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MORAVIAN COLLEGE MAGAZINE • SPRING/SUMMER 1999

Linda Shay Gardner ’74 rescues victims of parental abduction


Commencement 1999

Kathryn Kelleman ’99 with her brother James ’98, grandfather William G. Palenchar ’52, and sister Amy ’93.

Gonzalo Garcia-Pedroso and Wendy L. Esch were elected to give the statements of the bachelor’s and master’s graduates.

Harry Dimopoulos (left) presented H. A. Wagner (next) and Priscilla Payne Hurd (next) presented Charles Peischl (right) for honorary degrees). Here they chat before the processional.

Katherine Scheneman ’99 with her father Mark ’70.

Jamie Druckenmiller ’99 with her grandfather Michael H. Picucci ’54.

Sarah Kish ’99 with her sister Jennifer, brother Andrew, mother Jamie, father Frank ’64, and sister Annie.

Twin graduates Becky and T. J. Hutler ’99 with their father Ted ’71.

Jill Hollinger ’99 with her mother Diane, father Nevin ’65, sister-in-law Kendra Hilmer Hollinger ’96, and brother Jed ’96. Photos: John Palcewski ’86.


Moravian College Magazine Staff Editor Assistant editor Sports editor

Susan Overath Woolley Judith K. Mehl Mark J. Fleming

Alumni Relations Staff Director Bertha Francis Knisely ’69 Assistant director Elizabeth K. Martin Class notes assistant Patricia Murray Hanna ’82 Student assistant Lisa Hahn ’00

MORAVIAN COLLEGE MAGAZINE • SPRING/SUMMER 1999

The Moravian College Magazine is published three times a year for the information and pleasure of Moravian College and Moravian Theological Seminary alumni, faculty, staff, students, parents, and friends. Readers are cordially invited to submit articles and opinion essays to be considered for publication in the Magazine. Submissions should be typed, double-spaced. Criteria for acceptance include timeliness, relevance to the life and interests of Moravian College and its community, and excellence of writing. Letters to the editor about issues discussed in the Magazine are welcome. Any reader who has access to electronic mail may send letters to the Magazine through that medium. Susan Woolley’s Internet address is woolley@ moravian.edu or mesow01@moravian.edu. U.S. Mail will get to the editors, too! Anyone who wishes to contact the Alumni Office may do so at (610) 861-1366, by fax at (610) 861-3945, or via the Internet at alumrel@moravian.edu. Deadlines for submitting articles and for sending news to class correspondents are: Fall issue: June 15 Winter issue: October 15 Spring issue: February 15 All accepted articles, class correspondence, and letters to the editor will be subject to editing.

Table of Contents Around Campus

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Seeking the Lost Lambs

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Smile for the Spam Cam

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Remembering the Forgotten Victims

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James J. Heller, 1921-1999

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Greyhound Sports

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Alumni Association News

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Class Notes

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Copyright © 1999 by Moravian College. Photographs and artwork copyright by their respective creators or by Moravian College. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reused or republished in any form without express written permission.

Moravian College, in compliance with federal and state laws and regulations governing affirmative action and non-discrimination, does not discriminate in the recruitment, admission, and employment of students, faculty, and staff in the operation of any of its educational programs and activities as defined by law. Accordingly, nothing in this publication should be viewed as directly or indirectly expressing any limitation, specification, or discrimination as to race, religion, color, or national origin; or to handicap, age, sex, sexual orientation, or status as a disabled or Vietnam era veteran except as required by law. Inquiries concerning this policy may be directed to Mr. Dennis Domchek, Vice President for Administration, Moravian College, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18018, (610) 861-1360.

Volume 48, No. 2 Moravian College Magazine Spring/Summer 1999 Cover photo

Stephen Barth 3


Around Campus Moravian Appoints New Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty In April, President Ervin Rokke announced the appointment of Randall K. Packer as vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty at Moravian College. He will officially join the Moravian community on July 1, 1999. Packer has been a member of the biology department of George Washington University in Washington, D.C., since 1971, where he rose from the rank of assistant professor to full professor and served as chair of the 25-member department from 1987 to 1996. He is the author or co-author of 24 articles on the biology and physiology of fish and mammals, has given numerous presentations and invited lectures at national conferences and other venues, and has been a visiting scientist at the National Institutes of Health and at instituPhoto: Ann Grillo. tions in Canada and England. He received his undergraduate degree in biology and secondary education at Lock Haven State College in Pennsylvania, and his Ph.D. in zoology at Pennsylvania State University. “Dr. Packer brings to our community a broad and impressive range of experience as a teacher, advisor, administrator, and leader in undergraduate programs, as well as an exceptional record of productive research,” said President Rokke. “That experience—in faculty development, departmental leadership, program development, and administration—makes him ideally suited to his new position at Moravian. “Dr. Packer was selected after a thorough, rigorous screening and interview process, which involved a number of outstanding candidates. Despite the challenge of such an exceptional field, the search committee that conducted the selection process has clearly led us to the best possible candidate. Faculty, trustee, student, and staff members of the committee—and certainly committee chair Bettie Smolansky—should be commended for their demonstrated commitment to this critical effort. “In his initial communication with the search committee, Dr. Packer offered a telling comment about his strong interest in Moravian College. ‘I have broad intellectual interests outside science, particularly in literature,’ he observed. ‘Although I have had a productive research career, my first love has always been teaching undergraduates in a liberal arts curriculum. I would like to continue my administrative career at an institution where the focus is on undergraduate liberal arts education.’ Dr. Packer’s aspirations in that regard suit him very well for his new role and responsibilities at Moravian College. “I hope you will join me in welcoming Dr. Packer to our community.”

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Faculty Explores Writing across the Curriculum with the Help of Two Grants Faculty members completed the second of two workshops in February as part of a writing across the curriculum program made possible by a Christian A. Johnson Fund grant for faculty development. A third program is set for this summer, funded by the Faculty Development and Research Committee. “Writing across the curriculum is an effort to involve writing in as many courses and programs as possible and to not limit instruction and student experience with writing to English courses. It is also a way to increase the practice of writing as a mode of learning, not just as a way for students to tell professors what they have learned,” said Joel Wingard of the English Department. Under the new general education curriculum at Moravian, writing across the curriculum is to take the form of an interdisciplinary first-year writing course required of all students and at least one writingintensive course in every academic major. Last year’s workshop, led by Rebecca Moore Howard, a faculty member at Texas Christian University, focused on writing across the curriculum generally. The February workshop provided food for thought for the development or revision of writing intensive courses within disciplinary majors. It was led by Steve North of the English Department at the State University of New York at Albany. He led participants through exercises designed to clarify thinking on writing assignments in disciplinespecific courses. They also discussed refining expectations for the development of student writing within their disciplines over time. This summer, a faculty development seminar led by Joyce Hinnefeld of the English Department and Joel Wingard will address issues of the interdisciplinary first-year composition course.


Adaptive Computer System Aids Low-Vision and Blind Students Imagine a computer system that allows a blind person to place a book on a flatbed scanner, push a button, and ten seconds later have the system reading the scanned pages out loud—a system that allows the blind to read. Moravian College now has a system that does this and much more. The new adaptive system serves low-vision and blind students and persons with alternate learning-style preferences. It was installed in March at Reeves Library. “The system represents a strong commitment by the College to serve students with adaptive needs. It is a very exciting step forward for Moravian,” said Bev Kochard, vice president for student affairs and dean of students. The system includes: a speech synthesis program that allows totally blind persons to navigate through Windows and Windows applications such as word processors, e-mail and Web browsers; a program that takes scanned documents such as books, magazines, or other printed material, converts them to text and reads the documents out loud; software to present information in many different ways to assist learners who need flexibility in how they engage the material they need to learn; and a program that enlarges text to allow persons with low vision to read text off a screen. A Braille-N-Speak that functions as a Braille notepad with speech synthesis was also acquired as part of the project.

gramming in support of scholarship. The Northeast Panhellenic Conference represents all colleges and universities with greek systems from Maine to Maryland. Moravian’s sororities consistently earn organizational grades above the allwomen’s average. The award was given for achievement during the spring 1998 and fall 1998 semesters. For spring 1998, the all-sorority GPA was a 3.28, and the all-women’s a 2.97 and for fall of 1998, the all-sorority GPA was a 3.14 and the all-women’s a 2.91. In addition, each sorority earned a GPA at or above a 3.0 during that period.

“Prevention, Protection, Detection” Enhances Safety The Department of Campus Safety has always been responsible for maintaining a safe and pleasant environment for students, faculty, and staff to live, work, and learn. The department, through its police coverage and prevention programs, serves to protect campus life and property, prevent and detect crime on campus, and provide essential safety services to the College community. Though these services have been generally available in the past the

Bequest Supports Professors Who Made a Difference A bequest from a DCS alumnus will make it possible for Moravian’s computer science professors to make the same difference in future students’ lives that they had made in his own. Francis J. Dolegiewicz ’87 provided for Moravian College with a bequest totalling 40% of his estate. A first distribution of $180,000 has been received. Following a career as a pollution control technician at Bethlehem Steel and an accountant for Wal-Mart,

Color Them Thrilled

Sororities Receive Award for Academics and Scholarship The Moravian College Panhellenic Council, the coordinating council for sororities on campus, received the Northeast Panhellenic Conference Award for Excellence in Scholarship at the annual Northeast Panhellenic Conference Leadership Conference held February 18-21 in Stamford, Connecticut. The Excellence in Scholarship Award is presented in recognition of academic achievement, as well as pro-

department has made several additions and changes this past year. Campus Safety has been conducting informative programs for the students and the faculty and staff, added a new emergency outside phone line (610 861-0364), and produced a brochure to clarify its services to students. The program list includes sessions on sexual assault/rape, date rape drugs, escort services, “Operation I-Dent,” campus safety, dorm safety, fake IDs, alcohol awareness, heroin addiction, and vandalism. The department also conducted a program outlining, for faculty and staff, Moravian’s process for responsible reporting of offenses.

Thank-you cards designed by Carly Silvesti ’99, Katy Fiandaca ’99, and Tiffany van Gorden ’00.

Two weeks after trustee Philip Erdle found out that Moravian’s art students were struggling to output their best computer work on an eight-year-old color printer that was continually breaking down, the graphics lab had a networked Hewlett-Packard 8500 color laser printer, thanks to his energy and generosity. It is already getting a workout, serving 16 students twice a day, every day. Anne Dutlinger, director of the graphic design program, said, “The new printer is helping students present themselves on a professional level, understand quality, and produce their work in a physical form they can be proud of.” One of its first fruits was a series of thank-you cards to Phil Erdle and President Rokke from the students who are using it.

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Dolegiewicz met an untimely death in April 1998 at age 47. George Nakata, executor of the estate, commented that Frank spoke with him about how the excellent professors at Moravian “really made a difference in his life.” John Stoneback, department chair, remembers Frank as “a dedicated student, a neat guy to have in class. Frank produced wonderful work and once mentioned to me that his computer training really helped him with his personal investing.” Frank’s bachelor of science degree in 1987 from Moravian was not his first. His love of education brought him back to school 11 years after earning a B.S. in 1972 in chemical engineering at Lehigh University. Frank came to Moravian as a computer science major in the Division of Continuing Studies from 1983 to 1987. In May 1989 Frank received a master’s degree in computer science from Villanova University. The large gift from his estate was not his first either. In 1988 he created a modest endowment at Moravian to honor the memory of his parents, Agnes and John Dolegiewicz. This fund provides support for the Computer Science Department and ensures that the department remains competitive and technologically current. “Frank’s generosity is an example of how one man can

make a difference. His significant gift will help the Computer Science Department continue to purchase the hardware and software it needs to give our students exposure to cutting-edge technology. Generations of students will benefit from Frank’s thoughtful preparation and his name will always be remembered at Moravian,” said Linda Robertson, director of development.

SIFE Wins Regional Championship

Moravian College’s Students in Free Enterprise team (SIFE), after only a few months in operation, went to the Regional Exposition and Career Opportunity Fair in New Orleans this past April and came away champions. The eleven students and advisor John D. Rossi of the Economics and Business Department brought back two trophies, $1,500 in prize money, and an invitation to the international competition in Kansas City May 16-18. The trophies were the Regional Championship trophy and the Rookie of the Year trophy, given to the most impressive first-year team. Rossi, as advisor, was named a Sam M. Walton Free Enterprise Fellow in recognition of his leadership and support of the program. SIFE students presented their outreach programs to a panel of local and national business leaders and entrepreneurs who rated the overall effectiveness of each team’s efforts. Students also met with dozens of corporate representatives from the business community to discuss job opportunities. Regional champions named at sixteen competitions held SIFE team members display their awards in New Orleans. First row: in North America, Kenneth Usuki, Daniel Kent, Nick Kimball (team captain), Ryan Purdy, in Central Asia, Sammy Franzosa, John Rossi (advisor). Second row: Roy Lee, Allison Richardi, Becky Matijasich, Vincent Bordieri, Allison Fisk, Joe Wiedmayer. and Brazil presented 6

their projects at the Hallmark Cards/ SIFE International Exposition and Career Opportunity Fair in May. At the international exposition, SIFE team members had the opportunity to network with hundreds of leading CEOs, presidents and executives of major U.S. corporations, and SIFE sponsoring organizations, and came away with their second Rookie of the Year trophy, this time on the international level. Students in Free Enterprise encourages students to take classroom learning, apply it to real-life situations, and use the knowledge to better their communities through educational outreach projects. The mission of SIFE, a nonprofit organization, is to provide college students the best opportunity to make a difference and to develop leadership, teamwork, and communication skills through learning, practicing, and teaching the principles of free enterprise. SIFE is also a major sponsor of “Make a Difference Day” and encourages all team members to participate. Team members who have completed a minimum of 50 hours on SIFE projects are eligible to become a “Certified SIFE Scholar” and make use of the ResSearch electronic database to search for career opportunities. These opportunities are for full-time careers, as well as internships and summer employment.

Student Services Launches Community Service Venture In April Moravian initiated the “Sharing the Wealth of Knowledge” Program, which is funded through the generosity of Air Products & Chemicals, Inc. The program is a cooperative service-learning initiative involving children in the Bethlehem Area School District and area youth agencies. It is expected to be beneficial in many ways. It will bring to campus 30 to 40 atrisk elementary school students who have been nominated by their schools to participate in the program. These children will be paired with a Moravian College student to form a mentoring/ tutoring relationship.


It will offer Moravian a chance to experiment with the service-learning concept. “In the months ahead, we will be talking to faculty members about having their classes make presentations to these children while they are on campus. We expect to schedule five or six campus visits each semester on Saturdays beginning fall 1999,” said Bev Kochard, vice president for student affairs and dean of students. Finally, it will provide a support system for the parents of children participating in the program, enabling Moravian to partner with members of the community and the schools with which they are associated. Those who will gain from this venture include the at-risk elementary students who receive academic and personal support, the parents of these students who access a support network, the Moravian students who acquire mentoring and tutoring experience, and college community members who benefit from exposure to a novel servicelearning partnership. Sally Donches ’93 was named coordinator of the program. She was active for many years in various Lehigh Valley community service projects, most recently with the volunteer programs at St. Luke’s Hospital. Her husband, Steve Donches, is a member of the Moravian College Board of Trustees.

Martha Stockton Hancock Joins Moravian Theological Seminary Board of Trustees Martha Stockton Hancock joined the Moravian Theological Seminary Board of Trustees in April. She also serves as a trustee of Salem Academy and College in Winston-Salem, N.C. She received a bachelor’s degree in religion from Randolph-Macon College and earned a master’s degree in education and counseling from Wake Forest University. She has a private counseling practice and serves in a variety of roles at Home Moravian Church where she chairs the Christian Education committee and is a lead teacher for the catechism class.

Campus Faces The personal and professional lives of Dr. A. Kathrine Miller ’34 have been inextricably bound to that of the College for more than sixty-five years. Better known as Kitty, this dynamic member of the Moravian community has served actively as student, alumna, educator, trustee, and biographer of its founder, Benigna von Zinzendorf. As president of the Moravian College alumni association for four years, she was a tireless orchestrator of alumni activities. Her leadership on the Board of Trustees culminated in her appointment as a Life Trustee in 1994. She has garnered nearly every honor the College has to bestow: the Medallion of Merit Award in 1961, the Comenius Alumni Award in 1969, and in 1998 the honorary degree of Doctor of Humanities. At 85, Kitty remains an active participant in Moravian’s life and is also an ardent gardener, naturalist, and birdwatcher. Kitty became interested in the life of Benigna when asked to speak at Founder’s Day in 1982. Because Kitty A. Kathrine Miller at Moravian’s 1998 could find no publication in English Commencement. Photo: Aardvark Studios. on the life of Benigna she translated a German article that resulted in two publications in the Transactions of the Moravian Historical Society, 1992, Vol. 27. The first piece was a compilation on Benigna’s life, “A Short History of the Life of Benigna, Baroness Von Watteville, Countess Von Zinzendorf,” and the second was the translation, “Benigna’s First Visit to North America: A Translation from Johann Ritter’s Life of Benigna.” In addition to being a lifelong proponent of Moravian College, Kitty is a committed educator and acclaimed researcher. She received her B.A. in biology from Moravian in 1934 and her M.S. from Columbia University in 1936. She worked at Moravian for more than six years as an assistant professor of biology before continuing on to Cornell University and earning a Ph.D. in bacteriology in 1942. Her long and distinguished record as a researcher in microbiology has been marked by a realized commitment to alleviating human illness and suffering. Her research in bacteriology and pharmacology at Sharp and Dohme and at the Merck Institute led to the development of many pharmaceuticals, including antibiotics used in chemotherapy. In 1996, the New York Academy of Sciences formally honored Dr. Miller for her significant contributions to the academy and to the greater scientific community for more than fifty years. Dr. Miller’s very active participation in a host of professional associations is further testimony to her enormous influence on her chosen field. She is a Diplomat Emeritus of the American Board of Microbiology, and is a member of the American Society for Industrial Microbiology, the American Academy of Microbiology, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Her contributions to these bodies include a study and published report in 1968 on the status and progress of women in scientific careers.

