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Spring 2013

MOLLI

Curiosity never retires.

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at

To learn more, contact 406.243.2905 or visit us online at www.umt.edu/molli


Welcome to the Time of Your Life! Initially funded by a grant from the Bernard Osher Foundation, the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UM (MOLLI) is a lifelong learning program for adult learners +50. MOLLI’s goal is to create an accessible and innovative learning environment so that active older adults from all backgrounds and levels of education may pursue learning. MOLLI builds on the rich resources of The University of Montana (UM) to offer its members an array of educational and social opportunities. As a MOLLI member, you have the opportunity to: • • • • • • •

Take a broad array of courses with distinguished UM faculty, emeritus faculty, and other Missoula area teachers in a “no grade, no test” learning environment; Keep active and enrich your life; Meet new and interesting people; Continue to learn and expand your horizons; Explore new skills and develop new interests; Travel and learn in new ways; and Stay mentally fit – and have fun!

Membership is $20 per person and is renewable annually. Courses are $60 each. Some activities are free to members while others have a small fee. The benefits of membership include: • Access to the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Library at UM • Special member only events • Special “MOLLI only” parking permits during the MOLLI term • 10% discount at the Bookstore at UM for textbooks and art supplies for MOLLI courses

“It was fun to be a student again... especially in a class without tests or grades.” ~MOLLI member

MOLLI Council Members

Cynthia Aten Ann Boone Rafael Chacón Gladys Considine Gary Hawk Charlotte Hay Margaret Johnson Patrick Mahoney Dennis O’Donnell Ray Risho Burke Townsend Glenn Wood Marta York Janie Spencer, Director Roger Maclean, Dean, School of Extended & Lifelong Learning Our Valued Partners

The Missoula Symphony and Chorale spectrUM Discovery Area UM President’s Lecture Series The Springs Retirement Community Montana Museum of Art and Culture International Wildlife Film Festival


Table of Contents Support MOLLI – Ways to Give 2 Course Overview 3 Course Listings Fine Arts Women Artists Journaling Missoula’s Springtime Native Plants Shakespeare: From Page to Stage Getting Ready for the International Choral Festival A “Greatest Hits” for All Mankind: The Voyager Golden Record

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Humanities Inspiration and Poetic Creation in Twentieth-Century Russian Literature Who Really Made the Roman Empire Work? Julia Child and Craig Claiborne: How They Revolutionized the American Diet Reading the Short Story Korea: The Land of the Morning Calm or Calamity? Hemingway in Paris: The 1920s Wisdom and Compassion: An Introduction to Buddhism Women’s Activism and Human Rights in the U.S. Two Classic Anti-heroes

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Current and Political Affairs From Ancient Persia to Modern Iran: A Personal Journey The Cold War, 1945-1991: The Best Years of Our Lives

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Natural and Social Sciences In the Light of Evolution: Exploring Biology’s Central Principle Bhutan: Gross National Happiness and Natural Resource Issues Global Health, Your Health Montana CSI - Sex, Drugs, Guns, and Dirt: The Real Crime Lab Field Botany in the Spring: Montana Wildflowers

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MOLLI Summer Adventures in Science: Connecting the Circle

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MOLLI Special Member Event

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General Information

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Registration Form

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Support MOLLI - Ways to Give Please consider making a gift to MOLLI today. All gifts, regardless of size, are significant and meaningful. Your generosity will ensure that MOLLI will remain sustainable, vibrant, and accessible for generations to come. Thank you for your consideration and support.

Why give? Your gift will help MOLLI reach the following goals:

Support MOLLI

Meet current expenses of approximately $100 per course, not covered by the MOLLI annual membership fee of $20 and course fees of $60 per course

• Enhance MOLLI’s educational programs • Provide assistance toward course fees for lower income participants • Increase the MOLLI endowment fund to ensure MOLLI’s financial future • Assure adequate staffing, space, equipment, and publicity for programming Give the Gift of Learning There are many ways you can support MOLLI!

• Make an Annual Gift • Give a Memorial Gift to honor a family member or friend • Create an Endowed Gift in your name (or a loved one’s name) that will last a lifetime

• Consider an Estate Gift (a bequest, gift annuity, pension plan, IRA, or

real estate)

• Purchase a Gift Membership or course tuition waiver for someone special How Do I Donate? Contact Janie Spencer at 406.243.2905 or make a gift online at www.umt.edu/molli. Prefer to give on a monthly or quarterly basis? It’s easy to arrange for a regular gift via credit card at www.umt.edu/molli. Gifts are tax deductible. Please consider making a gift to MOLLI today. Thank you for your time and consideration.

