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Augustine Liu was a featured speaker at Tuesday's North Idaho College Popcorn forum on the topic of industry and trade with Hong Kong, Korea and the Republic of China. Liu is the director of the West Coast Commercial Office of the Coordination Council for

North American Affairs for the Republic of China. The forum, sponsored by NIC and Lewis-Clark College, also featured Lt. Col. Gordon Cucullu (second from left), a military advisor to the Assistant Sec. of State for Far East and Pacific Affairs.

Asian relations topic of NIC forum " Industrialization in East Asia: America's Relations with T~iwan, Hong Kong and Korea," will be the topic of a North Idaho College and Lewis-Clark State College co-sponsored Popcorn Forum at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, March 18, in the Bonner Room of the Student Union Building. Guests speakers are Augustine Liu, director of the West Coast Commercial Office for the Re-

public of China, Taiwan; Lt. Col. Gordon Cucullu, military advisor in the state department; John Thoreson, executive director of the Inland Northwest Tourism Alliance; Dr. Terrell Manyak, Lewis-Clark State College Business Division; and Dr. Stewart Johnson of the LCSC Science Department. The Popcorn Forum is open to the public without charge.

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The Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations and The North Idaho College Popcorn Forum

Present

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

''Living the Dream'' January 20, 1986


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ยง44 North 3rd-Coeur d'Alene1 Idaho

LEW1S-CLARK !TATE COLLEGE 8

NORTH IDAHO COLLEGE Invite you to attend a Popcorn Forum, March 18, 1986. 7:30 p.m. Bonner Room , Student Union Building, North Idaho College. Kick-off for the 5th Annual LCSC International Exchange Conference Coeur d'Alene Program featuring: . . . Augustine Liu, Director of the West Coast Commercial Office of the Coordination Council for North American Affairs (Republic of China) Lt. Col. Gordon Cucullu, Military Advisor to the Assistant Secretary of State for Far East and Pacific Affairs John Thoreson, Executive Director, Inland Northwest Tourism Alliance Dr. Terrell Manyak, LCSC Business Division Chair Dr. Stewart Johnson, LCSC Political Science Department

* * * * *

FREE TO THE PUBLIC-A UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY-PLEASE TRY TO ArrENDI For Information R,ganling TIIB lnt,mational Exchang, Conf1r,1JC1 March 19, 20, 21st-Contact LCSC (208} 799-2209

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POPCORN FORUMS FOR 1986-87 ACADEMIC YEAR

SYMPOSIUM:

"South Africa:

THE POLITICS OF APARTHEID"

(Popcorn Forums 215-218)

209 .

Guest: Dr. Thomas Moore, NASA ' s space flight physician. Topic: "The U. S . NASA Program: Space Sickness , Weightlessness and Physical Fitness of Space Travel. " September 24, 1986.

210.

"A Gathering for Solidarity" co - sponsored by the NIC Popcorn Forum and the Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations. Guests: Governor Cecil Andrus; Glen Walker, Kootenai County Prosecuting Attorney; Father Bill Wassmuth , President of the Task Force; Reverend Richard Hermstad, Pastor, Trinity Lutheran Church. Sept . 25, 1986.

211.

Guests: Corey Lane, spokesman for Idaho Citizens for Freedom and Jobs , supporter of Referendum land State Representative Steve Herndon, opponent of Referendum 1. Topic : " The 1986 Idaho Debate over the Right to Work Referendum Ill. October 13 , 1986 .

212 .

Guest : tions .

213.

Guest : Senator Steve Symms, Republican Candidate for U. S. Senate . Idaho Elections. October 17 , 1986 .

214.

Guest : Paula Evans, niece of Governor John V. Evans. Topic: Governor Evan ' s election campaign for the United State Senate . October 30 , 1986 .

215.

Guest : Dr. Allen Weinstein, President of the Center for Democracy and commentator for the NBC "Today Show" . Topic : "Historical Overview of South Africa and Apartheid ." December 1, 1986 .

216.

Guest: Mr . Ibrahim Gassama, Senior Research Fellow of Trans Africa. " Economic Sanctions: The U.S . Response to South African Apartheid." 1986 .

217.

Guest: Leslie Labuschagne, Counsul-General of the South African Government for the Western United States . Topic: "The Policies and Views of the Republic of South African Government. " December 3 , 1986.

218.

Guest: Ms. Tandi Geabashe, South African Civil Rights Activist. vs. Racial Equality : A Call to Conscience." December 4, 1986.

219.

Dr . Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Co-sponsored by the NIC Popcorn Forum and the Koo tenai County Task Force on Human Relations . Guest: Bishop Melvin Talbert, Resident Bisho p of the Pacific Northwest Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church. Januar y 19, 1987.

220.

Sixth Annual International Exchange Conference. Topic: "Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) : Region at a Crossroads . " March 4 , 1987.

221.

Guests: Dr. Stuart Denny, M.D.; Jo Marinovich, North Idaho College Nurse; Fouche, Health Educator for the Panhandle Health District. March 5, 1987.

Cecil Andrus , Democratic Candidate for Governor. October 15, 1986 .

Topic:

1986 Idaho ElecTopic :

1986

Topic: December 2,

Topic:

"Apartheid


the caeur d'alene

VOL 80, NO. 46

Topof the day NASA doctor talksatNIC Motion sickness did not become a problem until the Apollo program began in the late 1960's when the astronauts were given more room to move around the capsule, Dr. Thomas P. Moore, NASA's space flight physician, said Wednesday at the " Popcorn Forum" at North Idaho College. Moore is a specialist on the subjects of motion sickness, welghtlesness and space physiology. Weightlessness, particularly for a prolonged period of time can cause c.ardio vascular problems as well as muscle and bone atrophy. In space, exercise is of utmost importance for flights of the future that will be of longer duration. While in space, the shuttle astronauts perform duties such as sattelite deployment and retrieval, "extra vehicular activity" which allows astronauts to perform construction outside the craft skills that will be necessary to the construction of a permanent manned space station, Moore said The challenger program will be back in operation by 1988 and work on a manned space station will commence sometime in the 1990s, Moore said.

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 24, 1986


Chamber endorses solidarity gat'1ering By MICHAEL R. WICKLINE Press staff writer

Aday before a human rights solidarity rally, the Coeur d'Alene Chamber of Commerce has called for communitywide support in loudly and clearly decrying racism and bigotry. "It is now even more imperative that every person of the entire community rally behind¡the (Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations ) and around its leadership," chamber officials said in a statement to community leaders and groups. "In fact, each group and entity must take its own stand and show its own clear resolve so that the world know clearly that the Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations and its dedicated relationship is not a small group speaking out against hatred," they said. On Thursday at 7 p.m. in NIC's Student Union Building, organizers are expecting hundreds to attend a communitywide human rights rally in the aftermath of the bombing of The Rev . Bill Wassmuth's home more than a week ago. Speculation has been that the Aryan Nations are somehow tied to the bombing, but The Rev. Richard Butler of Aryans Nation church has blamed the Jewish Defense League for the violence. Wassmuth has been at the forefront of the task force's efforts in voicing opposition to the views espoused by the Aryan Nations, a white supremacist group. "Since violence bas occurred and more could follow. it is the See CHAMBER, Page 10

10

THE COEUR D'ALENE PRESS

CHAMBER CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 duty of each and every one of us to speak out, not only for ourselves and our families, but also for those our groups represent and areas of responsibilities encompass," the chamber officials pointed out. " It must be quickly be shown that these folks are only a part of an entire community, indeed, region, that abhors what th~ neoNazi group stands for and will not welcome such activities, prisonrecruits and other potential followers," they said. . This action is a reaff irmatlon of the strong positons taken in the fall of 1983 by the chamber, city and many other groups in support of the task force and the basic constitutional and human rights of all citizens , the chamber leaders

noted. In a related development, Butler said this morning he may attend the rally. , " If it's for non-whites, I wouldn t attend. If white men are n~~ barred, I probably will be there, Butler said. . Chamber officials emphas!zed the fight against the Aryan Nations and its views isn't the task force and its leadership against the "bad guys. " "It is all of us. A strong and v~ry clear message must be sent immediately to make it ab~n~.tly clear that threatening or mJunng one dedicated leader and spokesman will not be tolerated," the chamber officals said. "Now is the time to be heard, spread the burden and pressure from the task force itself to the entire community a~d . e;1ery group, business and md1V1dual withm it."


