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W

e are fortunate.

In this new world of pandemic precautions - social distancing, canceled

or delayed events, staying home to prevent virus spread - we in Montana can simply walk outside our door to

witness the wonder of mother nature. Scenic vistas, wildlife encounters and outdoor recreation opportunities abound. Though COVID-19 adjustments have been hard, I can’t help but think how much harder most other states have been hit. I am grateful to live near wide open spaces and in a place where neighbors still reach out to help one another. We are tasked with looking out for one another and protecting our most vulnerable populations from the novel coronavirus. Though we’ve fared well thus far, our area is not immune to this pandemic. Please continue to do your part to ensure everyone’s Montana summer is a healthy one. Happy trails to you all!

-

Summer Goddard, Publisher M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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Contents

Healing spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Fishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Swimming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Farmers markets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Bear aware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 SKQ Dam history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Flathead Lake drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Water safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Glacier National Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Aquatic Invasive Species . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

2020

MONTANA SUMMER 2020 Montana Summer is a yearly publication of the Valley Journal newspaper (PE 23-190) published weekly by Valley Journal LLC at 331 Main Street SW in Ronan, MT. Periodicals postage paid at Ronan, MT. Office hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Distribution is by mail subscription ($59 per year in Lake County, MT; $74 per year elsewhere in U.S.) and by newsstand sales. Postmaster: send address changes to Valley Journal, P.O. Box 326, Ronan, MT. 59864. Your homegrown newspaper serves residents of Lake County and the Flathead Indian Reservation. Deadline for display advertising is 2 4

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p.m. Thursday. Deadline for news submissions, calendar items, classifieds and legal advertising is noon Friday, for the following week’s newspaper. News, letters to the editor and calendar submissions may be sent by email to: vjeditor@valleyjournal.net. Classified and legal advertisements requests should be emailed to: vjmail@valleyjournal.net. All print subscriptions include full access to online news, archives. Sign up online at: www.valleyjournal.net/subscribe For general inquiries: call 406-676-8989, email summer@valleyjournal.net, or send mail correspondence to P.O. Box 326, Ronan, MT 59864.

Copyright 2020, the Valley Journal. All rights reserved. Reproduction, reuse or transmittal in any form or by any means is prohibited without written permission of the Valley Journal. Staff: Publisher / sales .................... Summer Goddard Adv. manager / owner........... Boone Goddard Editor....................................... Karen Peterson Reporter / graphic artist...... Rob Zolman Contributing writer.............. Mary Auld Copy editor............................ Kathi Beeks Office manager....................... Leni Baker Photographer......................... Nicole Tavenner


healing

spaces

Penned up by the pandemic, Montanans try to get well by getting out Craig Macholz hunched in a small lawn chair near Missoula’s Rattlesnake National Recreation Area trailhead on April 25, soaking up the sun as he waited for a buddy to return from a trail run. Cars and trucks filled the surrounding parking lot and lined the roadside for more than 100 yards beyond. Pairs of bikers zipped by. Individuals and families with small children wandered past, giving each other wide berths. Macholz had just finished a run of his own, his first since the coronavirus pandemic put Montanans in near-

lockdown. As a software engineer, Macholz was lucky to be able to work from home. But until now he’d felt too guilty to leave his wife and two kids behind in the name of exercise. “It was just so beautiful, so peaceful,” he said of his Saturday outing. “I forget how wonderful this time of year is. With the larch leaves, you can see very far, and the trails are just spectacular. It’s fun to be out.” As much as he enjoyed the fresh air, Macholz was keenly aware that others around the country don’t have the luxury. COVID-19 prompted widespread closures of public spaces nationwide over the past five weeks, from coastal beaches to national parks. Ski areas throughout the Rockies ended their seasons early, with some resorts pleading for state officials to give them even one more day.

In Montana, concerns about the health and safety of gateway communities prompted late-March closures of Glacier and Yellowstone national parks, and the U.S. Forest Service opted to shut down developed sites and rental cabins across the state’s national forest system. That the public is increasingly turning to open spaces in this time of crisis is abundantly clear. Officials in southern California are already rethinking recent decisions to reopen beaches after a warm weekend back drew large crowds. Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry recently defended reopenings in Florida after reports of similar crowding drew national criticism. The glut of vehicles at Missoula’s Rattlesnake trailhead last weekend is of a piece with a spike in public lands traffic in Montana. Pat

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Outdoor recreation, indeed nature itself, is critical to mental health.

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Doyle, marketing and communications manager for Montana State Parks, noted a 61 percent increase in visitation to state parks during March 2020 over March 2019. “Places like Makoshika State Park in Glendive, out in Dawson County in eastern Montana, we’re seeing numbers that kind of rival their summer numbers,” Doyle said. “People just want to get outside. They want to be outside. They want to regain some sense of normalcy in their lives.” In that way, the pandemic is underscoring a point many wildland advocates, government officials and health care professionals have touted for years: Outdoor recreation, indeed nature itself, is critical to mental health. The therapeutic potential of exposure to 6

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nature has prompted numerous scientific studies around the world, and nonprofits across the U.S. have worked with the National Park Service and other partners over the past decade to develop criteria for localized “ParkRX” programs that, according to the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy, “involve health or social service providers encouraging people to spend time in nature to improve their health and well-being.” According to Sara Boilen, owner and chief psychologist at Sweetgrass Psychological Services in Whitefish, some studies have shown that the effects of a 30-minute daily walk are equivalent to the effects of the antidepressant Prozac. She said she and the nurse practitioner at her practice often recommend regular walks to clients before considering prescription

medication. “There’s all the athletic and physical pursuits that we can do in nature, but there’s also just being in the presence of nature that is so healing,” Boilen said. “We have sandhill cranes right now out at our place. They’re so spectacular, and it can almost take your mind off coronavirus for a second. You can almost feel like other things don’t matter, and that’s pretty special.” Based on her research, Antonia Malchik, the Whitefish-based author of the 2019 book A Walking Life, partly credits that healing power to the cognitive role the simple act of walking plays in human development. She also reports a recent uptick in outdoor activity in the Whitefish area, evidenced by packed trailhead parking lots and neighbors who don’t normally bike


“...If we weren’t feeling attached to nature and in some way feeling the draw of it for ourselves, then we could just sit on our couches all the time.” - ANTONIA MALCHIK AUTHOR, A WALKING LIFE

suddenly pedaling with their children every day. “I don’t think people would be doing it if there weren’t a deeper need,” Malchik said. “If there weren’t a craving to be out there, if we weren’t feeling attached to nature and in some way feeling the draw of it for ourselves, then we could just sit on our couches all the time.” As Montanans wrestle with the new realities of pandemic life — job loss, remote work and schooling, social distancing, the absence of human touch and normal routine — maintaining mental health has become a more pressing priority than ever before. And the outdoors has become a vital component of that maintenance. The Japan-born practice of forest bathing is being promoted across the globe. The Icelandic Forestry Service is encouraging people to hug a tree for five minutes a day to fill the void of human contact. Andrew Person, a Missoula attorney, military veteran and former Democratic state legislator, has recognized the therapeutic value of wildlands through conversations with fellow veterans and the work of his nonprofit, Montanans for National Security, which takes veterans onto those lands. He said the general public should be turning to those lands now. But with so many people already flocking to trails and fishing access sites, concern about those areas becoming sites for the transmission of COVID-19 has become top-of-mind for local health officials and land advocates alike. Municipalities across the state have closed playgrounds in the name of public health, and Missoula County Incident Commander Cindy Farr said the potential for large crowds congregating at trailheads has spurred public messaging on the importance of maintaining social distancing. It’s the same approach Rachel Schmidt, director of the Montana Office of S E E PAG E 8

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Outdoor Recreation, has taken statewide. “We’ve tried to communicate very specifically, ‘Hey, we have this opportunity, but we only have this opportunity if we do it safely,’” Schmidt said. “Because right now, first and foremost, we’re facing a public health crisis, and most important is the health and safety of everybody.” In Gallatin County, the U.S. Forest Service and Gallatin County Land Trust have installed signage at outdoor recreation locations to the same effect, and Lori Christenson, Gallatin’s citycounty environmental health director, said local officials discussed early on what to do if contact tracing revealed clusters of COVID-19 cases tied to trailheads. In addition to the potential for disease transmission, increased outdoor recreation has sparked concern over resource damage during the wet spring mud season. EJ Porth, associate director of the Gallatin Valley Land Trust, said her organization has received requests from the public to close the Drinking Horse Trail near Bozeman due to damage caused by increased traffic and muddy conditions. Local officials opted to keep the trail open. “We can repair trails,” Porth said. “People’s mental health is more important right now.” Farr and Christenson each said their respective counties recognize the importance of outdoor recreation during

the pandemic, both for physical health and mental well-being. Farr added that Missoula County has tried to keep as many public spaces open as possible because “we want people to disperse and go to different areas instead of everybody just going to hike the M.” User groups and organizations such as the Montana Wilderness Association have endeavored through blog posts and social media to emphasize the importance of recreating responsibly, both to minimize the risk of virus transmission and to ensure continued access at a critical time. Along the main stem of the Rattlesnake, Megan Delamont and Josiah Simmons were seeking exactly those benefits on April 25. The two, both wildlife biology students at the University of Montana, had stopped with their dogs to watch an osprey feeding on a trout atop a tree. The fish wriggled beneath the osprey’s talons as Delamont and Simmons talked about the packed trailhead parking lot and their desire to get outside. Simmons confessed he “can’t stand the quarantine.” “I’ve got to get out,” he said. “It’s tough mentally to get through this, and we’ve both had a tough week with assignments being due and finals and all that, so having some place to escape and fall in love with the new flowers popping up and watch an osprey eat a fish, it’s super helpful.” Porth and others believe the increased COVID-inspired usage of trails and

open spaces has helped highlight public lands as critical health infrastructure. Conversations about land conservation in Montana over the past decade have largely focused on public lands as an economic and job-creating asset. Porth and Malchik both said they hope for and predict a shift in that thinking toward a view of public lands as a mental health asset. For psychologist Boilen, the need for such an asset will only become more widespread in the coming months. Even among her friends, Boilen said she’s noticed an increase in anxiety, fear, frustration and alcohol use during the pandemic, and she predicts a looming mental health crisis on the heels of the COVID curve. “There are a lot of people who were doing fine, they were going along,” Boilen said. “Then they lost their job, then they lost access to their friends, then they maybe lost housing or had other stressors, and they’re fighting with the spouse. Many of us don’t know how to cope with this. None of us know how to cope with this. This is brand new. Unless you were alive [during the influenza pandemic of ] 1918, you’ve never done this before. So it’s brutal.”

Story by Alex Sakariassen for Montana Free Press. Freelance writer Alex Sakariassen has spent the past decade writing long-form narrative stories that spotlight the people, the politics, and the wilds of Montana. Photos by Nicole Tavenner, Summer Goddard / Valley Journal.

