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The Press, Saturday, January 13, 2007

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JASON HUNT/Press

Collin Richards, 8, a third-grade student at Hayden Meadows Elementary School, carries a peace sign during a march to commemorate Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Friday.

Fifth-graders celebrate human rights About 1,200 area students attended ceremony at NIC's Boswell Hall By TOM GREENE

Staff writer COEUR d'ALENE - They came from Skyway, Hayden Meadows, Atlas and Ponderosa elementary schools. About 1,200 fifth-graders from area schools crammed into Boswell Hall at North Idaho College Friday for the 22nd annual Human Rights

"Have you ever seen this many fifth..graders?"

to hear each other's thoughts on .freedom, individual rights and diversity appropriately scheduled before Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Monday. "Martin Luther King is someone who is not that much older than I MARILYN SHULER am," Shuler said. "And he changed the world." Celebration. Students heard Shuler speak "Have you ever seen this many fifth-graders?" said Marilyn Shuler, on how the Aryan Nations group in the 1980s decided ''Idaho is who served as director of the so beautiful, we think only white Idaho Human Rights Commission Christians should live here." from 1978 to 1998, on stage at the auditorium. see RIGHTS, CS The large group congregated


North Idaho

Skyway Elementary Scho, student Chyenne Fisher sings "Colors of the Wind" as part of a human rights celebration at North Idaho College on Friday. Behind her, classmates give a musical interpretation in Body Sox. TOM GREENE/Press

RIGHTS

from C1

'This happened in your parents' lifetime," Shuler said. "But, people said 'You know what? Idaho is for everyone."'

Students also heard various choirs and singers, including Skyway Elementary soloist Chyenne Fisher who sang "Colors of the Wmd" as classmates used scarves, ribbons and Body Sox to dance around her. Other fifth-graders read

from essays they wrote addressing the topic of how the words to "Color of the Wind" relate to the teachings of King. "We shouldn't look at our outside differences - we should look at our insides,"

said Matt Fridley, from Borah Elementary. Morgan Leifer, from Ponderosa Elementary, summed up the event by saying: ''We can all be equal, we can all be friends. It does not matter, the color of our skin."


The Press, Tuesday, January 30, 2007

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C BUSINESS: . Windows Vista operating system hits shelves/ C10

Popcorn Forum to feature Lennon,Twain,Rogers By MARC STEWART

Staff writer COEUR d'ALENE - John Lennon, Mark Twain and Will Rogers will be featured in North Idaho College's Popcorn Forum this spring. Dozens of presenters will portray comedians and musicians throughout time as part of the 37th annual Popcorn Forum series. It's the ninth time the college has used performers to convey complicated ideas. 'This has been a very popular and good way to learn," said Tony Stewart, the college's Popcorn Forum coordina-

tor. "Humor has extremely powerful messages. Music is the international language." NIC Theater Director Joe Jacoby will present Lennon at 11\a.m. Tuesday. "Lennon took big st.ands, and he was a bold artist," Jacoby said, The program, "Celebrating Humor and Music: Conversations with Comedians and Musicians from the Past" will be held March 19 through 23. JEROME A. POLLOS/Press All Popcorn Forum events are open to Kerrin Tenneson, the NIC senior administrative assistant the public, except the Human Rights in the Social and Behavioral Sciences Division, will portray Banquet Tickets cost $25. Ethel Mertz from • 1 Love Lucy" during this year's Popcorn see POPCORN, C11

Forum at the college.


POPCORN

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The 10th annual Human Rights Banquet will feature a former Sudanese slave and author Francis Bok. The banquet will be held at the Coeur d'Alene Inn at 6 p.m. March 19.

Bok was captured and enslaved when he was 7 years old. He was forced to endure daily beatings, eat rotten food and to perform Islamic prayers. After three escape attempts, Bok succeeded in 1999. The United Nations relocated him to North Dakota and later he testified before the Senate Committee on Foreign

Relations. He also participated in the Sudan Peace Act signing ceremony at the White House. Michelle F'mk, president of the Human Rights Education Institute, said she picked Bok to be a speaker after reading his book about his struggles and hearing about his ability to communicate. Information: 769-3325

zznd A~nual ·Human•-Rights Cele)jration ·N orth)Jdaho College - January I2, 20~7: r


Page B2 • TNSday • January 30, 2007

NORTHWEST

Popcorn forum takes lighter tone With a theme of humor and music, event will feature portrayals of stars BY MEGHANN M. (:UNIFF Staff writer

In the past, the annual Popcorn Forum at North Idaho College has tackled emotional and often divisive topics such as racism, gun control, same-sex marriage, censorship and free speech. This year, things will be a bit lighter. Themed "Celebrating Humor and Music: Conversations with Comedians and Musicians From the Past," the forum will feature performances by actors and actresses portraying comedians and musicians such as Moms Mahley, Lucille Ball, Mark Twain and John Lennon. The 37th annual event kicks off March 19 and runs through March 23. "There's so many serious things going on in the world, we.said maybe it's time to do (the forum) in a format that is a little bit less stressful," said forum coordinator Tony Stewart, a political science instructor at NIC. "It's a softer approach, but it still has a powerful message." And the event still will have serious aspects. The 10th annual human rights banquet, part of the forum, will be held March 19 and feature a keynote speech by Francis Bok, a former Sudanese slave. "We still have slavery in the 21st century in some places in the world," Stewart said. Bok has told his story in many forums around the world, including a meeting with President Bush. "We're very fortunate to have him here," Stewart said. Tickets to the banquet cost $25, with proceeds going to the Human Rights Education Institute. All other events are free and open to

"There's so many serious thin~ going on in the worl~ we said maybe it's time to do (the forum) in a format that is a little bit less stressful" Tony Stewart Forum coordinator and political science instructor at NIC

public. The events are: • March 19: A brief welcoming ceremony will begin at 9:45 a.m. in Boswell Hall Schuler Auditorium, fol lowed by a presentation by Tawnya Pettiford-Wates, who'll portray Moms Mahley. The human rights banquet begins with a reception at 6 p.m. at the Coeur d'Alene Inn. • March 20: Local residents will perform as characters from "I Love Lucy," beginning with a 15-minute musical prelude at 8:45 a.m. in Schuler Auditorium. NIC graduate Tamara Poelstra will play Lucy Ricardo; Popcorn Forum executive assistant and NIC employee Kerrin Tenneson will play Ethel Mertz; NIC music instructor Max Mendez will play Ricky Ricardo; and retired high school history teacher and wrestling coach Ken Pelo of Spokane will play Fred Mertz. At 11 a.m. in the same auditorium, Joe Jacoby will portray musician John Lennon. A musical performance by All That Jazz under the direction of Dick Kuck is scheduled from 1 to 2:30 p.m. in the Lake Coeur d'Alene Room of the NIC Student Union Building. • March 21: Actress Denise Clark

Whom to call For more information about the Popcorn Forum, call (208)

769-7764.

will return to the forum to play humorist Erma Bombeck at 9 a.m. in Schuler Auditorium. A 15-rninute musical prelude by Debra O'Dell will begin at 8:45 a.m. More music is scheduled that afternoon, when Natural J azzaster will play from l to 2:30 p.m. in the Lake Coeur d'Alene Room of the Student Union Building. • March 22: Doug Watson will perform as entertainer Will Rogers. The performance will follow a 15minute musical prelude by Matt Gallatin & Company, scheduled for 10:15 a.m. in Schuler Auditorium. At 1 p.m., in the Lake Coeur d'Alene Room of the Student Union Building, NIC speech instructor Annie McKinlay will portray former Texas Gov. Ann Richards. • March 23: George Frein, an adjunct professor of religion at Furman University and emeritus professor at the University of North Dakota, will portray author Mark Twain at 11 a.m. in Schuler Auditorium. A 15-musical performance by Shelly Phillips is scheduled for 10:45 a.m. Frein and Watson will return to their characters at 1 p.m. that day for a conversation between Twain and Rogers. Under the direction of Terry I ones, a nighttime concert will include a variety of tunes by the legendary musicians of the 20th century including Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Benny Goodman, Glen Miller and Stan Kenton.


~

NORTH IDAHO COLLEGE 31th Annual

Popcorn Forum and

convocation Series svmuosium

March 19-23, 2001 "Celebrating Humor and Music: Conversations with Comedians and Musicians From the Past"

31th Annual Popcorn Forum Quick Reference Calendar All events are FREE and 1pen ta the public [except the March 19th Human Rights BanquetJ. for informadon about the Popcorn forum call 208.769.1764.

Monda111rct1 19 9:45 a. m.

10:00a.m. 6:00p. m.

Musical Prelude by Gerard Mathes Welcome: Ryan Robinson and Barbara Hanson, Ed.D. Tawnya Pettiford Wates, Ph.D., portraying MomsMabley 10th Annual H11mun Rights Banquet

Schuler Auditorium

Schuler Auditorium Coeur d'Alene Inn

TUesdlJ, llarch 20 8:45 a.m.

Musical Prelude by Shelly Phillips

Schuler Auditorium

9:00a.m.

Chautauqua Performers portraying Lucille Ball, Ricky Ricardo, Ethel and Fred Mertz

Schuler Auditorium

11:00 a.m. 1:00-2:30 p.m.