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Seeking the Lost Lambs The calm routines of a warm June morning were rattled by a phone call from the State Department. The caller said that a little girl whose father had abducted her six months ago had been retrieved in Honduras by U.S. agents. Could the girl’s mother meet her daughter at the Miami airport in five hours? Frederick P. Rooney ’75 and Linda Shay Gardner ’74 had waited many months for this alert. As law partners who have found and returned dozens of stolen children to bereft parents, Rooney and Gardner have often spent agonizing months, even years, for a signal that lost children had been found. “It’s frustrating sitting with a wall in front of you,” Gardner says of the waiting. “You know the FBI or other investigators are doing something, but it can seem like they’re not.” It has been an experience they describe, by turns, as wrenching, chilling, exhausting, and, in those moments of triumph, exhilerating. For their diligence, they have been called miracle workers and human rights crusaders by a wide circle of admirers that includes, beyond the reunited families themselves, those who have read the many newspaper accounts of their sometimes dramatic rescues and a collection of toughto-impress fellow lawyers. On the strength of that reputation, the Pennsylvania Bar Association recently singled out the firm for its prized pro bono award for exemplary public service. Rooney missed the award dinner. He was flying to Europe returning a toddler to his Hungarian mother. So on that June morning when the State Departmant rang, Rooney and Gardner were ready to pounce. The mother of the six-year-old girl was reached by phone in Montana. She would be unable to get to Miami on time, but quickly deputized Gardner to look after the girl until she could arrive. Then the two lawyers, Batman and Robin style, piled in a car and raced to the airport. There, as often happens in their joint enterprise, their minds did not exactly meet. Rooney, the frugal one, wanted to park in the long-term lot and it was full; Gardner believed time was too short to go farther. In the end, Rooney dashed into the terminal to get tickets, Gardner found parking in the long-term lot and they were able to board the plane only because a half-dozen drunken passengers had held up the flight. In Miami, the dazed little girl was reunited with her tearful mother. The father, under detention in Miami after his capture with the girl, would face charges. Another bitter happy ending. “The names and faces are different,” Rooney says, “but the issues are the same. A parent unilaterally decides that he or she is the more adequate parent and becomes judge and jury, removing the child from the other parent. It is a violation of the child’s human right to maintain a meaningful relationship with

both parents.” While they were at Moravian, Rooney and Gardner knew each other mostly as fellow partygoers, and their paths had crossed occasionally since. Three years ago, while Gardner was finishing Temple Law School, Rooney, already well known for his work with abducted children, asked Gardner to join his firm. Her goal was to practice on her own. “I told him I didn’t take direction well,” she recalls. “He said, ‘I don’t give direction.’ And you know what? He doesn’t.” Two strong personalities with a common commitment and unusual legal partnership. Each sees quirks in the other; more significantly, each reveres the other’s heart and calls it extraordinary. Both rank the other number one in lawyerly compassion. “We’re like brother and sister,” Rooney says. “We love each other very dearly, and we can also duke it out.” As a Spanish major at Moravian, Rooney spent a year in Colombia. On returning, his thinking took a sharp turn as the result of professor Gary Olson’s political science courses. Rooney says Olson left a lasting impression, making him aware of the suffering on the Third World caused by the U.S. He began to view American foreign policy with a critical eye and to hone a desire to fight for the poor here and in Latin America (among other gestures, he donates a six-acre plot he owns in Nicaragua to peasant farmers). For the young man who had as a high school student led protests in favor of the Vietnam war, the turnabout was striking. “Gary Olson gave me political awareness and courage to go Tamara Fritz, above, was abducted twice by her mother. Here, Linda Gardner listens as Robin against the stream,” Rooney Weber tells of her search for her son Robert Vickery. All photos: Stephen Barth. says. At the same

by Kenneth A. Briggs

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time, a case of re-entry blues upon his return from Colombia led him to the Latin culture of Bethlehem’s Puerto Ricans. He entered law school only after several nomadic years of social work in Pennsylvania, teaching English in Puerto Rico and spending six months on an Israeli kibbutz (where one of his jobs, chopping up chickens for the kitchen, turned him into a vegetarian). But he’d always had a hankering for law school. “I knew eventually I’d study law,” he says, “because on a daily basis I was bombarded by the injustices that happen to poor people every day. I had to study law to effectively help people—I had to do more than social work.” He has. Many of his poor clients pay reduced fees or nothing at all. The firm counts on income from family and immigrant law to pay its bills, but struggles to stay solvent. Rooney himself draws no income from the practice, relying on sources outside the firm. Rooney’s baptism in child abduction took place in 1987 when he was fresh from law school working for Legal Services. A brother and sister who had been taken by their father from the Lehigh Valley six years before were located in Tennessee when someone noticed pictures of the children on a milk carton. In processing the case, which involves securing the proper court orders for returning children, Rooney was guided by Tom Watts, head of a group called Children’s Rights of Pennsylvania which is linked to the larger National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. Watts’s passion for the plight of lost children rubbed off on Rooney. “Tom became my mentor,” Rooney says, “and from there it just snowballed.” At a point where his normal surplus of energy had been spent on a flurry of abduction cases, Gardner came along as if by act of Providence with the skills and dedication to take the baton. She has since absorbed most of the new cases and, in Rooney’s words, become “one of the nation’s experts” in the field. Rooney, meanwhile, has been dividing his time between practicing law in Bethlehem and running an innovative program for lawyers three days a week at the City University of New York Law School, where he was a member of its first graduating class in 1986. Funded by the Soros Foundation, the program provides a group of 30 recent graduates of the law school, all practicing solo, an opportunity to acquire technical and educational resources in how to handle a wider variety of cases in order to serve more needy people, as Rooney has done in Bethlehem. Gardner came to Bethlehem in 1968 when her father, Earl Shay, a Moravian missionary, was appointed to the Moravian Theological Seminary faculty as professor of practical theology (now emeritus). As she approached her 25th reunion this spring at Moravian, she looked back gratefully on what she considered “a very well-rounded education,” and especially the tutelege of professor of sociology James Highlander (now emeritus like her father), who “always encouraged me to do something different.” Her goal was social work; as a student, she got involved with projects for drug addicts (“I used to pull people out of bars to give them their Methadone”) and psychiatric patients. After 18 years of running adult education programs at various Lehigh Valley colleges, she felt the tug of law school.

The Café Havana in South Bethlehem, which offers lots of vegetarian fare as well as its famous Cuban Sandwich, is a favorite hangout for Fred Rooney. Its owners, Tony and Alma Fernandez, are his friends and Alma is a colleague as well; she serves as accountant and office manager in his firm. She met Fred through her work as an interpreter for the Social Security Administration when he was first starting out as a lawyer; she stepped in to help when his office accounting system was computerized, and stayed on.

To complete the degree at Temple, she trekked to Philadelphia five days a week for three years, departing Bethlehem before 7:00 a.m., returning 12 hours later. While she was still in school, Rooney asked her if she could find some information at Temple that related to the case of the Hungarian child taken illegally to the U.S. by his father. Gardner took the challenge and was on her way to being hooked. She now says she spends about one third of her practice on stolen children, all of them, she says, “heartbreaking.” In most cases in which a parent disappears with a child (roughly estimated to be upwards of 350,000 a year), the crisis is resolved in days or weeks. The most common cause is quarrels between parents which result in one of them storming off with the children, who are returned when cooler heads prevail. But hundreds of boys and girls remain hidden away. The State Department believes about 800 of those missing children have been taken to foreign nations each year. In half of those cases, the department says, the children have been taken to countries which subscribe to the Hague Treaty, adopted in 1988 by 36 nations including the U.S., which stipulates that the abductees be returned to the country from which they were taken. The other half have disappeared into nations which refuse to honor the treaty. Rooney and Gardner seek simply to bring children back to the circumstances where custody provisions can be defined by the court. In some cases, the kidnapping breaks an existing agreement; in others, terms have not been spelled out. The credo of the two lawyers is that children should be given every possible chance to be with both parents. But often that goal is difficult, even impossible, to achieve in the face of legal roadblocks, broken promises, and explosive feelings. 9


In the end, however, it is all for In 1995, Christine and Michael Lops the sake of Tamara Fritz and Robert agreed to joint custody in the process Vickery and Carmen and Claire Lops of obtaining a divorce in Germany. A and the flood of children like them month later, Michael Lops disapwho have been ripped from the arms peared with the girls, to South Caroof one parent by the other. Rooney lina, then to North Augusta, Georand Gardner have doggedly pursued gia. In late 1997, they were discovresolution of the conflicts and the ered in Georgia and Gardner was mysteries that attend these painful contacted to help plead the mother’s episodes. case (the father claimed the mother Tamara, a pretty girl of seven with had “abandoned” the children). The bright brown eyes, jet-black hair, and case was pure melodrama. A U.S. radiant charm, was kidnapped by her district judge said the girls should be mother, Elizabeth Knight Lloyd, not returned to their mother under the just once but twice. The first took terms of the Hague Treaty. Then the The reuniting of Mike Fritz and his daughter Tamara is a story place in 1996 when Lloyd absconded 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals with a happy ending. with her daughter to Canada to avoid stopped them from leaving until it sentencing on conviction of passing bad checks. The FBI could evaluate the father’s appeal. A family court judge in brought them back. The second occurred in 1988 after Lloyd South Carolina claimed jurisdiction over the case, ordering won visiting rights with Tamara and again found herself in Christine Lops to move to that state or risk losing custody. trouble with the law, charged with stealing from her employer. Finally, the 11th Circuit appeals court both nullified the South She fled to Ireland, then Scotland, where an extradition squad Carolina opinion and permitted the mother, now broke, to from the U.S. Embassy in London found them. Lloyd was jailed return with her daughters to Germany. Gardner says she deand Tamara was reunited with her father, Mike Fritz, a forklift voted at least four months to the case, making frequent trips to operator from Hanover Township, Pennsylvania. As she hugs Georgia. Pro bono. her bearish dad, she happily tells of being in the Brownies. Where clients can pay their fair share, Rooney says, they Lloyd awaits extradition back to Northampton County to face should do so. “Lawyers shouldn’t make all the sacrifices,” he charges. says. But there are many hard cases and some defeats, like the Robert is now five. He is a bundle of energy and extremely Egyptian woman whose husband tricked her into signing wary of anything that might make him lose control. For more divorce papers, locked her in their apartment and ran away than three years, he was out of the reach of his mother, Robin with the couple’s five-year-old son. Five years later, the mother, Weber. She and the father, Billy Hannah Jacobs, was told the child Vickery, were living in Arizona when, was in Colorado. She flew there one night, Vickery said he was going immediately, expecting a cheerful, down the road to visit his sister and tearful reunion. It didn’t happen that took the boy with him all the way to way. The boy rebuffed her as a California. Weber searched in vain stranger and a Colorado court ruled for Robert. Only when a case worker that the boy stay with the father on for the California family assistance grounds that she hadn’t tried hard program tracked her down (she had enough to find her son. She returned moved back to the Lehigh Valley to to her minimum wage job with scant be with her family) and informed her hope of seeing her son again. that Robert and his father were living Given the stresses and the volon public assistance did she know ume, what is it that keeps Rooney where her son was. Gardner guided and Gardner at this arduous work? her through the process, serving as Rooney appeals to deeply embedded friend and cheerleader as well as ideals. “I tend to be saddened by what counsel. In the summer of 1998, Robert Vickery, in a rare moment of closeness with his mother, people do to each other,” he says, Weber flew across country to retrieve lets her help him show off his newly-acquired grownup teeth to pensively, “and I hope we can rise Linda Shay Gardner. her son. It was not a joyful reunion. above the bitterness and anguish. I Robert didn’t know his mother and hope we can rise to the level of love.” wanted nothing to do with her. His father had married a Gardner, who has been moved to tears by many of these enwoman Robert referred to as his mother. Weber has been counters, says simply that she labors “to see the joy of parents patient. Robert is slowly warming up to her—a hug and a kiss reunited with their children.” every now and then on the fly. Kenneth A. Briggs is a free-lance writer and former religion editor of Carmen, 8, and Claire, 7, are back in Germany with their the New York Times. mother, Christine Lops, but only after years of legal haggling. 10


Smile for the Spam Cam

Color photos: Above, Andrew adjusts his slit camera. The Spam Cam is in front of his right hand and the drainpipe camera is in the foreground on the left. At right, Andrew displays the Lego camera, which was featured in the Senior Show. Below right, Andrew and Jeff Hurwitz critique his work.

For Andrew Mingione ’99, a camera isn’t necessarily something you buy. It’s something you can make out of the most unexpected materials. There’s the Spam Cam, made out of (surprise!) a Spam can, emptied of its contents, spray-painted black inside and fitted with two little glued-in dowels to hold a piece of photographic paper, and pierced with a pinhole. “You use your finger for the shutter,” said Andrew. A pinhole camera is the simplest, most primitive kind of camera. There is no lens. The Spam Cam takes a small round vignette with soft edges, forming a negative image directly on the photographic paper. The Lego camera is slightly more sophisticated: it has a hinged cover for the pinhole. “I had a lot of Legos left over from things I’ve built,” said Andrew (he had an elaborate Lego pirate ship in his studio, complete with firing cannons). “I figured I could make a camera out of them.” He did, and it works. Then there is the drainpipe camera, made of a segment of PVC plastic drainpipe with three standard plugs. The plug on the “front” side of the pipe is fitted with a real shutter, cannibalized from a cheap camera. It’s spring-operated, but it can also be pulled back and left open. Since the exposure time for taking a picture directly onto paper is long, this is what Andrew usually does. Some of Andrew’s cameras actually started life as cameras, but they have undergone transformations in his hands. The slit camera is one of these; Andrew attached a motor to the filmwinder and a cable release to the motor, and changed the camera’s aperture into a slit. When he presses the cable release, the film is drawn past the slit, recording what’s in front of it in a series of stripes. A moving person in front of the camera will appear to be still as the background appears to move in a blur. It creates odd and interesting effects; any part of the subject that moves faster than the film gets spread out, and any part that moves more slowly gets compressed. “It’s been great to have Andrew around,” said Jeff Hurwitz, Moravian’s photographer-in-residence, in whose course in Photo Art Processes Andrew got turned on to pinhole photography. “You come to his images and they’re a surprise; they push the envelope a little. And students see that work, and they say, ‘Oh, wow, I could do that,’ and prospective students say, ‘This is a place where I could do that.’ So it’s great for me, too, because it creates interest in the area.” Black and white photos: Above left, the slit camera captures Leahn Agnew ’99 in mid-run as the background blurs past. Far left,the Spam Cam’s tiny South Campus vignette is shown both in the original negative image and a positive version. At left is Andrew’s self-portrait taken with the drainpipe camera; the exposure was so long that he had to lie down to hold still. Color photos: Stephen Barth. Black and white photos: Andrew Mingione. 11


Remembering the

Forgotten Victims by Susan Overath Woolley

A Moravian student’s Honors project on the persecution of the gypsies in the Holocaust wins her a Fulbright Scholarship to Germany.

When Marianne Zwicker ’99 looked for a topic for her Honors thesis, she had no idea that it would lead her back to her childhood and half across the world, or that it would take her in her father’s footsteps, or that it would culminate in an achievement that no Moravian graduate has managed for over thirty years. She just wanted an interesting project. At the end of her junior year, Marianne, a German major, had been working on the AIDS Memorial Quilt Committee which brought the Names Project quilt to Moravian. She was moved by the devastation of the disease and the way it had been ignored during the early stages of its progress. She became interested in the subject of unknown or unacknowledged genocides. A project on AIDS was out of the question—it was too big a topic, and there was no locally-available advisor. But then Professor Hans Wuerth showed her a book he had bought at the National Holocaust Museum called Sinti and Roma. She didn’t know what the title referred to. “It’s the gypsies,” he told her; “they were victims of the Holocaust, like the Jews, but most people aren’t aware of the extent of their persecution.” “I’d always been fascinated by gypsies, ever since I was little,” said Marianne. “I wanted to be one for Halloween every year, and my favorite book when I was little was called Gypsy Summer. But I had no idea who they really were, or where they came from, or where they actually live now. And that was the biggest challenge when I began to research them—a lot isn’t known, because they didn’t write down their own history. So other people have had to figure it out, and many of the people who have written on the gypsies have filled their accounts with stereotypes.” The Holocaust was the culmination of a long history of persecution, Marianne discovered. Ever since the gypsies showed up in Europe in the fifteenth century (originally from India, by way of Persia, according to the generally-accepted scholarship) their way of life has been both their strength and their danger. Their close-knit clannishness and their mobility gave them resources to face adversity, but it also set them apart from the settled communities through which they moved, as did their “foreign” language, and they were regarded with a suspicion which they returned (they call non-gypsies “gadje,” meaning “outsiders”). Often harassed and hounded from place to place, sometimes subjected to attempts to force them to settle down and behave like “normal” citizens, sometimes actively hunted and killed, they nevertheless managed to retain their identity. It was left to the Holocaust to systematize their persecution and carry it out on an industrial scale. At left, gypsies in Kyustendil, Bulgaria, May 1941. Photo: Adolf Sohnn.