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Cast

away

Summer offers time to create fishing memories

The solitary nature of fishing makes it the perfect social-distancing activity this summer after many events were canceled due to the COVID-19 virus. Anglers recall the pleasure of dropping a hook in the water, watching the sun’s rays reflect on the surface and the excitement of the moment when the line goes tight. Beau Biggs, 18, said the process of “casting and reeling” is relaxing. He can spend hours waiting for a fish. He started fishing about the time he could walk and has caught fish in the kids’ pond at Ninepipe National Wildlife Refuge, in the Mission Mountain Wilderness, Flathead Lake and on the Flathead River. He said his tackle box is “ready to go” for the summer fishing season. On the Flathead Reservation, fishing

in streams, canals and ditches opened on the third Saturday in May. The season closes on Nov. 30. Fishing is open the entire year on lakes, ponds, reservoirs and potholes. The Flathead and Jocko rivers are also open to fishing all year, according to the regulations. Fishing is allowed at all hours on the reservation during the fishing season, unless otherwise posted. Fishing in rivers and streams in the western region of the state, outside the reservation, also started on the third Saturday in May and ends Nov. 30, unless otherwise posted. Fishing in lakes and reservoirs is open the entire year unless posted. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks created reservation regulations. Regulations for non-tribal members include information about where anglers can get permits for fishing. Vendors across the reservation sell the permits. The online

F L AT H E A D R I V E R I N M O I E S E

application is available at: http://app. mt.gov.als/index. The initial permit must be purchased at a retail outlet authorized by the CSKT Tribal Council. Subsequent permits purchased in following years can be bought online. Non-tribal members also need to purchase a land conservation permit. Children under 12 years of age don’t need a permit. The regulations state that anglers must stop and report at tribal check stations if a station is on their route of travel. It is unlawful to refuse to show a fishing permit when asked by law enforcement. Montana has 338 fishing access sites where anglers can enjoy access to streams, rivers, lakes and reservoirs. Lake County is located in Region One of the Fish, Wildlife and Parks management areas, which also includes Flathead and Lincoln counties, along with the northern section of Missoula County. The Montana

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regulations are similar to the reservation in that a valid fishing license is required for all types of fishing for individuals 12 years of age and older. Anglers must have the license in their possession when fishing. A license stored on a smart phone is also acceptable. Fishing gear comes in a wide variety of items from hooks and bait to tackle boxes. Though anglers are free to try out and choose what works best, there are a few rules on the subject. Fishing is allowed with one line containing one or two hooks on the reservation. Fishing poles are not required unless otherwise specified by management. The pole or line must be in the angler’s immediate control while fishing. According to regulations, snagging fish is unlawful. The bait at the end of the hook can include live or artificial products, including leeches, worms, insects and larvae unless otherwise posted. Live fish, live crayfish, frogs or salamanders can’t be used as bait on the reservation. Montana regulations

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also prohibit live fish or the use of live fish as bait in the western fishing district. Importing live baitfish is not allowed in Montana without authorization. The use of lead-based lures is prohibited in the Ninepipe and Pablo reservoirs in an effort to protect habitat; use of flotation devices or float tubes on these reservoirs is

also prohibited. Fishing with explosives is also not allowed on the reservation. It is unlawful to use any carbide, lime or dynamite or other explosive compound or any corrosive or narcotic poison. People need to keep in mind that possessing these items 100 feet from any water body for the purpose of stunning or killing fish isn’t allowed. If an angler is having a lucky fishing day, limits are in place. Fishing for bull trout on and off the reservation in Montana is closed. Information from CSKT explains that bull trout traveled long migration routs for thousands of years and were common throughout inland Pacific Northwest, but they now live in a reduced number in five western states. Montana and Idaho are the best places to find these fish, but they still face possible extinction in some streams. State, tribal and federal laws protect the bull trout. Intentionally or not, taking a bull trout is illegal. Identifying a bull trout can be tricky because they look similar to lake trout. According to CSKT information, a few distinctive characteristics can help


Know the difference

Bull Trout The bull trout has no black on its dorsal fin. “No black, put it back.” Also notice the white-edged fins on this mature adult. You should also look for a slightly forked tail fin and a drab or olive coloration. Body is silvery to light olive with yellow, orange, or pink spots; darker olive-colored on back with yellow or cream-colored spots; adults (usually over 14 inches) may have bright orange colors on belly and flanks, black on head, and whiteedged fins during fall.

anglers in the identification process, which should be done carefully. “Do not put your fingers in the gills of the fish,” CSKT information states. To identify the fish, look at the shape of the tail. Lake trout have a V-shaped tail. Bull trout have a flatter end to their tail, although juvenile bull trout can have a slight V-shape to their tails. Markings can help distinguish the two. Lake trout have gray and black markings on the dorsal fin, which is the large fin on the back; bull trout do not have gray or black markings on their dorsal fin. A short phrase to help anglers remember which fish to release can be handy: “When in doubt, no black put it back.” Anglers can go to mackdays.com to test their skills at identifying the two fish. FWP also has an online identification program at fwp. mt.gov. On the reservation, regulations state that there is “growing concern” for several native fish species. Along with the bull trout, the Westslope Cutthroat trout is in decline across the reservation. The Westslope Cutthroat is identifiable by a colorful slash below its mouth and dense

Lake Trout

spots toward the tail. The Mountain Whitefish is also on the decline and identifiable by its small mouth with no teeth and large scales. The northern pikeminnow is also on the list with its long snout, large toothless mouth and deeply forked tail fin. The non-native species in Flathead Lake are the Yellowstone cutthroat and the brook trout. In an effort to increase native trout in the Flathead Lake system, which includes the river and interconnected systems, non-native lake trout species must be reduced, according to CSKT information. Reducing the number of non-native trout could help increase bull trout and Westslope Cutthroat trout in the lake. Fishing is one way the public participates in the reduction of nonnative species in the lake. Annual Mack Days fishing tournaments are a management tool used by CSKT in the spring and fall to allow anglers to compete for cash prizes by catching tagged lake trout. Reservation fishing guidelines offer advice for releasing fish. The first piece of advice is to plan ahead and have pliers ready to use. It is also suggested that

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The lake trout has a deeply forked tail (center rays less than half length of longest rays). Their dorsal fin may have white spots and their body sports white spots. Dorsal fin is without spots or sometimes with light-colored oval markings; Body is with white or cream-colored spots (never pink or red) on darker background; Appearance - overall gray or nearly black/ white coloration, sometimes with yellow tinge on fins.

people have their camera ready so that photos can be quickly taken and the fish can be returned to the water. Once the fish is on the hook, anglers should bring them up more slowly during the last 30 feet. A net made of soft rubber or mesh netting is recommended to secure the fish. Fish should be left in the water. The pliers can be used to grab the hook and then reverse the angle and pop it out. With wet hands, hold the fish upright in the water until it starts to struggle. Regulations state that the angler should gently move the fish horizontally and let it go. Another way to do it: hold the fish horizontally and plunge the head into the water. During the catch and release process, a fish can sometimes be hurt. Regulations state that if a fish is bleeding and it’s not legal, the angler needs to turn it loose as it may still survive. Due to COVID-19 pandemic, many annual summer events and large gatherings have been canceled. Fishing is something people can still do while adhering to social distancing guidelines. Story by Karen Peterson / Valley Journal, lead photo by Nicole Tavenner / Valley Journal

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Swimming

Swimming lessons provide summer activity, life-saving skills

Kids love splashing around in the water on hot summer days. In the Mission Valley, there are a few options for lessons, and while out recreating, experts offer tips on water safety. Children who can’t swim should always wear a personal floatation device when in and around water. Pools should be securely fenced so children cannot get in without supervision. During lightning and thunderstorms, people should stay out of the water. In Lake County and the Flathead Reservation, many places are available for water activities, including the Flathead Lake and river, and sometimes, the bottoms of those water bodies are not visible. Experts advise people to never jump into unknown waters. A body of water can look deep but, actually, be shallow. Rocks could also be a problem. One critical piece of advice: people shouldn’t attempt to save others who are drowning by swimming to them without expert skills. When people are drowning, panic often sets in, and they reach for anything available, and the person attempting to rescue someone could be pulled under. People are advised to reach out from the shore or find a floatation

device to help the individual. Swimming lessons could save a person’s life. Eileen McMillan, who teaches lessons in the pool at her home, said swimming skills are important in this area. “There’s a lot of water around here,” she said. Between irrigation ditches, Flathead Lake, ponds and backyard pools, local children often come into contact with bodies of water,” she said. “If they fall or jump in and don’t know how to swim, they could drown.” McMillan has been teaching swimming lessons for more than 30 years. She teaches basic swimming and life-saving skills to children age three up to adults. She provides instruction for all skill levels, from complete beginners to advanced swimmers. McMillan, who trained as a physical education teacher, also runs a preschool during the school year. She teaches swimming full-time in the summer in her heated backyard pool. This year she’s implementing additional cleaning measures to ensure that the COVID-19 virus does not spread at her facility. Experts say pools that are properly treated with chemicals do not spread the virus. She’ll also encourage parents to socially distance while waiting for their children to finish lessons.

McMillan said she typically teaches more than 100 students each summer from all over the region. Lessons are held in three two-week sessions. Students attend 30-minute lessons Monday through Friday during their session. Some students enroll in multiple sessions. At the end of each session, parents are invited to watch their children show off their new skills. McMillan said the skills she teaches her students have saved lives numerous times. One three-year-old student fell into an irrigation ditch after his first day of swimming lessons and was able to propel himself to a place where his dad could rescue him. McMillan’s students have gone on to become lifeguards, rescue swimmers, and triathletes. Those interested in registering for lessons should call McMillan at 406-676-8392. Mission Valley Aquatic Center will also offer limited swimming lessons this summer. Two-week sessions start June 22. Children can attend lessons Monday through Thursday. Class sizes will be limited and additional precautions implemented to prevent the spread of COVID-19. For more information or to sign up, call 406-8834567 or pool@mvaquatics.org. Story by Mary Auld for the Valley Journal M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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Eat

fresh

Farmers Markets provide fresh, local produce despite pandemic

While measures to prevent the spread of the coronavirus have changed day-to-day life, people still have to eat. And lucky for the Mission Valley, vegetables are still growing in the fields, livestock are grazing, and local creators are making crafts and food items to sell. The area’s robust farmers markets continue to deliver fresh food just miles from where it was grown. The farmers market season started just as the state’s restrictions on gatherings and businesses began to lift.