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Course Overview

All courses are in the Todd Building, UM unless otherwise noted.

Course enrollments are limited. Early registration is encouraged.

Thursdays

Fridays

April 11-May 16, 2013

9:00 am–10:30 am                                                                                                              •Inspiration and Poetic Creation in TwentiethCentury Russian Literature – Ona Renner-Fahey •In the Light of Evolution: Exploring Biology’s Central Principle - Mary Bricker

April 12-May 17, 2013

9:00 am–10:30 am •Global Health, Your Health – Tom Bulger •Montana CSI – Sex, Drugs, Guns, and Dirt: The Real Crime Lab – Ray Murray et al. •Shakespeare: From Page to Stage – John Kenneth DeBoer [Don Anderson Hall, Room 004]

11:00 am–12:30 pm •Who Really Made the Roman Empire Work? – Linda W. Gillison •Julia Child and Craig Claiborne: How They Revolutionized the American Diet – Greg Patent

11:00 am–12:30 pm •From Ancient Persia to Modern Iran: A Personal Journey – Mehrdad Kia 1:00 pm–2:30 pm •Wisdom and Compassion: An Introduction to Buddhism – Bradley Clough •Women’s Activism and Human Rights in the U.S. – Anya Jabour •Getting Ready for the International Choral Festival – Nancy J. Cooper [Music Building, Room 105]

1:00 pm–2:30 pm •Reading the Short Story – David Allan Cates •Bhutan: Gross National Happiness and Natural Resource Issues – Ronald H. Wakimoto 3:00 pm–4:30 pm •Korea: The Land of the Morning Calm or Calamity? – Young-ee Cho •Hemingway in Paris: The 1920s – Frank Laurence

3:00 pm–4:30 pm •The Cold War, 1945-1991: The Best Years of Our Lives – Steven I. Levine •Two Classic Anti-heroes – Fred McGlynn •A “Greatest Hits” for All Mankind: The Voyager Golden Record – James Randall •Field Botany in the Spring: Montana Wildflowers – Marilyn Marler [Don Anderson Hall, Room 004]

Thursday Evening Courses 4:45 pm-6:45 pm Women Artists – H. Rafael Chacón 5:30 pm-7:00 pm Journaling Missoula’s Springtime Native Plants – Nancy Seiler [Pierce Prairie near the Missoulian]

Upcoming Event MOLLI Special Member Event:

Prelude to “The Verve” Christopher Comer, Richard Drake, and Ashby Kinch Tuesday, April 16, 3:00 pm-4:30 pm, Todd Building, UM To learn more, please see page 12.

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MOLLI Spring 2013 Course Listings Fine Arts Women Artists H. Rafael Chacón Evening Course: Thursdays, 4:45 pm-6:45 pm, Todd Building, UM Course will be held: April 11, May 2, May 9, and May 16; No class April 18 or April 25 This course addresses Linda Nochlin’s provocative question, “Why have there been no great women artists?” implying that women have either been inactive in art history or there are patterns of exclusion that can be analyzed and critiqued. The course will explore case studies from antiquity to the post-modern era of women’s engagement with the visual arts in the western world, specifically analyzing strategies for gauging the female presence in the endeavor of art.

Fine Arts

About the instructor: H. Rafael Chacón is a Professor of Art History and Criticism in the School of Art at The University of Montana. He researches, writes about, and lectures on a variety of topics in art history and criticism.

Journaling Missoula’s Springtime Native Plants Nancy Seiler Evening Course: Thursdays, 5:30 pm-7:00 pm, Pierce Prairie near the Missoulian (Rain Location: Todd Building, UM) Maximum Number of Students: 20 Learn to observe, document, and draw Missoula’s beautiful springtime native plants. This course will take participants in the field to Pierce Prairie, an abundant native plant location near the Missoulian, to observe the rapid changes of blooming native plants week by week. Course participants will learn how to start a journal page and draw plants with basic observations through step-by-step instruction. All students will receive a Montana Native Plants poster designed and illustrated by the instructor for The Missoula County Weed District in 2010. Start a journal and have fun! [Please note: Students will need to be able to walk a short distance and be able to kneel down or sit on the ground to view plants.] Supplies: Sketchbook (any size), Micron black ink pens in .005 and .02, and watercolor pencils. Additional information regarding optional supplies will be provided on a list upon registering for the course. Students may purchase drawing supplies at the Bookstore at The University of Montana at a 10% discount. About the instructor: Nancy Seiler is a graphic designer, botanical illustrator, and fine artist. After receiving her botanical illustration certification from The Denver Botanic Gardens in 2002, she began teaching botanical illustration and nature journaling at The Montana Natural History Center, Yellowstone Association Institute, as well as for MOLLI. Please visit her website to view samples of her work: www.nancyseiler.com.

