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MOLLI Fall 2011

Curiosity never retires.

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Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at To learn more, contact 406.243.2905 or visit us online at www.umt.edu/molli


Welcome to the Time of Your Life! Initially funded by a grant from the Bernard Osher Foundation, The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UM (MOLLI) is a lifelong learning program for adult learners +50. MOLLI’s goal is to create an accessible and innovative learning environment so that active older adults from all backgrounds and levels of education may pursue learning. MOLLI builds on the rich resources of The University of Montana to offer its members an array of educational and social opportunities. As a MOLLI member you have the opportunity to: • • • • • • •

Take a broad array of courses with distinguished UM faculty, emeritus faculty, and other Missoula area instructors in a “no grade, no test” learning environment Keep active and enrich your life Meet new and interesting people Continue to learn and expand your horizons Develop new skills and explore new interests Travel and learn in new ways Stay mentally fit – and have fun

Membership is $20 per person and is renewable annually. Courses are $60 each plus fees when applicable. Some activities are free to members while others have a small fee. The benefits of membership include: • Access to the UM library • Special member only events • Guest passes to bring a friend to member events • Special “MOLLI only” parking permits during the MOLLI term • 10% discount at the UM Bookstore for textbooks and art supplies for MOLLI courses

“I learned things I didn’t know I wanted to know.”

~MOLLI member

MOLLI Council Members

Cynthia Aten Ann Boone Gladys Considine Charlotte Hay Margaret Johnson Paul Lauren Patrick Mahoney Dennis O’Donnell Ray Risho Herbert Swick Burke Townsend Glenn Wood Marta York Janie Spencer, Interim Director Roger Maclean, Dean, School of Extended & Lifelong Learning Our Valued Partners

The Missoula Symphony and Chorale spectrUM Discovery Area UM President’s Lecture Series The Springs Retirement Community First Night Missoula Montana Museum of Art and Culture International Wildlife Film Festival


Table of Contents Support MOLLI 2 Course Overview 3 Course Listings Fine Arts The Art & Culture of Central Europe Fostering Creativity Surviving Bataan: The Art of Ben Steele

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Humanities Following Magical Montana Trails - Historical Overnight Bus Tour 5 Life Writing for Everyone 5 The Soul of Europe Today 6 Making Believe, Believing What You Make: Poetry of Frost & Stevens 6 Justice: Classical Theories & Contemporary Problems 6 Forgiveness & Reconciliation 7 Montana in the Eye of the Beholder: One Hundred Years of Black & White Photography 7 Reading the Short Story 7 Introduction to India 8 Born in the U.S.A.: American History through Children’s Eyes 8 Current & Political Affairs Constitutional Law & Philosophy World War II in the Pacific Is There Hope for Burma? The U.S. & the Middle East: Dancing on the Heads of Snakes Prayer & Civil Rights

9 9 9 10 10

Natural & Social Sciences Time Traveling through Mathematics: A Cultural Voyeuristic View 11 Climate Change: Myths, the Science, Reality, Challenges, & What’s Next? 11 Our Amazing Earth: Evolution through Volcanism, Plate Tectonics, & Atmospheric Processes 11 Nature’s Critical Interactions: How Partnerships Run the World 12 Biting Off More Than We Can Chew: Managing the Economy in a Twitter World 12

General Information Registration Form

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Support MOLLI In the past years, your membership in MOLLI has meant much more than just taking interesting courses. Your donations help us to: • Provide tuition waivers for those in need • Develop new courses • Provide stipends for instructors • Present special member events Our initial goal is to raise $25,000 by December 2011 to continue to build a sustainable MOLLI program. When you renew your membership or sign up for the Fall term, please consider making a donation by adding it to the registration form.

Thank you for your support of lifelong learning!

Help Us Fill Up the “O” & Reach Our Goal! Your Donation is Needed to Support a Vibrant and Sustainable MOLLI Program

“Thank you, MOLLI staff, for the scholarship you granted me to take this excellent class! By wading through Moby Dick I rediscovered my love of reading good literature.” ~MOLLI member 2


Course Overview Thursdays

Fridays

Sept. 29-Nov. 3, 2011

9:00 am-10:30 am • Constitutional Law & Philosophy • World War II in the Pacific [Late Start Date: Oct. 13 - Nov. 17] • Time Traveling Through Mathematics: A Cultural Voyeuristic View [Four Weeks Only: Sept. 29, Oct. 6, 20 & 27]