Roasted in Polson

Governor Steve Bullock announced earlier in the spring that farmers markets are essential businesses and could operate despite shelter in place orders. Markets across the region started to open gradually. The Polson market, the largest and oldest in the Mission Valley, started two weeks late. They started with just the basic vendors: produce, meat and plant seedlings. Over time, they added more vendors, starting with the most senior vendors and increasing capacity as pandemic prevention restrictions lifted. Markets developed guidelines to maintain safe social distancing and prevent the spread of the pandemic. Visitors and S EE PAG E 16

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vendors at markets are expected to stay home from the market if they are sick or at risk for contracting COVID-19. Only one person per household should attend the market, and pets should stay at home. Everyone should maintain six feet of distance from one another at all times. The markets should not be used as social gathering places. To-go food will be packaged and should not be consumed on-site. Customers should not touch items. Vendors will pack up the requested items. Katie Neskey, market manager for both the Ronan and Mission Falls markets, said the pandemic has made it even more important for locals to eat food produced by people in the community who they trust. “As always, knowing where your food comes from is very important,” Neskey said. “That becomes more clear in times like these.” The simplicity of the local supply chain reduces opportunities for food to be contaminated by the virus. She added that the market is safer than a grocery store

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because it’s outside where health experts say the virus is less likely to spread. At the beginning of the season, it seemed that locals took the importance of buying local to heart. Markets across the county were well-attended at the beginning of the season, according to market organizers. Buying food at the farmers market supports local businesses. Many community members have suffered economically because of the pandemic, and shopping from local farmers, producers, and creators is an investment in the local economy. “A lot of folks are struggling because of shutdowns,” Neskey said. “The smaller scale folks get hit a lot harder by things like that so it’s important to support them now.” Farmers markets also provide economic relief to shoppers. Those who have SNAP can get twice the value of their assistance through the markets’ double SNAP S EE PAG E 17

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program. Double SNAP is offered at markets in Polson, Ronan and Mission Falls. Seniors in the community can also get access to senior farmers market coupons through Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services. The Ronan market has developed an online market so customers can order their groceries and pay through a website. The market will pack items up and deliver them to the customer’s car for contactfree pickup. “It’s always good to support

our local folks and make sure we’re thriving together,” Neskey said. “Keeping our dollars local is important.” The Arlee Farmers Market postponed its start for the season. The Mission Falls Market in St. Ignatius is held every Friday from 5 to 7 p.m. at the pavilion in the Good Old Days park. The Ronan Farmers Market is held every Thursday from 4 to 7 p.m. behind the Visitor’s Center. The Polson Farmers Market happens each Friday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on 3rd Avenue West.

Story by Mary Auld for the Valley M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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Be bear aware, carry bear spray Though the Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee, created in 1983 to lead the recovery of grizzly bears in the lower 48 states, does not endorse any particular commercial bear spray, it points out in its literature that proper use of bear spray can: reduce the number of grizzly bears killed in self-defense, reduce human injuries caused by bears, and help promote the recovery and survival of the grizzly bear. In a study in the April 2008 edition of the Journal of Wildlife Management, Tom Smith examines “The Efficacy of Bear Deterrent Spray in Alaska.” The study shows that in 72 cases where people used bear spray to defend themselves from brown, black and polar bear, the spray stopped brown bears 92 percent of the time and 98 percent of the people involved were uninjured. Which bear spray to use In the rare case of a conflict, bear spray, a high-pressure extract of about two percent capsaicin, the chemical that makes peppers hot, and other related capsaicinoids, can get the job done. Recent incidents show bear spray to be more effective than a bullet in diverting or stopping a charging bear, according to the Center For Wildlife Information in Missoula. One way to begin is to check out the different brands available on the internet or at your local sporting goods store. Many manufacturers offer helpful product comparisons and detailed user instructions on their websites. Be especially careful to confirm that you are looking at products registered with the EPA that are intended specifically for use on bears. Features to assess when selecting a manufacturer The percent of active ingredients is important to consider: 1.3-2 percent is 18

M O N TA N A S U M M E R

G R I Z Z LY B E A R

recommended. Spray time: bear experts say six to nine seconds. Weight of the canister: at least 7.9 ounces. Spray range: bear experts recommend a range of 25 feet in order to give the bear time to experience the effects of the spray. Practicing with bear spray Manufacturers generally recommend practicing the steps necessary to use bear spray including arming the container, spraying, and then restoring the safety clip to disarm the container. First-time users will also want to perform a test spray or two. Because the spray is so forceful, it may require some practice to control it, especially if there is any wind. The down side is that every test spray reduces the canister’s effective spray time. It is important to track the time

remaining on a canister carefully. Carrying bear spray Each person should carry a can of bear spray when working or recreating in bear habitat. Bear pepper spray should be carried in a quick, accessible fashion, such as in a hip or chest holster. Keep bear spray readily available in your cooking area. and next to your flashlight in your tent. Some experts recommend carrying more than one can of bear spray to ensure you always have the additional spray time you might need if it takes more than one burst to stop a bear, or if you encounter more than one bear. When to use bear spray Bear pepper spray should be used as a deterrent only in an aggressive or


Recreation permits required

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attacking confrontation with a bear. Bear pepper spray is only effective when used as an airborne deterrent sprayed as a cloud at an aggressive animal. It should not be applied to people, tents, packs, other equipment, or surrounding area as a repellent. Do not apply the bear spray to camping gear, tents and backpacks. It does not repel bears when sprayed on such items. News from FWP

Popular outdoor recreational activities on the Flathead Reservation include hiking, picnicking, swimming, photography, camping, fishing and boating, and these activities require various permits and licenses. Non-tribal members are not allowed to pick berries and mushrooms on tribal lands unless they are children or the spouse of a tribal member who accompany and assist their tribal member parent or spouse. Reservation permits are also available on the internet at http://app.mt.gov/ Als/Index. A reservation permit must be purchased initially from a permit vendor, and subsequent permits can be purchased online. For complete details on fishing and recreation regulations, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks have developed a handbook, available at any of the following locations where licenses and permits are sold: Polson CSKT Division of Fish, Wildlife, Recreation

and Conservation at 406 Sixth Ave. E. in Polson (behind the Linderman Elementary School) open Monday-Thursday from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 406-883-2888 ext.7200 or 7237 Walmart in Polson at 36318 Memory Lane 406-883-9211 Pablo Zimmer Tackle at 32 Carlyle Lane. 406-675-0068 Ronan Westland Seed at 36272 Round Butte Rd. 406-676-4100 St. Ignatius Allard’s Stage Stop located at 77579 U.S. Highway 93. 406-745-2951 Hot Springs Cornerstone Convenience located at 1893 U.S. Highway 28. 406-741-3200 Woods Bay Papa’s Woods Bay Market at 14535 U.S. Highway 35. 406-837-4884

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AIS PROGRAM

KEEP FLATHEAD LAKE

PREVENTION IS THE ONLY

SOLUTION.

[

FREE OF INVASIVE MUSSELS our mission

is to develop and implement programs and strategies designed to prevent the introduction of aquatic invasive species into waters of the Flathead Reservation, and to help contain, control and where possible, eradicate aquatic invasive species already present on the Reservation.

IT’S UP TO YOU!

CLEAN. DRAIN. DRY.

Tiny, razor-sharp shells would coat and clog every

[

hard surface of the lake - rocks, boats, docks & dams. Invasive Mussels Would Ravage the Lake Environment

Zebra and quagga mussels devastate native species by stripping the food web of plankton, and that has a cascading effect throughout the ecosystem. Lack of food causes populations of native trout, whitefish and native mussel species to plummet. Invasive mussels typically cause harmful algal blooms and permanently alter water quality in a way that impacts aquatic life and even humanhealth.

Drain

Drain onto land all water from bait buckets, live wells, pumps, motor, Clean bilges, and remove Clean off all plants, animals, drain plugs. and mud from your watercraft Eliminate all water (canoe, kayak, boat) and BEFORE LEAVING equipment (boots, waders, an area where you fishing gear). Use a high have had your pressure washer or available boat and trailer. power washing stations. If you use your own high pressure washer or a car wash, make sure the water goes into a contained-water holding area. Rinse with very hot water (140 °F).

Dry

Dry all items completely before launching the watercraft into another body of water. Allow at least five days for you boat, trailer, and Confederated Salish and equipment to Kootenai Tribes completely dry Natural Resources Department before launching www.csktnomussels.org into other waters. email: erik.hanson@cskt.org (406) 675-2700 ext. 7280

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Center stage The Port Polson Players enter their 45th season of live summer theatre with some new twists and terrific shows! Due to CDC restrictions, the season kicks off a little later than originally planned with “Pinup Girls,” a brand new musical comedy salute to our veterans from the team of James Hindman and Jeffrey Lodin. The high-energy cast of Missoula actors reels through classic songs like “Sincerely,” “Coney Island Baby” and “Someone to Watch Over Me,” all taking place in a VFW hall in “anywhere America.” Director Anna Loehrke calls this a “Rollercoaster of laughs, music, nostalgia and heartfelt sentiment sure to please.” The regional premiere of “Pinup Girls” plays two weeks, July 16 – 26. Next up is the comic gem about family, “Over the River and Through the Woods,” by Joe DiPietro. Two sets of Italian grandparents conspire to keep

their only grandson from taking a job and moving clear across the country. DiPietro captures the heart and soul of what it means to be a family with a ton of laughs that will also tug at your heartstrings. “Over the River” runs for two weeks, July 30 – Aug. 9. Finally, “The Last Romance” enjoys its own regional premiere in the last summer slot. Also by Joe DiPietro, this is the story of two senior citizens who meet by chance on a park bench, strike up a conversation and ultimately create a beautiful romance, all because of a lost dog. A meddling sister creates a conflict that may or may not be enough to call a halt to this touching, funny and charming tale of romance in the twilight years. “The Last Romance” plays three weeks, Aug. 13 – 30. All shows are presented at Polson’s

beautiful theatre on the lake, on the Polson golf course. Curtain times are 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays, with Sunday matinees at 2 p.m.; the theatre is dark Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Please note that, at this writing, this information is tentative, depending on Montana Health Department guidelines. The theatre will only be allowed to seat between 50 and 60 patrons per show, as per social distancing restrictions. Therefore, reservations are imperative; no walk-ins will be admitted. Intermissions will maintain six-foot distances in bathroom and concession areas, and no receiving lines will be observed after the shows. “At this point, we’re proceeding with this plan, which could change unexpectedly with unforeseen CDC developments,” says Players Artistic S EE PAG E 22

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Director Karen Lewing. “Some summer theaters have cancelled their seasons altogether, but if possible, we want to afford people some diversion and a chance to have a few laughs.” But, Lewing cautions, the Players will adhere to all recommended government guidelines. Patrons are asked to bring masks. The performers’ acting area is 12 feet away from the audience; every other row will be blocked off but parties will be seated together. The theatre will have sanitizer at various stations and will be thoroughly disinfected before each show. Packaged concessions will be available at intermission to enjoy outside on the Polson Golf Course. Reservations can be made by calling the theatre box office at 406-883-9212 or by visiting: portpolsonplayers.com. “One of the best ways to stay on top of things is to follow us on Facebook,” reminds Players Managing Director Neal Lewing, who also recommends forwarding Facebook information to friends and family. Local news sources, such as the Valley Journal, will also be kept abreast of the Players schedule. In association with Mission Valley Friends of the Arts, Port Polson Players look forward to presenting three uplifting and funny shows to bring cheer to our faithful audiences in accordance with Montana State Health Guidelines. by Karen Lewing for the Valley Journal