“Thanks for jump starting my interest in an area I previously knew nothing about.” ~MOLLI member

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Shakespeare: From Page to Stage John Kenneth DeBoer Fridays, 9:00 am-10:30 am, Don Anderson Hall, Room 004, UM Course will be held: April 12, April 19, April 26, May 3 (no morning class; evening performance at 7:30 pm in Masquer Theatre, UM), May 10, and May 24; No Class May 17 [The tuition for this course is $70.00 and includes the price of the evening performance ticket on Friday, May 3, 2013] Maximum Number of Students: 20 Textbooks: The play scripts of The Comedy of Errors and A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare William Shakespeare is not only one of the most read playwrights in history but he is also one of the most performed. Students will engage with Shakespeare’s plays as both literature and drama. This course will focus on how the plays of Shakespeare are brought off of the page and onto the stage. Students will attend the upcoming university production of The Comedy of Errors, as well as meet the cast and production team, in order to gain additional insight into the production process. At the end of the session, students will have the opportunity to apply their acquired knowledge to some simple performances of Shakespeare.

Getting Ready for the International Choral Festival Nancy J. Cooper Fridays, 1:00 pm-2:30 pm, Music Building, Room 105, UM This course will provide tools for informed listening to choral music. Participants will learn to listen to choral music for its formal structure, musical shape, and technical showmanship. Students will hear many examples of choral singing, as well as multiple performances of individual works, in order to learn and hear what makes the approaches different. This course will have live performances in class and guest presentations from choral conductors. If possible, students will also hear recordings of some of the groups that will be here this summer for the International Choral Festival (ICF), in order to talk about their choral styles in advance of the event. About the instructor: Nancy Cooper has been a member of The University of Montana School of Music faculty since 1992. She is also the choir director/organist at Holy Spirit Episcopal Church. Professor Cooper has sung in choirs since age six and conducted choirs since age sixteen; she even had the privilege of singing with Sir David Willcocks for a week in the early 1980s. She LOVES choral music!

A “Greatest Hits” for All Mankind: The Voyager Golden Record James Randall Fridays, 3:00 pm-4:30 pm, Todd Building, UM When the Voyager spacecraft left Earth in 1977, there were a series of golden phonograph records on board. These records represented a musical playlist for all humankind, meant to document (for potential extraterrestrial encounter) the diversity of sounds we identify as music—everything from the blues to Bulgarian folk music, from rock ‘n’ roll to Beethoven. These records testify to an unusual endeavor: an attempt to communicate who we are by the music we make. This course explores what these musical choices say about us and about the diverse cultures, societies, and histories they represent. About the instructor: James Randall is an Associate Professor in the School of Music at The University of Montana, where he teaches courses in music history and world music.

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Fine Arts

About the instructor: John Kenneth DeBoer is an Associate Professor of Theatre at The University of Montana. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in Voice, Acting, Dramatic Literature, and Shakespeare. He has directed past university productions of Tongue of a Bird, Hay Fever, The Cherry Orchard, and this fall’s Fiddler on the Roof. In the spring, he can be seen playing the lead role in the spring production of David Edgar’s Pentecost.


Humanities Inspiration and Poetic Creation in Twentieth-Century Russian Literature Ona Renner-Fahey Thursdays, 9:00 am-10:30 am, Todd Building, UM

Humanities

How has the inspired state been depicted throughout the ages? What made the image of the muse so prevalent? How do poets mythologize their moments of inspiration in modern times? Do Russian poets put a unique “spin” on inspiration and the creative process? Which classical mythologies are appropriated by twentieth-century Russian poets and which are rejected? Does the gender of the poet inform his or her ideas of poetic creation? In this course, students will engage in some close readings of poetry and autobiographical writings by such Russian poets as Mandelstam, Tsvetaeva, Pasternak, Akhmatova, and Brodsky. Course participants will consider the works within the contexts of the various questions concerning inspiration and the creative process presented above. About the instructor: Ona Renner-Fahey is an Associate Professor of Russian in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages at The University of Montana. She has degrees from The Ohio State University, Middlebury College, and the University of Wisconsin. She teaches courses at UM in Russian language, culture, and literature. Her publications have focused on poetry, autobiography, and women authors. Professor Renner-Fahey is currently working on a book project about inspiration and the creative process in Russian poetry.

