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He has also served as assistant to the Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs, consultant to the special assistant to the President for National Security Affairs on strategic war plans and on delegation of presidential authority to execute nuclear war plans and as consultant to Henry Kissinger. la 1be world moving toward nuclear destruction? will be the topic of discussion for the response panel scheduled for 2 p.m. in the Bonner Room. Guests of the panel will include Ms. Helena Thorfinn, Sweden,! member of Campaign for Nuclea r Free Zone Europe; Doug McLean, NIC physics instructor; Burt Russell, author and historian; and Scott Reed, Coeur d' Alene attorney and former member of the National Board of the Audubon Society. NIC Director of Planning Owen Cargo) will moderate the group. Following the panel at 3:00 p.m., a 60-minute film, "The Last Epidemic," will be shown. "The Medical Conaeqaences of War' ' will be addressed by the April 28 keynote speaker, Dr. James R. McGrath, representative of physicians for social responsibility., at 11 a.m. in the C-A Auditorium.

McGrath is presently practicing pediatrics at the Bellevue Clinic in Bellevue, Wash. He is also a member of the attending staff at the Children's Orthopedic Hospital in Seattle and the Overlake Hospital in Bellevue. He is the former chief of staff at Overlake Hospital and is currently a clinical assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington.

The respoue puel following McGrath at 1 p.m. in the Bonner Room will discuss the medical diseases following a nuclear attack. Following the panel will be "The Day After Trinity," a 90-minute film starting at 2:30 p.m. in the Bonner Room. Friday, April 29, there will be two keynote speakers. Congressman Lury Craig will speak in the Bonner Room at 10 a.m. on "The United States Congress and the Nuclear Arms Issue in 1983," and The Reverend Dr. Richard T. Mcsorley, professor of theology at Georgetown University will speak on a " Biblical Basis for Peace Making in the Nuclear Age" at 11 a.m. in the Bonner Room.

Students will be e:s:cuecl from class to attend the Monday and Friday keynote speeches .


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Symposium exams nuke war Building. The nuclear gymposlum begins 1 p.m. Monday when Carroll, who was involved in naval planning for nuclear war, speaks on "ap assessment of the present threat for world destruction.'' A three-member panel will respond to his remarks starting 2:30 p.m., anda25-minutemm, "A Guide to Armegeddon," begins 4 p.m. Tuesday's schedule opens 10 a.m. with " An Assessment of the National Administration's Nuclear Arms Control Efforts: Defense Buildup and the START Talks," by Sullivan, who as a former official in the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, had "JeCurity clearance to supervise a top-secret analysis of Soviet comfl:f " "'"' 1 pliance with arms control treaties. Dr. Daniel Ells berg After his speech, a four-member panel will meet 1 p.m. to consider, Communication-Arts Audito~ium - " Are we lagging behind the U~R in and will be followed by a panel nuclear arms?" A film, " War discussion and movie, always in the Without Winners," will follow. B!Jnner Room of th~ Student Union Wednesday's discussions will focus on Ellsberg. After hls noon address on " A critical revie)V of the U.S. nuclear arms policy from Truman to Reagan," a 2 p.m. panel will consider the question, "Is the world moving toward nuclear destruction?" An hour-long film, "1be 198WS North Idaho College Popcorn Forum-Convocation Series Last Epidemic," ls to begin 3:30 NUCLEAR WAR: TIIE DANGERS AND REALITIES Speake..Time Topic Date p.m. Rear Admiral Eugene Carrolll p.m. " An Assessment of the Mon., April 25 Thursday'.s 11 a.m. keynote speakPre11ent Threat for World Destruction" er will be McGrath, clinical assisResponse Panel" U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. 2:30 p.m. tant. professor of pediatrics at the Clyde Demlston (Ret. ) University of Washington and a Steve Ruppel Jo Webb member of Physicians for Social 10 a.m. " Denfense Buildup and the David S. Sullivan Tues., April 26 Responsibility. START Talks" He will discuss " the medical con1 p.m. Response Panel Harvey Olsen Anne Salisbury-Brown sequences of a nuclear war,'; and.a 1 . Rlcbard Snyder p.m. panel will consider what disDr. Olarles Y. Glock 12 noon " A Critical Review of the Dr. Daniel Ellsberg Wed., April '/I eases might follow a nuclear attack. U.S. Nuclear Arms Polic.Y A 90-minute fllm , "The Day after from Truman to Reagan' Trinity," will follow the panel dis2 p.m. Response Panel Ms. Helena Thorfinn Doug McLean cussion. · Burt Russell Rep. Craig will begin Friday's Scott Reed 11 a.m. " The Medical <.:onse~ activities with a 10 a.m. speech on Thurs., April 28 Dr. ~ames R. McGrath quences of N~lear War" " the United States and the nuclear 1 p.m. Response Panel Frank Needham arms issue in 1983." James McLeod Curt Nelson His remarks will be followed at 11 Larry Craig 10 a.m. "'Jbe United States Con· Fri .. April 29 a.m. by an address from Rev. gress and the Nuclear McSorley, professor of Theology at Arms Issue In 1983" Rev. Richard T. McSorley 11 a.m. "A Biblical Basis for Georgetown University, concerning Peace Making in the Nu"a Biblical basis for peace-making clear Age" · 1 p.m. Respo.nse Panel Frather Bill Wassmuth in the nuclear age." . Charles Lempesis A panel of local theologians ~ Rev. Richard Hermstad the president of the Kootenai County Joyce Scherr • Keynote addresses on Monday through Thursday will be delivered in the Auditorium League of Women Voters will review or the Communication-Arts Building. Fridays addresses will be in the Bonner Room of the week's action at 1 p.m. the Student Union Building. The symposium is part of NIC's •• All Response Panels will meet In the Bonner Room or the Edminster Student Union. Popcorn Forum-Convocation Serles.

