Page 1


01 MOHAWK

MAKER

02 QUARTERLY

ISSUE 02:

A

MASTERY OF MATERIALS

WHAT WILL YOU MAKE TODAY?

B

WELCOME TO THE

MOHAWK MAKER QUARTERLY MASTERY OF MATERIALS

D

E

The origin of exceptional craft lies in exceptional materials.

A friend recently told us about his quest to recreate his grandmother’s cherry pie. She made her crusts using eggs from her neighbor’s chickens, unbleached flour and cream-top milk. Although it was a family favorite and requested year-round, she only made it in the summer months when cherries were at their ripest. She passed what she knew down to her grandson: only the best ingredients make the best food. The same holds true for paper, knives, apparel, coffee or other products. We know when we encounter well-made things. They taste better, last longer, look more beautiful and feel good in our hands. To put it simply, materials matter. Craftsmen make great products as a result of the time and energy spent developing their craft and perfecting processes, but everything begins with great raw materials: the pulp and the water, the wood and the steel, the cotton, the coffee bean. For our second issue of the Mohawk Maker Quarterly, we spoke to a diverse group of artists and craftspeople and asked them to tell the stories behind their materials. KOBO Pure Soy Candles clarified the difference between paraffin and soy wax, and the reasons they’ve chosen soy for their candles. Brooklyn Slate told us about their family’s quarry in upstate New York, and Juniper Ridge described foraging in Big Sur for their natural fragrances. Koppi Coffee explained the

C

H E ATH C E R AM I C S

A .

B RO O K LY N S L ATE

B .

PE N D LE TO N WO O LE N M I LLS

TABLE OF CONTENTS

C.

HAR R I S T W E E D

Letter from the Editor

2

D.

MAST B ROTH E RS C H O CO L ATES

Seed to Sheet

3

E .

H E ATH C E R AM I C S

A Case for Adaptation

5

F.

N E E MAN TO O LS

The Story of Loop

6

From Designer to Brewer

6

Materials Matter

7

The Movement

9

Departments

11

J EF F ERY CRO S S

importance of traveling to the sources of their beans in order to better understand their product. While each person we spoke with had a unique story to tell and expertise to share, we found that underlying these differences were two common values: quality and sustainability. We at Mohawk share these values. Each of our products has a recipe driven by ingredients carefully selected to yield specific properties. Pulps, dyes, water and fillers are expertly blended to yield aesthetic impact and optimal press performance. And because we care about the environment and our future generations, we source pulp from sustainable forests, conserve water, and harness wind power for our mills. Our customers might not know all this when they touch our paper, but its beautiful surface and dependable consistency prove that we use only the finest materials. As craftspeople working in the digital age, we know that physical experiences mean more to us than ever. Whether found on our family’s land or sourced from across the world, our materials are the foundation of products that matter. Join us in celebrating the origins of our craft. —Thomas D. O’Connor Jr.

GA B R I EL A H ER M A N

CA ROL A N N PE ACOCK

JACOB DI M I T ER

F

ADDITIONAL CONTENT

Mohawk Live Augmented Reality App Mohawk Live incorporates augmented reality, a new technology which allows access to content from web-based channels via scanned images on printed paper. The app was specifically designed to enhance materials printed on Mohawk fine paper, enhancing packaging, publications, point of sale displays, and other projects printed on Mohawk products. Mohawk Live seamlessly integrates print with dynamic, interactive content and transforms a one dimensional image to a multidimensional experience featuring 3-D images, videos, photos, infographics, text, websites, and animations.

Mohawk Live is easy to download and use, following these steps: 1

Download the free app from the Apple App Store or Google Play.

2 Point and hover a mobile device at the image that has the

Mohawk Live icon.

3 Wait for the enhanced content to load. WiFi connections are

recommended for faster load times and enhanced quality.

4 The app will launch enhanced content, seemingly bringing

the printed piece to life.


01 MOHAWK

MAKER

02 QUARTERLY

ISSUE 02:

A

MASTERY OF MATERIALS

WHAT WILL YOU MAKE TODAY?

B

WELCOME TO THE

MOHAWK MAKER QUARTERLY MASTERY OF MATERIALS

D

E

The origin of exceptional craft lies in exceptional materials.

A friend recently told us about his quest to recreate his grandmother’s cherry pie. She made her crusts using eggs from her neighbor’s chickens, unbleached flour and cream-top milk. Although it was a family favorite and requested year-round, she only made it in the summer months when cherries were at their ripest. She passed what she knew down to her grandson: only the best ingredients make the best food. The same holds true for paper, knives, apparel, coffee or other products. We know when we encounter well-made things. They taste better, last longer, look more beautiful and feel good in our hands. To put it simply, materials matter. Craftsmen make great products as a result of the time and energy spent developing their craft and perfecting processes, but everything begins with great raw materials: the pulp and the water, the wood and the steel, the cotton, the coffee bean. For our second issue of the Mohawk Maker Quarterly, we spoke to a diverse group of artists and craftspeople and asked them to tell the stories behind their materials. KOBO Pure Soy Candles clarified the difference between paraffin and soy wax, and the reasons they’ve chosen soy for their candles. Brooklyn Slate told us about their family’s quarry in upstate New York, and Juniper Ridge described foraging in Big Sur for their natural fragrances. Koppi Coffee explained the

C

H E ATH C E R AM I C S

A .

B RO O K LY N S L ATE

B .

PE N D LE TO N WO O LE N M I LLS

TABLE OF CONTENTS

C.

HAR R I S T W E E D

Letter from the Editor

2

D.

MAST B ROTH E RS C H O CO L ATES

Seed to Sheet

3

E .

H E ATH C E R AM I C S

A Case for Adaptation

5

F.

N E E MAN TO O LS

The Story of Loop

6

From Designer to Brewer

6

Materials Matter

7

The Movement

9

Departments

11

J EF F ERY CRO S S

importance of traveling to the sources of their beans in order to better understand their product. While each person we spoke with had a unique story to tell and expertise to share, we found that underlying these differences were two common values: quality and sustainability. We at Mohawk share these values. Each of our products has a recipe driven by ingredients carefully selected to yield specific properties. Pulps, dyes, water and fillers are expertly blended to yield aesthetic impact and optimal press performance. And because we care about the environment and our future generations, we source pulp from sustainable forests, conserve water, and harness wind power for our mills. Our customers might not know all this when they touch our paper, but its beautiful surface and dependable consistency prove that we use only the finest materials. As craftspeople working in the digital age, we know that physical experiences mean more to us than ever. Whether found on our family’s land or sourced from across the world, our materials are the foundation of products that matter. Join us in celebrating the origins of our craft. —Thomas D. O’Connor Jr.