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Marianne was astonished to discover the discrepancies in the historical record about the number of gypsy victims of the Holocaust. “Every source has a different number,” she said. “It ranges from 200,000 to 1,500,000. To me that’s unbelievable— where are all the people in between?” The other thing that surprised her was the denial that the gypsies were victims of genocide. “A lot of Holocaust researchers will say that the Jewish victims were unique, because all the other victims (Communists, gays, the mentally and physically handicapped) were killed because they were branded as ‘antisocial’ or ‘defective’ or because of their beliefs, whereas the Jewish people were killed simply because they were born Jewish. But it’s apparent from my research that the gypsies were killed because they were born gypsies.” As she progressed through the depressing accounts of the gypsies’ destruction in the Holocaust, Marianne was struck by their resilience. (They were the only group allowed to live in families in the concentration camps; they put up such fierce resistance to being separated that the Nazis simply found it not worth their while.) She began to wonder how they had fared after the end of World War II. Informed about the Fulbright Scholarship program by Professor Dennis Glew, chair of the Honors committee, and supported by an invitation from Professor Wolfgang Benz, director of the Zentrum für Antisemitismusforschung (Center for Antisemitic Studies) at the Technische Universität Berlin, to spend a year there as a guest scholar, she submitted a proposal to study the German Sinti and Roma since 1945. This spring, she was notified that her application was accepted. She is Moravian’s first Fulbright Scholar since Patricia McAndrew ’68, an Honors history student, received a Fulbright to work with a well-known Danish ballet master. Moravian’s only other Fulbright Scholar is Helen Bachochin ’65, who received a Fulbright for study at the University of Madrid. Marianne’s Fulbright will take her back to familiar territory. When she was twelve she spent a year in Lauda, a little town near Würtzburg, while her father participated in the Fulbright teacher exchange. It was there that she became really proficient in German, although she had learned to speak the language to a certain extent from her German mother. “We went to Berlin for a gathering of Fulbright teachers in the middle of the year,” she said, “and we were in Berlin when the wall had just come down. We went through Checkpoint Charlie, and got pieces of the wall. It’s funny,” she added, “I knew about the Fulbright teacher exchange because of my father, but I didn’t know about the scholarship program until Dr. Glew told me about it.” The U.S. Congress created the Fulbright Program in 1946, immediately after World War II, to foster mutual understanding among nations through educational and cultural exchanges. Today the Fulbright Program is the U.S. government’s premier scholarship program. It enables U.S. students, artists and other professionals to benefit from unique resources all over the world.

It Was a Very Good Year Marianne Zwicker’s thesis, “ ‘It Is Most Important That One Speaks of It’: The Persecution of the Gypsies in the Holocaust,” was one of an outstanding crop of Honors projects this year. A Marianne Zwicker with her Honors few examples: advisor, Hans Wuerth. Photo: John Palcewski ’86. The arcanesounding title of James Bradbury’s biology thesis, “Use of Deoxypyridinoline as a Marker of Bone Resorption in Ovariectomized Female ICR Mice,” described research with very practical implications for the study of osteoporosis in women. Jamie Druckenmiller’s thesis in biology, “A Literature Review on the Theories of Marine Mammal Strandings,” traced scientists’ fascinaA 17th-century engraving of a tion with why dolphins stranded whale. and whales strand themselves on shore, going all the way back to Aristotle. Michael Harrison ran into an unexpected difficulty with his psychology project, “Cooperation and Competition: The Time for Change Is upon Us.” He recruited fellow-students for experiments to determine the relative success of cooperative versus competitive behavior, but initially found his results skewed because Moravian students are disposed to cooperate with each other! Megan Leahy’s physics project built on the work of Chris Carlen ’98 on photorefractive polymers: he made them, and she studied their properties. Christina Szoke’s fascinatingly detailed history project, “From Pawn to Queen: The Significance of Emma of Normandy for Anglo-Saxon England,” involved a multi-dynastic cast of hundreds and more marital intrigues than a modern soapopera. Kathryn Fiandaca’s art project, “Eighty Years of Harper’s Bazaar: A Design Investigation,” was a tour de force of design as well as research and writing. Her thesis is an oversized volume in full color, produced on the graphics lab’s new HewlettPackard 8500 color laser printer.

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James J. Heller, 1921-1999 The Passing of an Era by Daniel S. Gilbert Sr. My friend and mentor, James J. Heller, dean emeritus of Moravian College, who died April 3, 1999, has, as the Moravians say, “gone home.” Appointed in 1950 to teach biblical theology in the Theological Seminary in 1950, he became the academic dean of the College in 1961, a position he held until his retirement in 1988. I first came to know him when I arrived at Moravian in 1953. We faculty and staff were very close in those days, working, socializing and raising our children together. I recall that Seminary-College faculty intramural volleyball team which won more than a few games due to such tall teammates as Jim Heller, Ed Kortz, and Lloyd Burkhart. Heller was always a fierce competitor and his former students remember his passion for playing (and invariably winning in) ping-pong. Professor Burkhart, who also joined the faculty in 1950, recalls those early days when a colony of faculty lived in Colonial Hall, enjoyed Mom Arndt’s meals in the old Refectory, and attempted to find appropriate housing for their families. In the late 1950s Moravian’s chapter of the Faculty Christian Fellowship was handed the task of redefining the mission of the College. In tones reminiscent of John Amos Comenius, Heller wrote that “the work of the mind is precisely the work to which God had called [the College]”and that “drawing upon the creative forces of five centuries of educational, international, cultural, and religious heritage, Moravian College seeks to fulfill its Christian vocation by the pursuit of truth and learning in an atmosphere of freedom.” Jim’s decision to answer the call to become dean of the College in 1961 must have been a difficult one for him, for he was at heart a scholar and a classroom teacher. Aware of Moravian’s traditional reliance on staff recruited from the 14

church or the alumni, Heller set out to develop a new faculty. It was to be made up of the best he could find at colleges and graduate schools throughout the nation and to include men and women from diverse backgrounds. At the same time he turned his attention to the revision and upgrading of that traditional (and rather rigid!) academic program. Beginning in the mid-1960s the faculty under his leadership revised both the College’s general education requirements as well as the overall structure of the academic program. The result was the introduction in 1968 of the innovative 4-14 curriculum with its four-course structure, a more flexible distribution system for general education, and the experimental possibilities of work study and the Jan Term. The change was not without its critics, but Heller, who personally wrote much of the new program, prevailed with his usual enthusiasm. It was an exciting time and for the next decade Heller and that articulate spokesman for the Jan Term, Professor Jack Ridge, took to the road to sell the program to other colleges. The program has since been modified, with the Jan Term now a May Term, and the general education program again redefined here in the late 1990s, but this does not lessen the importance of what Heller accomplished. While committed to the traditional liberal arts, Jim had a particular affection for the study of classical and modern languages. We also knew of his love of music—a visit with him in his office or at home was to attend a concert. Recognizing his importance to the development of Moravian’s music program, Professor Richard Schantz says that he thought that he “made his great decisions while listening to great music.” He added, “Revelation was on his tongue, but Gustav Mahler was passionately in his ear!” Heller was a man of many parts. First and always a churchman, he was also a devoted family man and concerned with the families of his associates. I know he struggled, as we all did, to balance the responsibilities of family and career. I also recall those wonderful dinners and desserts his wife, Alice, prepared at the Heller homestead when we gathered to talk over some issue, or to interview a job candidate. He was an outstanding teacher and even found time to publish books and articles on religious themes. He hoped he could eventually return to teaching, but it was not to happen, for the College continued to need his leadership. He did, however, find opportunities to lecture and give illustrated slide talks on the Book of Revelation. Others would stress the personal qualities of the man. His longtime friend, Professor G. Alden Sears, commented at his


memorial service on his integrity, compassion, and commitFinally, Jim Heller had a unique sense of community. He ment. We also knew that Heller had the strength of his convicunderstood and articulated how a faculty, staff, and student tions. But differences of opinion were just that to Jim and after body were called to work together in an academic setting and a frank exchange of views he bore no grudges. he was a visible leader working continuously to reinforce He had a proverbial open door for faculty in his that vision. He was the author of most of those alloffice in Colonial Hall and was usually availcollege convocations of his time and he able at faculty coffee (where he often stayed worked tirelessly to organize those great Jim had a scholar’s office right through the lunch hour). To this spring dinners to which he brought his and a scholar’s disposition. He loved veteran of academic wars, Heller’s usual enthusiasm for good food and learning, and he continued to work in his field patience with the requests of his fellowship. Late in his career he was even in retirement, when he focused especially on colleagues for special favors, or his instrumental in creating the apocalyptic literature generally and the Book of Revelation response to questions about next Moravian Educator’s Conferin particular. I think that part of what made him such an effective year’s salary, can only be deences. He was, as his colleague dean was his appreciation as a scholar of the difficulty of finding the scribed as exceptional. Professor Bettie Smolansky truth. Jim always pressed to get the full story, to see issues against a One of his shining hours recalls, in every sense “the broad background. Everyone got a thorough hearing from him, because as dean was during the late dean” on campus. he understood how easy it is to be mistaken. 1960s and early 1970s when Heller extended this Dennis G. Glew Moravian, along with other belief in community to his Professor of History colleges, was confronted work with the board of the Moravian College with student demands to Muhlenberg Hospital share in defining policies Center and his abiding • and with the Vietnam affection for Bethlehem’s It was through him that I was led to Princeton for graduate studies and studied under crisis. Heller went along Advent Moravian Otto Piper who had left Germany during the Nazi period. It was Piper’s knowledge of with many of these Church. He also served the Moravian leader and theologian Zinzendorf that was to inspire me to forty years of requests; the current on the board of directors study. regulations governing of the Moravian AcadArthur J. Freeman final examinations, emy and in different Professor Emeritus of New Testament term papers, and gradcapacities with profesMoravian Theological Seminary ing, come right out of sional organizations such that era. as the Pennsylvania • I also recall his cool, Conference of Academic “You know,” Jim would say, “there is almost no limit to the good you can do if you calm leadership during Deans. Professor John don’t have to get the credit.” That crystallizes the Heller style. He had bound his life those tumultuous days in McDermott also recalls to this institution with such intensity that whatever was good for it was good for May of 1970 when the his effective work with the him; whatever any member of the community accomplished was a source of students (and some facaccrediting agency, the personal pleasure for him, and he was happy to give others credit when I knew ulty) were demanding a Middle States Association. that he was the one who had started the ball rolling so that the achievement strike to protest U.S. policy In particular, he was frebecame possible. In sum, Jim Heller was the quintessential mentor to in Vietnam and Cambodia. quently called upon to assist countless Moravian faculty and staff through the years before people Heller never wavered. Classes in the evaluation of churcheven knew what to call the process. I can say only that I knew him continued to meet, term papers related colleges which, not well, I sometimes even disagreed with him about matters of were still due, and final exams unlike Moravian, were facing the some importance, but, in the final analysis, his was a life were not to be waived. challenge of balancing their worthy of emulation. But Jim was a visionary as well. commitment to the faith and the Bettie M. Smolansky In what became (to his surprise, I secular drift of contemporary AmeriProfessor of Sociology might note) his annual State of the can higher education. Moravian College College addresses at fall convocations, he He was to receive many honors in his articulated his views of the progress of the career, including honorary degrees from AllenCollege. His alliterative definitions of the 1950s town College and from Moravian College. PersonStruggle for Survival, or the 1960s Quest for Quality, or the ally, I am thankful that he lived to hear the emotional trib1970s Drive for Distinction, or the 1980s Challenge of Change ute paid to him by his friends and colleagues gathered at the (he left no word on a label for the 1990s!) made clear both Holiday Gala in December of 1998 for I have often thought where we had been and our goals for the future. that he may not have understood the affection and respect Jim and Alice were also world travelers. Often accompaeveryone had for him. nied by college friends, they found time to visit England, Scotland, Moravian centers in the Czech Republic, Italy, Daniel S. Gilbert Sr. is professor emeritus of history at Moravian and Greece and Asia Minor, Egypt, and the Baltic area over to St. College archivist. Petersburg, and Israel. 15


Greyhound Sports The Moravian College athletics program completed another successful campaign in 1998-99 with the Greyhounds’ sixteen teams posting an overall of 144 wins, 113 losses, and two ties. Nine of the 15 teams which competed in dual competition posted winning records. The women’s tennis team had the best season on campus with a perfect 16-0 record, running the team’s winning streak to 30. The golf team was 8-0 while the women’s cross country team had a 2-0 mark. The men’s and women’s track and field teams were 1-0 with dual meet victories over arch rival Muhlenberg College. The women’s volleyball team had the most victories with a 27-7 record while the softball team won 26 of its 40 contests at the time this article was written. The women’s basketball team had the final winning season at 14-10. Despite the winning season, the women’s basketball team missed the Middle Atlantic Conference playoffs for the first time in 17 years by one game. Five athletic teams won Middle Atlantic Conference Championships this year. The women’s tennis team captured its third straight MAC team title. Senior Lynne Grzywacz won her second consecutive MAC Singles Championship as the top seed in the tournament. Junior Marnie Heller and freshman Corinne Kleinsmith captured the MAC doubles title. The men’s and women’s cross country teams won their sixth straight MAC Championships, a conference record. Senior Kristie Reccek won the individual title in the meet at Allentown College. The men’s top finisher was senior Jeff Minnich with a second place finish. The women’s track and field team won a pair of titles. The Lady Greyhounds captured their fourth straight indoor championship and their seventh straight outdoor title. Four members of the team had qualified for the 1999 NCAA Division III Outdoor National Championships at the time this article was written. Reccek was an automatic qualifier in the 3,000 meters and a 16

provisional qualifier in the 1,500 meters. Freshman Heidi Wolfsberger had provisionally qualified in the 1,500 meters while classmates Jennifer Lohn and Sarah Shaneberger had provisionally qualified in the javelin and shot put respectively.

Freshman pitcher Rachel Mowrey warms up on the mound before one of this spring’s home games. Photo: Diane Torres.

At the MAC Indoor Championships, Reccek won the 1,500 meters and was part of the 4x800-meter relay team. Wolfsberger captured the 800 meters and was on the distance medley relay squad. Freshman Emily Shertzer captured the 3,000 meters while classmate Steph Horne won the 55-meter hurdles. Joining Wolfsberger on the distance medley relay were freshman Tiffany Catalino, Erin Boyle, and Kim Jaick. Boyle and Jaick joined Reccek and

senior Amy Cavanaugh to win the 4x800-meter relay race. In the outdoor meet, Reccek won the 1,500 meters and the 3,000 meters while Wolfsberger captured the 800 meters. Shertzer won both the 5,000 meters and the 10,000 meters to help the Lady Greyhounds nearly double the score of second place Messiah College. The Greyhound teams competed for NCAA National Championships in their respective sports. The women’s volleyball team earned its second straight appearance in the Mid-Atlantic Regional while the women’s cross country made its sixth straight in the national meet with a 14th place finish. The softball team had just qualified for its second straight NCAA East Regional at the time this article was written. The Lady Greyhounds were the fourth seed, the same seed as a year ago when Moravian became the first MAC softball team to win a game in the NCAA Division III National Tournament. This year, the Lady Greyhounds were ranked as high as second in the NCAA East Region during the season. Senior women’s volleyball and basketball player Stephanie Rickards was named to the GTE Academic AllAmerica College Division Volleyball First Team back in December. The 4.0 student was also named the GTE Academic All-America Team Member of the Year for Volleyball in the College Division. That award named Rickards the top student-athlete in the sport of women’s volleyball for all of NCAA Division’s II and III as well as the NAIA. Rickards was also named to the American Volleyball Coaches Association All-Mid-Atlantic Region Team for the second straight year.

Oops! We’re Sorry! Due to a typographical error in the last issue, the name of Kurt E. Montz ’84 was misspelled in the caption of the photo showing the Hall of Fame honorees. The staff of the Moravian College Magazine apologizes for the error.


Alumni Association News Catch the Spirit!

Young Alumni: A Board is Born

A Message from the Alumni Association President Jeanne Taccarino Guaraldo ’69 Our students are generating it. Our most recent alumni are taking it with them as they graduate. I know it’s catching, because they have passed it on to me and they are sharing it with others. It’s the spirit of pride. They are proud of their acccomplishments at Moravian, both individually and collectively. It’s the spirit of enthusiasm. They are enthusiastic about new programs and the positive atmosphere that is growing at Moravian. Let our young alumni and our Student Alumni Association members share their spirit with you. Read on about these two groups, but don’t stop there. Come back. Now is the time to catch the spirit and get involved!

Thanks to the dedication and enthusiasm of a group of young alumni, Moravian College is proud to annouce the formation of a Young Alumni Board, consisting of members of the classes of 1993 to 1998. The board held its first meeting on December 5, 1998. A representative from the Young Alumni Board sits on the Alumni Board, providing an active young alumni voice on campus. The board’s objectives include maintaining a positive relationship with Moravian College, increasing alumni support for the College, providing opportunities for young alumni to network with each other and other alumni, and creating a smooth transition from student to young alumni to alumni. The members will plan career networking and social events for young alumni, establish a young alumni presence at student events, and plan regional events in Philadelphia, New York, and Washington. They are already well on their way. On February 24, five board members held an informal panel discussion for Moravian students in conjunction with the Career Center. Panelists Frank Chou ’96, Dave Connor ’98, Michelle Litzenberger ’93, Jim Tobin ’93, and Jack Walls ’98 shared some of their experiences and gave advice about interviewing, resumes, networking, and the job market. On the social side, March 6 was the date of the third annual young alumni reunion at McGillicuddy’s. The reunion brought together 70 members of the classes of 1990 through 1998, giving them a chance to catch up and reminisce about their days at Moravian. Board members also helped to welcome the Class of 1999 to the Alumni Association by joining the seniors at a wine and cheese reception hosted by President and Mrs. Rokke on April 9.