Who Really Made the Roman Empire Work? Linda W. Gillison Thursdays, 11:00 am-12:30 pm, Todd Building, UM In this course, students will meet some of the individuals who were crucial to the functioning of the Roman Empire. These people have been immortalized, not in narrative history or other literary forms but in inscriptions, personal letters, contracts, and the like. We can hear them speak directly to us, and it’s an exciting and different experience. About the instructor: Linda Gillison (Ph.D., Classics, U. Minnesota) has been teaching on The University of Montana campus since 1992. Her specialties in Classics are Greco-Roman Historiography, Tacitus, Rhetoric, and Women in Antiquity. She has served as Director of the UM-M Study Abroad Program in Italy and as chairperson of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures. Additionally, Professor Gillison was co-recipient of last year’s Tom Boone Town and Gown Award for her work with the Alumni Association’s Community Lecture Series.

Julia Child and Craig Claiborne: How They Revolutionized the American Diet Greg Patent Thursdays, 11:00 am-12:30 pm, Todd Building, UM Course will be held: April 11, April 25, May 2, May 9, May 16, and May 23; No Class April 18 Two special people deserve the lion’s share of responsibility for getting Americans excited about exploring food beyond the accepted 1950s bland diet: Craig Claiborne, food editor of the New York Times and author of numerous books exploring the world of food; and Julia Child, who demystified French cooking and offered recipes doable by the home cook. This course will follow the careers of these important trend-setters as they mine the world’s cuisines for interesting and delicious dishes as well as expand the ways in which Americans view and experience cooking and eating. The course will explore insights into what made them icons of cuisine and how their influences affect the American diet even today. About the instructor: Greg Patent is a self-taught cook who learned his craft from reading cookbooks and watching Julia Child. He has written articles for many national food magazines, authored nine cookbooks, and won the 2003 James Beard Award for Baking in America. He also writes regularly for the Missoulian and Missoula Magazine. His radio show, The Food Guys, is broadcast Sunday mornings on KUFM.

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Reading the Short Story David Allan Cates Thursdays, 1:00 pm-2:30 pm, Todd Building, UM Course will be held: April 11, April 25, May 2, May 9, May 16, and May 23; No Class April 18 Course participants will read stories by masters as well as discuss the shape and structure of this relatively new literary form. How does it work? What is its subject, its territory, and its history? How does it relate to other forms of storytelling? What does it tell us about what it means to be a human being? What does it tell us about our culture? How does it give us something we need? The goal of this course is for students to have a deeper understanding of how these little masterpieces work, with the purpose of being moved by their elegance and appreciating their beauty. About the instructor: David Allan Cates is the author of the novels Hunger in America, X out of Wonderland, Freeman Walker, and Ben Armstrong’s Strange Trip Home. He has published twenty short stories in literary magazines and his non-fiction has appeared in the New York Times and Outside Magazine. David also works for Missoula Medical Aid and has led dozens of medical teams to work in impoverished areas of Honduras.

Young-ee Cho Thursdays, 3:00 pm-4:30 pm, Todd Building, UM Optional Textbooks: Still Life with Rice by Helie Lee, Lost Names: Scenes from a Korean Boyhood by Richard E. Kim, Please Look After Mom by Kyung-Sook Shin, and Brother One Cell by Cullen Thomas We see much to admire in Korea but also much that challenges our ideas of what a nation is. Korea has become a land of seemingly insoluble contradictions, from the economic and cultural miracles of the South to the failed state of the North. This course will explore key cultural and historical themes shared by both the South and the North, including: Korea’s occupation by Japan; the Korean War; and contradictions within Korean education, where the enrollment of ninety percent of the college-age population in higher education has engendered concern about a kind of education fever. About the instructor: Young-ee Cho received her BA and MBA from Indiana University, and a PhD in Interdisciplinary Studies from The University of Montana. She co-directed the National Consortium for Teaching About Asia (NCTA) seminars for public school teachers in Montana from 2006 to 2008 and has led a study tour to Japan and Korea. She frequently gives guest lectures on Korea and East Asian culture in History and Asian Studies classes taught at UM.