GA B R I EL A H ER M A N

CA ROL A N N PE ACOCK

JACOB DI M I T ER

F

ADDITIONAL CONTENT

Mohawk Live Augmented Reality App Mohawk Live incorporates augmented reality, a new technology which allows access to content from web-based channels via scanned images on printed paper. The app was specifically designed to enhance materials printed on Mohawk fine paper, enhancing packaging, publications, point of sale displays, and other projects printed on Mohawk products. Mohawk Live seamlessly integrates print with dynamic, interactive content and transforms a one dimensional image to a multidimensional experience featuring 3-D images, videos, photos, infographics, text, websites, and animations.

Mohawk Live is easy to download and use, following these steps: 1

Download the free app from the Apple App Store or Google Play.

2 Point and hover a mobile device at the image that has the

Mohawk Live icon.

3 Wait for the enhanced content to load. WiFi connections are

recommended for faster load times and enhanced quality.

4 The app will launch enhanced content, seemingly bringing

the printed piece to life.


03 MOHAWK

MAKER

QUARTERLY

S E E D TO S H E E T I LLU STR ATI O N

PAT CH A ROENSI R I M I K E A N DER S EN

SEED TO SHEET BY

Recycled pulps and sustainable forests are changing how we think about paper.

NINA L ACOUR

In a forest in Northern Maine, silvery-furred, solitary Canadian lynx roam through dense trees. Wetlands, habitat to a host of species from salamanders to songbirds, are favorite destinations for hikers and fishermen. Bald eagles make their homes in the tops of old-growth trees, and, come wintertime, deer seek shelter from harsh winds and deep snow under the lush canopy. One might think that such a forest could only exist untouched, perhaps protected by the state. But, in fact, this is one of thousands of privately owned, sustainable forests across North America. While the eco-systems of these forests are carefully monitored and managed to protect wildlife and enhance soil and water quality, trees are planted and felled to be used for timber or turned into pulp. Sustainable forests, along with recycled pulps, are vital to environmentally responsible paper manufacturers. Most of us are familiar with the benefits of recycled paper: conserving natural resources, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, saving landfill space, and extending the life of fibers. Well over half of the paper used in the U.S. is recycled, with the vast majority of domestic paper mills using fibers from postconsumer paper to create new products. However, the number of times that fibers can be processed and reused is finite. As Michelle Carpenter, Vice President of Environmental and Energy Stewardship at Mohawk explains, “While paper fiber can be recycled a number of times, a percentage of wood fiber is broken during processing, so new fiber must be added to recycled pulp feedstock over time to maintain strength in the paper produced.” Knowing pulps that have just come from a tree are needed to maintain the integrity of paper, responsible manufacturers are turning to sustainable forests. The more consumers embrace and seek out paper made from materials from these sustainably managed forests, the more financial incentive landowners receive to keep their forests thriving. As the World Business

Council for Sustainable Development states, “The income landowners receive for trees grown on their land encourages them to maintain, renew and manage this valuable resource sustainably.” In the U. S. more than 25% of our fresh water f lows through private forests and 60% of our at-risk wildlife depend on private forests for their habitats. But despite their environmental importance, these forests are often sacrificed to real estate development or conventional timber companies, with devastating effects for the wildlife and eco-systems. No one understands the value of sustainable forests more than their owners and managers. William H. Miller, Vice President of Prentiss & Carlisle, a forest resource management firm established in 1924, explains the delicate balance of preserving trees and felling them. “ In an ideal world,” he says, “if you want something to be sustainable you cut your growth.” When businesses such as Mohawk seek suppliers for their high quality papers, they look for pulps that originate on FSC certified lands which are well cared for by companies like Prentiss & Carlisle. The FSC, with its emphasis on chain of custody, ensures that all steps of the supply chain are environmentally sound. This way, Mohawk has the knowledge that the pulps they buy on the open market are from forests that meet rigorous standards. When trees are grown responsibly and farmers plant seeds as soon as the mature trees are felled, wood becomes a sustainable resource. As Miller states, “Trees grow, so unlike gas and oil and other resources that are mined, forests are constantly replenishing themselves. It’s a renewable resource and if it’s managed in an appropriate way it is going to benefit not only the current generation, but future generations as well.”


03 MOHAWK

MAKER

QUARTERLY

S E E D TO S H E E T I LLU STR ATI O N

PAT CH A ROENSI R I M I K E A N DER S EN

SEED TO SHEET BY

Recycled pulps and sustainable forests are changing how we think about paper.

NINA L ACOUR

In a forest in Northern Maine, silvery-furred, solitary Canadian lynx roam through dense trees. Wetlands, habitat to a host of species from salamanders to songbirds, are favorite destinations for hikers and fishermen. Bald eagles make their homes in the tops of old-growth trees, and, come wintertime, deer seek shelter from harsh winds and deep snow under the lush canopy. One might think that such a forest could only exist untouched, perhaps protected by the state. But, in fact, this is one of thousands of privately owned, sustainable forests across North America. While the eco-systems of these forests are carefully monitored and managed to protect wildlife and enhance soil and water quality, trees are planted and felled to be used for timber or turned into pulp. Sustainable forests, along with recycled pulps, are vital to environmentally responsible paper manufacturers. Most of us are familiar with the benefits of recycled paper: conserving natural resources, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, saving landfill space, and extending the life of fibers. Well over half of the paper used in the U.S. is recycled, with the vast majority of domestic paper mills using fibers from postconsumer paper to create new products. However, the number of times that fibers can be processed and reused is finite. As Michelle Carpenter, Vice President of Environmental and Energy Stewardship at Mohawk explains, “While paper fiber can be recycled a number of times, a percentage of wood fiber is broken during processing, so new fiber must be added to recycled pulp feedstock over time to maintain strength in the paper produced.” Knowing pulps that have just come from a tree are needed to maintain the integrity of paper, responsible manufacturers are turning to sustainable forests. The more consumers embrace and seek out paper made from materials from these sustainably managed forests, the more financial incentive landowners receive to keep their forests thriving. As the World Business

Council for Sustainable Development states, “The income landowners receive for trees grown on their land encourages them to maintain, renew and manage this valuable resource sustainably.” In the U. S. more than 25% of our fresh water f lows through private forests and 60% of our at-risk wildlife depend on private forests for their habitats. But despite their environmental importance, these forests are often sacrificed to real estate development or conventional timber companies, with devastating effects for the wildlife and eco-systems. No one understands the value of sustainable forests more than their owners and managers. William H. Miller, Vice President of Prentiss & Carlisle, a forest resource management firm established in 1924, explains the delicate balance of preserving trees and felling them. “ In an ideal world,” he says, “if you want something to be sustainable you cut your growth.” When businesses such as Mohawk seek suppliers for their high quality papers, they look for pulps that originate on FSC certified lands which are well cared for by companies like Prentiss & Carlisle. The FSC, with its emphasis on chain of custody, ensures that all steps of the supply chain are environmentally sound. This way, Mohawk has the knowledge that the pulps they buy on the open market are from forests that meet rigorous standards. When trees are grown responsibly and farmers plant seeds as soon as the mature trees are felled, wood becomes a sustainable resource. As Miller states, “Trees grow, so unlike gas and oil and other resources that are mined, forests are constantly replenishing themselves. It’s a renewable resource and if it’s managed in an appropriate way it is going to benefit not only the current generation, but future generations as well.”