Young Alumni Board members at McGillicuddy’s in March: Jennifer Kastle ’97, Ann Rissmiller Flood ’96, Tara O’Neal ’95, Tennant McGee ’96, Jonathan Ozimek ’95, Deena Diorio ’94, Frank Chou ’96, Jackie Karpow ’96, Michelle Litzenberger ’93, and Audrey Weaver ’98.

Philadelphia Committee Co-chaired by Mary Kate Turowski Andris ’96 and Jennifer Kastle ’97, a group of Philadelphia area young alumni has been busy planning regional events. Their first, a happy hour held at the Dickens Inn in Philadelphia on February 5th, was a huge success, drawing 50 alumni. The committee is planning two summer events: a networking social on June 16 in Philadelphia and a beach bash at the Jersey shore on July 31.

Members of the Philadelphia Young Alumni Committee at the Dickens Inn: Jennifer Kastle ’97, Audrey Weaver ’98, Bob Schneider ’97, Mary Kate Turowski Andris ’96, Jack Walls ’98, Jessica Blasko ’98, Adam Grutzmacher ’97, and Bill Wekluk ’98. 17


Richard T. Kingston Jr. ’77 Receives 1999 Medallion of Merit In recognition of his service to Moravian College, the Alumni Association honored Rick Kingston with its 1999 Medallion of Merit following the Reunion Luncheon on May 22. Rick’s charismatic leadership as an alumni volunteer has made an enormous difference for our alumni and our current and future students. Rick, an oral and maxillofacial specialist in Bethlehem, has been a member of the executive committee of the Blue and Grey Club since 1993, serving as president from 1995 to 1998. As president, he elevated the level of leadership for the Blue and Grey Club, not only through his presence at most sporting events on campus, but also by initiating the capital campaign for the Johnston Hall floor. His efforts in this endeavor resulted in a state of the art floor for Johnston Hall and a maintenance fund for the floor. In 1996, the Athletics Department recognized Rick with the Harvey Gillespie Memorial Award. He and his wife, Leslie, have extended the gift of Moravian hospitality to our students and our alumni. They have hosted five Lehigh Valley Alumni welcome picnics at their home for incoming freshmen. Almost 120 people attended the picnic in 1998. Rick served as a member of the Alumni Board for four years and was its first development committee chair. He served on his 20th reunion committee, was the 1997 reunion fund chair, and was active as a class agent. He and Leslie have attended the Alumni Association’s golf tournaments, Volunteer Leadership Day, and the Comenius Dinner. Two of their three children, Abby and Tom, have sung as Morning Star soloists for vespers.

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Mark Your Calendar! July 22 Lehigh Valley Freshman Picnic at the home of Rick ’77 and Leslie Kingston 29 New Jersey Freshman Picnic at the home of Scott and Mary Mercer ’78 Strickland 31 Young Alumni Beach Bash at the Princeton Bar and Grill in Avalon, New Jersey

August 8 Philadelphia Freshman Picnic at the home of Dean ’81 and Joanne Belletti ’82 Molle October 29 Rocco Calvo Golf Tournament; Comenius Dinner; Homecoming Dance; Class of 1994 Reunion 30 Homecoming November 6 Hall of Fame

Mardi Gras Dance: SAA Sponsors a Tradition in the Making

On January 30, over 500 members of the College community came together to celebrate Mardi Gras at the first-ever all-College dance sponsored by the Alumni Association and the Student Alumni Association. The event provided a rare opportunity for students, alumni, faculty, and staff to spend an evening in each other’s company. A committee made up of Student Alumni Association and Alumni Board members, chaired by Mike Preston ’01, met regularly to plan the theme, food, drinks, decorations, and music for the dance. The committee received additional funding from United Student Government. Thanks to the generosity of Sunny Modjadidi ’73, who donated his frequent flier miles, the event featured a raffle with the main prize of round trip tickets to anywhere in the continental United States. The Student Alumni Association raised a total of $374 through the raffle, all of which was donated to the Chris Pittman Van Fund. Clara Thorne ’01 won the tickets and nine other students won gift certificates to area businesses. The dance was a great opportunity for the entire college community to celebrate together. Says Student Alumni Association President Tanya Rapp ’00, “We plan to make this an annual event and hope to see even more students, alumni, faculty, and staff there next year.”


✒ 1998 News of

Dave Connor 1956 Allwood Drive, Apt. D Bethlehem, PA 18018 E-mail: dave.connor@hslehr.com From Dave: I hope this update finds everyone healthy and happy. I have only a few new pieces of information for everybody this time. I didn’t get a very big response for this third update. I do have plenty of e-mail addresses, so if you can’t find one, e-mail me, call, or write. This is the perfect place for you to toot your horn, so if you don’t tell me, I can’t write about it. Please have all of your news to me by July 1, 1999. Sean Carroll is teaching elementary instrumental and general music in the Chatham Public Schools in New Jersey. He also teaches private voice and instrument lessons and has started working for his master’s in music education at Montclair State University. Sean’s e-mail address is seanmusik@aol.com. Marc Murphy is working for Air Products at their world headquarters in Allentown. He is a technical systems coordinator with the proprietary division of corporate security. He conducts security assessments for all North American field locations. Shannon Eisenhauer has informed me that she is the development assistant for Planned Parenthood of Northeast Pennsylvania and enjoys the position. Chad Wenger has a new e-mail address that he wanted me to pass on to everyone: chad@disc-us.com. That’s all, folks. I wish I had more to report. Remember that even if you don’t want to actually talk to me, you can e-mail or call my work number (it’s free) and leave a message. I wish everyone the best of luck. Until next time, take care. From the Alumni House: Mike Messler has been hired as a financial advisor for Morgan Stanley Dean Witter in Morristown, N.J., and is residing in Bethlehem. Recently he completed the last leg of his three-week training program in New York with classes at the World Trade Center. Trainees from the 50 states were represented. This was a great experience and Mike loved every minute of it.

CLASS NOTES

✒ 1997 News of

Jennifer Kastle 1078 Spring View Drive Southampton, PA 18966 jkastle@erols.com Melissa Romanoski RR#4, Box 79 Sunbury, PA 17801 From Jenn: Through e-mail and by attending a few Young Alumni events, I have been able to catch up with a few classmates. I received an e-mail from Roy Beeson who has been extremely happy stationed with the Army in Hawaii for the past 15 months. Roy is a company fire support officer and was promoted in November to first lieutenant. Martha Volak e-mailed me to tell me she is moving in March to Dublin, Pa. Emily Evans is enjoying living in North Carolina. She had been working for First Union. Al Pape is still working at Sartomer Company but recently moved back to Bethlehem. I saw some alumni at a recent ASA rush party. Beth Schrey is teaching while going for her master’s at Lehigh. Robin North is working at Chubb Insurance. The Philadelphia Young Alumni Group had a happy hour in February at Dickens Inn. Over 60 young alumni attended, including Bill Wekluk, Bob Schneider, Adam Grutzmacher, Mike Jobst, Bonnie Katz, Kelly Davis, and Robin North. We will be having some more events in June and this summer, so check the Young Alumni page on the Moravian Web site for more information. Moravian’s Young Alumni Group also sponsored a happy hour in March at McGillicuddy’s. Fifty-nine alumni enjoyed pitchers and wings. Several ’97 classmates were there: Laura Sortino, Craig Neiman, Nate Groff, Bob Schneider, Megan Schock, Bill Wekluk, Chris Tarnowski, Cluny Erickson, Mike Jobst, Julie Sherwood, Brian Hunsicker, Jamie Shiner, Melissa Romanoski, Stacy Krauss, Katrina Blake, and Karen Borghi.

Wedding bells are ringing for several classmates. Laura Sortino and Craig Neiman will be married in May in Bethlehem. Terri Flowers and Chris Seifert will also be married in May and will be moving to Germany after the wedding. Megan Schock became engaged to her boyfriend Mike and will be married in May 2000. Becky Kobler became engaged to Ed Brookings in February. I began a new job in December at the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce. I look forward to hearing what everyone is doing and to seeing classmates at upcoming Young Alumni events. From the Alumni House: Mark Turdo, curator of the Moravian Historical Society, presented “Moravian Contributions to Pennsylvania German Culture” on March 9. This lecture was one in a series of programs in an eight-week art history course co-sponsored by the Allentown Art Museum and Lehigh Carbon Community College. Betsy Sletner moved to Berwick in the summer of 1998. She is working for King’s College in Wilkes-Barre as an admission counselor. Betsy got engaged over the Christmas holiday to Tom Costanza. She is planning a September 1999 wedding.

✒ 1996 News of

Mary Kate Turowski Andris 138 North 2nd Street, Apt. 3B Philadelphia, PA 19106 MaryKate.Andris@law.widener.edu J. P. Orlando 217 Valley Park South Road Bethlehem, PA 18018 j.p.orlando@hslehr.com From J. P.: What is up, dudes? This report comes to you following the Third Annual Young Alumni Social at McGillicudy’s. It was a tremendous success. We had 59 young alums attend and we hear through the grapevine that not all young alums received an invitation due to address changes. If you have moved within the last year, please e-mail your new address to alumrel@moravian.edu or call the Alumni House at (610) 861-1366. We don’t want anyone to miss a thing! In fact, an idea that we had was to start off our column from now on with a “Featured Alum” segment that would include a more specific update on one of our classmates plus a quote or word of wisdom. E-mail J. P. at j.p.orlando@hslehr.com

19


Class Notes Yuengling & Daughters Say “Yuengling” to most people and you bring up an image of a cold glass of amber beer. To Deborah Yuengling ’96 the word stands for family, tradition, and the future. Deb is one in a long line of Yuenglings whose life revolves around the popular line of beers. The company is so successful they are not always able to keep up with demand and had to briefly pull out of New England and Maryland markets to be able to fill orders for their loyal Pennsylvania customers. With a new brewery being built and four eager Yuengling women ready to join the brewery staff, the future of Yuengling & Son Brewery appears solid. Deb began preparing to become a sixth-generation brewery owner at Moravian by majoring in accounting (she is currently working on her CPA certificate with a Pottsville accounting firm, Jones & Co.). She has high praise for the excellent accounting faculty and business department at Moravian College, and stays in contact with her favorite professors. These days, Deb is handling the books for the brewery gift shop. She has attended brewmaster classes and eventually sees herself and her three sisters partnering to run the brewery. While having women in charge of the 170-yearold business will be different, Deb is not concerned. “Each of us is focusing on different areas of the business so conflict won’t be a problem. Times are changing and I think Yuengling won’t have any trouble moving away from the ‘old boys’ mentality.” With recent court permission to retain their slogan as “America’s Oldest Brewery,” the new plant, and growing customer devotion, Yuengling is not worried about competing with larger beer makers. “We started in Pottsville and have grown to serve Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York. While we plan to expand slowly through the Northeast, our focus will always be our loyal customer base.” That will keep McGillicuddy and OBT patrons happy.

if you wish to be in this segment or we will just pick someone to interview (couples are welcome). Our “Featured Alum”: Since the day he wisked away his diploma from the hands of our then-president Rusty Martin, Frank Costello has been somewhat of a man on a mission. Upon completion at Moravian, he quickly and skillfully began building the framework of his business on the foundations of his own sweat. Frank owns a middle-tohigh-end landscape design and construction firm in South Jersey. The business operations are in three states and are growing. In addition, Frank is a high school football coach. A coach’s rule, “Forget that the horses are blind 20

and saddle up!” Wedding announcements: Michelle Ciambruschini and Tom Ritter are engaged to be married on September 25. C. J. Brown is engaged to his high school sweetheart, Tara Carney, and they will be married on August 7. Renee Szabo and Sean Richardson are engaged to be married on November 20. Nicole DiFluri and Chris Clark are engaged to be married on June 24, 2000. Tara Pierson is engaged to Marty White and they will be married July 31 this year. Debbie Yuengling is engaged to Joe Ferhat and they will be married on November 7. Other updates include: Frank Chou is excelling in his position at Morgan Stanley

Dean Witter, teaching finance at the local community college, and in his spare time coaching boys’ elementary basketball. Frank is the assistant for head coach and two-year veteran Rob Bennett. They are coaching the Moore Township Elementary boys to one of their finest seasons ever. Bennett is looking to be a future basketball coach in his next adventures. Chris Harris is a first-time homeowner in Bethlehem. Eric Frank has returned to teaching in Bethlehem after his four-month venture abroad in China where he taught English at a university. Kevin Edwards, golf pro at Southmoore Golf Course, is preparing to compete for a position on the Nike Tour and will be competing in various other tournaments throughout the country. Tennant (TD) Magee is completing his second year of law school in Baltimore, and may elevate his master’s in political science to a Ph.D. in years to come. However, for now TD is focused on finishing law school, working as a law clerk, and working on publishing books on his father’s journey as a lawyer and on a cross-section of American culture. TD enjoys the company of his friends, family, and dog named Sausha. Nicole DiFluri moved up to Connecticut with Chris Clark back in June ’98. She is an underwriting analyst for CIGNA Insurance. Nicole and Chris are first time homeowners and proud owners of two boxer dogs named Sugar and Caesar. Tara Jardine is spending her time out west in California. Angela Dellisanti is attending dental school in Pittsburgh. Alice Young works in the human resources department of First Union and plans to move to New York City in the near future. Michelle Mistysyn Ulsh has moved to Harrisburg with her husband Mike and son Michael. Gregory Krausz ’95 and his wife Jennifer Heberling Krausz, who were married on September 1, 1996, have just celebrated the birth of their son, Daniel John Krausz, born March 3, 1999 at 4:13 a.m. Daniel John weighed in at 7 lbs. 14 oz. and was 21 inches long. Greg has been working at St. Luke’s Renewal Centers residential program as a dual-diagnosis therapist (mental health and drug and alcohol) with adolescents. Jen is working as a home-bound tutor with Teach Me Tutoring. Greg will be attending Moravian Theological Seminary for his Master of Arts in Pastoral Counseling. They are currently living in Bethlehem not far from the College. From the Alumni House: Anette Bjorkman is studying at the Swedish School of Economics and Business Administration, pursuing a master’s degree in management and organization. Richard Senker is a member of the Master


Class Notes Chorale of the Tampa Bay, the premier choir for the Florida Orchestra.

✹ 1995

Reunion Homecoming 2000 Julie Moyer 902 Pritchard Place Newtown Square, PA 19073-3036 Fax (610) 861-3959

✹ 1994

Reunion October 29 Ann Marie Schlottman Washington College 300 Washington Avenue Chestertown, MD 21620 From Ann Marie: Lisa Kravelk McCullion wrote to me way back in July of 1998. She was married to Captain Dwayne McCullion of the U.S. Air Force on September 27, 1997, and spent six months with her new husband in South Korea. When Lisa wrote to me, they were living in Tampa, Fla., and she was a guidance counselor at West Tampa Elementary School. I received a letter from Karen Leh last August. She got engaged around Christmas 1997 to her long-time boyfriend, Ron Stueber. Their wedding was to be on November 21, 1998, in Phillipsburg, New Jersey. Karen moved to Houston, Texas, in March 1998, and was working as a regulatory affairs assistant for Cyberonics, Inc., a company that makes a medical device for epilepsy. Patty Horwath Smith sent me a letter in October. She got married to Drew Smith on August 15, 1998, in Bethlehem. Moravian graduates in her wedding party were Jen Shelly ’94 and Linda Matos ’96. Other alums in attendance at the wedding were: Joan Vargo ’94, Melanie Ruberg ’94, Katie Needham ‘94, Jeff Maddock ’93, Danielle Shisko ’94, and Julie Moyer ’95. Also, her husband’s stepmother, Joan Starnes, is a 1988 Moravian graduate. When she wrote to me, Patty and her husband were living in Raleigh, N.C., and she was employed in the biotechnology industry. However, they were in the process of moving back to the Lehigh Valley. I also heard from Gayle Tanzosh Trenberth in October. She and her husband Jeff have been married since June 1995. They live in Nazareth, Pa., and have a son, Jacob, who was born on October 29, 1997. Gayle is a human resources manager for Foamex International, based in Linwood, Pa. She works out of

her home, so she gets to spend lots of quality time with Jacob. Gayle was looking forward to the reunion this year and seeing her fellow Phi Mu sisters. This year in my position as the sports information director at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland, I have had the pleasure of working with fellow 1994 graduate Eric Lamdinus. He is the assistant men’s soccer coach here. In addition, he is the finance assistant in the office of the college’s senior vice president. Eric will be playing professional soccer with the Reading Rage in Pennsylvania again this summer. Eric said Cindy Snow is a sixth grade teacher at the newly-built Macungie Middle School in the East Penn School District. She has been teaching in the district for five years and taught the fourth and second grades before moving to the sixth grade this year. She is also a JV softball coach for Emmaus High School. Cindy currently lives in Allentown. Also from Eric: Chris Kunzelmann and his wife Lisa Fromhertz ’92 recently purchased a house in New Providence, N.J. As for myself, I am busy as usual keeping up with the 17 sports here at Washington College. I am still really loving the sports information profession, but I am looking to possibly move on to another school next year. I really hope that all of the information that I included about fellow graduates is still accurate. From the Alumni House: Christopher C. Arabia has joined the commercial lending team of Commerce Bank. His responsiblities include the development of banking relationships with small and midsized companies throughout the Greater Mercer County region.