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UCL.EAR war and its historical, defense, medical. and religious aspects are the topic of a week-long symposium on "Nuclear Wari the Dangers and Realities," starting Monday at North Idaho Col· lege. Featured are speakers from inside and outside the U.S. nuclear policy·maklng fraternity : Daniel Ellsberg, accused of leaking the top-secret Pentagon Papers to the media in 1971; Rear A.dmiral Eugene J. Car· roll Jr., who helped with naval planning for nuclear war; David S. Sul· livan, an expert in Soviet compliance with arms control treaties; U.S. First Distrl&t Rep. Larry Craig; James McGrath, an expert on the medical problems associated with nucl~r war; and Rev. Richard T. McSorley, theology professor at Georgetown University. Each day of the symposium begins with a speech - all set for the NIC

Nuke war symposiu~ schedule


Ex-admiral: Nuke war By RIC CLARKÂŁ Pren Staff Writer

nuclear war that will destroy the United states, Soviet Union, Canada and Europe is "very probable" by 1990 if the world's superpowers continue to build their arsenals at the current rate, a former navy officer predicted today. Rear Admiral Eugene Carroll Jr., who planned naval strategy for nuclear war prior to his retirement, said the arms race is leading the world to a nuclear holocaust which easily could result in the loss of to million lives in America alone. Carroll and bis military colleagues at the Center for Defense Information in Washington D.C. are calling for an immediate global freeze on the production of nuclear weapons followed by the establishment of a mutual, verifiable arms control policy. The former U.S. Navy Deputy Chief of Plans, Policy and Operations arrived in Coeur d'Alene this morning from Vancouver, B.C., where he spoke at the anti-nuclear "Walk for Peace" rally attended by

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Eugene J. Carroll, Jr. 65,000 people. The 65-year-old Virginian was scheduled to deliver today the first keynote address at a North Idaho College week-long symposium entitled "Nuclear War: The Dangers and Realities." In a morning interview with The Coeur d'Alene Press, Carroll condemned the arms race as fatalistic

by 1990

and predicted that the "fear level" created by the build-up is leading to a nuclear holocaust. "It's a race to nowhere - a race to oblivion," he said. " It makes no difference who attacks. Both sides will be destroyed along with Europe and Canada.". America is committed to building a missile system that would "prevail in a prolonged nuclear war," he said. The program calls for the construction of 17,000 more nuclear weapons of various forms at the rate of five of six weapons a day, he said. But the concept is a fallacy, he added, as both sides will be destroyed if a nuclear war breaks out. The likllhood of a full-scale USUSSR nuclear war increases as the size of the countrys' arsenals grows, he said. "The fear level goes up and your're much more likely to have a war in a time of crisis," Carroll said. "The whole thing just increases the threat level. It's so unstable that in a time of crisis someone's going to panic," he said. "The question Is when we are going to have the war not if we are going to have the war." Carroll said an "orderly, bal-

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anced" arms control program Is possible between countries despite arguements that it could not be verified. The Soviets already have offered to improve the methods of verifying an arms contrQJ ~greement, he said, including the use qf tamper-proof sensors and on-site Cnspections. Carroll said the Center for DefeJ}Se Information, of which he is a director, is seeking a sound national defense policy for America through nuclear arms control. The center is staffed by a number of high-level military retirees, he said, including two other admirals and two generals. He admits that he is in the minority among military officers with his anti-nuclear sentiments, though he claims that a large number of officers wait until they are retired before confessing they oppose the nuclear arms race. Still others benefit from the development of nuclear weapons by lending their names to weapon-producing industries, he said. "I could make a lot more money selling weapons than opposing them," he said.

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Admiral predicts nuclear holocaust By CHUCK BANDEL Staff writer

Staff photo by STEVE THOMPSON

COEUR d'ALENE - The accelerated rate at which the Soviet Union and the United States are building nuclear weapons makes the probability of nuclear annihilation high by 1990 unless something is done now. That outlook was presented Monday by retired Rear Adm. Eugene J . Carroll, a former Navy policy and planning specialist who spoke as North Idaho College opened its week-long symposium on the dangers of nuclear war. Among the symposium speakers is Daniel Ellsberg, one of the nation's best-known anti-nuclear activists, who is to appear Wednesday. Carroll said Monday the only way the two superpowers can be diverted from the ultimate collision is for people of all nations to resist further nuclear armament. He dismissed as "ludicrous" the contention that recent antinuclear demonstrations in the United States have been Sovietinspired. He also said claims by President Reagan that the United States is militarily inferior to the Soviet Union are untrue. American technology and numbers of weapons more than offset the Soviets' higher-powered nuclear weapons, he said. But the technology that gives the United States "nuclear parity" also is what presents the greatest danger, Carroll added. "We are approaching a hair-trigger, first-strike strategy," be said. "Reagan says we are inferior because they have more ICBMs. On the other hand, we have more submarine and bomber weapons. "All we are doing by building more is pushing the existing parity higher." Carroll said the Soviets have 20,000 nuclear weapons to the 30,000 deployed by the United States. Only 400 of those weapons fired at each side, he said, would effectively destroy the other nation. While be supports a nuclear freeze, he said, he would not eliminate nuclear weapons unilaterally and put the nation's security in Jeopardy. "What I am saying is let's stop building new ones and get a lid on this blasted thing and then begin verifiable reductions," he said. "The way we are building up now, with new, harder-todefend-against weapons like the cruise missile, the probability of a nuclear war by 1990 is very high." Other countries are getting in on the act, too, Carroll said.

Retired Rear Adm. Eugene J. Carroll, a former Navy policy and planning specialist, believes that See ADMIRAL on page 5 nuclear annihilation will come by 1990 unless the world's superpowers halt the arms race.