05 MOHAWK

MAKER

06 QUARTERLY

ISSUE 02:

MASTERY OF MATERIALS

THE

STORY OF LOOP

How a paper line has helped reinvent the way products should be made in the 21st century. BY

EVAN PRICCO C

Mohawk set out to accomplish an ambitious goal in 2009: to create a single product line which exceeded our own well-established commitment to environmentally responsible papermaking. Beyond merely making another recycled paper line, we challenged ourselves to push the limits of fiber sourcing, harness exclusively wind generated power and build in high-performance print features which had never been done before in the category. The result was Loop. A product named to pay tribute to the cycles and loops we find everywhere in nature. From renewable energy to composting, recycling, rethinking, and reinventing, the loops we all create can go a long way toward preserving and extending our common resources. “ Loop became the f lagship grade for environmental papers in the world today,” says Melissa Stevens, VP of Sales at Mohawk. “Everything in Loop is FSC and Green Seal certified, Green-e Windpower, and carbon neutral. Specifically, this means Loop is made with

recycled materials and through renewable energy.” The industry was immediately drawn to Loop as an environmental-specific, go-to paper grade that embodied all of the elements they were looking for to support their personal commitments to sourcing from responsible suppliers. Used for traditional marketing materials, including viewbooks, brochures, stationery, newsletters, and packaging, environmentally conscious designers and printers were drawn to the fact that Loop contains the highest postconsumer content achievable in a printing paper. And even better, the paper provided stellar performance on digital and offset presses.

D

Herman Miller not only the chance to create marketing products that resemble their own visions of sustainable production, but provide the highest standards for print production. “ Loop prints consistently time after time and has a variety of weights with 100% recycled content,” says Marlene Capotosto, Graphic Production Manager at Herman Miller. “Plus, it’s nice to do business with a company that shares common beliefs surrounding the practice and promotion of environmental stewardship.”

A - B . D O D O c ase C.

M O HAW K LO O P

D.

WI N D FAR M

E .

ALMANAC B R E W E RY

GETT Y I M AGE S DA M I A N FAGA N

F - G . ALMANAC B R E W E RY

J E S S E F R I EDM A N

In only a few short years, Loop has become a go-to for designers. Herman Miller, a world-leader in innovative furniture design that fosters both a healthy workplace and planet with an emphasis on the best materials, has used Loop for their own marketing purposes, mainly promotional literature. With the highest environmental credentials, Loop gave

A

f lyers to customers in five major U.S. cities, all waiting in line for the iPad’s release. Buckley himself stood in the San Francisco line, eager to see how close his estimations were to the actual size of the iPad. He knew that his design would work; he would just need to tweak the measurements. Consumers were immediately captivated by the concept and the quality of the DODOcase, and word spread quickly. In the first three months, DODOcase earned revenues of close to a million dollars and their business has been thriving ever since. As iPads and other tablets grow in popularity, the DODOcase has risen with them and transcended customer bases. High profile techies, famous actors, and even President Obama, have been spotted with a DODOcase under their arm. Major companies, including Nike, have ordered custom cases to give to their staff, acknowledging the powerful combination of tech and touch.

A

CASE FOR

ADAPTATION Embracing new technology, while still championing traditional craftsmanship. BY

NINA L ACOUR

materials and ingredients, used to create them,” Fagan tells us. “If they are f lawed, the beers ref lect that. We work very hard to source our ingredients locally, from growers and producers with the same obsession for quality. Our goal is to deliver a drinkable form of California’s vast agriculture bounty in every bottle we produce.”

B

Even as consumers race to adopt the newest technological advancements into their daily lives, they are nostalgic for what they leave behind. Books are the perfect illustration of this. They are rife with opportunities for emotional attachment—the weight, the smell, the inscriptions and underlined passages—and they bring with them a promise of a singular focus, a respite from the digital world. Still, we know the advantages of tablets are abundant. Inspired by San Francisco’s once-thriving bookmaking industry, Patrick Buckley and Craig Dalton had a perfect solution for Apple’s early iPad customers: shiny new tablets sheathed in beautiful, high quality cases made with traditional bookbinding techniques. They used time-tested bindery materials—cloth, leather, paper—to give consumers the tactile sensation of carrying a book while embracing new technology. Because Apple is notoriously secretive with product design, Buckley, who was raised by a parent working in the publishing industry and grew up surrounded by books, scoured the internet for images of the iPad and fashioned a prototype based on estimated measurements. He built the bamboo tray himself, but the heart of his product idea was the intersection of artisan books and technology, so he hired a master bookbinder to construct the case using traditional materials and techniques.

FROM

DESIGNER TO BREWER

In the midst of tremendous success, Buckley and Dalton have not strayed from the initial concept behind the product: They buy their textiles from the oldest American manufacturer of book cloth, a family business based in Tennessee since 1895. They use environmentally friendly, handsanded bamboo for the trays. Each case is made at their San Francisco factory, using traditional bookbinding techniques and employing skilled artisans. They have even partnered with Mohawk to produce DODOcase Notes and DODOcase Folio, products that include a book of blank Mohawk Superfine for those daily tasks where we would rather turn to a pen and paper than the screen. “ Making a product the way that we do is more expensive, it’s more involved, it’s more difficult—but it’s totally worth it.” Buckley says. “ I hope that when people use their DODOcase they can feel the history of what went into it. That’s something that we’re really excited about.”

How the creative power of design can build an amazing and passionate product. BY

E

E VAN PRICCO

It’s not everyday that a brewery is spawned from the mind of a graphic designer. But the rare combination came to fruition in 2010, when The Almanac Beer Company was founded by Jesse Friedman and Damian Fagan. Their aim was to specialize in the very best, and unique farm-to-barrel seasonal ales, or as they call it, ales“ brewed specifically to complement local cuisine sourced and prepared with the same great care and craft.”

