Issuu on Google+

In This Issue Craig Hergert alara jewelry Altitude Gallery Jim R Harris Rein Gillstrom


Gra n d Pr i sm a t i c Sp r i n g Ae r i a l, Ye l l owsto n e Na t i o n a l Pa r k p h oto by Ji m Ha r r i s


scu lpt u re by Ga b r i e l Ku l ka

ERIK OLÉ NELSON | olenelson.com 406.580.9778 | ole @ mediastation.biz


6

features 26

ar tists ' ga lle r y

al ara j ewe l r y

10

al t it u d e gal l e r y

14

t re as u res

16

d an a aab e rg

18

c raig h e rge r t

24

t ar t

30

e m e rs o n ce nte r

32

r yan t u r n e r

40

b oze m an c am e ra

44

j im r. h ar r is

50

b e e gh l y ar t & d es ign

54

we n d y m arq u is

58

l ar r y st an l ey

62

t h e ar t of w in e

66

t h e l ast w in d u p

70

j o an n e b e rgh o l d

Publisher Mike Rey

editor Jessica Bayramian Byerly

General ManaGer Coco Nisbet

desiGn Jared Byerly

36

ad sales Mike Rey Coco Nisbet

Published by Rey Advertising 3220 Hillcrest Drive Bozeman, MT 59715 406-539-1010 reyadvertising@q.com

on the Cover re in d . gil l st ro m 4

Montana Art & Photography

"Ranch Road" - Augusta, MT by Craig Hergert


Grand Tetons over Jackson Lake, Infrared, circa 1930s

OWNANDAAWORK OF ART PIECE OF HISTORY PURCHASE AUTHENTIC PRINTS FROM ORIGINAL SLIDES & NEGATIVES AT

WWW.FRANKBYERLY.COM OR ASK YOUR LOCAL GALLERY IF THEY CARRY THE FRANK BYERLY VINTAGE COLLECTION


jewelry

alara

When asked about that quote now, Noelle responds, “I have looked back on that quote several times in the last 22 years – occasionally for interviews and once when I was choosing content for our website. It’s interesting to be confronted by your own words after the passage of some time. My take-away is that I still hold both true and dear those early words about my chosen art form.”

“Ideally, ine jewelry occupies a compelling intersection—one where art, technology, history, precious materials, craftsmanship and emotion meet.” ~ Babs Noe l l e

The quote above was originally published in a press release written by the American Gem Trade Association in 1989, when Babs Noelle won her irst national jewelry design award, a coveted Spectrum Award.

at home in Montana. espites rom he long wintes in rural Yucatan. former ig-city Texan (don’t hold it againt her). consides Bozeman a city now, esecialy as compared to her Paradise Valey home on he Yelowstone. grasrots philanhropic innovator. Her eyes zip about, animating her expressive face. Words come easily to Babs Noelle, especially if you are asking her about Montana or jewelry as an art form. “When did I know Montana was for me? Within two weeks of moving here, I was Montana’s biggest fan. My childhood family trips to Yellowstone did not extend to Paradise Valley or Bozeman, so I feel I moved to this area eight years ago sight unseen. Newly married to my husband, who had previously lived in Bozeman, I was suddenly a resident of Paradise Valley and a business owner in Bozeman. Despite not having a single friend or family member living here, I felt I had community support within a few short weeks. I consider that remarkable, even by the Western generous standard of friendliness.”

6

Montana Art & Photography


Noelle stops speaking, and laughs. “I’m sorry -- what were the other parts of the question?” How exactly does a one-time big-city designer for the famous end up happy and productive in Montana? And how has your approach to art been impacted by Montana? “Oh yes, how my approach to art has been impacted by Montana. I very much ind that I have come full circle. The one thing that has remained constant for the nearly three decades since I heeded the call to my profession is my intense passion about jewelry design and its impact on my fellow humans. I am a tiny speck on a continuum of design that reaches back to the beginnings of human culture, and a slightly more important speck in the signiicant events of a number of my clients. I am humbled by my part in both. But at the end of the day, the thing that is most satisfying is being a dream broker of sorts.” With an interesting story that is too long for this article, Noelle explains that when she returned from earning her Master’s in Jewelry Design in Germany, she entered as many jewelry competitions as she feasibly could. With victories and accolades, came a private clientele that was a vibrant mixture of oil magnates doubling as art collectors and celebrities of various types, from professional musicians and athletes to stars of the large and small screen. With some understandable pride, Noelle adds, “Undoubtedly, making several pieces for Elizabeth Taylor, one of the world’s true jewelry connoisseurs, was a great feather in my cap, as well as an intensely interesting experience. And I will certainly never forget delivering the winning bid on a 10-carat D-Flawless diamond at a Christie’s auction on a customer’s behalf or negotiating the details of various outlandish pieces with a colorful collection of NBA, NFL and MLB players.”