Hemingway in Paris: The 1920s Frank Laurence Thursdays, 3:00 pm-4:30 pm, Todd Building, UM Textbooks: The Sun Also Rises (1926) and A Farewell to Arms (1929) by Ernest Hemingway Writing in Paris in the 1920s, Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) was the leading force in the dynamics of modernism in American fiction. Biographers and literary critics find the concentration of his creativity in the short stories and novels of 1925 to 1929, including The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms. This course is directed towards two major questions: What are the distinctive qualities of Hemingway writing? And what is Hemingway’s place in American culture? [Please note: Participants will be expected to read The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, chapters from A Moveable Feast, and six short stories. Chapter summaries of the novels and copies of the other readings will be available on Electronic and Traditional Reserve one month in advance of the first class meeting.] About the instructor: Frank Laurence, PhD, holds degrees from Yale, Toronto, and University of Pennsylvania. He has taught at several universities, including UM, lectured at various national Hemingway conferences, and published numerous professional articles and the book Hemingway and the Movies. He is an Honorary Life Member of the Ernest Hemingway Foundation of Oak Park, Illinois (Hemingway’s birthplace).

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Humanities

Korea: The Land of the Morning Calm or Calamity?


Wisdom and Compassion: An Introduction to Buddhism Bradley Clough Fridays, 1:00 pm-2:30 pm, Todd Building, UM Optional Textbook: Buddhism: A Very Short Introduction by Damien Keown The main purpose of this course is to become familiar with the basic categories of philosophy and practice in Buddhism, a pan-Asian religious tradition of remarkable diversity and expansive geographical and chronological scope. The course will be structured mainly along thematic lines, according to the traditional concepts of ’sila (morals), samadhi (meditation), and prajña- (liberating insight). Following this structure, course participants will explore how Buddhists have viewed the world and lived their lives in the cultural settings of South and Southeast Asia (Theravada Buddhism), East Asia (Mahayana Buddhism), and the Tibetan and Himalayan regions of Asia (Tantric or Vajrayana Buddhism).

Humanities

About the instructor: Bradley Clough received his PhD in Buddhist studies from Columbia University in New York. He has taught courses on Buddhism and other Asian religions for the past twenty-five years. Professor Clough’s teaching and research interests have led him to spending much time in such Buddhist cultures as Himalayan India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, and Japan.

Women’s Activism and Human Rights in the U.S. Anya Jabour Fridays, 1:00 pm-2:30 pm, Todd Building, UM What do Lucy Stone, Susan B. Anthony, Florence Kelley, Jeannette Rankin, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Eleanor Roosevelt, Ella Baker, and Gloria Steinem all have in common? All of these women—and many others—spent their lives advancing human rights in the United States. Devoting attention to the antislavery movement, the suffrage movement, the Progressive Era, pacifism, the anti-lynching movement, the New Deal, the Civil Rights movement, and the women’s movement, this course explores U.S. women’s essential role in advancing human rights from the 1830s to the present. About the instructor: Anya Jabour, who earned her PhD in history from Rice University, is a Professor of History as well as Co-Director of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program at The University of Montana. She is currently working on a biography of social work educator and social justice advocate Sophonisba Preston Breckinridge (1866-1948).

Two Classic Anti-heroes Fred McGlynn Fridays, 3:00 pm-4:30 pm, Todd Building, UM Textbooks: Notes from Underground by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, translated by Ralph Matlaw; and The Fall by Albert Camus, translated by Justin O’Brien Course participants will read and discuss Dostoevsky’s Notes From Underground and Camus’ The Fall. Students will examine and compare these two works through class discussion in relation to the cultural situation at the time of their composition. Both works indict the reader in very subtle ways, which suggest that the narrator in his cynicism is the truly honest man. Students will look at this question using Jean Paul Sartre’s analysis of “bad faith” as a way of gaining a deeper insight into the structure and significance of both works. This course will emphasize class discussion. Only the first session will have a lecture. About the instructor: Fred McGlynn is an Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at The University of Montana where he taught both philosophy and humanities courses for more than thirty years. His specialties in philosophy are existentialism, phenomenology, and aesthetics. He has won the Teacher of the Year award and the Governor’s Humanities Award. This will be the sixth course that he has taught for MOLLI.