Sept. 30-Nov. 4, 2011

9:00 am-10:30 am • Surviving Bataan: The Art of Ben Steele [Late Start, Three Weeks Only: Oct. 14, 21 & 28] • Fostering Creativity [No Class Oct. 7; Make-up Nov. 18] 11:00 am-12:30 pm • Forgiveness & Reconciliation • Montana in the Eye of the Beholder: One Hundred Years of Black & White Photography

11:00 am-12:30 pm • Life Writing for Everyone • Climate Change: Myths, the Science, Reality, Challenges, & What’s Next? • Our Amazing Earth: Evolution through Volcanism, Plate Tectonics, & Atmospheric Processes

1:00 pm-2:30 pm • Reading the Short Story • Introduction to India 3:00 pm-4:30 pm • Born in the U.S.A.: American History through Children’s Eyes • Prayer & Civil Rights [Early Start Date: Sept. 23, 30, Oct. 21, 28, Nov. 4 & Thursday, Nov. 10; No Class Oct. 7 & 14]

1:00 pm-2:30 pm • The Soul of Europe Today • Nature’s Critical Interactions: How Partnerships Run the World [Late Start Date: Oct. 6 - Nov. 10] 3:00 pm-4:30 pm • Making Believe, Believing What You Make: Poetry of Frost & Stevens • Justice: Classical Theories & Contemporary Problems • Is There Hope for Burma? • Biting Off More Than We Can Chew: Managing the Economy in a Twitter World

Historical Overnight Bus Tour Following Magical Montana Trails Guided by Montana Historian Hal Stearns

Thursday Evening Courses

Course on Monday, Sept. 12, 2:00-4:00 pm Bus Tour Departs Tuesday, Sept. 13, 7:30 am

4:45 pm-6:30 pm • The Art & Culture of Central Europe [Five Extended Length Dates: Sept. 29 - Oct. 27]

& Returns Wednesday, Sept. 14, evening Two wonderful communities, Great Falls and Fort Benton, share the marquee with the mighty Missouri River on a two-day field trip that has it all!

7:00 pm-8:30 pm • The U.S. & the Middle East: Dancing on the Heads of Snakes [Early Start, Three Weeks Only: Sept. 22, 29 & Oct. 6]

Registration deadline is Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2011. To learn more see page 5.

Upcoming Event Surviving Bataan: The Art of Ben Steele

Course in Conjunction with War Torn: The Art of Ben Steele

Keith Hardin and Herbert Swick, M.D. Fridays, 9:00-10:30 am; Oct. 14, 21 & 28 Todd Building, UM

Paintings and Drawings from the Bataan Death March Exhibit on display Sept. 23 - Nov. 19 at the

Includes informal breakfast discussion with Ben Steele on last course date. To learn more see page 4.

Exhibit details at www.umt.edu/montanamuseum. 3


MOLLI Fall 2011 Course Listings Fine Arts The Art & Culture of Central Europe

Evening Course

H. Rafael Chacón

Thursdays, 4:45-6:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Five Extended Length Dates: Sept. 29 - Oct. 27

From the advent of the Hapsburgs through the collapse of Communism, central Europe has presented a rich and often troubling history over the last millennium. In six richly illustrated lectures, Professor Chacón will probe how successive empires have shaped the character of this important part of western civilization and left us an unsurpassed visual and cultural legacy in art and architecture.

Fine Arts

About the instructor: Dr. H. Rafael Chacón is a Professor of Art History and Criticism at The University of Montana where he investigates, publishes, and lectures on a variety of art, historical, and critical subjects. His most recent publications include an article on the art of Glacier National Park and an essay on modernist ceramics in Montana. He recently delivered a paper on large-scale, communally based art projects that go viral online at the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences.

Fostering Creativity

Eileen Rafferty

Fridays, 9:00-10:30 am, Todd Building, UM

No Class Oct. 7; Make-up Nov. 18

Many think that artistic talent and creativity are gifts that are inherent and natural. In reality, artistic vision and creativity can be learned with the proper resources, hard work, and dedication. From a discussion of the concept of creativity to practical exercises, we will discuss the idea of artistry, examine past and present artists, their working methods, and delve into readings about the artistic process. Students will gain a clearer understanding of what creativity is to each of us, and how we can reach for it. Although much of the content is based in the field of photographic art, these concepts can apply to many mediums. About the instructor: Eileen Rafferty is an artist who combines her lifelong study of photography with digital technology to create photography, mixed media, and video. Based on ideas of memory, photographic history and visual culture, her work fuses archival imagery and processes with modern technology to join the past and the present. She received her MFA in Photography/Film from VCU in Richmond, VA, and currently teaches at the Rocky Mountain School of Photography.