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THE COEUR D'ALENE PRESS

Press opinion

Beat hate together Thursday evening, Coeur d'Alenearea residents have the opportunity to make a strong statement in favor of human rights and equality. The rally, billed as a "Gathering for Solidarity," is set for 7 p.m. at North Idaho College and offers a chance for area residents to stand up en mass for racial equality, social justice and tolerance. Ahuge turnout and vocal support for these concepts is needed now more than ever. One reason is that there recently was an attempt on the life of one of the leaders of the human rights movement in this area, the Rev. Bill Wassmuth. Wassmuth has been the spearhead of efforts to combat racism and bigotry in North Idaho, and a good turnout Thursday will show the rest of this country how the majority of us feels about Wassmuth and the things he stands for. Another reason is that, except for a few small, fragmented groups, this community never has rallied together in large numbers to reject the principles of racism and bigotry espoused by some of this area's residents.

The Coeur d'Alene Chamber of Commerce has recognized this, and this week dashed off a memo to all community leaders and organizations seeking to unify forces against racism and for the human rights movement. The memo urges government, civic, business, church and other special purpose community-based groups to '' join with the Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations in once again loudly and clearly denouncing racism and bigotry in our area." Any of us who have a stake in the welfare of this community bear an obligation to protect here the freedoms set forth by the founders of our country, those being religious freedom, life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, and the belief that all people are created equal. Any of us who presently are living in fear of violence from any person or group is having our rights violated. What is needed now is a show of commitment to our beliefs and a demonstration of support for ALL the members of this community, black, brown, red, white or purple. Together we are stronger than bigotry and more powerful than hate. Together we can send a signal to racists here and everywhere that we will not stand for anyone harassing or attacking minority group members or anyone else in our community. See you at NIC Thursday.


the coeur d 1alene

VOL 80, NO. 48

Hundreds rally for tolerance By TRUDY WELSH Press staff writer

More than 600 people used music, dance and speeches Thursday to reaffirm support for racial equality and to non-violently vent their frustrations. The Gathering for Solidarity was planned after a bomb went off Sept. 15 at the home of the Rev. Bill Wassmuth, the Catholic priest who heads the Kootenai County Human Relations Task Force. Police have not arrested anyone for planting the pipe bomb, but Wassmuth and many area citizens speculate he was targeted because of his equal rights stance. "To ignore bigotry is to be a bigot yourself," Gov. John Evans said at the rally. "As long as I am governor, I will not let a cowardly few to use hatred and fear to accomplish their goals," he said, drawing loud applause. But at least a few did not participate in the clapping or the standing ovations given to Evans and Wassmuth, as well as Darlene Peters, who performed a Native American dance. The event

Related story, page 6 was also attended by the Rev. Richard Butler, pastor of the Aryan Nations church, and at least two of his followers. The Aryan doctrine is centered around the idea of white supremacy. Law enforcement security was heavy, but no incidents were reported. Wassmuth jokingly accused the crowd and master of ceremonies Ray Givens - who said the priest "embodies the true meaning of the Christian spirit" - of purposely choking him up so he would shorten his remarks. The St. Pius priest was uninjured in the bomb blast, but said the incident made him realize "what it means to be vulnerable." Wassmuth said the turnout, which included people from Portland, Spokane and all parts of Kootenai County, shows people are turning the violence into a positive statement. " God is working good out of evil and life out of destruction," he said. "Saying 'yes' to the dignity of each person is still the best way to say 'no' to racists." Kootenai County Prosecutor Glen Walker and Evans promised that everything will be done to bring the bomber or other criminals to justice. But the Rev. Richard Hermstad reminded the crowd that justice must also be tempered with mercy. "To often it seems (our society) is more dedicated to revenge than justice," he said. "From Karate Kid to Rambo, we are encouraged to see violence as the normal solution to problems." SM RAU.Y, Page 2

RALLY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Butler said after the gathering, "I thought it was beautiful, except for the hypocrisy." He asked why was there no similar public outcry when the Aryan Nations church was bombed, members were shot in other areas, his dogs mutilated and his car vandalized. Butler claims no connection with the bombing. He said 27 Aryan Nations members were in the audience, and said the large community response would not change his efforts to spread his beliefs. ¡ Nor, said Wassmuth, will the violence change the direction of the human relations task force. Plans already are under way for Martin Luther King Day, a multi-cultural celebration for next summer, and a five-state human rights commission. Peters said it saddens her to now

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see the same look of pain in the eyes of people here who work for human rights as she has felt herself and seen in the eyes of other minorities. Only the clicking of a camera and an occasional cough broke the crowded room's prayer-like silence when she performed the Seneca Tribe's Dance to Gather Strength from the Four Winds. Guitarist Nils RosdahJ, who with his wife Mary adopted a mentally retarded Filipino boy, urged the community to educate their children on the acceptance of minorities.


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COEUR d'ALENE _ They came to get answers, to share love, to vent their frustrations, to protest and to join together in solidarity. . . ~ t_ ~east 700 rel_ig1ous ~eaders, politic1ans, . l~w officers, city a_nd county officials and comm1;101ty members attended a human rights rally Thursday night at North Idaho College. Even the so-called "enemy" showed up. Nearly everyone at the rally billed as a "Gathering for Solidarity" in protest of a recent bombing here said they_came out of peace and love and without anger. "God is having us all go through some real ups and down these days," said the Rev. Bill Wassmuth, who received a standing ovation. On Sept. 15, a deadly pipe bomb exploded at his home, causing $4,000 damage but no injuries. Wassmuth was not exactly the guest speaker, but his beliefs were put on display. "When this comm unity gathers, good things happen. God is bringing good out of evil and life out of destruction." Wassmuth is pastor of St. Pius X Cburch and bead of the Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations. He's been the principal figure in the community's effort to comhat the presence of the white supremacist Aryan Nations compound near Hayden Lake.

Aryan Nations pastor, bas denied any connection with the bombing. . Butler and a spokeswoman for his churc,h, Betty Tate, attend~d Thursdays _the rally. 'J'.hey sat m the front circle of chairs and behaved as "peaceful as a lamb," one sheriff's deputy .said. The task force jointly sponsored

See photo - r-a ruane 19

U,e ,ally along with U,e NIC Popcorn Forum. "The task force will continue its goals," Wassmuth said. The bombing of his home has given him a different perspective, be said, showing him what it means to be vulnerable, as are minorities who live in North Idaho. But he called for a non-violent response. "Say 'yes' to the dignity of each person. That is still the best way to say 'no' to racism and prejudice." Echoing Wassmuth's belie.fs were Idaho Gov. John Evans, Kootenai County Prosecutor Glen Walker,. Coeur d'Alene Mayor Ray Stone, the Rev. Richard P. Hermstad, pas,tor of Trinity Lutheran Church and other leaders. It was not just the leaders who agreed with Wassmuth's non-violent message. "People have to come to show (See Rally on page 13)

(Continued from page 1) support for minority groups," said Kathy Goodson, a Coeur d'Alene resident who attended the rally. "I feel that if we don't stand together now, sometime we're going to stand apart," said Bonnie Grant. "Every community would rather they wouldn't be here," said Richard Peters of Coeur d'Alene. "But if they go somewhere else, they may not have a strong opposition." George Lyman was one of the few in attendance who voiced some anger at the Aryan Nations church. "I don't like some kind of nutgroup floating around and flexing their muscles," he said. " If they are going to use force and intimidation and fear, then we don't like it." Prosecutor Walker said not to react to the bombing with fear and anger, but to use the legal system. "We are not a police state," he said, noting that U.S. Attorney General Edwin Meese told him that his office is treating the bombing as one of its highest priorities. "We can't prosecute on a person's beliefs, he continued. "Never let the neo-Nazis set the standards for our community." Gov. Evans said he has ordered Idaho's law enforcement forces to begin an all-out effort to "bring to justice those who bombed Father Bill's house." "We will fight it at every stand and we will fight it right - peacefully, for the justice of all."