Joe Jacoby portraying John Lennon ''All that Jazz" with Dick Kuck

Schuler Auditorium Lake Cd'A Room, SUB

Wednesdav. larch 21 8:45 a.m.

Musical Prelude by Debra O'Dell

Schuler Auditorium

9:00a.m.

Denise Clark portraying Erma Bombed: "Natural fazU1Ster"

Schuler Auditorium

1:00-2:30 p.m.

Lake Cd:4 Room, SUB

Thursday,March 22 10:15 a.m.

Musical Prelude by Matt Gallatin & Company Schuler Auditorium

10:30 a.m.

Doug Watson, Ph.D., portraying Will Rogers

Sc/ruler Auditorium

Annie McKinlay portraying Ann Richards

Lake Cd'A Room, SUB

10:45 a.m.

N!usical Prelude by Shelly Phillips

Schuler Auditorium

11 :00a. m.

George Frein, Ph.D., portmyi11g Mark Twain Conversations w,t/1 Mark Twmr, and Will Rogers 'J\ Glimpse of the Past" Musical Co11cert

Schuler Auditorum1

1:00 p.m.

Friday,March 23

l:OOp.m. 7:30 p.m.

Schuler Auditorium Schuler Auditorium


Popcorn Forum schedule TodaJe

Local residents will perform as characters from "I Love Lucy," beginning with a 15-minute musical prelude at 8:45 a.m. in Schuler Auditorium. NIC graduate Tamara Poelstra will play Lucy Ricardo; Popcorn Forum executive assistant and NIC employee Kerrin Tenneson will play Ethel Mertz; NIC music instructor Max Mendez will play Ricky Ricardo; and retired high school history teacher and wrestling coach Ken Pelo, of Spokane, will play Fred Mertz. • At 11 a.m. in the auditorium, Joe Jacoby will portray musician John Lennon. • A musical performance by All That Jazz under the direction of Dick Kuck is scheduled from 1 to 2:30 p.m. in the Lake Coeur d'Alene Room of the NIC Student Union Building.

Wedaesdar '

• Actress Denise Clark will return to the forum to play humorist Erma Bombeck at 9 a.m. in Schuler Auditorium. • A 15-minute musical prelude by Debra O'Dell will begin at 8:45 a.m. More music Is scheduled for the afternoon, when Natural Jazzaster will play from 1 to 2:30 p.m. in the Lake Coeur d'Alene Room of the Student Union Building.

Frlclay • George Frein, an adjunct professor of religion at Furman University and emeritus professor at the University of North Dakota, will portray author Mark Twain at 11 a.m. in Schuler Auditorium. • A 15-musical performance by Shelly Phillips is scheduled for 10:45 a.m. • Frein and Watson will return to their characters at 1 p.m. for a conversation between Twain and Rogers. • Under the direction of Terry Jones, a nighttime

'

concert will include a variety of tunes by legendary musicians of the 20th century including Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Benny Goodman, Glen Miller and Stan Kenton. lldonnation: (208)769-7764

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• Doug Watson will perform as entertainer Will Rogers, following a 15-minute musical prelude by Matt Gallatin & Company, scheduled for 10:15 a.m. in Schuler Auditorium. • At 1 p.m., in the Lake Coeur d'Alene Room of the Student Union Building, NIC speech instructor Annie McKinlay will portray the late Ann Richards, former governor of Texas.

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PHOTOS BY KATHY PLONKA The Spokesman-Re111ew

Tawnya Pettiford-Wates adjusts her hat before hitti ng the stage as Moms Mabley during the NIC Popcom Forum and Convocation Series Symposium on Monday. Mabley was one of the most successful black vaudeville entertainers.


NIC hosts Popcorn·Forum Event hits stage with comedic burst

Sudan atrocities must be addressed, former slave says

BY MEGHANN M. CUNIFF Staff writer

sleep with animals. His master's wife would spit on him and direct her children to urinate on him. When he learned Arabic well enough to speak to his captors, Bok said he asked why he was treated that way and why no one loved him. His master responded by beating him, then told him never to ask such a question again. But the next day, the man approached Bok and said the reason he was forced to sleep with animals "is because you are an animal." Bok told the audience that he kept his hope by reminding himself that his family loved him. His father had always told him he was to do something special with his life, and he didn't forget that He first tried escaping at 14, but was caught several times before finally making it to a refugee camp at 17. He got refugee status from the United Nations in August 1999 and moved to the United States. He started in Fargo, N.D., before moving

Moms Mahley was a comedic pioneer. As one of the first famous, black female comedians, she used humor to address controversial and taboo topics, such as racism. And she earned good money performing to white audiences for thousands of dollars during her career peak in the 1950s and '60s. Mahley returned to the stage Monday morning to kick off North Idaho College's annual Popcorn Forum. Tawnya Pettiford-Wates, a professional actor and instructor in the theater department at Virginia Commonwealth University, portrayed Mahley, who died in 1975. For about 30 minutes, PettifordWates was Moms. Loud, crass and, most of all, funny. "Eye-da-ho. But I don't know; I've never been to Idaho before ... I need to take three planes, two cars and a donkey to get out here,n she said. A stewardess on the plane gave her gum to calm her nerves. "She says, 'Moms, Moms - drop yo' jaw,'" Pettiford-Wates said. "Well, I misunderstood." The crowd in NIC's Schuler Auditorium erupted in laughter. "It's innuendo instead of saying it

See BOK,82

See POPCORN, B2

BY MEGHANN M. CUNIFF Staff writer

Modern-day slavery shouldn't be ignored. The issue shouldn't be buried inside a newspaper or dismissed by people and their governments as someone else's business. Until the estimated 27 million people enslaved worldwide see freedom, their stories should dominate everyone's agenda, a former Sudanese slave told the nearly 500 people who packed the Human Rights Banquet at the Coeur d'Alene Inn on Monday night · Francis Bok was the keynote speaker at the 10th annual banquet, part of the Popcorn Forum put on by the Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations. He told of his enslavement, his repeated attempts· at escape and his ultimate success at finding freedom in the United States. It was meant to serve as a wake-up call, a c.ry for action and a promise to do whatever it takes to help those enslaved in the most dehumanizing of conditions. "While we are sitting in comfort and freedom, there's people (who) are waiting for us to come and free them," the 28-year-old said in slightly broken English. "I was one of them." Bok said he was captured by Arab militiamen when he was 7. He had lived happily with his family but was taken from his village and enslaved for 10 years. He was beaten and forced to

Francis Bok was the keynote speaker for Monday's Human Rights Banquet.


POPCORN Continued from B1 right out," she said after the performance. Pettiford-Wates'perfonnance was the first of seven re-enactments scheduled ¡this week as part of NIC's 37th annual Popcorn Forum. Started by political science instructor Tony Stewart, the weeklong symposium talces on a differ~nt topic each year. This year's theme is "Celebrating Humor and Music: Conversations with Comedians and Musicians From the Past" Professors and actors from around the country will portray figures such as Lucille Ball, Will

BOK Continued from B1 to Des Moines, Iowa, in 2000. Bok began speaking in Boston about his experiences, leading to speaking engagements across Massachusetts and soon the country. He's testified before the U.S Senate Committee on Foreign Relations and attended the Sudan Peace Act signing

Rogers and J ohn Lennon. Monday was the first time Pettiford-Wates had portrayed Mahley publicly. "She blazed trails that people didn't even realize she blazed," she said after the performance. "Only in the last few ye.a rs of her life did she start to get the accolades that she deserved." Pettiford-Wates recalled being pulled over after running a red light The officer said to her, "You wanna 'splain to me why you ran that red light?" "Yes sir," Pettiford-Wates said in her Mahley voice. "I was watching all you white folks go through the green light and I figured that red one must be for us." ceremony at the White House, where he spoke with President Bush. "That peace is not a real peace," Bok told the crowd. Genocide is ravaging the people of Darfur, Sudan. Slavery still exists, and Bok wants the world to pay attention. "This is the story that should always be on the front page of every magazine," Bok said.


www.cdapress.com -

Tuesday March 20, 2007

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Story of modern-day slavery humbles, captivates audience 10th annual Human Rights Banquet draws about 500 By LINDA BALL Staff writer

COEUR d'ALENE - Francis Bok will become an American citizen March 28. "America gave me a second chance at life," Bok said Monday night at the 10th annual Human Rights Banquet at the Coeur d'Alene Inn. With about 500 in attendance, it was the second largest turnout for the event, said Tony Stewart of the Kootenai County Task Force on Human Rights. Bok's story is profound.

A native of southern Sudan, Bok was taketl from his family in 1986 at the age of 7 and enslaved during an Arab militia raid on his village. Bok, who is tall, elegant and well-spoken (he did apologize for his broken English, however), said there are millions of people - 27 million - still enslaved worldwide. 'These people are waiting for you to come and free them," he said. "I missed all my childhood." Bok said he was a happy boy living see BOK, A9

JEROME A. POLLOS/Press

Francis Bok, the keynote speaker at the 10th Human Rights Banquet, held Monday, shares his story of becoming a slave in Sudan at the age of 7 .