✒ 1993 News of

Michelle M. Litzenberger 1866 Mansfield St. Hellertown, PA 18055 e-mail: mlitzen@aol.com From the Alumni House: Jason Reed has been the auality assurance manger at Omnipoint Communications in Bethlehem for the last two years. His wife Mary E. Cresseveur-Reed ’91 graduated from Columbia University School of Dental and Oral Surgery in 1995. Since then she has done a residency at Muhlenberg Hospital, has worked for another dentist in Easton for three years and was planning to open her very own practice in Coopersburg, Pa., at the beginning of April.

✒ 1992 News of

John S. Nunnemacher 235 North Valley Street, #136 Burbank, CA 91505 cooner@earthlink.net Michael Q. Roth 944 Renaldi Road Wind Gap, PA 18091 From the Alumni House: Jeffrey Glueck was recently appointed branch sales manager/banking officer for the Lansdale office of Commonwealth Bank.

✒ 1991 News of

Melissa dePamphilis 8B Knoxbury Terrace Greenville, SC 29601 melissaAD@aol.com Christine A. Palermo Wallach 380 Mountain Road, Apt. 609 Union City, NJ 07087 From Melissa: Hey everyone! I’m back in touch now thanks to my advance into the computer era. Yes, I finally got e-mail, so please send me all your info. I’m still enjoying life in the South, although I miss my friends and family back home. I must thank Dori Brown Ahart for helping me collect a lot of my facts this time around. Dori and her husband Greg live in Gilbertsville, Pa. Dori works in Warminster where she is a marketing manager for CRC Industries, Automotive/Marine Division. Christine Taylor Lilley and husband Chris ’92 live in Morrisville, Pa., and are expecting their first child in March 1999. Chris Hamm and Mike Weiner are engaged and planning a wedding for July 1999. Amy Pinko Cara and husband Mike ’90 welcomed their second child, a daughter, Megan Elizabeth, on May 15, 1998. Their son, Michael, is four years old. Amy is a marketing analysis manager at Rodale Press. Mike is a manager for Giles & Ransome. Craig Downey and Kristen Morgan ’92 are living in Bethlehem. Craig is a first grade teacher in the Bethlehem Area School District. He will be finishing his master’s degree this summer and will be a reading specialist. Kristen is a senior book designer at Rodale Press. She art-directs and designs Rodale’s spirituality imprint, Daybreak. 21


Class Notes Close-Up: Karen C Smith ’91 Karen Smith ’91 knows how to juggle. While a student in the Moravian College Division of Continuing Studies program, Karen divided her time between classes, motherhood, and managing her own company, KCS International. With her daughter grown and a Moravian degree under her belt, Karen now focuses her efforts on keeping KCS International on the cutting edge. KCS International, a worldwide company, markets advertising space in international trade journals. Since her main clientele is rapidly progressing telecommunications companies, Karen has developed expertise in predicting market trends and technological advancements. As owner and CEO, Karen maintains a grueling travel schedule that includes regular visits to Amsterdam, London, and Miami. So, how does she manage to balance her hectic lifestyle? “No matter how busy I am, I allow time for my true passion—music. It is a great stress reliever,” Karen says. It was her love of music which drew Karen to Moravian. She says, “Moravian was wonderful. The encouragement I received from the music faculty and the energy of the traditional students kept me going. A highlight was performing a solo at the Kennedy Center with the Moravian choir.” Karen continues to take voice lessons, sings with a church choir, and enjoys playing her grand piano. She also performs as a soloist at two local churches. Karen even manages to find time to continue her education, through an intensive summer music program at Marywood College. It is no surprise that Karen Smith has big plans for the future, including a West Coast branch of KCS International. No matter where life takes her, Karen intends to stay connected to Moravian. She explains, “Moravian will always hold a special place in my heart.” Beth Strelecky e-mailed me the other day. She writes, “I left the unstable world of banking and am now working as an accountant for the Federal Home Mortgage Company (Freddie Mac), which is a government sponsored mortgage company. I’m living in Reston, Va., near Washington, D.C.” Julie Bower was married to Jay Fawbush on October 24, 1998, in Atlanta, Ga. She attended paralegal school and is now working with attorneys out of Atlanta. Another Atlanta resident, Laurie Good, has recently been made office manager at Perimeter Placement, Inc. She says she is in charge of everything from payroll and handling accounts to maintaining office supplies. She has been extremely busy since taking over the company books, but she has enjoyed the work. 22

Eli Shute Hart and Andy ’90 just moved into their new home in Campbell Hall, N.Y. with their two sons, Alex, 4, and Gregory, 18 months. Eli is working towards completion of her master’s degree in secondary school counseling and Andy is a consultant for Price Waterhouse. Christy Wickmann lives in Dublin, Pa., and teaches third grade at Pine Run Elementary School. She is taking classes at Kutztown University in order to obtain her master’s degree. She plans to be a reading specialist. As for myself, I am a licensed massage therapist and owner of Health Quest in Greenville, S.C. I have really enjoyed the doors of opportunity this profession has opened for me. I have been extremely fortunate to work with professional athletes as well as musicians.

Please let me know what you and your fellow classmates have been up to recently.

✹ 1990

Reunion Homecoming 2000 Jeannine O’Grady 4 Renault Drive Flanders, NJ 07836 From Jeannine: Michele Stocklas Anderson and her husband Jim ’89 are doing extremely well both professionally and personally! Jim has a new job as an inventory control manager for a distribution company. He loves his job. He calls it disneyland, and the commute is nice and short. His company encourages life outside of the office which luckily affords Jim the opportunity to spend more time in the woods, bow hunting, and at his newly developed hobby, home remodeling! Michele is teaching her seventh class of fourth grade students this year in Springfield, N.J. Last April, she was named Teacher of the Year in her school district, having been selected to receive the Governor’s Teacher Recognition Award. In May, she graduated from Kean University with a master’s degree in instruction and curriculum. She is extremely involved in the Springfield Education Association and traveled to New Orleans in July as a delegate to the National Education Association Representative Assembly. While their dogs are all doing well, they will have some adjusting to do this spring. Michele and Jim are expecting fraternal twins in early May. According to the Andersons they are both very excited but a bit nervous! Congratulations and the best of luck to the Anderson Clan! We will anxiously await the birth announcement introducing the arrival of the twins. Dawn Ross Torstenson and her husband Mark dropped me a quick note to keep us all updated on their busy lives. They have moved several times this past year and have recently settled in “the country,” in Flanders, N.J. They are extremely happy with their brand-new house which they took great pride in helping to create. They live in a wonderful community with friendly neighbors, block parties, and nearby golfing. Mark is still with Oracle as a regional manager. Although Mark travels a lot, all of his hard work paid off this past year in the form of a fun-filled trip to Vancouver, Canada, a family trip to the Jersey Shore, Stone Harbor, as well as a cruise to the Bahamas to


Class Notes celebrate Dawn’s 30th birthday! Their children, Sean and Morgan, will be three in March. They too seem to be enjoying the big, new house and lots of neighborhood friends! Let’s not forget that the pet dogs, Dreyfus and Navar, as well as cats Domino and Brandon, have adjusted well to life in the country. Whether it’s the fenced-in yard or the trek in the woods, even the Torstenson pets are enjoying themselves. From the Alumni House: Mike Cara was recently appointed manager of the newly opened Ransome Rents store in Allentown. Chris Damandl has been working for an international banking company and is currently in Brazil learning Portuguese in preparation for a career in Latin America. Caryn Thompson French and husband Chris are living in Virginia Beach, Va. They are expecting their second child in March 1999. Their daughter, Caitlyn, is two years old.

✒ 1989 News of

Amanda Westphal Radcliffe 68 Highpoint Drive Berwyn, PA 19312

✒ 1988 News of

Cris Santini 2900 Delk Road Marietta, GA 30067

✒ 1987 News of

Lauren Kelly Lawn 1948 Stirling Drive Lansdale, PA 19446-5561 Edie Fuchs Lewis 216 Old Lancaster Road Devon, PA 19333 fontlock@AOL.com

✒ 1986 News of

James and Lynda Farrell Swartz 153 Lilac Drive Allentown, PA 18104 From Jamie and Lynda: We hear from Jeanne Villano Petrucci that she and her husband Jim have two children, Emilia and Joseph, who attend school full time. This provides Jeanne with more time to embark on a career as an international trader of disposable medical products. This job brings her back to the Lehigh Valley where she works out of Easton. Recently, we received a fax from Lauren Turnbach Brennan who told us that she and her husband, Dennis, live in Bethlehem with their children, Kevin and Julia. Julia has a profound hearing loss and uses a cochlear implant to hear. Lauren invites any local alumni with hearing-impaired children to attend a meeting of the Lehigh Valley Parent’s Group for Hard of Hearing Children at the American Legion Hall on Fullerton Avenue in Whitehall, Pa. Contact Lauren at (610) 866-4788 or brennan@beth.k12.pa.us for more information. We also are in close contact with Corinne Parker Edmonds who with her husband Dave ’85 still lives in Macungie, Pa., and is expecting their second child in May. Big-brother-tobe Parker is very anxious for the arrival. Corinne proves to be a good source of information on Sigma Sisters. Dawn Cittone Stamets and her husband Richard ’87 welcomed the arrival of their daughter Gillian on February 16, 1999. The Stamets are also pleased to announce that they now reside in Pennsylvania. Donna Machinshok Aslanian, her husband Ed, and daughter Cayleigh, recently welcomed Mackensie Francesca. The Aslanians are busy living in Montville, N.J. Lauren Schaffernoth DeFuria and her husband Brian recently moved into a new home in Pittstown, N.J. Now that Lauren and Brian are closer to Pennsylvania, we hope to see more of them. Brenda Mertz Sharp and her husband, John, live down the road from us with their children, Emily and Tony. Brenda and Emily ran into Marshall Billig, while he was dropping his daughter Jenna off at Brownies. On a personal note, we have exciting news. My law firm recently reorganized and is now practicing under the name King, Herman, Freund, Swartz & Reid in Allentown. We are a general practice firm whose practice extends throughout Northeast Pennsylvania.

From the Alumni House: Robin Pflugler Kanefsky has moved back Northeast after almost seven years in Baton Rouge, La. The FBI transferred her husband Mitchell to the Washington headquarters office. The movers packed her belongings on November 29 and loaded them on November 30, and they moved into their new house in Woodbridge, Va. on December 9. The holidays were definitely hectic with boxes everywhere and trying to unpack with 5-month-old Rachel wanting attention. Right now Robin is enjoying being a stay-at-home mom until they are settled. Robin loves living in Virginia where it will be easier to see family and friends. Linda Gipson is running her own studio in Allentown. Gipson Studio, which was Linda’s creation, opened in 1993.

✹ 1985

Reunion May 19-20 Lynn Muschlitz LaBarre 651 Long Lane Road Walnutport, PA 18088 Paula Colizzo Lewinski 118 Springdale Lane Lansdale, PA 19446-3529 pjlewinski@erols.com From Lynn: The holidays brought cards and pictures to my house with alumni news and updates. Joan Burke Muldoon and her husband Jim and their three-year-old daughter Sarah moved into their new house in Bridgewater, N.J., in April 1998. Joan is keeping busy with her family and full-time psychologist career. Retiring from her account executive job is Maureen Sinnott Kopczknski. Maureen’s days are now filled with finger painting and Lego building with her two sons, Brian, 4, and Sean, 18 months. I’ve been retired from banking for almost seven years and working at home is very hectic but rewarding. John is 9 and Jenny is 7 so another job outside the home is just around the corner. Another classmate who manages the family at home is Colleen Peters Harris in San Diego, Calif. I received a lovely holiday greeting from the Harris family with pictures of all four children. Wow! Megan is 8, Mitchell is 6, Andrew 21/2, and Olivia is 11/2. Now I have someone to look for when I make the trip to sunny southern California. On the other end of the country in Canterbury, N.H., are Mae Lynn Neyhart Arlinghaus and her husband Charlie. Their son Henry began 23


Class Notes preschool classes in January. Since she’s not presently teaching at the college, Mae Lynn has been developing a green thumb in her yard. Somehow I can’t picture ML with a shovel and a box of Miracle Gro. Times sure change! Finally, Harris Hoke and Kathleen send their classmates greetings from Myrtle Beach, S.C. Their daughter Bridget was born last summer and enjoyed her first Christmas with her big brother Little Harris (something tells me that there’s another way to make that statement). Harris is enjoying kindergarten. From Paula: I heard from Anita Jean Finelli Maura via e-mail back in December. She had lots of good news for us. She had been with Wyeth Ayerst Research for almost twelve years before switching to her current job at CB Technologies, Inc., a software development and consulting company in Malvern. Her job is managing client accounts and she loves it. Anita and husband Craig just celebrated their tenth anniversary. It’s been 17 years since their first date at freshman year Homecoming! They had their first child, Caroline, in April ’98 and they love being parents. Despite careers and parenthood, Anita and Craig do get back to Moravian occasionally. They made it to the Hall of Fame Induction and had a great time. Anita keeps in touch with Sue Farinelli Manis. Sue and husband Bobby had twin boys in March of ’98. On a sad note, Joe and I received an e-mail from Dave Petry, who let us know that Keith Woods died in January of this year of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. There was a memorial service held on February 13 in Hamilton Square, that we, sadly, were unable to attend. We are all saddened by the loss of this classmate and friend. Mark your calenders! Next June we will be celebrating our 15th year reunion. As we move closer to the date you’ll be receiving more information. It would be wonderful to see you. From the Alumni House: Joe Bernard is working at Fairfield University as assistant head coach and defensive coordinator. He was the former Nazareth head coach until 1995. Fairfield’s defense is ranked No. 1 in the country.

✒ 1984 News of

Janet Gomes Feakes 18 Hamilton Avenue Berkeley Heights, NJ 07922 Jafeakes@aol.com 24

I received a terrific lengthy e-mail from Joe Luksa in August ’98. I’m afraid I won’t do it justice but he tells a great story of his years since graduating from Momo with a Bachelor of Music in performance. During years of working in an auto dealership and with a wedding band, Joe earned his teaching certificate in music at the College Misericordia. After substitute teaching for many years, he was appointed to the position of middle school music instructor, teaching grades 6-8 band, in the Wyoming Valley West School District. Joe has also been the guitarist in various productions at the Little Theater of Wilkes-Barre and for Martha Reeves and the Vandellas when they performed locally. Through a good friend he met at Misericordia, Sister Mary Carmel, Joe met his wife Jennifer, a ’98 grad of Penn State. A very funny story goes along with that but Joe will just have to share it with us at the reunion. They were married in June of ’98 with a reception at their home in Luzerne, Pa. Some Momo people in attendance were Dave Roth ’85, Sean Delonas, Dan Richardson ’83 and Robert Steelman, a member of the Momo music department. Milan Ozdinec e-mailed me in December of 1998. He writes, “My wife Kathy Kuss and I just celebrated our 10th wedding anniversary. We have four-year-old twins, Emily and Elizabeth. I work in Washington, D.C., for the Department of Housing and Urban Development as the Director of the Office of Urban Revitalization. I’m spending two semesters at Harvard University as a Loeb Fellow with the Graduate School of Design.” He will go back to HUD in July. Ozzie added that “Cambridge is great and in some ways reminds me a lot of Bethlehem.” Chris Guggeis Lavell has been married for 12 years to John, a Ursinus grad, and keeps busy with her four children! She, too, has twins—Emily and Victoria, 8, Patrick, 51/2, and Catherine, 4. Chris was teaching elementary school and is now a full-time mom, also substituting for the past seven years. She hopes to go back and get her special ed degree. Her husband just completed his M.B.A. Chris is also a Brownie leader and a high school track official, and is very active in the school PTA along with the local, state, and national Twins Association. Her brother David ’96 is married to Lisa Meoli ’97. They have two boys, David, 4, and newborn Benjamin. Leigh Newbaker Smith told me that her cousin and our classmate Keith Newbaker and his wife Sherry had a baby girl, Lindsay Alyssa, on February 11, 1999, in Berwyn, Pa. Cindy Gessell is recently engaged to Bob Phillips with a Paris wedding planned for the fall of this year. The best part is that I’m in the wedding party!

My husband Jeff Feakes ’82 and I had the privilege of attending the wedding of Mark Allender ’81 in August 1998. Many Momo alumni joined us—Bret Wrigley ’81, Sammy Skean ’80, Bart Terroni ’80, Frank Zucal ’81, Joe Casciano ’80, Chuck Rongione ’82, Jim Artuso ’80, and Steve Saveri ’80. It was great to see everyone and to see so many keeping in touch. Keep Homecoming in mind for October 30, 1999! And keep sending those notes! From the Alumni House: Robert Price was named vice president of private banking and Lynne Neel was appointed assistant vice-president of loan operations at Lafayette Ambassador Bank.

✒ 1983 News of

Dawn Bullaro-Stawiarski 26 Fox Chase Drive Blackwood, NJ 08012 JStawiarski@Omicron.com From the Alumni House: Mark Fleming, sports information director for the College, reported that he was happy to see that Denise Childress supported the women’s basketball team when they were in Las Vegas during the past winter break.