Spokane, Wash., Fri. Sept. 26, 1986.

THE SPOkESMAN-REVIEW


Spokane. Wash., Wed., Oct. 8, 1986. THE SPOkESMAN-REVIEW

A9

Debaters to discuss right-to-work issue COEUR d'ALENE - The right to work issue will be the topic of a debate presented by the North Idaho College Convocation Commit¡tee and NIC Popcorn Forum at 11 a.m. Monday in the College Communication-Arts Auditorium. Speaking in support of Initiative No. 1 (the right-to-work measure) will be Cory Lane, North Idaho's representative for the Idaho Citizens for Freedom in Jobs. Lane is an employee of that organization responsible for promoting the initiative in this part of the state. Rep. Steve Herndon, D-Sandpoint, will speak against Initiative No. 1. Herndon is an attorney, and is seeking his second term for the District 4, Seat B Floterial position to the Idaho House. The debate format calls for 20-minute main presentations, fiveminute rebuttals and questions from the audience. The debate is open to the public at no charge.

NORTHWEST . DIGEST/Fr<

NIC Popcorn Forum to feature Andrus COEUR d'ALENE - Idaho Democratic gubernatorial candidate Cecil Andrus will be the featured speaker for the 212th North Idaho College " Popcorn Forum" at 9 a.m. Wednesday in the Student Union building Bonner Room. The former Idaho governor, who has made education and economic development the major issues of his election campaign, will deliver an educational address to the college community. Andrus began his political career in Idaho at the age of 29 when he was elected to the state Senate from Orofino. He was elected to his first term as governor in 1970, then re-elected in 1974. In 1977, he resigned the remaining portion of his second term to become U.S. Secretary of the Interior. The Popcorn Forum series is co-sponsored by the North Idaho College Associated Student Government and the college's Department of Political Science. The public is invited to the forum at no charge.


Right-to-work issue focus of lively debate By MICHAEL NEFF Press staff writer

Referendum One is a choice between majority rule or individual rights, argued the participants Monday morning during a debate of Idaho's right-to-work law. Rep. Steve Herndon, D-Sandpoint, and Corey Lane, right-to. work's paid coordinator in North Idaho, met in a head-to-head debate at North Idaho College before a crowd of students that was sprinkled with what appeared to be union members. The debate, moderated by political science professor Tony Stewart, was part of NIC'S convocation and popcorn forum programs. Idaho voters will decide at the polls Nov. 4 whether a right-towork law passed by the 1985 Legislature should remain in place. A yes vote is a vote to retain the law, and a no vote is a vote to reject it. Right-to-work laws, which are in place in 21 states, prohibit the majority of the workers in a workplace from requiring all workers to pay dues to the union. "Right-to-work is designed to foster individual' freedom of choice," said Lane, who lost a coin flip to Herndon and had to speak first. "A person should not be discriminated against because of race, creed, color, religious affiliation or union affiliation. " Lane, a former union member, contends he had his union membership in good standing taken away two years ago when he refused to pay a $2-a-month union fee approved by his Teamsters local to help defeat the right-to-work law

COREY LANE

passed by the Legislature in 1985. Since the $2 monthly fee was clearly for a political campaign, one on which the union position differed from Lane's. Lane said he should

See DEBATE, Page 6


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DEBATE

States, said Lane, 50 percent of the com~nies relocating will not even consider a new location unless it is CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 in a right-to-work state. Nevada have been free not to pay the and Arizona, two of the four rigbtmonthly assesment. to-work states in the Western United States, led the nation in the The right-to-work opponent Herndon - naturally saw things creation of new manufacturing differently than Lane. What rigbt- jobs in 1985, Lane said. to-work laws do, said Herndon, is "Idaho needs those jobs," Lane give workers the choice to accept said. Lane cited statistics showing union representation without paying for it. By federal law, work· people living and working in ers in right-to-work states may Western right-to-work states have choose not to join unions even a higher standard of living than though they must be offered the those living in states without rightsame contract negotiated by the to-work. All four of the Western right-to-work states - Nevada, union for its workers. "The person gets to freeload off Arizona, Wyoming, and Utah, have a higher average income than Ida· of his co-workers." The founding fathers, said ho, said Lane. Herndon, provided the glue to hold Herndon fired back that five society in the United States togeth- states in the nation have lower aver when they wrote the Constitu- erage income thatn Idaho, and four tion. That glue includes the princi- or the five are right-to-wort ple of majority rule, said Herndon. states. He added that five states in li a majority of workers in a shop the nation spend less on education want everyone to pay dues for rep- than Idaho, and that all five area resentations, Herndon said, all right-to-work states. workers should abide by that wish. "What does that tell you about In bis rebuttal, Lane retorted statistics," said Herndon. Since implementing right-tothat if unions do not allow freedom of individual choice, the checks work, the standards of living have and balances that bold the Ameri- decreased in Arizona, Utah, and can system together disappear. Wyoming, and remained the same The two not only argued in Nevada, said Herndon. He conphilosophy but also ticked off tinued, saying recent study rankstatistics to the audience. ing the industrial climates in the 50 According to studies by the com- states ranked Idaho 37th, Nevada pany which does most of the in- 41st, Utah 45th, and Wyoming 48th. Targeting right-to-work as an dustrial relocation in th~ United

answer to the Idaho's economic woes is the wrong approach to creating a thriving state economy, said Herndon. The real problems blocking economic development are poor silver and timber markets, inadequate funding for education, and "goat trails" for roads. More money for education and the infrastructure is needed to give industry the tools it needs for a future in Idaho, said Herndon. "The cause of our problems it seems to me is that we haven't faced up to them yet," Herndon said. The study Lane cited when be said 50 percent of all relocation corporations will not consider a state without right-to-work, Herdon said, is outdated. More recent studies indicate the percentage has fallen to 10 percent. In his rebuttal, Lane said Herndon was wrong, but countered that even if 10 pei:cent was the correct figure, 10 percent is still a high percentage of prospects being eliminated immediately. "Steve, are you going to be the one that tells every one out of 10 people in this room they're not going to have jobs," said Lane. Lane contended the AFL-CIO ii trying to cloud the issue of right-towork by waging a heavy media campaign. "The idea is the AFL-CIO'S deception committee doesn't want you to understand what rigbt-towork is all about," Lane said.


THE SPC*ESMAN-REVÂŁW Wed., Oct. 29, 1986, Spokane, Wash.

Evans' niece to speak at Popcorn Forum COEUR d'ALENE - The 214th North Idaho College Popcorn Forum will feature Paula Evans, the niece of Gov. John V. Evans. She will speak in support of her uncle's campaign for the United States Senate. Paula Evans is a University of Idaho senior majoring in financebusiness. She serves as a student senator on the University of Idaho Associated Student Board. The Popcorn Forum will be at 7 p.m. Thursday in the Bonner Room of the Student Union Building. A question period will follow the address. The forum is co-sponsored by the North Idaho College Department of Political Science and the Associated Student Government. The public is invited at no charge.


