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Winter 2013

MOLLI

Curiosity never retires.

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at

To learn more, contact 406.243.2905 or visit us online at www.umt.edu/molli


Welcome to the Time of Your Life! Initially funded by a grant from the Bernard Osher Foundation, the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UM (MOLLI) is a lifelong learning program for adult learners +50. MOLLI’s goal is to create an accessible and innovative learning environment so that active older adults from all backgrounds and levels of education may pursue learning. MOLLI builds on the rich resources of The University of Montana (UM) to offer its members an array of educational and social opportunities. As a MOLLI member, you have the opportunity to: • • • • • • •

Take a broad array of courses with distinguished UM faculty, emeritus faculty, and other Missoula area teachers in a “no grade, no test” learning environment; Keep active and enrich your life; Meet new and interesting people; Continue to learn and expand your horizons; Explore new skills and develop new interests; Travel and learn in new ways; and Stay mentally fit – and have fun!

Membership is $20 per person and is renewable annually. Courses are $60 each. Some activities are free to members while others have a small fee. The benefits of membership include: • Access to the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Library at UM • Special member only events • Special “MOLLI only” parking permits during the MOLLI term • 10% discount at the Bookstore at UM for textbooks and art supplies for MOLLI courses

“Love this whole concept! Very relaxing and a great non-judgmental way to learn” ~MOLLI member

MOLLI Council Members

Cynthia Aten Ann Boone Rafael Chacón Gladys Considine Gary Hawk Charlotte Hay Margaret Johnson Patrick Mahoney Dennis O’Donnell Ray Risho Burke Townsend Glenn Wood Marta York Janie Spencer, Director Roger Maclean, Dean, School of Extended & Lifelong Learning Our Valued Partners

The Missoula Symphony and Chorale spectrUM Discovery Area UM President’s Lecture Series The Springs Retirement Community Montana Museum of Art and Culture International Wildlife Film Festival


Table of Contents Support MOLLI – Ways to Give 2 Course Overview 3 Course Listings 4 Fine Arts A Backstage Pass to Neil Simon’s Biloxi Blues Cuisine Artistry: The Global Kitchen Starting with Huffman: Photographers of Montana’s High Plains The Creative Process: Finding Your Spark

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Humanities Cultural and Global Savvy Through Film My Love Affair with Montana Masterpieces of 20th Century Central European Literature Culture and Agriculture The Philosophers’ Government Food and Culture: Anthropology Stalin’s Russia Brazil and the Promise of Order and Progress: 1500s-Present

6 6 6 7 7 7 8 8

Current and Political Affairs The Great War: 1914-1919

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Natural and Social Sciences Mathematics Then and Now The New North: The Changing Arctic Montana Before History: 11,000 Years of Hunter-Gatherers in the Plains and Rockies Activity, Vitality and Longevity Language Myths Everything is Infectious: The Past, Present and Future Impact of the Microbial World on Human and Global Health MOLLI Special Member Event

9 9 10 10 10 11 12

General Information 13 Registration Form

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Support MOLLI - Ways to Give Please consider making a gift to MOLLI today. All gifts, regardless of size, are significant and meaningful. Your generosity will ensure that MOLLI will remain sustainable, vibrant and accessible for generations to come. Thank you for your consideration and support.

Why give? Your gift will help MOLLI reach the following goals:

Support MOLLI

Meet current expenses of approximately $100 per course, not covered by the MOLLI annual membership fee of $20 and course fees of $60 per course

• Enhance MOLLI’s educational programs • Provide assistance toward course fees for lower income participants • Increase the MOLLI endowment fund to ensure MOLLI’s financial future • Assure adequate staffing, space, equipment and publicity for programming Give the Gift of Learning There are many ways you can support MOLLI!

• Make an Annual Gift • Give a Memorial Gift to honor a family member or friend • Create an Endowed Gift in your name (or a loved one’s name) that will last a lifetime

• Consider an Estate Gift (a bequest, gift annuity, pension plan, IRA or

real estate)

• Purchase a Gift Membership or course tuition waiver for someone special How Do I Donate? Contact Janie Spencer at 406.243.2905 or make a gift online at www.umt.edu/ MOLLI. Prefer to give on a monthly or quarterly basis? It’s easy to arrange for a regular gift via credit card at www.umt.edu/MOLLI. Gifts are tax deductible; please make your gift by December 31 so we may count your support for the coming year. Thank you for your time and consideration.