Admiral---Continued from page 3-------"Military intelligence indicates as many as 11 l'he :.trength ut the (nuclear freeze) movenations will join the nuclear family in t he near ment is its makeup," he said. "These are everyfuture.," he said. "One of those nations is Libya day, conservative people who want to work and Col. Khadafy. within the system. But if the movement is ignored, he said, it "There are going to be too many fingers on could become radical. the_trigger if something isn't done soon." Carroll said it may be a bad political move for <.:arroll said he supports a Canadian proposal Reagan to paint the Soviets as the root of all that would in effect suffocate the nuclear arms evil. race. That proposal, he said, calls for a compre"Reagan is convinced he can continue to take hensive test-ban treaty, an end to in-flight test- the hard-line stance and people will follow ing of nuclear delivery systems, an end to manu- him. .. . We have got to learn to accommodate facture of fissionable nuclear materials and an and compete with the Soviets without calling for I ultimate end to funds for nuclear weaponry. a holy war.''

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Reagan official: Soviets think nuke freeze By BILL GEROUX Pret1 Stalf Writer

OVIET officials think thâ&#x20AC;˘ United States is "crazy" for considering a voluntary freeze on nuclear arms, a Reaga n Administration defense spokesman said today. "The Soviets are rug traders; they expect to bargain," David S. Sullivan, official of the national Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and legislative aide for U.S. Senator Steve Symms, told listeners at North Idaho College.

David Sullivan "They think we're crazy if we just unilaterally restrict arms and hope they do the same." SUllivan, on the eve of an expected U.S. House of Representatives vote on the freeze proposal, told the crowd at MC's nuclear anns symposium that America bas tried seven nuclear freeze agreements with the Russians since 1958, "and all of them have failed." In most cases, Sullivan said, the

Soviets have used freezes to increase their strategic arms edge over this country. Today " the so-called strategic arms race isn' t really a race at all," be said, because America is voluntarily deactivating its weaponry while the Russians are enhancing theirs. Sullivan said President Reagan this week very likely will alert the public to a growing Soviet threat in Cuba, where the Russians in the past year have shipped three times as much offensive weapon-

ry as in any year since 1962, when the CUban Missile Crisis brought the world to the brink of nuclear war. Cuba definitely bas the submarines and bombers neces.,ary to launch a nuclear strike at America, Sullivan said, and "we have to assume" that nuclear warheads may be present there

too. The Russians consistently violate nuclear arms limitation agreements - everything from the Kennedy-Kruschev letters

that defused the missile crisis to SALT I and n. Sullivan said. But knowing it and acting on it are two different things. The toughest part of verifying disarmament agreements, be said, is " making the political decision" to confront the Soviets privately or publicly with the proof. Sullivan plainly came to talk about the impending nuclear freeze plan. It's unwise, be said, because the Soviet Union now bas superior

firepower and "we would be freezing the U.S. into permanent strategic inferiority." A freeze also would prevent America from modernizing its existing weaponry, Sullivan said, and the U.S.'s arsenal is an average of ten years older than the U.S.S.R.'s. A freeze would "bea nigbbnare to verify," be said, but most importantly it would "enormously reduce'' the incentive for Russiaâ&#x20AC;˘ s participation in the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (START).

Because if America will reduce its arsenal on its own, be asked, why should the Soviets bother to reduce theirs? Sullivan quoted a remark made to American negotiators by a top Russian arms diplomat: " We are neither philantrophists nor pacifists." The Russians want to achieve and maintain superiority in nuclear arms so they can "blackmail" Americans and thrust safely into such places as Afghanistan and Laos, Sullivan said.


The Coeur d 'Allne Press Thurs., ~pril 21, 1913

9

'Ellsberg says success bred arms race By BILL GEROUX Pre11 Staff Writer

when U.S. ground forces or their alJies are surrounded or losing badly, as at the Chosin Reservoir in Korea in 1950. President Dwight D. Eisenhower also threatened the Communist Chinese with nuclear destruction in 1953 while applying leverage for a cease-fire in the Korean Conflict, he claimed. Nuclear threats also helped defuse crises in the Taiwan Straits in 1955 and 1958, EJ!sberg said, but perhaps the most telling incident was the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. Confronted with the presence of Russian missiles in Cuba, President John F. Kennedy threatened nuclear war if the missiles were not withdrawn, and former Soviet Premier Nikita Kruschev ultimately relented.

Daniel Ellsberg says the nuclear arms race is a "direct consequence and cost" of America's past success with nuclear threats in Korea, Cuba and Vietnam. The Soviets backed down 20 years ago because they were outgunned, Ellsberg told listeners Wednesday at a North Idaho College symposium on nuclear arms. " But the odds were a lot better then than they are today, or ever will be again," be said. " It is both wildly reckless and dangerous for us to make those threats and back them up with weapons. "And it's wrong, very wrong." Ellsberg, a former Pentagon insider who became one of America's most famous critics of nuclear weaponry, told the Ellsberg said be remembers KeMedy crowd that only the American people have the power to halt the arms race, because believed the threat bad a "two-thirds" Russian citizens have no freedom to chance of preventing war, leaving "a oneaffect government decisions. third chance that millions of people would di e." The long-range effects of the missile "We have the power," Ellsberg said. "That gives us the responsibility. Let's do crisis on Russian policy, Ellsberg said, were profound: Kruschev lost his job; the it." Ellsberg, 53, a Harvard University Soviets lost face; and Russia spent the prodigy, served as consultant to the White next ~ years and trillions of dollars House and Defense Department on assembling a nuclear arsenal to ensure strategic nuclear war plans from 1961 to they never again would have to back 1964, and held many prominent govern- down. EUsberg said Reagan Administration ment posts up until 1975. In those years, he said Wednesday, he officials, making essentially the same studied the nuances of United States threats over the Middle East, "trust the military policy since the nuclear age, and Soviet Union a good deal more than I do. found it full of first-strike bomb threats. They seem to treat the Russians as if they Ellsberg said American presidents his- expect them always to back down." Historically, Ellsberg said, the United torically have considered nuclear attack

When strategic nuclear bombs are not enough, he said, the plan is to employ the hydrogen bombs, which use atomic bombs as "triggers" and carry 1,000 times their power. American ground forces have a natural disadvantage in places such as Iran, which is far closer to Russia than to the United States, Ellsberg said, and the Soviets face the same problem in Central America. Nuclear threats, he said, cannot be "credible" unless America is prepared to back them up, so ultimatums essentially " give the trigger" to the enemy. And newer weapons such as the Pershing and MX missiles are so fast and accurate, he said, that the Soviets may feel pressured into installing an autcr ma tic response system - turning over the nuclear trigger to World War Ill to a machine.