2012/2013 7


8

Montana Art & Photography


Despite an early career that would certainly be the envy of any start-up designer, Noelle found the high proile of her client base eventually wore out its welcome. “I was always elated to receive a call from a friend, or the friend of a friend, because the art I was producing for those clients had a heart. What impressed most upon me was how a ‘piece of a lifetime’ could be so impactful, meaningful and special to ‘regular’ folks: from the working student who had inherited grandma’s diamond and the couple scrimping and saving to get new bands for their 10-year anniversary to the irst-time bride at the age of ifty-two and the two brothers buying their mother a surprise birthday gift. The feeling of being a part of signiicant events was addictive." "And that’s what I mean about coming full circle. My move to Montana has allowed me to continue to spoil myself by creating other’s dreams in precious materials, some of which I actually ind in my own backyard. And to take it one step further, I have put my jewelry talents to their highest and best use by aiding a goodly number of our deserving local-area nonproits with limited edition pieces and by offering free wedding jewelry to couples in need.” While she won’t deny she’s made a few creations for a handful of celebrities and business moguls since moving to Montana, she’s “happy to report that their goals are aligned with mine. They have been emotionally important pieces, not just bling for the sake of bling. Because that’s not art, by my deinition or anyone else’s.”

2012/2013 9


galery

altitude

Altitude Gallery has been showcasing contemporary art in the Gallatin Valley for seven years. Originally located in Big Sky, the gallery has been in its current location, in the heart of downtown Bozeman, since 2006. The unique architectural space that houses the gallery was once an alley. Turned into a building in 1920, the space emanates a cozy feel when you walk through the door.

1.

2.

Representing over 30 local and regional artists, Altitude Gallery carries everything from paintings and photography to pottery, glass and jewelry. Owner, Amy Kirkland looks for artists who are thinking outside the box. “I love it when someone walks around the gallery and gets excited about art that is different than anything they’ve seen before,” says Amy. “My goal is to create an inviting atmosphere where all people feel welcome to browse and ask questions. It is through this intimacy that people can really learn about our artists and their processes.” Montana artists represented by Altitude Gallery include: Patrick Clayton, AM Stockhill, Laura Blue Palmer, Alan McNiel, Theresa Gong, Jill Zeidler, Carol Lehmann, Toby Mercer, Bill Drum, Pyper Hugos, Mimi Harris and Doug McKnight.

3. 1 . AM Stock hill 2. Ananda Khalsa 3 . Ayala Bar

10

Montana Art & Photography


4.

5.

8. 6.

13 4 E . Ma i n St . • B oze ma n , M T 597 1 5 • 406. 5 82. 4472

4. Ca ro l Le h ma n n • 5 . De n n i s Ki r k l a n d • 6. Ji m Mu l l a n • 7. Pat Clayton • 8. Melis sa G raves Brow n

7.

2012/2013 11


9.

10.

9. Pyper Hugos 1 0. Tina Clos e

12

Montana Art & Photography


2012/2013 13


aaerg

dana

1.

2.

Dana Aaberg works as both a photographer and a graphic designer. With a love for problem solving and expressive imagery, Aaberg offers communication solutions for businesses, non-proits and entrepreneurs. Aaberg’s work concentrates on creating imagery to instill memory and communicate emotion. He has a talent for capturing a subject’s nature and boiling it down to its expressive essence. With stints in Chicago and Boston, Aaberg cut his teeth in an urban environment and eventually moved back to Bozeman. A native of the Gallatin Valley, he was born on the way to the hospital between Baker Creek and Camp Creek, on the old road from Ennis. Aaberg grew up on the Sun Ranch, in the Madison valley, riding horses, chasing cows and making the weekly pilgrimage to the movies on Saturday night.

3.

4. 1. Ar t i n t h e Pa r k , 2 012 . S cu l pt u re by Ch a r l es Ringer 2 . “ In t h e St u d i o” Ja c k i e, f ro m t h e Li ce n s e to Create s eries 3 . Re a l Cowb oys, 2 011 4. Smo k y Sk i es, Ho u s e o n t h e Hi l l , 2 012 5 . Ki tc h e n Inte r i o r, Th o ma s McGu a n e, At Ho me Magaz ine

16

Montana Art & Photography

6. Jewe l r y Det a i l , 2 012 7. Pro d u c t Ph oto fo r Re d B e a m St u d i os


Later, he completed the professional design program at Montana State University. It was the love of design, color and how things went together; what they did; and how they were created that really got him excited. As Aaberg remarks about starting art school, “It was the hardest thing I ever did. I had a technical background, (math, sciences, biology) and suddenly there was no set solution; a thing was as good as it looked and it didn’t matter if you spent four hours on it or 40 hours, it still had to be a good idea and look good. I never worked so hard in my life.” Aaberg is well rounded, having worked as an oil painter, airbrush artist, communications designer and art director; he presently has a penchant for moving pixels into pleasant orientations. He teaches igure drawing on occasion and, besides pixels, thinks charcoal is best for drawing and white wine is for mixing with watercolor. Besides working for clients, Aaberg is working on a series entitled “License to Create” about capturing moments illed with emotion and spirit. Dana Aaberg has a studio in the Emerson Center. His website is at aabergstudio.com. 5.

6.

7.

2012/2013 17


hergert

craig

18

Montana Art & Photography

The Montana Panoramic Company and Montana Aerial Imaging is an ongoing collection of photographs by award winning photographer Craig W. Hergert. Beginning in 1997, this collection of vast landscapes, mountain ranges, wilderness, rivers, parks, towns, wildlife, hunting and ishing photographs from all over the great state of Montana has grown to include thousands of images. And it continues to grow each day. Craig is a freelance artist whose work is currently on display in several galleries and businesses throughout Montana, including his studio and gallery in Bozeman, and in private collections all over the world. He has won numerous international panoramic photography awards and has also been given the "Montana's Treasured Artist" award by the Secretary of State.