Special Course in Conjunction with War Torn: The Art of Ben Steele at MMAC Surviving Bataan: The Art of Ben Steele

Keith Hardin and Herbert Swick, M.D.

Fridays, 9:00-10:30 am, Todd Building, UM

Late Start, Three Weeks Only: Oct. 14, 21 & 28

Optional Textbook: Tears in the Darkness, by Michael & Elizabeth Norman

Informal breakfast discussion with Ben Steele on last course date. Course fee: $30

The Battle of Bataan marked a major allied defeat in the early months of World War II. Tens of thousands of U.S. and allied prisoners of war endured horrifying conditions as they were marched across the Bataan Peninsula and held in Japanese POW camps for almost four years. Thousands upon thousands died, and many of the survivors were scarred for life. Ben Steele, a Montana artist who survived the Bataan Death March, used his art to both record and recover from his experiences. The Montana Museum of Art and Culture is featuring a major exhibit of Ben Steele’s art this fall. This special three-part MOLLI class will use this exhibit to explore historical, psychological, and medical consequences of the Bataan Death March. About the instructors: Keith Hardin is an artist as well as an art and military historian. He serves as a consultant to the Military Museum at Old Fort Missoula. Herbert Swick is a physician with an interest in how artists depict the experiences of illness and healing. 4


Humanities Following Magical Montana Trails

Historical Overnight Bus Tour

Hal Stearns

Monday, Sept. 12, 2:00-4:00 pm, Todd Building, UM

Bus Tour Departs Missoula: Tuesday, Sept. 13, 7:30 am, from East Broadway Park-N-Ride

Bus Tour Returns to Missoula: Wednesday, Sept. 14, approx. 8 pm, to East Broadway Park-N-Ride

Course & Bus Tour fee: $200

Bus Tour includes transportation, lodging, dinner at the Grand Union Hotel & most other meals. Details provided upon registration.

Registration deadline is Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2011.

Additional fees if requested: $80 single room & $4 for baggage assistance.

Course Only fee: $10

About the instructor: Hal Stearns, a native of Harlowton with generations of ranchers, homesteaders and newsmen in his family, holds a B.A. from the University of Notre Dame and an M.A. and doctorate from The University of Montana. He taught for 34 years in Germany, at Sentinel High School and at UM. Honored as Montana’s Teacher of the Year and Outstanding U.S. History Teacher, he was the recipient of two “National Endowment for the Humanities” grants and was a Keizai Koho Fellow to Japan. He also served in the Montana Army National Guard for 35 years, attaining the rank of Brigadier General.

Historical Helena Bus Tour with Hal Stearns in Spring 2010

Life Writing for Everyone

Joyce Hocker

Thursdays, 11:00 am-12:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Textbook: Write From the Heart, by Hal Zina Bennett

Are you writing about your life? Have you wanted to, but didn’t know where to start? The instructor will stimulate your own writing through a review of life themes and developmental stages. The focus will be on your own writing, both in class and at home. Brief readings will inspire you to find your own key stories, whether you use them for your own insight or plan to share them with family and the world. You will have the option of reading short excerpts from your writing in class, in an encouraging and non-critical environment. Please bring a three ring binder and paper or a laptop to class. About the instructor: Joyce Hocker received a Ph.D. in Communication from the University of Texas, and a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from The University of Montana. She was a professor of communication at the Universities of Colorado and Montana. Joyce recently retired from her private practice in Clinical Psychology. She is coauthor of Interpersonal Conflict (McGraw Hill, 8th. Ed.). She has been keeping a journal all of her adult life, and recently has published several memoir articles. She has presented her own life writing for the National Communication Association. 5

Humanities

Two wonderful communities, Great Falls and Fort Benton, share the marquee with the mighty Missouri River on a two-day field trip that has it all: cowboys and the days of the Open Range, the steamboat era, Indian stories, the finest buffalo display anywhere, a special buffalo jump, a dog named Shep, an elk called Earl, and the cagiest wolf of them all. Dinner at the Grand Union Hotel in Fort Benton will feature the creations of Chef Scott Myers, who focuses on Montana regional cuisine with a strong farm to table approach. We will walk along a levee and a river trail. Visits to the Lewis and Clark Interpretative Center and Charlie Russell’s home, studio, and gallery and Montana’s amazing agricultural museum add to this unique visit of a dynamic part of our Big Sky Country. Some walking required.

MOLLI Textbooks

Textbooks are available for purchase at the UM Bookstore. Textbook prices have been discounted 10% for MOLLI members.