DODOcase knows that even as we embrace our ever-changing technology, we want to feel connected to the traditional art of books, and that craft is what makes the DODOcase special. Unlike the bird they named themselves after, the art of bookbinding will not become extinct any time soon.

Perhaps Almanac benefits from the mind of a graphic designer, where every element is carefully considered to create the whole. Fagan has taken that mindset to help establish Almanac as a brewery of highly specialized materials. “Our beers are defined by the

As the release date approached, Buckley and Dalton hired a carefully selected group of Apple enthusiasts (found on Craigslist) to distribute F

G

Each season, Almanac teams with a different Northern California farm to use specific fruit for their specific brews. Every beer is a collaboration, a creation totally unique to its season and locale, brewed and bottled only once. “ We helped a local grad student harvest a full acre of barley he grew on the Stanford University campus with simple kitchen knives because there was no other way to get it done,” Fagan mentions of just how specific Almanac gets. “The uniqueness of the barley’s f lavor profile was worth the effort. That one acre of barley inspired a specific beer and we made a handful of kegs with it—and that was it—the ingredients drove the entire project.” Almanac is one of many brewers in Northern California, but their mission and background make for one of the most specific visions in the craft brewery market; how to take the creative power of design and build a passionate product. “Design, to me, is simply storytelling. The stories we tell define our values, our intentions, our histories, our outlooks and our purposes. If they’re authentic, dynamic and compelling, people pay attention. If they’re not, they’re ignored.”


05 MOHAWK

MAKER

06 QUARTERLY

ISSUE 02:

MASTERY OF MATERIALS

THE

STORY OF LOOP

How a paper line has helped reinvent the way products should be made in the 21st century. BY

EVAN PRICCO C

Mohawk set out to accomplish an ambitious goal in 2009: to create a single product line which exceeded our own well-established commitment to environmentally responsible papermaking. Beyond merely making another recycled paper line, we challenged ourselves to push the limits of fiber sourcing, harness exclusively wind generated power and build in high-performance print features which had never been done before in the category. The result was Loop. A product named to pay tribute to the cycles and loops we find everywhere in nature. From renewable energy to composting, recycling, rethinking, and reinventing, the loops we all create can go a long way toward preserving and extending our common resources. “ Loop became the f lagship grade for environmental papers in the world today,” says Melissa Stevens, VP of Sales at Mohawk. “Everything in Loop is FSC and Green Seal certified, Green-e Windpower, and carbon neutral. Specifically, this means Loop is made with

recycled materials and through renewable energy.” The industry was immediately drawn to Loop as an environmental-specific, go-to paper grade that embodied all of the elements they were looking for to support their personal commitments to sourcing from responsible suppliers. Used for traditional marketing materials, including viewbooks, brochures, stationery, newsletters, and packaging, environmentally conscious designers and printers were drawn to the fact that Loop contains the highest postconsumer content achievable in a printing paper. And even better, the paper provided stellar performance on digital and offset presses.

D

Herman Miller not only the chance to create marketing products that resemble their own visions of sustainable production, but provide the highest standards for print production. “ Loop prints consistently time after time and has a variety of weights with 100% recycled content,” says Marlene Capotosto, Graphic Production Manager at Herman Miller. “Plus, it’s nice to do business with a company that shares common beliefs surrounding the practice and promotion of environmental stewardship.”

A - B . D O D O c ase C.

M O HAW K LO O P

D.

WI N D FAR M

E .

ALMANAC B R E W E RY

GETT Y I M AGE S DA M I A N FAGA N

F - G . ALMANAC B R E W E RY

J E S S E F R I EDM A N

In only a few short years, Loop has become a go-to for designers. Herman Miller, a world-leader in innovative furniture design that fosters both a healthy workplace and planet with an emphasis on the best materials, has used Loop for their own marketing purposes, mainly promotional literature. With the highest environmental credentials, Loop gave

A

f lyers to customers in five major U.S. cities, all waiting in line for the iPad’s release. Buckley himself stood in the San Francisco line, eager to see how close his estimations were to the actual size of the iPad. He knew that his design would work; he would just need to tweak the measurements. Consumers were immediately captivated by the concept and the quality of the DODOcase, and word spread quickly. In the first three months, DODOcase earned revenues of close to a million dollars and their business has been thriving ever since. As iPads and other tablets grow in popularity, the DODOcase has risen with them and transcended customer bases. High profile techies, famous actors, and even President Obama, have been spotted with a DODOcase under their arm. Major companies, including Nike, have ordered custom cases to give to their staff, acknowledging the powerful combination of tech and touch.

A

CASE FOR

ADAPTATION Embracing new technology, while still championing traditional craftsmanship. BY

NINA L ACOUR

materials and ingredients, used to create them,” Fagan tells us. “If they are f lawed, the beers ref lect that. We work very hard to source our ingredients locally, from growers and producers with the same obsession for quality. Our goal is to deliver a drinkable form of California’s vast agriculture bounty in every bottle we produce.”

B

Even as consumers race to adopt the newest technological advancements into their daily lives, they are nostalgic for what they leave behind. Books are the perfect illustration of this. They are rife with opportunities for emotional attachment—the weight, the smell, the inscriptions and underlined passages—and they bring with them a promise of a singular focus, a respite from the digital world. Still, we know the advantages of tablets are abundant. Inspired by San Francisco’s once-thriving bookmaking industry, Patrick Buckley and Craig Dalton had a perfect solution for Apple’s early iPad customers: shiny new tablets sheathed in beautiful, high quality cases made with traditional bookbinding techniques. They used time-tested bindery materials—cloth, leather, paper—to give consumers the tactile sensation of carrying a book while embracing new technology. Because Apple is notoriously secretive with product design, Buckley, who was raised by a parent working in the publishing industry and grew up surrounded by books, scoured the internet for images of the iPad and fashioned a prototype based on estimated measurements. He built the bamboo tray himself, but the heart of his product idea was the intersection of artisan books and technology, so he hired a master bookbinder to construct the case using traditional materials and techniques.