1. 1. “ Li mb e r Pi n e #1” Au g u st a , M T 2 01 0 2 . “G ra n d Pr i s ma t i c” Ye l l owsto n e, N P 201 2

2.

2012/2013 19


Craig has two new hardcover coffee table-style books coming out in the next 12 months. The irst piece, now six years in the making and due out later this fall, is titled MONTANA: Skiing the Last Best Place. A Photo Documentary, and includes a foreword by Warren Miller. This highly anticipated piece will be an immediate collectors item. Then, next spring, he will re-release the now out of print Montana Panoramic Volume I: 1997-2007, along with a new version in the series, Montana Panoramic Volume II: 2008-2012, which will focus primarily on the Rocky Mountain Front and the Plains of Montana.

5.

3.

3 . “ Paradi se Eve” Ye llowsto n e Ri ve r 2009 4. “ Bi g Ti mb er Fa lls” Cra zy Mo u nt a i n s 2007 5. “ Red Bloom” Cra zy Mo u nt a i n s 2 008 6 . “ Bozeman Mi lli n g Co.” 2 01 0

4.

20

Montana Art & Photography


6.

2012/2013 21


7.

7. “ Th e Me a n d e r i n g F l a t h e a d ” Ka l i s p e l l 2 012

22

Montana Art & Photography


For more information on Craig's work, please visit the website at MontanaPanoramic.com, or at his gallery in Bozeman:

Montana Panoramic Gallery 24 F Shawnee Way Bozeman, MT 59715 Tuesday-Saturday: 11:00 AM-6 PM 2012/2013 23


galery

artists'

111 S . G ra n d Ave. Su i te 10 6 • B oze ma n , M T • Op e n Monday - Saturday 1 0 am - 5 pm

The Artists’ Gallery has been a staple retail art gallery in The Emerson Center for over 20 years and is currently the only cooperative gallery in Bozeman. With over 20 members and consignors, all from the Bozeman area, the Gallery offers a vast selection of artwork to purchase and appreciate. From ine and fun jewelry to bronze sculptures and oil paintings, there’s always something new to discover. In addition to showcasing locally made greeting cards, handmade lampwork beads, decorative and functional pottery and wood-turned bowls, the Gallery is home to many painters. With all the members participating to keep the Gallery running on a daily basis, it is a great place to get to know local artists and their artwork. Some of the Gallery’s members include: Sarah Angst, Kathy Burk, Dede Christman, MACK, Spencer Simons, Ann Wilbert and Kitty Whitehouse. Sarah Angst’s graphic block prints are well known in Bozeman. With its bright colors and bold lines, Angst’s 1.

26

Montana Art & Photography


work grabs your attention. The Artists’ Gallery is currently the only place in town to purchase Angst’s original artwork. Kathy Burk has always been inspired by Montana’s dynamic landscapes and seasonal changes. Her artwork merges organic design with industrial style. She incorporates glass, steel and found materials with a strong emphasis on color and texture. Nothing goes to waste and light is always considered. Dede Christman is best known for her Yellowstone bowls, which masterfully depict the raw beauty of the Yellowstone geysers. With their exquisite texture and

2.

3.

rich colors they look even more real than the real thing; plus, you can actually touch these and take them home with you.

1. Sa ra h An gst 2 . Ka t hy B u r k 3 . De d e Ch r i st ma n 4. M AC K

MACK's art is bright, jubilant and colorful, relecting her Alaskan upbringing, love of the West, mountains and water. Her characters are multi-ethnic and each embodies commentary on judgments formed by prejudice. They are adorned with ethnic inluences from around the world along with their passions and attributes. 4.

2012/2013 27


Most of Spencer Simons’ current paintings have one or two reoccurring elements, rust and wood. Exploring how the forces of nature, water, wind, and time alter things, Simons’ paintings illustrate how natural processes give manmade, inanimate objects a life of their own. As a lampwork bead artist, Ann Wilbert tries to capture a unique beauty in every bead she creates, and there are ininite possibilities with each attempt. The process of making small glass beads has fascinated her for years and she will continue to create captivating jewelry from her discoveries for years to come. 5.

6.

7.

28

Montana Art & Photography

Kitty Whitehouse’s irst love is painting wildlife in oils. She tries to capture how light portrays the essence of the animal in its habitat. She also creates landscapes, and does plein air paintings on location under the big skies of Montana.

5 . Spencer Simons 6 . An n Wi l b er t 7. Kitty Whitehous e

The Artists’ Gallery is located in The Galleria Hall of The Emerson at 111 S. Grand Ave., Suite 106 in Bozeman, Montana. Open Monday through Saturday from 10AM until 5PM, the Gallery can be reached at (406) 5872127. Join the artists every second Friday from 5PM until 8PM for year-round Emerson Art Walks.


center

emerson

The Emerson is a thriving arts and community center located a block from historic downtown Bozeman. The building was originally an elementary school built in 1918, attended by thousands of Bozeman youth before its closure in 1991. With the building facing demolition in 1992, a grassroots coalition of community members dedicated to historic preservation and celebration of the arts formed a nonproit board, raised funds, and bought the building from the City of Bozeman. The building been renovated continuously since this purchase. Thanks to over one million dollars in generous private donations and grants, the Emerson has renovated the Lobby and Ballroom, upgraded the vintage wooden theater chairs for comfortable,