✒ 1982 News of

Joanne Belletti Molle 618 Jamie Circle King of Prussia, PA 19406 From the Alumni House: Carol Burkhardt Heinze is currently teaching elementary music for the Palmerton Area School District. She has been teaching there since 1986. She free-lances as a soloist and sings with the Bach Choir of Bethlehem. In May 1998, Carol graduated with distinction from Westminster Choir College of Rider University with a Master of Music in vocal pedagogy and performance. Her home e-mail is singers@ptd.net. Visit her home page at http://home.ptd.net/~singers/Carole.html. She’d love to hear from anyone, especially those from the Music Department that graduated between the years of 1980 and 1986!


Class Notes

✒ 1981 News of

Tamera Boote Hatton 715 Pineview Lane North Wales, PA 19454 Celia Tonkinson Dollmeyer graduated from Indiana University in December 1997 with a Ph.D. in Hispanic literature. She has been teaching for five years at Hanover College in Hanover, Ind., where she is an assistant professor of Spanish. Celia and her husband Tom reside in Columbus, Ind.

✹ 1980

Reunion May 19-20 Molly Donaldson Brown 1906 Wenner Street Allentown, PA 18103 unsinkable@fast.net Patrick J. Malloy 372 Central Park West, Apt. 3M New York, NY 10025-8203 From Molly: My family and I had a great visit with classmates Tim and Linda Allocco Mas in their Mendham, N.J., home one Sunday last December. Lori Vargo ’82 of Elkins Park, Pa., joined us. Florida resident Mark Tryon ’80 and daughter Emily, who were in Jersey visiting relatives for the holidays, also stopped by. His wife Donna Dickinson ’81 and their other daughter couldn’t make the trip this time—we missed them! The ladies in the group had a couple of chuckles, as we flipped through our old yearbooks and recalled the highlights of our days on campus. Denise Heil Ford sent an update of what she was up to in 1998. Like most of us, she turned 40 and somehow over the course of the year she became the shortest member of her family as sons, Donald, 13, and Chris, 12, surpassed her in height! Denise also returned to work and adds that, surprisingly, “not everything fell apart.” The Fords’ vacation was a trip exploring Vancouver Island. “This was our first exposure to Pacific beaches as a family, so we felt like true adventurers,” she says. “What a thrill to hike through a forest before you meet the beginning of a rocky, driftwood-strewn beach!” Denise, her husband Brad, and their two sons live in Calgary, Alberta. Speaking of turning 40, one of the last in our class to do so was Renee Sullivan James.

Renee works at Rodale Press (the same company I work at) just a floor above me in the book division’s marketing department where she is the director of special sales. Her buddy Leslie Kachure Scott sent her a “beautiful basket of flowers” to mark that special day this past January. The card read “Welcome to the other side!” I loved the collage of pictures that Leslie sent as part of her holiday newsletter. She even included a piece of nostalgia from our college days: a picture of herself planting a smooch on Bruce Springsteen 20 years ago. She reports it happened the night she, Renee, and other class of ’80 ladies, Janice Christofferson and Vonnie Stroh McGee, caught up with him heading out the backstage door after a Spectrum concert. That same lucky group spotted him later that evening at a restaurant (Leslie is still second guessing if he was actually looking for her!). Hmmm! The Scotts made their annual trip to Bermuda in July, followed just two weeks later by a Disney vacation with their three sons, Tyler, Collin, and Riley. Then Rick surprised Leslie last September with a four-day getaway to St. John (no kids allowed) to help Leslie “ease into her 41st year.” Speaking of 40, Charlotte Kepfer Hooker had a party for her husband Tom last year— wonder how he got even when it was her turn. Char is another of our classmates living in sunny Florida. At the time of her December letter, she was wearing shorts and enjoying temps in the 80s, but was itching to experience a good blizzard as part of their holiday visit north later that month. The Hookers’ big project, launched earlier this year, is an extension of their home. While it’s really “Char’s project,” Tom has asked for full veto power along the way. “Kind of reminds me of our wedding planning 16 years ago,” she says. Charlotte reports that her twins, Mark and Andy, nicknamed Hollywood and Bones respectively, are growing by leaps and bounds. As is their two-year-old sister, Kelly, who is already making a mark (literally) with her strong-willed personality. Little Kelly established her position on her first day of preschool by biting one of her male classmates and later refusing to have her picture taken. (Are these Kepfer or Hooker genes?) Still on the 40 thing, I received a response from classmate John Snyder who tells us he turned 40 three years ago. He celebrated turning 43 by taking up sailboat racing with the Iowa State Sailing Club. The skipper he teamed up with is an undergrad from Burma who has been sailing since he was a child. They race a class of boat that has two sails, takes a crew of two, and is 131/2 feet long.

In their six races last year, the pair did quite well, including a third-place finish at the Sweet Corn Regatta at the University of Iowa and a first place trophy at the DeSoto Derby at the DeSoto Wildlife Refuge near Blair, Neb. Rules for intercollegiate regattas call for undergrads only. “I am often mistaken for being ten years younger than I am,” explains John, “but with a little grey in my beard and a few wrinkles, I really don’t pass for an undergrad anymore. So I have to stick to the Open Class Regattas.” At the time of his letter, John was eagerly looking forward to this summer’s races. Last year meant another move for Jody Vinzant Rennie and her family. They are now happily settled in Center Valley, Pa., in what Jody says is hopefully their last home purchase for years. “Paint and wallpaper have combined to form splashes of color and style that would shock everyone who has ever been in any one of our homes,” she says. “The old military attitude of ‘gotta keep it neutral because we gotta sell it soon’ is gone.” Decorating adventures aside, Jody is as busy as ever. At her church, she’s a team leader overseeing Mother’s Morning Out and the preschool. She also serves as the coordinator of the church photo directory project and is the assistant chair of the administrative council. She homeschools her two older children, Rachel, 12, and Billy, 9. Three-yearold Miranda attends preschool outside the home, two days weekly. The Rennies’ travel plans last year included a two-week trip to Europe visiting Germany, England, Holland, and Belgium, a ski trip to West Virginia, and visits with the family in Vermont and New York. Turning 40, obviously, hasn’t slowed down many of our classmates! Amid all the excitement and activities, the Rennies managed to be “foster parents” on two different occasions last year: first for a German shepherd and then for a golden retriever. The animals were on loan to them from the Seeing Eye program. I also heard from Deb Tisdale Cozen who included a photo of her three children. The oldest, Yori, who’s seven, looks just like mom with matching blonde hair and the Tis smile. She didn’t comment on being 40, but offered that time is passing at what seems to be “break-neck speed.” She’s a “room mother” and Girl Scout leader, and returned to her synagogue’s choir—all of which she loves and finds gratifying. She eloquently sums up the recent months with “Bennett and I are busier than ever—work, the family, blah blah blah, you know.” In the small world department, my older daughter, Nicole is in seventh grade at St.

25


Class Notes Thomas More School in Allentown and is pals with Victoria Gilbert, daughter of Karl Gilbert ’80. (Some of you have had classes with Karl’s dad, Dr. Daniel Gilbert, who taught history while we were there.) Coincidentally, we ran into each other often as Karl’s son John was co-captain of the school’s varsity basketball team this year and Nicole is a cheerleader. It was an exciting season, watching this undefeated team in action. I haven’t heard from many of you in a long time. Please take a few minutes to drop me a line or now you can e-mail me at: unsinkable@fast.net and save yourself a stamp. Tell us about your job, your hobbies, your family, your travels—and you can still share your activities and feelings surrounding your 40th birthday. I would also like to hear how you plan to celebrate next New Year’s Eve. Before I close, I want to welcome my nextdoor neighbor (just about the sweetest person on earth) to Moravian’s Alumni Association. Susan DeJong ’99 graduated in May with a double major in biology and art. From the Alumni House: Jane Paluda recently joined the University of Vermont as a marketing manager in the Division of Continuing Education. She is now residing in Jericho, Vt.

✒ 1979 News of

C. Jayne Merlo Bray 322 West Street Bethlehem, PA 18018 From the Alumni House: Candy Barr Heimbach has become a shareholder in the regional defense litigation law firm of Marshall, Dennehey, Warner, Coleman, & Goggin.

✒ 1978 News of

Robin Tobman Lubin 5129 Chevy Chase Parkway Washington, DC 20008-2920

✒ 1977 News of

Vince Pantalone 48 Half Street Hershey, PA 17033 Vcrprjn@aol.com 26

At Christmas I received the annual Villani newsletter. Tony Villani and Joanie, his wife, are busy people. Although Tony had two major surgeries last year, he is currently training administrators and teachers in the Bethlehem Area School District in a program called “New Standards.” Tony sounds busy, teaching and training all over the country. Next year he will be the principal at Freedom High School. Joanie is teaching art lessons to private students and continuing in her art pursuits. Their son Vince is a senior who is investigating several colleges while playing sports and being active in school and church activities. Where did Tony’s son get all that baseball talent? Their daughter Gina is a high school student who is involved in a number of activities. Kathy Ozzard Chism sent us some beautiful wedding pictures. She and John beamed with happiness in the terrifically-set mountain pictures from Yosemite Valley. Life in California suites Kathy, as she and John recently bought a house in Santa Rosa, Calif. I do hope the rest of the class is well. Please let me know how you are doing.

✒ 1974 News of

Otto and Susan Lenius Dreydoppel 117 North Main Street Nazareth, PA 18064

✒ 1973 News of

Dennis Jones 614 Crestline Avenue Bethlehem, PA 18015-4204 Priscilla Barres Schueck 703 West Goepp Street Bethlehem, PA 18018 From the Alumni House: Sunny Modjadidi was recently promoted to a newly-created position of general manager, international customer service, for the Fuller Company. His previous title was manager of international customer service.

✒ 1972

News of

✒ 1976

News of

K. Dale Zusi Scolnick 55 Dyckman Place Basking Ridge, NJ 07920-1413

Beverly Papps Skeffington 25910 Stuckey Avenue S.W. Vashon, WA 98070 skeffie@seanet.com

From the Alumni House: Recently Celia Zucker Craig and James Korczak founded Summit Professional Resources, LLC. Summit is a multi-faceted firm that provides support to attorneys in civil litigation matters. The new office opened in Hackettstown, N.J. Summit offers services in the areas of expert witness evaluation and testimony, insurance inspections and loss control, and forensic photography and videography.

✹ 1975

Reunion May 19-20 Carol Brown Dibley 21 Chandler Road Chatham, NJ 07928-1803 Rev. John Zoppi P.O. Box H Hunker, PA 15639

Nothing really very much to report. In trying to avoid a big celebration next year for my 50th birthday, I had a big Karaoke bash on February 26th to celebrate my “seven squared” birthday here on Vashon Island and was totally surprised when my college roommate Diane Murphy Pektor (having flown from Pennsylvania) showed up.

✒ 1971 News of

John Madison 5749 Blue Grass Trail Coopersburg, PA 18036-1835 Constance M. Sokalsky One North Second Street Harrisburg, PA 17102 From Constance: After living in Lancaster for 16 years, Charlotte Hannan Ahner and her husband moved to Atlanta, where David is the vicepresident of sales and marketing for an Austra-


Class Notes lian firm, Watlyl Paint. Charlotte works parttime in a fabric store, while also working on her golf game. Their daughter Jennifer, a Penn State graduate, lives in the Buckhead section of Atlanta, and their son Bill is a junior at Penn State. I recently had a note from Janice Goldberg Fischel, who is living in Seattle this academic year while Bill is on sabbatical from Dartmouth and writing a new book about the politics and economics of local government. She left her part-time job at Dartmouth’s Development Office and is now a volunteer at Seattle’s Children’s Hospital. Son Josh is in his third year at his father’s alma mater, Amherst, majoring in American studies. The Fischels celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary officially on August 5 but decided to get out of New England in March to spend a week in St. Lucia in the Carribean. They drove crosscountry in August, taking time to see friends and relatives on their way to Seattle. Rod and Donnie Fiorini Saylor ’72 spent their 19th Christmas in Waverly, Pa., where Rod is a pastor, who still enjoys skiing, and Donnie teaches third grade. Son Adam is a senior at Susquehanna University, who polevaults and traveled with the university’s football team to play the German national team in Frankfurt. Sister Liz also spent some time in Europe and is a sophomore at Susquehanna, studying communications, taking voice lessons, and singing opera. Twelve-year-old Katy is enjoying being an “only” child. Ed Zaninelli recently relocated from New York to the San Francisco Bay area. This move goes along with a promotion to director of North American sales with OOCL, a global shipping company.

✒ 1969 News of

Wayne Beaver 15848 North Tenth Street Phoenix, AZ 85022-3143

✒ 1968 News of

George Berger 107 Mohawk Drive Johnston, PA 15905 berger@vms.cis.pitt.edu Jill Stefko 734 Second Avenue Bethlehem, PA 18018

✒ 1967

From the Alumni House: Mark your calendars! Cluster reunion with the classes of ’65 and ’66 planned for Alumni Weekend, May 19 and 20, 2000. Look for more information to come in the mail.

✒ 1963

Marisue Brugler Easterly R.D. Box 3109 Saylorsburg, PA 18353

Bill Leicht 16819 N. 59th Place Scottsdale, AZ 85254 Fax: (602) 493-1949 E-mail: leicht@azlink.com

✹ 1966

Reunion May 19-20 Fay Iudicello 1659 Kirby Road McLean, VA 22101 Fax: 703-827-0431 email: fay_iudicello@ios.doi.gov

Denise Maday Greiner 309 High Street Catasauqua, PA 18032-1428

From the Alumni House: Mark your calendars! Cluster reunion with the classes of ’64 and ’65 planned for Alumni Weekend, May 19 and 20, 2000. Look for more information to come in the mail.

From the Alumni House: Deborah Behr has been accepted into the American Law Institute. Deborah is the assistant attorney general in Alaska. The American Law Institute is in Philadelphia and has few women and even fewer Alaskans. Deborah has lived in Alaska since 1974.

Judith Morecz Simpson 2532 Hepplewhite Drive York, PA 17404-1216

News of

✹ 1970 Kenneth T. Small 216 Owego Street Candor, NY 13743

✹ 1964

Reunion May 19-20

News of

David Berg 624 Juniper Hills Court Arnold, MD 21401 e-mail: dgberg@erols.com

Reunion May 19-20

From the Alumni House: Mark your calendars! Cluster reunion with the classes of ’64 and ’66 planned for Alumni Weekend, May 19 and 20, 2000. Look for more information to come in the mail.

✹ 1965

Reunion May 19-20 William Horwath 22300 Maplewood Drive Southfield, MI 48034 will@m-m-s.com

Pete Lehr said he and his wife Sally were sorry they missed the class reunion last year, but will be certain to make the next one. Pete retired as Ford Motor Company’s real estate manager in 1996 after 28 years. They have three children (the youngest recently married) and two grandkids. And, oh yes, Pete was a TKE, but we liked him anyway! Don Vogel is vice president of the American Lung Association, not the Heart Association as I reported in the last issue. Don has been in contact with Paul Reinhard ’65 and Ted Meixell, both with the Allentown Morning Call. Don has a particular interest in reading about the number-one ranking of the Northampton wrestling team. Don’s brother (and my OGO Little Brother) Dallas Vogel ’64 retired as guidance counselor at Lebon Valley Vocational Technical School. To keep busy, he now is a part-time greeter at the Chocolate Factory at Hershey Park. I received a nice e-mail from Sam Maczko ’61. Sam is still in the Ridgefield Park, N.J., School system as a counselor. He returned for Homecoming and reminisced about the good old Greyhound days with Gus Rampone, Monk Moreilli, and other alumni. Carol and I will become first-time grandparents in April and we’re pretty excited.

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Class Notes Also, we will be celebrating our 35th wedding anniversary in June and look forward to a trip to Europe in August. To all 1963 classmates (and other alumni as well) please drop me a note to say hello. I’d love to hear from you and pass along your news in our next issue.

✒ 1962 News of

Merr Trumbore 1040 Ebenezer Church Road Rising Sun, MD 21911 e-mail: merr@dpnet.net Emma Demuth Williams Box 221 Newfoundland, PA 18445

✒ 1961 News of

Sandra Kromer Long 9 Driftwood Drive Somerset, NJ 08873-1717

✹ 1960

Reunion May 19-20 Jane Ziegenfus Hamill 237 Thorn Street Swickley, PA 15143 From the Alumni House: Frances Bonin-Schlemmer’s husband Dieter passed away recently. We send our condolences to her and the family.

✒ 1959 News of

Kathy Werst Detwiler 1383 North Allen Street State College, PA 16803 kxd11@scasd.k12.pa.us From Kathy: On November 13, 1998, our classmate Gus Rampone was the recipient of the Robert Martin Herbstman Award at the MC Athletic Hall of Fame. The induction ceremony was a spectacular affair with many special friends of our class in attendance. We enjoyed reminiscing with Jackie Finelli ’58 and his beautiful daughter Anita Maura ’85 and her husband. Oh, the stories we shared! I spoke with Ronnie Vrabel Cheek and 28

learned that she is still enjoying her singing career. She has retired from teaching, but is continuing to enjoy being the vocal soloist to a band. Bob Clemens wrote and said he has been in the Midwest since graduation; he has been retired since 1987 and claims there are no longer enough hours in the day. Last month’s conversation with Kate Kuhns Herrington was a mini-reunion for us. Kate is busy as ever with family and church activities; in a special December holiday exchange Kate and her children entertained the hearingimpaired folks of their church at the Herrington home—a party complete with dinner and baskets of gifts for all guests.

