay will be in Frankenmuth, Mich., a beautiful Bavarian town. Take a ferry to Mackinac Island where you will enjoy lunch at the famous Grand Hotel. Enjoy a horse and carriage ride around the island to Arch Rock. Ride thru the Soo Locks and then the Kewadin Shores Casino after a visit in St. Ignace, Mich. Friday, Oct. 16 - Strasburg, Pa.; $69. Take a ride on the Strasburg railroad, enjoy lunch on board and then visit the train museum. Nov. 16-20 - Christmas at the Biltmore Estates in Asheville, N.C.; $589 pp, double. Enjoy a candlelight dinner at Deerpark restaurant and a tour of the Biltmore. Also included are a Christmas show at the Carolina Nights Dinner Theater and a Christmas show at the Wohlfahrt Dinner Theater. Visit Chimney Rock Park, Moose Café at the Farmers Market, the Smith McDowell House and take a bus tour of Asheville. Wednesday, Dec. 2 - American Music Theater to see a Christmas Show; $92. Stop for lunch at Miller’s Smorgasbord in Lancaster, Pa. before the show. For more information, contact Rose Wheaton at 629-7180.

PAGE 23

Theater trips

Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus is offering trips with a multi-generational appeal that would be a great experience for grandparents to enjoy with their grandchildren. At the Civic Center in Salisbury, Md. on Friday, April 17, journey into the enchanted forests of “Cirque Dreams” and encounter the strength and power of soaring aerialists, spine binding contortionists and vine swinging characters. On Tuesday, April 21 at Delaware State University in Dover enjoy the touching story of “Silent Boy.” The Disney classic “Beauty and the Beast” will premiere at Toby’s Theater in Baltimore, Md. on Thursday, April 23. For complete trip information, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 302-854-6966.

April trips offered at Del Tech

Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus is offering a variety of trips in April. Get ready for a night of pure laughter with “Those Funny Guys” at the Schwartz Center on Friday, April 17. Get on board for the “25th Annual Putnam Spelling Bee” at the DuPont Theater on Saturday, April 18. Broaden your horizons with a one-of-a-kind trip on the Potomac Cruise and Luncheon on Tuesday, April 21. The ever-popular Dandy takes you on a round trip, two and a half hour luncheon cruise up the Potomac River. Relive the history of Old Town Alexandria on Tuesday, April 21. This trip allows you to have a day on your own to

The Easter Song

A heart-stirring dramatic musical at

Laurel Wesleyan Church Friday, Apr. 10th at 7:00 pm

Orioles vs. Yankees game

Seaford Recreation Department’s annual trip to see the Yankees vs. the Orioles is Friday, May 8. Cost is $55 and includes a ticket to the game and charter bus transportation. To reserve a ticket or for more information, call the office at 629-6809.

Seaford AARP offers trips

Seaford AARP Chapter 1084 is offering the following trips to the public. All trips leave from the Peebles parking lot in Seaford. Friday, May 22 - Gettysburg, Pa. - A visit to the Gettysburg Battlefield Visitor’s Center and Museum, $79. Visit the galleries at the Visitor’s Center and eat lunch at General Pickett’s Buffet. Wednesday, July 1 - Dutch Apple Dinner Theatre, Lancaster, Pa.; $79. After

& Sunday, Apr. 12th at 9:00 am & 11:00 am Laurel Wesleyan Church is located at 30186 Seaford Rd., Laurel, Del. (Alt. 13, 1/2 mile north of Laurel)

Nursery Care Provided For more information call 302-875-5380


PAGE 24 enjoy cobblestone streets, a tall ship anchored on the waterfront, historic landmarks, and antique shops. Disney’s fairy tale love story “Beauty and the Beast” will premiere at Toby’s Theater on Thursday, April 23. Take a trip to the Smithsonian on Saturday, April 25. Stroll through the eight museums located on the National Mall between the Washington Monument and the Capitol. Experience the “monumental tour” of the World War II Memorial and much more on Tuesday, April 28. This trip offers a first-rate guided tour of Vietnam, Women in Armed Forces, Einstein, Jefferson, Korean, Lincoln, Iowa Jima and the FDR memorial. Don’t miss a unique trip to the United States Botanic Gardens on Thursday, April 30. View rare living plants from around the world and have independent time to explore. For complete trip information, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 302-854-6966.

Rails & Trails

Escorted motor-coach trip to Waterville Valley, New Hampshire sponsored by the Seaford WPS, Sept. 21-24. Four days and three nights – cost $639 per person, includes lodging, three breakfasts, three dinners, entertainment, cruise on Lake Winnipesaukee, Castle in the clouds, Rock Estates, Mt. Washington Cog Railway, dinner on Lake Winnipesaukee Railroad, Wolfeboro Village, all gratuities, taxes and baggage handling. Or additional information contact Frances Horner at 6294416.

Horse Expo in Harrington

Horses of all kinds will be spotlighted when the 5th Annual Delaware Horse Expo at the State Fairgrounds, Harrington, on Saturday, April 25. The day includes a Parade of Breeds, demonstrations, clinics and seminars as well as a yard sale, vendors, exhibits, activities for kids, a Breyer model horse show and a riding horse sale. Admission is $5 and children 12 and under are free. For registration forms or more information, visit www.delawarehorseexpo.com. Space is available for commercial vendors, non-profit organizations and yard sale par-

MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009 ticipants as well as for entries in the Parade of Breeds or space in the Show Barn. For reservations, call Wayne at 302-270-8999. To consign horses in the Riding Horse Sale, call Frankie at 302270-4432. For more information about the Breyer event, contact Ingrid at 629-0306.

Embroiders’ Guild

The Sussex Chapter of Embroiders’ Guild meets on the second Monday of the month – Sept. through June at 10 a.m. at the CHEER Center in Georgetown. This month it will be April 13. We welcome all levels of stitchers from beginner to advanced. For more information call 410-208-9386. Questions call 302-539-9717.

Ham & turkey shoot

The Ellendale Ruritan Club ham and turkey shoot, Saturday, April 25 (rain date May 2) at 11:30 a.m., at Ellendale VFW, on V.F.W. Road. Directions: 1/2 mile south of U.S. 113 and 16 intersection). Refreshments will be available for sale. (If rain dates are cancelled, we will go to next shoot.) For possible cancellations call 302-422-2948 or cell 302249-7025.

Georgetown AARP

Join Georgetown AARP Chapter 5340 at their monthly luncheon meetings held on the first Monday of each month at 11:30 a.m. at the Sussex Pines Country Club. For details contact: Dee Richards at 302-841-5066 or Bettie Comer at 302-265-5606.

Weight Loss Club

The Slow and Steady Weight Loss Club will hold an open house on Tuesday, April 28 from 11 a.m. to noon at Grace Baptist Church on Atlanta Road in Seaford. Anyone interested in losing weight in a relaxed group setting is invited to join us. Slow and Steady is a nonprofit, non-religious weight loss support club open to anyone over 13-years-old. We follow the government’s weight loss program at www. Nutrition.gov.

For more information, call 410-883-3407 or e-mail ssweightlossclub@yahoo.com.

H.A.P.P.E.N.

The members of H.A.P.P.E.N., Hearn’s Pond Association for its protection, preservation, enhancement and naturalization will meet on Thursday, April 9, at 7 p.m., at the Seaford Museum. Among the topics to be discussed will be dam safety, annexation, traffic concerns and the Hearn’s Pond spring event. As always, H.A.P.P.E.N. members welcome any group or individual who is interested in attending the meeting.

Widowed persons service

The Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service will have its next meeting on Tuesday, April 21, at 12:15 p.m. at the Golden Corral, Salisbury, (302 E. Naylor Mill Road). The planned guest speaker will be Jessica Marine of the Eastern Shore veterinary Hospital. All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend. Come join us — we all enjoy the trips, lunches/dinners, etc. that we do.

Delaware Equine Council

The next meeting of the Delaware Equine Council is Monday, April 20 at 7 p.m. at Harrington Public Library. We are gearing up for the 2009 equine expo on Saturday, April 25 and preparing for upcoming events. Anyone interested in horses is welcome to attend. For more information, call Stan at 302684-3966.

Seaford Historical Society

Because of existing conflicts the Seaford Historical Society Board of Trustees meeting for the month of April will be held on the fourth Monday, April 27 at 7 p.m., instead of the usual third Monday as was originally scheduled. The meeting will be held in the Webb Room of the Seaford Museum.

Submit Bulletin Board items by noon, Thursday. Send to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, email to editor@mspublications.com or drop off at 951 Norman Eskridge Hwy., Seaford (Home Team Bldg.).

SUDOKU Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

See Answers page 49


MORNING STAR • ApRIl 9 - 15, 2009

pAGE 25

Community Walk creates a sense of togetherness You might call it a walk in the park as it was so much friendship at urPhy and fun shared. I am talking about the “Spring Their mission is Into Health’s Community Walk,” to engage the entire Saturday in Laurel. Two-hundredand-twenty-five people were esticommunity in an efmated to have signed up for Laufort to improve the rel’s walk, much better than previous years. Seaford and Woodbridge health of children in Sussex County. also held similar walks. Sponsored by the Sussex Child Health Promotion Coalition and a number of local businesses, this day four and a part of the fifth trip around the was designed for families and they were front perimeter of the school. How can you there. Some families even brought their turn down Larry’s enthusiasm? dogs to walk with them and it was heartSo, Peggy (Geisler) count one more warming to see the sense of togetherness walker for Laurel. Peggy is the very enamong all those present. thusiastic director of Sussex Child Health. I would be wrong to not mention the Their mission is to engage the entire comsponsors who helped with this health enmunity in a collaborative effort to improve deavor, not for the notoriety but for somethe health of children in Sussex County. thing they believe in. They are the NemThis event cost the participants nothing ours Health & Prevention Services, Delaand they gained a morning of smiles and ware Physicians Care, Soroptimist Club sense of togetherness. Next year, Laurel is of Seaford, Delaware Health and Social going to do even better. Services, Allen’s Familly Foods, Delmarva Power, Dole, Walmart, Trinity Transport, The new bowling alley should certainly Sussex County Council and Darrell Meade be good news for Laurel and I am sure of ASAP Printing, who “doled out” 100 or owner Pete Bryan’s dedication will pay so free T-shirts for the walk. Dole donated off. That building was the former Food piles of bananas. City building and before that it was origiAfter declining the invitation to walk nally built as the Acme grocery store in from my sister-in-law, Marsha Murphy, Laurel. Remember, there was also a Safe(“I’m taking pictures”) Larry Allen comes way where Foot Rite was located. How by and pulls me by the arm and I made many Acmes, or as it was much earlier,

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American stores, have been in Laurel? If you guessed four, you would be correct. Starting out in a building that was next to the Good Samaritan Shop in the Market Street area it was (as I understand) just a good old-fashioned store with a few new previews of the modern era of shopping. Harvey Oliphant was the manager as he was when they built the new modern store with off street parking (the Samaritans Furniture Store now). This was around 1952 or so. Harvey was the manager, as I said, and it was the days of “bagboys” who bagged your groceries and pushed the cart to your car as far away as the present Bank of Delmarva or farther at times. Frank Ward, probably Franklin Hastings and others were the meat department specialists. Other “pioneers” of the early stores (that I can remember) were Ronnie Lynch, Fred Melvin, Dot Breasure, Pansy Plummer, Narcissis Callaway, Dale Boyce, Norman Parsons, Harrison Rayne, Myrtle O’Neal, Bertha Parsons and many more. Of course, Cliff Parsons, Jay Ward, Vaughn Hall and myself, all came along later. Oh, yes, there were three other legends of that old store, Stubby Ellis, Everett Hall and olé “Mo,” Elmo Stoakley. Around 1960, Acme Markets made a bold move opening the old Discountland building as the largest grocery store on the shore. Jim Collins was the manager and Pansy Plummer was second in command. I can

devote a whole column to stories about that store, including our baked bean display that was in Good Housekeeping magazine. I will save all this for a future time, but I have already told part of it. Around 1972 or so, with expenses rising on the old concrete building, their latest and last store in Laurel was built. That store is now going to be your bowling alley. Loren Fuller and I were fortunate enough to have part-time jobs for their grand opening, but soon we were turned loose, as the hours were cut back. There is an Acme in Dover and I think there is one in Salisbury, but for me and several others, we have great memories of that era in Laurel when we asked, “Ma’am, can I put your groceries in a box, or in bags?” All carts of groceries were loaded for the customer. Ah, for those kinder, gentler days. On Sunday, April 12, the Laurel Legion will be holding its annual Easter Egg Hunt in Laurel at the Middle School. Time is 1 p.m. I really didn’t want to tell you the time, as Joe Hitchens and his “can’t-hit – sure-miss” hunting club is coming out to see the Easter Bunny. On a more serious side, there are “Sunrise” Church Services in Laurel on the 12th. See the church news for more information. Have a good spring week everyone!


PAGE 26

MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

Church Bulletins St. Luke’s holds Bible study

Janet Hubbard of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church will be coordinating a Bible study of the book of Esther. The group will meet in St. Luke’s Parish House. Additional information can be obtained by calling Janet at 628-0417.

All Walks of Life events

All Walks of Life Outreach Ministries in Laurel has planned the following events in April and May. Movie Night On Friday, April 10 at 7 p.m. the Youth Department hosts Movie Night. The $3 donation fee includes the movie, a snack and drink. For more information, contact Youth Directors Elder Temerius Drummond at 302-519-9761 or Sister Robin Boyd at 443-934-4556. Easter Sunday On Sunday, April 12 at 5 a.m. there will be a Sunrise service with holy communion and feet washing. At 11 a.m. is the Celebration Service with Apostle Randy and Prophetess Lorrie Jones. Pastor Aide Service On Sunday, April 26 at 4 p.m. Pastor Carol Hopkins of Victory in Grace Tabernacle will be the guest preacher. For more information, call 875-7772. Annual Gospel Explosion All Walks of Life hosts its annual Gospel Explosion on Saturday, May 30 at 6 p.m. at the Citadel of Hope on Concord Road in Seaford.

If your group or choir would like to sing, contact Elder Drummond at 302519-9761 or call the church at 875-7772.

Easter Sunrise Service

Christ United Methodist Church in Laurel will hold a Community Easter Sunrise Service at 6:30 a.m. at Janosik Park. Rain location is Christ UMC located at Sixth and Central Streets.

Greenwood UMC events

National Day of Prayer Join the Greenwood community’s celebration of the 58th annual National Day of Prayer at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 7 at Greenwood United Methodist Church. Enjoy the talent of individuals and groups as they participate in this year’s event, “Prayer - America’s Hope.” Bake Sale Need some baked goods to round out your menu for Easter? Come out on Thursday, April 9 from 3 to 7 p.m. at Greenwood United Methodist Church to pick out your selections. Proceeds benefit the church’s summer youth mission trip. Holy Week events Join us at Greenwood UMC on Thursday, April 9 at 7 p.m. for a Holy Thursday service. On Friday evening, return at 7 p.m. for the film “The Passion” in the sanctuary. For the children, there is an Easter egg hunt on Saturday, April 11 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Easter Sunday service begins at 11 a.m. For more information, call 302-349-4047.

St. Jude’s Bike-a-thon

Ron Breeding is calling on Seaford residents once again to join the St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital Wheels for Life bike-a-thon slated for Sunday, April 19, at 2 p.m. at West Seaford Elementary School. Volunteer workers and riders are needed for this bike-a-thon to raise funds for the world famous research center in its battle against childhood cancer and other catastrophic diseases. “We’re looking for riders who will contribute their time and talent to help children live. We really need lots of riders, since they are the ones who can make this bike-a-thon successful,” Breeding said. In the Wheels for Life bike-a-thon, riders ask sponsors to make donations based on each mile completed. All riders turning in money will receive a certificate. Those who raise $35 will receive a certificate and a special St. Jude t-shirt. When $75 is raised, the rider receives a backpack as well as the certificate and the t-shirt. Also plans are being made to give a $100 savings bond to the top fund-raiser plus great gifts will be given to a boy or girl who collect the most money. The Seaford Kiwanis Club will host the event for the 23rd year by providing refreshments. This is a great family project that provides everyone with a “feel good feeling.” Entry forms are available at all school offices, the Nemours Health and Prevention Office and City Hall. Anyone wishing to provide a prize, sponsor a rider or participate in the ride should call Ron Breeding at 629-3964.

Woodland Methodist Church

On April 9, there will be a Maundy Thursday service and communion at 7:30 p.m. at Woodland Methodist Church. Call 629-8775 for more information. On April 12, Woodland Methodist Church is having an Easter Contata, Easter Sunday Service at 9 a.m. Call 6298775 for more information. On April 11 – There will be an Easter Egg Hunt, at 1 p.m. at Woodland Methodist Church for children up to 12 years old.

Woodland Church is located 4.5 mile west of Seaford next to the Woodland Ferry. Call 629-8775 for more information.

Ladies Day

Come join your sisters for Ladies Day at the Laurel Church of Christ, Saturday, May 2, registration is from 9-9-45 a.m. Ladies Day begins at 9:45 a.m.-2 p.m. (Lunch provided). “Open Your Heart” with Melissa Lester, contributing editor to “Christian

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship CHURCH OF CHRIST

Sunday Family Worship 10:00 a.m. 94 Walnut Street, Laurel, DE (across from GameZone) 302-875-7873 www.laurelnazarene.org

A church you can relate to

1010S.C entral Ave., Laurel Ph: 875-7748 Minister: Ian J. Drucker Worship Services: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. BibleS tudy: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m. In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Donna Hinkle, Pastor Church: 875-4233 Sunday Services: 8:30 am Praise 9:30 am Sunday School,10:45 am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

Centenary United Methodist Church

“Where Caring is Sharing” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m.

Rev. K. Wayne Grier, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church 600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956

(302) 875-3644

The Rev. Dr. Howard G. Backus, Rector www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing Sunday ~ 8:30 & 10:30 am Church School ~ 9:30 am

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching Youth Group Wednesday 7:00 pm

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

Christian Church of Seaford

Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love

Centrally located at 14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956

Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road68, South of Laurel Laurel,D el.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m. www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

Delmar Wesleyan Church

800 East Street Delmar, MD 21875 “The Church That Cares” 410-896-3600 Pastor James C. Hitch

Sunday: Sunday School 10 M Worship 11 AM & 6 PM

Wednesday: BibleS tudy 7P M


MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009 Woman” magazine; author of “Giving for All It’s Worth;” and contributor to “Woman to Woman.” We welcome any last minute additions. Call or e-mail to RSVP — Marti Drucker, 302-280-6036, or m.drucker@comcast.net. The Laurel Church of Christ is located at 1010 So. Central Ave., Laurel.

Laurel Baptist Church

Laurel Baptist Church will be hosting a free community luncheon on Saturday, April 18, from noon to 2 p.m. The church is located at 33056 BiState Boulevard (west side of 13A, approximately 2 miles south of town). Any questions, call Shirley @ 875-2314.

The Kings Ambassadors

The Kings Ambassadors will be performing at the Delmar Wesleyan Church on Saturday April 11, at 6 p.m. The Church is located at 800 East Street Delmar Md. There will be no charge, just a love offering for the group.

Homemade Easter eggs

Homemade Easter eggs from Christ Lutheran Church, finest ever and still the best on the shore. $3.50 each. Selection is: peanut butter, coconut cream and butter cream. To order call 629-9751 or 629-9755.

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

During Lent, Thursday evening service at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, Seaford, will include Holy Eucharist and Stations of the Cross. The service begins at 6 p.m. and newcomers are welcome.

Good Friday events planned

The Laurel Ministerial Association (LMA) is sponsoring Good Friday events for the Laurel community on Friday, April 10. The first event is a Cross Walk that starts at Centenary United Methodist Church at noon and follows a path through the downtown area where participants will stop at different locations and pray. The next event is a community Good Friday Service at Christ United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This is an ecumenical service and will have participation from different denominations. For details call the Rev. Julie Lewis at 875-4741.

Welcome…

SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

701 Bridgeville Road 629-9077

“Welcome Home!”

Wesley United Methodist Church

22025 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE Pastor James Bongard Contemporary Worship 9 am Sunday School & Bible Education 10 am Traditional Worship 11 am Wednesday Worship 6:45 pm 302-629-3029 * Info Line 302-628-0112

PAGE 27

Easter Sunrise Service

The Easter Sunrise Service at Janosik Park in Laurel is scheduled for Sunday April 12, at 6 a.m. This is sponsored by the Laurel Ministerial Association. Everyone is invited.

Delmar Kiwanis Club

Easter Sunrise Service, Easter Sunday, April 12, 7 a.m., at All Saints Episcopal Church, (corner of State and 10th streets.) Kiwanis Community Prayer Breakfast, May 9, 9 a.m., at St. Stephen’s United Methodist Church, (Camelot Hall).

Joint Men’s Day

Mt. Calvary UMC in Bridgeville presents Joint Men’s Day on Sunday, April 19 at 4 p.m. The theme is “Prophesy, Dream, Vision; Promises of the Spirit” and the theme scripture is Joel 2:28-29. Guest preacher is the Rev. Dr. Michael T. Scott Sr., along with his choir and congregation from Jerusalem Baptist Church in Temperanceville, Va. There will be a fellowship meal served before the service at 3 p.m. For details contact Butch Lee at 302337-8198 or George L. Batson at 410754-6987. Host pastor is the Rev. Baron N. Hopkins Sr.

Joint Trustee Day

Mt. Calvary UMC in Bridgeville presents Joint Trustee Day on Sunday, May 17 at 3:30 p.m. Guest preacher is the Rev. Randolph Fitchett from Coppins AME and Ross AME Churches on the Preston Circuit Charge, Ridgely, Md. A fellowship meal will be served before the service at 2:30 p.m. For more information, contact Mary Jones at 302-337-7335 or George L. Batson at 410-754-6987. Host pastor is the Rev. Baron N. Hopkins Sr.

Spring Revival

Mt. Calvary UMC in Bridgeville presents their Spring Revival on May 12-14, 7 p.m. nightly. Guest preacher is Elder Tyrone Thomas, pastor, Charity Community Church of God, Baltimore, Md. All are invited. Host pastor is the Rev. Baron N. Hopkins Sr.