Daniel Ellsberg States sends ground troops onto foreign soil with the understood backing of "strategic" nuclear weapons such as the atomic bomb - which has become one of the least lethal components of the nuclear arsenal.

" When the Pershings are in (installed in Europe), the roulette wheel has started to spin," he said. Ellsberg said the American people have the power to stop the anns race, especially if they realize the value of non-violent civil disobedience. Ellsberg himself has been arrested in recent years for protesting at the Pentagon, Wall Street and the University of California; and five times for obstructing railroad tracks used to transport nuclear waste. Citizens spoke up to end the Vietnam War, be said, by persuading their Congressmen to cut off funds for the bombing, and the same could be done in 1983.


ExPert: Cd'_ A in range By BILL GEROUX Preaâ&#x20AC;˘ Staff Writer HYDROGEN bomb exploding at 8,000 feet over Fairchild Air Force Base, with a . moderate westerly wind, would cover Coe1ll' d'Alene with lethal fallout within 10 to 15 minutes, says a physician who studies the medical effects of nuclear war. Dr. James R. McGrath, a Bellevue, Wash., pediatric physician and spokesman for Physicians for Social Responsibility, was in Coeur d'Alene today to speak at a North Idaho College symposium on nuclear war. Before bis speech, be described for The Coeur d'Alene Press the medical consequences of a nuclear blast. Coeur d'Alene, with its population of fewer than 25,000 people, is not on any nuclear target maps, McGrath said, but Spokane and Fairchild are - and that's close enough. A hydrogen bomb, containing enough TNT to fill a freight train 200 miles long, would kill approximately 178,000 people if it was

detonated over Spokane, be said. Coeur d'Alene very likely would sustain no damage from the blast or beat, McGrath said, but westSee related story on Page 9 erly winds of 15 miles per hour, similar to those that brought. . Mount St. Helen's volcanic ash to the Lake City in 1980, would carry fallout here in no time. The immediate results for those exposed, McGrath said, could be gruesome: confusion, vomiting, intestinal pain and bleeding from eyes, ears and mouth. In Spokane, be said, only about one-fourth of the existing pbysiciaos would remain alive, and " there would be no hospitals, no ambulances, no X-rays, no lab equipment and no operating rooms." Those who shielded themselves from the fallout would have worries in years to come, McGrath said. Babies lying in the wombs of mothers would risk growing up mentally or ~evelo~mentally retarded, he said, and m later years

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some would contract leukemia and cancers of the breast and lungs. The thermonuclear blast also would disrupt the ozone layer in the atmosphere that protects bu¡ man life from harmful doses of ultraviolet radiation, McGrath said. Life on earth developed in part because of the formation of the ozone layer, be said, and a bomb blast could start the process in reverse. The food chain, McGrath said, also would be disrupted as many animals died or were blinded and left helpless. McGrath told bis audience in the NIC Communication-Arts Auditorium that it's difficult to discuss nuclear holocaust on a warm, spring day in a place like Coeur d'Alene. " But sometimes it's necessary to tum one's attention to the hideous in order to preserve the beautiful," he said, and medical considerations are "the bottom, bottom line. " McGrath, in addition to bis position at the Bellevue Clinic, is assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington.

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Paths to peace---GPA -+--fre.<.s-_Cf-____ 2

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Craig favors 'Star Wars' defense; priest for global village

By RIC CLARKE Pre11 Staff Writer

ROPOSALS for peace took opposite paths today at North Idaho College, one seeking a "Star Wars defense" and the other favoring the creation of an "international world." Keynoters U.S. Rep. Larry Cralg and Rev. Richard T. McSorley agreed the world is on the verge of self-destruction but the North Idaho College Symposium speakers recommended vastly different answers to the problem. Craig, who recently drew national attention for bis opposition to federal proposals for the MX Missie, said the Soviets cannot be trusted to adhere to an arms

limitation agreement, so the United States must pursue a totally new philosophy of defense. President Reagan's "high frontiers" concept of a high-technology defense shield in space may save the world from a nuclear holocaust, Craig said. McSorley, who teaches theology at Georgetown University, said technology has evolved in the nuclear age to the point that countries cannot defend themselves. To avoid a global holocaust, the world must eliminate the concept of separate military and political states and develop an international community, he said. Mcsorley said his anti-war philosophy is based on the teachings of the New Testament, principally the concepts that man Cf,t-f ,tt ve L

Congressman Larry Craig

Dr. Richard T. Mcsorley


should love his enemies, that all worsen the disparity between the men are the children of God, that two countries. means and ends are interrelated He attacked the current defense and that man should imitate strategy of mutual assured deChrist. struction as illogical. " We must either interna" It is the threat of nuclear war tionalize the world or perish," that is our defense," he said. McSorley said. " The Gospel and "That philosophy bas to have to our technology tell us that we be a little bit mad." either get along together or we Instead of pursuing an answer. destroy each other." through a defense based on Craig, on the other hand, does strength, America must pursue an not believe a workable policy of entirely new philosophy, be said. cooperation can be achieved. Craig called for ari end to the The congressman, armed with a nuclear threat and the developchart comparing nuclear weaponment of Reagan's "Star Wars" ry growth in the last two decades, high-technology space defense concept. accused the Soviets of building an advantage over the United States Reagan's commitment to invest by violating the SALT agreein the concept is the "most peacements. ful expression any president in the United States bas ever made " he CraiJ{ said a freeze on strategic said' . ' production would only serve to