✒ 1958 News of

F. Jarrett (“Dee”) DeJulio (Bennie Bennett) P.O. Box 607 Dover, NJ 07802-0607 From the Alumni House: Isidore Mihalakis was awarded the Col. John K. Schafer Award at the Lehigh County Police Chiefs Association’s annual banquet.

✒ 1957 News of

Pearl Stein 3 Tulip Court Marlton, NJ 08053-5542 From Pearl: College friends Carmella Carrescia, Cornelia Schlotter, and Karen Johnson Berry and her husband Harold are looking forward to another mini-reunion hosted by Carmella at her Roseto, Pa., home. They were planning to attend Founder’s Day and the rededication of the Chapel windows over Alumni Weekend. Their first gathering in December was occasioned by Vespers. They were joined for dinner by Bev Bell ’56. Carmella, a retired teacher, serves as president of the local senior citizens group. She volunteers at several libraries. One day a week she volunteers at a medical library in Stroudsburg, and another day each week at a local parochial school where she teaches children how to use the library. Karen and Harold, now living in Vermont, are researching their family geneology. They have checked passenger lists in the National Archives, cemeteries in Wisconsin and Michigan, and data on AmericaOnline.

Cornelia Schlotter is enjoying her retirement. Cornelia and her friend Marcella Kimmick share responsibility for their home in Westmont, N.J., and their beautiful dogs, Honeybear and Baggybear. Cornelia is currently taking a class in gardening. Jo-Anne Pessin and husband Herb are now living in Kennett Square. Both are retired and are very active in local groups. We spent a very pleasant day with them in the University City area of Philadelphia, viewing exhibits at the University of Pennsylvania Museum and having lunch at the White Dog Café. Joanne and Herb have a daughter living and working in New York and a son living near them. By the time our Moravian College Magazine is published, I should be living in a new home. I’ll be moving at the end of March to Marlton, N.J. From the Alumni House: Joan Haupert and Peter ’56 were planning on spending the month of April in Europe. Joan will be touring Portugal while Peter studies French in Paris. Last year they spent five weeks in Provence studying French.

✒ 1956 News of

Robert Gray 3190 Pheasant Drive Northampton, PA 18067-9768

✹ 1955

Reunion May 19-20 Helen Varady Keyser 2038 Kenmerer Street Bethlehem, PA 18018 Sue Ann Henkelman Fortney writes that she and Ralph are fine. They have had a quiet year. They were going to spend the holidays in North Carolina with their five-year-old granddaughter Jennifer. Their oldest granddaughter is a freshman at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill and loves it. Another granddaughter, Theresa, is a junior in high school. Gladys Smith Winkelman and her husband Howie are having lots of snow in Spirit Lake, Idaho. John and I follow her on the “Weather Channel.” She brought two twopound fruit cakes for the holidays and Howie had eaten one by Christmas! Bam McCombs Justice has retired after 31 years of federal service and is moving back to Sarasota. She would like to take a trip to


Class Notes Bethlehem. She hasn’t been there for almost 23 years and would like to see everyone. Kay Moyer Cressman of Round Rock, Tex., writes that they have had a rough year weather-wise. First, they had a drought, then flooding, but at least the hurricanes passed them by. Kay and Dr. Marvin now have three granddaughters and three grandsons; the newest grandson is Matthew. Their oldest grandson, Randy, who is living with them, is in high school, so Kay says she is dealing with a teenager again. Son Brian passed his ob-gyn boards and delivered 200 babies in Howe, Alaska. Son Scott is dealing with the Christmas madness being a Toys-R-Us store manager. Kay and Dr. Marvin flew to Philadelphia, Bryce Canyon, Utah, Seattle, and South Carolina last year, mostly for neurological meetings. Dr. Marvin is a neurosurgeon and still works twelve hours a day at age 65. Nolan Ryan (professional baseball pitcher) and his son are building a minor league baseball park within walking distance from Cressman Ranch, so the traffic nightmare should only get worse, Kay writes. Kay volunteers at the library. A new library is being built, completion date in 1999 sometime. She says the summer reading program was quite hectic. We are sorry to learn that Mary Nelmes Williams Seagreaves ’53 lost her husband Nelson last September. It was good to hear from Sister Millicent Drake ’54. Sister wrote that she was using the twelve days of Christmas to send out her greetings. The days before Christmas are so busy with extra services. She hoped to get to Moravian for reunion weekend. Also heard from Mary Pongracz ’52, Anne Enright ’52, Barbara Cump Schmoyer, and Joan Landrock Schlegel. John and I attended the Moravian College Christmas Vespers. Rev. J. Christian Giesler, chaplain of the College and son of classmate Rev. John Giesler, had a wonderful message and the music is always beautiful. I especially love to hear “Morning Star,” which is traditionally sung with a child soloist. And our deepest sympathy goes out to Rose Mandiz Donchez at the passing away of her mother in January. John and I attended the viewing. Barbara Cump Schmoyer, Joan Landrock Schlegel, Rose Mandiz Donchez, and I had a January get-together at Michael’s Restaurant, and later browsed at A Corner in Time, an antique shop next to the restaurant. It is interesting to note that the Rev. Thomas and family (friends of Joan’s family) had lived here. Some of you might remember the late Dora Thomas Dudding, a Moravian alum.

Joan says she and Wallace came back early from their trip because she had gotten sick. They drove through West Virginia, Alabama, Tennessee, Arizona, California, Mexico, New Mexico, Texas, Maryland, and Mississippi. Joan started a mug collection and has been in 45 states. And Rosie tells us that Mary Polak Barkes of Maretta, Ga., is going to be a grandmother. I was happy to receive a note from Nancy Zeleski Frantz ’52. She and her husband Bob had a quiet holiday. Nancy writes that she received a letter from Margaret Czipoth Underwood and husband Eugene. They are fine and so is their terrier. Margaret and Eugene miss their friends and hope that people will visit them in Costa Rica. Margaret is very active in the women’s club, Bible study, book club, and the national symphony. John and I were invited to the Moravian Museum, of which we are members, to attend a lecture and reception. Guest speaker was Helen Desh Woodbridge ’54, who shared stories and remembrances of the Desh family in Bethlehem. Helen portrayed her father Robert James Desh. The exhibit, “Tools from the Hearth and Field of the Desh Family Collection,” was very interesting in addition to all the memorabilia. John and I saw other Moravian alumni here: Anne Enright ’52, Shirley Beck Dutt ’54, and husband Carl, Sally Morris, Marcella Dommick, and Betty Machsteller Groffis.

✒ 1954 News of

Helen Desh Woodbridge 3574 Browning Lane Bethlehem, PA 18018 From Helen: Classmates shared some memorable events in their Christmas cards and several looked forward to our 45th class reunion on May 2122 and their plans to be on campus for one or more events—Jan B. Cook, Millicent Drake, Betty Kuss Erney, Nancy Webber Whissen, Dorothy Ruyak, Marian Wagner, and Dawn Van Keuren, who informed me by phone. Classmates who reported notable or memorable events were Lois Lutz Geehr, Pat Nuttal, Pat K. Nebinger, Dorothy Ruyak, and Nancy Webber Whissen. News also came from Helen Varady Keyser ’55(about Sister Millicent Drake ’54), Fran Webber Horton ’52, Marilyn Nuss Landon ’53, Nancy Zeleski Frantz ’52, and Grace MacMurtie. At two recent events I saw several friends from former college days at Moravian.

The story of Sister Millicent’s 23 years at St. John’s appeared under “Congregations in Profile—St. John’s of Boyertown,” in the November 1998 issue of Partners in the Spirit published by the Northeastern Pennsylvania Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The article praised her accomplishments in the congregation as a musician, an educator, a preacher, a healer, and a communicator. From her Christmas note we know she visited in Lititz, where on Christmas Eve she attended the Vigil service in the Moravian Church. Notable in the life of Lois was Fred’s completion of his term as interim pastor at Hope Lutheran Church in Northeast Philadelphia. Then they were blessed with the birth of grandson Alexander Griffith whose middle name brought forth much song in remembrance of his great-great-grandfather, of Welsh ancestry. The past year marked a new phase in the life of Dorothy Ruyak in Maryland. In January 1998 she went from a full-time job to a parttime job. She was scheduled to continue until April 1 to help in the company’s transition to the computer system. I’d say she has made a fine adjustment to semi-retirement state as she continues to contribute her expertise to the League of Women Voters, with its changes and challenges, and to her church’s call committee in locating a new pastor. Through visits, she keeps up friendships begun at Connecticut College, at Moravian, and at Penn State. She also keeps in touch with her sister in Florida, a sister in Bethlehem, and by e-mail with a cousin, now in Hawaii. Nancy Whissen, who came from Texas along with Betty Erney for our 40th Reunion, wrote that she hoped to attend our 45th with Betty Erney. She also wrote about the musical shows she presented at day care centers; then, with only substitute experience, she taught geometry and second-year algebra in a private school. Pat K. Nebringer visited Central’s putz with Lori and grandson Victor. She had been in touch with Betty Erney about our reunion. We can rejoice at the news from Colorado that Pat Lewis Nuttal and her husband Charles celebrated their 45th anniversary on December 21. They have five children and five grandchildren. She serves her church as deacon and in community services. Among former college friends with news is Fran Webber Horton ’52, my “big sister” at Moravian. Fran’s musical interest is evident in her six grandchildren, four of them instrumentalists. After many years of searching for the music of “Morning Star,” she located a copy in time for the Youth Choir at St. Andrew’s

29


Class Notes Church to sing it at their Christmas Eve service. Again this Christmas she participated in their 23rd Cookies and Carols Party, “where three generations work together to enjoy glorious music.” Last year she organized the first church musical with 30 musicians performing favorite selections. Last summer she and Rod visited their daughter Averil and her family in England and attended Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night at Stratford-on-Avon. The news in Marilyn Landon’s life is about her daughters. Kendra graduated from New York University. Marilyn’s interest in Eleanor’s trip to Morocco was satisfied upon hearing that Casablanca was “not as glamorous as the old Humphrey Bogart movies might suggest.” Grace and Leroy MacMurtie were blessed with two more grandchildren and their Kathryn was one of the angels in the Christmas tableau presented at Liberty High School. Nancy Frantz wrote of “the wonderful Moravian gatherings, the church groups and trips taken during their visit.” Son David is married and “Stanley is living in his grandmother’s house with the dog and cat, and all are doing well.” It was good to see Shirley Beck Dutt and her husband Karl, Anne Enright, Pat Browne Hunter, Helen and John Keyser ’55 and Sally Morris among the group that filled the Saal at the Moravian Museum on February 24 for the talk on the rememberances and stories of the Desh family, the current exhibit downstairs. The audience was very attentive during my talk and the question period. Dale and Claire Pharo kindly loaned Cas their video equipment for the event. Women who attended the recent World Day of Prayer at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church sponsored by Church Women United were inspired by the music provided by Joanne Hoodmaker ’56 accompanied by Fern Bachman Koplin ’51 on the piano. From the Alumni House: In January 1999 John Schlamp retired after fourteen years as chairman of the Nazareth National Bank.

✒ 1953 News of

Charlie Hasenecz 3940 Washington Street Bethlehem, PA 18020 Mundahas@aol.com Marilyn Nuss Landon 1510 Taylor Avenue Ft. Washington, MD 20744-2911

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E. Allen Schultz 931 San Carlos Avenue, N.E. St. Petersburg, FL 33702 From Allen: I received word that Frederick “Fritz” Morgenstern ’54 had a knee replacement in January and that he is, as of this writing, recuperating at home through the TLC of his wife Lois. They are living in Richmond, Ind., where Fritz was part of a pastoral care division of Richmond State Hospital. My wife Jean and I attended an enthusiastic alumni meeting held in late January in Sarasota by Mildred Diefenderfer Thompson ’39. It was a wonderful time for my wife and me to renew acquaintance with Doris English Smullin ’42, M. Grace Keeler Hodge ’46, Barbara Shepherd ’46, and Stanley and Evalyn Adams Hawk ’38. Stanley and Evalyn were on their annual Florida break from Phillipsburg, N.J. Also, we met for the first time Frank and LaRue Marsteller ’36 and Jackie and Rod Williams ’55. At this meeting Linda Robertson, Moravian’s director of development, represented the College staff. In our discussions we identified a number of our mutual friends and interests, and equally important, the pervading sentiment was a strong enthusiasm and appreciation for Moravian College regardless of when we attended or which campus. From Marilyn: I’m glad to report your Christmas cards indicate we’re active, interesting people who seem to be savoring retirement or semiretirement. Nan Moritz Tiffany is engaged in various Alamagordo, N.M., volunteer endeavors, as well as in campus teaching as a fill-in sub. She and Norm celebrated their 45th wedding anniversary. Mincha Drucker Neiditch writes that she and Gene completed their instruction for CASA (court-appointed special advocate). Their job is to investigate and report about children involved with the courts. Gene and Mincha are also certified by Virginia Tech as master gardeners and are active with their local group. In addition, Mincha is a hospital volunteer and in the local quilting guild. Shirley Albright keeps busy with home projects, but in November and December puts them aside to help her nephew in his train shop. Polly Rayner still enjoys work at the Morning Call. Though she managed to enjoy several visits with grandchildren and friends, Pat Browne Hunter had a rough ’98 health-wise. She spent the early part of the year recuperating from gall bladder surgery. In May, she began a

long period necessitating several hospital stays for a pancreatic cyst problem. Lois Kester Jason had a creatively productive 1998. She appeared in a Pilot Pen commercial, was the lady whose house burned in an instructional film about arson investigation made for Alcohol, Tobacco, and Fireman, and if you’re in a Summit Bank, you can see her as the “bakery owner” on a counter card. She and husband Jerry go to the gym every day. Helen Search Rogens says she and Ted still love to dance and take pleasure in day trips. Recently, they celebrated their 30th wedding anniversary. Shayne Dunbar Arnesen and husband John travel a lot visiting children and grandchildren in three states. John works part-time selling steel. Last May, Char Haag Walek and Walter spent several weeks touring Great Britain, staying in London for a while, then enjoying “B&B’s” around England, Scotland, and Wales. The rest of the year, they found life in their Cape Cod home much to their liking. Those other seaside dwellers, Joan Bramble Kurtz and Jack, love their retirement in Ocean City, N.J. They both vacationed there as kids not knowing each other then. For about fifteen years, they had a summer place there before converting it to year-round living. They do leave it, though, to vacation somewhere else. Recently, they cruised the Columbus and Snake Rivers, learning a lot about the Lewis and Clark Expedition. In ’99 they intend to go to the Greek Isles and on to Istanbul. Connie Nonnemaker Strain and Bill headed south to Florida for Christmas and most of the winter to spend time with their son and his family. They also keep in touch with many relatives who now live there. Joanne Lohrman has a new residence in Dewey, Ariz. Her place is on the fringe of a golfing community, “out in the country.” Wild creatures abound, particularly Gambel’s quails. Prescott is just fifteen miles away, and her kids are only ten miles away. At Dewey’s 5000-foot elevation, she even gets snow. I loved hearing from you and am always open to receiving more news! Keep those cards and letters coming!

✒ 1952 News of

Gloria Parkhill P.O. Box 214 Stockertown, PA 18083-0214


Class Notes

✒ 1951 News of

“During spring break we shall host some student cousins from the University of Rome at our home in Florida.”

✒ 1948

Andy Jasso 35 W. Greenwich Street Bethlehem, PA 18018-2439

News of

Carol Buechner McMullen 613 Cliff Street Hohokus, NJ 07423

Marion Schmidt Heacock 407 East Fairview Street Bethlehem, PA 18018

✹ 1950

Janice Trauger Bewley and hubby Don are on the move again. They spent the month of June on Cape Cod. They had fun when the grandsons, 14 and 10, came for a two-week visit. In November they moved to Sun City, Hilton Head. In December they took a 10-day cruise to the Caribbean and Panama Canal. On March 1, their address will change to South Carolina. Bill and I enjoyed a wonderful trip to the Southwest last fall. We toured Los Angeles, the Grand Canyon, Bryce Canyon, Zion and Yosemite National Parks, Las Vegas, and San Francisco. Hearst Castle was fabulous as well as the Old Mission in Santa Barbara. Lots of great memories!

Reunion May 19-20 Bob Scholl P.O. Box 5083 Bethlehem, PA 18015

✒ 1940s

News of Men of the ’40s Charles W. Eichman 1280 Wynnewood Drive Bethlehem, PA 18017-3553

✒ 1949 News of

Faye Werley Jurden Oak Lane Manor 1113 Parkside Drive Wilmington, DE 19803 Thomas F. Keim 422 East Locust Street Bethlehem, PA 18018 William H. Woods 3032 Coplay Lane Whitehall, PA 18052 From the Alumni House: Dr. Bernard J. Terzigni wrote in to say that he traveled through Europe recently. “On one trip to Europe, we went to Lourdes, France, the site of St. Bernadette’s apparitions of the Virgin Mary,” he said. “For decades the grotto’s spring water has produced many documented unexplained improvements and cures of medical conditions of many pilgrims. “I also was blessed with an unexplained improvement in a chronic eye condition confirmed medically by renowned retinologists. Hence, my wife and I shall return to Lourdes as medical volunteers in the very near future.