HANDLE SATURDAY. NOV. 22, 1986

NIC plans :s outh Africa symposium Winner of United N ations World Peace Award to open program By Cynthia Taggart Staff corrapondent

COEUR d' ALENE - For four days next month, North Idahoans will be invited to tackle the rroblems of South Africa. " can't think of any major issue people know less about," said Tony Stewart, the North Idaho College instructor behind the Dec. 1-4 symposium. To enlighten local residents to the philosophies of an area that has been prominent in the news lately, Stewart has invited four experts on South Africa to speak at his latest popcorn forum - NIC's annual lecture series. "It's very current, with Congress debating economic sanctions against South Africa. That's of major significance," he said. " And we' ve bee.n experiencing here so m u ch on the issue of human rights. I find it very pertinent for people here to deal with human rights somewhere else in the world." South Africa is the area where the world's greatest struggle of oppressed people is occurring, he said. Of the country's 34 million residents, 4.5 million are white. "That leaves 29 million without citizenship

and who don't have the right to determine their own destinies,'' Stewart said. "I think that's of significance." Stewart chose the topic for his most ma jor symposium this year after consulting with friends last summer. Most indicated a strong interest in South Africa, which motivated Stewart to commit $4,000 of his annual $4,900 popcorn forum budget to the subject. With the funds, he's scheduled three- to fourhour programs featuring speakers, response panels and films. The forum will open Dec. 1 with a speech by Allen Weinstein, the recipient of this year's United Nations World Peace Award and a history professor at Geor getown University in Washin~ton, D.C. 'I scheduled him first because he's an expert on South Africa a nd apartheid. He'll bP, a ble to give everyone the whole perspective," Stewart said. Weinstein also is the president of the Center for Democracy, the managing editor of the Washington Quarterly and a commentator on international affairs for NBC's Today Show. The program Dec. 2 will feature a congressional aide " who wor ks for someone tied closely to international affairs," Stewart said. The

speaker will discuss economic sanctions toward South Africa. The Consul General of the South African government based in Beverly Hills, Calif., Leslie Labuschagne, will speak the third day about the policies of bis government. Labuschagne also has worked at the government affairs directorate in Pretoria, in the consul office in New Yor k and as a government attorney for the South African Supreme Court. The forum will end Dec. 4 with a talk by Ta ndi Geabascbe, a black civil rights activist who bas bee.n barred from South Africa since 1970. Geabasche, now a resident of Atlanta, is the director of the South African pro~am for the southeastern region of the American Friends Service Committee. She will speak on a partheid and racial equality. Each day, a three- to five-member panel will respond to the speakers followed by a questionand-answer period with audience members. Stewart also has scheduled six films. After the public sessions, Stewart will interview each speaker for the campus video camer'as. The tapes will be broadcast on Spokane public television station KSPS and on the local cable station.


6

THECOEUR D'ALENE PRESS Friday. November 28. 1986

NIC set to sponsor forum

on South Africa politics Speeches by international ex- sponse to Sou th African sociology instructor ; Ida Hawkins, perts and policymakers followed Apartheid" begins at 10 a.m. in the community activist; a representbyresponsepanelsdiscussingvar- auditorium by a U.S. con- ative of the American Friends Serious topics will highlight the North gressional staff aide or a national vice Committee, and moderator Idaho College symposium on expert on international sanctions. Daralyn Mattei, NIC English in"South Africa: The Politics of He or she will discuss the action by structor. Thirty-minute films Apartheid" scheduled for Dec.1-4. Congress for economic sanctions " The Discarded People" and The symposium opens Monday and their effect on both the United "Generations of Resistance" will be shown at 1:30 p.m. in the Bonner at 9 a.m. in the Communication- States and South Africa. Arts auditorium with a talk on "An A 35-minute film, "South Africa Room. The final Keynote speaker, at l Historical Overview of South Belongs to Us, " will be shown noon Africa and Apartheid" by Dr. Al- in the Bonner Room, as will the p.m. Thursday in the Bonner len Weinstein, president of the response panel at 1 p.m. to discuss Room, will be South African civil Center for Democracy and pro- the economic sanctions and their rights activist Tandi Geabashe on fessor of history at Boston Univer- consequences. Members of U.e "Apartheid versus Racial Equalsity and Georgetown University. panel will be Norman Gissel, at- ity: A Call to Conscience." A native of South Africa, she Recipient of the 1986 United Na- torney and member of the human tions World Peace Award, Dr. rights task force; Dr. D.A. Louw, earned degrees in nursing and Weinstein is a commentator of in- University of Idaho psychology physcology and is mother of four ternational affairs for the NBC professor visiting from South children. She was exiled from "Today Show" and was a member Africa; Nils Rosdahl, journalist; South Africa in 1970 and resides in of the U.S. observer team for the and moderator Mary Lou Reed, Atlanta, Ga. Discussing the moral issues of last Philippine election. He is ex- Idaho state senator. ecutive editor of The Washington The keynote address at 11 a.m. apartheid at 2:30 p.m. in the BonQuarterly and an author of several Wednesday in the Bonner Room ner Room will be a response panel books and articles. will be on "The Policies and Views comprised of the Rev. Richard Hermstad, Kootenai County PubThe film "Land of Fear " a th Af · documentary on apartheid in South ~ o~! r~eJ:iu:~~ •?f Le~~~ lic De(ender Chuck Lempesis, JuAfrica, will be shown at noon and Labuschagne, consul general of dith Sylte of the NIC English de2:30 p.m. in the Bonner Room of the South African government to partment, attorney Ida Leggett, a representative of the American the Student Union Building. the United States. A response panel to Weinstein's Serving with his country's U.S. Friends Service Committee and talk also will be held in the Bonner Consulate-General office the past moderator Richard Snyder of the Room at 1 p.m. Members of the three years, Labuschagne has been NIC anthropology department. Thirty-minute films "The Devpanel include the Rev. Bill employed in international governWassmuth, president of the Koot- ment offices since the 1960's. He ils Circle" and " Namibians in Exenai County Task Force on Human also was an attorney for the South ile'' will be shown at 11: 30 a.m. in Relations; Glen Walker, Kootenai African Supreme Court. His the Bonner Room. County prosecutor; Dr. Dale French Hugenot family arrived in Soden of the NIC history depart- South Africa in 1710. All speeches, films and response ment, and moderator Steve Meeting at noon in the Bonner panels are free and open to the Schenk, director of public rela- Room, the response panel will dis- public. The symposium is prestions at NIC. cuss legal policies of the South ented by the NIC Popcorn Forum Tuesday's topic of "Economic African government. Members of Committee, chaired by Tony StewSanctions: The United States' __R_e-_~th~e~pan~e:!.l~a!.!.:re~D~a~vi~·d~Co~h~e.:,n., 1 ~Nl::,:C;;;;_~atAJt~.- ~- - ------:-:-

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SUNDAY, NOV. 30, 1986

INSIDE

REGIONAL NEWS HANDLE SPORTS PAGE 08

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IDAHO HANDLE

THE. N.OR.TH

South Africa to be subject of NIC forum By Cynthia Taggart Staff corrupondcnt

COEUR d' ALENE - Diplomats, foreign policy experts and human rights activists will discuss various aspects of the politics of South Africa at North Idaho College this week. Allen Weinstein, president of the Center for Democracy and commentator for international affairs for the NBC Today Show, will open the four-day symposium at 9 a.m. Monday in the Communication Arts auditorium with "A Historical Overview of South Africa and Apartheid." Weinstein recently received the United Nations World Peace Award for 1986 and was a member of the U.S. observer team for the last election in the Philippines. Weinstein's talk will be followed at 1 p.m. in NIC's Bonner Room by a response panel comprised of the Rev. Blll Wassmuth, president of the Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations; Glen Walker, Kootenai County prosecutor; a nd Dale Soden, NIC history instructor. The symposium will continue at 2:30 p.m. in the Bonner Room with the film documentary on apar-