45 Years of Live Theatre Montana Health Directive Employed Recipients of the 2016 Montana Governor’s Arts Award

883-9212

portpolsonplayers.com 22

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“Some summer theatres have cancelled their seasons altogether, but if possible, we want to afford people some diversion and a chance to have a few laughs.” - KAREN LEWING, PORT POLSON PLAYERS ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

P O RT P O L S O N P L AY E R S


d d d

d B e s d t B ’s ur RICHWINE DDD gers Goin’ D D DDRGERVILLE BU D DD

DD

BURGERS

SANDWICHES

Royal Burger Single………

$6.15

Royal Burger Double……

$8.55

Royal Burger Triple………

$10.95

Cheese Dx Single…………

$4.15

Cheese Dx Double………

$6.55

Cheese Dx Triple…………

$8.95

Cheese Plain Single………

$4.00

BLT………………………. . . . Garden Veggie Burger………. Steak Sandwich…………. . . . . Pork Sandwich …………. . . . . Chicken Burger…………. . . . . Hot Fish Sandwich…….…. . . . Shrimpwich……………. . . . . . . Grilled Cheese. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Grilled Ham and Cheese. . . . . . $4.35

Cheese Plain Double……… $6.40 Cheese Plain Triple………

$8.80

Hamburger Dx Single……

$3.65

Hamburger Dx Double……

$5.55

Hamburger Dx Triple……

$7.45

Hamburger Plain Single……

$3.50

Hamburger Plain Double…

$5.40

Hamburger Plain Triple……

$7.30

Bernie Burger Single……

$5.40

Bernie Burger Double……

$7.80

Bernie Burger Triple……

$10.20

$4.35 $4.85 $5.35 $5.10 $4.85 $4.85 $4.85 $3.10

SPECIALTIES Shrimp Dinner………………. Seafood Dinner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oyster Dinner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chicken and Chips. . . . . . . . . . . . Fish and Chips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Foot Long Hot Dog. . . . . . . . . . . Foot Long Hot Dog w/Chili Foot Long Hot Dog w/Chili and Cheese…………. . . . . . . . . Burrito. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MILK. . . .12 oz $1.50 16 oz $1.75 24 oz $2.25 32 oz. $2.50 Huckleberry Shakes. . . 16 oz $5.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 oz $5.50 Frozen Huckleberry Lemonade 16 oz $3.00 with ice cream $3.75 Huckleberry Sundae $4.25 Huckleberry Sundae Deluxe $4.50

DESSERTS

$10.00 $10.00 $10.00

$8.00 $8.00 $4.10 $4.85 $5.35 $2.25

Hot Fudge Sundae. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plain $3.25 Deluxe $3.50 Sundaes Plain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.75 Sundaes Deluxe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3.00 Black And White Sundae. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3.75 Cones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Small $1.75 Large $2.25 Dip Cones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Small $2.25 Large $2.75 Big Wheel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1.75 Soft Ice Cream Quart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.00 1/2 Gallon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9.00

Corn Dog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.25

ting

58

bra Cele

EXTRAS

Tomato………………. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.50 Cups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.25 Catsup/Fry Sauce/Ranch 1 oz $0.15 2 oz $0.25 Flavors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.25 Cheese. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.50 Patties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.00 Bacon or Ham. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1.35 Gluten-Free Bun. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1.50

RS!2 0 A E Y -2 0 196

DRINKS

Coke, Diet Coke, Sprite, Dr. Pepper, Root Beer, Lemonade, Orange, Iced Tea 12 oz . . . $1.00 16 oz . . . $1.25 24 oz . . . $1.50 32 oz . . . $1.75 24 oz $4.00 Malts, Shakes, Sodas, Floats & Spins . . . 16 oz $3.50 Coffee and Tea. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 oz $1.00 Hot Chocolate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 oz $1.00

2

SIDES Onion Rings 4 oz. . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 oz. . . . . . . . . . . . . Family Fries 14 oz Potato Salad

$2.25 $4.50 $5.00 $1.75

Green Salad $1.75 Fries 5 oz. . . . . . . . . . . $2.00 7 oz. . . . . . . . . . . $2.50

Prices may change without notice. We accept

50567 Hwy 93, Polson • 883-2620 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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5th Ave W 5th Ave E 6th Ave E 7th Ave E

Adams St. SW Buchanan St. SW Cleveland St. SW

Eisenhower St. SW

N

Terrace Lake Rd. E

Hillcrest Dr.

93

Franklin St. SE Garfield St. SE

Eisenhower St. SE

Dayton St. SE

Buchanan St. SE Cleveland St. SE

Adams St. SE

Main St. SW 93 Main St. SE

Round Butte Rd. W

3rd Ave E 4th Ave E

M O N TA N A S U M M E R

Map Design By: Ben Stone / Valley Journal

t. Regis

93

& I-90

200

35

Bison Range Entrance

Moiese

Dixon

331 MAIN ST. RONAN www.valleyjournal.net @valleyjournal_mt

(406) 676-8989

SKQ Dam Overlook

93

Wild Horse Island

200

Ravalli

National Bison Range

212

93

93

93

35

D

y Po

Turtle Lake

35

int

Skidoo Bay

Arlee Jocko Historical Society

St. Ignatius Mission

Fort Connah

Kicking Horse Reservoir Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana

Arlee

St. Ignatius

Fin le

Mission Reservoir

McDonald Lake

East to Swan Valley

Woods Bay

Yellow Bay

East Bay

93

Four Winds Indian Trading Post

Ninepipe Reservoir

Ronan

Garden of the Rockies Museum

CSKT Headquarters

Pablo

The People’s Center

Pablo Reservoir

Polson Flathead Lake Museum

Polson

D

Finley Point State Park

D

209

Blue Bay

D

The Narrows

Wayfarers State Park

East to Swan Valley

Bigfork

83

North to Glacier National Park Via Columbia Falls

Polson Bay

West Shore

D State Park

Charlo

Crow Reservoir

Mission Valley

Big Arm

D

Big Arm State Park

your homegrown newspaper

West to S

Polson

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Boettcher Park

28

West to Hot Springs

Elmo

Dayton

93

North to Kalispell

Rollins

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Somers

Lower Flathead Valley

CSKT Reservation Northern Boundary

Lake Mary Ronan

Dr.

Arlee 55 Big Arm 73 41 Big Fork 29 36 53 Charlo 65 10 32 45 Dayton 17 49 67 14 65 Dixon 59 4 37 40 6 60 Elmo 80 25 16 60 15 80 21 Lakeside 35 21 39 15 31 29 25 46 Pablo 43 12 34 23 22 37 16 37 9 Polson 9 47 64 20 56 8 50 71 26 41 Ravalli 30 26 44 10 36 23 30 51 6 14 20 Ronan 82 30 10 62 21 85 26 6 53 43 73 53 Somers 16 41 58 14 50 13 45 65 67 28 7 15 67 St. Ignatius 68 41 6 48 36 61 41 21 15 28 58 38 15 53 Woods Bay

Dayton St. SW

Skate Park 6th Ave W 7th Ave W 8th Ave W 9th Ave W

1st Ave E

Sacajawea Park & Salish Point

◆ Area: 147,040 sq. miles

◆ Population: 1,050,493 (2018 est.) (Cows still out number people 2:1)

◆ State Gems: Sapphire & Agate

◆ State Tree: Ponderosa Pine

◆ State Bird: Western Meadowlark

◆ State Animal: Grizzly Bear

◆ State Flower: Bitterroot

◆ State Motto: Oro y Plata (Spanish for gold and silver)

Montana Facts

er wat

Ronan

Dog Park

3rd St. W 2nd St. W

Riverside Park

Armed Forces Memorial Bridge Regatta Shoreline Amphitheater

5 miles

Scenic Veiw Point

Valley Journal Headquarters

State Park

1st St. W Main St. 1st St. E

D

Hospital

Museum

Airport

Fairgrounds

AIS Watercraft Inspection Station

Point of Interest

Boat Launch

Cherry Orchard

Town

Bike Path

Water

Secondary Road

HWY

Key

MONTANA • 2020

MISSION VALLEY

2nd St. E

M O N TA N A S U M M E R

5th St. E 6th St. E 7th St. E 8th St. E

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Then and now Seli’š Ksanka Qlispe’ Dam history shared POLSON – The Seli’š Ksanka Qlispe’ Dam is an iconic sight. It rises more than 200 feet on the lower Flathead River, holding back aqua blue waters and framed by rolling grassy hills and the snow-capped Mission Mountains, but it’s much more than just a landmark. The SKQ Dam supports recreation in Flathead Lake, prevents flooding around the region, generates electricity, and holds great cultural significance for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The dam is also the only one in the country owned solely by a Native American tribe. 26

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“The dam’s construction was imposed upon the tribes at a time in history when the perspective of the federal government was to do away with the tribes ... ” - BRIAN LIPSCOMB, CEO OF ENERGY KEEPERS INC.

The hydroelectric dam sits six miles downriver from Flathead Lake. CSKT purchased the dam in 2015 and changed the dam’s name from Kerr Dam to Seli’š Ksanka Qlispe’ Dam soon after acquiring it. The dam is managed by the tribally owned business Energy Keepers Inc. Normally, in the warmer months, Energy Keepers CEO Brian Lipscomb gives tours of the dam to local school groups. Visitors are welcome to view the dam from the overlook or walk to the river’s edge; however, the dam, overlook, and river access around it are closed to the public until further notice to protect dam staff from being exposed to COVID-19. Lipscomb said it’s especially important to keep employees safe because every dam is different, so the staff at the SKQ dam have specialized knowledge. If they all get sick, no one else can fill in for them. According to Lipscomb, CSKT purchased the dam because they wanted to make decisions regarding natural resources on the reservation. It’s also located at a culturally important site. The location where the dam sits today used to feature a waterfall. Owning the dam allows CSKT to make decisions about the way they manage the water that runs through it. Before the dam was built, the waterline of Flathead Lake fluctuated naturally throughout the year and that created ecological phenomena like a ring of lush vegetation around the edges of the lake when it receded. When the dam was built, people began controlling the amount of water in the lake, based not on ecology but on when people needed electricity. They released a lot of water through the dam during the day, when

energy needs were high, but held it back at night, when people were asleep and using less electricity. This management style harmed some fish and animal habitat. Now, under CSKT’s management, water flows over the dam are kept fairly steady in an approach that supports fish and animal habitat. People can also use Flathead Lake for boating, fishing and swimming all summer, rather than having to adjust activity based on the amount of water in the lake. The dam generates about one million megawatt-hours of electricity each year. That’s enough to supply electricity for about 100,000 homes for a year, but the electricity generated by the dam doesn’t only power homes; instead, Energy Keepers Inc. sells the electricity on the wholesale market. The company sells electricity to 14 industrial customers and a number of small utilities. The dam provides some energy in Great Falls and to a community near Red Lodge. Over the years, the dam has generated energy used across the West, even in Las Vegas and Arizona. The dam also helps prevent flooding across the northwest by holding back water to ensure that communities downstream don’t get flooded. Facility staff coordinate with the Army Corps of Engineers to manage water. Lipscomb explained that the tribes’ decision to purchase the dam is rooted in the first agreement members of CSKT made with the federal government. After Native people entered into the Hellgate Treaty with the federal government, CSKT had rights to all the natural resources on the reservation, including the Flathead River where the dam sits today, and the resources were intended to be used by the tribe, but it didn’t work out that way. In 1908, the federal government fractured the reservation into pieces and allowed settlers to claim ownership of parcels of land that were not allotted to tribal members. This was S EE PAG E 28