North Idaho

BOK

he said. "If I looked at my master's wife, she would spit on me or one of her sons from A1 would pee on me." He was fed once a day and had to manwith his family. His father was a businessage hundreds of goats. If even one went man with thousands of cows, so they lived missing, he would be severely beaten. comfortably. "No matter how hard I worked, I knew But one night, that all changed. Bok was they'd never appreciate me," Bok said. sent to the local market to sell eggs and After two failed e.s cape attempts, Bok pe.a nuts for his mother. finally got away in December 1996. He said he heard people talking as they He eventually made his way to Cairo, were leaving the market. He didn't recogEgypt, spending 22 days there with no nize the fear in their voices. money and without"a friend. "literally, I looked behind me and saw all He then applied as a refugee with the these militia men coming toward me," he United Nations, which helped him resettle said. in Fargo, N.D. "You try to exit, but there is no exit." "I didn't have a choice, but it was good There was much confusion. The militia when I got there," he said. "'The weather marched all the women and children to the wasn't that good for me." north, and one soldier shot a 12-year-0ld He began his speaking career in Boston, girl in the head because she wouldn't stop and in May 2000, he took his message to crying. Capitol Hill Bok was placed with a man who would The war in Darfur continues, and Bok become his master for the next 10 years, said he will never rest until he sees his people free. and he was shown off like a new car. But, his master's.children would beat He has written a book that tells his story him with sticks until he couldn't cry anycalled, "Escape from Slavery: The True more. Story of My Ten Years in Captivity and My "I was forced to sleep with the animals," Journey to Freedom in America."


The Press, Wednesday, March 21, 2007

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JASON HUNT/Press

Joe Jacoby, theater director at North Idaho College, performs as John Lennon in a chautauqua performance as part of the 37th annual Popcorn Forum on Tuesday at NIC.


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37th annual Popcorn Forum Today 9 a.m. - Denise Clark portraying Erma Bombeck; Schuler Auditorium. 1-2:30 p.m. - ¡Natural Jazzaster;" Lake Coeur d'Alene Room. Thursday 10:30 a.m. - Doug Watson portraying Will Rogers; Schuler Auditorium. 1 p.m. - Annie McKinlay portraying Ann Richards; Lake Coeur d'Alene. Friday 11 a.m. - George Frein portraying Mark Twain; Schuler Auditorium. 1 p.m. - Conversations with Mark Twain and Will Rogers; Schuler Auditorium. 7:30 p.m. - "A Glimpse of the Past" music concert; Schuler Auditorium. All events are free and open to the public. Information: 769-7764

peopl NIC's Popcorn Forum brings Lennon to life By LINDA BALL Staff writer

COEUR d'ALENE - For one hour Tuesday, John Lennon was alive and well again.

In a performance by North Idaho College theater director Joe Jacoby, Lennon told the abbreviated story of his life, from childhood to the fateful day of his death.

"You might remember me I was with a group - we had a few hits," Jacoby said while on stage at Schuler Auditorium during a Popcorn Forum presentation. Lennon was named No. 8 in a 2002 BBC poll of Britain's greatest citizens. Rolling Stone magamie named the Beatles, the band he founded, see POPCORN, C13


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his writing partner for the next decade. from "He could actually play rock 'n' roll guitar," Jacoby said of as No. 1 in their 2005 list of McCartney. greatest artists, and Lennon as George Harrison, three a solo artist was No. 38. years their junior, was brought He said he was born into the band, and John's best as bombs were falling on friend, Stu Stutcliffe, became Liverpool on Oct. 9, 1940. the bass player, even though At the age of five, his father, he couldn't play the instruFreddie Lennon, a merchant ment sailor, abandoned his wife Julia The group began performand his son. John was sent to ing at the Casbah Club, which live with his Aunt Mimi and was in the basement of the Uncle George. home of music fan Mona Best "From a very early age, I Her son, Pete Best, became knew I was different," Jacoby their first drummer. said. "When I saw surrealistic And so, the five set off paintings I realized other ~ to hone their performing pie saw the world differently, skills in the wild clubs on the too." Reeperbaum in Hamburg, Lennon never liked school Germany. very much, but skiffle music "That's when we really changed his life. became a band," Jacoby said. "You could play skiffle but "When we got back from you didn't have to know how Hamburg to Liverpool, we to play an instrument," he said. were billed as 'direct from Lennon convinced Aunt Hamburg.'" ¡ Mimi, who once told him he'd They began to play at the never make a living playing Cavern Club in Liverpool, guitar, into buying him one. which they made famous, and He had reestablished a relait was there that they were tionship with his mother, Julia "discovered" by Brian Epstein, Stanley Lennon, who taught who would become their him how to play banjo. manager and get them their Lennon started his band, first recording contract with the Quarrymen, and later met George Martin. ¡ Paul McCartney, who came to "Please, Please Me" became bear the Quarrymen play in their first No. 1 hit in the UK. Liverpool Lennon discovered Even though Lennon's the man who would become dream of making a living

playing guitar had come true, he had become trapped in the madness of Beatlemania. Meeting Yoko Ono, he said, the subsequent breakup of the Beatles and the move to New York City saved his life. "I'd never been a father to Julian," he said of his son by his first wife, Cynthia. "Suddenly I had my own dream." He and Yoko had a son, Sean. The two were close. They baked bread and traveled all over the world together. "We were supposed to be underground, but we were everywhere," Jacoby said. Just when he was writing songs again, releasing "Double Fantasy" with Ono in November 1980, he was

shot and killed outside of the Dakota, where they lived in New York City, December 8, 1980. He was 40. Citing one of Lennon's early influences, Jacoby performed "That11 be the Day" by Buddy Holly, then Beatle's songs "You've got to Hide Your love Away," and "Norwegian Wood." He also sang "love" by the Plastic Ono Band, and closed with "Imagine," even playing it on a grand piano, just like Lennon. He received a standing ovation. The Popcorn Forum, "Celebrating Humor and Music: Conversations with Comedians and Musicians From the Past," continues through Friday. Information call 769-7764.

I


The Press, Monday, March 26, 2007

l<ootenai County Snapshots

Mark Twain, left, portrayed by George Frein, and Will Rogers, played by Doug Watson, discuss their significance in the world and the lifestyle and atmosphere in their time during a uconversation" Friday on stage at North Idaho College for the Popcorn Forum.


<;;ifurday, !'lepteâ&#x20AC;˘Mor R 2007

Popcorn Forum celebrates Constitution Day North Idaho College's Popcorn Forum will co-sponsor a public forum titled "Clouds over the Constitution: Attacks on Judicial Impartiality" Sept.17 in celebration of Constitution Day, which honors the signing of the U.S. Constitution on Sept 17, 1787. The event kicks off the 38th annual Popcorn Forum at NIC. Two keynote speakers will be featured at the event, which is scheduled for 11 am. in the Lake Coeur d'Alene Room ofNIC's Edminster Student Union Building. Dean and foundation professor oflaw at the University of Idaho Donald Burnett Jr. will present "A Cancer on the Republic: The Assault on Impartiality of State Courts and the Challenge to Judicial Selection:â&#x20AC;˘ Burnett holds a bachelor's degree in economics from Harvard University, a master's degree in law from the University ofVirginia and a judicial degree from the University of Chicago. Burnett has served as assistant attorney general for the state of Idaho, president of the Idaho State Bar, a judge of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Court as well as on the Idaho Judicial Council and Idaho Court of Appeals. Former Chief Justice of the idaho Supreme Court Linda Copple Trout will present "Observations on Judicial Elections." She holds bachelor's and judicial degrees from the

University of Idaho. She has served as magistrate judge, acting trial court administrator for the 2nd Judicial District and as district judge serving Nez Perce and Clearwater counties. She was appointed by Gov. Cecil Andrus in 1992 as the first woman justice of the Idaho Supreme Court She most recentlv served as chief justice of the Supreme Court for two terms. Audience members can order a box lunch in advance if they choose to stay for the response panel at noon with Senior Judge James Judd, Administrative District Judge from the First Judicial District John Patrick Luster and attorney and member of the Idaho Judicial Council Anne Solomon. Lunches are $7 each and must be ordered in advance by sending a check made payable to NIC Auxiliary Services to the Human Rights Education Institute at P.O. Box 3281, Coeur d'Alene, ID 83816. Participants should indicate if they want a beef, turkey or a vegetable sandwich. The event is cosponsored by the League of Women Voters of Kootenai County, the NIC Popcorn Forum, the Human Rights Education Institute, the Kootenai County Bar, the First District Bar Association and the University of Idaho College of Letters, Arts and Social Sciences. For more information, call 769-3325.