Writer thanks NIC for symposium EDITOR: My compliments and thanks to North Idaho College and Its Symposium Committee for bringing to our consciousness the threat of the world endangering nuclear war. The quality and variety of backgrounds of the speakers during the week of the Nuclear War Symposium was impressive. I also express my gratitude to all of the panel members who were brave enough to risk sitting before their community peers and commenting from their own experience and feelings on the nucl~ ar issue. They were a model to each of us to become more informed and aware of the cost of nuclear war to hamanity and the rest of Earth's creatures now and in the future. We somehow forget that the cost is verv oersonal - and it does and

will affect us as individuals as well as a country and World. F.ach of us in this country has the responsibility of becoming informed enough to make a decision in our own consciousness about paying that cost and acting upon that decision. MC helped to provide information for us to decide where we individually stand on the nuclear war Issue. As a major power, our country stands on the edge, but we still may have time to go a less destructive direction. Seeking peat-e and more harmonious relationships between peoples and governments seems to me a must for survival. Thanks, NIC. GERTIE HANSON Coeur d'Alene

Get informed on chemical warfare EDI'rOR : I've just completed a three year term enlistment in the Army as a Nuclear, Chemical, Biological Decontamination and Recon Specialist. Throughout the last two years, I was head instruc tor of a team repsonsible for "enlightening" military personnel in other various fields to the dangers of nuclear and chemical warfare. However, the main body of the course emphasized that of survival. The major civilian population is overwhelmed with fallicies and misconceptions concerning hazards of nuclear detonations, which lead to a panic if an incident were to occur, and could cost them their lives. Though I never attended the symposium at the MC, it's an initial step

~ -7 - ? 3 to creating an interest rather than that of a disoriented awe surrounding the subject. Keep in mind, chemical warfare could follow direcUy after a detonation. Chemicals such as a blood agent, which prohibits the absorption of oxygen into the body. Or a nerve agent, which can effect the body In as Utile time as nine seconds, acting much the way common insecticides do on insects. There is still information to be sought, and in the sense of solving the problem, It should be understood. I challenge you to continue learning, and to have enough faith to move mountains. TIMOTHY G. GERLITZ Hayden Lake


Nuke war symposium was enlightening EDITOR : I would like to thank North Idaho College for bringing such noted speakers to our area. 'lbe symposium was enlightening to say the least. It gave us a chance to bear both sides of the nuclear war issue, it was up to those attending to detennine who we wanted to believe. The first three speakers were somewhat hawkish and did handle the truth a bit roughly. What it really bolled down to, it was a propaganda ploy to stop the Nuclear Freeze Movement u much of the talk centered oo this ilsue. As much of the talks were stressing the fact the Russians bad us outnumbered ln nuclear milliles and warheads, also newer bombers and more submarines. My belief is that DO nation, not even ours, comments or displays its military weakness or its military strength. I am inclined to disbelieve much of what was said about our military weaknea. And as far as the Soviets having more missiles and warheads than we, was also eugerated. For that matter what difference would it make, give or take a few, when both sides have enough to blow us all to kingdom come many times over. Dr. Daniel Ellsberg spoke with historical clarity and did not need a bunch of charts to confuse the au-

dience. His speech covered the area from Truman to Reagan. The many times this nation was about to use the nuclear bomb and when the adversary backed down, it was averted. The Reagan administration is using the MX Missile as a future bargaining chip to bring the Russians to their knees. Ellsberg feels now that the Soviets have a sizable arsenal of nuclear weapons, tbey just might not back down this time. What happens then? Reagan must tum bis bold card. The result: Nuclear War. I tboqht David Sullivan, Steve Symms' aid was the moet antagonistic in his speech. it seemed the freeze was bis main fear; lt would send the wrong message to the Russians. He in no way could change my feeling as to the freeze. We must start aomewhere. If the president was sincere in bis approach to the disarmament issue he himself would advocate slowing down the arms race by cancelln, aome of the new arms DOW being proposed. It might bring about aome goodwlll and open up the lines of communication between our nation and the Soviet Union. TONY TABERT Post Falls

Don't let bullies run our schools EDITOR : I have been a teacher in this district for four years. During this time I have dealt personally with Dr. Steim on numerous occasions as well as taking classes from him evenings. Since I have been here he has always taught classes to the teachers in the district. I know that this has been on his own time and on some evenings meant be was in class from 4:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. (after his work day). To my thinking, this shows Dr. Steim to be a leader, (that's why he was hired), and to be Interested in improving the quality of his teaching staff. The current round of mud slinging that is going on against Dr. Steim and the school district in retaliation to the Lundblad incident is so juvenile in nature and serves as a poor

example to our students. Almost daily in my classes I try to impress on my students qualities such as responsibility , decision making skills, ccr.nmunications so they can grow to be mature adults. This becomes very difficult in the light of examples they are seeing in the socalled adult community. Defend Lundblad, if that is where your convictions lie, but do it on bis merit, not by cutting down others. As parents, teachers and students we have all known the type of people who cut others to boost their own egos. They are called bullies. Let's be thankful that this type of individual does not run our school. TERRY MACK

Coeur d'Alene

Thanks to NIC, Stewart for ¡nuke forum EDITOR: A heartfelt thanks to Tony Stewart week - being enlightened on the No. and anyone at NIC who was respon- 1 moral issue of today. Thanks again. sible for the symposium on Nuclear War: 'lbe Dangers and Realities. EILEEN M. RAY What an excellent way to spend a Coeur d'Alene


Nuclear symposium hits close to home EDITOR: After living in Coeur d'Alene for 10 years, I have developed a sense of community and a great appreciatioo for the quality of life we all enjoy here. I was impressed by the full page ad in the April 29 issue of the Press, in which many Coeur d'Alene citizen~ voiced their support for a local issue. I think it's great when people feel so strongly about an issue and act on their feelings to impress others. However, the fact that another issue covered in the Press last week did not appear to receive the excitement "the coaching issue" generated distresses me. I must commend NIC for sponsoring the week-long symposium addressinJt the issue of