✒ 1947 News of

June Urffer Moyer 27012 Aldeano Drive Mission Viejo, CA 92691 From June: Barbara Schlegel Miller and Kenny moved to the Highlands in Wyomissing, Pa. before the holidays. Adjusting to a new life style and making new friends is keeping them busy. Peg Loveless Brown is joining the ranks of the retired at the end of the school year. Peg writes all her friends love it. That will be a huge change for Peg who has taught school all these years, but I’m certain she has big plans. Betty Riegel Mesner and Bill and family continue to be involved in their church and community activities. When Betty has a chance she attends art classes and water exercises for arthritis. Reen Cutler and Bill drove to Noreen’s to spend time with their Colorado family and to get to know their great granddaughter, Savanna. The big trip of the year was their RussianScandinavian trip in October. “All the fabulous Russian buildings—but the dour expressions of the Russian people left a lasting impression of very unhappy people.”

From the Alumni House: Ed Steager has had his book of poetry published and promoted it at a book-signing at the Moravian Book Shop.

✒ 1946 News of

Martha Miexell Danner 10 Lynbrook Drive Lambertville, NJ 08530-3007 Ada Zellner Flower 834 Hilltop Road Oyster Bay, NY 11771 From Ada: I’m substituting for Martha Meixell Danner this issue. Since Bob’s death, she has been dealing with a myriad of concerns: family health, home maintenance, insurance forms, finances, etc. Her sons and grandchildren are tremendous support. Mildred Henrie Kepler is also adjusting to loss. Her friend, Paul Miller, whom we met at our 50th reunion, died in November. Mildred speaks of the wonderful memories of her life with husband, Bob, until his death, and now with Paul. Marian Emig Hoffman fulfilled a dream by going to Prudhoe Bay in Alaska in August. She says the spectacular wildlife and scenery she saw on the trip will be pictured in her mind forever. She has done a dog sled ride with Mary Shields (of Iditarod fame) and continues her volunteer work. Ann and Bill Smythe seem to have been all over the United States in 1998 and to Europe. Much of their travels involved visits with children, cousins, friends, the Hodges in Bradenton, Fla., and (in Amsterdam) with an exchange student who lived with them 20 years ago. Ann fractured a hip in a fall, but has returned to normal activity. She is still president of the library board. Bill continues to assist with services in Red Feather Lake. In December, he officiated at the marriage of their grandson Matthew in Kansas. Grace Keeler Hodge responded to my request for news with a phone call. What a pleasure for me! She bemoaned the fact that she wasn’t doing well in the February golf tournaments—a putting problem. She did well in the long drive category. In April ’98 she and David went with Peg Loveless Browne ’47 and her students on a wonderful trip to Italy and Switzerland. They did Israel and Egypt in October and visited their son Peter in Tuscon at Christmas. Both are active in church and were to sing in the combined choir concert the evening she called. The 31


Class Notes Hodges spent summer in Chatauqua and winter in Bradenton. In April ’99 they will have celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary with a party in Florida and then later in Chatauqua!

✹ 1945

Reunion May 19-20 Jane Smith Ebelhare 805 Buckeye Street Ft. Collins, CO 80524 Many thanks to those who sent me Christmas letters recapping news of the year. After creating her 1999 Christmas cards, Easter cards, and valentines, Ellie Gift Kistler took a leave from creativity and has been having a great time babysitting her grandson, Austin. She has had the joy of seeing him go through the early developmental stages. She says that her new granddaughter is a “rare jewel” also. She planned to go to Strasburg to see the Sight and Sound production of Noah in a few weeks and, if possible, visit her youngest daughter who now lives in the Yukon. Dorothy Stump Leid claims that she doesn’t have anything newsworthy. However, it sounds like taking exercise classes and painting classes, teaching Sunday School classes, and leading Lenten Bible study might keep her slightly active. Because she is on medication which requires that one remain upright after swallowing, she has used this time to finish an afghan which was started last year, and she has resumed work on a quilt which has been in production for a long time. Ellen Peters McGinnis and husband Ralph have leased a place in Orlando, Fla., for the months of February and March, and they love it. They are asking friends and relatives to visit them, and for a change, are staying put. Ellen’s sister Harriet Peters Williamson ’60 was there for a few days, and her brother Dave lives just three miles away. Apparently this trip to Maui to celebrate Ellen’s three-quarters of a century was unbelievable. The original plan to visit Ellen’s new great-grandson in California had to be altered, so that was to happen in April. In October, Jackie Stout McGiffert and a friend attended a two-week Adventure Elderhostel. It took place in Oahu for one week and the next week on Maui. Then they stayed on Maui for another week. Apparently the Elderhostel was quite demanding “with action-packed days and evening activities.” They had two difficult hikes and two easy ones, instruction on surfing, sea kayaking, and outrigger canoeing. They also went snorkeling

32

with some young biologists from the Pacific Whale Foundation. Both of Jackie’s grandchildren, with their accompanying parents, spent Christmas with her. The “M&M’s” had their annual Christmas gathering at the home of Janet Moyer Paulus and her husband Dick in Phillipsburg, and as usual had a great time together. Jim and Doris Fetterman Cherrington ’43, Warren and Florence Drebert Fritts, and Jackie Haas Bauder “crossed the Delaware” for this New Jersey holiday luncheon. Janet and Dick plan to sell their home of fifty years and buy a house in the Allentown area. Alice Joyce Yeager has had to overcome several surgeries this year, but this hasn’t stopped her from organizing a trip to Florida United Methodist Children’s Home in Enterprise, Fla. She says that it was a beautiful and rewarding day at the facility which is along Lake Monroe at the beginning of the St. John’s River. There are 200-year-old live oaks in front of the chapel, and counseling and tutoring services are stressed to help the children living there and to improve their talents. Alice has also started a water color class and hopes to attend a computer group. Andy and I will continue with the Winter Equestrian Festival here in Wellington, Fla., until the end of March and then head back to Colorado. It has been a busy but very enjoyable time.

Highlands. It is a regular family affair now that all three Schlegel sisters are living at the Highlands. Marie Brady Fuller and Dan spent Christmas in Martinez, Calif., with her daughter Mary and her family. This will be the last Christmas she has to travel far for the holidays because her son-in-law is being transferred to the East in the spring. Marie spent New Year’s with her other daughter, Anne Marie, in Nashville, Tenn.

✒ 1944

Life is a combination of sadness and joy, and the class of 1941 experienced both this year. Jeanne Manley passed away in 1998, as did the husband of Jean Mecherly Myers ’39. The class sends sympathy to both families. Several people wrote at Christmas time. I wish more would. Barbara Ellen Bastian Uhrig continues her quilting. She visited with children in Austin, and had a wonderful 80th birthday with all of her family members present. She had successful cataract surgery during the year, an operation that many of us have experienced and found the outcome beyond all expectation. Lois Yerger Fischel and Jack went to California to visit their son and enjoy the Rose Bowl Parade. Last summer they went on an Elderhostel trip to South Africa, which Lois says will probably be their last long foreign trek. They were lucky; just recently an Elderhostel group there was held up and robbed of their valuables. A post-holiday letter from Thelma Scheifele Heiberger compared her 1998 to a kaleidoscope of many colors and shapes, with her grandchildren holding a prominent place. Bob now has just one small church in nearby Cementon part time, and Thelma is still busy with music and flowers.

News of

Jane Shirer 6447 Overbrook Avenue Philadelphia, PA 19151

✒ 1943 News of

Margaret L. Albright 129 North 11th Street Allentown, PA 18102 June Bright Reese 22 East Washington Avenue Bethlehem, PA 18018 From Margaret: Mary Jane Schlegel Schofer had a nice note on her Christmas card. She really had a bad year healthwise and went through two operations. Now that this is behind her, she and Jay are again very active at the Highlands. She also mentioned that her sister Barbara Schlegel Miller ’47 has also moved to the

✒ 1942 News of

Mary Kuehl Concevitch 1036 Center Street Bethlehem, PA 18018 The sympathy of the class is extended to Mary Luch Annett ’41, whose husband Jed died January 27, 1999.

✒ 1941 News of

Ruth Hemmerly Kelly 30 West Market Street Bethlehem, PA 18018


Class Notes My 1998 was rather adventuresome with an Elderhostel trip in Florida, and an April trip to England and Cornwall, a family reunion in Michigan, and in September a frequent flyer trip to California. After two days at home to wash clothes and pay bills, I was off on a three-week bus trip to the canyons, Bryce, Zion, Grand Canyon, Monument Valley, Mesa Verde, etc. Gorgeous weather, golden aspens, blue skies, spectacular mountains with snow-covered passes and peaks, all in all a most glorious experience.

✹ 1940

Reunion May 19-20 Anne Borhek Manning 2913 Anderson Drive Raleigh, NC 27608-1507 From the Alumni House: We are sorry to report that Anne is resigning from her position as your class correspondent. She has done this for a number of years and we thank her for all of her work. This means the Class of 1940 needs a new correspondent. If you are interested, please either call the Alumni Office at 610-861-1366 or send an e-mail to alumrel@ moravian.edu.

✒ 1939 News of

Arlington A. Nagle, M.D. 855 N. Park Road, Apt. 201 Reading, PA 19610 Alice Snyder Wilson 10 Hillside Place Cranford, NJ 07016

✒ 1938 News of

Evalyn Adams Hawk 306 Ohio Avenue, Shimer Manor Philipsburg, NJ 08865 From Evalyn: Christmastime found Frances Fulmer McClain from Sun City, Ariz., back in Bethlehem for Moravian College Christmas Vespers. This is the first time she has enjoyed the superb Christmas music with “Morning Star” since college days, except once right after college when she and her husband Bill were there. Her sister and her husband joined Frances for the vespers.

Harking Back: Mildred Diefenderfer Ladner Thompson ’39 A Personal Reminiscence by Kathleen Doyle Dowd ’68 I experienced my first encounter with Millie Diefenderfer Ladner Thompson as a naïve teenager in the 1960s. My mother, Margaret Johnson Doyle, insisted that, on a cross-country vacation, we stop in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to visit Millie Diefenderfer who, along with my mother and Lee Shields formed a triumvirate of friends in the class of 1939 at Moravian College. While we were chatting about old times, the phone rang. To my utter amazement, it was the White House. Liz Carpenter, LBJ’s Chief of Staff, called to talk with Millie. My mother was the friend of a friend of a friend of the president of the United States! For a future history major this was an impressive introduction to the distinction of the women of the ’30s. As a student at MoMo, Millie, ever nosing out news, spent hours stalking the attic of Colonial Hall, the repository of the archives which housed, according to Millie, the elusive ghost of a Revolutionary War soldier. Fanny Harrah once asked her to escort a Miss Doolittle around the campus only to discover later that Miss Doolittle was Hilda Doolittle, daughter of Moravian parents, member of the “Bloomsbury Set,” a world-famous imagist poet, and winner of the Gold Medal from the Academy of Arts and Letters. During her tenure as the book editor for the Tulsa World, Millie hobnobbed with the likes of Irving Stone, Paul Scott (author of The Jewel in the In the 1939 Benigna. Crown), and Seamus Heaney, Nobel Prize-winning poet. Among her journalistic achievements, Millie served in the Press Corps in Washington, D.C. She attributed the inclusion of women into the male-dominated Fourth Estate to the “patron saint” of women, Eleanor Roosevelt, who insisted she be interviewed by women. She has also been correspondent to the Wall Street Journal, active member of the Women’s National Press Club, special writer for the Diplomatic Magazine, author of William de la Montagne Cary: Artist on the Mississippi, and Comenius Award winner 1962. Not bad for a girl who paid three dollars for her dress for her senior picture at Moravian. In the 1999 Reunion parade (with Marguerite Resetco on the right). Millie reflects her generation’s Photo: Gregory M. Fota ’69. initiative to be different, to challenge themselves, and to have the courage to succeed. Her advice to the students of the new millennium is, “Think for the long haul, be flexible, keep up with the trends.” For six decades she certainly has.

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Class Notes When Catherine Marquard from Langhorne, Pa., retired from her New York City public library job, one of the special things she did was to experience the beautiful music of Moravian’s Vespers. I had greetings from Catherine Fraly, Christine Roberts, and Lois Laubach Pasley at Christmas. Christine is enjoying her family with her great-grandchildren now. Lois still volunteers weekly at Falmouth Massachusetts Public Library. Miriam Schaeffer Romig also sent greetings and praise for our heartwarming 60th reunion in May. This February we had our annual luncheon of Betty Chase Wagner, Betty Kessler Brady, Blanche Williams Sheese ’37, and myself in North Port, Fla. Blanche and Fred, her husband, are selling their home here in North Port and are moving to Virginia in May to be near one of their daughters. I trust that the little booklet which Olivia sent was of interest to you all.

✒ 1937

Marriages

Deaths

1994

1985

Patricia A. Horwath to Drew P. Smith on August 15, 1998. James Whitcomb to Adrienne McAuley on June 20, 1998.

Keith Woods, February 10, 1999.

1993

1962

Kelly Berkelbach to Daniel David on July 26, 1997. Eric Weist to Maraquita Marsteller on October 24, 1998.

1958

Births 1993 To Kristine Yurko Groeber and Paul Groeber Jr. ’90, a daughter, Justine Noelle, December 25, 1998.

1992 To Joe Kopko and Jamie Rittenhouse ’90, a daughter, Sophia, December 1998.

News of

1991

Bertha Finkelstein Cohen 2800 South Ocean Boulevard, Apt. 9A Boca Raton, FL 33452

1990

✒ 1936 News of

Harold E. Orvis 421 East Drake Road Ft. Collins, CO 80525-1731

✹ 1935

Reunion May 19-20 Wilma Kistler Uhrich 300 Willow Valley Lakes Drive, Apt. A319 Willow Street, PA 17584

☛ Changes

To Tina Sauter and Frank Gregor, a daughter, Emily, September 1998. To Philip and Karen Haux-Baney, a daughter, Colette, October 14, 1998. To Cathy Wilkins Taylor and Dwight, a daughter, Jessica Lynn, September 28, 1999.

1988 To Alease Duker Chabrak and Douglas, a daughter, Alexandra Antoinette, January 13, 1999.

1987 To Lori Chomo Traupman and John, a son, Eric Matthew, December 19, 1998. To Valerie Decristofano Paulus and Rusty, a son, Matthew Dominic, November 8, 1998.

1986 To Donna Mackinshok Aslanian and Edward, a daughter, Mackensie Francesca, December 26, 1998.

Peter Odell, January 31, 1999. Richard Tewell, December 19, 1998. Shirley Elliot, November 22, 1998. Pauline M. Machin, February 17, 1999. William J. Rupp Jr., October 26, 1998.

1951 Jean Cassedy Colville, November 21, 1998. Matilda Lemon, January 27, 1999.

1947 Earl L. Leonhard, September 27, 1998.

1943 Scott M. Bower, February 5, 1999.

1942 Michael Burcin, May 22, 1998. Dr. Ross Long, February 24, 1999. E. Howard Housman, March 15, 1999.

1940 William A. Dean, December 21, 1998. Catherine Chirco, February 27, 1999.

1939 Fred W. Leonard, December 4, 1998.

1938 Charles “Chink” Gallagher, January 4, 1999. Marion Leedecker, November 10, 1998.

1935 Rev. Gordon Andrew Stoltz, March 15, 1999.

1933 Anna Karp Bianco, February 3, 1999.

1930 Martha M. Schlegel, March 13, 1999.

1929 Estes J. Bachman, February 12, 1999.

1927

News of

1985

Charles S. Thaeler, November 25, 1998.

To Kerri and Kerry Freidl, a son, Judson William, January 22, 1999.

Faculty, Staff & Friends

Engagements

1984

1993 Martin Marion to Tracy Hoffman, to be wed July 2000.

To David Griscom and Elizabeth PlarrGriscom, a daughter, Emily Elizabeth, September 14, 1998.

1980 To John Fellenbaum and Diane, a son, John, September 18, 1998.

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1964

Anthony J. Brzyski, former adjunct economics professor, February 6, 1999. Anita P. Jacob, former head of student accounts 1958-1985, February 6, 1999. Arthur Schachter, husband of the late Beverly Schachter ’79, former staff member in the Registrar’s Office, December 2, 1998.


Moravian through the Years... In 1927, the roaring ’20s were in full swing, the stock market had no where to go but up (or so everyone thought), and Bertha Mae Starner graduated from Moravian College for Women. She embarked on a 40year career as a teacher in the Allentown school district. During these 40 years, Bertha Mae enjoyed meeting regularly with other members of the Allentown Alumnae Club at monthly luncheon meetings and at special College events. She developed a love of music during her college days and was a long-time member of the Bach Choir.

Bertha Mae never really left Moravian after commencement because she always carried the College in her heart. To perpetuate this life-long love of the College and of music, Bertha Mae made a bequest provision for the College’s Music Department. Upon her death in 1998, Bertha Mae established the Jay F. and Bertha Mae Starner Chair in Music. Through this generous and thoughtful gift, Bertha Mae and Moravian College are entwined forever.

For more information about gifts of this nature, contact: Lisa Dippre Titus Director of Major and Planned Gifts 1200 Main Street Bethlehem, PA 18018 (610) 861-1342 Toll-free (800) 429-9437 Fax (610) 861-3983 E-mail: meldt01@moravian.edu


Another Grand Slam Victory

The 1998-99 Moravian College women’s tennis team celebrated its third consecutive Middle Atlantic Conference championship victory. Athletics programs are among the many areas that benefit from Annual Fund support. Help us continue the tradition of excellence in athletics by making an Annual Fund gift today. Join a winning team!

MORAVIAN COLLEGE 1200 Main Street Bethlehem, PA 18018 Address Correction Requested

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Profile for Moravian College

Moravian College Magazine Summer 1999  

Moravian College Magazine Summer 1999  

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