THE PRESS Wednesday, September 5, 2007 A11

NIC presents Constitution Day public forum bachelors degree in economics from Harvard University, a masters degree in law from the University of Virginia and a judicial degree from the University of Chicago. COEUR d' ALENE Burnett has served as assisNorth Idaho College's tant attorney general for the Popcorn Forum will state of Idaho, president of cosponsor a public forum the Idaho State Bar, a judge titled "Clouds over the of the Shoshone-Bannock Constitution: Attacks Tribal Court as well as on the on Judicial Impartiality" Idaho Judicial Council and Monday, Sept 17, in celebra- Idaho Court of Appeals. tion of Constitution Day, Former Chief Justice of which honors the signing of the Idaho Supreme Court the U.S. Constitution, Sept Unda Copple Trout will 17, 1787. The event kicks present on "Observations off the 38th annual Popcorn on Judicial Elections." She Forum at NIC. holds bachelors and judicial Two keynote speakers will degrees from the University present at 11 am. in the Lake of Idaho. She has served as Coeur d'Alene Room of NIC's magistrate judge, acting trial Edminster Student Union court administrator for the Building. Second Judicial District and Dean and Foundation as district judge serving Nez Professor of Law at the Perce and Clearwater counUniversity of Idaho Donald ties. Burnett Jr., will presShe was appointed by Gov. ent on "A Cancer on the Cecil Andrus in 1992 as the Republic: The Assault on first woman justice of the Impartiality of State Courts Idaho Supreme Court. She and the Challenge to Judicial most recently served as chief Selection." Burnett holds a justice of the Supreme Court

UI dean, former Chief Justice to be keynote speakers

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for two terms. Audience members can order a box lunch in advance if they choose to stay for the response panel at noon with Senior Judge James Judd, Administrative District Judge from the First Judicial District John Patrick Luster and attorney and member of the Idaho Judicial Council Anne Solomon. Lunches are $7 each and must be ordered in advance by sending a check made payable to NIC Auxiliary Services to the Human Rights Education Institute at P.O. Box 3281, Coeur d'Alene, ID 83816. Participants should indicate if they want a beef, turkey or a vegetable sandwich. The event is cosponsored by the League of Women Voters of Kootenai County, the NIC Popcorn Forum, the Human Rights Education Institute, the Kootenai County Bar, the First District Bar Association and the University of Idaho College of Letters, Arts and Social Sciences. Information: 769-3325 o

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NIC's Popcorn Forum celebrates Constitution Day By MAUREEN DOLAN Staff writer

COEUR d'ALENE - The final draft of the U.S. Constitution was

completed on Sept 17, 1787. In honor of the 220th anniversary of its signing, North Idaho College will host its 38th annual Popcorn Forum, focusing on the importance of judiciary independence.

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degree in economics from Harvard University, a juris doctorate from the University of Chicago, and a master i>f laws degree from the of Vrrginia. He has rved as assistant attorney eneral for the state of Idaho, esident of the Idaho State Bar, judge of the ShoshoneBannock Tribal Court, executive director of the Idaho Council, and judge of e Idaho Court of Appeals. e is a past president of the aho State Bar. "Justice Linda Copple

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The Sept 17 event, titled "Clouds over the Constitution: Attacks on Judicial Impartiality," features keynote speakers - Don Burnett, dean and professor of law at the University of Idaho, and former chief justice of the Idaho Supreme Court, Llnda Copple Trout "The issue is basically judicial selection, judicial independence," Mary Lou Reed said. "We think

Trout is leaving the bench this month, choosing not to run for another term," Reed said. "It will be interesting to hear her viewpoints." Trout holds a bachelor's degree in English and a juris doctorate from the University of Idaho. She has served as a magistrate judge, acting trial court administrator for the 2nd Judicial District, and as district judge serving Nez Perce and Clearwater Counties. She was appointed in 1992 by Gov. Cecil Andrus as the first woman justice to serve on the Idaho Supreme Court She recently served for two terms as chief justice of the Idaho Supreme Court

it's a very important issue- how our judges are selected and how we can keep politics out of the judiciary." Reed is coordinator of the forum for the League of Women Voters of Kootenai County, one of the program's sponsors. To fund the program, the local league was one of 20 state leagues to be awarded a competitive grant from the League of Women Voters

The keynote speeches will be followed by a response panel discussion at noon. The panel includes the Honorable James F. Judd, senior district judge; Hon. John P. Luster, administrative district judge from the First Judicial District; and Anne Solomon, attorney and member of the Idaho Judicial Council. "These are people who are right in the thick of it, so we're very fortunate to have them," Reed said. The event is cosponsored by the League of Women Voters of Kootenai County, the University of Idaho College of Letters, Arts and Social Sciences, the NIC

Education Fund and the Program on Constitutional and Legal Policy of the Open Society Institute. "We feel like this is such an important part of the Constitution, the separation of powers," Reed said. "I'm pleased with the breadth of experience of the people we have participating." Burnett holds a bachelor's

Popcorn Forum, The Human Rights Education Institute, the Kootenai County Bar, and the First District Bar Association. The event kicks off the 38th annual Popcorn Forum at NIC. l Lunch is $7 and must be ordered in advance of the event Make checks payable to NIC Auxiliary Services, and mail payment to the I Human Rights Education Institute, P.O. Box 3281, Coeur d'Alene, ID 83816. Participants should indicate a lunch choice of beef, turkey or vegetable sandwich. It is free and open to the public. For more information, call (208) 769-3325.

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The Press, Tuesday, September 18, 2007

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Chief Justice Linda Copple Trout, the first woman to serve on Idaho's highest court, discusses judiciat-election impartiality during a celebrat ion Monday of the U.S. Constit ution at North Idaho College. Trout, as w ell as Donald Burnett, right. dean of the University of Idaho College of Law, expressed concerns over the severity of the issue that affects not only local courts, but all courts.

Speakers: Judiciary under attack Program kicks off NIC's 38th Popcorn Forum By LUCY DUKES Staff w riter COEUR d' ALENE - The impartiality of the judiciary is under attack by special interests and partisan politics from the left and right. That was the message deliv-

ered Monday by former Idaho Supreme Court Chief Justice Linda Copple Trout and Donald Burnett Jr., foundation professor of law at the University of Idaho, when they spoke at North Idaho College. Toe program, "Clouds over the Constitution: Attacks on Judicial Impartiality," kicked off the Popcorn Forum's 38th year. Burnett called the attacks a "cancer on the Republic."

"Today we are not keeping the republic that was envisioned by the framers. We are losing it," Burnett said. The framers of the Constitution dispersed power among three branches of government to safeguard against tyranny - by many over a few or by a few over many, he said. But now forces competing to see FORUM, C2


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control court composition would substitute their interests for the rule of law, and insist judges do so as well, he said. Contested elections are becoming increasingly common, and campaigns are

being funded by groups that want a judiciary partial to their interests. "Judges should have no agenda," Burnett said. "Courts should have no constituency except for the rule of law itself." Trout said she has been through every selection process for becoming a judge,

from appointment to contested election to a "yes/no" vote for retention. Typical elected officials represent paints of view. In contrast, judges must not allow relationships to influence their conduct and must disqualify themselves when their impartiality could be rea sonably questioned, she said. They cannot make pledges or promises other than to the rule of law, she ~d. "Judges are simply different," Trout said. She was also troubled by the idea of a special interest group appearing to "buy" an elected office with campaign contributions. One possible solution could be merit selection coupled with judicial performance evaluations. Voters could cast ballots with a sens of knowing if a judge was doing a good job, she said. Public financing of judicia elections is another option, but doesn't resolve thirdparty "soft money." Voter guides could help, too, as would attorney ballots rating candidates, she said. 'The time is now to step up and defend the Constitution," Trout said. Those who came to the forum were impressed with the keynote speakers, who were followed later by a respanse panel. The whole concept of judge selection should be thoroughly discussed, said Bob Bennett, executive dire, tor of the Human Rights Institute. Lillian Lind said the judiciary's impartiality has always been attacked. "It's the way it is," said Lind, who said attended because she's interested in history. Ron Johnson, Democrati Club of Kootenai County president, said he was glad ¡ see somebody else recogrili the attack on the judiciary. 'The only protection we have as a minority party is the judiciary," he said.

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Fair and impartial: Words to live by Awe close the book on the week celebrating the U.S. Constitution's 220th birthday, we are reminded that the freedom upon which our great republic is built faces powerful threats like never before. The reminding hit home on Monday during the Popcorn Forum at North Idaho College. Two of Idaho's most profound legal minds, Don Burnett, dean of the University of Idaho Law School, and Linda Copple Trout, former chief justice of the Idaho Supreme Court, were eloquent, thorough and convincing. They spoke on the topic "Clouds over the Constitution: Attacks on Judicial Impartiality." Both of them outlined in detail how special interest groups' increasing determination to influence the election and appointment of judicial candidates threatens judges' most critical function: being fair and impartial. The real question now becomes, what can we, average citizens, do about it? How can we balance the tens of millions of dollars spent to influence judicial election outcomes, to offset the powerful pushing and shoving from those who wish their viewpoints and beliefs to be represented in the courtroom? We found several worthy suggestions in Monday's presentations. • First and foremost, voters should arm themselves with as much information about judicial candidates as possible. Qualities like intelligence, wisdom and temperament are key, and voters should above all ask how fair and impartial that candidate is likely to be once seated at the head of a district or appellate court. • Voters could get a lot of help from members of the state bar. In some places, members of the bar complete surveys anonymously evaluating judicial candidates' track record on fairness and impartiality, and make the survey results available to the public. We think this would be an indispensable tool for Idaho voters. • Judicial elections could be moved from their current place in the primaries to the November general elections, when much greater turnout is almost always assured. There's no guarantee that a higher number of voters will lead to the best judicial candidate being selected, but stronger turnout does provide a bulwark against powerful special interest groups' influence. Merely making yourself more aware of the incursions on judicial impartiality is a step in the right direction. Refusing to support special interest groups who attempt to influence judicial selection is another step; don't give them your money or your endorsement. And please, don't take lightly this appeal to better arm yourself with information. Your very freedom depends upon it