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nuclear armament. Our beautiful community by the lake provided a very appropriate place for the presentation of an issue which is so potentially devastating to earthly beauty. The thought of lakes, trees, birds, fish and people being blown away or destroyed slowly over a long period of time due to radiation sends shivers up my spine. Do you get my point? Citizens of this town, this country, this earth please give the issue of nuclear war serious consideration and act on your feelings. For peace, BARBARA SCARTH Coeur d'Alene

, America facing a 'survival imperative' EDITOR : "Not to be evaded nor avoided" : this is the definition of the imperative now facing all mankind. This imperative offers no choice: EITHER this shall be one OR EI.SE that will surely happen. On numerous occasions our early warning electronic systems have falsely reported incoming missiles. Because of the approximately 30 minutes time lapse between missile launching across the top of the world from the United States to Russia or vice versa there has existed a grace period of perhaps 25 minutes during which errors could be and have been traced to malfunctioning computer chips. President Reagan's hell-bent resolve to install Pershing 2 and Cruise missiles in Europe no later than this autumn will cut the time to 5 or 6 minutes. This will allow only time to respond to computer warning with a massive return strike. So the imperative emerges: EITHER we shall conclude an agreement with the Russians for No ¡ First Strike, a Nuclear Verifiable Freeze to be followed by reduction of nuclear weapons OR ELSE by autumn we shall be riding a hairtrigger situation in which only the correct functioning of a computer . will stand at all times between the world and six unbearable minutes to nllclear holocaust. And even when this first step is taken to ease tensions between the two super powers we will still face

growing incidents of indiscriminate slaughter by terrorists or mass butchery by rabid military dictators. Again, the survival imperative demands that EITHER the super powers bow their arrogant military heads to the discipline of the United Nations representing almost 150 other nations OR ELSE the know-how of nuclear, biological or chemical means of mass destruction shall proceed uncontrolled on this planet to our inevitable obliteration. And even when this second step succeeds in cootrolllng outlaw actions by means of an International Police Force responsible to the democratic will of all the nations there will remain dangerously destabilizing problems like world hunger, explosive population growth, vanishing resources. The Survival Imperative dictates that EITHER we shall swiftly set about solving all these problems and establish a brotherhood of the entire human race of all skin colors, languages and beliefs within which we shall share resources, food , knowledge and power OR EI.SE mankind shall shortly be blasted by our own hands into atomic dust and our planet once so filled with throbbing life and beauty will float forever among the stars, a scarred and ugly rebuke to all our dreams of justice and love. BERT RUSSELL Harr~on


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Stop the buildup or start job-hunting EDITOR: At last week's nuclear symposium at NIC, we learned the following: 1. Our country has used nuclear threats in several times of crisis over the last 30 years (luckily the Soviets and the Chinese always backed down - but will they next time). 2. The Idaho representatives and senators appear to be unwilling to bear any point of view other than a pro-nuclear buildup viewpoint expressed by the military and the Reagan Administration. 3. In a small nuclear war (400 warheads used out of over 50,000 available) life and the environment destroyed (600 million people fallout-sheltered or not - would probably die). 4. Our government and out military lie to us and manipulate statistics at all levels to keep us

believing and to keep the dollars coming (Rear Admiral Carroll, Daniel Ellsberg, an informed physician and a highly respected clergyman all told us this). 5. A nuclear. freeze, if instituted now, would be verifiable by means that we have now. 6. We can have an impact on whether such a buildup continues. U we can cut off funding for nuclear testing or for Oight testing of the missiles, a buildup will be stopped in its tracks. Congress can do that - if we make them. I for one intend to force our representatives and senators either to stop this senseless march toward destruction or to be fired from their jobs in the next election. TIM A. PILGRIM Coeur d'Alene


The Staff Of The Cardinal Review Invites

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those who believe that nuclear weapon development

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should cease immediately and that current stockpiles of such devices should ultimately be defused and destroyed to participate in its first

ANTI-NUKE DIE-IN Friday, April 29, 1983 3 tq 4:15 p.m. TO CELEBRATE OUR SOLIDARITY OF INTENT THE CR STAFF WILL PROVIDE

2 FREE DRAFT BEERS (Between 3 p.m . and 4 p.m.) at the

FORT GROUND TAVERN AT EXACTLY 4 P.M . PARTICIPANTS WILL STAGE A TWO-MINUTE DIE-IN TO PROTEST NUCLEAR WEAPONS


The Coeur d'Alene Pren Fri., May 6, 1913

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David M. Potts 4103 Arrowhead Road Coeur d'Alene, ID 83814 April 30, 1983 The Honorable Larry E. Craig, Member of Congress United States House of Representatives Washington, D.C. 20515 Dear Larry, Your letter of March 21, 1983 promised that you would send me the results of your analysis of the "nuclear freeze" and its ramifications when your scrutiny was completed. I got the results first hand yesterday as I listened to your address at NIC. I appreciate your ignoring the counsel of your advisors and deciding to participate in the NIC symposium on nuclear war. Although I am an advocate of the nuclear freeze, I want to assure you that I had no hostile feelings toward you either before or after your presentation. However, I fundamentally disagree with you and found your arguments inadequate and unpersuasive. Despite your initial plea for rationality, you presented a chart biased both visually and factually. You failed to explore the "false premise" on which you claim the nuclear freeze movement is based and resorted to calling it "stupid." I felt this rhetorical tactic was unworthy of your intelligence and contemptuous of the gravity of the subject. Perhaps the most important thing those of us who attended all the sessions of the symposium learned was that our government has used the threat of nuclear war as part of its foreign policy since the presidency of Harry Truman. When John Kennedy faced down Khrushchev in the Cuban missile crisis, we had over 400 ICBM's and the Russians had four. The threat worked because Russia did not have the capacity to retaliate. Khrushchev lost his job, and Russia determined never again to be vulnerable to this kind of threat. Your chart indicated the subsequent Russian buildup but failed to show the reason for it.