FROM

DESIGNER TO BREWER

In the midst of tremendous success, Buckley and Dalton have not strayed from the initial concept behind the product: They buy their textiles from the oldest American manufacturer of book cloth, a family business based in Tennessee since 1895. They use environmentally friendly, handsanded bamboo for the trays. Each case is made at their San Francisco factory, using traditional bookbinding techniques and employing skilled artisans. They have even partnered with Mohawk to produce DODOcase Notes and DODOcase Folio, products that include a book of blank Mohawk Superfine for those daily tasks where we would rather turn to a pen and paper than the screen. “ Making a product the way that we do is more expensive, it’s more involved, it’s more difficult—but it’s totally worth it.” Buckley says. “ I hope that when people use their DODOcase they can feel the history of what went into it. That’s something that we’re really excited about.”

How the creative power of design can build an amazing and passionate product. BY

E

E VAN PRICCO

It’s not everyday that a brewery is spawned from the mind of a graphic designer. But the rare combination came to fruition in 2010, when The Almanac Beer Company was founded by Jesse Friedman and Damian Fagan. Their aim was to specialize in the very best, and unique farm-to-barrel seasonal ales, or as they call it, ales“ brewed specifically to complement local cuisine sourced and prepared with the same great care and craft.”

DODOcase knows that even as we embrace our ever-changing technology, we want to feel connected to the traditional art of books, and that craft is what makes the DODOcase special. Unlike the bird they named themselves after, the art of bookbinding will not become extinct any time soon.

Perhaps Almanac benefits from the mind of a graphic designer, where every element is carefully considered to create the whole. Fagan has taken that mindset to help establish Almanac as a brewery of highly specialized materials. “Our beers are defined by the

As the release date approached, Buckley and Dalton hired a carefully selected group of Apple enthusiasts (found on Craigslist) to distribute F

G

Each season, Almanac teams with a different Northern California farm to use specific fruit for their specific brews. Every beer is a collaboration, a creation totally unique to its season and locale, brewed and bottled only once. “ We helped a local grad student harvest a full acre of barley he grew on the Stanford University campus with simple kitchen knives because there was no other way to get it done,” Fagan mentions of just how specific Almanac gets. “The uniqueness of the barley’s f lavor profile was worth the effort. That one acre of barley inspired a specific beer and we made a handful of kegs with it—and that was it—the ingredients drove the entire project.” Almanac is one of many brewers in Northern California, but their mission and background make for one of the most specific visions in the craft brewery market; how to take the creative power of design and build a passionate product. “Design, to me, is simply storytelling. The stories we tell define our values, our intentions, our histories, our outlooks and our purposes. If they’re authentic, dynamic and compelling, people pay attention. If they’re not, they’re ignored.”


07 8 MOHAWK

MAKER

08 9 QUARTERLY

ISSUE 02:

MASTERY OF MATERIALS

MATERIALS MATTER E XPERTS WEIGH IN ON WHY MATERIALS MAT TER

We asked a group of experts, how materials matter to their products.

Wax is a varied material that has a multitude of historical and current uses. For our purposes we have chosen soy wax. It allows us to mix with fragrance, maintain its stability and then release it with heat. This is a tricky wax for creating scented candles.

By

WAX

KOBO Pure Soy Candles KO B O CAN D LES .CO M

WATER

By

Lagunitas Brewing Co. L AG U N ITAS .CO M

Water makes up 93% of beer so, yes, quality is very important. It’s all about the mineral ions in the water. Harder water makes for a more pleasant bitterness. Softer water makes better light lagers. Brewers love to overmystify the water, but the types of rock and geographical locations will dissolve into the water and adjust what it has to offer, and thus famous locations have beer styles associated with their famous waters. Today, brewers make their water mimic the region for the style they are after.

of soot and interior pollution. Our soy wax is biodegradable and will easily clean up with soap and water if needed. We look for waxes that have a smooth oil rich content.

We use soy wax to produce the most environmentally friendly candle available. Most candles are made from a petrochemicalbased wax called paraffin, which is a by-product from the refining of lubricating oil. Paraffin by its structure will produce a high level

MILK

By

Author of

Kirstin Jackson, It’s Not You, It’s Brie

ITS N OT YO U ITS B R I E .CO M

By

Many think good cheesemaking pertains only to what happens in the make room. Not true. It begins in the field. It is a conversation evolving around milk. A milking animal’s state of mind and its diet is as inf luential on a cheese’s taste as the way its curds are cooked or which cultures are used. If animals are happy grazing on seasonal grasses, wildf lowers, and herbs, these f lavors will be conveyed on the cheese plate. Because expressing the story of the pasture is part of a cheesemaker’s duty, the milk’s integrity must also be protected. It must be gently procured and transported with its unique microflora, lipid, and protein structure intact to the make room. There, the conversation thread can continue towards cheese.

WOOL

Pendleton Woolen Mills PE N D LE TO N - U SA .CO M

Wool is our core competency, always has been, so naturally, beautifully crafted wool textile was a cornerstone to our contemporary Portland Collection. We have two, century old woolen textile mills; one in Pendleton, Oregon, our original mill, and another in Washougal, Washington. At these two mills we weave all of our jacquard, legendary plaids, and tartans, solids and stripes. There is definitely discrimination between quality and non-quality, and that’s why we use only 100% virgin wool that is not reused from any other product. Wool is nature’s renewable resource, sustainable before we ever thought about the importance of being so. Non-recycled, quality, durable wools are the only items that will become heirlooms and worthy of passing on to generations.

BEANS By

Koppi Coffee KO PPI . S E

We approach our coffee beans in a similar way as a wine-maker approaches their grapes. Every unique bean has its own flavor profile due to various conditions including soil, weather, picking, and processing; all of these aspects have an impact on the final taste of the coffee. In creating these profiles, we like to remember that coffee was once a seed in a fruit. The final product should taste sweet, fruity and clean with a pleasant and vibrant acidity. From the seed to the roasting stage, we work with each variety to capture these different flavors.

For us, it is important to know that the coffee we source is sustainably grown, both environmentally and ethically. We travel as much as we can to visit the producers at their farms every year, which gives us a greater understanding for the product we work with. By experiencing how the coffee bean behaves both on the farm level and in the roasting stage, we gain an invaluable advantage as a roaster.

MATE R IALS MAT TE R PH OTO

H EN R I K K A M


07 8 MOHAWK

MAKER

08 9 QUARTERLY

ISSUE 02:

MASTERY OF MATERIALS

MATERIALS MATTER E XPERTS WEIGH IN ON WHY MATERIALS MAT TER

We asked a group of experts, how materials matter to their products.

Wax is a varied material that has a multitude of historical and current uses. For our purposes we have chosen soy wax. It allows us to mix with fragrance, maintain its stability and then release it with heat. This is a tricky wax for creating scented candles.