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The Press, Saturday, February 9, 2008

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Popcorn Fo~um goes global Weeklong discussion, dialogue series focuses on five critical issues By MAUREEN DOLAN Staff writer COEUR d'ALENE - North Idaho College's 38th annual Popcorn Forum and Convocation

Series Symposium will highlight issues organizers say could determine the future of our planet and our survival as a species. Popcorn Forum creator and lead organizer Tony Stewart said he considered dedicating this year's program entitled "Earth in Crisis: A Search for Solutions" to all young people. see FORUM, C4

Philippe Valle, a graphic design instructor at North Idaho College, highlights one of his student's work on Friday that was prepared for the 38th annual Popcorn Forum themed uEarth in Crisis: A Search for Solutions." JEROME A. POLLOS/Press


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"It's those individuals that will have to address this issue much more so than we as we move down that road," Stewart said. Fwe critical issues - global warming, viral diseases, food contamination, terrorism and ethnic genocide - will be featured during the weeklong series of discussions and dialogues. Each morning of the forum, which runs March 1721, prominent keynote speakers will discuss one of the issues followed by an afternoon expert response panel. "There will be a diverse viewpoint," Stewart said. "The Challenges of Global Warming to Our Future." will kick off the forum March 17 at 11 a.m. with philanthropist and human rights supporter Gregory C. Carr discussing

the causes of global warming and proposing a solution to biodiversity loss in Africa. Carr has ~ledged $40 mil- Stewart lion to a conservation project in Mozambique to restore thousands of acres of forest damag"ed destroyed by.rebels during civil war. "He is putting his funding where his heart is," Stewart said. Carr will also be the keynote speaker at the 11th annual Human Rights Banquet at 6 p.m. March 17. "Emerging Viral Diseases: A World Crisis," "The Threat of Contamination to the World's Consumer Products and Food Supply," "The Growing Threat of Terrorists and Weapons of Mass Destruction," "Understanding Terrorism and Terrorists:

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Lessons for Our Future," and "Becoming Evil: How Ordinary People Commit Genocide and Mass Killing," will all be topics of discussion during the week. NIC graphic design students, under the guidance of instructor Philippe Valle, created prints visually conveying a message tied to the forum iS&Ue&. The prints. will be displayed â&#x20AC;˘ia the student union building during the forum. Valle discussed the importance and challenge of creating graphic messages addressing social issues. "It's not going to take 12 years to get a message across," Valle said. Student Georgia Beck's AIDS awareness print shows the outlines of a young child's face shrouded by clouds with a new definition of the AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) acronym: Abolishing Ignorance Detennine Success.

Ashley Pinnt's print, in the form of a Sudan flag, depicts the horror of genocide in that country. A special concert by the NIC Jazz Ensemble entitled "A Solution," will be part of the Popcorn Forum. The Thursday concert starts at 7:30p.m. Film footage of this year's forum will be edited into live one-hour documentaries that will be produced and aired on KSPS Public Television between June 8 and July 6. The documentaries will be narrated by Stewart All sessions except the 11th Annual Human Rights Banquet are free and open to the public and take place on the NIC campus at the Boswell Hall Schuler Perfonning Arts Center. The banquet will be held at the Best Western Coeur d'Alene Inn are $30 per person. Information: 769-7764


Page 82 • Saturday • February 9, 2008

NI C symposium tackles global issues , BY ERICA F. CURLESS Staff writer

It's possible North Idaho College students could help save the world, especially with ideas sparked by experts on everything from global warming to genocide during the annual Popcorn Forum. "We hope they become the leaders and do everything they can to protect our planet for future generations," said Tony Stewart, who has coordinated the event for 38 years. "The Earth in Crisis: A Search for Solutions" is the topic of this year's free symposium March 17-21 that will focus on five areas: global warming, viral diseases, food contamination, terrorism and ethnic genocide. Each day an expert will discuss one of the issues. Most importantly, Stewart said, experts will recommend solutions, whether it's to stop dependency on single-use bottled water or to protect against severe acute respiratory syndrome. . . "The good news is they are proposing solutions," Stewart said during a press conference Friday to unveil the topics and schedule. "Action is necessary in order to survive." For the first time, Stewart along with KSPS will produce a onehour documentary from each day

If you go "The Earth in Crisis" is the focus of this year's North Idaho College Popcorn Forum, March 17-21. Speakers and panelists will discuss global warming, viral diseases, food contamination, terrorism and genocide. The March 17 Human Rights Banquet is in conjunction with the symposium. For more information and a schedule, call (208) 769-7764 or go to www. nic.edu/popcorn_forum/ popcorn_forum_08.pdf.

copies in its Molstead Library. The event kicks off March 17 when Idaho Falls native Greg Carr, the former CEO of Prodigy Inc., discusses his efforts to restore the Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique, which was destroyed during the recent civil war. Carr attended Harvard University and created the Carr Institute for Human Rights Policy there. The Carr Foundation purchased the former Aryan Nations compound in Hayden after a $6.3 mil-

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Human Rights Education Foundation for the human rights education center in Coeur d'Alene. Now Carr has donated $40 million to the African park restoration project and wants to strengthen the nation's economy by turning the park into a tourist destination. "I can't think of any topic more compatible with Coeur d'Alene than tourism," said Human Rights Education Institute Director Bob Bennett, a former NIC president. .He hopes connecting human rights and environmental restoration to tourism will attract a lot of locals to the annual Human Rights Banquet the same night, where Carr will re the headline speaker. He plans to talk about the status of human rights on the global scene. Other headline speakers and the topics they'll address: • March 18: Kenneth Alexander, chief of pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Chicago, emerging viral diseases. • March 19: Safety consultant Denise Pozen, the threat of contamination to the world's food supply. • March 20: Jeffrey Simon and Philip Crowley, terrorism. • March 21: Whitworth University psychology professor J'ames Edward Waller, genocide.

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Popcorn Forum to address world issues Eventruns

March 17-21 COEUR d'ALENE -

North Idaho College's Popcorn Forum Convocation Series Symposium will address global issues during this year's series "'Earth in Crisis: A Search for Solutions" March 17-21. Dozens of exper ts will present on current topics prevalent world wide, including global warming, viral . - - -~ diseases, food contammation, terrorism and ~ ethnic genocide. 'This year's keynoters are all nationally-recognized Stewart experts in their various fields of study, making this symposium one of the most outstanding in the 38-year history of the Popcorn Forum," said NIC Popcorn Forum Coordinator and Political Science Instructor Tony Stewart. On Monday, March 17, the symposium will kick off with a brief welcome by NIC President Priscilla Be ll and Associated Students of NIC President Ryan Robinson at 11 a.m. in Boswell Hall Schuler Performing Arts Center immediately followed by 'The Challenges of Global Warming to Our Future" with Gregor y Carr of the Gregor y C. Carr Foundation. Carr is embarking on one of the largest individual commitments in the history of conservation projects in Africa with a pledge of $40 million over the next 30 years to restore Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique. As part of the Monday's theme, the Associated Students of NIC and the NIC Social and

Philippe Valle, a graphic design instructor at North Idaho College, highlights one of his student's work prepared for t he 38th annual Popcorn Forum t hemed "Earth in Crisis: A Search for Solutions." Pressiile

Behavioral Sciences Division are sponsoring "fake Back the Tap," an initiative focused on encouraging the use of reusable, polycarbonate water bottles on campus to reduce the waste of plastic water bottles. Information on the project will be presented during the response panel from 1 to 2 p.rn. in the Lake Coeur d'Alene Room of NIC's Edminster Student Union Building. The 11th annual Human Rights Banquet will be held at 7 p.m. Monday at the Coeur d'Alene Inn, located at 414 Appleway in Coeur d'Alene. Carr, who is also the advisor y board chair of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard University, will present on "'The Status of Human Rig hts on the Global Scene." Tickets for the banquet are $30 and must be purchased by mailing a check made out to the Human Rig hts Education Institute to P.O. Box 2725, Coeur d'Alene, ID, 83816, by March 14. Infectious disease expert Kenneth Alexander, M.D. and Ph.D., will present on "Emerging Viral Diseases: A World of Crisis" at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, March 18 in Boswell Hall Schuler Performing Arts Center. He

is a leading researcher and professor at the University of Chicago. Denise Pozen, a corporate safety consultant with more than 20 years experience in consumer product safety, will present 'The Threat of Contamination to the World's Consumer Products and Food Supply" at 10 a.m. Wednesday, March 19 in NIC's Boswell Hall Schuler Performing Arts Center. In both her corporate and consulting roles, Pozen has worked as a liaison with the Consumer Product Safety Commission, negotiated product recalls and acted as a primary adviser for clients' international safety standards. Thursday, March 20's topic, The Threat of Domestic and International Terrorism, will be explored by two keynote speakers. Terrorism expert Jeffrey Simon, M.D., will present "'The Growing Threat of Terrorists and Weapons of Mass Destruction" at 9:30 a.m. Thursday in NIC's Boswell Hall Schuler Performing Arts Center. Simon is the author of the critically-acclaimed book 'The Terrorist Trap: America's Experience with Terrorism."