Outreach golf tournament

Centenary United Methodist Church’s Higher Ground Youth Ministry is hosting a golf tournament at 9:30 a.m. on Satur-

Union

United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 Handicap Friendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

Easter Sunday: Communion Service

Services: Sunday: 10 am Tues.: Prayer 7-8 pm Thurs.: Bible Study 7 pm

22606 Sussex Hwy. Seaford, DE • 302-359-6331

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor

WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel

302- 875-4646

PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

Sun. 9:30 am Wed. 7:00 pm

Children’s Church • Nursery

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Senior Minister: Dr. Carl G Vincent Senior Pastor: Pastor Barry B. Dukes wwwmessiahsvineyard.org

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Youth Minister: James Hollis Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

VICTORY TABERNACLE

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 4:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP

11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT

Ministry for the wholef amily 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson

28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

22625 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 - www.atlantaroadcma.org Sunday

Wednesday Evening

9:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Worship, Nursery, Classes for Kids-Adults 7:00 p.m. Evening Service

6:45 Catalyst Youth (grades 7-12), DivorceCare 7:00 Prayer Meeting, Men’s Group, KidStuf 103 (K-6 Kids & their parents, 1 & 3rd Wed.)

COKESBURY CHURCH All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE (302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburywc.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

Mount Olivet

United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School

Pastor: Rev. Jim Sipes • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

27225 Kaye Road Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.thelighthouselaurel.org Timothy P. Jones, Pastor Sunday Family Worship - 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Family Ministries - 7:00 p.m.

“Shining His Light”

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel

Sunday School - 9:30 Worship - 9:00 & 10:45 Sunday Evening Worship Wed. 6:30 p.m. - Youth Ministries & WKID, The Zone, Children’s Ministries

Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor: Rev. Rick Green; Youth: Kyle Horton Children’s Pastor: Marilyn Searcey

CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH

315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-9755

Pastor: Rev. Andrew C. Watkins www.christlutheranseaford.com

Praise Worship 8:15 AM • Sunday School 9:45 AM • Traditional Worship 11:15 AM

Laurel Baptist Church, SBC Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 LBC Sunday School ~ 10:00 Morning Worship ~ 11:00 Wednesday Bible Study ~ 7:00 P.M. NurseryP rovided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Music Director: Linda Lewis

302-875-7998

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

Front & King St., Seaford, DE 629-7979 Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - G. W. Cliver - 629-6206 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10 a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

743 E. Clarence St., Seaford, Del. Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Paster

629-9443, Cell: 448-0852 • cogclarence@verizon.net

Sunday: Midweek Activities: Church School........9:45 am Call for Details Morning Worship......11 am Children’s Church & Youth Explosion ........6 pm Nursery Provided Evening Worship.........7 pm *Counseling by appt. only Tuesday: Thursday: Bible Study & Family Corporate Prayer.........7 pm ‘Come and Grow with Us!’ Training Hour...........7 pm

Thank You to the churches that sponsor these pages. Your contribution makes it possible for the “Good News” to be published each week.


PAGE 28 day, May 16 at Seaford Golf & Country Club. The tournament will raise funds for Higher Ground’s mission trips and outreach programs. Registration is $85 per golfer or $330 for a foursome. Spots are also available for sponsors. Registration deadline is Thursday, April 30. For more information contact Blair Hall at 302-875-8106 or visit highergroundgolf.webs.com.

Arabic ministry in Seaford

A weekly Sunday meeting for Arabicspeaking Christians will be held at Atlanta Road Alliance Church in Seaford beginning Sunday, May 3, at 12:30 p.m. For more information, call Pastor Gorgui at 629-5600, ext. 14, or email PastorGorgui@atlantaroadcma.org.

Delmar Wesleyan holds dinner

Delmar Wesleyan Church will hold an Emings barbeque chicken dinner on Friday, April 17 from 4 to 8 p.m. You may eat in or take out. Cost is $8.95. Tickets may be purchased by calling 410-896-3600, Jay Hill at 875-3926, or Jim Littleton at 875-1153. Proceeds benefit church pew restoration.

Holy Week

Maundy Thursday, April 9 at 6 pm., a special dinner and service will be held at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church, South Central Avenue, Laurel, with the Rev. Dr. Howard Backus, officiant. Easter Sunday, April 12, services with Holy Eucharist will be at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m. Lay reader Leigh Clark, Terry Trujillo and Joanne Czernik, Chalicest, will assist Dr Backus. Charles Wise will be Healing Service lead with Leigh Clark as Pastoral Care lead.

MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

The Easter Song

This year Laurel Wesleyan Church would like to invite you to The Easter Song, a heart-stirring dramatic musical on Friday, April 10, at 7 p.m. and Sunday, April 12, at 9 and 11 a.m. Admission is free and nursery care will be provided. Laurel Wesleyan is located at 30186 Seaford Road, ½ mile north of Laurel on Alt. 133. For more information contact us at 875-5380, or www.laurlwesleyan.org.

Easter Vigil Service

An Easter Vigil Service will be held at historic Barratt’s Chapel located on Route 113 in Frederica on Saturday, April 11 at 7 p.m. This initmate time of worship will include music, drama and communion administered by Bishop Peggy Johnson. The service and communion are open to all persons regardless of denominational or church membership who desire to prepare for the celebration of Easter.

Holy Week services

St. John’s United Methodist Church located at Pine and Poplar Streets, Seaford, will celebrate faith and life in Christ Jesus with the following Holy Week services and events: • Thursday, April 9 through Friday, April 10 - Prayer Vigil, 9 p.m. to noon. Persons may pray in a secure sanctuary or at home. • Friday, April 10 - Good Friday Service, 7 p.m. • Saturday, April 11 - Easter Egg Hunt, 10 a.m. to noon, ages two through 5th grade • Sunday, April 12 - Easter celebration, traditional services at 8:30 a.m. and 11:15 a.m., Hearts Afire contemporary worship at 10 a.m.

Song by local gospel artist reaches number one on New York Gospel Review Chart Local gospel artist Jerry Jones has once again received the honor of achieving a number one song. In January 2009 a song written by him, “Barstools and Church Pews” reached number one on the New York Gospel Review Chart top 40 Inspirational Songs. His song was released by Ready Records, Kissimmee, Fla., in Nov. 2008. In December of 2007 another song written by Jones, “Read the Word,” also released by Ready Records, climbed to number one on that same chart. Having written 21 Gospel songs since his Salvation seven years ago, Jones contributes his success in the music industry to his Salvation, never having the ability to write songs before. He has had four other sons on various charts all over the country since then, “Christmas Time,” “God Doesn’t Care” (Who You Are, Or Where You’ve Been), “I Won’t Be There,” “Calvary,” and two songs written by Carol Collins, Georgetown, Del., “God’s Soldiers” and “Fire In My Feet.” He has received many awards for his singing and songwriting of Gospel music, including Eastern United States Male Vocalist and Songwriter of the Year, and International Songwriter of the Year. His music is currently being promoted worldwide by RhonBob Promotions, Kodak, Tennessee, and Shepherd Productions, Cincinnati, Ohio.

The Joneses, having just returned from a ministry trip to Southern and Central, Fla., and South Carolina, say, “It’s so very good to be home! We couldn’t wait to get back to Delaware, and didn’t realize how beautiful it is here!” They travel all over the country going wherever they are called to go, in their 37-foot motor home, their new “home,” spreading the message of Salvation. Jones has been privileged to sing in Branson, Mo., Pigeon Forge, Tenn., and Nashville, Tenn., along with many other states, but says that his favorite place to sing is Delmarva, where they have numerous concerts scheduled before leaving May 18, for concerts scheduled in Tennessee. On May 16, Jerry and his wife Jeannie, along with wonderfully gifted local singers Joe Dawson, Laura Mitchell, and Amanda Jones, will present an evening of Gospel Music at St. John’s United Methodist Church, King Street, Seaford. It will be a benefit concert for Nanticoke Senior Center in Seaford. A love offering will be asked during the concert. No tickets are needed. All proceeds from the concert will go to the Senior Center. The concert will start at 7 p.m. For further information about this concert or to “Keep up with the Joneses,” call them at 302-228-4813, or visit their website at www.jerryjonesministries.com.

What Must I Do to Be Saved? Acknowledge your sin and place your trust in Christ. All who place their trust in Christ in this way are adopted as God’s children. All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. ~ Romans 3:23 The wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. ~ Romans 6:23 God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. ~ Romans 5:8 If you confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus and believe in your heart that God has raised him from the dead, you will be saved. ~ Romans 10:9


MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

PAGE 29

Obituaries T. Harold Messick, 77

T. Harold Messick of Bridgeville, passed away Sunday, March 29, 2009, at Delaware Hospice Center in Milford. He was born on Nov. 24, 1931, in Greenwood, son of Fred and May Broadrup Messick. Mr. Messick was a man with many talents. Early in his career, he worked briefly for the DuPont Company. In 1962, he and his brother-in-law, William Gray Jr. formed Messick & Gray Construction Company of which Mr. Messick served as president. Today the company continues under the leadership of Mr. Messick’s son, Alan Messick. In 1967, he established Power Trans, Inc., a company specializing in industrial parts and equipment. Shortly thereafter, he formed Bridgeville Machining. Mr. Messick served his country with the U.S. Air Force during the Korean Conflict and was honorably discharged as a Tech Sergeant. He was a member of the Nanticoke River Yacht Club and the Ballantrae Golf and Yacht Club in Port St. Lucie, Fla. He was also a member and past president of the Bridgeville Lions Club. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by five brothers, Floyd, Paul, Norris, Francis and George; and one sister, Dorothy Webb. He is survived by his wife of 53 years, Shirley Gray Messick; a son, Alan Thomas Messick and his wife, Jean of Bridgeville; two grandsons, Ryan and Jeremy Messick of Bridgeville; his brother, Glenn Messick of Queenstown, Md.; and several nieces and nephews. The funeral was held Thursday, April 2 at Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Hardesty Chapel, in Bridgeville. Interment followed in Bridgeville Cemetery. Pastor Al Taylor officiated. Memorial contributions may be made to Delaware Hospice Center, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963.

Frank Leonard Naggy, 79

Frank Leonard Naggy of Laurel, died Thursday, April 2, 2009, at his home. He was born in New York, a son of Charles Knight Naggy and Elizabeth Fillinger Naggy. Frank graduated from Mardela High School. He worked for over 22 years as a steel fabricator for Crown, Cork and Seal in Fruitland, Md. before retiring in 1995. He loved to travel and enjoyed spending time with family. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth “Betty” Gibbons Naggy, whom he married on Feb. 22, 1995; a son, Gary L. Naggy of Salisbury; two daughters, Debbie Suskin of Delmar and Brenda Carey of Salisbury; six grandchildren, Gary Naggy Jr., Gavin Carey, Andrew Carey, Sara Beth Nester, Melissa Davis and Tyler Shane Lowe; three great-grandchildren; two sisters, Irene Jones of Seaford and Emma J. Naggy of Milford; a stepson, Philip Benton of Laurel; a stepdaughter, Teresa L. Benton of Millsboro; and six sisters-in-law. He is also survived by several nieces, nephews

and cousins. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by a brother, George C. Naggy. The funeral was held Tuesday, April 7 at Short Funeral Home in Delmar. The Rev. Donna McEntee, chaplain for Compassionate Care Hospice, officiated. Interment was private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Compassionate Care Hospice Foundation, 31038 Country Garden Blvd., Suite D-2, Country Garden Business Center, Dagsboro, DE 19939. Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.shortfh.com.

Betty J. West, 79

Betty J. West of Millsboro, passed away on Thursday, April 2, 2009. She was born on July 1, 1929, a daughter of Lawrence and Helen Baker Joseph. She was a homemaker and her interests revolved around her family. She adored her family, which was her entire world. She enjoyed mystery shows and crossword puzzles. She loved watching deer, and her gardens and rosebushes. She was deeply loved by her family, and will be greatly missed. She was preceded in death by her beloved husband, Clifford, in 2003; and a brother, Lawrence Joseph. She is survived by one son, Steven West and wife, Theresa, of Georgetown; two daughters, Lutitia West of Millsboro and Sandra Beatty of Laurel; a sister, Joyce West of Bridgeville; two grandchildren, Cody and Shelby; and many close friends and extended family. She is also survived by her feline friend, “Maggie.” The funeral was held Tuesday, April 7, at Watson Funeral Home in Millsboro. The Rev. Kenny Dodd officiated.

Anna Belle Pryor Hagelin, 86

Anna Belle Pryor Hagelin of Seaford passed away on Monday, April 6, 2009, at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. Born in Elkneck, Md., the daughter of the late Arthur John and Mary McKinney Pryor, Anna was a graduate of Elkton High School. She attended nursing school at Franklin Square Hospital in Baltimore where she received her RN license. While working at Anne Arundel Hospital in Annapolis, Md., she met and married Carl O. Hagelin. After his retirement, they lived in Kill Devil Hills, N.C. before settling in Seaford which has been their home for 23 years. She is survived by her loving husband of 63 years; her son, Karl and his wife, Holly of Stevensville, Md.; daughterin-law, Cindy of Ypsilanti, Mich.; three grandchildren, Michelle Lawrence, John Hagelin and Mathew Hagelin; four greatgrandchildren, Katie, Becky, Summer and Michael; nieces, Ida Bonsall and Mary Gonce; and nephew, Jim Gonce. In addition to her parents, she was also preceeded in death by her daughter, Anna Belle and son, J. Kevin. Services will be private. In lieu of

flowers, contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society, Mid-Atlantic Division, 1138 Parsons Rd., Salisbury, MD 21801. Arrangements are by WatsonYates Funeral Home, Seaford.

Ella Mae Hitch, 78

Ella Mae Hitch of Laurel passed away at her home on Saturday, April 4, 2009, surrounded by her loving family. Mrs. Hitch was born in Gumboro, a daughter of Lester J. and Eva Dennis. She was a homemaker who loved to spend time with her family, especially her grandchildren. She was a member of Central Worship in Laurel. She was preceded in death by her husband, Cecil R. Hitch; a son, David Dennis; a sister, Alice Walls; and brothers, Tommy Dennis and Lester Dennis. She is survived by her daughter, Crystal Chambers; three granddaughters, Heather, Christina and Amber Chambers; greatgranddaughter, Nyia Lopez; two brothers, Robert Dennis and wife, Barbara and William Dennis of Virginia; sister, Helen Cobb and husband, Harvey of Chesapeake, Va.; and several nieces and nephews. The funeral was held at Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home in Laurel on Wednesday, April 8. The Rev. Tim Dukes officiated. Interment followed in Odd Fellows Cemetery, Laurel.

The Family of

Ronald L. “Ron” Bounds

would like to thank everyone for the prayers, calls, visits, food, flowers and cards received after his death. A special thank you to the doctors, nurses and EMT’s who attended to Ron in the ambulance and at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital’s Emergency Room, I.C.U. and O.R. for the care Ron received during his admission and stay.

Where Can I Make Those Copies I Need? ¢

10 each*

*8 1/2 x 11 white copy

Morning Star Publications, Inc. 951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 629-9788

Death Notices Howard J. Mason, 81

Howard J. Mason of Seaford, died Thursday, April 2, 2009, at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. The funeral was Monday, April 6 at Mt. Olivet United Methodist Church, Seaford. Burial was in Odd Fellows Cemetery, Laurel.

Earl Price, 74

Earl Price of Laurel passed away on Saturday, April 4, 2009. All services were private. Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home in Laurel is serving the family.

Melissa VanderHoeven, 34

Melissa VanderHoeven of Galestown, Md. and Laurel, passed away at her home in Galestown on March 30, 2009. Services were private.

Thank You The family of Phillip BenjaminL owe thanksthe entire community for your love and support during Phillip’s illness and since his death. Your cards, phone calls, donations, and especially your prayers have meant so much to us. A special thank you to Rev. Wayne Grier and Rev. Kevin English for their visits and for a wonderful celebration of Phillip’s life, and to the ladies of Centenary United Methodist Church for a delicious meal following the service.

We could not have gotten through this difficult time without faith and your support. Amanda and Taylor Lowe Lynn and Dale Twilley &f amily Ben and Linda Lowe & family Randy and Ann Lee & family


PAGE 30

MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

Entertainment Polynesian dancers will perform

Watch the Polynesian Paradise Dancers perform at Delaware Tech on Sunday, April 26 at 1 p.m.

The Polynesian Paradise Dancers, a professional Polynesian dance company, will present a vibrant, high-energy performance on Sunday, April 26 at 1 p.m. in the theatre of the Arts & Science Center at Delaware Technical & Community College in Georgetown. The southern California group, formed in 1993 by Akemi Welsh, specializes in the traditional and modern dances of Hawaii, Tahiti, New Zealand and Samoa. One of the most-sought after shows of this nature, the Polynesian Paradise Dancers have been highlighted in movie premiers, including Adam Sandler’s “50 First Dates” and “Disney’s Lilo & Stitch,” in television, at Elvis Presley’s Graceland and more. In addition to numerous special engagements, the dance company has completed nine international tours and a 58-city tour in the United States.

Guys & Dolls

From left, Rebecca Burns, Judy Venturini, Aimee String and Tara Jones rehearse a scene from the upcoming PPP production of Guys & Dolls.

Tickets are becoming a scarce commodity for the Possum Point Players production of Guys and Dolls which opens on Friday, April 17 at 8 p.m. and runs through Sunday, April 26 at 2 p.m.

Wine Tasting Friday 3-6

Beringer

Wt Zin, Wt. Merlot, Pinot Grigio

8

$ 99 1.5

Ch. St. Michelle Reisling

7

$ 99 750 Rudolf Muller Reisling......................... 750 $799 Bed Rock Merlot ....................................... 750 $899 337 Cab ......................................................... 750 $999 Yellow Tail ................................................ 1.5 $1099 Bella Sera Pinot Grigio ........................... 1.5 $999 Redwood All Varietals ........................... 1.5 $999 Corbett Canyon................................... 1.5 $599 Coppola (Diamond) Cab & Merlot. 750 $1399 Oyster Bay Chard, Sauv Blanc . 750 $1099

The exotic, beautiful dancers accompanied by resounding drum beats, fire and mesmerizing choreography will stir your spirit and delight you with an amazing, unforgettable performance. Nine members of the group will be present at the Delaware Tech performance including: six dancers, two drummers and one fire performer. For more information on the Polynesian Paradise Dancers, visit www.polynesianparadise.net. Tickets are $20 for adults, $15 for senior citizens age 60+ and students with ID (must be presented at the door), and $10 for children 12 and younger. Proceeds from the performance will benefit Owens Campus students. Visit www.dtcc.edu/ ppdtickets to buy your tickets online or call 302-855-1617, Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Purchased tickets will be available for pick up in the theatre lobby prior to the performance. Performances are at 8 p.m. on April 17, 18, 24 & 25, and at 2 p.m. on Sunday, April 19 and 26. Tickets are $20 or $19 for seniors and students. For tickets, call the Possum Ticketline at 302-856-4560.

Wild Horse Cab, Merlot .................. 750 $1999 Gouquenheim Cab, Melbec .............. 750 $699 Gnarly All Varietals .................................. 750 $999 Vendage All Varietals.............................. 1.5 $699 Jadet Beau Lais Village .................. 750 $999 Bogle Zin................................................... 750 $1099 Ronbauer Zin ....................................... 750 $2299 Rosen Blum All Varietals ...................... 750 $999 Baywood Pinot Noir ......................... 750 $1099 Kahlua ........................................................ 750 $1899 Bailey's Irish Cream ....................... 750 $1899 Crown Royal ...................................... 1.75 $3899 CORONA, LT 2/12 BTL. ................$1299+ MILLER, LT 24 LOOSE BTL.......$1699+ BUD LT, ROLLING ROCK, $ 99+ 24 LOOSE BTL. ....................................

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We’ll MatCh COMPetitORs lOCal PRiCes. Just BRing in the ad.

10% Off Mixed Cases of Wine. Regular Price Only.

We reserve the right to limit quantities. Not responsible for typographical errors. Local pricing.

NyloN Package Store 730 Sussex Ave., Seaford, DE (Stein Hwy., Behind PNC Bank) • 302-629-8875

SALE PRICES GOOD THURSDAY, APRIL 9 THRU SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009 THURS. FRI. SAT. SUN. MON. TUES. WED. APRIL 16 APRIL 17 APRIL 18 CLOSED APRIL 20 APRIL 21 APRIL 22 APRIL 23 APRIL 24 APRIL 25


Monday-Thursday: Buy 1 Lg Pizza w/1 Topping, Get 1 Sm. Cheese FREE Fri.: Buy 2 Lg., 1 Top. Pizza, Get $2 OFF Saturday-Sunday: Buy Lg Pizza w/1 Topping, Get 6 Wings FREE.

Open Easter Full Menu

Serving H am & Candied Ya ms All Day

Stoves (Gas & Electric), Washers & Dryers Mobile Home Air Conditioners & Furnaces. All With Warranties!

Homemade Desserts: Tiramisu, Baklava, Cheesecake, Rice Pudding Cannoli, Chocolate Cake Try Our Homemade Homemade JUMBO Soups

Lunch & Dinner Specials

LUMP CRAB CAKES

Carry Out Available

411 N. Central Ave., Laurel, Del. OPEN 7 DAYS

302-877-0660

APPLIANCE SALE! Reconditioned Refrigerators, Sam’s Furniture 302-934-1777

30203 Mitchell Street, Millsboro, Delaware Open 9-6 Tues-Fri; Sat 9-4 , Closed Sun & Mon

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE $8,000 TAX STIMULUS OFFER THIS YEAR. 302

629-3244

MEN WOMEN CHILDREN Cuts • Perms • Color • Foiling Highlighting • Facial Waxing Ear Piercing

INTEREST RATES CURRENTLY UNDER 5%. FHA APPROVED.