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Current and Political Affairs From Ancient Persia to Modern Iran: A Personal Journey Mehrdad Kia This course will focus on the political, cultural, and intellectual history of Iran (i.e. Persia) from ancient times to the present through the instructor’s personal experiences and encounters with Iranians from different walks of life. About the instructor: Mehrdad Kia is the Director of the Central and Southwest Asian Studies Center and Professor of History at The University of Montana. He is the author of numerous articles and several books on the history of the Middle East and Central Asia.

The Cold War, 1945-1991: The Best Years of Our Lives Steven I. Levine Fridays, 3:00 pm-4:30 pm, Todd Building, UM Maximum Number of Students: 40 Optional Textbook: The World Transformed: 1945 to the Present by Michael H. Hunt The Cold War spanned the second half of the 20th century, from the end of World War II until the late 1980s. This titanic struggle between two superpowers--the United States and the Soviet Union--and the coalitions they led influenced almost every corner of the globe. It also had an enormous and continuing impact within the United States on government, the economy, and culture. This course will examine its origins, its development, and its denouement on both sides of the Cold War divide, and consider its legacy. About the instructor: Steven I. Levine, Research Faculty Associate, Department of History, had a forty-year university teaching career, focusing on East Asia, especially China. Most recently, he is the co-author, with Michael H. Hunt, of Arc of Empire: America’s Wars in Asia and, with Alexander Pantsov, of Mao: The Real Story. He has taught four previous MOLLI courses.

MOLLI Coffee Club The MOLLI Coffee Club Card is available for purchase at The Market in the University Center

—$20 value for $15!

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Current & Political Affairs

Fridays, 11:00 am-12:30 pm, Todd Building, UM


Natural and Social Sciences In the Light of Evolution: Exploring Biology’s Central Principle Mary Bricker

Natural & Social Sciences

Thursdays, 9:00 am-10:30 am, Todd Building, UM Textbook: The Tangled Bank: An Introduction to Evolution by Carl Zimmer This course will examine the history and development of the field of evolutionary biology from its founders to scientists conducting research today. Along the way, course participants will learn basic biology as well as examine the nature of science as a discipline and way of knowing. Students will explore the various ways that scientists study evolution and how it is applied to fields like conservation biology and medicine. In addition, students will look at some deep evolutionary history to see how species are related to one another and examine how evolution affects our daily lives. About the instructor: Mary Bricker earned her PhD in ecology from The University of Montana after many field seasons studying native plants and small mammals in the Blackfoot Valley. After two years teaching at Pacific University in Oregon, she has returned to Missoula where she continues to teach, farm, and work with a non-profit developing international field courses for students of all ages.

Bhutan: Gross National Happiness and Natural Resource Issues Ronald H. Wakimoto Thursdays, 1:00 pm-2:30 pm, Todd Building, UM Maximum Number of Students: 30 The Fourth King of Bhutan, Jigme Singye Wangchuck, developed the concept of Gross National Happiness (GNH) as a substitute for Gross National Product, in evaluating the progress of his country. The four pillars of GNH are: 1.) sustainable and equitable socio-economic development; 2.) conservation of the environment; 3.) preservation and promotion of culture; and 4.) good governance. These pillars will be explored with relevance to Bhutanese natural resource management issues. Some issues to be presented and discussed are water resources; forests and fire management; natural disaster preparedness; and social change as the country develops roads, expands electrification, and conserves wildlife. About the instructor: Ronald H. Wakimoto, a Fellow in the Society of American Foresters, was Chair of the Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences at The University of Montana from 2005 through 2010. Since 2006, he has taught short-courses on fire ecology, prescribed burning, disaster preparedness, fire behavior, and fire suppression throughout the Kingdom of Bhutan. In 2011, he spent a five month sabbatical leave in Bhutan observing wildfire effects, working on a national fire management strategy, and teaching basic fire management skills.

Global Health, Your Health Tom Bulger Fridays, 9:00 am-10:30 am, Todd Building, UM Course participants will consider some of the big issues in global health, including their importance to American health. This course will discuss: life expectancy, what really affects it, and some recent trends that may surprise you; the role of infections, including those that allowed Europeans to conquer America, those that still kill millions every year, and the next great plague; social determinants of health, which are stronger than any medicine; gender issues that influence health and health access; nutrition, from starvation to stunting to obesity; and finally, health care delivery in the United States and the world. About the instructor: Tom Bulger is an emergency physician at St. Patrick Hospital. He has worked in rural Kenya and Central America. He has been teaching a course at The University of Montana on issues of global health for the last six years.