~eid in South Africa, "The Land of Fear." Tuesday's activities will begin at 10 a.m. in the auditorium with a discussion by Ibrahim Gassama of economic sanctions as an answer to apartheid. Gassama, a New York attorney and graduate of Harvard University Law School, is a senior researcher for Trans Africa, the black American lobby grour, for Africa and the Caribbean. A film, 'South Africa Belongs to Us," will follow at noon in the Bonner Room. At 1 p.m., a response panel with task force member Norm Gissel; Joy Scherr, member of the Idaho League for Women Voters; D.A. Louw, University of Idaho psychology professor visiting from South Africa; journalist Nils Rosdahl; and state Sen. Mary Lou Reed, D-Coeur d'Alene, will discuss Gassama's speech. Activities Wednesday will begin at 11 a.m . in the Bonner Room with the consul general of the South African government to the U.S., Leslie Labuschagne, speaking on the policies a nd views of bis government. Labuschagne has worked in South African governmental international offices since the 1960s and also was a government attorney for the South Afri-

can Supreme Court. In the Bonner Room at noon, David Cohen, NIC sociology instructor; Ida Hawkins, community activist; and a member of the American Friends Service Committee will respond to Labuschagne. "The Discarded People" and "Generations of Resistance," two 30-minute films, will be shown in the Bonner Room starting at 1:30 p.m . Thursday's activities begin at 11:30 a .m. in the Bonner Room with the showin~ of "The Devil's Circle" and "Namibians in Exile,' two half-hour films. The week's final speaker, Tandi Geabasche, a South African native who was exiled from the country in 1970, will address apartheid and racial equality at 1 p.m. in the Bonner Room. At 2:30 p.m., the Rev. Richard Hermstad; Koote.n ai County public defender Chuck Lempesis; Judith Sylte, NIC English instructor; and Ida Leggett of the American Friends Service Committee will respond to Geabasche. All activities are free to the public. The symposium is sponsored by the NIC Popcorn Forum Committee, which is headed by political science instructor Tony Stewart.


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South Africa to be subject of NIC forum ~eid in South Africa, "The Land of Fear." Tuesday's activities will begin at 10 a .m . in the auditorium with a discussion by Ibrahim Gassama of economic sanctions as an answer to apartheid. Gassama, a New Yor k attorney and graduate of Harvard University Law School, is a se.n ior researcher for Trans Africa, the black American lobby grouP. for Africa and the Caribbean. A film, ' South Africa Belongs to Us," will follow at noon in the Bonner Room. At 1 p.m., a response panel with task force member Norm Gissel; J oy Scherr, member of the Idaho League for Women Voters; D.A. Louw, University of Idaho psychology professor visiting from South Africa; journalist Nils Rosdahl; and state Sen. Mary Lou Reed, D-Coeur d'Alene, will discuss Gassama's speech. Activities Wednesday will begin at 11 a .m. in the Bonner Room with the consul general of the South African governme.n t to the U.S., Leslie Labuschagne, speaking on the policies and views of his government. Labuschagne has worked in South African governmental international offices since the 1960s and also was a government attorney for the South Afri-

By Cynthia Taggart

Staff conapondent

COEUR d' ALENE - Diplomats, foreign policy experts and human rights activists will discuss various aspects of the politics of South Africa at North Idaho Colle~e this week. Allen Wemstein, president of the Center for Democracy and commentator for international affairs for the NBC Today Show, will open the four-day symposium at 9 a.m. Monday in the Communication Arts auditorium with "A Historical Overview of South Africa and Apartheid." Weinstein recently received the United Nations World Peace Award for 1986 and was a member of the U.S. observer team for the last election in the Philippines. Weinstein's talk will be followed at 1 p.m. in NIC's Bonner Room by a response panel comprised of the Rev. Bill Wassmuth, president of the Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations; Glen Walker, Kootenai County prosecutor; and Dale Soden, NIC history instructor. The symposium will continue at 2:30 p.m. in the Bonner Room with the film documentary on aparr

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can Supreme Court. In the Bonner Room at noon, David Cohen, NIC sociology instructor; Ida Hawkins, community activist; and a member of the American Friends Service Committee will respond to Labuschagne. " The Discarded People" and "Generations of Resistance," two 30-minute films, will be shown in the Bonner Room starting at 1:30 p.m. Thursday's activities begin at 11:30 a .m . in the Bonner Room with the showin~ of "The Devil's Circle" and "Namibians in Exile,' two half-hour films. The week's final speaker, Tandi Geabasche, a South African native who was exiled from the country in 1970, will address apartheid and racial equality at 1 p.m. in the Bonner Room. At 2:30 p.m., the Rev. Richard Hermstad; Kootenai County public defender Chuck Lempesis; Judith Sylte, NIC English instructor; and Ida Leggett of the American Friends Service Committee will respond to Geabasche. All activities are free to the public. The symposium is sponsored by the NIC Popcorn Forum Committee, which is headed by political science instructor Tony Stewart. .

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the CD'3ur d 1alene

VOL 80, NO. 103

MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1986

Action called for to end apartheid By TRUDY WELSH Press staff writer

Americans must come up with "concrete proposals" for ending apartheid in South Africa instead of blindly backing sanctions as the cure-all, an expert on the South African history said today at North Idaho College. "We need more than a piously moralist identification with some unspecific idea of change," said Allen Weinstein, president for the Center for Democracy, history professor at Boston University and the 1986 recipient of the United Nations World Peace Award. As one new U.S. senator noted in relating a dream to Weinstein, the United States has laid no transi-

tional plans for helping to implement a multi-racial government i! Pieter Bota's administration suddenly pulled out under pressures of sanctions and divestitures, the professor said. Many of the options likely will be discussed durin, NIC's four"8y forum on the politics of apartheid, which began today. ¡ Weinstein cautioned that all policy options are based on a particular person's view of what the immediate future holds for South Africa. The strategy suggested by the person who envisions an extended period of civil war will differ greatly from that proposed b~ See APARTHEID, Page 12

25 CENTS

APARTHEID CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 someone who sees an "accelerated unraveling of the Bota government" over " several bloody years," he said. Americans must also realize that apartheid began being applied by statute in 1948 as a "defensive product" after the blacks were officially freed in America and began taking a more active role in politics, Weinstein said. Statutes that have built the "system of repression" included requiring passes of blacks, creating racial classifications through poir ulation registrations, enforcing internal security laws, which allowed almost "unlimited" powers to dete.ntion, surveillance and investigation, and the creation of artificial black homelands, far from economic centers that would provide work opportunities, he

said. A sentiment of neo-Nazism is rising in South Africa, which is only 14-15 percent white, said the professor, who praised the community of Coeur d'Alene for showing a "quite remarkable response to the bigotry" displayed by a similar group in Kootenai County. "We in America are in your debt because you have shown how a community can learn and then educate the country," he said. The NIC forum and others like it around the nation are designed "not to moralize," but to analyze the existing situation and evaluate prospects for change, he said. Tuesday's topic of "Economic Sanctions: The United States' Res pons e to So u th African Apartheid" will be addressed at 10 a.m. in the auditorium by a U.S. congressional staff aide or a national expert on international sanctions. He or she will talk about the action bv Congress for econom-

ic sanctions and their effect on both the United States and South Africa. A 35-minute film, "South Africa Belongs to Us," will be shown at noon in the Bonner Room, as will the response panel at 1 p.m. to di~ cuss the economic sanctions and their consequences. Members of the panel will be Norm Gissel, attorney and member of the Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations ; Dr. D.A. Louw, University of Idaho psychology professor visiting from South Africa; Nils Rosdahl, journalist; and moderator Mary Lou Reed, an Idaho state senator. The keynote address Wednesday, at 11 a.m. in the Bonner Room, will be on ''The Policies and Views of the Republic of South African Government" by Leslie Labuschagne, consul general of the South African government to the United States.