324 East Stein Highway Seaford, DE

E WE’R ! N I G DEAL

Day and Evening Hours Appointments & Walk-Ins

John Burton Manor Starting below

$200,000

Happy Easter Easter Plants and Arrangements

Fresh Flowers • Balloons • Plants • Fruit Baskets • Snack Baskets New Laurel Location Sympathy Arrangements • Grave Blankets Solar Powered Eternal Lights PLACE YOUR ORDER FOR DELIVERY

WWW.KITTYSFLOWERS.COM SALISBURY, MD

302

LAUREL, DE

875-7600

800

800-255-8200

Road (by American Legion), Left on John B Drive.

Laurel Dutch Inn South Central Ave., Laurel, DE

Breakfast Buffet $ 7 am - 11 am

Easter Sunday

699

Includes: Eggs, Ham, Pancakes, French Toast, Bacon Scrapple, Sausage, Home Fries, Chip Beef and Beverage

$

1299

Includes: Turkey, Ham, Baby Back Ribs, Dressing, Vegetables, Soup and Salad Bar and Beverage Kids 6 & Under Eat FREE

OCEAN PINES, MD

252-8897

Monday thru Friday 9 am to 6 pm • Saturday 9 am to 3 pm

Please call ahead to make reservations: 875-7158

Fisher Auto Parts Wishing All Our Customers and Friends A Very Happy Easter! Georgetown

Millsboro

211 W Market St (302)856- 9591

422 Union St (302)934- 8088

Lewes

Milton

18421 Coastal Hwy (302)645- 2816

221 Ellendale Rd (302)684- 3077

404 N Central Ave (302)875- 5951

414 Rehoboth Ave. Models open weekends 12-4 pm or call Jim at 302-542-5088 for a private Rehoboth Beach, DE 19971 showing. Rt. 24 East Thru Millsboro, Right on Legion

DINNER BUFFET

204 Delaware Ave • Next to Towne Package Store

Laurel

MANN & SONS, INC.

3 or 4 bedroom stick built homes on ½ acre lots. Model homes available now or new homes in 60 days. Low HOA fee, minimum community restrictions, very conveniently located.

DINNER SPECIALS

Prime Rib ................. $12.99 Petite Delmonico & 1/4lb Steamed Shrimp ....... $14.99 T-Bone Steak ............ $13.99 1/2lb Steamed Shrimp ....................... $9.99 Stuffed Shrimp ......... $15.99 Fried Jumbo Shrimp . $14.99 Fried Seafood Combo ...................... $15.99 Eastern Shore Platter ...................... $14.99 Fried Oysters ............ $10.99 Broiled Scallops ........ $11.99 Stuffed Flounder....... $15.99 Specials Include 2 Vegetables

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FRESH SEAFOOD Sale Ends Saturday, April 11

Mon. - Thurs. 10-6, Fri. & Sat. 10-7

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302

492-0444

800

504 Bridgeville Road, Seaford, DE www.harborhouseseafood.com Fax: 302-629-0745


PAGE 32

MORNING STAR

• APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

Classifieds

FREE CLASSIFIEDS*

(For Subscribers - Personal Use Only)

MOTORCYCLES/ REC VEHICLES

*Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

2008 FLY SCOOTER, 50 cc motor, $1800. 846-9880. 4/9

Line ads ($9.00 minimum)

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES

Not responsible for typographical errors after first insertion

‘79 SEAFORD YEAR BOOK, Aloha, $40. 3988915. 4/9

Deadline: Monday, 2 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch

Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.50/inch Legals: $6.50 per inch

629-9788

Call: Or E-mail: ads@mspublications.com LOST

COMPUTERS

SPECIALTY DE TAG # 57920, white w/duck design. $750 value, make offer. 629-2796. 4/2

5-HORNED SHEEP, mother & 2 spotted babies. Lost nr. Shiloh Woods, Laurel. If you have info, please call 877-0982. 3/26

RICHARD PETTY & Dover Racing Soda Btls., $5 per 6 pk. Children’s metal mechanical Spinning Top from 60’s, $7. 398-0309. 3/5

FOUND TAN CHIHUAHUA MIX MALE, found at Carvel Gardens, Laurel, 3/24. 6824445. 4/9

GIVE-AWAY ABOVE GROUND POOL, 16X32, must remove. 6292292. 4/2

HELP WANTED

EMPLOYMENT WANTED LIC. CNA looking to sit with young & young-at-heart. Please call before 8 pm, 875-0964. 3/26

SERVICES Seeking talented and creative counselors for Summer 2009. Group Leaders Specialists Assistant Counselors Counselors in Training Interested candidates can learn more and apply at www.campodyssey.org/ jeffersonschool F/T Mobile Tech wanted ASAP. Must have experience in Restaurant equipment repair,HVAC,electrica l,plumbing. Call John 443324-4050. 4/9/2tp

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

SPRING CLEAN UP! I’ll rake leaves, clean gutters, mow grass. Reasonable rates, ref. avail. Call Terry, 629-7056 or cell: 858-1005. 4/9/2t

SERVICES WANTED PART-TIME PERSON WANTED for handiman yard work. Must have own transportation. 629-4529. 4/2/2t NEED HELP to do yard work & misc. chores outside. Laurel area. 8750747. 3/26

AUTOMOTIVE

Join my

MAZDA MIATA FACTORY CAR COVER, like new, rarely used, cost $179, asking $75. 629-8081. 2/26

Barbara, AVON rep., for info:

INFINITY CAR SPEAKERS, 6x9, $25 pr. 8757775. 2/26

Would you like to earn extra money?

AVON team. Call

858-6799

1915 NAT’L. CASH REGISTER, all bronze, model 366, works! $550. 875-7531 or 875-5164. 4/2

Subscribe 629-9788

‘BOZO GOES to the Dog Show’ Book & Record set Beautiful illustrations, w/7” record. $25 set. 398-0309. 3/5

FOR SALE ALUMINUM LADDER, 24’, good cond., $65 OBO. 8754668. 4/9 RIDING LAWN MOWER, John Deere LT160, 42” cut 16hp, auto shift, like new, $850. 745-5659. 4/9 TRIPLE HARD BAGGER for Craftsman Mower, 9 bushels for 42/48 deck, cost $375, Asking $125. 629-8081. 4/9 TOOLS, Skil battery drill, elec. drill, gas weed wacker, gas sm. tiller, 875-0393, lv. msg. 4/9 WEDDING GOWN, white, floor length, satin w/seethru lace, long sleee, scalloped neck line & bodice & pearls. Chest 38”, hips 34”, exc. cond., $40 firm. 6294225. 4/2

PANASONIC DIGITAL CAMCORDER, many features w/cape, long life batteries, charger & case, $100. 875-1877. 4/2 MINOLTA CAMERAS, exc. cond. Maxx Model 400 SI 35mm film, w/AF28-80 zoom lens, exc. cond., $90. Maxx SXI film, w/AF-105 zoom lens, $100. 875-1877. 4/2 DVDs, horror & SciFi, some new, $3 ea. Romance & Mystery books, $3 bag. 875-3744. 3/26 WASHERS & DRYERS for sale. Repairs done also. 629-9809. 3/26/2t PSE COMPOUND BOW, left hand, 8 carbon arrows, pendulum sight w/light, 3D deer target, $275. 6283724. 3/26 ROLL-AWAY BED, exc. cond., $50. 875-1210. 3/26 26” MONGOOSE BICYCLE, 21 spd. mountain bike, $125. 398-0309. 3/19 USED SUNDAY SCHOOL MATERIALS. Pre K - middle school. Great for your church, VBS or mission. 628-9922. 3/12 REFRIGERATOR: 2006 25 cu. ft. s/b/s GE, perfect condition, best offer. 337-3909. 3/12 VCR TAPES, full length movies, 3 on ea, $50¢ ea. tape. 628-8546. 3/12 FIREWOOD, 1/2 cord, hardwood, cut to 16”, $30. 846-9788. 3/12 LARSON STORM DOOR, white, new, still in box, $60. 846-9788. 3/12 METAL FRAME for Portable Garage, 20’L x 10’W, $65. 875-8197. 3/5 2 OLD WOODEN CABINETS, $60 both. 21x27 gold frame painting by Robert Wood $125. Exercise bike, $75. 875-5277. 3/5

KENMORE DEHUMIDIFIER, 35 pint, used 1 week, $125. 628-1815. 4/2

ANIMALS, ETC.

EMPIRE GAS LOG HEATER w/logs & lava rocks. Vent free, no odor, natural or propane, $300. 6282166. 4/2

BABY GOATS, Bore-Nubian Cross, will be ready for easter, your choice. Taking deposits, $45 Billy, $50 Nanny. 249-6058. 3/12/4t

19” COLOR TV w/built-in DVD player, $50. 877-0644 eve. after 7. 4/2

SHO TERRIOR PUPPIES, male & female, 3 mos. old, $60 ea. 536-1057. 3/12

LEGALS NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Northwest Fork Hundred Case No. 10395 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article IV, Subsection 115-20, Item A(1)(h) of said ordinance of JOHN AND KIM WILKERSON who are seeking a variance from the maximum age requirement for placement of a manufactured home, to be located southeast intersection of Road 30 and Road 31, being Lot 3. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, MAY 4, 2009, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 4/9/1tc NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Broad Creek Hundred Case No. 10396 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article IV, Subsection 115-25, Item A(1) of said ordinance of LAUREL GRAIN CO. who are seeking a variance from the minimum lot width requirement for a parcel, to be located north of Road 28, 1,219 feet west of U.S. Route 13. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, MAY 4, 2009, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hear-

ing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 4/9/1tc PUBLIC NOTICE City of Seaford Annual Municipal Election CANCELLED As of March 27, 2009 at 5 p.m., only the incumbent candidates have filed for election. Councilwoman Grace S. Peterson Councilman William G. Bennett The City of Seaford’s Annual Municipal Election scheduled to be held on April 18, 2009 is hereby being cancelled as per Delaware Law, Chapter 75; Section 7555. All of the incumbent candidates filed for re-election and had no formal opponents file for election prior to the March 27, 2009 deadline for candidate filing. Therefore, the incumbents may assume office without the holding of a formal election. Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager 4/2/2tc LEGAL NOTICE ON APRIL 28, 2009 at 11:00 a.m., Laurel Storage Center, Road 468, Laurel, DE will conduct a sale pursuant to Title 25, DEL. C. ANN. 4904-4905. The contents of the following bins will be sold: Bin(s): #39 Skeeter Milburn; #7 Frances H. Bishop; #70 Susan Eudy; #10 Zina Delrosario; #59 Jean DeMatteo; #86 Joan Davis; #146 Ethel Anderson; #209 Tracy Kefauver. BIDDERS: Call office on day of sale to confirm, (302) 875-5931. 4/2/2tc PUBLIC HEARING The Commissioners of Bridgeville will hold a Public Hearing and present a Resolution authorizing the closure and donation of a portion of Union Alley to the Bridgeville Volunteer Fire Company at their monthly meeting, which is scheduled for April 13, 2009. The meeting begins at 7:00 P.M. and takes place at the Town Hall, 101 N. Main Street, Bridgeville, Delaware. COMMISSIONERS OF BRIDGEVILLE BONNIE WALLS, TOWN MANAGER 4/2/2tc See LEGALS—page 33


MORNING STAR NOTICE

Estate of Robert R. Gerke, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Robert R. Gerke who departed this life on the 11th day of March, A.D. 2009 late of Bridgeville, DE were duly granted unto Richard Gerke on the 26th day of March, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 11th day of November, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Richard Gerke 73 Bozarthtown Rd. Tabernacle, NJ 08088 Attorney: Michele Procino Wells, Esq. Procino Wells, LLC 225 High St. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 4/9/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Samuel James Moore, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Samuel James Moore who departed this life on the 26th day of February, A.D. 2009 late of Bethel, DE were duly granted unto Tina Marie Thomas on the 18th day of March, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 26th day of October, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Tina Marie Thomas 7542 Rivershore Dr. Seaford, DE 19973 Attorney: Lawrence B. Steele, III, Esq. P.O. Box 799 Georgetown, DE 19947 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 4/2/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of William H. Ash, Jr., Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of William H. Ash, Jr. who departed this life on the 21st day of February, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Brenda Adams on the 12th

day of March, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 21st day of October, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Brenda Adams 4 Quail Ridge Road Milford, DE 129963 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 3/26/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Margaret J. Carmean, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Margaret J. Carmean who departed this life on the 26th day of February, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Todd J. Carmean on the 12th day of March, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 26th day of October, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Todd J. Carmean 28616 Seaford Road Laurel, DE 19956 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 3/26/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Ruthie Arizona Allen, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Ruthie Arizona Allen who departed this life on the 26th day of February, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Darrell L. Morgan on the 17th day of March, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 26th day of October, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Darrell L. Morgan 6026 Old Sharptown Road Laurel, DE 19956 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 3/26/3tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land with the improvements thereon erected, situated in Cedar Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware; lying on the south side of Adams Drive, being all of lot #46, as laid out in “EASTMAN HEIGHTS, Block B” subdivision, as shown on a plan recorded in Plot Book #8, Page #156; being bounded on the north by lot #5, on the east by lot #45, on the south by Adams Drive and on the west by lot #47; and being more particularly described in accordance with a recent survey by Robert L. Neely, Professional Engineer, dated April 20, 2007, as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a point, a found iron pin, in the north line of Adams Drive (50 feet wide) at a corner for this lot and lot #47; Thence running from the point of beginning with the line of lot #47, North 39 degrees 24 minutes 01 seconds West 159.76 feet to a point at a corner for lot #5, said point being a power pole in the center of a 20 foot wide drainage easement; thence turning and running with line of lot #5 and said 20 foot wide easement, North 50 degrees 36 minutes 23 seconds East 100.00 feet to a found iron pin, at a corner for lot #45; thence turning and running with the line of lot #45, South 39 degrees 24 minutes 01 seconds East 159.77 feet to a found iron pipe, at a corner for lot #45 in the north line of Adams Drive; thence turning and running with north line of Adams Drive, South 50 degrees 36 minutes 46 seconds West 100.00 feet to the point and place of beginning and containing within said metes and bounds 15,976 square feet of land, be the same more or less. BEING the same lands and premises which Suzanne R. Grenier, by Deed dated April 27, 2007 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3445, Page 76, did grant and convey unto Stacey Vaneiken. Tax Parcel: 3-30-11.1775.00 Property Address: 607

• APRIL 9 - 15, 2009 Adams Drive, Milford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 4, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 8, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of STACY & (STACEY) VANEIKEN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land with the improvements thereon erected situate in Cedar Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, lying at the northwest corner of the intersection of Old Shawnee Road (County Road 619) and Sunset Lane; being all of Lot 10 as shown on a plan of Evergreen Acres Subdivision recorded in Plot Book 2 Page 69 and being more particularly bounded and

PAGE 33 described in accordance with a recent survey by William L. Sapp, Professional Land Surveyor, dated July 3, 1997, as follows to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pin found at a corner for this lot and the intersection of the northwesterly line of Old Shawnee Road (60 feet wide) with the northeasterly line of Sunset Lane (44 feet wide); thence along the northeasterly line of Sunset Lane at a corner for Lot 20; thence along line of Lot 20 North 34 degrees 25 minutes and 00 seconds East 87.00 feet to an iron pin set at a corner for Lot 20, Lot 21 and Lot 9; thence along line of Lot South 55 degrees 35 minutes 00 seconds East 140.00 feet to an iron pipe found at a corner for Lot 9 in the northwesterly line of Old Shawnee Road; thence along the northwesterly line of Old Shawnee Road South 34 degrees 25 minutes 00 seconds West 87.00 feet to the place of beginning. BEING the same lands and premises which Bruce C. Wells and Marlene B. Wells did by deed dated July 12th, 1997 and recorded in the office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 2216 Page 6 did grant and convey unto Freddie L. Walker and Leatta A. Walker. Tax Parcel: 1-30-3.0716.00 Property Address: 5888 Old Shawnee Road, Milford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 4, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 8, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented

to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LEATTA A. & FREDDIE L. WALKER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred,, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being more particularly described as follows, to BEGINNING at an iron pipe (set) on the Southerly side of Sussex County Road No. 493 (80’ R/W), said iron pipe being a comer for these lands and located at the intersection of Sussex County Road No. 493 and Sussex County Road No. 492A (50’ R/W); thence turning and running along these lands and Sussex County Road No. 492A, South 04 degrees 29 minutes 20 seconds east 218.91 feet to a point; thence continuing with Sussex County Road No. 492A and the curve thereof, having a radius of 713.02 feet, a delta angle of 14 degrees 46 minutes 21 seconds, a length of 183.84 and a chord bearing of South 02 degrees 53 minutes 50 seconds West 183.33 feet to a point and ending of curve; thence continuing along these lands and said Sussex County Road No. 492A, South 10 degrees 17 minutes 00 West 37.64 feet to a concrete monument (found), said monument being a corner for these lands and lands now or formerly of Maurice Kevin and Melinda R. Tingle; thence turning and running along these lands and lands now or formerly of said Tingle lands, South 76 degrees 11 See LEGALS—page 34


PAGE 34 LEGALS - from Page 33 minutes 00 seconds west 220.00 feet to a concrete monument (found), said monument being a corner for these lands and lands now or formerly of William L. and Florence Pedersen; thence turning and running along these lands and said Pedersen lands, North 04 degrees 10 minutes 29 seconds West 440.03 feet to a concrete monument (found) on the South side of Sussex County Road No. 493, said concrete monument being a corner for these lands and said Pedersen lands; thence turning and running along these lands and the Southerly side of County Road No. 493, North 77 degrees 59 minutes 00 seconds east 250.00 feet to the iron pipe (set), the point and place of beginning, said to contain 2.4367 acres, more or less, together with all improvements thereon, as is more fully shown upon reference to a survey prepared by Miller-Lewis, Inc., dated April 15, 2004. BEING the same lands and premises which Linda K. Christophel, by Deed dated April 23, 2004 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2970, Page 32, did grant and convey unto Christopher R. Wilder and Stacy Giordano Wilder. Tax Parcel: 4-32-3.0024.02 Property Address: 30836 S. Shell Bridge Road, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 4, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 8, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of

MORNING STAR sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of CHRISTOPHER R. & STACY GIORDANO WILDER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate on the Easterly side of Chandler Street, in the city of Seaford, Sussex County, State of Delaware, and more particularly described as follows: BEGINNNG at a concrete monument found lying on the easterly right-of-way line of Chandler Street, said concrete monument found being a corner for this land and for lands now or formerly of Mary Chapman; thence by and with aforesaid Chandler Street North 39 degrees 12 minutes 13 seconds East 80.11 feet to an iron stob found; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this lands and for lands formerly of Better Homes of Seaford Inc., South 49 degrees 02 minutes 10 seconds East 100.84 feet to a concrete monument found; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this land and lands now or formerly of Better Homes of Seaford, Inc. South 39 degrees 42 minutes 15 West 80.09 feet to a concrete monument found; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for land and lands now or formerly of Mary Chapman North 49 degrees 02 minutes 10 seconds West 100.14 feet home to the place of beginning said to contain 8,046 square feet of land more or less as shown on a survey prepared by Temple-Sellers, Inc. dated September 12, 2001. BEING the same lands

and premises which Christian V. Elbert by Deed dated October 29, 2001 of Record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware in Deed Book 2645, page 333, did grant and convey unto Jarvis L. Ross. Tax Parcel: 3-31-5.203.00 Property Address: 15 Chandler Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 4, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 8, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JARVIS L. ROSS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece and parcel of land, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County and State of Dela-

• APRIL 9 - 15, 2009 ware, being designated as Lot #4 on a Plot of COUNTRY ACRES, of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County in Plot Book 76, Page 291 and being mote particularly described in accordance with a survey prepared by John H. Plummer and Assoc., Inc., dated July 20, 2005, as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at an iron rod/cap found on the southerly right of way line of Country Court (50 feet R1W) marking a comer for this parcel and a comer for Lot #5; thence proceeding by and with the southerly right of way line of Country Court the following three courses and distances: (l) defecting with a curve having a radius of 175.00 feet an arc distance of 21.72 feet to an iron rod/cap found; (2) defecting with a curve with a radius of 25.00 feet an arc distance of 28.01 feet to an iron rod/cap found; and (3) South 41 degrees 4 minutes 26 seconds East 97.92 feet to an iron rod/cap found marking a corner for this parcel and a comer for Lot #3; thence proceeding by and with the line of Lot No.3, South 29 degrees 36 minutes 11 seconds West 250.31 feet to an iron rod/ cap found marking a corner for this parcel; thence turning and running North 45 degrees 37 minutes 20 seconds West 156.99 feet to an iron rod/cap found marking a comer for this parcel and a corner for Lot #5; thence proceeding by and with the line of Lot #5 North 34 degrees 11 minutes 13 seconds East 223.13 feet home to the iron rod/cap marking the point and place of Beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. AND BEING the same lands conveyed unto Jeffrey T. Benson, Jr. and La’ Glennda K. Benson by deed of Bayland Homes, Inc., dated August 5, 2005 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Deed Book 3182, page 283. Tax Parcel: 3-31-13.00223.00 Property Address: 12179 Country Drive, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required.