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part of a long-term effort by the federal government to extinguish Native Americans and their culture. At the same time, the federal government built an irrigation project to provide irrigation for farmers’ crops. It was under this system of checkerboard reservation ownership that the federal government began building the dam. CSKT didn’t have any say in whether the dam would be built. The Montana Power Company, then owners of the dam, completed construction in 1938. “The dam’s construction was imposed upon the tribes at a time in history when the policy perspective of the federal government was to do away with the tribes,” Lipscomb said. In the midst of the dam’s construction, the federal government signed the Indian Reorganization Act into law. The IRA turned over governance to the tribes and encouraged them to instate tribal constitutions. CSKT was the first tribe to adopt a constitution and become a self-governing body. The tribe immediately began to buy back land and amass assets that, years later, would allow it to purchase the dam. According to Lipscomb, the dam is one facet of CSKT’s commitment to managing natural resources on the Flathead Reservation for future generations. “It’s out of appreciation for what our elders have done for us,” he said. “The reservation is our base for perpetuating our culture.” Story by Mary Auld for the Valley Journal

Shop Local! We have amazing local businesses. Please be safe when visiting and remember to shop local. Check out our Facebook page and website for summer and fall events. www.ronanchamber.com or www.facebook.com/ronanchamber

We would like to thank our gold member businesses!

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Road trip round the lake It’s summertime in the Mission Valley and time to enjoy a good old-fashioned road trip around the lake. Flathead Lake is considered the largest source of natural freshwater west of the Mississippi River, and its tranquil waters are among the cleanest and clearest in

e

g

the world. The lake exists as a result of the flooding from prehistoric Glacial Lake Missoula during the ice age. The trip can start and end in Polson by either choosing the east shore route along U.S. Highway 35 or the west shore route along U.S. Highway 93.

Montana Highway 35 is a 45-minute stretch of winding road that hugs the lake’s eastern shoreline between the lakeside communities of Polson and Bigfork. This picturesque expanse of highway provides spectacular viewpoints.

S EE PAG E 30

CONSERVATION • HUNTING • FISHING

Licenses q

36272

Round Butte Rd., Ronan

q

1 Mile West of Dairy Queen in Ronan

406-676-4100

Hiking & Camping Equipment Pet Supplies • Bear Spray

bnf

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There are numerous turnoff areas along the way to snap photos and take a moment to ogle the gorgeously pristine waters. The east shore route includes a variety of fee-based familyfriendly camping and picnicking opportunities, along with public fishing access sites and amenities that are maintained by both the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks. The pebble-strewn beaches of Blue Bay, Yellow Bay and Wayfarers Park tempt stone-throwers to try their hand at rock skipping, while providing ideal spots to fish or dip a toe in. The University of Montana Flathead Lake Biological Station is located just north of the Yellow Bay State Park. The FLBS is an ecological research and education center. Visitors can stop in and ask questions or take a class when available. Check out their website for more information. Fruit stands are set up along the east shore of the lake with locally grown and harvested Flathead Lake cherries, which are famous for their large size and sweet taste. Locally grown apples, plums and melons can be purchased directly from the growers. There are also some farms where you can handpick your own fruit. Bigfork is a lake resort town that hosts many art galleries, a live theater, a 27-hole golf course, unique shops, sidewalk cafes and restaurants. Three miles outside of Bigfork, travelers can turn west onto U.S. Highway 82 to continue around Flathead Lake. Along with views of the north end of the lake, this sevenmile stretch of road that connects U.S. Highway 35 with U.S. Highway 93 awards drivers with glimpses of the glacier-covered peaks of Glacier National Park in the far distance. Once travelers reach the U.S. Highway 93 intersection, a turn north will lead to Kalispell, and a turn south will continue the trip around Flathead Lake. U.S. Highway 93 is a much busier and wider highway than U.S. Highway 35, which makes it an ideal travel route for trucks with trailers and large motorhomes. Driving south on U.S. Highway 93, the next town you come to will be the community of Lakeside. Lakeside offers both locals and tourists a nice selection of restaurants and access points onto the lake. Just like the east side, the west route also offers visitors and locals alike a wide range of public fishing access sites, camping and picnicking opportunities. The 129-acre West Shore State Park and the 217-acre Big Arm State Park are two of the more popular westside campgrounds. Travelers can stop in the waterfront communities of Rollins, Dayton, Elmo, and Big Arm. Jette Hill offers an impressive view and a long downhill descent back to Polson. A panoramic view of the lake can also be seen, along with the town of Polson and the jagged snowcapped peaks of the Mission Mountains. The trip comes full circle with the crossing of the Armed Forces Memorial Bridge over the Flathead River. Once in Polson, there are many shops for people to visit. A trip to a local restaurant or ice cream shop might be a nice way to end the trip. Story by Rob Zolman, photo by Nicole Tavenner / Valley Journal

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M O N TA N A S U M M E R


Recreate safely in water News from Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks

The tragic drowning of a Great Falls man who was swimming in Belt Creek near the Sluice Boxes area June 3 is a good reminder for swimmers, boaters, floaters and anglers to use caution in and near the water. Water levels are higher and swifter in rivers throughout Montana during spring runoff, and recreationists should be aware of extra risks that come with high flows. These conditions can change rapidly, creating new and hidden hazards for boaters. Water temperatures are also especially cold this time of year, which increases the risk of hypothermia. Even if you’re on shore, keep water safety and rescue equipment with you, including life jackets, floatation devices and throw ropes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that “every day, about 10 people die from unintentional drowning. Of these, two are children aged 14 or younger. Drowning ranks fifth among the leading causes of unintentional injury death in the United States.” Here are some tips to keep you safe when you’re on the water: Using the proper size and type of life jacket is crucial for all swimmers to be safe while recreating. To properly fit a life jacket, hold your arms straight up over your head

U. S. COAST G UA R D AU X I L I A RY

and ask a friend to grasp the tops of the arm openings and gently pull up. Make sure there is no excess room above the openings and that the jacket does not ride up over your chin or face. Make sure an adult is constantly watching children swimming or playing in or around the water. Have children playing near water wear life jackets as there may be steep drop-offs you are unaware of. — Don’t consider your children to be “drown-proof ” because you enrolled them in swimming class. A child who falls into water unexpectedly may panic and forget learned swimming skills. — Always swim with a buddy. Never swim alone or unsupervised. — Know the local weather conditions and forecast before swimming or boating.

Strong winds and thunderstorms with lightning strikes are dangerous to swimmers and boaters. — Don’t use air-filled or foam toys, such as water-wings, noodles, or inner-tubes, in place of life jackets. These are toys and are not designed to keep a swimmer safe. — When boating, children under 12 years of age must wear a U.S. Coast Guardapproved life jacket, but it is recommended that everyone on the boat wears a life jacket.   — Jumping from cliffs or bridges is dangerous because of shallow water, submerged rocks, trees, or other hazards. Never dive head-first into water. — Never drink alcohol before or while swimming or boating. Never drink alcohol while supervising children.

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G L AC I E R N AT I O N A L PA R K

Glacier reopens under new conditions Glacier National Park increased recreational access and services on a limited basis on June 8. Following guidance from the White House, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and state and local public health authorities, Glacier National Park is increasing recreational access and services on a limited basis. The park has been closed to visitors since March 24 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This limited opening approach will allow the park to continue coordinating with the Blackfeet Tribe while they maintain restrictions through June 30, help the park and internal business partners improve and refine mitigation actions with lighter levels of visitation, and allow for an assessment of how returning visitors affect COVID-19 curves within surrounding gateway communities. “We understand the economic 32

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M O U N TA I N G OAT

importance that Glacier has to our gateway communities,” said park superintendent Jeff Mow. “Our goal is to gradually provide visitor access and to mitigate for and respond quickly to any new infections should they occur.” The park’s reopening priorities center on protecting the public and employees from transmission risks through a

variety of mitigation actions consistent with local, state, tribal and federal guidance. The park will actively monitor changing conditions (in the park and in surrounding counties) and will maintain flexibility to expand, adjust or contract operations as conditions warrant. The park has developed a range of mitigation actions that include: providing protective barriers where needed, encouraging the use of masks or facial coverings when social distancing cannot be maintained, increasing cleaning frequency of facilities, adding signage on boardwalks and other public spaces, and messaging to visitors through a variety of methods. On Monday, June 8 the west gate entrance was opened at West Glacier. The gate will be open until 4:30 p.m. each day until operations are extended. Visitors will be able to access Apgar and Going-to-the-Sun Road as far as Lake


“Our goal is to gradually provide visitor access and to mitigate for and respond quickly to any new infections should they occur.” - JEFF MOW, GLACIER NATIONAL PARK SUPERINTENDENT

McDonald Lodge. Going-to-the-Sun will open to hiker/ biker traffic as conditions allow. Visitors should check the park website for updates. Visitors will be able to access restrooms and trails that are accessible from open park roads. Private businesses in Apgar Village may decide to operate. The park is targeting to have personal boating on Lake McDonald and aquatic invasive species inspection stations open. Check the park website for updates. What will remain closed until later phases of the plan? East entrances from the Blackfeet Reservation will remain closed. The park is consulting with the Blackfeet Tribal Business Council to establish reopening dates for entrances from the reservation. Visitor centers and ranger stations will remain closed until later in the season. Overnight accommodations will be unavailable until later in the season. Campgrounds, backcountry permits, additional stores, expanded tours and takeout food service will remain closed. These services and/ or facilities will open when safe and appropriate mitigation measures are in place.

Hotels, full-service dining, commercial tour buses, and ranger programs will remain closed. These services and/or facilities will reopen when health conditions allow. Visitor transportation service (shuttles) will not be offered this season due to social distancing requirements in according with the Centers for Disease Control guidance on transit. Visitors should come prepared and follow all CDC and local health guidance by practicing good hygiene and social distancing. Face coverings are recommended where social distancing is not possible. People who are sick should stay home and not visit the park. The CDC has provided specific guidance on visiting parks and recreational facilities. “We are excited to have visitors return to Glacier National Park, but it’s important that our visitors help us prevent the spread of COVID-19 by practicing social distancing from fellow visitors and our employees,” said Mow. “We all have a role to play in protecting our families and friends.” Previously-scheduled road construction projects on both sides of the park will continue in the spring

and summer. Many areas of the park are still experiencing winter conditions and plowing is in progress on Goingto-the-Sun Road. As in previous years, Going-to-the-Sun Road over Logan Pass is expected to open in late June. The park will provide details and updates for operations as they change on https://www.nps.gov/glac/index.htm and on the park’s social media channels. Updates about NPS operations will be posted on www.nps.gov/coronavirus. The park’s phased reopening plans will align with Montana as the state adjusts to certain COVID-19 restrictions. This plan articulates the phased reopening sequence that is focused on protecting the park employees, volunteers, partners and the public. Visitor service operations will start conservatively and will expand if conditions allow. There will be fewer staff and services available in the park in 2020. The decision to reopen the park is largely based on the recommendations provided by Flathead and Glacier County health officers, the Blackfeet Nation, and the State of Montana.