The studios and arts businesses in the building are alive with creativity - work in the process of being produced or performed. Our retail venues in Galleria Hall include a diverse range of artistic efforts including painting, ceramics, photography, mixed media, and crafts. The Emerson hosts also host many free community outreach events such as weekly summertime concert series Lunch on the Lawn, Friday night Art Walks, Halloween Open House, our annual Garden & Home Tour, and gingerbread house making and the Holiday Bazaar at Christmas Stroll. In 1995, the Emerson merged with another local arts organization, the Beall Park Arts Center. Originally Beall Park housed a contemporary arts exhibit space, a classroom and pottery. These programs were eventually moved to the Emerson venue. In the summer of 2006, the Emerson created the new secure, climate-controlled Jessie Wilber Gallery, along with a secure art storage space. The Emerson now also houses the Frances Senska Pottery Studio, and a dedicated art classroom, Studio 219, all originally housed in the Beall Park Arts Center.

cushioned seats in the Crawford Theater, and updated the stage lighting and sound systems. The Crawford Theater hosts many local and national performances. Hundreds of individuals, businesses and non-proit organizations rent our public spaces for conferences, fundraisers, meetings, classes, dances, and church services. 30

Montana Art & Photography


turner

ryan

Montana adventure photographer Ryan Turner shoots stunning skiing, hiking, and ly-ishing action shots while capturing the landscape, lifestyle and the unexpected along the way. Ryan is an award winning photographer who has been photographing primarily in Montana for over 15 years. His adventures and photography have taken him to additional locations such as Alaska, Hawaii, Florida, Utah, Arizona, California, Washington, Wisconsin, Canada, France, Mexico and many other places in between. “When photographing, I am always trying to ind ways that light will ignite the situation. In addition, there is nothing better for me than capturing unique combinations of people and the environment they love. When those two things intertwine, it is the best! I love photographing in Montana because for me there are so many of those opportunities with its endless beauty in land and people.� The Ryan Turner Photography Gallery is located in Big Sky, Montana near the junction of Montana Highways 191 and 64 in the Bighorn Center. Come visit us to see amazing photography from the Southwest Montana area including photography from Yellowstone National Park, Big Sky Resort, Moonlight Basin and the Gallatin River.

1.

32

Montana Art & Photography


2.

1. Du st i n g Sn ow o n t h e Gallatin 2 . Lo n e Pe a k 3 . Froze n B i s o n

3.

2012/2013 33


The gallery showcases many of Ryan’s brilliant images as Giclees on canvas. These museum-quality archival certiied ine art photographic prints will last 100+ years before any noticeable color shift occurs. All of our Giclee prints are signed by the artist. The Gallery pieces also feature custom hand crafted frames made from reclaimed lumber found right here in Montana. Let Ryan’s artistic abilities and imagination create the perfect work of art for your home or ofice.

4.

34

Montana Art & Photography


5.

4 . Lo n e Pe a k In d i a n Pa i nt b r u sh 5. Mo ose i n Asp e n s

2012/2013 35


gillstrom

rein d.

Rein D. Gillstrom is more than just another one of Montana's modern day, digital landscape photographers. He is an enthusiastic, self taught painter and graphic designer who nearly 20 years ago became one of Montana's irst pioneering digital photographers and large format Giclee art printers. Born in 1963, amid the rolling, tree covered, agricultural farmlands of Wisconsin, Rein's earliest inluences were his artist grandmother (“Moa�), whose home was always illed with her latest masterpieces, along with Rein's memories of Wisconsin's unforgettable, Chathamesque countrysides. In 1981, his parents exchanged those Wisconsin countrysides for the vast grandeur's of Southwestern Montana. Upon his graduation from Grizzly territory, Rein would travel the seemingly endless Highway 200 to eastern Montana's oil and sugar beet town Sidney. By 1985 Rein was inluenced to enroll at Montana State University and moved to Bozeman. In the summer '87, he became a college dropout (aka, entrepreneur) after studies within MSU's acclaimed Film & TV and Graphic Design Departments. He escaped University life to illustrate products, posters, ad designs, logos, for downtown businesses. He developed a cartoon strip as staff artist for Montana Outdoor Sports and Recreation Magazine, and in 1989 illustrated a licensed, limited edition print for the Great Montana Centennial Cattle Drive.

1.

2.

36

Montana Art & Photography


3.

1 . Si li ca Ci rcu i t - Pe a G re e n 2 . Si li ca Ci rcu i t - Si el l ow 3. Fla t h e a d Su n set 4 . Go ld e n Mo o n r i se

4.

2012/2013 37


5 . U S Made in China 6. F l i p - Flopping the Bear tooths in July 7. Wi n d swept Cottonwood 5.