The balance is to be paid on or before May 4, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 8, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LA’GLENNDA K. & JEFFREY T. BENSON, JR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Laurel, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, lying on the southerly side of Eighth Street Extended, and being known as Lot R-13-A as shown on a plat of lots entitled “Town of Laurel Resubdivision (L.E. Parsons)”, said plat recorded in Georgetown, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in plat book 13, page 43. AND BEING the same lands and premises which Mayor and Council of Laurel by deed dated May 23, 1980 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Record 1012, Page 261 did grant and convey unto REBECCA J. SMITH, in fee. Tax Parcel: 4-32-8.0631.00 Property Address: 603 West 8th Street, Laurel Registration is required

for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 4, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 8, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of REBECCA J. SMITH and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain piece, parcel and tract of land lying and being situate in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being described more particularly: BEGINNING at an Iron pipe (found) on the northerly right-of-way line of Sussex County Road #454A (50’ R/W); said pipe being situate westerly 0.24 miles, more or less, from the rightof-way of U.S. Road #13; thence with the right-of-way line of Sussex County Road #454A North 76°·08’-48” See LEGALS—page 36


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PAGE 36 LEGALS - from Page 34 East a distance of 117.13 feet to an iron pipe (set); thence with the lands of Robert F. Kelly, Jr., now or formerly, North 13°-45’00” West a distance of 218.11 feet to an iron rod (found); thence continuing with the said Kelly lands North 76°-17’-17” West a distance of 150.00 feet to an iron rod (found); thence with the lands of Ella M. & Robert L. Disharoon, now or formerly, North 13°41’-30” East a distance of 79.73 feet to an iron pipe (found); thence continuing with the said Disharoon lands North 76°-16’¬20” West a distance of 142.79 feet to an iron pipe (found); thence with the lands of Doris A. Bailey, now or formerly, North 15°-07’-13” East a distance of 975.55 feet to a gum tree guarded by iron axle; thence with the lands of ANBR, LLC, now or formerly, South 73°11’-28” East a distance of 250.06 feet to an iron pipe (found); thence continuing with the said ANBR, LLC lands and A & S Real Estate, LLP, now or formerly, South 79°-22’.58” East a distance of 722.89 feet to an iron pipe (found); thence with the lands of Ronald K. Bridge, now or formerly, South 10°.39’.43” West a distance of 516.31 feet to an iron pipe (set); thence with the lands of Gregory D. & Carolyn A. Tingle, now or formerly, North 75°·52’¬16” West a distance of 323.40 feet to an iron pipe (found); thence continuing with the said Tingle lands South 14°.07’.20” West a distance of 450.80 feet to an iron pipe (found), thence with lands of Kenneth E. Groce & Linda A. Skelley, now or formerly, North 75°.16’-08” West a distance of 150.00 feet to an iron rod (found); thence with the lands of David L & Strachan & Barbara J. Berry, now or formerly, North 76°.09’-34” West a distance of 150.03 feet to an iron pipe (found); thence continuing with the said Berry lands South 11 °-25’-56” West a distance of 338.20 feet home to the point and place of beginning said to contain 19.687 acres of land, be the same more or less. Tax Parcel: 5-32-13.0052.02 Property Address: 10591 Allens Mill Road, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale

MORNING STAR (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 4, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 8, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DAVID VENABLES and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece and parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the Town of Seaford, County of Sussex and State of Delaware and being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at an iron stob at the intersection of Shipley Street and Juniper Street in said town; thence by and with Juniper Street, South 79 degrees 33 minutes West, 185 feet to an iron spike at the curb base on Juniper Street, a comer for this lot and lands of W.R Breasure; thence by and with these lands and lands of said W.R Breasure, South 12 degrees 00 minutes East, 95 feet to a pipe, a comer for this lot and lands of Albert E. Rosenbauer thence by and with these lands and lands of said Rosenbauer, North 79 degrees 30 minutes East 175 feet to an iron stob

on the southwesterly side of Shipley Street; thence by and with the sidewalk of Shipley Street, North 12 degrees 00 minutes West, 49.80 feet to the iron spike, the place of beginning. Be the contents thereof what they may. Tax Parcel: 5-31-13.1025.00 Property Address: 218 North Shipley Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 4, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 8, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOANN WESCOTT and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being In Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex

• APRIL 9 - 15, 2009 County, Delaware, being designated as Lot #594-E4, shown on the plot of “Newberg Lots”, prepared for Paul Wilson, as surveyed by Coast Survey, Inc,. Land Surveying and Planning, dated November 8, 1992, divided March 16. 1994, filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County. at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 52, page 50, and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a pipe found on the southeasterly right-of-way line of County Road #594 (50 feet wide), a corner for this lot and Lot #594-E-5; thence continuing with said right-ofway north 33 degrees 07 minutes 08 seconds East 300.00 feet to a pipe; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this lot and Lot E-3 South 56 degrees 52 minutes 52 seconds East 525.30 feet (passing over a pipe at 195.00 feet) to a point in the center of Gum Branch Ditch; thence with said Ditch South 29 degrees 23 minutes 05 seconds West 204.20 feet to a point and continuing South 27 degrees 31 minutes 00 seconds West 385.07 feet to a point; thence turning and running by and with Lot E-5 North 22 degrees 55 minutes 28 seconds West 513.82 feet to a pipe: thence continuing on North 22 degrees 55 minutes 28 second West 106.59 feet to a pipe: thence continuing on North 56 degrees 52 minutes 52 second West 150.00 feet to the place of beginning said to contain 5.000 acres more or less. Tax Parcel: 4-30-9.0042.04 Property Address: Not Available Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 4, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 8, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and

3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of REBECCA R. & CHARLES A. HOLLINGSWORTH, II and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being known and designated as Lot #2 on that certain plot entitled “Minor Subdivision of Lands of Shore Properties Partnership” prepared by AKS Associates, Inc. Registered Surveyors, dated September 11, 2001, and filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 72, Page 239, containing 1.03 acres of land, more or less, as reference thereunto being had will more fully and at large appear. Being the same land and premises described by Deed from Shore Properties Partnership, dated November 4, 2002 and recorded November 8, 2002 in the Sussex County Clerk’s Office in Deed Book 2770, Page 108, conveyed said property unto Glenn E. Thomas and Kathy L. Thomas, in fee. Being the same land and premises described by Deed from Glenn E. Thomas and Kathy L. Thomas, dated July 21, 2005 and recorded August 10, 2005 in the Sussex County Clerk’s Office in Deed Book 3182, Page 153, conveyed said property unto Jason Thomas and Mollie A. Thomas,

in fee. Tax Parcel: 3-31-4.0060.02 Property Address: 10149 Old Furnace Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 4, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 8, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JASON & MOLLIE A. THOMAS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situated in a Subdivision known as GREEN ACRES, Seaford Hundred. Sussex County, Delaware, being all of LOT #53, as shown on a plan recorded in Deed record #310, page 540, being more See LEGALS—page 37


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 36 recently shown on a plot of Elliot Surveying dated May 27, 1996, said lot lying on the Northerly side of Garden Lane (40 feet wide) and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a point on the Northerly side of Garden Lane, a corner for this lot and Lot #52, said point being located North 69 degrees 12 minutes West 2,457.61 feet from the Northwesterly corner of the intersection of Route #13-A and Garden Lane; thence from the said point of beginning, the following four courses and distances: 1) North 69 degrees 12 minutes West 50 feet, measured along the Northerly side of Garden Lane, to a point, a corner for Lot #54; thence with the same; 2) North 20 degrees 48 minutes East 150 feet to a point in the line of lands of others; thence with the same; 3) South 69 degrees 12 minutes East 50 feet to a point, a corner for Lot #52; thence with the same; 4) South 20 degrees 48 minutes West 150 feet to a point, the point and place of beginning. Containing within said metes and bounds 7,500 square feet of land, more or less, together with the improvements located thereon, as surveyed by Walter R. Todd, Registered Surveyor, dated July 11, 2007. Being the same lands and premises which Barbara Ann Delisi, did grant and convey unto Peggy A. Collison, by deed dated July 27, 2007 and recorded on August 1, 2007 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3480 at Page 184. Tax Parcel: 3-31-3.00227.00 Property Address: 8555 Garden Lane, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register.

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TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 4, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 8, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of PEGGY A. COLLISON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece, parcel and tract of land, lying and being situate in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, and the State of Delaware, being depicted on a survey as Parcel 2.02 and consisting of 35.0 I acres more or less with improvement thereon, as survey prepared by Charles D. Murphy Associates, Inc. dated September 20, 2006, of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Plot Book 108, at Page 141. BEING the same land conveyed unto Jason C. Clagg and Jennifer J. Clagg, his wife, by deed of Noble M. Schuyler dated June 15, 2006, of record in the Office of the Recorder

of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 3323 at Page 201. Being the same lands and premises which Noble M. Schuyler, did grant and convey unto Jason C. Clagg and Jennifer J. Clagg, by deed dated June 15, 2006 and recorded on June 19, 2006 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3323 at Page 201. Tax Parcel: 4-30-6.002.02 Property Address: 12935 Lighthouse Lane, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 4, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 8, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JASON C. & JENNIFER J. CLAGG and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/9/2tc

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• APRIL 9 - 15, 2009 SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being all of Lots Nos. 10, 31 and 32 of a Plat of lots laid out by James E. Lloyd, said Plat being of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, at Georgetown. Being the same lands and premises which Kelly Hastings, individually and as Executor of the Estate of Sally E. Garris and Keith L. Hastings, did grant and convey unto Keith L. Hastings, by deed dated April 30, 2004 and recorded on May 19, 2004 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 02980 at Page 203. Tax Parcel: 1-32-6.00169.00 Property Address: 26920 Windsor Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 4, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 8, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited.

PAGE 37 Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of KEITH L. HASTINGS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being known and designated as LOT 44, SHILOH FARMS, a subdivision plot recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 48, Page 52, and in Plot Book 49, Page 196. Being the same lands and premises which David A. Justus and Jeri M. Justus n/k/a Jeri Lynn Miller, did grant and convey unto John M. Irwin and Deborah S. Irwin, by deed dated January 30, 2004 and recorded on February 9 2004 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2941 at Page 63. Tax Parcel: 2-32-14.0080.00 Property Address: 14191 East Court, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 4, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 8, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further

Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOHN M. & DEBORAH S. IRWIN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece, parcel and tract of land lying and being situate in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, known as LOT NO. 11 of “FOREST KNOLL ESTATES” subdivision, and being described more particularly as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe found at the Northeasterly right of way line of Forest Knoll drive (50 foot right of way) at a corner for this lot and Lot No. 10; thence with said right of way line the following two (2) courses and distances: (1) along a curve to the left having a radius of l75 feet, a delta angle of 12 degrees 00 minutes 45 seconds, an arc length 36.69 feet and a chord bearing North 38 degrees 47 minutes 37 seconds West 36.62 feet to a point; (2) North 44 degrees 48 minutes 00 seconds West 91.73 feet to an iron pipe found at a corner for this lot and Lot No. 12; thence with Lot No. 12 North 45 degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds East 275.45 feet to 3n iron pipe found, passing over an iron pipe found at 121.67 feet, at a corner for this lot, Lot No. 12 and in line of lands now or formerly of Charles T. Phillips; thence with the lands now or formerly of Charles T. Phillips South 44 degrees 49 minutes 19 seconds East 187.60 feet to an iron pipe found at a corner for this lot, Lot No. See LEGALS—page 38


pAGE 38 PAGE

MORNING STAR • •ApRIl 9 -915, 2009 APRIL - 15, 2009

LEGALS - from Page 37 10 and in line of lands now or formerly of Charles T. Phillips; thence with Lot No. 10 South 57 degrees 12 minutes 48 seconds West 285.61 feet home, passing over an iron pipe found at 157.30 feet, to the point of beginning, said to contain 1.002 acres of land, be the same more or Jess, as shown on a survey prepared by Miller-Lewis, Inc., dated April 18, 2006. Being the same lands and premises which S & L Contractors, Inc., did grant and convey unto Steven W. Coleman and Carrie M. Coleman, by deed dated April 20, 2006 and recorded on April 25, 2006 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3300 at Page 143. Tax Parcel: 4-32-9.0025.00 Property Address: 33137 Forest Knoll Drive, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 4, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 8, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be

refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of STEVEN W. & CARRIE M. COLEMAN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN lot, piece or parcel of land, situated in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, lying on the south side of Glen Circle, being all of Lot 69 as shown on a plat of “Country Glen” as recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, in Plot Book 57, page 201, being bounded on the north by Glen Circle, on the east by Lot 70, on the south by Lot 60, and on the west by Lot 68, and being more particularly described in accordance with a recent survey by Richard Vetter Land Surveying dated June 20, 2005, as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a set iron pin in the south line of Glen Circle at a corner for this lot and Lot 68; thence running along the south line of Glen Circle, South 65 deg. 36 min. 34 sec. East 125.00 feet to a set iron pin at a corner for this lot and Lot 70; thence turning and running with Lot 70, South 24 deg. 23 min. 26 sec. West, 125.00 feet to a found iron pipe at a common corner

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for this lot, Lot 59 and Lot 60; thence turning and running with Lot 60, North 65 deg. 36 min. 34 sec. West, 125.00 feet to a found iron pin at a common corner for this lot, Lot 61, and Lot 68; thence turning and running with Lot 68, North 24 deg. 23 min. 26 sec. East, 125.00 feet to the point and place of beginning and containing 15.625 square feet of land, be the same more or less. Being the same lands and premises which Ronald Boswell and Margaret Boswell, did grant and convey unto Ronald Boswell, Margaret Boswell, and Kimmy Leann Dunbar, by deed dated October 12, 2006 and recorded on October 25, 2006 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3375 at Page 267. Tax Parcel: 4-30-19.00138.00 Property Address: 11856 Glen Circle, Bridgeville Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 4, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 8, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RONALD W. & MARGARET M. BOSWELL & KIMMY DUNBAR and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/9/2tc

The dreaded state sales tax may be needed to combat budget shortfall FREE

CLASSIFIEDS During my time growing up I

Personal forthings you was told thereItems were two rank alio had to do Sale. in life, die and pay taxes. While life eventually comes to No Vendors Please. For years I have been an an end for all of us we now know Call 629-9788, some people because of tax loop advocate of a sales tax ornot send to or their fair holes do pay taxes P.O. Box 1000, Seaeven when I owned my share of taxes. ford, DE 19973. With all states battling budget own business. shortfalls, governors and elected officials are scrambling to make brutal cuts to their budgets to avoid raising taxes. groups, although allowing sports betting To avoid raising taxes revenue projin other states, are saying that would be ilects that were a no no with the Minner legal in Delaware. A group wants to put in administration are now a high priority. I a racing track and casino in eastern Sussex speak of sports betting and building more which would create hundreds of jobs in Personal Itemsgovernor for Sale.Minner held the addition to hundreds of construction jobs. casinos. Former sports movementPlease. hostage during her tenNo Vendors The other casinos object, fearing a dip in ure Call threatening vetoes 629-9788,if legislation allow- their bottom line. ing sports passed. or send to betting P.O. Box 1000, My answer to the budget short fall? Seaford, DE 19973. Governor Jack Markell, faced with a A sales tax. For years I have been an ad$700 million shortfall this year and more vocate of a sales tax even when I owned of the same with future budgets, is strong- my own business. A sales tax is the only ly committed to sports betting, additional tax everyone has to pay; there are no loop slots and building new casinos and adding holes, you pay at the cash register. new table games similar to Las Vegas. This issue has been a no no for years. Although the thought of more gambling Legislators shudder at the thought of instihas upset a few, the majority of Delawartuting a sales tax and the current governor eans seem to support the new governor. said at a recent Chamber luncheon in SeaAll was quiet on the home front until ford that such a tax was not on the table. Markell suggested building more casinos The State Chamber of Commerce will in addition to the three existing gambling argue the loss of revenue to businesses complexes, Harrington, Dover and Branfrom out of state customers who appardywine. Sussex is the only county without ently stream across state lines to buy in a slot complex and race track. Delaware. Now enter rumblings from the three caI seldom travel to PA and I don’t know sinos. Not only does the governor want to how many travel to Delaware to shop. I construct more casinos, he wants to take understand quite a few people walk onto a larger cut from their profits to help balthe ferry from NJ and pick up a shuttle to ance the budget. shop at the outlets. With the tolls being I’m sure bottom lines are being adraised I’m not sure if that is as popular. justed downwards showing how poorly But I do know going to the Centre in the casinos are doing because of competiSalisbury or to the eating places there I tion in PA and soon to be in MD, and the see my share of Delaware tags. With the economy. The purpose of allowing casinos price of gas, time and wear and tear on a in Delaware was to help the failing racvehicle, it’s cheaper to pay the sales tax ing industry because the purses were low shopping at the Centre in Salisbury than a and the better horses went to other states trip to the Dover Mall. The same goes for where winnings were higher. shopping Sam’s in Salisbury vs. Dover. One only needs to visit the casinos and When Wicomico County was giving see new stables, improved facilities, and Sam’s and Walmart a difficult time with luxury-like Vegas slots to see the system their zoning, as Economic Development worked. I am not a regular at the slots and director for Sussex County, I wrote to I do not bet on sports games. But people their corporate headquarters in Bentonhere in our area are betting daily with loville, Ark., offering land across the line in cal bookies. One reader told me he knows Delmar as a tax free opportunity. of one bookie living in the area who sent I think they showed my letter to the two kids to college just taking bets. MD zoning commission, because shortly People sold liquor during Prohibition thereafter the zoning issue was quickly reand people have been betting illegally solved. A sales tax was not an issue. since then. Booze has been legalized, Someday Delaware is going to have why not sports betting? Delaware is one to seriously address the issue of a sales of only four states allowed to have sports tax. We are a small state with no major betting under an old grandfather clause. industry as a base to tax and we can’t keep Not only does the governor have obsqueezing the taxpayers to balance the jectors in the state, but national sports state’s budget. See LEGALS—page 39

FREE CLASSIFIEDS

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MORNING STAR • ApRIl 9 - 15, 2009

pAGE 39

Missing from Country Awards: Country Music Okay, I just want to vent for ony indsor a couple of minutes. I am at the Let’s face it, it is a vidage where I can eo age. Buck Owens easily transcend into the “grumpy would not have stood old man” persona a chance in today’s at the drop of a hat. music business. However, I have spent the last decade 16-year-old Miley Cyrus, sang harboring one of my greatest and the young girls screamed and personal frustrations and it cencried like it was footage from a ters around the annual televised 1960s Beatles concert. “Country Music Awards.” With the exception of a perI come from a long line of formance by George Strait, I country music fans and each heard little that night that remoteyear my mother asked if I will ly reminded me anything of what be watching the Country Music country music has stood for since Awards. its heyday in the 1950s through Each year I tell her “no” and 1970s. explain how the country music The icing on the cake was shows are as much about country watching the legendary performer music as the shuffleboard awards. George Strait lose “Entertainer of I think my frustrations with the Year” to Carrie Underwood. the award shows really gained I will give kudos to the show steam when a number of years for its highlighting of the Trace ago Garth Brooks was on a roll Adkins performance with the getting “Entertainer of the Year” Marine Corp Glee Club in honor time after time. of our nation’s military, this enThese awards were coming to abled support for the “Wounded him during times when he had Warriors Project,” which Atkins not toured or cut a new album supports. at all that year. This angered me My feelings about the Country when he was up against tourMusic Awards are my own. I ing talent like Alan Jackson and recognize that the Country Music George Strait. industry like any other big busiWell, over the years I became ness is doing what it can to make so enraged when watching the money. It is clear that young Country Music Awards that it people probably represent the was suggested that I not do so as largest buying audience when it a means of stress reduction. comes to concerts, CDs, Internet The last show I watched was downloads and entertainer mera stage fiasco that included “Big chandise. and Rich,” “Cowboy Troy” and Traditionally, young people Kid Rock. The performances are not country music’s demowere about as country as a Marigraphic. So, consequently, we lyn Manson concert. have seen country performers This year, my mother came to doing “cross-over” specials on my house to watch the Country MTV and other networks singing Music Awards, which aired on with rock and rap artists. Sunday night. She never misses The Sunday night Country this show each year, so I felt Music Awards were just one obliged to watch some of it with more example of trying to sell her. That was a major mistake. country music to the teenage auI thought perhaps things had dience. It is the art of selling out changed and there may actually at its best. be something unusual to occur, When I was a teen I hated like there may be some country country music. I hated it because music featured on the show. it did not represent anything that The first thing I noticed was I was familiar with. The songs they had built a semi-circular were aimed at everyday working mosh pit in front of the stage folk who were dealing with the and strategically placed young struggles, heartaches and oftenpeople, mostly girls, in that times disappointments of life. venue where they could stand, Yes, these sometimes also cry, scream, wring their hands included the cheating spouse and and wave their arms and hands drunk husband, but these songs in unison like they were at a tent represented a microcosm of life. revival. Therefore, as a teenager I was not I watched as performers, such being courted by country music as 19-year-old Taylor Swift and artists, so I took my interests

T

W

to the Rolling Stones and The Guess Who. Now, country music has abandoned its roots as “Country” music and taken on a desire to be the ultimate cure all for anyone age 10 to 35. If you fall outside of that range, Country Music has little to offer you. In my opinion, youngsters who decide to become country artists should have to name at least three songs from George Jones, Hank Williams, Webb Pierce, Left Frizzell and Merle Haggard before they are allowed to grace the stage of the Grand Ole Opry. The Country Music Awards show should have a special section roped off in front of the stage that is reserved for “The Legends.” When the camera

scans the audience in that section we should see people like Loretta Lynn, Kitty Wells, George Jones, Merle Haggard and Vern Gosdin. These are the people who were country “when country wasn’t cool.” They paved the road and brought “Hillbilly Music” into the living rooms and hearts of people in the city and made it possible for the Taylor Swifts, Miranda Lamberts and Carrie Underwoods to go from the school playground to the Grand Ole Opry. Don’t get me wrong, I am not saying these new artists are not talented. There is no question they have talent, as well as beauty. Let’s face it, it is a video age. Buck Owens would not have

stood a chance in today’s music business. I applaud the talent and the ability to reach the young audience. As a matter of fact Taylor Swift is an extremely gifted song writer and has been since she was 14. But, you are messing with “Country Music” here. To some it may just be a genre of music, but to me and others it is a scared institution. As George Jones once said, “They should come up with a new name for today’s country music, because it is not country music. They are putting out songs today that leave nothing for folks over 40 years old.” I think we can all agree George Jones has earned a right to cast an opinion about Country Music.

PUBLIC AUCTION VALUABLE REAL ESTATE

SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 2009 11:00 A.M. Location: Old Church Landing, Fawn Drive - Lot 41, Laurel, Delaware: Traveling on US 13 in Laurel, Delaware, turn East onto Route 24. Go 1 mile and turn left onto Christ Church Road. Continue 4/10 mile to stop and turn right onto Chipmans Pond Road (Rd. 465). Turn first left into Old Church Landing onto Old Church Landing Road. Continue 3/10 mile and turn right onto Fawn Drive. Proceed to the corner lot which is the third property on right. Signs will be posted.