The Soul of Europe Today

Richard Drake

Thursdays, 1:00-2:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

The ideological history of modern Europe consists of an engagement among four traditions: liberalism, conservatism, socialism, and reactionism. The course will focus on the philosophical claims of the foundation thinkers in these traditions, and show how all four are still in competition for Europe’s “soul” today. Fears over nonEuropean immigration, environmental collapse, and a protracted economic crisis have resuscitated the hopes and appeal of radicals who only a short time ago appeared to be of no political consequence. Contemporary Europe furnishes an ideal case study for understanding the crisis of liberalism and the prospects of its principal ideological rivals. About the instructor: Richard Drake has taught at The University of Montana since 1982. He is best known on campus for his course “Terrorism in the Modern World.” He has published extensively on modern Italian history and is at work on a book about contemporary Europe. For the past twenty-four years, he has been the coordinator of the President’s Lecture Series.

Humanities

Making Believe, Believing What You Make: Poetry of Frost & Stevens

Robert Pack

Thursdays, 3:00-4:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Textbooks: Robert Frost: Collected Poems (Holt) and Wallace Stevens: Collected Poems (Knopf)

Selected poems by Robert Frost and Wallace Stevens will be closely examined for their metaphorical structure and their exposition of the concept of the creative imagination. Other major themes, such as celebration and lamentation, also will be considered in assessing the accomplishments of these major American poets. About the instructor: Robert Pack is a Distinguished Senior Visiting Professor at The University of Montana, Abernethy Professor Emeritus at Middlebury College, and Emeritus Director of the Bread Loaf Writers Conference. He is also the author of over twenty books of poetry and literary criticism, including books on Frost and Stevens.

“It was fun to be a student again…especially in a class without tests or grades.” ~MOLLI member Justice: Classical Theories & Contemporary Problems

Dane Scott

Thursdays, 3:00-4:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Textbook: Justice, What is the Right Thing to Do?, by Michael J. Sandel

Everyone talks about justice, but do most people have a clear conception of justice? What makes certain decisions just and others unjust? What ethical principles should we use to settle contentious moral issues? This course will discuss some of the most vexing moral issues of our time as we read Michael Sandel’s engaging book, Justice, What is the Right Thing to Do? This discussion-based course will examine a number of controversial moral issues, such as healthcare, climate change, and global poverty, based on a substantive engagement with theories of justice. About the instructor: Dane Scott, Ph.D. is the Director of the Mansfield Center’s Ethics and Public Affairs Program, and Associate Professor of Ethics in the College of Forestry and Conservation at The University of Montana. He holds a doctorate in philosophy from Vanderbilt University. Dr. Scott specializes in environmental ethics, climate change ethics and policy, and ethical issues involving emerging technologies.

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Forgiveness & Reconciliation

Gary W. Hawk

Fridays, 11:00 am-12:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Textbook: Difficult Conversations, by Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton & Sheila Heen

This class will offer a guided conversation about important matters—how individuals and families move through difficult experiences toward forgiveness and reconciliation. We will begin with a theoretical overview and investigate a few different models for this process. We will see how South Africa’s experience with The Truth and Reconciliation Commission can inform our understanding of the relationship between trauma and forgiveness. We will explore the relationship between painful memories and the development and recovery of identity. We will venture into the barely-charted river of self-forgiveness, relying on the humor and honesty of Anne Lamott to help us learn to be gracious toward ourselves. We will explore forms of communication that can help people grow toward understanding and compassion after a period of alienation. And we will let a few poets show us how we can live well, even gratefully, in a world of wounds.

Montana in the Eye of the Beholder: One Hundred Years of Black & White Photography

James Sieg

Fridays, 11:00 am-12:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

During the course we will examine and enjoy black and white photographs of Montana landscapes, people, animals, cultural artifacts, tools, and architecture. The photographs were created in Montana by Montana photographers between the years of 1850 and 1950. Some of the photographers to be considered are Evelyn Cameron, L.A. Huffman, F.J. Hayes, and Rollin H. McKay. Short readings from photographers’ day-books and journals, as well as their own insights and critiques, will encourage students to make connections among images, word, and Montana history. About the instructor: During a forty-five year teaching career Sieg has taught English, Creative Writing, and Journalism. He holds a Master’s Degree in Comparative Literature from the University of California, Irvine and a Ph.D. from New York University. Sieg’s black and white photographs have appeared in national publications as well as in galleries and museums.