By

WAX

KOBO Pure Soy Candles KO B O CAN D LES .CO M

WATER

By

Lagunitas Brewing Co. L AG U N ITAS .CO M

Water makes up 93% of beer so, yes, quality is very important. It’s all about the mineral ions in the water. Harder water makes for a more pleasant bitterness. Softer water makes better light lagers. Brewers love to overmystify the water, but the types of rock and geographical locations will dissolve into the water and adjust what it has to offer, and thus famous locations have beer styles associated with their famous waters. Today, brewers make their water mimic the region for the style they are after.

of soot and interior pollution. Our soy wax is biodegradable and will easily clean up with soap and water if needed. We look for waxes that have a smooth oil rich content.

We use soy wax to produce the most environmentally friendly candle available. Most candles are made from a petrochemicalbased wax called paraffin, which is a by-product from the refining of lubricating oil. Paraffin by its structure will produce a high level

MILK

By

Author of

Kirstin Jackson, It’s Not You, It’s Brie

ITS N OT YO U ITS B R I E .CO M

By

Many think good cheesemaking pertains only to what happens in the make room. Not true. It begins in the field. It is a conversation evolving around milk. A milking animal’s state of mind and its diet is as inf luential on a cheese’s taste as the way its curds are cooked or which cultures are used. If animals are happy grazing on seasonal grasses, wildf lowers, and herbs, these f lavors will be conveyed on the cheese plate. Because expressing the story of the pasture is part of a cheesemaker’s duty, the milk’s integrity must also be protected. It must be gently procured and transported with its unique microflora, lipid, and protein structure intact to the make room. There, the conversation thread can continue towards cheese.

WOOL

Pendleton Woolen Mills PE N D LE TO N - U SA .CO M

Wool is our core competency, always has been, so naturally, beautifully crafted wool textile was a cornerstone to our contemporary Portland Collection. We have two, century old woolen textile mills; one in Pendleton, Oregon, our original mill, and another in Washougal, Washington. At these two mills we weave all of our jacquard, legendary plaids, and tartans, solids and stripes. There is definitely discrimination between quality and non-quality, and that’s why we use only 100% virgin wool that is not reused from any other product. Wool is nature’s renewable resource, sustainable before we ever thought about the importance of being so. Non-recycled, quality, durable wools are the only items that will become heirlooms and worthy of passing on to generations.

BEANS By

Koppi Coffee KO PPI . S E

We approach our coffee beans in a similar way as a wine-maker approaches their grapes. Every unique bean has its own flavor profile due to various conditions including soil, weather, picking, and processing; all of these aspects have an impact on the final taste of the coffee. In creating these profiles, we like to remember that coffee was once a seed in a fruit. The final product should taste sweet, fruity and clean with a pleasant and vibrant acidity. From the seed to the roasting stage, we work with each variety to capture these different flavors.

For us, it is important to know that the coffee we source is sustainably grown, both environmentally and ethically. We travel as much as we can to visit the producers at their farms every year, which gives us a greater understanding for the product we work with. By experiencing how the coffee bean behaves both on the farm level and in the roasting stage, we gain an invaluable advantage as a roaster.

MATE R IALS MAT TE R PH OTO

H EN R I K K A M


09 MOHAWK

THE

MAKER

10 QUARTERLY

ISSUE 02:

MOVEMENT

PHOTOGR A PH E R S / I L LUST R ATOR S A L A N S OLOMON & JO S H UA DU LCI M ER B ROOK LY N S L AT E COM PA N Y H E AT H CER A M IC S

CHAMPIONS OF CRAFT

A

MASTERY OF MATERIALS

A. B. C.

D. E. F. G.

M A ST B ROT H ER S CHOCOL AT E S CA ROL A N N PE ACOCK OBI K AU F M A N N JACOB DI M I T ER

D

E

Sawkill Lumber Co.

Harris Tweed Authority

SAW K I L .CO M

HAR R I ST WE E D.O RG

Protectors and promoters of Harris Tweed Isle of Lewis , Scotland

Reclaimed wood craftsmen Brooklyn, New York

Mast Brothers Chocolate

“ Reclaimed lumber’s transformation from salvage into modern building products represents a kind of magic. It is essentially another form of recycling, and works to realize the highest and best use of the material. It would otherwise go to a landfill, wood chipper, or fuel pellet facility.

Craft chocolate makers Brooklyn, New York

There are at least three features that distinguish reclaimed woods. Beauty: reclaimed woods are often antique or vintage, meaning they grew in dense old growth forests that yield a rich dense grain; and through a century or more of use, acquired character marks. History: Reclaimed woods carry the history of a specific site, and have a story to tell. Some have called this ‘embodied history.’ Sustainability: The re-use of old growth woods saves trees, water, and energy.”

B

MASTB ROTH E RS .CO M

C

F

“ What we are looking for in everything we source is taste. Everything should taste good from the source, whether it’s our cacao beans or our almonds. When things are carefully grown or sourced they taste that much better and that is what we are looking for. This is why our Madagascar single origin chocolate tastes different than our Dominican Republic single origin. Each chocolate really highlights its source. The differences in the beans we source are what yield the differences in our chocolate. A bean from Madagascar is going to taste completely different than one from the Dominican Republic simply because they are grown in different soil, climate, and elevation. All of these things are going to change how the chocolate will taste in the end.”

“ The traditional Scottish Blackface wool is a specialty wool in a class of its own, and only the finest Scottish Blackface wool is used for Harris Tweed. In addition, the softer, finer fibers from Cheviot and related Crossbreeds wools are added to the blend for a more luxurious feel. Top designers and talented artisans often remark upon how great the cloth is to work with because of its durability and high quality. However, it is the provenance and the history of the cloth that makes each item that is created out of it that much more intriguing. Customers are drawn to the heritage and luxury aspect of it, which has a very strong appeal nowadays and it certainly adds that unique touch to any garment or accessory.”

G

Brooklyn Slate Slate manufacturers Brooklyn, New York

B RO O K LY N S L ATE .CO M

“ Slate is one of the most durable, naturally occurring stones readily available. Slate shingles typically withstand natural elements for up to 200 years. Additionally, it is ideal for serving food because it’s non-porous, meaning that unlike a wood board, fungus and mold can’t develop on the surface. All of our slate is sourced from our family’s third generation quarry in upstate New York. We’re proud to be producing a product that, by its very nature, can last for years. Sharing food with family and friends is really important to us, and we like the idea that a slate cheese board serves as a sturdy vehicle for this interaction. With care and a little maintenance, our boards can be passed down from one generation to the next, allowing others to continue this tradition.”