8. Go l d West Morning Panoramic

Rein's digital career began in 1994 with the design of a humorous magazine cover spooing golf. From that, Covershot Graphics was born. His goal was “how to maintain remain an artist without starving in the process.” He did this by photographing classic cars and youth athletic events, later expanding into national auto racing events, while selling the digital printing services to businesses for trade shows, marketing, and to budding artists and photographers. Covershot Graphics would later become CDI- Covershot Digital Imaging, which is now known as GicleeWorks.com Digital Print Center. Relecting on artists, Rein says: “I see artists as historical visionaries, at key points in history, political and religious lightning rods. I know for certain that my life has a distinct purpose. I have messages to communicate through my art. Some are of the subtle beauty of God's creation, while some are about classic design. In my art you will see clarity, balance, mystery and life's travails. You will see traditional rules broken, and visually some clearly hit home hard.” Rein is stepping into a more conident reality as both an accomplished landscape photographer and graphic designer, and printer, but also as a contemporary digital artist. Enjoy! 6.

38

Montana Art & Photography

To contact the artist directly call (406) 451-8099. Or visit online at www.ineartamerica.com/proiles/rein-gillstrom.html or www.gicleeworks.com


7.

8.

2012/2013 39


camera

bozeman

Bozeman Camera & Repair is Montana's resource for professional and consumer photography equipment. Offering the largest used camera selection in the state, Bozeman Camera also has a full Canon and Nikon dealership, as well as a large rental inventory. What makes the store unique is its on-site repair shop with emergency repair service capabilities. Each technician has over 20 years of experience and the knowledgeable and friendly sales staff provides lifetime technical support on all cameras sold. Whether you’re looking to purchase equipment or in need of a sensor cleaning, the staff at Bozeman Camera will make it happen. “How many businesses actually service what they sell?” asks owner, Marshall Lewis. “You could call it old-fashioned, but our customers love it. The level of customer service we provide really sets us apart.” All of the employees at Bozeman Camera & Repair share a passion for photography. 1.

40

Montana Art & Photography


staff photography

2.

4.

3.

5.

1. Mars h al l Lew i s 2 . Ma t t Tre a ge r 3 . Ta n n e r Jo h n s o n 4. B e n Jo h n s o n 5 . Ke e ga n Fi e l d s

2012/2013 41


5.

5 . Mike Gover 6. Mars hall Lew is 7. Tanner Johns on 8. Ben Johns on

6.

42

Montana Art & Photography


7.

8.

2012/2013 43


1.

1. Trail Creek , east of Bozeman 2 . M SU Bobcat Stadium

44

Montana Art & Photography


harris

jim r.

2.

Jim has been taking photos since as long as he can remember. He was given his irst SLR ilm camera in 1983, a Canon T50. Since then, photography has always been a part of Jim's life. He grew up in North Carolina, moved to Bozeman in 1992 and then graduated from Montana State University with a degree in Photography. While at MSU Bozeman, he was lucky enough to have Rudy Dietrich as an professor. Rudy was fascinated with the new realm of Digital Photography and needed a few students to sign up for a digital photo class...this was 1993! We were fortunate to be able to learn Adobe Photoshop 2.0, the early platform for editing digital photography. The hard drive on a Mac desktop was huge at 250 megabytes back then! That one class help set the stage for what was later to come known as Outside Bozeman Magazine, Jim’s irst publication in which he co-founded in 1999. An avid outdoorsman and the love for travel have taken Jim too many locations around the globe. You will see some of the photographic work from places like Africa, Alaska, Bahamas, Belize, Chile, Mexico, Montana, Nepal, Peru and the American West. Jim’s photographic talents are diverse. If you ask him what is his favorite subject to photograph, he will simply reply, “There isn’t one…I just love to take pictures.” With that philosophy and ongoing desire, he is one of the busiest photographers around. His favorite photo: Aerial photo of MSU Bobcat Stadium! As a full time Professional Photographer, Jim stays busy with photographing interiors and exteriors of ine homes for Architects, Builders and Real Estate Brokers. He also enjoys taking Aerial Photographs of Ranches, Golf Courses, Stadiums and Commercial Holdings from a helicopter. He only takes 2-3 wedding jobs per a year and has his own studio for product photography. With a diverse photographic background and the willingness to continue learning new techniques, Jim continues to capture stunning images. 2012/2013 45


3.

3. Ae r i a l v i ew of Elk He rd 4. Aeri al vi ew of No r t h e r n B r i d ge r Ra n ge

4.

46

Montana Art & Photography


2012/2013 47


5.

5 . Ae r i a l v i ew of the Jef fers on River

Jim is currently working on a photographic essay of Montana, Yellowstone & Glacier National Parks. Jim uses all Nikon Professional DSLR cameras and lenses with a Canon DSLR used for video. One of the coolest tools Jim has is a 48 foot Tripod/Mast that has a motorized camera mount and video feed for capturing “Ground Based� Aerial photographs. Jim lives in Bozeman with his wife, 2 sons and a yellow lab. Montana Aerial, LLC Po Box 793 Bozeman, MT 59771 48