Reading the Short Story

David Allan Cates

Fridays, 1:00-2:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

We will read stories by masters, and discuss the shape and structure of this relatively new literary form. How do short stories work? What is unique about the short story’s subject and its history? How do they relate to other forms of storytelling, and how do they tell us about what it means to be a human being? What do short stories reveal about our culture? How do they give us something we need? The goal is for students to have a deeper understanding of the how these little masterpieces work, with the purpose of being moved by their elegance and appreciating their beauty. About the instructor: David Allan Cates is the author of the novels Hunger in America, X out of Wonderland, and Freeman Walker. He has published 20 short stories in literary magazines and his non-fiction has appeared in The New York Times and Outside Magazine. He is also the Executive Director of Missoula Medical Aid and leads medical teams to work in impoverished areas of Honduras.

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Humanities

About the instructor: Gary Hawk is an instructor in the Davidson Honors College at The University of Montana where he teaches a variety of courses in the humanities. For fourteen years, he has taught a popular course called “Forgiveness and Reconciliation” through the Davidson Honors College. He brings to MOLLI a background as a minister in the United Church of Christ, five previous MOLLI courses, and a desire to listen as well as speak. When not on campus he can often be found in his sea kayak “Bluebird” or in his shop where he designs and makes furniture.


Humanities

Introduction to India

Ruth Vanita

Fridays, 1:00-2:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

India, the world’s largest secular democracy, is one of the ancient cradles of civilization and now home to onesixth of humanity. This course introduces students to Indian history, society, and culture, including the major religions practiced (Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Islam); the major languages and literatures; cuisines; arts (dance, drama, music, sculpture, architecture, painting); politics and philosophy (e.g., Gandhian thought); modern economy and life in cities and villages. Artifacts and audio-visual media will be used to convey some of the experiences, colors and sounds of everyday life in India. About the instructor: Ruth Vanita is a Professor of Liberal Studies at The University of Montana and formerly a Reader in English at Delhi University, India. She co-founded Manushi, India’s first nationwide feminist journal. The author of several books published in the U.S. and India, she is also a poet, translator (Hindi and Urdu to English) and literary critic.

Born in the U.S.A.: American History through Children’s Eyes

Anya Jabour

Fridays, 3:00-4:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Optional Textbook: Major Problems in the History of American Families and Children, ed. by Anya Jabour

This course offers a unique perspective on American history by exploring selected time periods in U.S. history as experienced by children. How do children’s insights reveal experiences missed by adults? Topics will include children in the Early America, the Civil War, the Progressive Era, the Great Depression, and World War II. About the instructor: Anya Jabour received her Ph.D. from Rice University in 1995 and has taught in the History Department at The University of Montana ever since. Her specialties are U.S. women’s history, the history of families and children, and the American South. Her most recent book is Topsy-Turvy: How the Civil War Turned the World Upside Down for Southern Children (Ivan R. Dee, 2010). She is currently working on a biography of twentieth-century social worker and child welfare advocate Sophonisba Preston Breckinridge.

MOLLI by the Numbers 2010-2011

1,175 members 3,695 participants in 62 courses & 11 special events UC Reserved 1,537 increase in participants over 2009-2010 MOLLI Social Tables Each term, tables will be reserved 1,904 enrolled in courses in the University Center Food Court for MOLLI members to socialize from 8:00 am-5:00 pm before, during, 10,354 participants in life of the program and after classes on Thursdays and

Fridays. The tables are located in the far Southeast corner near the brick wall and will have signs noting the reservation.

Thank you for your continued support & for helping us spread the word about MOLLI & lifelong learning! 8


Current & Political Affairs

Tom Huff

Thursdays, 9:00-10:30 am, Todd Building, UM

Our constitutional law is rooted in a distinctive set of political values framed in the 17th and 18th centuries, revised after our civil war, and expanded during the mid-twentieth century. This class will discuss some important parts of constitutional law (e.g., the Bill of Rights, the Fourteenth Amendment, the application of the Bill of Rights to the states, and the Commerce Clause) by analyzing how constitutional law reflects political values, including their structure and the problems they sought to address. Inevitably, we will consider issues of constitutional interpretation, though this controversial subject will not be the focus of this class. About the instructor: Professor Huff teaches The University of Montana School of Law’s seminar in the Philosophy of Law with U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy and Court Staff Attorney Melissa Hartigan. He also teaches political philosophy in the Philosophy Department. Huff taught Constitutional Law for 25 years in the Law School with Professors Elison and Kende. Huff won the University’s Outstanding Teacher Award in 1971 and in 1992.