Tax ID# 2-30-26.00-76.04: Located in the charming Old Church Landing Development, this desirable corner lot contains approximately 1.15 acres of land, more or less. Cleared and ideal for new construction, this property is situated in a quiet, rural setting. The convenient location affords the privacy and beauty of a country lot, while providing easy access to many major routes and destinations. Owner: Bruce Rickards Real Estate Terms: Purchaser shall pay $20,000 down payment day of sale

with cash or certified check made payable to Wilson’s Auction Sales, the balance to be paid within 60 days. Purchaser to pay all cost of examination, preparing and transferring deed. Purchaser shall pay the Delaware 1 1/2% State Realty Transfer Tax and the 1 1/2% Sussex County Realty Transfer Tax. Purchaser shall pay any and all other property tax, transfer tax and fees. If the above terms are not complied with, the down payment shall be forfeited. Seller reserves the right to accept or reject any and all bids, but it is their intent to sell the property. This property is being sold "as is and where is" with no expressed or implied warranty. Announcements made the day of sale take precedence over any and all advertisements. No Buyer’s Premium. Auctioneer’s Note: For more information, or to schedule your private showing, please contact our office. Visit our web site for a complete deed description. Remember, there is No Buyer’s Premium applied to your bid price, so what you bid is what you pay. Don’t Miss This Opportunity.

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Dave Wilson, Auctioneer & Sales Manager K. Wade Wilson, Auctioneer & Customer Service Representative

(302) 422-3454 Fax (302) 422-0462

www.wilsonsauction.com


PAGE 40

MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

Education Jefferson School to hold workshop “Chair!” Jake Darmstatdler crowed as he tottered over to a table, pulled out a chair and began to play with a toy cash register there. About a half-hour later, it was Jake’s parents, Lee and Brooke, who were playing – his mother at a table creating butterflies with tiny puzzle-like pieces and his father on his knees running toy cars around a wooden block racetrack. The family were among a group of people receiving a hands-on look at the value and importance of play one March evening at The Jefferson School, a nonprofit independent day school that offers a child-centered learning environment. Gathered in the school’s Junior Kindergarten classroom, parents, grandparents and teachers built with blocks, painted with potatoes and created crafts with chenille sticks – an entertaining role reversal, but one that carried with it a lesson. Watching a group of young children play – dressing up, “cooking” in a toy kitchen, painting, reading, building – may look like chaos at first. But play is actually the main way that children learn about their environments, said Lisa Crim, director of curriculum at The Jefferson School, speaking on the topic “Linking Brain Research and Your Child: Why Play Is Not a Four-Letter Word.” “Play is the fundamental component to

the young child’s healthy brain development; when young children are deeply involved in play the neuro-pathways in their brains are connecting, providing the critical elements to vital healthy brain development,” she said. The play session was the second of three workshops that challenged parents and educators to redefine their views on education. The last workshop, called “Searching for Middle School Happiness: Ways to Build a Confident Adolescent Learner,” will be held at 6 p.m. on Thursday, April 23 at The Jefferson School in Georgetown. “These kinds of things that don’t really feel like high-level thinking are laying the groundwork for everything that comes later,” Crim added. And adults often overlook the importance of engaging in simple, creative activities, she said. “A lot of times, we look at kids and say, ‘Oh, they’re just playing’,” Crim said. “We forget the value of play.” Too often, adults impose their own learning styles on children – sitting still, being quiet, writing out worksheets, she said. But children are fundamentally different. “They have to touch things, they have to shake them, they have to move them,” Crim said. “They have to really figure

Brooke and Lee Darmstatdler of Oak Orchard place themselves in the role of their children to discover how youngsters learn best.

them out.” The next workshop on April 23 will be held at The Jefferson School, 22051 Wilson Road in Georgetown. Childcare and light refreshments will be available. For more information, call 302856-3300 or visit www.jeffersonschool. com.

Dr. Bruner to speak at ECS

Parents and teachers are invited to a workshop presented by Dr. Fred Bruner, Your Brain Affects... Everything You Do, Thursday, April 9, at 6:30 p.m. in the chapel at Epworth Christian School (ECS). The workshop is sponsored by the Differentiated Learning Program at ECS and will offer insight and strategies for helping, not only their child or student, but their entire family and school. Dr. Bruner has over 30 years experience as a Christian educator, pastor, and family therapist bringing hope and healing to hundreds of families on Delmarva. He is affiliated with the Amen Clinics (www.amenclinics.com). Dr. Amen’s work has been presented nationally on PBS with “Change Your Brain, Change Your Life,” and “Magnificent Mind At Any Age!” To attend, RSVP to the school at 302-875-4488 so that ample resources are available. Donations of $4/person or $10/family are requested.

May 22-24, 2009

Honored for their contributions to adult education are, from left, front row – Outstanding Adult Education Students, Vincente Gonzalez, Melgar Gonzalez and Jennie Davis (absent from photo, Betty Hughes); second row – Tom Keeton, teacher; Jose Oyola and Kristi King, adult ed coordinators; Patti Keeton, Delaware’s Adult Educator of the Year; Patt Kelley and Cookie Coleman, teachers; and Terri Corder, principal of Groves High School.

Sussex adult educators honored Several students from Sussex Tech Adult Education were recently honored during the 18th Annual Delaware Adult Student Conference and Student Awards event in honor of Delaware Adult Learners. The day was designed especially for adult education learners and alumni and featured workshops, a keynote speaker and an awards luncheon. Receiving statewide awards for being Outstanding Adult Education Students were four students from the Groves High

School – Jennie Davis of Bishopville, Md., Vincente Gonzalez of Bridgeville, Melgar Gonzalez of Georgetown, and Betty Hughes of Bridgeville. Groves High School teacher Patti Keeton was named Delaware’s Adult Educator of the Year. During the 2007-08 school year, almost 8,000 adult students were enrolled in classes. Statistics show that 13.3 percent (68,719) of 18 to 64-year-olds in Delaware have not completed their high school education.

Presented by the Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce and The Seaford Historical Society, Seaford Heritage Weekend is May 22-24, 2009. Held at the historic Governor Ross Mansion grounds in Seaford, this threeday event features dynamic glimpses into Civil War era life, complete with reenacted battles, living camp exhibits, period craft demonstrations and music, children’s games, and lots of food and fun. Morning Star Publications, Inc. is preparing a magazine that will be inserted in the May 14, 2009, edition of the Seaford and Laurel Star newspapers. The magazine has a glossy cover and full process color throughout. Those advertising in the Seaford Heritage Weekend magazine may pick up the same ad in the Annual Nanticoke Riverfest magazine to be published in July for a 20% discount.

Phone: 302 629-9788 Or Fax: 302 629-9243 email: sales@mspublications.com


Del Tech recognizes donors

MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

Students at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus often receive scholarships which are established by private individuals and organizations. Several scholarship donors and the students who benefited from their generosity met recently at the annual Scholarship Donor & Recipient Luncheon on March 12. This year Discover Bank provided an underwriting sponsorship that made the event possible in spite of financial cutbacks at the campus. Over the past five years, Discover has awarded approximately $174,000 in scholarships to Owens Campus students as well as $25,000 to buy books and $100,000 to support the annual fundraising gala. Several members of the Delaware Tech family were present: Board of Trustees member Selham Sue Saliba; Development Council members Pat Campbell-White, Dr. Bill Carter, Walton Johnson, Merrill Moore, Rob Rider; Delaware Tech President Dr. Orlando George; and Vice President and Owens Campus Director Dr. Ileana Smith. Legacy Society members Blanche Baker and Phillip Bills, as well as Jean Hodges and Patti Grimes representing the Carl M. Freeman Foundation also attended. Featured speakers included Arlene Belgrave, of Millsboro, a human services graduate who is completing her bachelor’s degree at Wilmington University; Cynthia Smith, of Milford, a nursing student who received the Marguerite Lowery Nursing Scholarship and the Medical Society of Delaware Scholarship; and Travis Brown, of Bridgeville, a communications student who received the Fantl Journalism Scholarship and the Academic Incentive Scholarship. The Scholarship Donor and Recipient Luncheon was established in 1997 to give recipients and donors the rewarding experience of meeting. Private scholarships are a vital supplement to federal and state financial aid in providing the financial resources that allow students to attend Delaware Tech.

Farrelly inducted into society

Renee Sue Farrelly was recently inducted into the Alpha Epsilon Epsilon Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at Delaware Technical & Community College. Farrelly, who is majoring in Nursing, is the daughter of Leroy and Jeannette Smith of Laurel. She is married to Donnie Farrelly of Laurel. Phi Theta Kappa is the oldest and most prestigious honor society serving two-year colleges around the world.

Volunteerism grows at SHS

As spring grows in Seaford, so does the hours of community service that Seaford’s PAVE (Peers Actively Educating and Volunteering) and Key Club put forth. To date, the Seaford Key Club has donated over 1,000 hours of community service. The group is led by Alison Schwinn. Upcoming projects include Seaford’s Community Walk, St. Jude’s Bikeathon and the Baltimore Aquarium Beach Restoration. PAVE also presents volunteer opportunities for students. A few PAVE projects include Quilts of Valor, Relay for Life and establishing a Coffee House/Concert Hall for folk music. PAVE, which has received the Governor’s Award for two consecutive years, is under the leadership of Kate McMullen. For more information on the Key Club or PAVE, contact Harry Brake at 629-4587, ext. 405.

Nominate a Distinguished Alumni

Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus is accepting nominations for the 2009 Distinguished Alumni Award to be presented at the annual Walk of Success Induction Ceremony on Thursday, Oct. 8. The award recognizes Owens Campus graduates who have made significant contributions to their communities through their academic and career achievements, community service and personal accomplishments. Nominees must have received an associate degree or diploma from Delaware Tech, Owens Campus, and/or have graduated from the Delaware Tech/University of Delaware Parallel Program at the Owens Campus. Eligibility begins seven years after graduation. Current Delaware Tech full-time employees are not eligible for nomination. Completed nomination forms must be received by Friday, May 15. For nomination forms or more information, contact Alison Buckley, alumni coordinator, at 302-855-1607.

Mayercsik joins honor society

Nathan P. Mayercsik of Laurel has accepted an invitation to join the Delaware chapter of Chi Epsilon, a civil engineering honors society that invites the top third of the junior civil engineering class for membership. Mayercsik is an honors Civil Engineering student at the University of Delaware and was named to the Dean’s List for the fall term.

PAGE 41

From left are Robert Hearn, Owens Campus business manager; Arlene Belgrave, former Delaware Tech student and featured speaker; Travis Black and Cynthia Smith, Delaware Tech students, scholarship recipients and featured speakers; and Dr. Ileana Smith, vice president and campus director.


pAGE 42

MORNING STAR • ApRIl 9 - 15, 2009

Special Easter desserts just like Nonna used to make There’s an old Italian tongue in cheek rhyme, “Natale con i suoi, oretta norr Pasqua con chi vuoi,â€? which means you must spend Christmas with your relatives but at Easter you can choose your own company. I don’t know where this saying originated but it wasn’t from any branch of my family tree. To be sure we had lots of nonrelated guests at our Easter dinners over the years but every family member had to have a darn good reason to be awarded an excused surface, roll out the larger disk of pastry absence. to an 1/8-inch-thick round. Ease the pastry Like Christmas, the Italian Easter meal into the tart pan, pressing the dough into is steeped in tradition. And no matter how the corners. Don’t trim the overhang. delicious the entrĂŠe, everyone saves room Spread the chilled pastry cream in the for dessert. tart shell in an even layer. Roll out the Torta Della Nonna remaining pastry disk to an 1/8-inch-thick “Grandmother’s cakeâ€? is a traditional round and set it over the tart; gently press Tuscan dessert, though everyone’s nonna out any air bubbles. Carefully roll the rollmakes it slightly different. This version ing pin over the tart pan rim to cut off the combines a delicate pastry crust with a overhanging dough. Gently press the edge silky pastry cream, which is flavored with vanilla and lemon zest (other Tuscan cooks together to seal the tart. Bake the tart in the lower third of the add ricotta cheese). The tart is topped with oven for about 40 minutes, rotating the pine nuts, another regional staple. tart pans halfway through baking, until Serves 8 the crust is golden brown. Let the tart cool pastry completely in the tart pan. Unmold the 3 cups all-purpose flour tart and transfer it to a large serving plate. 1/2 cup sugar Sprinkle the tart with pine nuts, cut into 1 teaspoon baking powder wedges and serve with berries. Finely grated zest of 1 lemon 1/4 teaspoon salt Ricotta Pie 1 stick plus 6 tablespoons unsalted butServes 8 ter (7 ounces), softened This has been our family’s Easter des2 large eggs sert for generations. A mixer and food pro4 large egg yolks cessor makes preparation a lot easier for pastry cream 2 cups milk 1/2 cup sugar 1/2 vanilla bean, scraped Two 2-by-1-inch strips of lemon zest 5 large egg yolks 1/3 cup all-purpose flour Toasted pine nuts and fresh berries, for serving Make the pastry: In a food processor, combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, lemon zest and salt. Add the butter in clumps and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Add the whole eggs and egg yolks and pulse a few times, until the dough just comes together. Turn the pastry dough out onto a lightly floured work surface and knead it 2 or 3 times, just until it comes together. Divide the pastry dough into 2 pieces, 1 slightly smaller than the other. Pat the pastry dough into disks, wrap each disk in plastic and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes. Meanwhile, make the pastry cream: Set a fine-mesh strainer over a medium bowl. In a medium saucepan, heat the milk with 1/4 cup of the sugar, the vanilla bean and vanilla seeds and the lemon zest until the mixture is hot to the touch. In another medium bowl, whisk the egg yolks with the remaining 1/4 cup of sugar until blended. Stir in the flour until incorporated. Whisk in the hot milk in a thin stream. Pour the pastry cream mixture back into the saucepan and cook over moderate heat, whisking, until thick and bubbling, about 2 minutes. Immediately strain the pastry cream into the bowl, scraping the strainer with a rubber spatula. Press a sheet of plastic wrap directly onto the surface of the pastry cream and refrigerate until chilled, 1 to 2 hours. Preheat the oven to 350°. Butter and flour a 10-inch fluted tart pan with a removable bottom. On a lightly floured work

L

K

The Practical Gourmet

me than it was for nonna. For the dough: 2 cups flour 1/2 cup sugar 7 tablespoons unsalted butter 3 tablespoons vegetable shortening 3 egg yolks plus 1 whole egg 1 tablespoon grated lemon rind In a food processor combine the flour, sugar, butter and vegetable shortening. Add the egg yolks, the whole egg and the lemon rind. Pulse a few times until the pastry comes together; turn onto a lightly floured surface and knead until it just comes together. Cover and refrigerate. For the filling: 16 ounces ricotta cheese 1/4 cup unsalted butter, softened 3 egg yolks 3/4 cup sugar 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1â „2 teaspoon salt 1 cup evaporated milk 2 tablespoons cornstarch 1 teaspoon vanilla 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

3 egg whites, beaten until soft peaks form In a large bowl, beat together the ricotta and butter. Add the egg yolks, sugar, lemon juice and salt to the ricotta mixture and combine well. Then add the evaporated milk, cornstarch, vanilla and cinnamon. Finally, beat the egg whites until soft peaks form and fold gently into the ricotta mixture. To assemble and bake the pie: Preheat oven to 350. Remove the dough from the refrigerator and roll out to fit a 9-inch pie plate. (There should be enough dough to fit into a 10inch fluted tart pan, if you prefer). Prick the bottom of the dough with a fork but do not pre-bake. Pour the filling over the dough. Bake the pie at 350 for 10 minutes. Turn the oven to 300 and continue baking for 1 hour. Turn off the oven and open the door. Allow the pie to cool in the oven. Cover and refrigerate the pie until ready to eat. Tastes best when refrigerated at least 24 hours.

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MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

PAGE 43

Seaford varsity golf coach Tim Lee, left, and Laurel golf coach Mike Allen are shown with their players prior to their match which was held recently in Seaford. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel High golf team loses to Sussex Central, 180-200 The Laurel varsity golf team fell to Sussex Central, 180-200, last Tuesday. Quinten Langley led the way with a 44 while Gaven Parker and Daniel Wang each shot a 50 for the Bulldogs. See related story on page 46.

Laurel Star varsity spring sports makeup dates (as of 4/6)

The following games have been rescheduled after being postponed due to inclement weather: Laurel baseball and softball home vs. Polytech, April 29; Laurel baseball and softball home vs. Smyrna, April 16; Delmar baseball and softball home vs. Dover, April 27; Sussex Tech baseball home vs. Red Lion Christian, May 19

Delmar’s Corie Elliott, shown with the ball during last Saturday’s home win over Tatnall, had five goals in the Wildcats’ games last week. Photo by Mike McClure

Delmar girls’ soccer team tops Tatnall to net third win of season By Mike McClure

The Delmar varsity girls’ soccer team moved to 3-2 overall with a 2-1 win over Tatnall last Saturday. The Wildcats defeated Polytech earlier in the week after a narrow loss to Dover. Katie Elliott and Corie Elliott each netted a goal and Brittani Scott dished out an assist in Delmar’s non-conference win over Tatnall. Dori Arkins scored on a penalty to make the score, 2-1. Delmar held a 17-16 edge in shots and had a 7-2 advantage in corners. Ashley Matos recorded 15 saves in goal for the Wildcats. On Thursday, Delmar blanked Polytech, 5-0, as Corie Elliott scored off a feed from Scott before adding another goal on a header with Katie Elliott picking up the assist. The Wildcats held a 2-0 lead at the half. Katie Elliott dished out assists on goals by Corie Elliott and Samantha Johnson and Scott netted the final goal of the game. Delmar outshot Polytech, 28-14, while the Panthers had a 4-2 edge in corners. Matos made 11 saves in the Wildcat win. Corie Elliott and Samantha Johnson each netted a goal in last Tuesday’s 3-2 loss to Dover. Corie Elliott scored a pair

Delmar goalie Ashley Matos kicks the ball during her team’s 2-1 win over Tatnall last Saturday in Delmar. Matos had 15 saves for the Wildcats. Photo by Mike McClure

of goals and Katie Elliott had one goal in 3-1 win over Cape Henlopen earlier in the season. Continued on page 47

The Wildcats’ Alyssa Martin looks to keep the ball in play during last weekend’s home win over Tatnall. Photo by Mike McClure


PAGE 44

    MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

WILDCATS AND RAVENS- Delmar’s Cameron Mattox, left, looks to get past Sussex Tech’s Jon Davis during last Wednesday’s game in Delmar. See story on page 49. Photo by Mike McClure

Delmarva Christian boys’ lacrosse tops Campus, 10-6 The Delmarva Christian varsity boys’ lacrosse team earned a 10-6 victory over Campus Community last Wednesday. Jeff Mohr and Mark Engle each netted four goals for the Royals. Justin Hawkes added two goals and James Mohr recorded 20 saves.

TAKING A LEAD- Raven senior Jenna Allen takes a lead off third base as head coach John Marvel looks on during last Saturday’s game in Georgetown. Allen had three hits and four RBIs in her team’s 14-1 win over Concord. See story on page 48. Photo by Mike McClure

Del Tech-Owens golf team places third in tourney The Delaware Technical and Community College, Owens campus, golf team hosted a Region 19 golf tournament at Baywood last week. Burlington Community College (308) placed first, Ocean County College (326) was second, and Delaware Tech (338) was third. Don Emakarich led the Roadrunners with a 77, Travis Parker added an 81, and Colin Gillespie shot an 84.

Delaware Tech-Owens baseball falls in doubleheader The Delaware Technical and Community College, Owens campus, baseball team lost a pair to Glouchester (N.J.) College last Friday. DelTech’s Kory Hearn (Seaford) threw one shutout inning in relief in the 6-2 loss in game one. The Roadrunners also fell, 14-2, in the second game.

500TH WIN- The Delaware Technical and Community College, Owens campus, baseball team handed Harford Community College a 10-0 loss last week. The win was the head coach Curtis Brock’s 500th win. Brock, in his 21st year at DTCC, has been the program’s only coach since baseball returned to the Georgetown campus in 1989. The team won Region championships in 1995, 1998, 1999, 2001, and 2004; District championships in 1995, 1998, and 2001; and a World Series championship in 2001 under Brock.


MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

Laurel Stars of the Week

PAGE 45

Female Co-Athlete of the Female Co-Athlete of the Week- Corie Elliott- Delmar Week- Jenna Allen- Sussex Tech Delmar junior Corie Elliott tallied Male Co-Athlete of the WeekDavid Albert- Laurel High Laurel senior David Albert placed first in the long jump, triple jump, and high jump in his team’s meet at Polytech last Tuesday.

Male Co-Athlete of the WeekZach Adkins- Sussex Tech Sussex Tech’s Zach Adkins allowed one run on five hits in his team’s home win over Delmar last Tuesday. Adkins also collected three hits including a pair of doubles.