It is obvious from its plans for an immense builq.-up of nuclear weapons systems; its talk of "protracted and winnable nuclear war;" its proposal for a "high frontiers" defensive satellite system which you so enthusiastically support that the present administration intends to continue this policy of nuclear threat. If these plans were successful and if such a high frontier system could be put in place and made invulnerable to attack, it would put us right back where we were in 1962. We could make our threat of nuclear war stick. But threatening to annihilate 200 to 300 million people in order to preserve "our way of life" is unjustifiable on any basis - political, military, economic or moral. This policy should be recognized for what it is and rejected unequivically.


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The nuclear freeze is on~ step in this direction. Moving away from our past strategy is not simple, easy or quickly done, but we must recognize that we are in a totally untenable and unjustifiable position. â&#x20AC;˘

We are, in fact, impotent. We are depending on weapons that we cannot use without destroying ourselves and most probably the rest of humanity and its future. In clinging to this dependency, our government abdicates any claim to be serving our interests or the interests of mankind. Military conflict which assures our own destruction is not war. It is national suicide. If we fail to recognize this and act accordingly, we will have become morally bankrupt and will remain militarily impotent. We will have made ourselves the executioner of history. As inheritors of the Judeo-Christian ethic, as members of the

most powerful and productive democratic society in history, we must reverse ourselves, reject this role of history's executioner and measure up to our true inheritance and responsi bility. We must renounce a first strike policy; we must cease the nuclear arms build-up; we must stop the deployment of the Pershing II and cruise missiles in Europe; we must stop the deployment of the MX; we must accept a bilateral, verifiable nuclear freeze; we must accept the comprehensive test ban agreement now before the United Nations; we must work in every possible way to reduce and finally eliminate nuclear weapons. We either begin anew or we continue on our present path which will lead inevitably to mankind's extermination. This is neither simply an "emotional" nor a "rational" issue. It is the ultimate issue involving every aspect of our being. It is eschatology taken out of the textbooks, the Bible, the churches and seminaries and put squarely into the halls of . Congress, the corridors of the Pentagon and the Oval Office. Please work to dissolve your resistance to this overwhelming reality and join in backing away from the final abyss. Sincerely,

-~ David M. Potts This ad is endorsed and paid for by the following people in the hope that you will write Larry Craig if you share the feelings and convictions it expresses. Our purpose is to promote, provide and participate in educational and non-violent politcial activities aimed at reducing and finally eliminating nuclear weapons. For further information, please call Katie Blank, 772-7926. Katie Blank, Lloyd & Opal Brootin, Doug Fagenness, Wes Hanson, Richard Hermstad, Richard Heimann, Rose Hutchison, Bill & Vic Keenen, David & Theresa Potts, Eileen Ray, Lee Ray, Kathryn Reed, Steve Rup~. Marcy_§pilker, Johno Stocks, Helena Thorfinn.


North Idaho College Popcorn Forum-Convocation Serles presents

NUCLEAR WAR: The DANGERS and REALITIES

April 25 - 29, 1983 North Idaho College NORTH IDAHO COLLEGE CONVOCATIONS Leona Hassen, Chairperson NORTH IDAHO COLLEGE POPCORN FORUM Tony Stewart, Chairperson


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Evans: Idaho can afford to give education more 81 RIC CLARKE p...., Staff Writer

ONEY is available to fund quality public education ln Idaho without raising tues, ~ Gov. John Evans aJd this morning while appealing to Idahoans to rally behind bis '224 million education package. Prior to speaking at a North Idaho College education rally, Evans told The CoelD' d'Alene Press the Idaho Tu Commission soon will announce that its 11184 revenue projections are biper than what previously was expected. He did not, however, say bow much of an locrease ls foreseen. The governor also predicted that if the IA!glslatlD'e would agree to switch the state's method of gathering income tues to a quarterly collection for all tupayers, Idaho would make an additional $19 million, which could be spent on education. " We'll have some more resources to appropriate," Evans predicted. "'lbere are 10me alternatives," be said, referring to the Legislature's plan to bold the line oo the education budget to p~ vent tax increases. Evans bas vetoed the Leglslature' s $215 allocation bill and bas

called a ~ial session for Monday to consider bis proposals. He ls requesting that the Republicandominated lawmakers raise the state's funding to public schools by '9 million. 'lbe governor embarked on a tour of the state this week to rally support for bis bud,et request and to make known bis pla!l on how the increased funding can be fi. nanced without raising taxes. Local school district officials Warren Bates (Coeur d'Alene), Bob Jones (Lakeland) and Jim Todd (Post Falls) also were scheduled to speak at the NIC rally. Evans this morning warned that the Gem State already ls in a precarious situation as far u public school funding is concerned. Idaho this week fell behind Mississippi, which until now has been regarded as one of the nation's least supportive states to public education. Education authorities predict that Idaho may fall to lut place amoog the 50 state for the amount of money spent per student. Evans predicted that Idaho's lack of commitment to its public schools soon will have a detrimental effect on its economy. " If we don't have a welleducated citizenry, we're not going to see Industry expanding."

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1983-84 Academic Year 175. Members of the American Festival Ballet - Topic: "The Techni ques of Ballet Dance" (Sept. 13, 1983) 176. Dr. Adele M. Scheele, national television personal ity and author. Topic: "How to Get to the Top as a College Student." (Sept, 16, 1983). 177. .u r. Frederick Ambrose (HD) ; Ms. i-ielissa Clark, Education Director of Spok ane Planned Parenthood; and Ms. Jan Palmer, nurse epidemiologist. Top i c: "Herpes: Tra.nsmissi on, Symptoms and Recurrences." (Oct. 12,1983) 178. Ms. Mary Lee ~ei l Tatwn, Professional Educator, Lecturer, Author and Consultant on Hwnan Sexuality . Topic: " Sex In Society: Contrasts In Hwnan Behavior.'' (Nov 11, 1983) 179. United States Rep resentative Larry Craig, Idaho State Senator No rma Dobler, Idaho State Representative Dean naagenson, an Idaho PTA Representative , Coeur d'Alene School Superintendant Warren Bakes, Lakeland School Superintendant Robe rt Jones, Post Falls Schoo l Board Member Richar d Koh les, NI C President Barry Schuler and Idaho Education Association President Terry Haggardt. Topic : "The Fund ing of Public Educati on" (Dec 7, 1983)

180. 181.