World War II in the Pacific

James V. Koch

Thursdays, 9:00-10:30 am, Todd Building, UM

Late Start Date: Oct. 13 - Nov. 17

The Pacific Theater in World War II has gained interest through several recent books as well as the HBO miniseries, “The Pacific.” We will examine the conflict overall and then focus on fascinating topics such as the role of code breaking and intelligence, General Douglas MacArthur, the atomic bomb, and the possibility that Japan could have defeated the U.S. We will also hear from some World War II veterans who actually were there, look at bits of several videos, examine how novelists and movies have treated the conflict, consider the final results, and see how our views of the War have changed over the years. About the instructor: James V. Koch teaches Economics and History at both Old Dominion University and The University of Montana and is the former President of both institutions. He has published extensively on World War II and has appeared on History Channel videos as an expert. He is teaching “The History of World War II” this fall at UM.

Is There Hope for Burma?

Steven I. Levine

Thursdays, 3:00-4:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Textbook: A History of Modern Burma, by Michael W. Charney

Burma, or Myanmar as its military rulers renamed it, has been a wallflower at Southeast Asia’s modernization dance. Wracked with ethnic and political conflict since its birth as a modern state in 1948, Burma came under military rule in 1962. Despite a recent election that created a facade of democracy, it remains highly repressive and poverty-stricken. Its best-known opposition leader, Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi, although presently free, faces the constant threat of re-arrest. Its rulers selfishly exploit Burma’s rich natural resources. We will examine Burma’s history, politics, economy, and prospects for change. About the instructor: Steven I. Levine has studied and taught Asian politics and history for 50 years. A Harvard Ph.D., he has lived and traveled widely in Asia and published extensively on China and related subjects. His most recent MOLLI course in Fall 2010 focused on North Korea. He is presently a Research Faculty Associate in the Department of History at The University of Montana.

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Current & Political Affairs

Constitutional Law & Philosophy


Current & Political Affairs

The U.S. & the Middle East: Dancing on the Heads of Snakes

Evening Course

Mark Johnson

Thursdays, 7:00-8:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

*Instructor will be available for questions for up to 30 minutes after class

Early Start, Three Weeks Only: Sept. 22, 29 & Oct. 6 Course fee: $30

The Middle East is witnessing an unprecedented political upheaval. Popular protests and riots have touched virtually every corner of the region from North Africa to the Persian Gulf. The so-called Arab Spring has been met with deepening bloodshed and brutality. Meanwhile, an equally unprecedented power struggle has erupted in Iran, while the crisis between Palestine and Israel shows no sign of improving. How should the U.S. be responding to these major turns of events? What options do Washington and its allies have? Please join us for a discussion of this fascinating, turbulent, and critical region. About the instructor: Mark Johnson was one of the first instructors in the MOLLI program. After a 30-year career in the U.S. State Department, he returned home to his native Montana where he founded the World Affairs Council of Montana. He served in Egypt, the Persian Gulf, Iran, and Kuwait and was U.S. Ambassador to Senegal.

Prayer & Civil Rights

Tobin Miller Shearer

Fridays, 3:00-4:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Early Start Date: Sept. 23, 30, Oct. 21, 28, Nov. 4 & Thursday, Nov. 10 [No class Oct. 7 & 14]

Explore the meaning of public prayer during the civil rights movement by asking, “Does religion help or hinder the pursuit of social change?” The class will study how public prayer allowed activists to articulate a rationale for change, appeal to ethical values, and evoke divine support. Rather than acts of piety, prayer emerges as a strategically employed resource. Using video clips, audio recordings, newspaper accounts, and oral histories, class members will explore instances of public prayer during the civil rights movement. About the instructor: Tobin Miller Shearer is an assistant professor of history and the African-American Studies Coordinator at The University of Montana. He holds a dual Ph.D. in History and Religious Studies from Northwestern University where he won several teaching awards. He looks forward with great anticipation to exploring prayer and the civil rights movement with all those who will gather for this study.

“The instructor is an expert in his field, is a master teacher, and makes every class session challenging and exciting. The time flies by! This was one of the very best MOLLI courses I have taken.” ~MOLLI member about Black Radical Traditions taught by Tobin Miller Shearer, Winter 2011

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Natural & Social Sciences Time Traveling through Mathematics: A Cultural Voyeuristic View Bharath Sriraman

Thursdays, 9:00-10:30 am, Todd Building, UM

Four Weeks Only: Sept. 29, Oct. 6, 20 & 27

Course fee: $40

The course will present a cultural, non-European view of the development of mathematics by examining the contributions of early civilizations including Egypt, India, Maya and Central Asia (Persia, China). Number systems, calendar development, and the contextual relevance of mathematics to the particular culture will be examined. Myths about the static nature of the mathematics developed by the ancients will be dispelled by revealing the travels of the ancients and the cross fertilization of mathematical ideas between civilizations. About the instructor: Bharath Sriraman is a Professor of Mathematics at The University of Montana, as well as holding a faculty position in Central/Southwestern Asian Studies. He is a former merchant marine with Klaveness & Co (Oslo), and for the last two decades has traveled, collaborated and published extensively with researchers in the Nordic world, Western Europe, the Mediterranean, Central Asia and Australasia. For more details visit: http://www.umt.edu/math/People/Sriraman.html

Climate Change: Myths, the Science, Reality, Challenges, & What’s Next?