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Philip Crowley, senior fellow and director of homeland security at the Center for American Progress in Washington, D.C., will present "Understanding Terrorism and Terrorists: Lessons for Our Future" at 10:30 a.m. Thursday in NIC's Boswell Hall Schuler Performing Arts Center. During the Clinton administration, Crowley was special assistant to the president of the United States for national security affairs, serving as senior director of public affairs for the National Security Council. Leading expert on the history of genocide in the world James Edward Waller Jr., Ph.D., will present "Becoming Evil: How Ordinary People Commit Genocide and Mass Killing" at noon Friday, March 21 in Boswell Hall Schuler Performing Arts Center. Waller is a psychology professor at Whitworth University and the author of several

books on racism and genocide. A special concert by the NIC Jazz Ensemble will explore "A Solution" at 7:30 p.m. Friday in Boswell Hall Schuler Performing Arts Center. Under the direction of NIC Band Director Terry Jones, the ensemble will feature the premiere of a work by Vern Sielert, Ph.D., trumpet and jazz professor at the University of Idaho. "A Solution" aims to illustrate how music builds harmony and requires cooperation. A response panel featuring subject matter experts will respond to the keynote speaker's address each day from 1 to 2:30 p.m. in the Lake Coeur il'Alene Room of NIC's Edminster Student Union Building. An exhibit of prints depicting the global issues covered during this year's series will be on display in NIC's Edminster Student Union Building throughout the week. The prints were created by students in NIC's graphic design program. All Popcorn Forum events are free and open to the public, with the exception of the Human Rights Banquet March 17. Visitor parking permits will not be required on NIC's campus the week of the Popcorn Forum. The 38th annual Popcorn Forum is cosponsored by the Associated Students of NIC, KSPS Public Television and Spokane Teachers Credit Union.

With footage of the keynote speakers, interviews and national coverage of the global issues, five one-hour documentaries will be produced and aired on KSPS Public Television beginning the week of June 8 through the week of July 6. The docu¡ ¡ mentaries will be narrated by Stewart, who founded t_he Popcorn Forum Convocation Series Symposium 38 years ago. The documentaries ~ be available for checkout m NIC's Molstead library after they air this summer. To receive a free printed program, call the NIC College Relations Office at (208) 769-7764 or view .it online at http://www.mc. edu/ popcorn_forum/poir corn_forum_08.pdf/.


INIJND Russian Cooperative CLASSICAL MUSIC At a competition last August in

Only Squares Are Unaware FORUM The polar bears aren't the only ones who'll be in trouble if the ice caps melt. With five k~ote spcak<:'°s coming to North Idaho College to a~~s the envu-onmental cnses challenging our worlcl's leaders and a~,. North I~o CoU~ge's 38th annual Popcorn Forum won't be lacking m anr,wng. (Ibey II even provide the popcorn.) All next week, the Forum will host experts examining topics such as viral diseases food ~n~tion, te~rism, ~thruc gcna:odc and global warming. ~els with titles such as Emerging Viral Diseases: A World of Crisis" and " ~ o ~ Evil: How Ordinary People Commit Genocide and Mass Killing" will explore possible solutions. ~<?'s Popcorn Fo~ ~e drawn thousan~ of attendees every year, this year, the emphasis will be on cncouragmg action. In the words of <;nvironmentalist ~uricc Strong, "Don't accept that you can't make a difference. Because if you feel that you can't make a difference, you won'.t make a difference - and if you put a multiplier on that, we will contmuc on an unsustamablc pathway." - BLJJR TELLERS

Popcorn Forum • Monday-Friday, March 17-21 • Free • NIC Schuler Performing Arts Center • 1000 W. Garden Ave., Coeur d'Al~e • Human Rights Banquet • Monday, March 17, ~ 6 pm • Tickeu: $30 • ~ t Wmer_n Coeur d'Alene Inn • 414 W. Applcway Rd, Coeur d'.Alene • V1Sit www.nic.edu/popcomforum • Call: (208) 769-7764

Cleveland's Severance Hall, Russian pianist Alexandre Moutouzkine, 27, referred to orchestras as "big, living organism[s]." 'This weekend at the Fox, he'll perform the concerto of Alexander Scriabin. While com· posed (in 1896} under the inftuence of Frederic Chopin, the Scriabin con· certo highlights the orchestra rather more and the soloist less than had been Chopin's custom; teamwork between soloist and musicians will still be at a premium. For the Spokane Symphony's first performance in 32 years of Maurice Ravel's DaphniJ and CJJ« suires, director Lori Wiest's Symphony Chorale will sing from backstage in the wordless "Interlude" of the less-often-performed first suite and in the famous reunion of the lovers at dawn (from the ballet's third act). This weekend's concerts will open with a 13-minute tone poem from a century ago, Anton Webern's In Sommerwind, which sounds nothing like the later, dissonant Webern as it moves from a hush to a crescendo and back again to a hush.

- MICHAEL BOWEN Spokane Symphony On:hcstra performs music of Wcbcm, Saiabin and Ravel • Saturday, Man:b 15, at 8 pm, and Sunday, Man:b 16, at 3 pm• TKketa: $1~1 • The Fox• Sprague and Monroe Street • Visit: www.spokanesymphcmy.org • Call: 624-1200 or 325-SEAT

56 INlANDER MARCH 13, ZOOI


SATU RDA Y, MARCH 15, 2008

A SPOKESMAN-REVIEW PUBLICATION

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Big changes on-tap at NIC water bottles are recycled, said Carol Lindsay, chair of the college's Social and Behavioral Sciences Division and key BY AMY CANNATA water bottles instead of disposable organizer of the bottle effort. Staff writer plastic bottles. That statistic got Lindsay thinking: The "Talce Back the Tap" program "How do we reduce the amount of A small group of North Idaho College will be launched Monday as part of the plastic water bottles being thrown away faculty, staff and students is trying to do college's annual ''Popcorn Forum." This at NIC every day?" its part for the planet by launching a new year's theme is "Earth in Crisis: A Search The answer? Provide each incoming initiative to get people at NIC to begin for Solutions." student, faculty member and staff drinking from reusable polycarbonate Nationally only two in 10 disposable member with a reusable water bottle

Program promotes reusable water bottles

next fall. Lindsay estimates buying the 2,500 bottles would cost about $5,500. Raising that money will be a key part of the Take Back the Tap initiative, as will education. The group will be launching a Web site to promote the program, said Dean Bennett, who heads up student activities for the college. See NIC,5


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"If you look at trash cans across the campus, they're always filled with water bottles," Bennett said. 'Buying water by the bottle may be more convenient but it doesn't necessarily taste any better. Most of the bottles aren't fiJled with mountain spring water, Lindsay said. They're filled with the same municipal water that consumers could get straight from their own tap.

NIC Popcorn Forum schedule Monday: 11 a.m. kickoff event, "The Challenges of Global

Warming to Our Future" with Gregory Carr; 1 p.m. "Take Back the Tap" presentation at the Edminster Student Union Building¡ Tuesday: 10:30 a.m., "Emerging Viral Diseases: A World in Crisis" Wednesday: 10 a.m. "The Threat of Contamination to the World's Consumer Products and Food Supply" Thursday: 9:30 a.m., "The Growing Threat of Terrorists and Weapons of Mass Destruction"; 10:30 a.m. "Understanding Terrorism and Terrorists: Lessons for Our Future" Friday: noon, "Becoming Evil: How Ordinary Peopl~ Commit Genocide and Mass Killing"; 7:30 p.m. NIC Jazz Ensemble concert ¡ All events are free and, unless otherwise Indicated, are in the Boswell Hall Schuler Performing Arts Center. More information is available at www.nic.edu/popcorn_forum.

Some cities, including San Francisco, have instituted limited bans on disposable plastic bottles. San Francisco city departments aren't allowed to buy water in plastic they create mountains of trash. Some say that drinking from bottles. Other cities are looking at banning the bottles because the bottles regularly can be

hazardous to people's health because the bottles can leach chemicals into the water.

And then there's the cost. At about a buck apiece or even more, buying water by the bottle is a highly uneconomical way to quench your thirst. NIC student Jessica DeWitt used to buy a bottle of water each day, spending more than $300 a year on what she could have gotten free from a school drinking fountain or sink. Now DeWitt refills her Nalgene brand bottle and is helping with the Take Back the Tap initiative to encourage others to do the same. "I think that our society uses water bottles like they're going out of style," she said. Besides, ''When you buy a water bottle from the store, you're just getting tap water." Amy Cannata can be reached at 765-7126, (509) 927-2179

amyc@spokesman.com.

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¡ Lovin' their limericks Readers take poetic license with our presidential candidates SUNDAYS TODAY SECTION

NIC's Popcorn Forum focuses on 'Earth in Crisis'

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Discussions center on finding solutions to problems FROM STAFF REPORTS

The North Idaho College Popcorn Forum, a series of lectures and discussion panels, enters its 38th year with the theme, "Earth in Crisis, a Search for Solutions." A ::;cbedule of events, which are free and open to the public, follows. North Idaho College is at Garden Avenue and Hubbard Street, west of

commitment to help restore Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique. When: 11 a.m. Where: Boswell Hall Shuler Performing Arts Center Response panel W ith Steve Ruppel, NIC director of Information Technology; Dale Marcy, NIC chemistry instructor; climatologist Cliff Harris and meteorologist Randy Mann. Moderated by Carol Lindsay, chair of the NIC Social and Behavioral Sciences Division

downtown Coeur d'Alene. For more information, visit www.nic.edu.