Heath Ceramics

Juniper Ridge

Neeman Tools

H E ATH C E R AM I C S .CO M

J U N I PE R R I D G E .CO M

N E E MANTO O LS .CO M

Artisan ceramicists Sausalito, California

“Clay is the essence of everything we do. It drives our design, process and products. The brown clay body we use today was originally sourced by Edith Heath in the mid-1940s. She wanted to find a clay that looked like where it came from, and found a clay bed outside Sacramento that was reminiscent of the nearby Sierra Mountains. It inf luences the look and feel of all of our products. The materials we use and our making process give our work a unique personality. The natural looking clay, paired with glazes that we design ourselves, provides designers and architects who use our tile an amazing range of color and texture. Each glaze is unique and the process we use to make the tile creates subtle variations in the final materials that we showcase and champion. We call it ‘imperfectly perfect.’ When all of those beautiful pieces come together in a space, there’s a real warm, handcrafted look that has a great impact on the surrounding environment.”

Foraged scent distillers Petaluma, California

“ To keep it simple: we only use the real stuff. We’re the world’s only wild fragrance company—you can’t buy our materials or fragrance ingredients anywhere because nobody does what we do and no one works with the plants we work with. The only way to get our materials is to hop in the van, throw the fragrance still in back and head up into the mountains. We make our own stuff and have never gone outside our company for fragrance ingredients. Never. I’d never substitute European sage oil—which I could buy for cheap cheap cheap since it comes from huge farms in Mexico—for our local wild sages because they smell completely different. The only way to capture Big Sur in a bottle is to go there, put your hiking boots on, harvest plants, and make it yourself.”

Craft tool makers Latvia

“ In the craft of tool-making, it is imperative to understand the materials you are working with, and how they react in different scenarios. For example, only certain raw materials have the right properties to serve as the handle of an axe. In North America hickory is the choice wood, France and Germany use ash, and in northern Europe and the UK, elm is used. With hands-on research and the experience as craftsmen, we find what works best and lasts the longest. Today, there are many cheaply produced tools on the market. Quality and craftsmanship has been substituted with cheap materials and processes. We look at tools as an extension of our hand; a mediator between us and our work. The better the tool, the better the results. Carpenters all over the world have deemed our chisel’s, axes and knives the best tools for function and longevity. This is because we have carefully chosen the materials for each tool and have precisely crafted them with the end user in mind.”


09 MOHAWK

THE

MAKER

10 QUARTERLY

ISSUE 02:

MOVEMENT

PHOTOGR A PH E R S / I L LUST R ATOR S A L A N S OLOMON & JO S H UA DU LCI M ER B ROOK LY N S L AT E COM PA N Y H E AT H CER A M IC S

CHAMPIONS OF CRAFT

A

MASTERY OF MATERIALS

A. B. C.

D. E. F. G.

M A ST B ROT H ER S CHOCOL AT E S CA ROL A N N PE ACOCK OBI K AU F M A N N JACOB DI M I T ER

D

E

Sawkill Lumber Co.

Harris Tweed Authority

SAW K I L .CO M

HAR R I ST WE E D.O RG

Protectors and promoters of Harris Tweed Isle of Lewis , Scotland

Reclaimed wood craftsmen Brooklyn, New York

Mast Brothers Chocolate

“ Reclaimed lumber’s transformation from salvage into modern building products represents a kind of magic. It is essentially another form of recycling, and works to realize the highest and best use of the material. It would otherwise go to a landfill, wood chipper, or fuel pellet facility.

Craft chocolate makers Brooklyn, New York

There are at least three features that distinguish reclaimed woods. Beauty: reclaimed woods are often antique or vintage, meaning they grew in dense old growth forests that yield a rich dense grain; and through a century or more of use, acquired character marks. History: Reclaimed woods carry the history of a specific site, and have a story to tell. Some have called this ‘embodied history.’ Sustainability: The re-use of old growth woods saves trees, water, and energy.”

B

MASTB ROTH E RS .CO M

C

F

“ What we are looking for in everything we source is taste. Everything should taste good from the source, whether it’s our cacao beans or our almonds. When things are carefully grown or sourced they taste that much better and that is what we are looking for. This is why our Madagascar single origin chocolate tastes different than our Dominican Republic single origin. Each chocolate really highlights its source. The differences in the beans we source are what yield the differences in our chocolate. A bean from Madagascar is going to taste completely different than one from the Dominican Republic simply because they are grown in different soil, climate, and elevation. All of these things are going to change how the chocolate will taste in the end.”

“ The traditional Scottish Blackface wool is a specialty wool in a class of its own, and only the finest Scottish Blackface wool is used for Harris Tweed. In addition, the softer, finer fibers from Cheviot and related Crossbreeds wools are added to the blend for a more luxurious feel. Top designers and talented artisans often remark upon how great the cloth is to work with because of its durability and high quality. However, it is the provenance and the history of the cloth that makes each item that is created out of it that much more intriguing. Customers are drawn to the heritage and luxury aspect of it, which has a very strong appeal nowadays and it certainly adds that unique touch to any garment or accessory.”

G

Brooklyn Slate Slate manufacturers Brooklyn, New York

B RO O K LY N S L ATE .CO M

“ Slate is one of the most durable, naturally occurring stones readily available. Slate shingles typically withstand natural elements for up to 200 years. Additionally, it is ideal for serving food because it’s non-porous, meaning that unlike a wood board, fungus and mold can’t develop on the surface. All of our slate is sourced from our family’s third generation quarry in upstate New York. We’re proud to be producing a product that, by its very nature, can last for years. Sharing food with family and friends is really important to us, and we like the idea that a slate cheese board serves as a sturdy vehicle for this interaction. With care and a little maintenance, our boards can be passed down from one generation to the next, allowing others to continue this tradition.”

Heath Ceramics

Juniper Ridge

Neeman Tools

H E ATH C E R AM I C S .CO M

J U N I PE R R I D G E .CO M

N E E MANTO O LS .CO M

Artisan ceramicists Sausalito, California

“Clay is the essence of everything we do. It drives our design, process and products. The brown clay body we use today was originally sourced by Edith Heath in the mid-1940s. She wanted to find a clay that looked like where it came from, and found a clay bed outside Sacramento that was reminiscent of the nearby Sierra Mountains. It inf luences the look and feel of all of our products. The materials we use and our making process give our work a unique personality. The natural looking clay, paired with glazes that we design ourselves, provides designers and architects who use our tile an amazing range of color and texture. Each glaze is unique and the process we use to make the tile creates subtle variations in the final materials that we showcase and champion. We call it ‘imperfectly perfect.’ When all of those beautiful pieces come together in a space, there’s a real warm, handcrafted look that has a great impact on the surrounding environment.”