Look at South Africa's past'urged By Cynthia Taggart Stall correspondent

COEUR d'ALENE - To decide what course the U.S. should follow with South Africa, the American government must predict the future and understand the past, an expert on international affairs said Monday. "Our policy options will be determined by our prophetic instincts," said Allen Weinstein, president of the Center for Democracy and this year's recipient of the United Nations World Peace Award. Weinstein was the first of four speakers scheduled to discuss the history, policies and future of South Africa during a four-day symposium at North Idaho College. Weinstein told an audience in NIC's Communication Arts auditorium that the racist policies practiced in South Africa between 1690 when the first Dutch settlers arrived and 1948 were lax compared with today's. During that period, the Dutch Boer influence in South Africa became strong and natives were used as laborers, Weinstein said.

With the arrival of the British in the late 18th century came an anti-slavery philosophy. The 4,000 Afrikane.r s - a blend of Dutch, French and Portugese left the South African coastal areas and the British for the inland areas. The brutal trek inland established the myth of white survivallsm in South Africa, Weinstein said. When the British wrenched from the Boers control of the gold-rich country during the Anglo-Boer War, the Afrikaners' distrust of other whites solidified, he said. Nearly 26,000 Afrikan women and children died in British concentration camps during that war. Although South Africa became a dominion of the British Empire in 1910, the British gave the Boers control over the country. On 1948, the controlling Afrikan government began witnessing a loss of control, Weinstein said. To maintain control, the Afrikans disenfranchised all non-whites, taking away the citizenship and voting rights given to them in 1910. "To bring about apartheid required many constitutional changes," Weinstein said. "At that time, apar-

TUESDAY,DEC. 2, 1986

theid replaced the informal defensive measures the Afrikaner political culture had used to stabilize control." The the 1950s, the Afrikan government enacted a rac.ial classification law and pass laws, which required all blacks to keep identification with photos on them at all times. Weinstein said the goal of South Africa's current government is total separation of the races - socially, economically and territorially. To meet that goal, the government assigned many of the country's 24 million blacks to their native homeland territories. But mauy of those people have intermarried, are second- and third-generation city dwellers and have businesses elsewhere, he said. Currently, South Africa and much of the rest of the world is playing a waiting game, Weinstein said. "The (South African) business community is waiting to see if the government can withstand sanctions. How that is handled will determine how the business community responds," he said.

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What to do about South Africa? By Cynthia Taggart Staff correspondenl

COEUR d'ALENE - To decide what course the U.S. should follow with South Africa, the American government must predict the future and understand the past, an expert on international affairs said Monday. "Our policy options will be determined by our prophetic instincts," said Allen Weinstein, president of the Center for Democracy and this year's recipient of the United Nations World Peace Award. Weinstein was the first of four s~akers scheduled to discus.s the history, policies and future of South Africa during a four-day symposium at North Idaho College. Weinstein told an audience in NIC's Communication Arts auditorium that the racist policies practiced in South Africa between 1690 and 1948 were lax compared with today's. In that period, the Dutch Boer influence in South Africa became strong and natives were used as laborers, Weinstein said. With the arrival of the British in the late 18th century came an antislavery philosophy. The 4,000 Afrikaners - a blend of Dutch, French and Portugese - left the South Af-

The U.S. must decide whether South Africa will erupt in a lengthy civil war that the government can withstand or whether national and international pressure will bring a multiracial government, says expert on foreign affairs. rican coastal areas and the British, moving to inland areas. The brutal trek inland established the myth of white survivalism in South Africa, Weinstein said. When the British wrenched from the Boers control of the gold-rich country during the Anglo-Boer War, the Afrikaners' distrust of other whites solidified, he said. Nearly 26,000 Afrikaner women and children died in British concentration camps during that war. Although South Africa became a dominion of the British Empire in 1910, the British gave the Boers

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control over the country. On 1948, the controlling Afrikaner government began witnessing a loss of control, Weinstein said. To maintain control, the Afrikaners disenfranchised all nonwhites, taking away the citizenship and voting rights given to them in 1910. "To bring about apartheid required many constitutional changes," Weinstein said. "At that time, apartheid replaced the informal defensive measures the Afrikaner political culture had used to stabilize control." In the 1950s, the Afrikaner government enacted a racial classification law and pass laws, which required all blacks to keep identification with photos on them at all times. Weinstein said the goal of South Africa's curre.nt government is total separation of the races - socially, economically and territor ially. To meet that goal, the government assigned many of the country's 24 million blacks to their native homeland territories. But many of those people have intermarried, are second- and third-generation city dwellers and have businesses elsewhere, he said. Ct!rrently, South Africa and

much of the rest of the world is pl~ying a waiting game, Weinstein said. "The (South African) business community is waiting to see if the government can withstand sanctions. How that is handled will determine how the business community responds," he said. Weinstein said he is fascinated with the idea of bringing the leaders of the South African government together with leaders of the African National Congress and the People's Federalist Party - South African groups that support a multiracial government. However, "The Botha government won't recognize anything but white control and the African National Congress wants a transfer of r,ower to its hands," Weinstein said. 'Neither is seriously considering negotiations with the goal of devising a genuine power scheme." The United States must decide whether South Africa will erupt into a lengthy civil war that the current government can withstand or whether national and international pressure on the South African government will speed the process .toward a multiracial government, he said. "We must study the future to understand what to do in the present." ~

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6

THE COEUR D'ALENE PRESS

South African: Sanctions won't quell turmoil By SCOTT IRELAND Press staff writer

South Africa's current and past political and sociological quandary is complex and cannot be alleviated by America imposing sanctions against the South Africa n government, according to Leslie Labuschagne, consul general of the controversial nation. Labuschagne spoke today at the North Idaho College symposium on apartheid and South Africa being held this week at the college. Under the doctrine of apartheid, whites run the government of the mostly black nation and black people are denied the same social freedoms of whites. The imposition of sanctions, a knee-jerk reaction on the part of America, is not a viable notion if one understands the realities of South Africa , Labuschagne said. "In South Africa you do not have a homogeneous society, you have two macro-value systems," one system consisting of First World values and others consisting of Third World ideologies. This fact, coupled with South Africa's history of discrimination, the interdependence of the economies of southern Africa countries, and the global struggle between eastern block and western civilizations makes the idea of sanctions impracticable, Labuschagne said. According to Labuschagne, the real debate concerning South Africa should not be whether sanctions are appropriate, but rather how to find solutions that would serve to broaden democracy in South Africa. Sanctions do not aid in this process but will only serve to pull the country further apart, Labuschagne said. "The biggest problem is that the borders of South Africa were drawn by colonial powers without regard to ethnic diversity; it is a problem of Africa, not just South Africa," Labuschagne said. South Africa must accept the fact that contained within the country's borders are different languages, cultures and value systems and the country must learn to build upon this diversity, Labuschagne said. According to Labuschagne, South Africa must respect its different cultures and not attempt to impose a value system on any one culture, he continued. All of the country's varied cultures must then unite and work together in areas that affect everybody. Labuschagne said he feels the process is already underwav.

"Ten years ago the country's philosophy was separation, today it is sharing," Labuschagne said, pointing out South Africa's recent steps forward in rights granted to blacks and the repealing of discriminatory laws. He said that negotiations must continue between all factions in order for the progress to continue.