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four goals in three games last week. ElSussex Tech senior Jenna Allen had liott had one of her team’s two goals in a three hits, three RBIs, and two runs in her home win over Tatnall last Saturday and team’s home win over Concord last Saturadded two goals on Thursday and one on day. Allen also had a pair of hits and four Tuesday for the Wildcats. RBI’s in Tuesday’s win over Delmar. Honorable mention- Jenna Cahall- Laurel; Breada Boyce- Laurel; Cassidy Elliott- Laurel; Stephanie Wheatley- Laurel; Twila McCrea- Laurel; Siera Butler- Laurel; Sherloune Charleon- Laurel; Katie Elliott- Delmar; Samantha Johnson- Delmar; Brittani Scott- Delmar; Ashley Matos- Delmar; Kim Smith- Sussex Tech; Melony Thompson- Sussex Tech; Logan Pavlik- Sussex Tech; Tori Seuss- Sussex Tech; Maxine Fluharty- Sussex Tech; Paige Morris- Sussex Tech; Jeff Fleetwood- Delmar; Tyler Webb- Laurel; Branden Fischer- Laurel; Seth Benson- Delmar; Jose Flores- Delmar; Kevin Forse- Delmar; Zach Exume- Laurel; Justin Rife- Laurel; Quinten LangleyLaurel; Steve Sharff- Sussex Tech; James Smith- Sussex Tech; Herb Quick- Sussex Tech; Dustin Miller- Sussex Tech; David Fluharty- Sussex Tech; Drew Stewart- Sussex Tech; Jeff Mohr- Delmarva Christian; Mark Engle- Delmarva Christian; James Mohr- Delmarva Christian; Earl Batten- Sussex Tech; Andrew Townsend- Sussex Tech; Josh Strand- Sussex Tech; Emir Laroya- Sussex Tech

Albert, Exume lead Laurel boys’ track and field against Polytech

In an 81-52 loss to Polytech last Tuesday, the Bulldogs had a very good effort with David Albert getting wins in the high jump, long jump, and triple jump, Zach Exume placing first in the 400 meter, and Justin Rife winning the discus. The 4X100 relay team of Jean Ilera, Jermaine Harris, Exume, and Chris Jones also placed first with Exume breaking the race open with an outstanding third leg. Ryan Boyce placed second in the 1,600, Lee Butler was second in the 800, Ilera finished second in the 200, and Roosevelt Joinville came in second in both the long jump and triple jump. The 4X400 relay team lost by 2/10 of a second in a very thrilling final event. Ilera also finished third in the 100, Caleb McDonough was third in the 800, Boyce placed third in the 3,200, and Rife was third in the shotput.

Butler, McCrea paced Lady Bulldogs in loss to Panthers

Sierra Butler and Twila McCrea led Laurel with a pair of wins in last Tuesday’s 8948 loss to Polytech. Butler won the 100 and 300 hurdles and McCrea placed first in the 200 and 400 meter dashes. Sherloun Charleon also finished first in the 800 meter run and the 4X400 relay team of Charleon, Kayla Miller, Lauren Hitch, and McCrea placed first. The Bulldogs also received second place finished from Miller (both hurdles), Kittie Stancell (long jump and 400), and Ashley Zarello (discus). Lauren Hitch had a third place finish in the 1,600, Jhara Ross was third in the 400, and Zarrello finished third in the shot put.

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GOING TO THE GOAL- Casie Brinck looks to take the ball to the goal during the Delmar varsity girls’ soccer team’s 2-1 win over Tatnall last weekend. Photo by Mike Mc-

Delaware Tech-Owens softball team comes back to win a pair

The Delaware Technical and Community College, Owens campus, softball team rallied to win a pair of games against previously unbeaten Mercer County last Saturday. In game one of the doubleheader, Kim Owens drove in Amanda Horsey in the bottom of the seventh inning for the winning run in the 6-5 Del Tech victory. Horsey went 4-4, Ashlyn Booth was 2-3 with a double, and Kristine Jackson batted 2-3 with a double. Erin Tingle struck out seven in seven innings and earned the win on the mound. Tingle drove in Booth in the bottom of the seventh in game two to give the Roadrunners the sweep with the 10-9 win. Mercer entered the twin bill with a 19-0 record. Kelsey Riggleman went 3-5 with a pair of doubles, Owens had three hits including a home run, Booth homered, and Chloe Vescovi picked up the win. On Sunday, Del Tech defeated Cecil Community College in a pair of games. Tingle earned the win in game one, striking out seven. Owens went 2-4 with a home run, Horsey was 2-4, and Booth collected three hits including a double as the Roadrunners won, 8-6. In game two, Owens went 2-4 and allowed three runs on six hits and struck out seven in seven innings in the 8-3 win. Booth added a hit and Vescovi doubled.


PAGE 46

      MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

Ben Parks wins Super Pro Points opener at U.S. 13 By Charlie Brown

LADY BULLDOGS- Laurel right fielder Kelsey Willey delivers an RBI groundout to plate Tomorrow Briddell to move the Bulldogs within a run during last Monday’s home contest against Nandua. Laurel went on to win the game, 6-3. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel senior Aaron Givens tees off during his team’s home match against Sussex Tech last Thursday in Seaford. Givens was one of three Bulldogs to shoot a 49, while Quinten Langley shot a team best 48. Photo by Mike McClure

Sussex Tech’s Clayton Bunting follows through on his swing during last week’s match in Seaford. Bunting shot a 40 while teammate Dustin Miller was the medalist with a score of 35 in the Ravens’ win over Laurel. Photo by Mike McClure

Sussex Tech golf moves to 4-0 with win over Laurel The Sussex Tech varsity golf team advanced to 4-0 with a 161-195 win over Laurel last Thursday in Seaford. The Ravens’ Dustin Miller was the medalist with a 35, Clayton Bunting had a 40, Herb Quick and Trey Smith each shot a 43, and Tim Gaskin and Matt Read (44) rounded out the scoring for Sussex Tech. Quinten Langley led Laurel with a score of 48 and Gaven Parker, Colby Watts, and Aaron Givens each shot a 49.

Laurel Star varsity sports schedules for April 9-15

Thursday, April 9- golf- Laurel at Cape Henlopen, 3:30 p.m., Delmar at Indian River, 3:30 p.m., Sussex Tech at Seaford, 3:30 p.m.; girls’ soccer- Laurel at Cape Henlopen, 7 p.m., Delmar at Sussex Central, 7 p.m., Sussex Tech home vs. Indian River, 7 p.m.; softball- Laurel home vs. Red Lion Christian Academy, 3:45 p.m. Friday, April 10- baseball- Laurel at Clarence Laird Memorial Tournament, TBA Saturday, April 11- track and field- Burgess Invitational at Lake Forest, 11 a.m.; baseball- Delmar at Parkside Invitational, noon Monday, April 13- softball- Sussex Tech at Hodgson, 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 15- baseball- Laurel home vs. Holly Grove, 4 p.m.; softballLaurel home vs. Holly Grove, 4 p.m.

The 2009 Summit ET Points Series got off to a great start on Sunday as a good crowd and a large field of cars was on hand. Salisbury’s Ben Parks took top honors in Super Pro in a good match up with veteran Sterling Clough of Crisfield. Charles DeHaven of Salisbury was runner up two weeks ago but this week took the win in Pro and Jay Windsor of Felton rode to the win in Pro Bike. Other winners on the day included: Andy Davenport of Seaford in Street; Charles Ardolino of Parksley, Va., in Import, Raymond Bacon of Seaford in Bike Trophy, Jerel Davis of Salisbury in Jr. Dragster 1 and Page Townsend of Dagsboro in Jr. Dragster 2. The Parks and Clough match up in Super Pro was a good one. Parks had the better reaction at the start with an .017 and Clough could not catch him as Parks posted an 8.271/161.31 for the win. Clough ran a solid 8.059/160.39 on an 8.05 dial. Semi-finalist was Vic Gordy of Ellendale. Charles DeHaven faced Steven Truitt of Parsonsburg, Md., in the Pro final. Truitt had a red light foul and DeHaven made a full pass of 12.089/111.19 on a 12.13 dial for the win. Semi-finalist was Frank Parks of Denton who lost to Truitt. Defending champion Jay Windsor rode up against Charles Nock of Frankford in the Pro Bike final. Windsor edged Nock for the win with an 8.382/148.53 on an 8.26 dial. Nock ran a 9.171/151.48 on a 9.04 dial. Semi-finalists were James Farmer of Felton who lost to Windsor and David Manuel of Pittsville who lost to Nock. Both Davenport and Joel Yates of Delmar were slow off the line in the Street final but it was Davenport running his dial with an 11.408/115.97 on an 11.40 dial for the win. Yates was close with a 16.690/84.01 on a 16.65. Amber Payne of Delmar, Md., had the better reaction but Ardolino had the better run to post his second win of the young season in Import. Ardolino ran a 17.554/78.67 on a 17.45 dial while Payne was off her dial with a 17.386/80.13 on a 17.15 dial. Jack Moore of Dover had a red light foul and Bacon took the Bike Trophy win with a 10.647/91.80 on a 10.00 dial. Davis was paired against Alex Bradford of Newark, Md., in the Jr. Dragster 1 final. Bradford was too quick and broke out with a 9.175/70.18 on a 9.20 dial. Davis took the win with an strong run at 8.928/71.86 on an 8.90 dial. In Jr. Dragster 2 it was 2007 champ Townsend facing Trevor Post of Delmar. Trevor left .003 seconds too early and fouled and Townsend took the win with a 7.906/81.01 on a 7.90 dial.

Shown (clockwise from top): Delmar senior Kevin Forse attempts to pick the ball up as Sussex Tech’s Ben Bateman (17) and John Powell (9) move in; the Wildcats’ Cody Harmon moves upfield with the ball; and Delmar’s Jose Flores passes to a teammate in the Wildcats’ home loss to Sussex Tech last Wednesday. Photos by Mike McClure


MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

PAGE 47

A view from the cheap seats By Mike McClure, Star Sports Editor The Good- I can’t think of a better week in the world of sports than the first week of baseball and Final Four weekend in college basketball. Add in the Masters this week and you can’t ask for much more if you’re a sports fan. I guess the next best thing would be World Series time and the first month of NFL and college football. On a personal note, while the Phillies lost MLB’s first game of the season, the Orioles beat the Yankees and the Tarheels won it all. Two out of three ain’t bad. The Bad- The local spring weather has been true to form, ugly. If the rain and cold weather keeps up they’ll be playing spring sports state tournament games in July. I know the local coaches can’t be happy about all the potential makeup games and the athletic directors must be fit to be tied trying to figure out when to make up all of the missed games. The Ugly- I’ve been a little busy over the last few months, so I haven’t had a chance to write a column since the Seaford wrestling team was disqualified from the state dual meet tournament. I guess you could argue that rules are rules, but the way that DIAA went about disqualifying the Seaford wrestling team and informing them the same day the tournament was to begin was suspect, to say the least. The Wildcats’ Brittani Scott keeps the ball in front of her as a Tatnall defender moves in during last Saturday’s girls’ soccer game in Delmar. Photo by Mike McClure

Delmar soccer continued “We’re moving the ball really well. Every game we seem to be getting bet-

ter,” said Delmar head coach Tim Phillips said following Saturday’s game. “Overall the team’s coming right along, I’m pleased.”

Like many of the people I’ve talked to since this incident occurred, I feel for the kids. They worked hard and earned the berth in the tournament. It would be easy to blame the coach, but I have known Dave Rogers for a number of years. He is one of the best wrestling coaches in the state and is also one of the nicest guys you’ll ever meet. The bottom line is DIAA approved Seaford’s schedule and then turned around and said they wrestled in too many matches. What’s the point in having that body approve schedules if it’s not going to enforce its own rules? College sports- Delmar graduate Brittney Ruark of Seaford picked up her team leading eighth win of the season to pace the Delaware State softball team in a win over UMES on Sunday. Ruark has 34 career wins, just one away from the school’s record held by Jessica Murray (35). See next week’s Star for more on all the local players who are playing Spring sports in college. Quick hits- Little League opening day is right around the corner. Here are the local opening day dates: Delmar, April 18; Laurel and Woodbridge, April 25; and Nanticoke, May 2. Congratulations to Josh Kosiorowski, a WBOC athlete of the month, and Del Tech baseball coach Curtis Brock for his 500th career win.

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WILDCATS’ SOCCER- Delmar senior Katie Elliott dribbles the ball during her team’s win last Saturday in Delmar. Elliott had a goal in the Wildcats’ 2-1 victory over Tatnall. Photo McClure

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PAGE 48

    MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

Sussex Tech softball team tops Concord, 14-1, for home win By Mike McClure

LADY RAIDERS- Woodbridge’s Crystal Ruiz races to the ball as teammates Kelly Warner, left, and Brittany Joseph look on during Tuesday’s girls’ soccer game. Photo by Mike McClure

Seaford/Laurel Star varsity spring sports scoreboard

Boys’ lacrosse- St. Mark’s 16, Sussex Tech 11 (Monday)- Drew Stewart, Ben Bateman, and Orlando Theiss each had three goals for the Ravens. Jacob Bernier added one goal and one assist, David Fluharty netted a goal, and Bateman dished out a pair of assists. Salisbury School 12, Delmarva Christian 5 (Monday)- Mark Engle netted three goals, Jeff Mohr had two goals, and James Mohr recorded 25 saves for the Royals. Girls’ lacrosse- Salisbury School 14, Delmarva Christian 10 (Monday)- Jessica Stratton scored four goals and Meghan Whittington, Sarah Betts, and Rebecca Bryan each had two goals for Delmarva Christian. Girls’ soccer- Woodbridge 2, Polytech 2 (OT)- Samantha Richey and Kelsey Johnson each netted a goal and Leslie DeRoche and Seaford’s Spencer Coulbourne Crystal Ruiz had assists for the Raiders, who makes the defensive play at third held a 2-0 lead at the half. Megan Sirkis rebase for the out in the top of the corded 14 saves in goal for Woodbridge. second inning against Woodbridge. Sussex Tech 2, Lake Forest 0 (OT)- Lau- Seaford shut out the Raider’s 5-0. ren Burkholder netted a pair of goals in over- Photo by Lynn Schofer time to lead the Ravens to the win over the Spartans. Baseball- Seaford 5, Woodbridge 0- Zach Reynolds allowed two hits and struck out nine in the shutout win and also collected two of his team’s 10 hits. Scott Donovan added a pair of hits for Seaford and Jordan Vazquez had both of the Raiders’ hits. Sussex Tech 11, Indian River 8- Sam Grahovac collected two hits including a double and drove in four and James Smith doubled and earned the win in relief for the Ravens. Softball- Seaford 6, Woodbridge 5- Haley Quillen and Courtney Rementer each doubled and Katie Hitch earned the win on the mound for the Blue Jays, who scored three runs in the bottom of the third for the win. Grace Reardon doubled for Woodbridge. Sussex Tech 12, Indian River 2- Brooke Tull had two hits including a pair of home runs and six RBIs and allowed three hits in her return for Sussex Tech. Kim Smith and Lauren Smith each doubled. Girls’ tennis- Seaford 3, Dover 2- Seaford’s Kelly Kimpton earned a win at first singles (6-3, 6-7, 6-2); Whitley Maddox won 7-6, 6-4; and Emily Nielson and Emily Hubbard took their first singles match, 6-4, 6-3. Boys’ tennis- Dover 3, Seaford 2- Tim Halter won his first singles match, 6-3, 6-2 and Ethan Lee won at third singles, 6-4, 6-3 for the Blue Jays. Golf- Sussex Tech 172, Milford 183- The Ravens’ Clayton Bunting was the medalist with a 38, Richard Atkins added a 41, and Herb Quick added a 43. Sussex Central 178, Seaford 193- Matt Lank led Seaford with a 42 and Tyler Hughes added a 44. Sports editor’s note- See next week’s Seaford Star for stories on the SeafordWoodbridge baseball and softball and Woodbridge girls’ soccer games as well as results from the track and field meets.

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The Sussex Tech varsity softball team advanced to 3-1 with a 14-1 home win over Concord last Saturday. The Ravens allowed a run in the top of the second, but answered with eight runs in the bottom of the inning. Logan Pavlik singled and scored on a single by Lauren Smith, Smith came home on a ground out by Kelsey Doherty and Kim Smith singled in Amber Callahan (single). Smith and Cassidy Taylor (first on error) scored on a double by Jenna Allen and a Concord error, Allen came home on a double by Melony Thompson; and Pavlik singled in Thompson and scored on a single by Lauren Smith. Sussex Tech scored five more runs in the third as Doherty hit a one out double and scored on a single by Kim Smith, Allen doubled in a pair, and Pavlik doubled in a run and scored on an error. Doherty hit a leadoff double and came home on a ground out by Kasey Thompson in the bottom of the fourth. The Lady Ravens went on to win the game, 14-1, with Taylor pitching one shutout inning in relief of Kim Smith who allowed one run on five hits in four innings. Doherty went 2-4 with an RBI; Kim Smith was 3-4 with two RBIs; Allen batted 3-4 with two doubles, four RBIs, and two runs; and Pavlik went 3-3 with a double, three runs, and two RBIs. Lauren Smith was 2-3 with a run and two RBIs; Thompson doubled, scored a run, and drove in a run; and Callahan and Melissa Trout added one hit each.

Sussex Tech starting pitcher Kim Smith throws to first during her team’s home win over Concord last Saturday. Smith allowed one run on five hits in four innings of work for the win. Photo by Mike McClure

RETURN HIT- Seaford’s Tim Halter prepares to make a return during his first singles match on Tuesday in Seaford. Halter won his match, but the Blue Jays fell to Dover, 3-2. Photo by Mike McClure


MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

PAGE 49

Raven Roundup- Boys’, girls’ varsity lacrosse teams earn wins By Mike McClure

Sussex Tech’s Quinn Stewart, right, looks to get past Delmar’s Dante Tingle during last Wednesday’s boys’ lacrosse game in Delmar. Stewart netted three goals in his team’s 19-6 win. Photo by Mike McClure

Ravens’ lacrosse builds on first half lead for win over Wildcats By Mike McClure

The Sussex Tech varsity boys’ lacrosse team opened up a 10-3 lead at the half and didn’t look back in last Wednesday’s 19-6 road win over Delmar. Quinn Stewart and David Fluharty each had two goals and an assist and Ben Bateman netted a pair of first half goals to lead the Ravens to a 10-3 lead at the half. Jacob Bernier also had two goals and an assist, Drew Stewart added one goal and three assists, Orlando Theiss contributed a goal and an assist, and John Powell dished out an assist. For Delmar, Brad Sensenig, Jose Flores, and Kevin Forse each netted a goal. Forse opened the second half with a goal, but Sussex Tech scored six third quarter goals to up its lead to 16-5. Powell and Fluharty each had two goals and an assist, Bateman added a goal and an assist, Quinn Stewart netted a goal, and Drew Stewart and Bernier dished out assists for the Ravens. Flores tallied the Wildcats’ fifth goal during the quarter. Delmar’s Cameron Mattox opened the fourth quarter with a goal off a feed from Flores, but Bateman tallied two goals and Fluharty added won for the 19-6 Sussex Tech win. Quinn Stewart had three goals and an assist; Drew Stewart added one goal and four assists; David Fluharty netted four goals and dished out two assists; Ben Bateman contributed two goals and one assist; and Jacob Bernier and John Powell each had two goals and two assists. Forse and Flores each had a pair of goals for Delmar.

The Sussex Tech boys’ lacrosse team followed up its win over Delmar with an 8-6 non-conference win over William Penn last Saturday. David Fluharty had three goals and an assist, Drew Stewart netted a pair of goals, and Quinn Stewart and Jacob Bernier each contributed a goal and an assist. John Powell scored one goal and Ben Bateman dished out an assist for the Ravens. Aaron Hitchens also recorded 10 saves in the Sussex Tech win. The Lady Ravens topped Red Lion Christian, 17-9, on Wednesday and defeated Maxine Fluharty Salisbury School, 17-6, on Friday. Sussex Tech moved to 2-2 with the wins after falling to Cape Henlopen, 13-2, and Friends, 11-10. Maxine Fluharty netted 10 goals in Wednesday’s win over Red Lion. Fluharty also had eight goals and four assists on Friday. Natalie Justice added four goals and two assists, Sara Adams netted a pair of goals, Courtenay Rickards had one goal and one asTori Seuss sist, Steph Keller scored a goal, and Hannah Small dished out an assist for the Ravens. Tech soccer wins one of two- The Sussex Tech varsity girls’ soccer team won one of two games last week. The Lady Ravens blanked Laurel, 10-0, on Thursday as Tori Seuss netted two goals and Lauren Burkholder added one goal and three assists. Sussex Tech fell to Concord, 1-0, on Saturday. Track teams fall to CR- The Ravens’ boys’ and girls’ track teams lost to Caesar Rodney last Tuesday. The boys fell, 100-46, despite a first place finish by Andrew Townsend in the 800 meter run (2:09.5). Josh Strand was first in the high jump (5’ 10”), Earl Bratten won the shotput (43’ 5”) and the discus (117’ 2”), Brian Singh placed first in the pole vault (8’ 8”), and Emir Laroya came in first in the triple jump (41’ 5”). The girls lost, 87-50, as Paige Morris placed first in the shotput Earl Batten (37’ 2”), discus (98’ 11”), and the long jump (15’ 2”). Emily Ritter won the triple jump (31’ 1/4”) and Shani Wells was first in the high jump (4’ 8”).

Senior Women’s Softball League to hold first practice April 20

The Senior Women’s Softball League will have its first practice at 6 p.m. on Monday, April 20, at Sports At The Beach in Georgetown. Three teams returning to the league are the Alley Cats 50’s, Delaware Diamonds 50’s and Delaware Diamonds 60’s. Games will be played on Monday nights. Teams will also compete in the Delaware Senior Olympics in September. If you are between 50 and 75 years old and would like to join one of these teams, or if you have a whole new team, please call coordinator Marion Lisehora at 934-9512.

Atlantic Coastal Drillers to hold tryouts at Laurel Middle School

The Atlantic Coastal Drillers, a semi-pro team in the NABF Eastern Shore baseball league, will hold tryouts on Sunday, April 19 and Saturday, April 25 at 1 p.m. at Laurel Middle School. The Drillers play a 24 game regular season schedule from the last week in May to the first of August in Salisbury. There is a double elimination tournament at the end of the year. The winner of the regular season and the winner of the tournament get a chance to play in a regional tournament for a chance to play in the NABF World Series in Louisville, Ky., in August. The age group is 18 and older (anyone under 18 needs a parent to sign a release form to try out). There are several spots available for the 2009 season. The cost to play in the league is $150 (if you make the team). Visit the team’s website at www.leaguelineup.com/marylandsemiprobaseball (go to the Eastern Shore League).