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Course Overview Thursdays

All Courses are in the Todd Building, UM unless otherwise noted.

Fridays

January 24 - February 28, 2013

January 25 - March 1, 2013

11:00 am – 12:30 pm •Masterpieces of 20th Century Central European Literature – Anna Dulba-Barnett •Cuisine Artistry: The Global Kitchen – Ray Risho

9:00 am–10:30 am •Food and Culture: Anthropology – Garry Kerr [The Springs at Missoula] •The New North: The Changing Arctic – Anna Klene •Montana Before History: 11,000 Years of HunterGatherers in the Plains and Rockies – Douglas MacDonald

1:00 pm – 2:30 pm •Culture and Agriculture – Joshua Slotnick •Mathematics Then and Now – Diane Burrell

11:00 am–12:30 pm •Activity, Vitality and Longevity – Brian Sharkey •Language Myths – Leora Bar-el

3:00 pm – 4:30 pm •Starting with Huffman: Photographers of Montana’s High Plains – Kristi Hager •The Philosophers’ Government – Richard E. Walton

1:00 pm–2:30 pm •Stalin’s Russia – Robert H. Greene •The Creative Process: Finding Your Spark – Lee Heuermann •Everything is Infectious: The Past, Present and Future Impact of the Microbial World on Human and Global Health – George Risi

9:00 am – 10:30 am •My Love Affair with Montana – Hal Stearns

Courses with a special schedule:

3:00 pm–4:30 pm •Brazil and the Promise of Order and Progress: 1500s-Present – Silvia Lazo •The Great War: 1914-1919 – Harry Fritz

Wednesdays 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm (January 2-January 23), and Thursday, 7:30 pm (January 29) •A Backstage Pass to Neil Simon’s Biloxi Blues – Teresa Waldorf [PARTV Center, Room 190, UM] 3:00 pm - 6:00 pm (January 23, February 6 & 13) •Cultural and Global Savvy Through Film – Udo Fluck

Upcoming Event MOLLI Special Member Event:

Behind the Scenes at the Symphony: Mozart’s Requiem Darko Butorac Tuesdays, February 19 & 26, 3:00 pm-5:00 pm, University Center Theater, UM, and Thursday, February 28, Dress Rehearsal, Time TBA, Dennison University Theatre, UM To learn more, please see page 12

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MOLLI Winter 2013 Course Listings Fine Arts A Backstage Pass to Neil Simon’s Biloxi Blues Teresa Waldorf Wednesdays, 2:30 pm-4:00 pm (January 2-January 23), and Thursday, 7:30 pm (January 29 - The Opening Night Performance), PARTV Center, Room 190, UM [The tuition for this course is $70.00 and includes the price of the Opening Night Performance ticket on January 29, 2013.]

Maximum Number of Students: 15 Textbook: The play script for Biloxi Blues (available at the Bookstore at UM)

Fine Arts

Get a peek behind the scenes of the Montana Repertory Theatre’s (MRT) professional national touring production of Neil Simon’s Biloxi Blues. Led by MRT’s Educational Outreach Coordinator, Teresa Waldorf, course participants have the opportunity to talk with the director, designers, and cast members as well as attend blocking and technical rehearsals to see what it takes to produce a world-class comedy. An in-depth analysis of the script and history of the times will be on the discussion list as well. Students also attend the opening night performance as a group. About the instructor: Teresa Waldorf is the Educational Outreach Coordinator for the Montana Repertory Theatre and adjunct instructor for The University of Montana’s School of Theatre and Dance. Teresa’s directing credits at UM include Gypsy, Batboy, Rocky Horror Show, Still Life with Iris and Once Upon a Mattress. Teresa received her MFA from UM in 1991 in Acting/Directing and continues to act as much as possible. She can frequently be seen on stage acting in Montana Rep Missoula productions at the Crystal Theatre or doing stand-up comedy at the Downtown Dance Collective.