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These professionals understand the transboundary nature of visitors traveling to Glacier and are best positioned to understand local and regional health concerns. The park has had and continues to hold discussions with business leaders, stakeholders, and internal business partners. The park listened to these perspectives and considered them when developing this phased approach. While the timing of the park’s temporary closure occurred during the shoulder season, the economic stress and impacts associated with the closure are continuing to grow substantially as the summer months approach. While these economic stressors do not override health concerns, they are being considered. The park’s goal is to reopen safely, minimize risks to visitors and employees, allow visitor access Glacier and help restart local economies. In general, the park’s reopening will follow three flexible phases. Phase one allowed vehicle access to some of the park roads with no services other than restrooms. In phase two, some visitor services and facilities opened if they were staffed and operated safely. Going-tothe-Sun Road over Logan Pass will open during phase two. Elements in phase three will not be implemented until the park and its partners have had time to evaluate the impacts from opening operations and facilities outlined in phases one and two and it is deemed safe to open additional services and facilities. Phase three will require additional staffing for the National Park Service and

H I D D E N L A K E B OA R DWA L K

park partners, which means associated risks will need to be assessed. Implementation Timing During the park closure, the park superintendent has worked closely with the Montana state governor’s office to determine the proper timing for reopening based on COVID-19 conditions in Montana. As an iconic unit of the national park system, Glacier serves a worldwide audience. Once open, the park will attract large numbers of visitors from outside the area to our local communities. Reopening Priorities The goal is to protect employees and the public from COVID-19 transmission risks by implementing mitigation actions consistent with local, state and federal health guidelines; to develop consistent operating plans (NPS and partners) that focus on safe reopening

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actions; actively monitor changing conditions (in park and out) and adjust operations accordingly; and ensure flexibility to expand or adjust operations depending on conditions and risk factors. Additionally, the goal is to support local communities and partners. Visitor Messaging Visitors will be advised to prepare for limited food services, lodging and activities prior to traveling. Visitors who are sick should not visit the park. Use of face coverings will be voluntary, but visitors will be encouraged to wear appropriate facial protection during their visit. Visitors will be asked to adhere to CDC and local health guidance regarding social distancing and other actions designed to reduce COVID-19 transmission. Plan Ahead and Prepare Visitor services are very limited. Expect

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W I L D G O OS E I S L A N D OV E R LO O K

wait times at the park entrances and parking lots. Wear face-coverings in high-visitation areas and inside visitor facilities. A reduced number of visitors will be allowed in visitor centers at a given time. Maintain social distancing of six feet, especially in high-visitation areas (in visitor facilities, on popular trails, while viewing wildlife, etc.). Wash your hands with soap and water or use hand sanitizer. Sneeze or cough into a tissue or the inside of your elbow. Avoid touching your face. If you are sick, do not visit the park and self-isolate to avoid exposing others. Summary of Mitigation Actions A range of mitigation measures both indoor and outdoor will be implemented throughout the park to protect both visitors and employees. Public indoor facilities will not open until proper risk assessments have been conducted and mitigation measures have been developed and implemented (e.g., protective barriers, facial coverings, metering visitors, increased cleaning frequency, signage with CDC and local health guidelines). The park is evaluating high congestion areas to determine appropriate management and mitigation measures (e.g., additional signage, parking considerations, one-way traffic on trails, and visitor spacing at public restrooms).

The park may also limit the number of vehicles and/or people entering high congestion areas. Backcountry Permits All backcountry camping advance permit reservations have been canceled for the season. When Glacier can safely provide backcountry experiences including trail maintenance and open backcountry campsites, the park will issue first-come, first-served, walkin backcountry camping permits as conditions allow. Limited Visitor Centers and Ranger Stations Once proper mitigation measures have been implemented, select visitor centers and ranger stations may begin to open. Prior to opening, park staff may utilize protective barriers at information stations, control access, and increase cleaning frequency. Visitors will be encouraged to wear appropriate facial covering when entering buildings to protect themselves and others. Limited Personal Boating The park will open personal boating on Lake McDonald as part of phase two. Aquatic invasive species inspection stations will be operational in Apgar. Lodging and On-the-Go Food Service Glacier National Park Lodges will gradually open all five lodges across the

park. On-the-go food service will be offered during phases two and three. Lobby access to buildings will be allowed for overnight guests only. The park is working with individual commercial visitor service operators to ensure appropriate COVID-19 mitigation measures are in place. Surveillance/Monitoring The NPS will continue working with state and local health officials and the Blackfeet Nation to share information regarding COVID-19 infection rates, hospital and testing capacity, monitoring actions, and the ability to isolate infected employees. The park is also preparing response protocols for visitors who test positive for the virus. The park is working with public health officials in Flathead and Glacier counties to expand testing and surveillance capacity. Contingency Planning Should states, counties, or the Blackfeet Nation reinstate major health restrictions due to unacceptably high COVID-19 infection rates, the park is prepared to scale back facilities and operations as necessary, in conjunction with these restrictions. The detection of community spread within the park will trigger the closure of facilities and potentially affected geographic areas. News, photos from Glacier National Park M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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Tiny invaders, colossal problem Help keep aquatic invasive species out of Montana waterways Outdoor recreationists and boaters venturing out into Lake County rivers and lakes need to be aware of the ongoing effort to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species to the area. Aquatic invasive species are aquatic organisms that are not normally present in an ecosystem. These organisms will out-compete native species, and their presence can cause severe damage and major disruption to local ecosystems, economies, industry and tourism. The zebra and quagga mussels are two types of invasive mussels from Europe now found in more than 600 lakes and reservoirs in 30 states across the country. These fingernail-sized mussels have byssal threads, which allow them to attach to surfaces like boats, canoes, kayaks, paddleboards, inflatable water toys and fishing equipment. Mussels can impact agriculture and hydropower by attaching themselves to the insides of pipes, clogging irrigation systems and inner workings of dams, which causes environmental and economic harm. Zebra and quagga mussels aren’t the only invasive species wreaking environmental havoc. Other invasive

Z E B R A MU SS E L

species include weeds, such as the curly leaf pond or the Eurasian watermilfoil, which displace native vegetation and wildlife. Snails, such as the New Zealand mud snail, will use up nutrients for native vegetation and reduce the number of native bugs that fish eat. In an attempt to thwart a statewide AIS contamination, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks and partner agencies, which include the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, operate more than 25 roadside watercraft inspection stations and across the state. Anyone carrying or towing any type of watercraft or water-based equipment, non-motorized and motorized, must stop at all open roadside inspection stations they encounter. All watercraft coming into Montana from out-of-state must seek out an inspection prior to launching. Inspections are typically brief and include a short interview to make sure watercraft are not transporting mud, water, plants or invasive organisms. Larger or more complex boats may require additional time for an inspection. Watercraft owners can minimize the

risk of spreading AIS into new locations and make their inspections faster by practicing the “clean, drain, dry” method. • Clean: Remove all mud, water, and vegetation before leaving an access area. • Drain: All water from the watercraft and equipment needs to be drained. • Dry: Let your watercraft and equipment dry before launching in another area. According to FWP officials, these inspection stations are having a solid impact. As of May 30, inspectors in Montana caught 12 mussel-fouled boats with invasive zebra or quagga mussels and one boat with red rim melania snails attached to watercraft. Last year, more than 113,000 watercraft were inspected for signs of aquatic invasive species, identifying 16 mussel-fouled vessels and over 300 vessels were intercepted for transporting aquatic weeds. Inspection station staff will do their part in the fight against the coronavirus by following COVID-19 safety protocols, which include mandatory six-foot social distancing, wearing facial masks when interacting with the public and regularly wiping down and sanitizing equipment and surfaces. To find a watercraft inspection station or for more information about FWP’s AIS program, go to CleanDrainDryMT. com or call the FWP Aquatic Invasive Species Bureau at 406-444-2440. Story by Rob Zolman / Valley Journal

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summer

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Editor’s note: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many summer activities and events have either been canceled, postponed, condensed or moved to new dates and or locations. Events listed in this calendar may still change. Check the Valley Journal weekly newspaper for the most up-todate information on area events.

Saturday, June 20 Summer Solstice • BIGFORK — Join Flathead Land Trust and Flathead Audubon on a free 8.5-mile bike ride around the Smith Lake wetland complex to celebrate the latest conservation of 257 acres of important bird habitat.

Small groups of 10 people will bike around the Smith Lake wetland complex, west of Kalispell, stopping to learn about birds and conservation projects. Mountain or fat tire bikes are recommended, as well as helmets, water, and binoculars. To RSVP contact the Flathead Land Trust at 406-752-8293 or lkatzman@ flatheadlandtrust.org. The trip is planned from 9 a.m.-noon. Due to COVID-19, we will take precautions to implement social distancing.

Sunday, June 21 Father’s Day • POLSON — The Father’s Day two-person scramble

golf tournament takes place at the Polson Bay Golf Course with three divisions: parent/ child, husband/wife and open. Handicap is not required. Go to: polsonbaygolfcourse@ gmail.com, for more information.

Tuesday, June 23 • DAYTON — The Dayton Parent/Teacher Organization invites students to have some fun and celebrate spring and summer. We will ride around the Dayton area together and find fun surprises along the route with which to jazz up your bike. All ages welcome. After our RAD ride we will enjoy popsicle refreshments. Meet at Dayton

School at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call Carrie Ramsey at 406-471-8810 or Amanda Adams at 406-3608597.

Thursday, June 25 • DAYTON — The Dayton Parent/Teacher Organization invites students to have some fun and celebrate spring and summer: ready, ready swing batter. All ages and skill levels welcome, this is a family friendly event for all. Meet at Proctor School at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call Carrie Ramsey at 406-4718810 or Amanda Adams at 406-360-8597. S EE PAG E 38

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June / July homesteading families. There are also hundreds of obituaries with genealogy information along with a military display commemorating those who have given their lives for this country. The Arlee Museum is located at corner of Bouch and Fyant (by the grade school). To arrange a viewing appointment, call 406-7263167 or 406-360-6252.