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Delmar senior David Bradshaw, right, defends the Ravens’ David Fluharty during last week’s boys’ lacrosse game. Photo by Mike McClure

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PAGE 50

         MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

Seaford Bowling Lanes Tuesday AM Mixed

High games and series Mike Baker 280, 750 Carolyn Chandler 241 Clara Townsend 604

Eastern Shore Men

High games and series Joe Holloway 289

Todd James

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High games and series Bill Thomas 285 Matt Sammons 761

Sunday Nite Mixed

High games and series Sean James 302, 774 Brenda Layton 309, 811

Christian Fellowship

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High games and series John Kinney 253

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High games and series Gordon Hearn 294, 756 Theresa Richey 266 Brandi Lewis 746 Doug Hastings 286 Brittany Hastings 285, 801

Tuesday Early Mixed

High games and series Rip Penuel 283 Donna Reed 240, 682

Senior Express

High games and series Bob Sample 297, 813 Elsie Willey 291, 782

Sussex Country Sports Foundation baseball tourneys to be held in Laurel The Sussex County Sports Foundation will be holding travel baseball tournaments in Laurel for ages 9U to 18U throughout the 2009 season. The organization’s tournaments will be held on the following dates: Backyard Brawl- May 2-3; Quest for the Best- May 30-31; SCSF June Baseball- June 6-7; Summer Sizzler- June 27-28; August Heat III- August 1-2

Seaford Recreation Department prepares for softball season Meredith Connar takes a practice swing as Georgianna Arnesen looks on. They are co-chairpersons for the Heritage Shores 9-hole Ladies League, located in Bridgeville. The league’s season opened April 1. Contact Connar at 302-956-0318 or mlconnar@comcast.net for more details. Photo to E.W. Faircloth

The Seaford Recreation Department is getting ready for the softball season. Anyone interested in entering a team into the men’s slo-pitch, men’s modified, or co-ed Sunday leagues can call the office at 629-6809 for more details. There will be coach’s meetings scheduled at a later date. Entry fees will be determined depending on the number of teams in the league, so register your team now.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

The Heritage Shores Ladies’ Golf Association kicked off its 2009 season on Wednesday, April 1. This opening scramble was won by Margaret ‘M’ Brunatti, Muriel Waite, and Marilyn Williams.

Mitch Griffith of Seaford is shown with a large mouth bass he caught during a Boy Scout trip to Trap Pond. The fish is over 17 inches long.


MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

PAGE 51

House Bill 117 would eliminate separate school board elections Calling this an opportunity to save taxpayer money and increasing voter participation, House Majority Whip Rep. Valerie J. Longhurst introduced legislation recently that would align public school board elections with bi-annual general elections. House Bill 117 would eliminate the annual school board elections for the 16 school districts that elect board members. School board elections currently are held

on the second Tuesday of May and can occur in any year. Under the legislation, school board elections would move to Election Day beginning in 2010. Doing so will save the state from having to mobilize poll workers, voting machines and running up to 16 separate elections on the same day, which amounts to a statewide election. “Currently, less than 2 percent of regis-

Laurel church seeks town’s support for traffic safety issue By Tony E. Windsor A Laurel church appeared before the town’s Mayor and Council to seek support for what it feels has become a safety issue for the congregation. During the Monday, April 6, meeting of Council, Richard Davis, a member of the Security and Safety Team for the Laurel Nazarene Church, said the church would like the town to consider making a traffic adjustment in front of the church. The Laurel Nazarene Church is located on Walnut Street and Davis said traffic operating in front of the church has become a safety issue to congregation, especially the younger children who tend to play outside on the lawn following youth services. He asked that the town consider closing Walnut Street to vehicle traffic between Central Avenue and Maryland Avenue each Sunday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Neither Laurel’s Police Department nor Public Works departments objected to the request, however, Laurel Town Manager Bill Fasano expressed a “technical issue” with how the request was made before council. Fasano said the request to close the street was incorrectly made in the wrong form. It was brought before the Mayor and Council as a “special event’s request.” Fasano said there was not a problem with the request,

just a concern about the technical aspects. “I do not disagree with the request, but the petitioner is not asking to hold a special event. The church is asking for a long term road closure,” he said. Fasano suggested that rather than deal with the issue in its current form, the Mayor and Council make a motion to accept closing the road in the one-block area of Walnut Street for a period of six months to a year. At the end of the designated period of time, the town and church can assess if the road closure has presented any issues that need to be addressed. The council voted to approve the road closing along Walnut Street between Central Avenue and Maryland Avenue of a period of one year. Police Chief Jamie Wilson told the council that Walnut Street is a one-way street and the problem with traffic turning onto that street traveling in the wrong direction is significant. “We have more problems with people driving the wrong way on that oneway street than any other street in the town,” he said. In making the motion to allow the road closing at the church, Councilman Randy Lee suggested that rather than use cones to alert traffic that the road is closed, there should be barricades placed to mark the road closing. This was approved as part of the council decision to support the churches’ request.

Applications are available now for state farmland preservation

Entities interested in preserving farmland in Delaware are invited to sign up for financial assistance through the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Applications must be received on or before Friday, May 15, to receive consideration for funding in fiscal year 2009. Eligible entities are State, Tribal, or local governments and non-government organizations that meet specific requirements. The entities must have an established farm and ranch land protection program, have the authority to hold and man-

age easements; have the capacity to acquire, manage, and enforce the easements; and the funds to match the Federal contribution. Land must meet one of three eligibility categories: contain at least fifty percent prime and unique farmland soils and soils of Statewide and local importance; contain historic or archeological resources; or contain land that supports the farm and ranch land protection policies of state or local programs. For more information, contact Paul Petrichenko at 302-678-4180 or paul.petrichenko@de.usda.gov.

tered voters actually vote in school board elections. It’s disheartening that people aren’t active in school board elections. Hopefully with this change, people will become more involved and give the same scrutiny to school board races as they do with all other elections,” said Rep. Longhurst, D-Bear. In 2008, the state spent nearly $120,000 on elections in 11 of the 16 school districts that have school board

elections while only 8,230 of nearly 600,000 registered voters voted. Rep. Longhurst worked on the proposal during the past few months, meeting with officials from Department of Education and Department of Elections to ensure that the legislation is implemented smoothly. “This bill will dramatically increase voter turnout. You hate to throw an election and no one comes to vote,” said Commissioner of Elections Elaine Manlove.

“YOU GOTTA DIE FROM SOMETHING.

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PAGE 52

MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

People Meg Sipos weds Clay Harvey Meg Sipos and Clay Harvey were united in marriage on Nov. 8, 2008 in a barefoot, beachside ceremony at sunset in Islamorda, Fla. The Rev. George Olive, uncle of the bride and Rev. Barbara Ammann, minister at the Matecumbe U.M.C. in Islamorda, officiated at the double-ring ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Sipos of Lewes. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Steven Harvey of Wilmington, N.C. Mrs. Ralph O’Day of Seaford and Mrs. Mona Harvey of Wilmington are the grandparents of the couple. The bride wore a strapless white satin pick-up ball gown with cuff neckline, corset laced back and sweep train accented with a chocolate brown sash. Her bouquet consisted of light pink roses and daisies with prayer book entwined. Matrons of honor were the bride’s sisters, Carolyn Krams of Seaford, and Susie Smargisi of Arnold, Md.; Donna Harvey, sister-in-law of the groom, and Heather Healy, friend of the bride and groom, were bridesmaids. Bridesmaids dresses were strapless eyelet top with contrasting chocolate brown sash intertwined around the bodice and flattering a-line silhouette skirt. The bridesmaids carried a bouquet of pink and white daisies. The groom wore white linen trousers and a white cotton button-down shirt. The best-man was Steven Harvey, father of the

Meg Sipos and Clay Harvey

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groom, and other groomsmen were Guy Harvey, brother of the groom, Seth Healy, Nick Rhode, and Jeff Glenn, friends of the groom. The groomsmen wore chocolate brown linen trousers and white cotton shirts. The ring bearer, Joey Smargissi, nephew of the bride, also wore chocolate pants and white shirt. The flower girls were Abigail Krams, Elizabeth Krams, Mason Smargissi, nieces of the bride, and Brooke Harvey, niece of the groom. They wore long white cotton dresses with pink sashes and carried one pink Shasta daisy. A reception was held following the ceremony on the beach at a private residence in Islamorada. A local steel-drum player provided the music and the brides’ cousins, Noelle Sipos and Jeff Sipos sang. The white three-tier cake was trimmed with brown and pink ribbon and seshells. The bride is a graduate of Seaford Senior High School and a college graduate of Shepherd College in Shepherdstown, W.Va. She is employed at Davenport & Co. in Raleigh, N.C. The groom is a graduate of John T. Hoggard High School, in Wilmington, N.C. He is the owner of CLH Painting Inc. in Raleigh and Wilmington, N.C. The couple enjoyed a weeklong honeymoon in St. Lucia, in the Caribbean. Meg and Clay currently reside in Raleigh, N.C.

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PAGE 53

Tracy Whaley and Matthew Kennedy

Tracy Whaley weds Matthew Kennedy Tracy Whaley and Matthew Kennedy, both of Hoboken, N.J., were married on Oct. 24, 2008, at Our Lady Star of the Sea in Cape May, N.J. The bride is the daughter of Terry and Cindy Whaley of Laurel. The bridegroom is the son of Matthew and Patricia Kennedy of Bethlehem, Pa. The ceremony was performed by Father Peter Donohue, president of Villanova University. The bride wore an ivory Lela Rose gown with a cathedral length veil. The gown had a V-neckline and a deep Vback, trimmed with crocheted lace with a satin ribbon around the waist. Maid of honor was Lauren Coughlin of New York City, best friend from college. Bridesmaids were Jayme Birkmire of Jersey City, N.J., a college friend; Natalie Dunlap of Jacksonville, Fla., college friend; Ashley Soukup of Hoboken, N.J., college friend; Gina Whaley of Berlin, Md., sister-in-law of the bride; Jude Kennedy of Philadelphia, Pa., sister of the groom; and Bridget Kennedy of New York

City, sister of the groom. Best Men were Matt Higgins of Long Island, N.Y. and Jason Orchard of West Chester, N.Y., both college friends of the groom. Groomsmen were Matthew Whaley of Berlin, Md., brother of the bride; Kevin Cahill of Hoboken, N.J., college friend; Matt Mento of Chicago, Ill., high school friend; Ben Supinski of Hoboken, N.J., high school friend; and Charles Fixter of Hoboken, N.J., a friend from college. A reception was held at Congress Hall in Cape May, N.J. Music was provided by Nick and the Heartbeats of Philadelphia. The bride was a graduate of the University of Del., Newark, with a bachelors degree in English. She is employed as a Recruiter at Glocap Search in N.Y. City. The bridegroom was a graduate of Villanova University, Villanova, Pa., with a bachelors degree in accounting. He is employed at the Bank of America in N.Y. City. Since their return from a honeymoon in Tahiti/Bora Bora, they are living in Hoboken, N.J.

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MORNING STAR • ApRIl 9 - 15, 2009

Police Journal Two arrested at Memories Bar

Shortly after midnight on Sunday, April 5, troopers were called to Memories Bar in Delmar in reference to a fight in the parking lot. A group of about 20 to 30 people were getting ready to fight when troopers arrived. One particular subject, Eddy Almonte, 24, of Salisbury, Md., was seen swinging a baseball bat, inciting the other subjects to fight. Officers approached Almonte who was extremely intoxicated and refused to drop the bat. When Almonte finally complied, troopers began to handcuff him at which time Almonte’s girlfriend, Jamie Vari, 24, of New Castle, approached officers and began yelling at them. Vari was ordered to back away and leave but she refused, so she was also arrested. Eddy Almonte was charged with possession of a deadly weapon during the commission of a felony (felony), inciting a riot (felony) and disorderly conduct (misdemeanor). He was held by the Department of Corrections on a $7,000 cash only bond. Jamie Vari was formally charged with the following misdemeanors - hindering prosecution, disorderly conduct and Loitering. She was released on $2,000 unsecured bond.

Knife was for birthday cake

On Thursday, April 2, Delaware State Police received notice from Leasure Elementary in Newark regarding an incident on April 1. In this case, it was alleged that an 11-year-old girl had brought a cake and cupcakes to school as a part of her campaign for an election. The student’s parents also sent a knife in with her to cut the cake. The knife was secured by the school staff and the police were notified per state requirements. This incident was reviewed by Delaware State Police detectives and also with the Attorney General’s Office. Prosecution was declined.

Laurel man beaten and robbed

On Friday, April 3 at 10:30 p.m., a 31-year-old victim, who functions at a middle school level, was walking home from his brother’s house after watching a movie, in the Laurel Village Mobile Home Park. He was on Cottonwood Road when he was approached by three subjects: Jeffrey Chambers, 18, of Bethel; James Walls, 17, of Laurel; and Frank Walls, 17, of Laurel. The three subjects allegedly assaulted the victim, drug him into a nearby wooded area and beat him. They took his keys and wallet and left him lying on the ground. The victim got to his feet and made his way home. Once inside the residence, he collapsed and fell asleep. On the morning of April 4, the victim’s mother woke up and found her son injured. She took him to the hospital where he was treated for a concussion, along with other superficial injuries. The two brothers, James and Frank Walls, along with Jeffrey Chambers, were formally charged with the following felony offenses: robbery, second degree assault

and second degree conspiracy. All three subjects were ordered held at the appropriate detention facility, in regards to their ages, on a $20,000 secured bond.

Man indicted for gambling ring

The grand jury for Superior Court in New Castle County has returned a 38-count indictment charging a Middletown man with multiple gambling offenses and tax evasion, arising out of an illegal gambling operation run out of his Middletown residence and for failing to report his profits as income. William Shane Anderson, 38, was charged with one felony count and one misdemeanor count of attempting to evade tax, as well as an additional 36 counts involving gambling offenses, including providing a premises for gambling and possessing a gambling device. The indictment alleges that from about July 2007 through February 2008, Anderson ran illegal poker games including illegally taking bets from both residents of Delaware and neighboring states and failing to pay taxes on profits earned. Anderson solicited players mostly by wordof-mouth or referrals and would send textmessages to players noting the date and time of the games. Investigators say that Anderson collected payments from the gamblers who were required to pay a certain percentage of their wagers to the “house.” In order to conceal the income, Anderson then allegedly deposited the proceeds into a bank account set up in the name D.V.Services. The felony count carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison, and such fines and penalties as the court deems appropriate. The 37 misdemeanor counts each carry a maximum penalty of one year in prison and $2,300 in fines. This case stems from an investigation conducted by the Middletown Police Department and the Delaware Division of Revenue’s Criminal Investigation Unit, and was referred to the Delaware Attorney General’s office for indictment and prosecution. Anderson awaits arraignment and trial date in Superior Court in New Castle County.

Four arrested for shoplifting

On Saturday, April 2 at 5 p.m., troopers were called to the Puma Store at the Tanger Outlets for a shoplifting incident. Officers arrived on the scene and were advised four women had just shoplifted from their store and were currently walking in the parking lot. Officers located them getting into their vehicle. The four females were taken into custody without incident, but not before providing the officers with false names. The suspects, Neveah Akins, 15; Latoya Donaldson, 23; Porcha Love, 23; and Nachiema Whitaker, 23, all of Philadelphia, Pa., stole merchandise at Puma, 9-West and Polo. They concealed goods in large bags they brought with them and also placed items in ‘booster bags,’ which are lined in a metallic substance hindering the store’s theft alarm. The ladies also cut away security devices, damaging some of the clothing.

A search of the suspect’s vehicle yielded additional stolen merchandise from the Christiana Mall in Newark earlier in the day. This investigation is still pending. The value of all of the stolen merchandise exceeded $1,000. The four suspects were charged with the following offenses: two counts of possession of shoplifting tools (felony), shoplifting (felony), second degree conspiracy (felony), criminal impersonation (misdemeanor) and two counts of criminal mischief (misdemeanor). All four suspects were turned over to the appropriate detention facility due to their ages in default of a $12,000 cash only bond.

Statements against governor

Delaware State Police have arrested a 50-year-old Dover man for several harassment charges after he was responsible for sending a series of emails that directed alarming and offensive statements toward Governor Jack Markell. The investigation began after representatives from the Governor’s office alerted State Police about receiving alarming emails that were sent to the cost saving suggestion public mailbox on Sunday, March 22. This public mailbox, which is located at Delaware.gov, was developed for citizens to share their suggestions, publicly or anonymously, on ways Governor Markell’s administration can reduce costs and increase fiscal responsibility. The ensuing investigation by DSP Troop 3 Major Crime’s detectives revealed that several emails made alarming statements that caused concern for the safety of the Governor. Records obtained by detectives from the High Technology Crimes Unit (HTCU) revealed the IP address was assigned to Comcast Cable Internet Service. A subsequent subpoena directed to Comcast to retrieve the subscriber information on the Comcast account revealed Steven R. Lenhart, 50, of Dyke Branch Road, Dover, was the registered user. On Saturday, March 28, several additional emails were sent to the cost saving suggestion public mailbox where more threats were made. These emails were linked to the same IP address as Lenhart. On Thursday, April 2, detectives executed a search warrant at Lenhart’s residence and seized a home computer. Additionally, detectives learned Lenhart was employed as a correctional officer for the State of Delaware. He was taken into custody without incident. As a result of the investigation, Lenhart was arrested for 10 misdemeanor counts of harassment. He was released after posting a $10,000 secured bail and ordered to have no contact with the Governor. This is an ongoing investigation.

Driver falls asleep on Route 1

Delaware State Police investigated an overnight crash that closed portions of State Route 1 southbound at the Dover Toll Plaza. Troopers responded to the single tractor-trailer crash at 1:46 a.m. on Friday, April 3, and discovered the tractortrailer struck a concrete barrier that separated the EZ Pass lanes with the standard

tollbooth lanes. Troopers learned a 2007 Volvo Tractor, operated by Shimon Dahan, 45, of Berlin, Md. and registered to Tidewater Express Inc. in Salisbury, Md., was southbound on USRT 1 approaching the toll plaza when he fell asleep. The tractor-trailer drifted off the roadway and struck the barrier. The tractor-trailer continued southbound along the barrier, lost its contents (frozen seafood) and leaked fuel from the fuel tanks onto the roadway. Representatives from the Department of Natural Resources and the Dover Fire Department responded to the scene and contained the fuel spill. Dahan, who was wearing a seatbelt and was not injured, was cited for inattentive driving.

Two women fight over man

In the early morning hours of Saturday, April 4, troopers were called to Mobile Gardens, Seaford, for a domestic related assault. Officers arrived on the scene and contacted a 20-year-old female victim. She advised she received several calls throughout the night from a restricted number and believed the caller was Cherrena Waples, 35, of Frankford. The victim said she and Waples have an ongoing dispute as the two are dating the same man. At 3:30 a.m., the victim said Waples, and another female named Tremaine Collins, 27, of Seaford, responded to her home and started banging on the side of the house challenging her to come out. When she refused, Waples keyed the victim’s car. The victim saw what happened and ran outside to confront the two suspects. It was at this point that Waples and Collins assaulted the victim. The victim was struck in the head with a wooden night stick causing a closed head injury. The suspects then fled the scene. As troopers were ascertaining the facts of the case, the two suspects returned to the scene of the crime. Troopers took them into custody without incident. Waples was found to have been driving while impaired. She was also in possession of marijuana and paraphernalia. The two suspects were transported back to Troop 5 where they were charged with the following offenses: Waples was charged with DUI, second assault (felony), second degree conspiracy (felony), criminal mischief (felony), carrying a concealed deadly instrument (misdemeanor), trespass (misdemeanor), disorderly conduct (misdemeanor), possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia (misdemeanors) Collins was charged with second degree assault (felony), second degree conspiracy (felony), carrying a concealed deadly instrument (misdemeanor), trespass (misdemeanor) and disorderly conduct (misdemeanor). Both women were committed to the Department of Corrections in default of secured bond.

Pair found near Canada

Delaware State Police have confirmed that Nathaly Alonzo, 12, of Bridgeville, and Jose Nedar Reyes-Castro, 19, were located on Monday, April 6 at approxi-


MORNING STAR • ApRIl 9 - 15, 2009 mately 1:45 a.m. after they were attempting to enter Canada from the United States border at the Peace Bridge Plaza in Buffalo, N.Y. Alonzo left the area with Reyes-Castro, a housemate who was staying with her family for the past six months, on Friday, March 26. The pair was seen in the Bridgeville area on Saturday, March 27 and were tracked near Florida the next day. Members of the U.S. Border Patrol apprehended the two on Monday, April 6 in the stolen Ford Explorer, which was borrowed from a friend in Laurel at the end of March. Reyes–Castro was taken into custody in regards to the outstanding arrest warrants in Delaware. He was turned over to the Buffalo Police Department where he remains in custody of the Buffalo authorities. Nathaly Alonzo is currently in the custody of New York authorities awaiting the arrival of her parents. She is unharmed. The case remains under investigation.

Fatal industrial accident

On Tuesday, March 31, troopers and medical personnel responded to Tyson F. Sartin Inc. in Saint Georges, in reference to an industrial accident. The business owner, a 56-year-old man, was working on a company truck, a 1983 Chevrolet C30, and was positioned beneath the vehicle. The truck was running during this repair. The owner’s clothing became entangled in the mechanical workings on the under side of the vehicle, pulling him into the frame of the truck, pinning him there and critically injuring him. The patient was freed from the truck by first responders and rushed to Christiana Hospital where he later died.

Assault suspect wanted

Delaware State Police are seeking the assistance of the public in locating a 33-year-old Laurel man who is wanted in connection with an assault. On Sunday, April 5, at approximately 9:50 p.m., troopers

responded to a residence on New Hope Road in Ellendale after it was reported Dwayne A. Daniels forced entry into the 50-year-old male’s home and assaulted him. The investigation revealed Daniels went to the home, forced entry by breaking through the front door, and proceeded to assault the victim by punching and biting him. The reason for Daniels’ presence at the home was that he was seeking the location of an ex-girlfriend and discovered she was with the homeowner. The assault occurred in the midst of the 24-year-old ex-girlfriend and her two children, ages four and three. Daniels is also the father of these children. As the assault was occurring, the woman called 911 prompting Daniels to flee the home. The victim sustained several abrasions, contusions and lacerations. He was taken to Milford Memorial Hospital where he was treated and released. Arrest warrants have been obtained on Daniels for first degree burglary (felony), second degree assault (felony), two counts of endangering the welfare of a child (misdemeanor) and criminal mischief (misdemeanor). Delaware State Police seek the whereabouts of Daniels and ask anyone with information to contact investigators at Troop 7 at 302-644-5020 or Crime Stoppers at 800-TIP-3333.