Cuisine Artistry: The Global Kitchen Ray Risho Thursdays, 11:00 am-12:30 pm, Todd Building, UM Travel on a global culinary adventure with Ray Risho and explore the importance of cuisine as a defining imprint of culture. Course participants learn how the raw materials of food translate into cuisine and art while opening pantry doors to regional cuisines across the globe. Students also gain an understanding how mediums carry flavor and explore the world’s spice cupboards and pantries with cooking techniques that focus on the flavors of the Middle East and the Mediterranean Basin. Particular attention will be given to cuisine as the “gateway to culture”, referred to as gastro-diplomacy, and the role of cuisine in peace-making, conflict resolution, negotiation and betrayal. The course concludes with a cooking demonstration based on material discussed in preceding lectures. About the instructor: Founder of the celebrated Perugia Restaurant in Missoula, Montana, chef and independent scholar Ray Risho has spent a lifetime of travel studying global cuisine. In addition to Europe and Asia, Ray has traveled extensively in the Middle East. He has presented numerous teaching-dinners featuring classic menus from around the world, and frequently gives workshops and cooking demonstrations on global cuisine.

“MOLLI is doing well providing such a variety of topics and instructors with a group of varied students in each class. Keep on keeping on!” ~MOLLI member

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Starting with Huffman: Photographers of Montana’s High Plains Kristi Hager Thursdays, 3:00 pm-4:30 pm, Todd Building, UM This course will explore three centuries of Montana prairie landscapes by selected  photographers across three centuries: L.A. Huffman, E.J. Cameron, F. Jay Haynes (1880s/early 1900s); John Vachon, John Smart, and others (1940’s-1980s); Lee Friedlander, Lois Conner, and others (2000 to present). Analysis includes essays, letters and journals that reveal the unique challenges and private jubilation at success under hot, cold, windy, dusty, muddy, and lonely conditions. Participants will learn to “read” photographs to gain a deeper appreciation of each photographer’s vision, both in the broad notion of how to be in the world and in the particular beauty of Montana’s high plains. About the instructor: Kristi Hager has worked for twenty years as a professional photographer using a camera much like L.A. Huffman’s. She taught photography at Santa Clara University and has presented programs on Montana photography for Humanities Montana’s Speakers Bureau. Her book, Evelyn Cameron: Montana’s Frontier Photographer, was a 2008 Montana Book Award Honor winner.

The Creative Process: Finding Your Spark Lee Heuermann Fridays, 1:00 pm-2:30 pm, Todd Building, UM Maximum Number of Students: 15

About the instructor: Lee Heuermann is on the faculty at The University of Montana School of Music and the Wilderness and Civilization Program, where she has taught such classes as Sound in the Natural World, Composition and Women in Music. Lee’s most recent compositions include “Ridge of Blue Longing” for which she was the 2011 recipient of the Judith Lang Zaimant Prize from the International Alliance for Women in Music. Additionally, she has collaborated with Amy Ragsdale’s Headwaters Dance Company. As a singer, she specializes in contemporary music and experimental jazz. Lee has a PhD in Composition from Stony Brook University, a MM degree from the Yale School of Music, and a BM from the New England Conservatory.

“I entered this course not knowing what to expect but being challenged to learn something new. I found this to be a most interesting course.”

~MOLLI member

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Fine Arts

Creativity is inherent in all of us and is known to be a key component of aging well. In this course, participants will have the opportunity to explore their creativity in a supportive and non-judgmental setting. Through exercises involving self-reflection/journaling, improvisation/play, and reading/discussion, participants will focus on developing and honing their creative instincts through attending to themselves and their surrounding world. Additionally, the instructor–a musician, composer and performer–will share the ups and downs of her own creative process.


Humanities Cultural and Global Savvy Through Film Udo Fluck Wednesdays, 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm (January 23, February 6 and 13), Todd Building, UM This MOLLI course will use one of the most powerful forms of media - film - to help the participants develop a crosscultural sensitivity and become cultural savvy. Film has the ability to mentally transport people to locations and remote regions, providing a unique insight into the way people communicate, collaborate, etc. We will examine both sociotypes and stereotypes and compare style, plot and characters to uncover the hidden ways of communicating cultural difference and dispelling common myths about other cultures.