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Ray Murray et al. Fridays, 9:00 am-10:30 am, Todd Building, UM Optional Textbook: Evidence from the Earth-Forensic Geology and Criminal Investigation by Ray Murray Do you watch CSI, Forensic Files, or the nightly news? Do you read crime novels, newspapers, or just plain wonder what really goes on in a crime lab? Here is your chance to find out. Six of the best - five from the Montana State Crime Lab (MSCL) - want to share with you the real world of physical evidence collection, examination, and court presentation. The course consists of six lectures covering such evidence as firearms identification; bomb, gun, and drug chemistry; DNA and biological materials; finger prints; medical examination; and soils. About the instructors: Lynette Lancon – MSCL, Annalivia Harris – MSCL, Walter Kemp – MSCL, Heather Jenner – MSCL, Ray Murray – Forensic Geologist, and Joseph Pasternak – MSCL.

Field Botany in the Spring: Montana Wildflowers Marilyn Marler Fridays, 3:00 pm-4:30 pm, Don Anderson Hall, Room 004, UM Maximum Number of Students: 20 Textbook: Manual of Montana Vascular Plants by Peter Lesica and Barney Lipscomb Learn to identify spring wildflowers of Montana, from Allium to Zigadenus. This course will use a combination of illustrated lectures, hands-on labs, and field outings to learn about Missoula’s spring flora. Lesson will cover plant anatomy (including floral details) and basic plant taxonomy. Course participants will learn to identify many species on sight and learn tools to identify unknown plants in the future. This is a fun, hands-on class that does not require previous experience or course work - just a love of flowers. About the instructor: Marilyn Marler has worked as The University of Montana’s natural areas manager for over thirteen years and loves teaching people how to identify plants. She has an MS in ecology and a BS in biology, and has served on boards of several Montana non-profits who work on native plant conservation and education. She lives in Missoula with her husband and pets, and enjoys gardening as well as serving on the Missoula City Council.

MOLLI Summer Adventures in Science: Connecting the Circle The summer camp team is hard at work making plans for next summer’s camp.  Visit our website at www.umt.edu/molli in the coming months for camp dates and updated information.

“It’s a great experience for both generations.” ~MOLLI member Summer Adventures in Science camp

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Natural & Social Sciences

Montana CSI - Sex, Drugs, Guns, and Dirt: The Real Crime Lab


MOLLI Special Member Event: Prelude to “The Verve” Christopher Comer, Richard Drake, and Ashby Kinch

Special Member Event

Tuesday, April 16, 3:00 pm-4:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Before attending the event, please review the recommended reading by Stephen Greenblatt, located at the following website: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/08/08/110808fa_fact_greenblatt This MOLLI Special Member Event is held in conjunction with the President’s Lecture Series, The Verve: Humanism, Scholarship, and Modern Life with Seth Lerer. For details about the President’s Lecture Series, please visit: www.umt.edu/president/events/lectures. Three notable faculty members from The University of Montana will discuss “Humanism, Scholarship and Modern Life” as an introduction to some of the main ideas and controversies related to the upcoming Presidential Lecture by Seth Lerer on the evening of April 29th.  The trio will consist of Christopher Comer (Division of Biological Sciences), Richard Drake (Department of History), and Ashby Kinch (Department of English). Their discussion will explore the making of the modern world and the modern mind from multiple perspectives.

About the presenters: Christopher Comer is a Professor of Biology & Neuroscience and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at The University of Montana. He received a PhD from the University of Chicago. Before coming to Montana, he was a Postdoctoral Associate at Cornell University, a Professor and Dean at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and for two years served at The National Science Foundation as Director of the Behavioral Neuroscience program.  Richard Drake has taught history at The University of Montana since 1982. His courses include the Great Historians, Terrorism in the Modern World, Early and Modern Italy, Contemporary Europe, European Cultural and Intellectual History of the 19th and 20th Centuries, and Western Civilization. He has published four books on modern Italy. Later this year, the University of Wisconsin Press will publish his latest book, Robert M. La Follette: The Making of an American Anti-Imperialist. For the past twenty-six years, he has coordinated the President’s Lecture Series. Ashby Kinch is an Associate Professor of English at The University of Montana, with a research specialty in late medieval literature and art. He has published widely on Alain Chartier, the most influential European author of the 15th century. His recent book, Imago Mortis: Mediating Images of Death in Late Medieval Culture, studies the literature and art of dying in the early 15th century. Free with MOLLI membership. Use a guest pass and bring a friend. Please RSVP by Tuesday, April 2, 2013.