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Friday, June 26 • POLSON — Join us on Friday, June 26, for the ninth annual Chamber Blast hosted at the world-class Big Sky Sporting Clays in Polson. Bring a shotgun, eye protection and ear protection – no experience is necessary. Profits from this event go to support the Polson Chamber’s fundraising efforts, including the 4th of July fireworks show, hanging flower baskets and more. Registration is from 10 a.m.-10:20, a shooter safety briefing takes place from 10:20-10:30 a.m. and the tournament takes place from 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. with a lunch and awards ceremony from 2-2:30 p.m. Station sponsorship (banner displayed at event and recognition at awards ceremony) is $120. Three-person team price is $360 and and $500 for both team registration and station sponsorship. For more information, call 406-8832000. Monday, June 29 • POLSON — Flathead Lake Cheese, 208 First Ave. E, will hold an open house, “Outdoor Cheese-a-Palooza,” everyday from Monday, June 29, through Monday, July 6, from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

H OT DAY, CO O L ST R E A M

Come for tours and tastings. Call 406-883-0343 or visit: flatheadlakecheese.com, for more information.

Thursday, July 2 • CHARLO — Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana, 69316 U.S. Highway 93, will open to the public on Thursday, July 2. Summer hours are: Thursdays and Fridays from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. or by special appointment for group tours. For more information, go to: www.ninepipesmuseum. org or call: 406-644-3435. Bud and Laurel Cheff built the Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana in 1997 to tell the stories of the land, the people and the wildlife of the

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Saturday, July 4 • POLSON — The July 4th parade and the fireworks at dusk were still pending as of press time. Call the Polson Chamber of Commerce for more information: 406883-5969 or visit www. polsonchamber.com • ARLEE — Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Arlee Jocko Valley Museum, which normally opens on the 4th of July, will provide viewings by appointment only during the summer of 2020. The museum is run by the Arlee Historical Society and has many historical displays including many photographs of Native and

Monday, July 13 • POLSON — Member Magic, an art show exhibit at Sandpiper Art Gallery and Gift Shop, will be available for viewing from July 13 – Sept. 12. A reception will be held on Friday, July 17, from 5-7 p.m. This is a members only open show. We will feature Sandpiper member artists past and present. All submissions will be accepted in the artist’s interpretation of the theme. This is member magic at its best. Tuesday, July 14 • DAYTON — The Dayton Parent/Teacher Organization invites students to have some fun and celebrate spring and summer. You don’t want to miss this special event. Come enjoy a day with the Spectrum Science team and learn about chemistry by exploring multiple exhibits. Lunch will be provided by the PTO (will

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July need RSVP count) This is a free event. All ages welcome. Meet at Proctor School at 11 a.m. For more information, call Carrie at 406-471-8810 or Amanda at 406-360-8597.

Scholarship Association fourperson scramble will take place at Polson Bay Golf Club on Saturday, July 25. Contact the Mission Valley Alumni Association for information.

Saturday, July 18 • POLSON — The annual Polson Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival is planned for July 18 and 19 in beautiful, downtown Polson. Cherry season in Montana’s Flathead Lake area is an exciting time of the year. Come see, eat or purchase an amazing assortment of everything from art, photos, and crafts to foods and treats. Visit our fine vendors and local businesses Saturday, July 18, from 9 a.m.6 p.m., and Sunday, July 19, from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. • The Lake County Fair gets underway at the fairgrounds in Ronan with a horse show

Monday, July 27 • RONAN — The deadline to register for the Pioneer Days 3-on-3 basketball tournament the first weekend in August is July 27. (Pioneer Days events were still pending as of press time.) For up-to-date information about the annual 3-on-3 tournament, visit www.missionvalley3on3.com.

D E L

E C N A C

P O L S O N M A I N ST R E E T F L AT H E A D C H E R RY F E ST I VA L

at 8 a.m. The fair continues through Sunday, July 26 and includes dog, cat, poultry, rabbit and goat shows as well as swine and beef showmanship. A quilt show, stock dog competition, ranch rodeo and barrel race are also planned. For full schedule of

Journalism

matters

events, see the Lake County Fairbook at the Valley Journal newspaper’s website: www. valleyjournal.net. Click the icon on the left-hand side of the homepage.

Saturday, July 25 • POLSON — THE MSU

Thursday, July 30 • RONAN — Deadline for the 39th annual Mission Mountain Classic Run (5k and 10k), held in conjunction with Pioneer Days (event S EE PAG E 40

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• Offers checks and balances on local government • Promotes free speech, community involvement • Brings awareness to issues of local importance and connects citizens to one another • Shares local business offerings - highlighting the unique products & sales of area stores • Is a record of the events, history and culture of our communities, providing a sense of identity & place By

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August vendors.

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pending as of press time) is Thursday, July 30. The registration fee is $20. All proceeds benefit the Boys & Girls Club of the Flathead Reservation & Lake County. For up-to-date information and to register, go to: https:// www.flatheadbgc.org.

Saturday, Aug. 8 • POLSON — The Mission Valley Cruiser’s annual car show will take place in downtown Polson on Saturday, Aug. 8, from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. There will be music, the car show and vendors. Go to the Mission Valley Cruisers Facebook page for updated information. • POLSON — The 49th annual Sandpiper Art Festival will be held Saturday, Aug. 8, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Founded in 1971, the Sandpiper Art Festival is a

C RU I S E R S C A R S H OW

one day, juried show featuring original fine art and artisan crafts, organized by the Sandpiper Art Gallery. It is held on the Lake County Courthouse lawn in Polson. The festival accepts a wide range of mediums. Painting, photography, ceramics, sculpture and mixed media are

all welcome. The festival offers live entertainment throughout the day and several onsite food or beverage vendors. The application fee is $35 and the 10X10 booth fee is $85. Please visit the Sandpiper Art Festival page for more information and application forms for artists and food

Saturday, Aug. 22 • POLSON — “Small town girl market” is a juried craft event that will take place at Mission Valley Christian Academy, 38907 U.S. Highway 35, from 9 a.m.3:30 p.m. An application does not guarantee booth space at the market. We are excited to share this event with you and look forward to seeing everyone’s creations. All items must be handmade, homegrown, homemade, vintage or repurposed items - no imports or bulk retail sales. Deadline to apply is July 4. We will reply to all applications by July 11 via email, so don’t forget to provide your email address when applying. For an application go to: smalltowngirlmarket.com. Return the application and

18th Annual

Mission Valley Consignment Auction Saturday, Aug. 29, 2020 • 9 a.m. Quilts • Outdoor Furniture • Mini Storage Barns • Flowers • Tack Auction proceeds benefit Mission Valley Amish Christian School For more information contact: Jason (406)-214-4885

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Sale location: 31827 Allison Rd. St. Ignatius, Mt


M I SS I O N VA L L E Y CO N S I G N M E N T AU C T I O N, ST. I G N AT I U S

August / September sample pictures via email. If you have had a booth with us in the past, please just indicate the size of space you would like this year and mail your check to: 41398 Flathead View Dr., Polson MT 59860. Call 406-885-2738 for more information.

all proceeds go to support the Mission Valley Amish Christian School. Lunch will be available. 406-7454395 for more information (no Sunday or evening calls please).

Tuesday, Aug. 25 • GLACIER PARK — Admission to Glacier National Park is free on this day in recognition of the National Park Service Day.

Sunday, Aug. 30 • POLSON — Polson Bay Golf Club’s one-day championship, The Pine Cone Classic, is open to anyone with a season pass. For more information, contact Cameron Milton: cmilton@pga.com.

Saturday, Aug. 29 • ST. IGNATIUS — The 18th annual Mission Valley Consignment Auction gets underway at 9 a.m. at 31827 Allison Road. There will be quilts, outdoor furniture, mini storage barns, flowers, tack and more. A portion of

Monday, Aug. 31 • PLAINS — The Sanders County Fair 4-H and Ag events and livestock auction will take place Monday, Aug. 31-Wednesday, Sept. 2, at the fairgrounds. For more information, go to: sanderscountyfair.com.

Thursday, Sept. 3 • PLAINS — The 2020 Sanders County Fair and PRCA Rodeo and carnival commences. The rodeo, featuring Powder River Rodeo, is held from 7-10 p.m. For more information, visit: sanderscountyfair.com. Exhibition doors open at 10 a.m. No dogs are allowed in the fairway. Enjoy exhibitions, carnival, amusement, and midway concessions. Friday, Sept. 4 • PLAINS — The 2020 Sanders County Fair and PRCA Rodeo continues. The rodeo is held from 7-10 p.m. For more information, visit: sanderscountyfair.com. Exhibition doors open at 10 a.m. No dogs are allowed in the fairway.

Saturday, Sept. 5 • PLAINS — The 2020 Sanders County Fair and PRCA Rodeo continues. The rodeo is held from 7-10 p.m. For more information, visit: sanderscountyfair.com. Exhibition doors open at 10 a.m. The rodeo is held from 7-10 p.m. No dogs are allowed in the fairway. Sunday, Sept. 6 • PLAINS — The 2020 Sanders County Fair continues through Sunday, Sept. 1. For more information, go to the fair website at: sanderscountyfair.com. “Carnage on The Clark Fork 2020” demolition derby will take place at 5 p.m. No dogs are allowed in the fairway. S EE PAG E 42 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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September F ROM PAGE 41

Monday, Sept. 7 Labor Day • POLSON — The Kiwanis Club is hosting a local beer and wine fest from 6-9 p.m. at the KOA Campground, 200 Irvine Flats Road, on Labor Day, Sept. 7. This fundraiser supports local Kiwanis community projects and local youth activities including scholarships, the Boys and Girls Club, Boy Scouts, Special Olympics and the Polson Middle School band. Call 406-8833890 for more information. Saturday, Sept. 12 • DAYTON — The 2020 Dayton Daze theme is “Pioneering the West.” On Sept. 12, the Chief Cliff Volunteer Fire Department and QRU plans to celebrate

42

M O N TA N A S U M M E R

DAY TO N DA Z E

all the hard-working, tough and quirky individuals who ventured to western Montana in the late 1800s and early 1900s to make a home. It celebrates those early pioneers who built communities out of hard

work, sweat, and ingenuity. Many descendants of early pioneers and inhabitants still make their homes in our fire service area, and volunteer at the fire department and QRU. Festivities will start at noon with craft booths, kids’

games, face-painting, silent auction, raffle, firefighter games, soft drinks, beer, and free hot dogs. This is your opportunity to put together a great costume (and float) to celebrate your own heritage, take a shot at winning a rifle at our raffle (tickets available from CCVFD members), and otherwise help to raise funds for our hard-working volunteer firefighters. The parade starts at 1 p.m. with prizes for best entries and best costumes, and the raffle and silent auction wrap up at 4. Whether you dress as a homesteader, blacksmith, outlaw, vigilante, dance hall girl, or sheepherder, the whole family will be guaranteed an afternoon of fun, festivities, and fundraising – all while helping out the Chief Cliff VFD and QRU. For more


F L AT H E A D R I V E R , P O L S O N

September information, call Zoe at 406-849-5917. This Chief Cliff VFD/QRU’s annual fundraiser will be held at Dayton Park on Saturday, Sept. 12 from noon- 4 p.m.