Humanities

About the instructor: Udo Fluck was born, raised and received his primary education in Germany. During the past decade, he worked as a curriculum developer, faculty member, and cross-cultural researcher in Germany and the United States. In 2004, Udo created Multicultural Learning Solutions at The University of Montana and has developed and taught courses in cross-cultural and global competence building across campus.

My Love Affair with Montana Hal Stearns Thursdays, 9:00 am-10:30 am, Todd Building, UM Montana has a history as rich as our beloved big sky: early explorers and trappers, cows and cowboys, Indian tribes inhabiting the plains and mountains, folks famous and infamous, politics good and bad, railroaders and town builders. Each and every one has contributed to making this very special place our home. About the instructor: Hal Stearns is a native of Harlowton with generations of ranchers, homesteaders, newsmen, and educators in his family. He holds a BA from the University of Notre Dame, as well as a MA and doctoral degrees from The University of Montana. He taught for 34 years at Sentinel High School, as well as in Wiesbaden Germany and at UM. Honored as Montana’s Teacher of the Year and Outstanding U.S. History Teacher, Hal was the recipient of two grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Additionally, Hal was a Keizia Koho Fellow to Japan and recognized as one of the 40 Humanities Montana “Heroes” in 2012. He also served in the Montana Army National Guard for 35 years, attaining the rank of Brigadier General.

Masterpieces of 20th Century Central European Literature Anna Dulba-Barnett Thursdays, 11:00 am-12:30 pm, Todd Building, UM Optional Textbooks: Process by Franz Kafka, Index Card by Tadeusz Rozewicz* and The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgahov *Instructor can provide participants with the electronic version of this text as it may be difficult to obtain. What makes a novel or a play a masterpiece? Is it its form or content? Maybe it’s the author himself who secures the greatness of the work? We will look for the answers to these questions as we read three works representing three different countries: Poland, Russia and the Czech Republic. These lands have witnessed the trauma of two world wars, Nazi concentration camps, and political oppressions. Out of this troubled history, great minds have produced literature that ranks among the best of world literature. About the instructor: Anna Dulba-Barnett got her BA from Jagiellonian University in Cracow, Poland. She acquired her MA in theater studies from The University of Montana. Anna gives guest lectures at UM and she serves the School of Theatre and Dance as an Assistant Director and Dramaturg in various productions.

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Culture and Agriculture Josh Slotnick Thursdays, 1:00 pm-2:30 pm, Todd Building, UM Course participants will have the opportunity to consider farming through a humanities lens. We will look at notable points in the history of American agriculture, with special attention paid to writers, artists, poets and social historians. We will also trace the production techniques of specific crops and discuss the social and historical ramifications of these choices. About the instructor: Josh Slotnick is a faculty member in Environmental Studies Program at The University of Montana. He is a co-founder of the PEAS farm and the non-profit Garden City Harvest. Josh manages the PEAS farm and has been farming in Missoula for 20 years.

The Philosophers’ Government Richard E. Walton Thursdays, 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Course Website URL: http://www.rewalt.me/TPG/index.html The United States’ government is the first and longest lasting of modern governments - governments explicitly based on a set of ideas. In particular, the “words we live by” are to a notable extent the product of European philosophy in the 150 years before they were enshrined. Controversies and shortcomings in those philosophical theories persist in American political discourse to this day. Thus, we will undertake a systematic examination of the seminal documents of American government, especially The Declaration of Independence and The Constitution of the U.S., supported by selected readings from the philosophical background of these monumental works. About the instructor: Richard E. Walton is a native of Montana. He has earned degrees in mathematics and philosophy from The University of Montana, and did his graduate work at the University of Oregon and the Claremont Graduate School. Richard joined the UM faculty in 1969, retiring in 2008. He was honored with the UM’s Distinguished Teaching Award in 1989. Richard co-founded the UM-St. Patrick Hospital Institute of Medicine and Humanities, and served on its Board for several years. He also served as a member of the St. Patrick Hospital Ethics Committee. Richard has published papers in ancient philosophy and medical ethics, as well as numerous papers on issues in higher education and several book reviews. He also served as a journal chief editor for several years.