Three 182 . 183. 184.

185 . 186.

Samuel J. Rouston, Administrative Assistant to U.S. Senator Steve Symns. Topi c : "U .S. Foreign Policy i n Nicaragua and El Salvador" (Ja nuary 26, 1984) Attorney Peter Erbland, Assistant Kootenai Co unty Prosecutor; Ms. Sharon Naylor, member of PROTECT; Ms. Carol Hanson, Co-Founder of PROTECT; and Ms. Melaine Traver, Registered Nurse at Sacred Heart Medical Center . Topic : "Sexual Abuse: Child Molesting and rncest" (Feb. 6, 1984) Oay Sympos i um on Political Humor (Forums 182-184). March 7-9, 1984 : Bill Hal l , Editor of Editorial Page at Lewiston Morning Tribune. Topic: . "American Political Humor: Political Editorials and Commentaries" (March 7, 1984) Comedian Carl Grant. Topi'c : "American Political Humor: Politi cal Comedy in America" (March 8, 1984) Paul Conrad, Editoria l Cartooni s t for the Los Angeles Times . Topic: "American Political Humor: Political Commentary Through Cartoons" (March 9, 1984) Ms. Caro le King, International Recording Star, Song Wri ter and Po li tical Activ ist. Topic: "The Gary Hart for President Campaign" (April 30, 1984) Debate Between Kootena i Co unty Prosecutor Glen ~lalker and Aryan Nation's Leader Richard Butler . Topi c: "Equality vs Raci al Superiority " (May 3, 1984) ,

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By SUSAN TOFT Pre11 Staff Writer College students can be anything and do anything they want, providing they "want to" bad enough, a career management consultant said in a forum at North Idaho College Friday. Adele Scheele, an author , columnist and television personality, was in Coeur d'Alene as one of the principal speakers at the Western Women·s Career Management Forum continuing today at the North Shore Convention Center. Scheele is the author of "Making College Pay Off," and Friday's taJk was aimed at the students gathered for the second "NIC Popcorn Forum" of the school year. Scheele contends that people are divided into two groups: sustainers and achievers. Sustainers, she said, are those who " wait for life to do for them." "They wait for people to do for them , then eventually become invisible and bitter about life," Scheele said. Achievers, on the other hand, are those who make their own opportunities, she said. The difference between the two groups can be determined in whether they consider life a test or an experiment, Scheele contended. Sustainers are content to complete the minimum to get through life, while achievers try for as many experiences in as many areas as possible, she said.

"To do the work well is not enough," she said. "You must ask queslions, do extra work, become j nvolved.

~· ,· "Then, the doors of opportunity open." Students have the cban~e to d~- • velop three attributes dunng their college years: a sense of "hustle," a sense of opportunity and courage, ' Scheele said. . The development of courage is "crucial," she said, because through involvement, " you can become a different kind of person. 11 . "The things that pulverize most people, you have to force yoursel~ to do, so you won' t be afraid o~ ~king a fool of yourself in public, she

sa1·ct . " That's what most people .. f ear. b to "hustle" to make . Students ave .· Scheele . their own opportunities, said. II

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"Find out what compels you and go after it," she said, suggesting internships, volunteer work and asking questions of those knowledgeable in the field as ways of finding a niche in life. l can help it, " Nobody as long as h \ " she ' · t· einSC 00 , will waste their im said.

Adele Scheele: "find out what compels you and go after It."

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-路--路路-- 路- _.,....,. ._..,~ ..... ~~ 0If P ,. r-~-(" . Another month and stlll no nulce war EDITOR:

Another month bas passed and rolled out the red carpet for aome of still no nuclear holocaust. Some of the 28 Kremlin officiala who, under the freezenics must be confounded the CHpOosonhip of the left-wlDc by such news. Institute of Policy Studies, r"eCIIIIIIIJ Nevertheless, for those true dis- traveled around the country peddllae ciples of the anti-nuke crusade, the their propapnda, ... - f' passage of another month free of The communJat fronts nuclear war merely heillttens their cow Institute for the USA and C..1 tensions and convinces them that da and the USSR-USA Society, tlNlr when the war of their dreams finally Soviet agents and their Amerm breaks out it will be even more apologists - made their talks oa devasting than anticipated. college campuses mainly devoted to The fact that for almost four influencing public opinion in favor of decades there has been no nuclear U.S. military dil8rmament. confrontation, solely due to our 'Ibey spouted their UIU8l invecknown capacity to retaliate, ap- tives aplnst the U.S. and Presidmt parently just worries the freezenics Reapn, accusing them of provoklns e,en more. a nuclear war while the Soviets were Their reaction is comparable to doing their utmost to preserve the that of the millions of Indonesians peace. terrified by the recent eclipse of the The original "conference" at the sun. That phenomenon was no more University of Minnesota bad its stanunderstandable to those primitive dard complement of Soviet sympaintellects than nuclear weapons are thisers from William Sloan Cofftn of to intellects of freeze adherents. the New York Riverside <llurcb, to As did the Indonesians, perhaps Randall Forsberg, a founder of the they should try beating drums to "nuclear freeze." frighten away the specter of their Meanwhile, 50 leaders fo tbe putative nuclear holocaust. "peace" movements were WJaDl-. At least, due to summer vacation mous in agreeing that responsibility for the local junior college, area for taking the first "concrete mearesidents were spared another prop- ures" falls on the United States; a aganda session similar to the last definite euphemism for unilateral featuring Daniel Ellsberg advocat- disarmament. ing unilateral U.S. disarmament. Otherwise the so-called "political CHAR~ C. STARR science" department would have Coeur d'Alea

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Profile for Molstead Library at North Idaho College

Popcorn Forum Scrapbook 1982-1984  

Popcorn Forum Scrapbook 1982-1984  

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