Monday, Sept. 14 • POLSON — “Cornucopia”

is the theme of the Sandpiper Art Gallery and Gift Gallery art show scheduled from Sept. 14 – Nov. 7. This is a nonjuried show, open to all artists. Artistic interpretation of the theme, in any medium, will be accepted. There is a small entry fee for non-Sandpiper

member artists and a 30 percent commission. Call the gallery for submission information or view our exhibit policy and call for art.

Friday, Sept. 18 • POLSON — “Cornucopia” is the theme of the Sandpiper

Art Gallery and Gift Gallery art show from scheduled from Sept. 14 – Nov. 7. A reception will be held on Friday, Sept. 18, from 5-7 p.m. at the Sandpiper Art Gallery. S EE PAG E 4 4

QUICKSILVER EXPRESSO

TAKE A BREAK!

Come in for: • Soup & Sandwiches • Coffee Bar • Free Wi-Fi • Ice Cream • Car Wash & Vacuum • Laundromat • ATM • Flathead Transit/ Jefferson Line connect

675-5000 51999 US 93 • PABLO

HUGE

selection of snacks & beverag es!!

Open Monday - Thursday 7 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 36079 Pablo West Road, Pablo, MT 59855

883-7900

7 days a week

(near the walking bridge in Pablo)

Monday- Friday 6 a.m. - 9 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 7 a.m. - 9 p.m.

(After hours 883-7972) missionvalleypower.org • Follow us on Facebook M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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• LAKE COUNTY — The second day of the Lake County High School Rodeo will be held on Sunday, Sept. 20. For more information, including location, call 406309-5864 or go to: Mission Valley Rodeo Team on Facebook.

F ROM PAGE 43

Saturday, Sept. 19 • CHARLO — The sixth annual Bison Stampede is a one-mile fun run, a 5k and a 10k. There is also a pancake breakfast the morning of the races. Proceeds will go toward campus improvements, especially with common play spaces. Event details and schedule: 8-8:50 a.m. packet pickup/late registration; 8:3011 a.m. breakfast available for purchase; 9 a.m. - 10k starts; 9:30 a.m. - 5k starts; 10:15 a.m. - one-mile fun run. Paid registrations include a T-shirt designed by one of our students. No charge for kids 10 years old and under. No charge for the one-mile Fun Run.  • POLSON — The Toys for Tots Scramble is a one-day event held at Polson Bay Golf Course on Saturday, Sept. 19. This four-person scramble benefits local Toys for Tots. Call 406-883-8230, for more

S A N D P I P E R A RT S H OW

information. • LAKE COUNTY — Lake County High School Rodeo will be held on Saturday, Sept. 19. Watch as the high school and middle school girls and boys participate in a wide range of rodeo activities: barrels, saddle broncs, goat tying, and breakaway roping. For more information, including location, call 406309-5864 or go to: Mission

Valley Rodeo Team on Facebook.

Sunday, Sept. 20 • POLSON — Polson Bay Golf Course will hold a fourperson scramble supporting Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) of Lake and Sanders counties. Contact Cameron Milton at: polsonbaygolfcourse@gmail. com, for more information.

Saturday, Sept. 26 • GLACIER PARK — Admission to Glacier National Park is free on this day in recognition of Public Lands Day. • MISSOULA — Out of concern for athlete safety, our Board of Directors has voted to postpone the 2020 Montana Senior Olympics until Oct. 1, 2, and 3 in Missoula. Please note that while most events will fall back into their same day and time slot, there may be some minor changes to the schedule as needed. VJ

WE WELCOME our vistors to explore & discover our friendly Country Store! • snacks • groceries • kitchen wares • fresh produce • deli sandwiches • fresh deli meats and cheeses • clocks • quilts • fabrics & sewing supplies • hickory rockers

For information call Flathead Transit.

READ DOWN 7 days/week 10:00 a.m. 11:30 a.m. 11:50 a.m.

12:00 p.m.

and much more!

Flag Stop

12:15 p.m. 1:00 p.m. 1:25 p.m.

16 Flavors!!

2:10 p.m.

HOURS: Mon.- Fri. 9 am -5:30 pm • Sat. 9 am - 5 pm (Deli closes 15 minutes earlier every day)

61307 Watson Rd, St. Ignatius, MT

turn East on Airport Rd. to Watson Rd (follow signs) 44

M O N TA N A S U M M E R

406-745-7200

2:30 p.m. 3:10 p.m.

READ UP 7 days/week

PABLO 52001 US Hwy., Pablo • 406-275-2877 MISSOULA 1660 West Broadway, Missoula • 406-549-2339 EVARO 20750 US Hwy. 93, Missoula • 406-726-3778 ARLEE 92345 US Hwy. 93, Arlee • 406-726-7777 RAVALLI 27330 Hwy. 93, Ravalli • 406-396-6522 ST. IGNATIUS 240 Mnt. View Drive, St. Ignatius • 406-745-3634 PABLO 52001 US Hwy. 93, Pablo • 406-275-2877 POLSON 49708 US Hwy. 93, Polson • 406-883-3636 LAKESIDE 7170 US Hwy. 93, Lakeside • 406-844-3372 KALISPELL/EVERGREEN 2076 US Hwy. 2 W., Evergreen • 406-755-7447

7:30 p.m. 7:05 p.m. 6:50 p.m.

Flag Stop 6:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 4:55 p.m. 4:30 p.m.

NEW WHITEFISH ADD O’Shaugnessy Cultural Art Center RES #1 Central Ave., Whitefish • 406-275-2712 S!

4:00 p.m.


Regularly scheduled events Farmers’ Market Cooperative will be held each Wednesday until Oct. 7 from 3-6 p.m. Located at 22 Swan Way, next to the Liquor Barn at the intersection of U.S. Highway 35 and U.S. Highway 83. For more information, go to: bigforkfarmersmarket.com.

MONDAYS • POLSON — Mother Goose Time is a special halfhour program for toddlers and their caregivers each Monday offered online at our YouTube channel: https://www. youtube.com/channel/UCQI0rfrQANcT-M4XA54ieA from 10:30-11 a.m. Mother Goose is ready to do nursery rhymes and stories with her friends. For more information, call 406-883-8225. • POLSON — Makerspace Mondays continues our forays into Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math (STEAM) principles, online. Each Monday afternoon we will post a STEAM project you can work on at home. Find our YouTube channel here: https://www. youtube.com/channel/UCQI0rfrQANcT-M4XA54ieA. WEDNESDAYS • ARLEE — If there were enough volunteers, the Arlee Farmers Market season planned to kick off on Wednesday, June 10, from 4-7 p.m. in front of the Brown Building on Highway 93. Hand-crafted items and locally grown produce will be sold. Vendors are now accepting SNAP coupons. Call 406-240-7175 for more information.

7 T H AV E N U E S K AT E PA R K, P O L S O N

• POLSON — Join us in the after-school hour for Wiggle Worms from 3:30-4:30 p.m. for stories, activities and crafts designed to boost a love of learning! While optimized for kids four and up, all ages are welcome to join us as

we celebrate movement and developing critical fine motor skills. We hope you join us at our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/ channel/UCQ-I0rfrQANcTM4XA54ieA. • BIGFORK — The Bigfork

THURSDAYS • RONAN — You will find the Ronan Farmers Market behind the Ronan Visitor’s Center, 106 Main Street, from 4-7 p.m. We’ll have fresh bread, plant starts, baked goods, beef and lamb, some fresh veggies, lemonade, quilted products, jewelry, other crafts, and more. For more information and rules due to the COVID-19 virus, go to the Ronan Farmers Market Facebook page. We hope to see you there. • CHARLO — Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana, 69316 U.S. Highway 93, will open to the public on Thursday, July 2. Summer hours are Thursdays from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FRIDAYS • RONAN — Ronan Library District, 203 Main Street W. Call (406) 676-3682 for hours of operation and more information.

S EE PAG E 46

Authentic Mexican Food • Daily lunch specials

• Seafood

• Combinations

• Specialties

• Children’s menu • Full bar

• American food • To go orders

Kids’ room with arcade. Special appetizers every day. (On lounge side)

Outside dining and great views. Open 7 days a week, 11 a.m. - 9 p.m.

110 Main St. #10, Polson • 883-5854 • www.fiestaenjalisco.net M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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Regularly scheduled events tourist destination. For more information and COVID-19 rules, visit: http:// polsonfarmersmarket.com.

F ROM PAGE 45

• CHARLO — Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana, 69316 U.S. Highway 93, will open to the public on Thursday, July 2. Summer hours are Fridays from 9 a.m.5 p.m. • ST. IGNATIUS — Mission Falls Farmers Market, located at the pavilion in the Good Old Days Park, will take place every Friday until fall, from 5-7 p.m. We have fresh produce, tomato starts, bread, beef and lamb, flowers, eggs, salves, a full kids’ market with fresh pasta, desserts and dog treats. Follow us on Facebook. • POLSON — The Polson Farmers Market will be open from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. every Friday. The Polson Farmers Market Co-op is the oldest running farmers market in Lake County. The farmers

SATURDAYS • CHARLO — Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana, 69316 U.S. Highway 93, will open to the public on Thursday, July 2. The musueum will be open Saturdays from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. throughout the summer.

N AT I O N A L B I S O N R A N G E , M O I E S E

market is the heartbeat of Polson and surrounding communities with over 50 vendors providing a variety of local grown, hand crafted,

Fidelity Title Agency of Lake County WELCOMES all visitors to the Mission Valley and Flathead Lake

Title Insurance - Escrow Closings Member ALTA/MLTA

Downtown Polson, MT

and baked goods. Operating annually from May to mid October the market provides something for everyone and is a wonderful

SUNDAYS • CHARLO — Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana, 69316 U.S. Highway 93, will open to the public on Thursday, July 2. The musueum will also be open Sundays from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. throughout the summer. VJ

lathead Cherr y F

Festival

July 18 & 19 • 2020 Downtown • Polson, Mt

D E L E C AN

Online Ordering

Safety first, please follow suggested guidelines. Hand sanitation stations, gloves and masks will be available.

@www.Iclandco.com

Proudly sponsored by the Polson Business Community

and more

402 1st Street East • Suite 101 Polson, MT 59860

406-883-6051 • 406-883-6055 Fax • 1-888-413-8508 Toll Free 46

M O N TA N A S U M M E R

C

Questions? email: pcf@flatheadcherryfestival.com


Local Meats

Montana Marbled Meats has only the finest cuts for you and your guest. We have meat directly from farm to market with a low cost.

We Also Offer...

Bratwurst • Sausages • Jerky• Seasonings

Fresh fish and Seafood every Thursday! Stop by and check out our great selections.

46878 U.S. Hwy 93 • Polson, Montana

(406) 883-MEAT

www.montanamarbledmeats.com 10% Discount for first responders and both active and retired military

M O N TA N A S U M M E R

47


Profile for Valley Journal

Montana Summer 2020  

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