Food and Culture: Anthropology Garry Kerr Fridays, 9:00 am-10:30 am, The Springs at Missoula Food and Culture examines the ways that culture shapes the satisfaction of a biological need – eating. Food production, preparation, choices, customs, taste, taboos, spices and diets will be covered. Cannibals to vegetarians, America to Asia, we will again see the strong hand of culture. About the instructor: Garry Kerr has been teaching in the Department of Anthropology since 1988. His students range in age from 9 to 90 and they each bring something unique to the classroom. Garry was voted “The Best Professor at The University” twelve times. “I love what I do and am known for contagious enthusiasm.”- Kerr.

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Humanities

Optional Textbook: The Declaration of Independence and The Constitution of the U.S. (Pocket edition) by the Cato Institute


Stalin’s Russia Robert H. Greene Fridays, 1:00 pm-2:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Current & Political Affairs

Textbook: Sofia Petrovna by Lydia Chukovskaya This course will examine the political, social and cultural history of the USSR at the height of the Stalin years (19291941). How did a relatively obscure Georgian seminary dropout rise to power and maintain tight control over the Soviet state and party for nearly 30 years? How did a revolution that promised equality for the toiling masses and an end to political and economic exploitation result in a one-party dictatorship whose leaders made use of terror and state-sponsored violence against their own citizens? Was Stalinism, as its opponents charged, an aberration from the principles of 1917, or a natural outgrowth of the system Lenin and the Bolsheviks established after the October Revolution? And what similarities and differences can we see between the totalitarian regimes of Stalinist Russia and Hitler’s Germany? Through a combination of lecture and discussion, we will address these questions and more. About the instructor: Robert H. Greene completed his PhD at the University of Michigan and is an Associate Professor of History at The University of Montana, where he teaches courses in Russian, Soviet and East European history. He is the author of Bodies Like Bright Stars: Saints and Relics in Orthodox Russia and The Story of a Life: The Memoirs of a Young Jewish Woman in the Russian Empire.

Brazil and the Promise of Order and Progress: 1500s-Present Silvia Lazo Fridays, 3:00 pm-4:30 pm, Todd Building, UM This class will provide a panoramic view of Brazilian civilization as it surveys a body of cultural and intellectual materials, including scholarly and literary publications (news and book chapters) and art (architecture, paintings, music, film). A goal of this course is to develop a critical understanding of the history, economic development, culture, religions and contemporary challenges of this dynamic country. About the instructor: Silvia Lazo holds BA degrees in Theater and Music from Whitworth University and an MM degree from The University of Montana where she is also completing her PhD in Musicology. Silvia was raised in São Paulo, Brazil. She has worked as Assistant Executive Director for Spokane Opera, performed Latin American classical and popular music, and served the Washington State Arts Commission.

Current and Political Affairs The Great War: 1914-1919 Harry W. Fritz Fridays, 3:00 pm-4:30 pm The Great War (1914-1919) was the pivotal event of the 20th century. “From it came U.S. intervention, the Bolshevik Revolution and the creation of the Soviet Union, Italian Fascism, the Great Depression, Nazism, World War II, the Holocaust, the ruin of Europe [Aldous Huxley, 1946],” not to mention the Cold War, the creation and ultimate destruction of Yugoslavia, and the formation of the modern Middle East. This MOLLI course places the war in its global context, while stressing the stalemate on the Western Front and the efforts to overcome it. About the instructor: Harry W. Fritz is Professor Emeritus of History at The University of Montana in Missoula. He graduated from Missoula County High School in 1956, and attended Dartmouth College (AB 1960), The University of Montana (MA 1962), and Washington University in St. Louis (PhD 1971). Harry still teaches courses in early American history, American military history, and Montana history. He has been UM’s Teacher of the Year (1972 and 1999) and the Carnegie Foundation’s Montana Professor of the Year (2004). In 1985, Harry won UM’s Distinguished Service Award, the Governor’s Humanities Award in 2003, and in 2007 the Robert T. Pantzer award. He has also written and lectured widely on the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Harry is the author of The Lewis and Clark Expedition (Greenwood 2004), Montana: Land of Contrast (1984; rev. ed., 2001), and co-editor of Montana and the West (1984), The Montana Heritage (1992), and The Montana Legacy (2002). Harry served in the Montana House of Representatives in 1985 and 1987, as well as in the Montana Senate in 1991 and 1993.