But sanctions will not aid in the process, Labuscbagne said. America should not equate its own black/white problem with the problem that currently exists in South Africa. America is using South Africa as a scapegoat for its own societal ills, according to Labuschagne.

"How do you divert attention from yourself? Easy - point a finger at someone else," Labuschagne said. Sanctions will only serve to destroy the South African economy, thereby hurting all of the country's citizens, black and wnite, he said, adding that sanctions could ultimately result in the unemployment of hundreds of thousands. Labuschagne questioned how that action would contribute to the process of creating political and social harmony in South Africa. The imposition of sanctions "is obviously an attack against our economy and everybody shares in the economy of South Africa," he said. " We will obviously now have to look for other markets for our goods."


Sanctions urged by speaker By Cynthia Taggart Staff correspondent

COEUR d'ALENE - Economic sanctions will hurt South Africa's white Afrikan regime and crumble a government that enforces brutal racist policies, said a spokesman for a black lobbyist group. Western money, technology, goods and services are essential to the function of South Africa's apartheid system, said Ibrahim Gassama, a senior research fellow for Trans Africa. Trans Africa's 15,000 members lobby in the U.S. government on behalf of Africa and the Caribbean. Gassama was in Coeur d'Alene to speak at North Idaho College's four-day symposium on South Africa. South Africa imports 80 percent of its weapons, owes 33 percent of its national debt to other countries and imports 55 percent of its goods, technology and services, Gassama said. "They use those computers to trap blacks. They use those weapons to kill blacks," he said. South Africa has lived with apartheid for centuries, "since the Dutch built fences to keep the Africans out of their settlements," Gassama said. But, be added, heavy Western investment in the country during the 1960s and 1970s nourished apartheid bf feeding the white government m power. "It became more sophisticated, more violent. Thousands have died," Gassama said. People who argue that South Africa's blacks will suffer the most under economic sanctions are partially right, he acknowledged. "Sanctions will hurt. We don't deny that," Gassama said. "But they are already dehumanized and reduced to slavery, which is supported by U.S. policies. Sacrifice 1s not new. Mandela, Tutu have expressed a willingness to endure to make things better for future generations." Despite lobbying efforts and picketing by Trans Africa members during President Reagan's terms, no headway was made until this year when Congress overwhelmingly approved imposing limited sanctions in South Africa, Gassama said.

Even then, to enact the sanctions, Congress overrode Reagan's veto. "I believe there is some South African connection behind that,'' he said. "I'm waiting for it to come out." Gassama believes the new democratic majority in the U.S. Senate will help Trans Africa's pursuit of more stringent U.S. sanctions in South Africa. Sanctions, he said, brought change in suppressive governments in Rhodesia/ Zimbabwe and Prime Minister) is alive and well and a member of Parliament. He wasn't executed." Several students, including one from South Africa, questioned whether Western sanctions would be diluted by more trade from the Eastern bloc countries. Such a turn of events, they said, could result in the sp~ad of commun!.sm. Gassama, however, said, "There is no question in our minds that America is a better place. If the

Chile, he said. The new ~overnments representing a maJority of the populations dianâ&#x20AC;˘t massacre the white minorities, he added in response to a student question. "Despite years of oppression, the black peorle don't understand the concept o racism. They don't see why they should unite against the white group," Gassama said. "In Zimbabwe, Ian Smith {former

Soviets have an interest in undermining American influence in Africa, that is an American problem. This has nothing to do with communism versus capitalism. This is a question of basic human justice." The symposium will continue today at 11 a.m. in NIC's Bonner Room with a talk by Leslie Labuscbagne, a consul general of the South African government to the U.S.


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Ibrahim Gassama speaks at a North Idaho College symposium on South Africa politics.

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THURSDAY, DEC. 4, 1986

REGIONAL NEWS

IDAHO HANDLE -

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s. Africa official: We're making strides By Cynthia Taggart Stall correspondent

COEUR d'ALENE - A South African government official told North Idaho College students Wednesday that P.W. Botha, president of South Africa, had announced his plan to redraft his country's constitution and abolish more than 40 laws enforcing apartheid. "Of the 10 pillars of apartheid, now only 1:i,, are left," said Leslie Labuscbagne, consul general of the South African government to the U.S. The roomful of listeners, gathered at NIC for this week's symposium on South Africa, clapped and cheered. Labuscbagne smiled at the response, then added, "Of course be didn't really say those things because most have already taken place." Attracting the largest crowd in the first three days of the symposium, Labuschagne claimed the South African government no longer follows policies of apartheid. That the country enacted apartheid laws

after World War II was a mistake, he said. But, the action was patterned on those of other countries. "We tried to seek a solution to our problems with the concept of partition. It was accepted in Western Europe and India,'' Labuschagne said. "But we didn't take into account our growing industrialization and the move of blacks into the city areas." By the 1970s, "We knew we needed new solutions," he added. The solutions included the election of Botha, who pressed for a sharing rather than separation of power in the country, Labuschagne said. But changes don't come easily - for many reasons, be said. The government must find solutions that fit both disparate groups of South Africans, be said. "Other realities are that South Africa is part of the African continent where twothirds of the world's least developed countries are and where democracy hardly ex-

ists," Labuschagne said. "We're the one country on the continent that's made a success of itself." More than 1.5 million blacks from neighboring countries travel legally and illegally to South Africa for work because conditions are better there than in other countries, he said. Eight million people in neighboring countries depend on the South African economy - a fact that "is glossed over by those who support sanctions," Labuschagne said. He urged his audience to focus on the strides forward his government is taking now and forget the years of extreme racism. "We recognize the fact that our legacy is a huge millstone around our necks today, but we're trying to move forward," he said. Those moves include the abolition of pass laws, the revision of labor laws and an act allowing mixed marriages. Labuschagne called the actions proof of good faith. "We haven't gone the full road yet, but there's less apartheid today than yesterday,"

he said. "Today's commitment is to rewrite the constitution and bring black participation at all levels of government." i He condemned the African National Congress as "the only group in South Africa that proposes violence as a solution." The United States, Labuschagne said, "should help us emP.loy more jackhammers on the remaining pillars of apartheid" than apply economic sanctions that will divert the country's energy toward rebuilding its economy. Labuscbagne reminded bis audience that it took the United States 200 years to grant civil rights to all races. "I assure you it won't take us a fraction of the time it took you to solve your problems," he said. The symposium's final speaker - Tandi Geabasche, a South African native who was exiled from the country in 1970 - will address apartheid and racial equality at 1 p.m. today in NIC's Bonner Room.