Ranshaw also operated a cleaning business under the name Littleman’s Cleaning Service based in Milford. Despite generating significant revenue from these businesses, Ranshaw failed to file a state tax return and report her business income in the years 2005, 2006 and 2007. From Oct. 2001 through Dec. 2008, Ranshaw misrepresented herself as a registered nurse and practiced nursing without a license. During this period of time, Ranshaw also attempted to conceal her income from the Division of Revenue by using a false social security number, under penalties of perjury, on a business license application. The felony count of perjury is punishable by up to a maximum three years in prison. The three misdemeanor tax offenses are each punishable by up to a maximum one year in prison and up to $2,300 in fines. Ranshaw awaits arraignment and a trial date in Superior Court in Dover.

pAGE 55

Delaware State Police plan annual Youth Week

Delaware State Police are accepting applications for the 38th Annual Trooper Youth Week. This weeklong academy is a collaborative effort between the Delaware State Police and the American Legion. The program is designed to give high school students interested in law enforcement an idea of what is expected of a state trooper. The cadets will experience academy life and attend many classes, including crash and crime scene investigation. The program, sponsored by the American Legion Post for Delaware, is facilitated by State Police Training Academy Staff at the DSP Academy and will be held from Monday, June 15 to Friday, June 19. Any high school age student may fill out an application. To obtain an application, students may contact their School Resource Officer or Sgt. Daniel Hall at the training academy at 739-5907 or daniel.hall@state.de.us. All completed applications can be mailed to Sgt. Hall at the DSP Academy located at 1441 N. DuPont Hwy. Dover, DE 19901. Questions from parents or students regarding the program can also be directed to Sgt. Hall.

Milford woman indicted

Director of Revenue Patrick T. Carter announces that the grand jury for the Superior Court in Kent County returned a fourcount indictment of tax fraud and perjury against a Milford woman. Georgeina B. Ranshaw, 46, was charged with three misdemeanor counts of failing to file a State of Delaware personal income tax return for tax years 2005, 2006 and 2007. Ranshaw was also charged with one felony count of perjury for signing a business license application using a false social security number. Ranshaw operated Nurses on the Go, which provided personal care services to elderly and disabled clients in their homes.

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PAGE 56

MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 -15, 2009

Snapshots

Pictured are the winners of the Delmar Kiwanis 20th annual Easter egg hunt. Pictured with them are Kiwanis members Al Bozman and Ron Davenport. One-hundred-and-ten youngsters participated in the annual event. Photo by Pat Murphy.

Some contestants used their egg baskets for a hat. Photo by Pat Murphy.

Jane Burlingame of Beta Sigma Phi Chapter Laureate Epsilon shown with Dale Boyce of Centenary Church. The sorority gave several bags of non-perishable items to their food pantry as one of their may service projects. Submitted photo.

Nothing to it says this three-year-old as she fills her basket. Photos by Pat Murphy.

The Laurel Lioness Club inducted six new members at its February meeting. Pictured left to right: Karen Chaffinch, Sponsored By Bea Wright; Claire Hartstein, sponsored by Lois Hartstein; Betty Bounds, sponsored by Suzanne Layton; Kim Trivits, sponsored by Lois Hartstein’; Myrna Marine, sponsored by Fay Hutchinson; and Jan McCoy, sponsored by Dot Hickman. The members were installed by the Lioness liaison, Ron Scott. Submitted photo.

Happy EastEr

Reading is Fundamental winner Dunbar Principal, Judy Noll, with First Grader, Bobbi Crouch, from Mrs. Sava’s and Mrs. Small’s class. Bobbi read 406 books during the Reading is Fundamental celebration, which was the most for the school. The entire school read 20,348 books during RIF. (Picture by Marilyn Neat, Dunbar School RIF coordinator)

Email Your Photo with description (include names) to editor@mspublications.com


MORNING STAR • APRIL 9 - 15, 2009

PAGE 57

Progress may be a way of life, Doing the Towns Together but changes can still be hard LAUREL AND DELMAR SOCIALS Have you ever noticed that just about the time you get comfortable with something it either wears out, falls apart, breaks or simply stops performing correctly. Good examples of this state of affairs is a particular pair of shoes, a pair that you have worn for a long while and in fact, have worn so long that each toe has a special groove, the heels might be a little worn to one side, if they require shoe strings there just might be a spot where it has broken and you have tied a small knot rather than invest in a new pair of laces. Bath towels fall into this old, used, but still good category as they become softer with age. Washcloths, a particular blouse or shirt, or pair of slacks or trousers. Just when the trousers feel really good against your body, a break will appear in the pocket, or a small rip that grows rapidly will surface. Or suddenly the color seems to be terribly faded. These things always seem to happen at the most inopportune time. Such was the case recently at our home. A key piece of equipment was involved and there was no choice but to replace the worn old friend. When I was 15-years old, my parents bought my first typewriter. At that time I had started classes in typing, bookkeeping, office practices and shorthand in high school. The curriculum was known as being a student in Commercial. From the first day of classes I enjoyed typing, even though the large machine facing me at my desk was terribly overwhelming. Under Miss Frances Vogeding, our shorthand and typing teacher, we students soon mastered the challenge of the two subjects involved. Actually it was a case of mastering or facing her wrath and lectures. So, we mastered. My first typewriter was a small portable Royal typewriter. That machine opened up a new world of speed writing for me. It was also a means of added income to supplement my meager allowance. My oldest sister, a leftie with some of the world’s worst handwriting, paid me the grand sum of five cents per page to type up her special homework assignments. Under that agreement, we were both happy campers! That little portable Royal was used constantly for years and years. The roller carriage finally developed wear-holes and after about 40 years, the machine had to be thrown away. It was then that Chuck and I purchased an electric Royal. During most of the years I worked as a secretary, non-electric typewriters were used. The day the newer electric models came into our office, we secretaries thought we had died and gone to heaven. In short order we mastered control of this newest development. It was a challenge to each of us, and I must admit the sound of the little bell tinkling to indicate the carriage must be zoomed back to begin another line was sometimes nerve-wracking.

“For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.” -- John 3:16 Happy Easter From Your Friends at The Star

Moments With Mike Virginia ‘Mike’ Barton Electric typewriters have a stationery carriage and that was another adjustment. Plus, electric machines were quite an advancement for the business world. The new home Royal was a good and faithful servant for a long while, producing many types ages of information. Through the years I have typed mountains of publicity releases for various organizations I have participated in, homework essays for our children, reports of every imaginable kind. The list is endless. Our offspring joked about the fact that they were the only students in their college dorm that received typed letters from home as opposed to those written in longhand. The electric Royal was finally replaced by a newer model, since electric typewriters never last as long as the old-fashioned nonelectric models. In today’s world, typewriters can be purchased that incorporate word processing, have a built-in dictionary, and many other features. This week my old faithful machine died and needed immediate replacement. Computers have replaced typewriters for a vast majority of the population. But, there are still those of us without a computer whose needs are satisfied by using a simple new model typewriter. With the flick of a small gizmo, the type style can be changed from cursive to gothic, or from legal prestige to super grande. Correctable film ribbon eliminates the need for messy correction fluid, correctable ribbons may be used instead of nylon ribbons, the machine itself is lightweight and portable. Speed is determined by the user. The new machine prints clear copy. Crisp, clean type is really nice. But, even after all these years, I still miss that little bell indicating the end of the line has been reached. And, more than one secretary or stenographer released lots of frustration as she grasped that carriage return bar and gave it a strong heave to return the carriage to begin another line of type. Progress. It is a way of life.

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A surprise 80th birthday party was hosted by family members and friends of Marge Starr on March 30. The covered dish supper celebration was held at St. Philip’s Parish hall and attended by many of Marge’s friends and family-namely: her daughter and husband, Virginia and Curtis Hinckley from Florida; son, Michael and Mary Beth Starr from North Carolina; daughter and husband, Anne and Michael Reeder from Maryland; granddaughter, Lisa Chipps, great--granddaughter, Angelia, of Curtis Bay, Md,, and from Pasadena, Md. Beth Starr and grandchildren, Asleigh and Zachary. Other out of town guests were, Lee and Thomas Shaw, Richard and Grace Emerson, Patricia Emerson, Bernard and Louise Gerrettson and Harry and Bertha Bowie. Needless to say the guests and honoree had a great afternoon.

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At St. Philip’s Church on March 29, little Hunter Jane Lewis was baptized with family members and friends attending to celebrate this milestone in her young life. Hunter Jane is the daughter of Celeste and David Lewis of Chicago, her grandparents are Robert and Billie Jane Wheatley of our town and the god-parents are Steve and Melissa Farley also of Chicago.

From Laurel we wish a speedy recovery to Ben Thornton recovering from recent surgery.

Sara Ellis had a nice visit last week from her son, Mike, of Greensboro, N.C., so Sara took a break from making those tasty Easter eggs that the Ladies Auxiliary turn out every year - and I so enjoy mine each Easter - it makes my holiday complete when I bite into my coconut cream delight. With a gentle roar and fortified with a hot dinner the Laurel Lady’s Lioness conducted their monthly meeting last Thursday night at the Georgia House. After presenting and conducting their business at hand they held a Chinese auction for the entertainment segment of the evening. Most every member departed with at least one or two items, however, it appeared that Marge Starr and Carol McCrea just about needed to rent a UHaul to carry away their “stash.” A correction on the Friends of the Library book sale held at the library, April 13-18. The hours are: Monday and Tuesday, 10 a.m.-7:30 p.m.; Wednesday and Thursday, noon to 7:30 p.m.; Friday, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. and Saturday, 10 a.m.-2

The Laurel Garden Club will not meet on their usual Sunday as it falls on Easter. They will resume their activities with a business meeting on Sunday, April 19. Fifteen ladies from the Delmar New Century Club attended the recent membership luncheon, hosted by the Laurel Club at the Georgia House. From Delmar I learned that two of their friends, Joyce Lord and Clifford Beach are recuperating at home following recent stays at PRMC. They also wish a speedy recovery to young Conner Niblett who is currently a bit under the weather.

A very special happy birthday wish is extended to Don Phillips on April 15 from “you know who”_ J.M. and S.M. We extend our deepest sympathy to the family and friends of: Bonnie Maxine Huffman, Melissa VanderHoeven and Leonard Naggy. We continue with prayers for our service men and service women and our friends who are ill: Thomas Wright, Alvin Lutz, Harriett MacVeigh, Howard McCrea, Jean Henry, Calvin Hearn, Hattie Puckham, Patrick Starr, Steve Trivits, June Williams, Bob Horn, Cecile Jones, Mary Wilson, Bob Christian, Robert Truitt, Donald Layton, Sr., Martha Windsor and Flaudine Otwell. Happy April birthday wishes for: Virginia Pennington on April 10; Claire Andress and Marie White, April 11; Walter Dorman, Leatrice Hearn, Robert Steele, and Joanne Czernik, April 12; Mary Wilson, April 13; Theodosia Gordy and Rosalee Wilson, April 14; Kathleen Garey, Kitty Goff, Stanley Taylor and Barbara Smith, April 15; and Nora Lee Callaway, April 16. Hope you all have a happy, bright, warm Easter and enjoy those chocolate treats — all of them. See you in the stars.

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PAGE 58

MORNING STAR • ApRIl 9 - 15, 2009

Opinion Guest Column

Tea Party questions and answers

The Delaware Tax Day Tea The local Tea Parties are less than a week Party is Wednesday, away. I would like to try and April 15, in Janosik answer some of the questions I have been asked in the last Park in Laurel from couple of weeks. 4 to 8 p.m. What is the Tea Party about? It is about a group of American Citizens gathering together, using their 1st amendment right of free speech, to express our displeasure with the wasteful spending bills our government is implementing. The motto of the Tax Day Tea Party is Repeal the Pork/Cut the Taxes. Is this sponsored by some political group? No! Who will be the speakers? We are not planning to have any politicians speak at our events. We certainly welcome them to attend the party, but our events are about the people’s voice not the government’s. If you would like to speak, please let me know. How did you become state coordinator and have you ever done anything like this before? I volunteered and, no, I am usually just a mom, wife, and respiratory therapist. I grew up in Laurel and I am thrilled to be able to hold one of the Tax Day Tea Parties in Laurel. What do you hope to accomplish? I hope to show the current office holders that we are not happy with how our government is being directed. The silent majority will no longer remain silent. I hope to gather enough support to make us a force that will be listened to. It is only beginning on April 15th. Will you be throwing anything into the river like the Boston Tea Party? No. We want to be part of the solution not to cause more problems. This is why we have started the We The People Food Drive. This is our opportunity to show government that We The People, can recognize a problem and provide a solution faster and better than the government, and we will not require a contract, increased taxes or need a million dollar bonus. Who is going to monitor the results of all the action? We are going to start by publishing videos of all the Tax Day Tea Parties on the net. We are also creating a database so we can reach everyone and keep them informed and involved. This is only the beginning. How do you think you’ll be able to know if it has any effect at all? We will know when we begin to get our Country back. We will not stop until we do. How can I help or get involved? I really need help with all kinds of things. I need everything from chairs to people with wireless laptops. I am asking everyone who is tried of being silent to come out and help make our united voices heard. I need you. You contact me at Delawaretaxteaparty@gmail.com. We really need your help to make this a success. Chris Shirey

Laurel

Letters to the editor Our School, Our Future

As a concerned Laurel citizen committed to my community, I have decided to run for election for the Laurel School Board. I wholeheartedly believe in a public school education and I wholeheartedly believe in the Laurel community. To give our children the best opportunity and for Laurel to be the best it can be, the community and the school need to work hand in hand. I want to retain our students, our teachers and our staff in the Laurel School district. My three children were all educated in the Laurel School District and then went on to graduate from college. I understand completely the challenges students and parents experience striving to obtain the education and opportunities they expect and deserve to become successful and productive citizens. I promise my continuous support and dedication to the Laurel School District, the Laurel School Board and the Laurel Community and that is why I am asking for your support. I urge the residents of Laurel to participate in shaping our children’s and community’s future by voting in the Laurel School Board election on May 12. After all, it is Our School District, Our Community, Our Future. Lois Hartstein

Laurel

Plant a tree on Arbor Day

Back in 1973, when I was road supervisor and Jason Franks was mayor of Lawrence Township in Cedarville, N.J., Mayor Franks asked me what he could do for the Lawrence people that would stand out long after he was mayor. I told him this just happened to be the 100th anniversary of Arbor Day so he should get 100 shade trees and plant them around Lawrence Township so that everyone could enjoy them. He asked me where he could get 100 trees, what it would cost and where he would put them. I told him to ask property owners if they would like it if we planted a tree on their property. Most owners said they would love one, some even wanted more. It didn’t take long before they were all taken. I told him Mr. Hess of Hess’s Nursery had a lot of Norway Maple Shade Trees that were too big to sell

and he could probably make a deal with him for that many trees. I don’t know what kind of deal he made or how much they cost, but I do know that we got 100 trees. My truck had a 12-foot flat-bed dump and could handle 10 trees at a time, but Mr. Hess had to load them on my truck with his front-end loader. He loaded 10 trees at a time; I then chained each tree on except the last one so they wouldn’t slide off when I raised the bed. I then took my two men, Wallace French and his son-in-law Walt, and dug a hole big enough for each tree. I backed up the truck to the hole where we were going to plant that tree. I had to be careful putting each tree in. If I missed the hole, there would be no way we could lift it out of the hole. We dug another hole and I backed my truck up to that hole, and raised the body just high enough so the tree would slide off. Then we hauled the next tree and did the same, one by one, until we got all 10 trees planted. After we planted those 100 trees, more property owners wanted one. Mayor Franks said as long as Mr. Hess had more trees to go ahead and give them one until they run out. After we planted them all, I put two 55-gallon metal drums on the back of my pick-up and went to each tree, and with a short garden hose, siphoned water to each one. I don’t know how many are still living since I haven’t been up there for some time. It’s been 37 years now and I know some of those property owners have gone to meet our Lord, but their descendants are living to enjoy those trees. Now, if any of those people should meet Mayor Franks, they stop him, shake his hand and say, “Thanks Franks for looking out for our future too.” Arbor Day falls on Friday, April 24 this year and wouldn’t it be nice if all property owners planted at least one tree on their property, if only in memory of one of their loved ones? And yes, if the mayors in all the towns, cities, etc. did the same, that would be nice too. Calvin V. Keller Sr.

Laurel

Think for yourself

What is it going to take for the American people to wake up to what’s going on around them? People I talk with all say they are patriotic, but show a lack of inter-

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est in what’s going on around them whether it be in their government or their spiritual lives. There are many things we can point to as the cause, but I will focus on two. One is not believing the Bible and what it says to shape our behavior. This began in our theological seminaries when some professors that were really wolves in sheep’s clothing cast the first doubts on the validity of the Bible. This has had a spreading effect ever since. The second reason is little or no knowlege of the Constitution which puts constraints on our elected officials. This is why all citizens should have some knowledge of both because they can shine a light on the world around them, but I’m afraid it won’t happen because both are either banned or discouraged in our government schools. Our congress and their liberal lobbyists are playing a masterful game of disguising their socialistic agenda. They used the politics of fear to rush through a socialistic program - all in the name of economic stimulus. Ignoring the voters, they are in lock-step together bringing about socialistic change. They have spent this country into oblivion and God help you if you raise a voice of opposition against this insanity. We have heard for years how President Nixon had an enemies list, but now we have an administration that will come after you in much more ferocity than Nixon ever thought about. As Vladimir Lenin once instructed his education commissars, “We must teach our children to hate because it’s the basis of every socialist and communist movement.” Class envy has been a defining staple of the left for centuries, from the frenzied mobs of the French Revolution to the communist takeover in the Soviet Union in 1917. Now we have the masses circling around AIG executives, egged on by the very people that are responsible for this mess. Whether you agree or not, AIG executives should have received those bonuses. They do not deserve the hate. It’s inexcusable for our elected officials to act as they have been doing. Wake up people. You are being played like an old violin. Start thinking for yourselves. Larry Calhoun Laurel

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MORNING STAR • ApRIl 9 - 15, 2009

pAGE 59

Another point of view on Obama’s first 60 days in office Response to “Reflecting on President Obama’s first 60 days in office”

I am responding to some of the points Frank Calio made in his column from April 2-8, 2009. First of all I believe that running up a debt that is double what the entire preceding presidents have accumulated is irresponsible. Calio states that his programs are not cheap and his opponents accuse him of running up a terrible debt. His response is to blame it on the preceding administration, as if that makes it okay to leave a debt load to the next generations. Calio states that his economic package will result in people going back to work. Well, the unemployment rate continues to climb and the projection is for it not to stop growing until at least the end of the year. How is that creating jobs and providing for the people? So Calio and Obama believe that controlling the banks and healthcare (nationalizing or going more socialist) is the cure for everything? The greed of corporate America and the greed from both parties has resulted in many of our problems economically. Socially, the left wing folks who apologize for everything America has done while sending billions of dollars in financial aide overseas, bankrolling the UN, planned parenthood (the largest abortion supplier in the nation) and deciding to send more money overseas to fund more abortions is responsible?

Final Word Increasing federal funding for ACORN, a special interest group is responsible? And Calio wants to blame it all on the other side. If perhaps we would stop the finger pointing long enough to have an adult responsible discussion about issues we might get somewhere! Calio goes on to say that the opposition has offered no plan. I believe he is wrong. Last week McCain came out with a plan and the “opposition” did so as well. He further states that stimulus money going to states for new projects indicates the bleeding has slowed somewhat. But is building a bridge for Microsoft in Washington state, while the major commuting bridge that is ranked in the lowest tier for safety sits without any repairs responsible or is it just more politics as usual (just to name one)? And what of the other billions in earmarks in Obama’s budget? So, perhaps, we have voted for change believing the rhetoric that Obama would have the most transparent administration, and would not allow earmarks, Was this a lie? With the assault on social programs and their extension, his continued apolo-

gies overseas at the G20 summit and others, I believe Obama wants to reshape America into something more like Europe, his own socialist state woven seamlessly into the rest of the socialist nations.

John Poe Bridgeville

Fundraiser-Memorial Service

Renee Roissier Miller died tragically on March 4. She leaves behind, her husband Jamie Miller, and their nine children. A Fundraiser-Memorial Service will be held on April 19, 2009, 3-8 p.m. at Seacrets, to benefit the Miller children. Below is a website we set up to honor her memory. I hope you will take the time to read about Renee, her family and what happened to her. We are all devastated by her death and struggling to deal with this senseless tragedy. We remain hopeful and encouraged by the outpouring of love and concern that our friends, family and the community here and in Tennessee have shown our family. It gives us hope for a brighter future. The website is reneeroissiermiller.com

As you can imagine this has been extremely frustrating for DelDOT, as well as the public, I’m sure. If all goes well, we are looking at mid-April for a restart date. If you want to hold off on doing an article, we should be putting out a press release (reference the restart of ferry operations) April 14 or 15 with more information. Bottom line is that we want to put a safe and useful vessel back in service, and will not start operations until we are sure this is the case. Please thank the public for their patience during this time. Thank you for your patience!

What can I do to help?

What can I do to help? As a child I spoke these words every morning but until recently I did not realize how much I had taken them for granted. Please help our country through these troubled times by praying every day. God, please help us once again to be the United States of America, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. Amen Mary Karoly

The Woodland Ferry saga

Following is a response from DelDOT to an inquiry by the Star about the ferry. DelDOT, Chesapeake Shipbuilding and George & Lynch have isolated and repaired all hydraulic leaks to date. They are currently focusing on ramping issues.

Seaford

The Final Word is a compilation of thoughts from Star staffers and members of the public. Email items to editor@ms publications.com or mail to Star, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973. Include your name, hometown and a daytime number.

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April 9, 2009_L