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Natural and Social Sciences Mathematics Then and Now Diane Burrell Thursdays, 1:00 pm-2:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

About the instructor: Diane Burrell has published numerous articles during her 30-year career as a mathematics teacher in Missoula. She was a recipient of the Montana Presidential Award for Excellence in Teaching Mathematics and was twice named a Tandy Outstanding Teacher. Since retiring from active teaching, she has written curriculum materials and has served as a math consultant and trainer.

The New North: The Changing Arctic Anna Klene Fridays, 9:00 am-10:30 am, Todd Building, UM Textbook: New North: The World in 2050 by Larry Smith The current and future impacts of climate change on the Arctic are widely discussed by the media. Larry Smith’s recent book broadens that discussion and looks at the combined impacts of climate change, population growth, globalization, and industrialization (oil, gas, and mineral resource development) on the region today and over the next several decades. In this course, we will use his popular-press book as a framework to review the current situation, look at slides and photos from around the Arctic, and discuss numerous issues arising from these geopolitical and environmental changes. About the instructor: Anna Klene, Associate Professor in The Department of Geography at The University of Montana, has done research in northern Alaska for 15 years on permafrost (perennially frozen ground) and climate interactions in natural and urban settings. She serves on the Board of the interdisciplinary Minor in Climate Change Studies and has traveled in Arctic regions of the U.S., Canada, Norway and western Siberia.

“Time flies when I am here. I have learned things I never knew before, that is really cool. Thanks so much for having this class.�

~MOLLI member

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Natural & Social Sciences

This course will trace the evolution of mathematics from its earliest development to how it affects decision-making today. Learn how ancient systems for counting and recording numbers influenced how different societies used mathematics. From mystical investigations of prime numbers to attempts to gain an advantage at medieval gaming tables to the logical structure of geometry, mathematics has grown to influence nearly every aspect of modern decision-making. This class assumes no prior knowledge of mathematics beyond a curiosity about how mathematical concepts permeate our world in unexpected and innovative ways.


Montana Before History: 11,000 Years of Hunter-Gatherers in the Plains and Rockies Douglas MacDonald Fridays, 9:00 am-10:30 am, Todd Building, UM Textbook: Montana Before History by Douglas H. MacDonald

Natural & Social Sciences

*The first 20 people registered for this course will receive the textbook free of charge, courtesy of the instructor. Montana Before History will teach MOLLI students the prehistory of Montana, from 11,000 to 300 years ago. Course participants will learn about the best Native American archaeological sites in the state and learn about Native American cultures that were present in Montana long before European-Americans. Students will follow along using the companion book of the same title, as authored by the instructor, an archaeologist at The University of Montana. About the instructor: Douglas MacDonald is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at UM. He holds MA and PhD degrees in Anthropology from Washington State University. Doug has conducted archaeological fieldwork across much of the United States. His current research is in Yellowstone National Park.

Activity, Vitality and Longevity Brian Sharkey Fridays, 11:00 am-12:30 pm, Todd Building, UM The American Medical Association (AMA) asserts, “Exercise is medicine”. Ever wonder why regular moderate physical activity confers health benefits and how fitness training enhances those benefits? We will explore the ways aerobic and muscular training prompt specific physiological adaptations, and consider the influence of genetics. We will discuss “meaningful” activity, and the intrinsic motivation needed to keep active throughout life. Course participants will learn how attainable life span is enhanced, what research says about exercise and fitness, how to fuel the active life, and the risks of exertion. Students will also discover that it is never too late to adopt an active lifestyle. About the instructor: Professor Emeritus from The University of Montana, Brian Sharkey directed the Human Performance Laboratory, conducted research, worked with athletes, and devoted 45 years to the health, safety and performance of wildland firefighters. He authored twelve books, published numerous research papers, worked with the U.S. Ski Team, the NCAA, and the Forest Service. In addition, Brian served as president of the American College of Sports Medicine.