Montana Art & Photography


Faure-Halvorsen Architects

P O B OX 7 93 • B OZ E M A N , M T 5 9 7 7 1 • 4 0 6 - 5 8 1 -7 7 7 7

W W W . J R H A R R I S P H O T O . 2012/2013 C O M 49


Baxter Hotel

50

Montana Art & Photography


art & design

Beeghly

Serigraphy, a ine art printmaking process also known as silkscreening, is a relatively lost art and local artist, Dail Beeghly, one of its few remaining practitioners. This labor intensive process involves layering stencils and related colors, sometimes up to 100 times, to create a print alive with depth and unparalleled three-dimensionality. With the dawn of Pop Art in the 1960s, serigraphy was reinvented as an important medium for artistic expression. Dail Beeghly continues to break new ground, continually reining his processes to create images both nostalgic and uniquely modern. Beeghly began his artistic career while in the Navy attending the Bethesda Naval Hospital School of Medical Illustration, from which he graduated with honors and a budding inclination toward the arts. Beeghly went on to design and produce medical exhibits while stationed at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, before leaving the navy in 1964 and beginning a lifelong career working in sign shops, learning and perfecting the trade. A fortuitous encounter in the late 1960s with famed promoter Durwood Settles, led to a substantial stint creating original concert posters for the likes of Jimmi Hendrix; The Doors; Janis Joplin; Led Zeppelin; Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young; and B.B. King. In these highly collectible posters, of which there are few remaining, Beeghly catalogued an iconic era in music history while deining and solidifying himself as more than just an employee in a sign shop, but as an artist. In 1992, critically acclaimed cubist abstractionist Joseph Holston, approached Beeghly to produce silkscreen prints of his work. Combining Holston’s colors and abstract designs with his own unique silkscreen style, Beeghly produced complex prints often containing up to 50 colors. Dail Beeghly moved to the beautiful Gallatin Valley in 2002 and has since been immortalizing historical photographs of area towns and cities in his ine art silkscreen prints. For further information or to purchase a print, contact Beeghly Art & Design at (406) 284-4247.

2012/2013 51


B oze m a n Hote l

52

Montana Art & Photography


P O B ox 670 Ma n h a tta n , M T 59741 4 0 6 . 2 8 4 . 4 247

2012/2013 53


marquis

wendy

1.

When I discover an ancient truck, a barn or an old grain bin, I dream about the history or family story that lies within its old bones. Even though I am an artist, the art of building things out of metal and wood intrigues me. I wonder about the homesteader who built that cabin with his bare hands or the men in the factory who assembled that 1938 GMC pickup for the farmer to haul hay in. To me, these machines and structures are as much a part of the Montana landscape as the crops in the ield. These ancient vehicles and historic structures represent man and his connection to the land. I am fascinated by the animals of the farm and ranch as well. I love to observe the rhythms of nature every spring when the calves arrive and the crops are planted. I know this cycle has happened for generations; these creatures are part of the landscape, too. Through the subject matter I choose to paint, I tell the story of past and present rural Montana.

2.

54

Montana Art & Photography


3.

1 . "He re to St ay " 2. "Ho m este a d e rs Dre a m " 3. "B r i d ge r GMC "

2012/2013 55


My eyes never stop panning the landscape for a subject to paint. As I compose a painting, I often borrow elements from different scenes to satisfy my own aesthetic with my graphic design education inluencing the way I build my compositions. Though I paint old objects in the landscape, my goal is to create art that is contemporary. I paint scenes when the light is low in the sky, because this is when strong contrasts appear. Light and shadow give shape to my subjects and depth to the land. My faux inishing background inluences the way I mix colors and create luminosity with layers of glazes. I also put a lot of emphasis on the way I build skies and clouds in layers to create depth. My artistic inluences started from the time I was a child growing up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Every morning, I walked down to breakfast past the art of masters like Picasso and Alexander Calder that lined the walls of the stairway in our home. I studied the Edward Hopper paintings, among many others in my mother’s gallery. Georgia O’Keeffe, Hieronymus Bosch and Salvador Dalí showed me what different statements art could make. The Hudson River School artists taught me about how to paint the light and magniicence of this earth. I focus on creating a romantic reality with depth and rustic lavor. When you look at my paintings, I invite you to feel the heat of the Montana sun on your back. See the intensity of color and light that is unique to this climate. I want you to be able to sit in front of my work and savor this distinct time; feel a sense of place…a place that you want to linger in again and again.

4.

4. " Th e Lo n g a n d Wi n d i n g Ro a d" 5 . " Pi g g y Ha p p i n es s " 6. " Two Ch i efs "

Come visit Wendy at 82 North Broadway, a multifaceted business encompassing a gallery, studio, and teaching space. Open Tuesday through Friday 10-6.Saturday, 11-3 5.

56

Montana Art & Photography

6.


2012/2013 57


1.

58

Montana Art & Photography


tanley

larry

3.

Larry picked up his irst camera at the age of ive, when his father gave him the gift of a 120mm roll ilm camera and a small black and white enlarger kit. With his father's inspired direction, his path has followed a route of studying life and its arising imagery across the United States and in Australia, the Philippines, China and Tibet. Initially inclined toward engineering studies at the University of Missouri, Larry’s interests later found root in photography at the Art Center in Pasadena, California. Doors soon opened into the world of advertising photography, with a specialty in food and products. Consuming the next 10 years of his professional experience and growth, Larry worked for national clients such as A-1 Foods, La Victoria Salsa, Celestial Seasonings and Spectrum Natural Oils. 2.

1 . Pot a la Pa la ce, L h a sa Ti b et 2. "eyes t h a t se e " Jo kh a n g Te mp l e, Lh a sa Ti b et 3. "ef f u si ve yo u t h "

In 1999, Larry volunteered a month of his time in support of orphaned Tibetan children. He traveled across China to Lhasa, Tibet to photograph the monks, nuns and children of the Gyatsu School, to raise awareness and money for their cause. Images of his photo work in Tibet were received by the Dalai Lama and were hung as part of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights Print Portfolio at the Durban Art Gallery in South Africa.