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COEUR d'ALENE - If the South African government doesn't change its policies of apartheid soon, the country "will see the bloodiest of bloodiest revolutions ever," predicted a South African exile Thursday. And, "If white people ex· pect a fair deal after independence, they'd better start treating blacks the same way," warned Tandi Geabasche , Geabascbe daughter of a former president of the African National Congress. Geabasche, a U.S. resident since her exile from South Africa in 1970, spoke to Coeur d'Alene listeners on apartheid and racial equality as part of North Idaho College's symposium on South Africa. The vanguard of the liberation movement in South Africa is the African National Congress, Geabasche said. The ANC was formed in 1912 to non-violently represent the rights of native Africans. In 1948 when the white Afrikaner party began . enacting harsh racist policies, the ANC began a campaign of non-cooperation with unjust laws, she said. " Non-cooperation didn't work for us because we bad no constitutional rights," Geabasche said. "The government just became more and more brutal with us." In 1960, the government outlawed the ANC. Geabasche's father, then ANC leader, asked the United Nations to apply sanctions to help the black cause. When that failed, the ~roup began a more violent campaign.. The organization's latest violent acts such as necklacing - filling tires with gasoline, slipping th!'!m around people's necks and settmg them on fire - "is especially hard for the older people who have ~ways followed a course of non-violence," Geabasche said. The ANC has used the necklace to kill other blacks - an action spawned when the ruling Afrikaners began putting blacks on lo-

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Exile pushes stiffer sanctions By scon IRELAND Press staff writer

She was " born, bred and nurtered in South Africa," and as she has been for most of her life, she continues to be an outspoken critic of the South African government. Tandi Geabashe, who spoke Thursday at the North Idaho College symposium on South Africa and the politics of apartheid, is a strong advocate of sanctions to remove t he la st vestiges of apartheid. " Apartheid is morally wrong and politically unacceptable," said Geabashe who is director of the South African program for the

Southeasern Region of the American Friends Service Committee. She was exiled from South Africa in 1960 and is still a member of the African National Congress, an anti-apartheid group the government of South Africa has also banished from the country. The sanctions bill passed by Congress is not tough enough, according to Geabashe. With the newly elected Democratic Senate, Geabashe is hopeful that a tougher sanctions bill will be introduced and adopted. Geabashe said she and her peers only asked for sanctions after failing to change the system from within and after peaceful protests failed to make a dent in South African governmetal

policies. A strong sanctions bill was the one way "we were asking for help," she said. According to Geabashe, the prime opposition in America to sanctions has been from politicians who feel the anti-apartheid pro-sanctions movement is spearheaded by a communist core. She said Third World countries that struggle for independence are often used as a pawn by countries interested in the larger "EastWest" struggle. Geabashe argued that the African National Congress, which admittedly contains some people with Marxist beliefs, is concerned with liberty and not communism. "We don't need a communist to tell us that an 8-year-old is being detained and tortured." Although South Afr ica ' s apartheid stance has softened some, Geabashe believes the ., ,, '

apartheid-bred attitude remains dominant in South Africa, and current government structures "are designed to avoid granting equal rights." " If you are white in South Africa you are expected to be racist by law. If you are not, you are a traitor," Geabashe said. Although she is a strong advocate of non-violence, Geabashe said if the lack of equality continues in South Africa, the country will see the " bloodiest revolution ever." In Geabahe's eyes, racial and political equality are "freedoms we will fight for side-by-side until we have achieved liberty." "I have never seen a people so determined to be free," Geabashe said of black South Africans. She asks Americans to "help us obtain these freedoms and this liberty, because for us we know that victory is certain."


â&#x20AC;˘

North Idaho joins King observances Events celebrating the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday are planned today at North Idaho College and the University of Idaho. In Coeur d'Alene the Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations and the NIC Popcorn Forum will present the following events: 10 a.m., Communication-Arts Auditorium: The film "Trumpet of Conscience" will be shown. 11 a.m.-noon, CommunicationArts Auditorium: Formal program with welcome by NIC P resident Robert Bennett; music by the

\

the Wallace Sixth Street Melodrama: "The Diary of Anne Frank.'' Northwest and national Free. events for King - page AS At the University of Idaho in Moscow, the celebration will include: 12:30 p.m., Borah Theater at NIC Concert Choir and Coeur d'Alene High School Choir. Key- Ul's Student Union Building: A note address, "Living the Dream speech by Allen Slickpoo, Nez of Dr. King," by Melvin G. Tal- Perce tribal leader. bert, bishop of the Pacific North9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 2 to 5 west Conference of the United p.m., Borah Theater: Films on the Methodist Church. life of King, the civil rights move12:30 p.m., Student Union Build- ment and non-violent change. 5 to 7 p.m., University Gallery ing-Bonner Room: International on the first floor of Ridenbaugh food luncheon, free. Hall: A display of posters by Mos7 p.m., Communication-Arts Au(See N. Idaho on page 8) ditorium: Theater production by

N~ Idaho

(Continued from page 1 ) - - -

cow students depicting King and King's birthday will close with a the civil rights movement. fund-raiser Tuesday from 7 to 9 7 p.I'(l., University Auditorium : p.m . at the former Kappa Alpha An adttress by Mamie Oliver, pro- Theta house at UI. Oliver will perfessot' df social work at Boise State form at the eiano and lead singing. Univetsity, on "Living the Dream The All Nations Christian Fellowship Choir, a local gospel group, 1987." Actiy,ities commemorating will perform.

Spokane, Wash., Mon., Jan. 19, 1987. THE ~

REVIEW


MU< day was a success Editor: Once again we wish to express our deepest gratitude and heart-felt pride for the outpouring support given by the people of Kootenai County for human ripts. On Monday, Jan. 19, approximately 1,200 citizens attended the second annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration. Many Kootenai Cowlty citizens continue to speak out through their presence at these important events for equality. We thank each and every one of you. A special thanks ls extended to the members and workers of the Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations; all the students facuity and persoMel of School District 271 and North Idaho Coll~e; JeMifer Lamb and her first grade students at Seltice Elementary School; the Fairchild Air Force Color Guard ; Norweco, Inc. ; the Sixth Street Melodrama of Wallace; Bishop Melvin Talbert; lawenforcement; andKVNiradioandCoeur d'Alene Cablevision for broadcasting the program. We thank all of you again. BILL WASSMUTB, president Kootenai County Tau Force on Buman Relatiou TONY STEWART, cllalrman NIC Lecture Series

COA

frf'~S Fri$Y; Januav 23. 1987


Friday, February 131 1987

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CPR

Gov. Cecil Andrus prepares to sign Into law a blll authorizing Martin Luther King Jr. Commemoration Day. Watching the signing ceremony are (from left) Rep. Leanna Lasuen, D-Mountaln Home; Rep. Jeanne Givens, D-

Coeur d'Alene; Sen. Mary Lou Reed, D-Coeur d'Alene; Idaho Human Rights Commission Chairwoman Marilyn Schuler; Rep. Robert Scates, R-Coeur d'Alene; and Rep. Tom Glovanelll, 0-Coeur d'Alene.

Andrus signs King legislation By MICHAEL NEFF Legislative reporter North Idaho News Network

BOISE - Gov. Cecil Andrus signed into law Thursday legislation to create a Martin Luther King Commemorative Day. The bill was the first of the 1987 session to receive the governor's signature. The honorary day will be the third Mondar. of each Janurary. "Dr. King s life was an outstanding example to all people on earth and points out what can be accomplished without violence," said Andrus as he signed the bill. Flanking the governor's desk as he signed the bill were several legislators and members of the Idaho

Human Rights Commission. Sen. Mary Lou Reed, D-Coeur d'Alene, Rep. Jeanne Givens, D-Coeur d'Alene, Rep. Bob Scates, R-Coeur d'Alene, and Rep. Tom Giovanelli, D-Coeur d'Alene, all attended the ceremony. During legislative hearings on the bill, some supporters testified that creating the day would seno a message to would-be white supremacists thinking of moving to Idaho. Andrus, however, downplayed that idea. "The point of the legislation is not sending a message to white supremacists or anyone else," said Andrus. "This is to pay tribute to the man." Anti-domestic terrorism legisla-

tion, which the governor's office is helping to sponsor, is the bill to send a message to white supremacists, said Andrus. That legislation is still under committee scrutiny. It would allow law enforcement -authorities to confiscate the weapons and property of those training to disturb the social order. Andrus said he will not support creating a new paid holiday honoring King, but said he will support the Legislature if its members want to supr,ort changing any of the existing nine state holidays to Martin Luther King Day. Nine states, including Wyoming and Montana, do not recognize Martin Luther King Day.

Profile for Molstead Library at North Idaho College

Popcorn Forum Scrapbook 1985-1987  

Popcorn Forum Scrapbook 1985-1987  

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