Language Myths Leora Bar-el Fridays, 11:00 am-12:30 pm, Todd Building, UM Textbook: Language Myths by Laurie Bauer and Peter Trudgill (eds.) Are some languages more beautiful than others? Does TV make people sound the same? Do some languages have no grammar? The goal of this course is to discuss, question and challenge commonly-held ideas about language. By exploring several language myths, we will reveal the ways in which linguists’ beliefs about language differ from beliefs about language that are prevalent in the wider community. About the instructor: Leora Bar-el is an Assistant Professor of Linguistics at The University of Montana. Her research interests include the grammar of tense and aspect, linguistic field methodology, North American Indigenous languages, Montana dialects of English, and issues in language endangerment and revitalization. In April 2012, she received the UM College of Arts and Sciences Helen and Winston Cox Education Excellence Award.

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Everything is Infectious: The Past, Present and Future Impact of the Microbial World on Human and Global Health George Risi Fridays, 1:00 pm-2:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

About the instructor: George Risi is a physician in private practice in Missoula. He is board certified in Infectious Diseases and holds a Master’s degree in the Immunology of Infectious Diseases. Between his 22 years in clinical practice and 8 years as the Clinical Advisor to the Rocky Mountain Labs in Hamilton, George has developed a strong appreciation of how infectious diseases are at once local and global. He notes that everyone has a stake in both understanding how diseases emerge, and how the control of disease requires a well-educated public.

“This course was particularly meaningful to me, helping me to transcend a difficult time in my life. Course work such as this is not only to educate but sometimes helps people in very meaningful ways in their life.”

~MOLLI member

MOLLI Coffee Club The MOLLI Coffee Club Card is available for purchase at The Market in the University Center

—$20 value for $15!

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Natural & Social Sciences

As the relationship between microbes and their mammalian hosts continues to be explored, surprising findings and implications for human and global health are discovered. This series will discuss important diseases that have affected humans, animals and altered the course of history. The future for control of infections is bright but the very definition of “control” must be restructured. As the importance of living with our biological flora is realized, discovery and management of emerging diseases gain increasing importance.


MOLLI Special Member Event: Behind the Scenes at the Symphony: Mozart’s Requiem Darko Butorac

Special Member Event

Tuesdays, February 19 & 26, 3:00 pm-5:00 pm, University Center Theater, UM, and Thursday, February 28, Dress Rehearsal, Time TBA, Dennison University Theatre, UM Go behind the scenes with the Missoula Symphony Orchestra and join music director Darko Butorac on a journey exploring one of the greatest works ever composed Mozart’s Requiem. In addition to two lectures on the background and structure of the piece, members will have a special opportunity to attend the Missoula Symphony Dress Rehearsal at the Dennison University Theatre and witness the process that brings a masterwork to life. About the instructor: Recently praised by the Tanjug News Agency for his “exceptional energy and musicianship”, Missoula Symphony Music Director Darko Butorac is quickly establishing himself as one of the world’s most sought-after young conductors. Following his debut with the Belgrade Philharmonic in January of 2011, he was invited to both close the 2011 and open the 2012 concert season. In addition to his activities in Belgrade, upcoming concerts this season include debuts with the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Neuss, the Rubinstein Philharmonic of Lodz, the Tallin Sinfonietta, as well as the Springfield and Tallahassee Symphonies in the U.S. as a music director candidate. He will make his Vienna Konzerthaus debut in June, 2014. Free with MOLLI membership. Use a guest pass and bring a friend. Please RSVP by Friday, February 8, 2013. Please note: The concert performances are NOT part of the free Behind the Scenes MOLLI event. Free guest passes are not accepted as admission to the concerts. To purchase a concert ticket, please visit www.missoulasymphony.org.

photo credit: Tom Bauer/Missoulian

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General Information Membership Dues $20 per person annually,

Parking and Transportation Options

membership period is July 1, 2012 - June 30, 2013.