Don Hyndman

Thursdays, 11:00 am-12:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Textbooks: 1) Climate Change, by Robert Henson 2) Chapter 10 of Natural Hazards and Disasters, 3rd ed., 2011, by Hyndman and Hyndman e-chapter available for $7.99 at http://www.cengagebrain.com/shop/isbn/9780538737524 This course will address important questions in the fascinating domain of climate change: what are indicators of climate change, to what extent is it human-caused, and what are the arguments for and against it? Among the issues to be considered are climate cycles and their causes, greenhouse gases and their sources, the consequences of black carbon, and future outlooks for changes in temperature, precipitation, available fresh water, and extreme weather. Finally, what are the unalterable long-term consequences of ongoing climate change, and how might we adapt? About the instructor: Don Hyndman is Professor Emeritus of Geosciences at The University of Montana. He also taught at Stanford and presented many research papers nationally and internationally. He is co-author of the Roadside Geology books, an advanced textbook on igneous rocks, and the recent college textbook Natural Hazards and Disasters. He travels extensively for research on hazards and climate change.

Our Amazing Earth: Evolution through Volcanism, Plate Tectonics, & Atmospheric Processes

Ian Muirhead Lange

Thursdays, 11:00 am-12:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Our planet continues to change, internally and externally – sometimes slowly, sometimes catastrophically. By employing some of Sherlock Holmes’ forensic techniques, earth scientists have learned a great deal about Earth’s development, and how and why it is so different from its stony solar system neighbors. Earth-shaping processes and the cataclysmic effects of large, meteoric impacting will be examined starting with our planet’s early years, 4.6 billion years ago. We shall end our investigative journey by looking into Earth’s future. About the instructor: Ian Lange received his B.A. and M.A. from Dartmouth College and Ph.D. from the University of Washington in geology and geochemistry. He taught at CA State University Fresno and Dartmouth College from 1972-2002 and was a University of Montana Research Faculty Affiliate with the U.S. Geological Survey from 1978-1996. He has published more than 130 papers in national and international journals and consults for mining and exploration companies.

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Natural & Social Sciences


Natural & Social Sciences

Nature’s Critical Interactions: How Partnerships Run the World

Diana L. Six

Thursdays, 1:00-2:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Late Start Date: Oct. 6 - Nov. 10

Most organisms on earth benefit from involvement with other organisms. Called “mutualisms,” such partnerships allow participants to do better by partnering than going it alone. Mutualisms allow organisms to succeed in marginal habitats or to compete when otherwise they would be at a disadvantage. In some cases, mutualisms have allowed organisms to become so successful they act as ecosystem engineers or severe pests. This class will examine several fascinating mutualisms, including those between humans and microbes, and the mountain pine beetle and fungi. We will also learn about how human impacts (including climate change) are enhancing or degrading some of these interactions. About the instructor: Diana L. Six has a Ph.D. in entomology with a minor in mycology (and other degrees in microbiology, agriculture, and chemical ecology). Most of her education and research has been driven by questions of how organisms get along (or don’t) and why, and what that means to humans and the ecosystems upon which they depend. She also likes to fly fish.

Biting Off More Than We Can Chew: Managing the Economy in a Twitter World

Dennis O’Donnell

Thursdays, 3:00-4:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

This class will address some of the major challenges facing the U.S. economy, including such issues as attempting to reach full employment, international trade balance, and financial stability with minimal inflation in the current global economic system. We will examine the gap between the experience of economic policy makers and the belief systems that dominate current economic policy implementation. We will try to make sense of the economic/political positions of the candidates vying for votes in the 2012 general election. We will see if modern social media such as Twitter, Facebook, and the 24-hour news cycle have clarified these issues or muddied the waters. If we figure this out and make sense of the economic/political deluge, we could go viral and tweet the “good news” to the massesvirtually of course. This is optional with extra credits usable to buy shares in Lehman Brothers of Two Dot, Montana! About the instructor: Dr. Dennis O’Donnell is a retired Professor of Economics/Asian Studies at The University of Montana (1974 - 2007). He has a Ph.D. from Penn State. His research and teaching focused on economic development issues in the U.S. and in Asia, with work in Nepal, Thailand, South Korea, the Republic of China, China, and regional issues Asia-wide. He served as Mansfield Professor of Modern Asian Affairs, Chair of Asian Studies, and worked at the East-West Center, the University of Hawaii, The London School of Economics, in China for the U.S. Institute of Peace, and in the U.S. State Department with the Foreign Affairs College (Chinese Foreign Ministry).