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General Information Membership Dues $20 per person annually,

Parking and Transportation Options

membership period is July 1, 2012 - June 30, 2013.

Course Fees $60 per course, plus fees when applicable. How To Register Online at www.umt.edu/molli until Friday, April 5, 2013.

Call us at 406.243.2905 E-mail us at molli@umontana.edu

Hand deliver your form to The University of Montana (UM) campus,Todd Building, adjacent to the University Center.

Mail the registration form to: The University of Montana School of Extended & Lifelong Learning - MOLLI 32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT 59812 Fax your registration form to 406.243.2047

Refund and Cancellation Policy

Course tuition costs may be refunded on a case-by-case basis on or before the third week of the Spring term. Refunds may be applied as a credit towards a future MOLLI course. Refunds are not granted after the third week of the Spring term. Membership cost is non-refundable. If paying by check, Social Security numbers must be provided to the MOLLI office to receive a refund. Social Security numbers are not required for refunds processed from credit card payments.

Course Location

With a few exceptions, most courses are held in the Todd Building on The University of Montana campus, adjacent to the University Center.

Accessibility

The University of Montana is an equal opportunity education provider.  For questions, concerns, or requests for reasonable accommodations, contact Roger Maclean, Dean, School of Extended and Lifelong Learning (SELL) at 406.243.2983, or e-mail roger.maclean@umontana.edu.

MOLLI Gift Cards

Give the gift of learning by giving a gift card to cover the cost of membership ($20), a course ($60), or both ($80) to your family and friends. Contact the MOLLI office at 406.243.2905 for more information or to purchase one today.

$12 MOLLI Six Day Parking Pass is good for six individual days of parking on campus. This pass is good for use in payby-hour and decal parking lots at UM. To purchase a parking pass, call 406.243.2905 or add it to your registration form. To learn more about where to park on campus, go online to http://www.umt.edu/publicsafety/docs/ parking.pdf or contact the MOLLI staff for a copy of the map. Please DO NOT park in Reserved parking spaces or your vehicle will be towed!

Financial Assistance

MOLLI tries very hard to keep costs at a minimum so everyone can participate. However, we know that some people may need some help. Therefore, MOLLI is pleased to offer a tuition waiver program to ensure everyone +50 has the opportunity to engage in lifelong learning. This fund has been supported by donations from MOLLI instructors and generous members. To learn more about financial assistance through the MOLLI tuition waiver program, or if you would like to consider a gift to this fund so that others may enjoy learning, please call 406.243.2905.

Textbooks

Textbooks for MOLLI courses are available in the general books section of the Bookstore at UM and may be purchased at a 10% discount.

Donations

Your tax-deductible donation to MOLLI will go a long way in support of tuition waivers, special events, and courses. To learn more, call 406.243.2905.

Bernard Osher Foundation

The Bernard Osher Foundation seeks to improve quality of life through the support of lifelong learning institutes such as MOLLI. The Foundation was founded in 1977 by Bernard Osher, a respected businessman and community leader. The Foundation has now funded more than 115 Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes on campuses of colleges and universities from Maine to Hawaii. Funding for MOLLI is contingent upon membership growth goals, so membership matters. To learn more about The Bernard Osher Foundation, please visit their website: http://www.osherfoundation.org/

Questions? The University of Montana School of Extended & Lifelong Learning - MOLLI 32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT 59812 Phone: 406.243.2905 Fax: 406.243.2047 E-mail: molli@umontana.edu www.umt.edu/molli

MOLLI is pleased to offer the following special! Spring Special: Take two $60 Spring courses for only $100. This is a 33% savings on your second course! *Please note the discount is for one participant enrolling in two courses.

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General Information

$25 MOLLI Term Parking Pass for April 11 - May 24 ONLY. This pass is good for use in pay-by-hour and decal parking lots at UM.


NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID MISSOULA, MT 59812 PERMIT NO. 569

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UM (MOLLI) School of Extended & Lifelong Learning MCE221 The University of Montana 32 Campus Drive Missoula, MT 59812 www.umt.edu/molli 406.243.2905 406.243.2047 Fax

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Spring 2013 MOLLI Brochure