Course Fees $60 per course, plus fees when applicable. How To Register Online at www.umt.edu/molli until Friday, January 18, 2013.

Call us at 406.243.2905 E-mail us at molli@umontana.edu

Hand deliver your form to The University of Montana (UM) campus,Todd Building, adjacent to the University Center.

Mail the registration form to: The University of Montana School of Extended & Lifelong Learning, MOLLI 32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT 59812 Fax your registration form to 406.243.2047

Refund and Cancellation Policy

Course tuition costs may be refunded on a case-by-case basis on or before the third week of the Winter term. Refunds may be applied as a credit towards a future MOLLI course. Refunds are not granted after the third week of the Winter term. Membership cost is non-refundable. If paying by check, Social Security numbers must be provided to the MOLLI office to receive a refund. Social Security numbers are not required for refunds processed from credit card payments.

Course Location

With a few exceptions, most courses are held in the Todd Building on the UM campus, adjacent to the University Center.

Accessibility

The University of Montana is an equal opportunity education provider.  For questions, concerns, or requests for reasonable accommodations, contact Roger Maclean, Dean, School of Extended and Lifelong Learning: 406.243.2983; roger. maclean@umontana.edu.

MOLLI Gift Cards

Give the gift of learning by giving a gift card to cover the cost of membership ($20), a course ($60), or both ($80) to your family and friends. Contact the MOLLI office at 406.243.2905 for more information or to purchase one today.

$12 MOLLI Six Day Parking Pass is good for six individual days of parking on campus. This pass is good for use in payby-hour and decal parking lots at UM. To purchase a parking pass, call 406.243.2905 or add it to your registration form. To learn more about where to park on campus, go online to http://www.umt.edu/publicsafety/docs/ parking.pdf or contact the MOLLI staff for a copy of the map. Please do not park in reserved spaces or your vehicle will be towed!

Financial Assistance

MOLLI tries very hard to keep costs at a minimum so everyone can participate. However, we know that some people may need some help. Therefore, MOLLI is pleased to offer a tuition waiver program to ensure everyone +50 has the opportunity to engage in lifelong learning. This fund has been supported by donations from MOLLI instructors and generous members. To learn more about financial assistance through the MOLLI tuition waiver program, or if you would like to consider a gift to this fund so that others can enjoy learning, please call 406.243.2905.

Textbooks

Textbooks for MOLLI courses are available in the general books section of the Bookstore at UM and may be purchased at a 10% discount.

Donations

Your tax-deductible donation to MOLLI will go a long way in support of tuition waivers, special events, and courses. To learn more, call 406.243.2905.

Bernard Osher Foundation

The Bernard Osher Foundation seeks to improve quality of life through the support of lifelong learning institutes such as MOLLI. The Foundation was founded in 1977 by Bernard Osher, a respected businessman and community leader. The Foundation has now funded more than 120 Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes on campuses of colleges and universities from Maine to Hawaii. Funding for MOLLI is contingent upon membership growth goals, so membership matters. To learn more about The Bernard Osher Foundation visit online http:// www.osherfoundation.org/

Questions? The University of Montana School of Extended & Lifelong Learning, MOLLI 32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT 59812 Phone: 406.243.2905 Fax: 406.243.2047 E-mail: molli@umontana.edu www.umt.edu/molli

MOLLI is pleased to offer the following special! Winter Special: Take two $60 Winter courses for only $100. This is a 33% savings on your second course! *Please note the discount is for one participant enrolling in two courses.

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General Information

$25 MOLLI Term Parking Pass for Jan. 24 - March 1 ONLY. This pass is good for use in pay-by-hour and decal parking lots at UM.


NON-Profit org. u.s. postage paid missoula, mt 59812 permit no. 569

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UM School of Extended & Lifelong Learning, MOLLI The University of Montana 32 Campus Drive Missoula, MT 59812 www.umt.edu/molli 406.243.2905 406.243.2047 Fax

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MOLLI Winter 2013 Brochure