Monday "The Challenges of Global Warming to Our Future"

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Gregory Carr of the Gregory C. Carr Foundation discusses worldwide ecological damage in the context of his $40 million

THE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW

When: 1 p.m. . . . Where: Edminster Student Uruon Building, Lake Coeur d'Alene Room

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"Emerging Viral Diseases: A World of Crisis Kenneth Alexander, M.D., Ph.D, infectious-disease expert from the University of Chicago, will discuss emerging viruses such as

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Continued from E1 Hanta and SARS, and how they can be addressed. When: 10:30 a.m. Where: Boswell Hall Shuler Performing Arts Center Response panel

Dr. Mike Dixon; Randi Lustig, epidemiologist program manager, Panhandle Health District and infectious-disease specialist David Souvenier, M.D. Moderated by Linda Michal-Hawks, NIC director of Student Health Services When: 1 p.m. Where: Edminster Student Union Building, Lake Coeur d'Alene Room

Wednesday "The Threat of Contamination to the World's Consumer Products and Food Supply" Denise Pozen, a corporate safety consultant who has worked as a liaison with the Consumer Product Safety Commission, will discuss the process of maintaining

product safety from the fellow and director of manufacturer to the consumer. homeland security at the Center for American Progress When: 10 a.m. Where: Boswell Hall Shuler in Washington, D.C. During Performing Arts Center the Clinton administration, Response panel Crowley was special assistant to the president of the United Jim Hansen, executive director of United Vision of States for national security Idaho; Beverly Dickens, M.S., affairs, serving as senior R.N., program coordinator of director of public affairs for NIC's Associate's Degree the National Security Council. Nursing program. Moderated When: 10:30 a.m. by Denise Clark, NIC public Where: Boswell Hall Shuler Performing Arts Center services librarian. When: 1 p.m. Response panel Where: Edminster Student Richard Moore, Ph.D., Union Building, Lake Coeur professor emeritus of Lewis-Clark State College; d'Alene Room Wayne Manis, CEO and Thursday president of Manis "The Growing Threat of Investigations Inc. and Don Terrorists and Weapons of Robinson, FBI agent and Mass Destrudlon" member of the Inland With Jeffrey Simon, M.D., Northwest Joint Terrorism author of "The Terrorist Trap: Task Force. Moderated by Mona Klinger, NIC America's Experience with communication instructor. Terrorism." When: 9:30 a.m. When: 1 p.m. Where: Boswell Hall Shuler Where: Edminster Student Performing Arts Center Union Building, Lake Coeur "Understanding Terrorism d'Alene Room and Terrorists: Lessons for Our Future"

With Philip Crowley, senior

Friday "Becoming Evil: How

Ordinary People Commit Genocide and Mass Killing"

With Whitworth University psychology professor James Edward Waller, Jr., Ph.D., author of several books on racism and genocide. When: noon Where: Boswell Hall Shuler Performing Arts Center Response panel

Ryan Robinson, president, Associated Students of NIC; Richard Randall, NIC philosophy instructor; and Sholeh Patrick, attorney and newspaper columrust. Moderated by Virginia Johnson, Ph.D., chair of the NIC Communication, Fine Arts and Humanities Division. When: 1 p.m. Where: Edminster Student Union Building, Lake Coeur d'Alene Room "A Solution"

Special concert by the NIC Jazz Ensemble featuring the premiere of a work \,y University of Idaho instructor Vern Sielert. When: 7 p.m. Where: Boswell Hall Shuler Performing Arts Center


COEUR d'ALENE - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - www.cdapress.com

Monday March 17, 2008

NIC's Popcorn Forum takes on global issues Human Rights Banquet features philanthropist Carr COEUR d'ALENE - North Idaho College's Popcorn Forum kicks off today. This year's program will address global issues during the week:long series, "Earth in Crisis: A Search for Solutions." Dozens of experts will present on current topics prevalent worldwide, including global warming, viral diseases, food contamination, terrorism and ethnic genocide. '1'his year's keynoters are all nation-

ally recogni7..ed experts in their various fields of study, making this symposium one of the most outstanding in the 38-year history of the Popcorn Forum," said NIC Popcorn Forum Coordinator Stewart and political science instructor Tony Stewart Philanthropist and Idaho native Gregory Carr will be the keynote speaker at the 11th annual Human Rights Banquet A see FORUM, A 11

Courtesy photo

Gregory Carr takes in the view at Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique, Africa. Carr has pledged S40 million over the next 30 years to restore Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique.


From the froni

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reception will be held at 6, followed by the banquet at 7 tonight at the Best Western Coeur d'Alene Inn. Carr will speak about "The Status of Human Rights on the Global Scene," which will be focused on his humanitarian work in Africa. Today, the symposium will kick off with a brief welcome by NIC President Priscilla Bell and Associated Students of NIC President Ryan Robinson at 11 a.m in Boswell Hall Schuler Performing Arts Center. It will be immediately followed by "The Challenges of Global Wanning to Our Future" with Carr. As part of today's theme, the Associated Students of NIC and the NIC Social and Behavioral Sciences Division are sponsoring "Take Back the Tap," an initiative focused on encouraging the use of reusable, polycarbonate water bottles on campus to reduce the waste of plastic water bottles. Information on the project will be presented during the response panel from 1 to 2·p.m. in the Lake Coeur d'Alene Room of NIC's Edminster Student Union Building.

• 1\111day • Infectious disease expert Kenneth Alexander, M.D. and Ph.D., will present on "'Emerging Viral Diaeases: A World of Crisis" at 10:30 a.m. in Boswell HalJ Schuler Performing Arts Center.

Wednesday • Denise Pozen, a corporate safety consultant with more than 20 years experience in consumer product safety, will present "The Threat of Contamination to the World's Consumer Products and Food Supply" at 10 a.m. in NIC's Boswell HalJ Schuler Performing Arts Center.

Thursday • Terrorism expert Jeffrey Simon,

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Friday • Leading expert on the history of genocide in the world James Edward Waller, Jr., Ph.D., will present "Becoming Evil: How Ordinary People Commit Genocide and Mass Killing" at noon in Boswell Hall.

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The Spokesman-Review

Page 82 • Tuesday • March 18, 2008

''Putting money into philanthropy is more fun than business." Greg Carr philanthropist

KATHY PLONKA' The Spokesman·Rev,ew

Greg Carr addresses a crowd at North Idaho College on Monday as the keynote speaker for the Popcorn Forum Convocation Series Symposium. He is embarking on one of the largest conservation projects in Africa with a pledge of $40 million to restore Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique.


Helping a park regain its luster Idaho entrepreneur pledges $40 million in Africa BY BECKY KRAMER Staff wrrter

When Greg Carr arrived at Gorongosa National Park four years ago, the scars from Mozambique's 30-year civil war were still glaring. The Army had slaughtered 20,000 Cape buffalo to feed its soldiers, leaving just a remnant of the vast herds that once roamed the ecologically rich comer of Africa Only crumbling guesthouses hinted that the 1,525square-mile park was once a tourist destination for wealthy globetrotters. "Gorongosa was sort of like Yellowstone National Park for this part of Africa," said Carr, an Idaho native and philanthropist. "Astronaut Charles Duke visited Gorongosa after he

landed on the moon. ... He said Gorongosa was better." Today, the park is regaining some of its biological grandeur 'and tourist traffic thanks to Carr, who has pledged $40 million over the next three decades to restore the park. The ambitious project seeks to integrate conservation with economic development, bettering the lives of 200,000 people who live near the park while restoring herds of elephants, wildebeest and antelope. Carr was the keynote speaker Monday at North Idaho College's Popcorn Forum, an annual event that seeks to spur community discussion of global. issues. He also gave the address at the 11th annual Human Rights banquet Monday night.