Volunteer Opportunity: Classroom Facilitator Please consider joining our support team of classroom facilitators. During Fall 2011, we will select a few classes as a pilot program for this opportunity. From introducing the instructor, assisting with audio-visual needs, and distributing and collecting evaluations – our classroom facilitators help make sure courses run smoothly. Facilitators must be registered, paid, and currently attending the class they will assist with; and will be selected on a first-come, first-served basis. You will need to be available the full term and must attend a brief orientation. If you are interested in this opportunity, fill out a brief survey at www.umt.edu/molli.

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General Information Membership Dues $20 per person annually

Fall Special

Course Fees $60 per course plus fees when applicable

Take two $60 fall courses for only $100. This is a 33% savings on your second course!

How To Register

Please note the discount is for one participant enrolling in two $60 courses. Historical bus tour not included in special.

Online at www.umt.edu/molli Call us at 406.243.2905

Email us at molli@umontana.edu

Hand deliver your form to the Todd Building, UM Campus, adjacent to the UC. Mail the registration form to: The University of Montana, School of Extended & Lifelong Learning, MOLLI, 32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT 59812 Fax your registration form to 406.243.6224

Course Location

With a few exceptions, most courses are held in the Todd Building on the UM campus, adjacent to the University Center.

Financial Assistance

Tuition waivers are available to ensure everyone +50 has the opportunity to engage in lifelong learning. To learn more call 406.243.2905.

MOLLI Gift Cards

MOLLI membership and/or course gift cards are wonderful presents for family and friends. Purchase a MOLLI gift card for a membership ($20), or MOLLI course ($60), or both ($80). To learn more about giving the gift of learning call 406.243.2905.

Parking and Transportation Options

$25 Special MOLLI Parking Pass for Sept. 29-Nov. 4 ONLY. This pass is good for use in pay-by-hour and decal parking lots at UM. $12 Special MOLLI Six Day Pass is good for six individual days of parking on campus. This pass is good for use in pay-by-hour and decal parking lots at UM. To purchase a pass call 406.243.2905 or add it to your registration form. To learn more about where to park on campus go online to http://www.umt.edu/publicsafety/ docs/parking.pdf or contact the MOLLI staff for a copy of the map. Please do not park in reserved spaces or your vehicle will be towed!

About the Costs of MOLLI

MOLLI tries very hard to keep costs at a minimum so everyone can participate. However, we know that some people may still need help. Therefore, MOLLI is pleased to offer a tuition waiver program to ensure everyone +50 has the opportunity to engage in lifelong learning. This fund has been supported by donations from MOLLI instructors and generous members.

To learn more about financial assistance through the MOLLI tuition waiver program, or if you would like to consider a gift to this fund so that others can enjoy learning, please call 406.243.2905.

Textbooks Textbooks for MOLLI courses can be purchased at the UM Bookstore at a 10% discount. They are available in the general books section. Donations Your tax-deductible donation to MOLLI will go a long way in support of tuition waivers, special events, and courses. To learn more, call 406.243.2905.

General Information

Bernard Osher Foundation The Osher Foundation seeks to improve quality of life through the support of lifelong learning institutes such as MOLLI. The Bernard Osher Foundation was founded in 1977 by Bernard Osher, a respected businessman and community leader. The Osher Foundation has now funded more than 120 Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes on campuses of colleges and universities from Maine to Hawaii. Funding for MOLLI is contingent upon membership growth goals, so membership matters! To learn more about The Bernard Osher Foundation visit online http://www.osherfoundation.org/

Questions? The University of Montana School of Extended & Lifelong Learning, MOLLI 32 Campus Drive Missoula, MT 59812 406.243.2905 Fax 406.243.6224 molli@umontana.edu www.umt.edu/molli

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MCE221

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Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UM School of Extended & Lifelong Learning, MOLLI The University of Montana 32 Campus Drive Missoula, MT 59812 www.umt.edu/molli 406.243.2905 406.243.6224 FAX

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Fall 2011 Brochure for MOLLI