2012/2013 59


Upon his return, things changed. Larry’s love of people and the ever-arising visual world inspired him to change his professional focus. In 2003, he founded Montana Wedding Photographer, Inc. Today, the father-daughter team of Larry and Jennie Lynn has established its new studio in the recently renovated historic red barn in Bozeman. In addition to photographing 30 to 40 weddings a year across the U.S., Larry and Jennie Lynn also shoot advertising and commercial assignments. Recently, Larry’s work gained international recognition as a gold medal award-winning member of the WPJA (Wedding Photojournalist Association). Current publishing of his advertising and editorial work spans a wide variety of publications, including the cover of Athleta.com, still images for the Discovery Channel and feature spreads in Cowgirl Magazine and IN SHAPE Germany. You can view his work at www.big-sky-people.com and www.big-sky-weddings.com. Larry thoughtfully describes his way of life and profession as the constant search for "beauty... as it occurs naturally."

60

Montana Art & Photography

4.


5.

4. "cy m b a ls a n d fo r m " 5. "Au t u m n b r i d e " Pa ra d i se Va lley 6 . " a r t i n fo r m "

6.

2012/2013 61


bozos

wine

The Ar t of Vi ni fi cati on i n Mo nt a n a by Jessi ca Bayram i a n Bye r ly

Who knew it was possible to craft a lush Zinfandel in Bozeman, Montana? Apparently, Wine Bozos Inc. proprietors Jim Walker and Matt Schmitz did. While on the management team for the build of Montana Ale Works, Walker decided its basement would make a good winery. Though the Ale Works locale idea was soon buried, the inclination to make wine in Bozeman wasn’t and approximately eight years later, in July of 2008, Wine Bozos was born. Once a year, Walker and Schmitz trek to Madroña Vineyards, an award winning Zinfandel producer near Sacramento, California, to purchase the approximately two tons of whole grape product necessary to produce their Castillo De Bozo and Deuce Juice Zinfandel vintages. And they get a little help from their friends, Kurt and Leslie Burris. Kurt has a degree in Oenology, or the science of winemaking, and his wife, Leslie, specializes in water purity. An arguable asset, Kurt and Leslie are oficially Walker and Schmitz’s “wine gurus,” having helped to direct the process by which Wine Bozos developed its varietals while providing a home away from home during their visits to Madroña. Once the grapes arrive in Bozeman, they are fermented, pressed, American Oak barrel aged for 15 months and bottled on site. Yielding approximately 120 cases a year (100 of the Castillo De Bozo and 20 of the Deuce Juice), Wine Bozos is a boutique winery offering red Zinfandel at decidedly reasonable prices – both varietals are under $20 a bottle. Castillo De Bozo, Wine Bozos’ lagship wine, boasts deep lavors of blackberry and spice, giving way to a complex lingering black cherry inish. The highly popular and slightly less expensive Deuce Juice offers a similar lavor proile. While they pair well with meat, Italian red sauces and cheese, both are delicious and dangerously drinkable on their own. 62

Montana Art & Photography


“Wine is one of he agreeale and esential ingredients f life.� - Julia Child

2012/2013 63


Friends for close to 35 years, Walker and Schmitz are both Montana natives – Walker is a native Bozemanite and Schmitz hails from Miles City. When Walker approached Schmitz about his newest idea, Schmitz unreservedly wanted in. After over a year and a half of preparation, particularly in obtaining proper federal and state licensure, Wine Bozos was launched and warmly welcomed by the community. A community that has thankfully and merrily followed Wine Bozos’ motto: “Pull a cork, fall in love, buy more.” They have indeed fallen in love. And the passion and excitement with which both Walker and Schmitz describe their wine has only further endeared them with local connoisseurs and businesses alike. “Everybody knows they can call us, both of our phone numbers are on the back of our bottles,” remarks Walker. Schmitz happily adds, “We’ll talk wine with anybody.” That unguarded joie de vivre has garnered Wine Bozos substantial support from local businesses since its inception. And it hasn’t gone unnoticed. Both Walker and Schmitz agree that the support that they have had from local establishments since the beginning – Montana Bar in Miles City; City Vineyard in Billings; and East Main Liquor, Heebs East Main Grocery and Vino per tutti in Bozeman – has solidiied their presence, accessibility and success. Wine Bozos wine is also proudly supported and now available by the glass at Montana Ale Works, The Eagles Club and the American Legion Bar in Bozeman; The Ofice Lounge and Liquor Store in Livingston; the Montana Bar in Miles City; and Lone Peak Brewery in Big Sky. As Wine Bozos further expands its markets and availability, growth and change surface on the distant horizon. Walker and Schmitz excitedly agree that a tasting room may be only a few years out and, with recent interest from farming-oriented friends, locally growing some of the northern grape varietals developed by the University of Minnesota may also become a reality. Further, while they currently self-distribute throughout Montana, outof-state distribution is not out of the question, should the opportunity arise. But, for now, Jim Walker and Matt Schmitz are content to simply craft some of the best wine in Montana, to quaff a bit themselves and to enjoy hardwon, homegrown success. Philip Seldon remarks in The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Wine, “Wine is older than history. Humans didn’t invent wine. We discovered it.” Schmitz and Walker have truly discovered something special. For more information on Wine Bozos offerings or to chat wine contact Jim Walker at (406) 8603908 or jwwinebozo@yahoo.com or Matt Schmitz at (406) 581-6633 or mswinebozo@yahoo.com or visit their facebook page @Wine Bozos Inc.