Foraged scent distillers Petaluma, California

“ To keep it simple: we only use the real stuff. We’re the world’s only wild fragrance company—you can’t buy our materials or fragrance ingredients anywhere because nobody does what we do and no one works with the plants we work with. The only way to get our materials is to hop in the van, throw the fragrance still in back and head up into the mountains. We make our own stuff and have never gone outside our company for fragrance ingredients. Never. I’d never substitute European sage oil—which I could buy for cheap cheap cheap since it comes from huge farms in Mexico—for our local wild sages because they smell completely different. The only way to capture Big Sur in a bottle is to go there, put your hiking boots on, harvest plants, and make it yourself.”

Craft tool makers Latvia

“ In the craft of tool-making, it is imperative to understand the materials you are working with, and how they react in different scenarios. For example, only certain raw materials have the right properties to serve as the handle of an axe. In North America hickory is the choice wood, France and Germany use ash, and in northern Europe and the UK, elm is used. With hands-on research and the experience as craftsmen, we find what works best and lasts the longest. Today, there are many cheaply produced tools on the market. Quality and craftsmanship has been substituted with cheap materials and processes. We look at tools as an extension of our hand; a mediator between us and our work. The better the tool, the better the results. Carpenters all over the world have deemed our chisel’s, axes and knives the best tools for function and longevity. This is because we have carefully chosen the materials for each tool and have precisely crafted them with the end user in mind.”


11 MOHAWK

MAKER

QUARTERLY

DEPARTMENTS OBSESSIONS

James Fooks-Bale

What material couldn’t you live without?

Creative Director, Monotype

M O N OT Y PE .CO M

“ From the ink squeeze under metal letters to the ferocious speeds of large scale publishing presses— our industries are buoyed by a commitment to achieve the best possible reading experience. We couldn’t live without the idea of reaching perfection across any material.”

Chris Brigham

Warren Schwartz

Principal, Knife & Saw

Principal, Schwartz Silver

TH E K N I FE AN DSAW.CO M

SC HWART ZS I LVE R .CO M

“ Wood. It is a role player or star in most everything in our lives. From the pencil I draw with to the house I live in, its combination of versatility, strength, renewability and beauty are unparalleled by any other. Oh yeah, I’d probably be out of a job too.”

“Glass is at the top of my list. Glass, with many choices of fritted coatings, allows an architect to treat a wall as a veil through which to view the landscape, as a screen which can reflect the sun’s glare, or as a surface on which to display images at any scale. Glass mediates between inside and out.”

Chris Dressick

JW & Melissa Buchanan

Chef, The Station

The Little Friends of Printmaking

TH ESTATI O N S F.CO M

TH E LIT TLE FR I E N DSO FPR I NTMAK I N G .CO M

“ Historically hand hammered to razor sharp perfection. Weapon, tool, necessity of life. For without it, we cannot harvest, prepare, cut, chop, butcher. It is the tool that after our minds, lets us create. An extension of our hands, yet one with our souls. Cold, hard, beautiful, steel.”

“ The material we can’t live without is overprint varnish. We use it to modify almost every screenprinting ink that we use. It adds transparency and a smooth finish that pushes our prints from image to object—something that feels special when you’re holding it in your hands.”

PAPER GRADES QUICK REFERENCE

MOHAWK PAPER SELECTOR To make our product line simpler, easier to specify and to reduce our environmental footprint, we have streamlined our product portfolio, merging brands and eliminating redundant colors.

3

2

1

Superfine

Options

THE ULTIMATE PAPER

THE INXWELL PAPER

Mohawk Superfine is the finest printing paper made today. No other paper has the same reputation for quality, consistency and uniformity. Superfine inspires great design with its superb formation, lush tactility, archival quality and timeless appeal.

Options features Mohawk’s exclusive Inxwell surface technology, combining the tactile feel of uncoated paper with the ink density and sharp detail of coated. Now including ultra-smooth Navajo, Options features six premium white shades to complement a range of styles.

4

5

THE RESPONSIBLE PAPER

THE ECONOMICAL PAPER

Via

Strathmore

Mohawk Loop is a complete collection of extremely high PCW recycled papers to support sustainable design. With a range of print surfaces and a fashionable palette of whites, pastels, jewel tones and earthy fibered shades, Loop enables environmental responsibility the Mohawk way.

Via is the best-selling uncoated paper in America, offering Mohawk quality at an affordable price. Featuring popular textures, colors and highly printable white shades, Via is a paper for today and for every day.

Setting the standard for design and innovation since 1895, the Strathmore Collection is a diverse assortment of cotton papers, colors and finishes that honor tradition while striking new ground with contemporary colors and surface technologies. They add an image of luxury to all print communications.

6

7

Carnival

Digital

Loop

THE COVER PAPER

THE IMAGING PAPERS

Mohawk Carnival has set the standard for intense saturated color, especially for pocket folders and other converted items. Designed for excellent score and fold properties, this cover grade offers primary hues in distinctive textures with complementary whites and text weights.

Mohawk features a comprehensive collection of digital substrates including a family of reliable and economical coated and uncoated papers specially made for digital presses as well as a unique offering of specialty substrates for digital printing that help place you and your customers on the cutting edge.

Brought to you by:

THE LUXE PAPER

LEARN MORE AT MOHAWKCONNECTS.COM

We believe that partnership is essential to furthering the interests of craftspeople everywhere. Mohawk is proud to partner with craft printers to bring you the Mohawk Maker Quarterly.

D ES I G N & CU R ATI O N

465 Saratoga Street Cohoes, NY 12047

Mohawk Loop, Inxwell Vellum, Eco White (100% PCW), 80 Text (118 gsm)

+1 (518) 237-1740 customerservice@mohawkpaper.com mohawkconnects.com

Hybrid Design Hybrid-design.com T Y PE FAC ES

Chalet New York Nineteen Sixty, Sentinel PAPE R

PR I NTE R

Classic Graphics Charlotte, NC

Knowclassic.com I N KS

4cp, 2nd black, match light green and dark green, spot dull varnish, satin black foil ITE M N U M B E R

76-702620713 September 2013

The names, symbols, logos, photographs and all other intellectual property of the companies, brands, and people appearing herein are the exclusive property of their respective owners and should not be interpreted as an endorsement of or by Mohawk; any legal and equitable rights in their intellectual property are exclusively reserved to those owners.

Mohawk Maker Quarterly Issue #2 | Mastery of Materials