An Idaho Falls native, Carr, 48, earned a master's degree at Harvard before starting companies focused on voice mail and early Internet service. According to a Smithsonian article, Carr's net worth reached $200 million by the end of the 1990s, when he left business to focus on charitable causes. He created the Carr Foundation, which supports human rights, the arts and the environment. "I got lucky with the Internet," said Carr, the former chairman of Prodigy Inc., who donated $1million to Coeur d'Alene's Human Rights Institute and helped bankroll the Anne Frank memorial in Boise. "Putting money

See CARR,82

Unite d Republl of Tanzania Zambia

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Staff map: Molly Quim


CARR

Continued from Bl into philanthropy is more fun than business." ' Personable and down-to-earth, Carr confessed to wearing a pair of black dress shoes borrowed from NIC faculty member Tony Stewart for his Monday appearances. Only a disreputable pair of loafers made it into his luggake. "They look fine in the jungle," quipped Carr, who is leaving this moming for Mozambique., one of eight trips he's planning to the country this year. Government officials first invited Carr to visit Mozambique in 20.02. He was on their radar because of Africa Online, a ve.nture he participated in with Kenyan officials, which provides Internet service in eight countries. Carr wasn't interested in starting a fOmpany in Mozambique,

but the tales of Gorongosa fasc.inated him. Photos from the early 1960s showed the park during its 路 glamour days, when celebrities flocked there to see elephants, lions, 500 species of birds, and some of the largest crocodiles on the African continent. "In 路the 1960s, it was paradise," he said. Carr figured that eco-tourism, which brings millions of dollars each year to the nearby countries 路 ofSouthAfrica,KenyaandTanzania, could also benefit Mozambique. But first, the ecological ravage of the Civil War - which ended in 1992 - had to be addressed in Gorongosa. The park also had to benefit thousands of people living at its edges, many of them desperately poor. "The history of national parks in Africa is not always a great history," sailCarr, noting that many of them ignored the communities on their fringes,

Gorongosa lies at the southern tip of the Great East African Rift Valley. In nearby villages, many adults die in their 30s because of HIV. They also rely heavily on Gorongosa's resources, hunting in the park for food and clearing and burning land for subsistence farms. For locals to give up those practices, they needed an alternate way of earning a living so they wouldn't slip further into poverty, said Frank Merry, the principal. investigator for a three-year project examining how park development will affect nearby communities. His work is funded by the National Science Foundation. Last summer, Merry and his cohorts collected baseline data from 1,700 households. They're just starting to analyze the data. "It's placing the park'in the context of the regional economy." Merry said. "It could return to being an

iconic place." 路 Carr's money has put about 500 Mozambique residents to work so far. Subsistence farmers are being paid to grow trees for reforestation. Others . are patrolling par ks, protecting the restocked wildlife herds from poachers. "That's my favorite picture," said Carr, referring to a photo of young women in khaki uni forms holding diplomas. They'd just completed a three-week course that taught them how to be housekeepers for tourist lodges. Carr makes frequent trips to the villages, working to convincie residents that the changes will bring them prosperity. . "Ifall goes well over the n,ext 20 years," he said, "we'll restore one of the world's greatest natural parks. We'll restore the trees; we'll restore the animals; and welll create a lot of jobs."


Helping a park regain its luster Idaho entrepreneur pledges $40 million in Africa BY BECKY KRAMER Staff writer

When Greg Carr arrived at Gorongosa National Park four years ago, the scars from Mozambique's 30-year civil war were still glaring. The Army bad slaughtered 20,000 Cape buffalo to feed its soldiers, leaving just a remnant of the vast herds that once roamed the ecologically rich corner of Africa. Only crumbling guesthouses hinted that the 1,525square-mile park was once a tourist destination for wealthy globetrotters. "Gorongosa was sort of like Yellowstone National Park for this part of Africa," said Carr, an Idaho native and philanthropist "Astronaut Charles Duke visited Gorongosa after he

landed on the moon.... He said Gorongosa was better." Today, the park is regaining some of its biological grandeur 'and tourist traffic thanks to Carr, who has pledged $40 million over the next three decades to restore the park. The ambitious project seeks to integrate conservation with economic development, bettering the lives of 200,000 people who live near the park while restoring herds of elephants, wildebeest and antelope. Carr was the keynote speaker Monday at North Idaho College's Popcorn Forum, an annual event that seeks to spur community discussion of global. issues. He also gave the address at the 11th annual Human Rights banquet Monday night.

An Idaho Falls native, Carr, 48, earned a master's degree at Harvard before starting companies focused on voice mail and early Internet service. According to a Smithsonian article, Carr's net worth reached $200 million by the end of the 1990s, when he left business to focus on charitable causes. He created the Carr Foundation, which supports human rights, the arts and the environment. "I got lucky with the Internet," said Carr, the former chairman of Prodigy Inc., who donated $1 million to Coeur d'Alene's Human Rights Institute and helped bankroll the Anne Frank memorial in Boise. "Putting money

See CARR, 82

'â&#x20AC;˘

Slaff map: Molly Quinn


The Press, Tuesday, M arch 18, 2008

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C ENTERTAINMENT: Beatie settles with ex-wife for $48.6 million/ C8

Kernal karma and other food for thought

S

cientists teach that for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. A priest might simply say do unto others as you would have them do unto you; another spiritual version is the idea of karma. A physicist might point to the endless transfer of energy, or the fact that matter never ceases to exist; it only changes form when affected. Whatever the perspective,literally Sholeh everything we do Patrick affects not only ourselves, but others, in an endless chain of events and consequences. Whether or not we choose to acknowledge or focus on it, that chain transcends local and national borders, and permeates all things - living and nonliving. To ignore that is foolish and not in self-interest ' That's why Tony Stewart's brainchild, NIC's Popcorn Forum, is so valuable. It reminds us of how we affect each other, examining current social issues on deeper levels - with audience-driven discussion thus guided by local perspectives. '

This year, the focus covers all the basics of human society. Home (Monday): global warming Health/ illness (today, 10:30 a.m.): viral disease Food (Wednesday, 10 a.m.): contamination and food supplies Safety (Thursday, 9:30 a.m.): terrorism and WMDs Getting along with others (Friday, noon): genocide and mass killing Each program starts with a nationally renowned guest speaker, followed by a moderating panel and audience discussion. It's always free, and yes, there is popcorn. For more information, call (208) 7693325 or 769-7764. Speaking of popcorn, its science is ironic. Popcorn is considered a dry snack, but it's the water inside it that changes it from kernel to white fluff. Each kernel stores a small amount of water surrounded by soft starch. As heat energy increases, the water molecules move faster and get farth er away from each other, creating a pressure against the starch and rupturing the kernel. The kernel is thus literally flipped inside out. A simple stimulus causing a radical transformation. "Life is change. Growth is optional. Choose wisely." - Karen Kaiser Clark Sholeh Patrick is a columnist for the Hagadone News Network. Send e-mail to sholehjo@hotmail.com.


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The Press, Friday, March 21, 2008

JEROME A. POLLOS/Press

Philip J. Crowley, a senior fellow and director of homeland security at the Center for American Progress, speaks about the changing environment of how the U.S. is dealing with terrorism during a presentation Thursday at North Idaho College's 38th annual Popcorn Forum.

'Lessons for Our Future' administration who is now senior fellow and director of homeland security at the Center for American Progress - a Washington, D.C.â&#x20AC;˘ political policy think tank - spoke to roughly 100 students and other By MAUREEN DOLAN Staff writer community members who gathered to hear his lecture, "Understanding COEUR d' ALENE - Take a deep Terrorism and Terrorists: Lessons breath. for Our Future." That was P.]. Crowley's advice to Crowley said it's time to reassess the audience before he spoke during our national strategy to protect the Thursday's Popcorn Forum at North American homeland - to look at the Idaho College, a weeklong lecture impact since 9/11 our focus on Iraq series entitled "Earth in Crisis: A has had on what's happening at home. Search for Solutions." "It is a good time here at the seven¡ Crowley. a former national year point and at the point of presisecurity adviser during the Clinton dential transition to think about where

Popcorn Forum speaker says it's time to reassess national security strategy

we are and where we need to go and put terrorism in its proper context," Crowley said. "Obviously the next president will inherit very difficult decisions regarding what to do about Iraq, what to do about Afghanistan." Crowley said it's time to determine who our enemies are, who's at risk and redefine the meaning of homeland security. Over the years, Crowley said alQaida and other similar groups have aligned themselves into a global social movement linked by the Internet with a center of gravity moving into Europe. see FORUM, C4


FORUM C1

the bomb-sniffing dog are some of the best tools we from have against terrorism. He said Cold War doc"'The primary threat today trines like strategic patience is outside the U.S.," Crowley are still valid and that we said. should rely on those politiCrowley's organization cal, diplomatic and economic considers Pakistan to be the tools that have worked in most significant threat to the past because "capitalism national security, especially works." in light of the recent assas"We were the beacons of sination of prime minister hope," Crowley said. Benazir Bhutto. During the Clinton adminAfghanistan, Europe and istration, Crowley was special Iraq are the other areas the assistant to the president of group sees as formidable the United States for National threats. Security Affairs, serving Redefining homeland secu- as senior director of Public rity means not just focusing Affairs for the National on terror, Crowley said. Security Council. Prior to He said severe weather that, he was principal deputy and infectious disease need assistant secretary of defense to be considered as well. for Public Affairs. In all, "I think the next adminis- Crowley was a spokesman tration has to redefine home- for the United States governland security to include these ment and United States milithreats," Crowley said. tary for 28 years, 11 of those He said defense fundyears at the Pentagon and ing needs to be redefined three at the White House. because we are funding priHe served for 26 years in marily just military defense the United States Air Force, retiring at the rank of colonel and state and local deficits in September 1999. He is a are weakening our security. veteran of Operations Desert "Perpeb.Jal war is unsusShield and Desert Storm tainable," Crowley said. During the Kosovo conflict, There are 5,000 less he was temporarily assigned policeman in New York City since 9/11 and that's a prob- to work with then NATO Secretary General Javier lem because according to Solana. Crowley, the policeman and

Profile for Molstead Library at North Idaho College

Popcorn Forum Scrapboook 2006-2008  

Popcorn Forum Scrapboook 2006-2008  

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