64

Montana Art & Photography


2012/2013 65


66

Montana Art & Photography


wind up

the last

“Can it be ixed?” These are words that make Dave Berghold smile. It’s his challenge. As the owner of The Last Wind-Up, it seems appropriate that time is of the essence. He has plenty of it to offer his customers. Beginning his quest toward the study of horology while in high school, Dave was smitten with the mechanics, artistry and history of time and timepieces. Someone once likened watch making to picking up ly feces with boxing gloves. “In my work, it is the delicate nature, mechanics and intricacy of a ine timepiece that offers me the greatest satisfaction,” remarks Berghold. For the last 30+ years, Berghold has pursued the science of horology. From a small boarding school in Connecticut, Berghold traveled to London, England, where he served an apprenticeship, before returning to the U.S. as an intern in the watch and clock department of Christies Auction House in New York. “I was in the vault providing, in my humblest way, condition reports on the various timepieces that were offered up for auction,” says Berghold. “It was like a dream come true…the crème de la crème of horology.” In 1990, Berghold opened The Last Wind-Up in Bozeman, where he specialized in antique clocks, watches, repairs and restorations. With the proliferation of cell phones, who would need a wristwatch or clock on the wall? Just ask Dave and he’ll tell you with exuberance, “Some people collect art that hangs on the wall… nothing wrong with that, but I prefer something that speaks…literally, with a tick. It’s a mechanical, functional piece of art.”

2012/2013 67


It was once said that to carry a Breguet watch was to carry the mind of a genius in your pocket. Berghold makes nearly any timepiece come to life with the same allure. With a mixture of early 19th century machinery and 21st century computerized diagnostic testing equipment, The Last Wind-Up has learned from the past and keeps pace with the future. “We don’t sell timepieces,” says Berghold. “We romance them and, thereby, educate the customer. I want the customer’s enthusiasm to come alive as does the resurrection of an antique timepiece.” From the heirloom pocket watch or stately wall clock to the modern Rolex, Omega or Patek Philippe, the staff at the Last Wind-Up shares the same passion and practical enthusiasm for the study of horology as watchmakers and clockmakers of yesteryear. Dave Berghold is a life member (and past local chapter president) of the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors and a member of the American Watch and Clockmakers Institute. Dave and his wife, Amy, along with two children, two dogs, two cats, 30 sheep and his souped up’68 Karmann Ghia (license plate “WINDEMUP”), live in the foothills south of Bozeman.

68

Montana Art & Photography


2012/2013 69


berghold

joanne

Old Windows — Old Doors provides a rare glimpse into the lives of Montana’s early settlers. It preserves, along with poems by nine of Montana’s poets and 50 photographs, the weatherworn homesteads that are fading into the land they once graced. These apertures provided access to, and protection from, the beautiful, but often harsh, country in which they stood. Old Windows — Old Doors is both a rare perspective of a piece of the West that is rapidly losing its battle with time and the elements and a testament to those who dared to try to tame Montana.

“I came to Montana in 1989 from the East. I came to photography through painting. I came to old windows and doors by happenstance.” ~ Joan n e Be rg h ol d

70

Montana Art & Photography

Joanne Berghold saw her irst rodeo at Madison Square Garden when she was nine. Forty years later, in 1989, Berghold and her husband built a cabin at the foot of the Crazy Mountains near Wilsall, Montana. There, she found her place—home—and began exploring. Every summer, she drove away from the cabin in her truck, with dog and camera, and impulsively followed rodeos. Twelve years later, Montana Hometown Rodeo (Museum of New Mexico Press, 2004), which captured a changing American tradition, was published. Berghold has now published her second collection of western scenes, Old Windows — Old Doors (JB Photography, 2012). This time the weather-beaten homesteads caught her eye. Again, she has preserved a piece of Montana’s rich heritage in a unique way.


Old Windows — Old Doors is a Made In Montana book. Berghold works with a Pentax 6x7 and uses TRI-X 400 ilm. She inds no temptation in digital camera work; the dark room is as much a part of the process of producing these images as her work in the ield. She has a BFA in photography and has taught and exhibited across the country. Her photographs are in many ine private collections. Joanne Berghold is at work on her third book, which also expresses the freedom and openness of her Montana world. She can be reached at Box 992, Livingston MT, 59047 or joanneberghold@earthlink.com.

Past Secrets, Old Memories, Forgotten Stories I think we all have a wonder of how others live in their homes. We gaze at a country house with windows aglow htqo"c"ykpvgt"Þtg."ugpug"vjg"ygneqog"qh"c"fqqt"qrgpgf" hqt"vjg"htguj"gxgpkpi"ckt0"Yg"ctg"ycvejgtu="vjg"crgtvwtgu"qh" windows and doors frame a story we imagine. We wonder about unrevealed lives. OLD WINDOWS —OLD DOORS by Joanne Berghold www.joanneberghold.com $25

2012/2013 71



Montana Art and Photograpy 2012-2013