Page 1

FEEL No. 08

THE

STR ATHMORE TIMELINE

WHAT WILL YOU MAKE TODAY?

THE

PITCHFORK REVIEW


05 ISSUE 08:

FEEL

B

A

C

A .

COVE R : O LI M PIA Z AG N O LI

B .

S E BASTIAN COX

C.

K E N N E T T M O H R MAN

D.

PE N L AN D SC H O O L

E .

B ROTH E RS & C R AF T

ADAM S I LVE R MAN

A DR I A N GAU T

ROBI N DR E Y E R

K I R K CH A M B E R S

D

E


05 ISSUE 08:

FEEL

B

A

C

A .

COVE R : O LI M PIA Z AG N O LI

B .

S E BASTIAN COX

C.

K E N N E T T M O H R MAN

D.

PE N L AN D SC H O O L

E .

B ROTH E RS & C R AF T

ADAM S I LVE R MAN

A DR I A N GAU T

ROBI N DR E Y E R

K I R K CH A M B E R S

D

E


06 MOHAWK

MAKER

QUARTERLY


07 ISSUE 07:

CHARACTER

PHOTOGRAPHY

HENRIK KAM


08 MOHAWK

MAKER

QUARTERLY


09 ISSUE 07:

CHARACTER

PHOTOGRAPHY

HENRIK KAM


10 MOHAWK

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13 ISSUE 08:

FEEL


10 MOHAWK

MAKER

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13 ISSUE 08:

FEEL


1921

PAPER IS PART OF THE PICTURE

The “Paper is Part of the Picture” campaign was launched in 1921 and featured work like this small poster-format illustration where the base paper color plays a key role in the figure/ground relationship.

1919

ALEXANDRA JAPAN

In 1919, William Dwiggins created this complex specimen book project for Strathmore. The cover is a beautiful example of his signature ornamentation created using wooden stamps and celluloid stencils.

1964

IF ALL THE WORLD WERE PAPER

Pushpin Studios’ eclectic aesthetic is wonderfully represented in this 1964 folder that explores the interaction between paper, printing and embellishing techniques.

1954

FOR RUGS VISIT THE BLUE ELEPHANT 25 GRAND ST

In 1954, the year he was awarded the AIGA medal, Will Bradley created a portfolio of illustrations (including this piece) celebrating 60 years of collaboration with Strathmore.


1943

A TRADEMARK OF QUALITY

As part of the wartime promotional effort, Strathmore states the case for quality in the midst of rationing and compromise.

1924

STRATHMORE TOWN

This page from Book No. 3 of the “ Strathmore Town” series was designed and illustrated by Helen Dryden, a brilliant illustrator whose Vogue magazine covers from the 1920s are iconic.

1938

STRATHMORE HANDBOOK

The cover to this paper handbook features Charles R. Capon’s interpretation of the iconic Strathmore Thistle. Capon was a skilled and successful artist with a career spanning the first half of the 20th century.

1968

ARE YOU AFRAID OF STRATHMORE?

This is one example from an ad campaign that ran throughout 1968 and was illustrated by Simms Taback, whose career included stints at CBS Records and the New York Times.

1969 HiFi

In 1969, Kenneth Kuenster designed this two-product printed sample relying heavily on letterforms and bold color to convey the oh-so-’60s theme: HiFi.


1899

1906

1921

Designed and printed by Will Bradley’s University Press, this woodcut is a perfect expression of Bradley’s fascination with colonial printing and stands as one of the earliest examples of a paper swatchbook.

During his 1903–05 tenure as art director at ATF, Will Bradley designed borders and typefaces. This book cover of a Strathmore Paper guide is a clear ref lection of Bradley’s work in that period, featuring his hand lettering and the first use of a thistle as the company logo.

The “Paper is Part of the Picture” campaign was launched in 1921 and featured work like this small poster-format illustration where the base paper color plays a key role in the figure/ground relationship.

STRATHMORE DECKLE EDGE PAPER

STRATHMORE QUALITY PAPERS

PAPER IS PART OF THE PICTURE

1919

ALEXANDRA JAPAN

In 1919, William Dwiggins created this complex specimen book project for Strathmore. The cover is a beautiful example of his signature ornamentation created using wooden stamps and celluloid stencils.

1950

1964

EXPRESSIVE PRINTING PAPERS

Known for his use of strong, direct forms and his role in establishing American modernism, Lester Beall extols the expressive power of paper in this quintessentially Beall printed portfolio.

IF ALL THE WORLD WERE PAPER

Pushpin Studios’ eclectic aesthetic is wonderfully represented in this 1964 folder that explores the interaction between paper, printing and embellishing techniques.

1954

FOR RUGS VISIT THE BLUE ELEPHANT 25 GRAND ST

In 1954, the year he was awarded the AIGA medal, Will Bradley created a portfolio of illustrations (including this piece) celebrating 60 years of collaboration with Strathmore.


1943

A TRADEMARK OF QUALITY

As part of the wartime promotional effort, Strathmore states the case for quality in the midst of rationing and compromise.

1924

STRATHMORE TOWN

This page from Book No. 3 of the “ Strathmore Town” series was designed and illustrated by Helen Dryden, a brilliant illustrator whose Vogue magazine covers from the 1920s are iconic.

1938

STRATHMORE HANDBOOK

The cover to this paper handbook features Charles R. Capon’s interpretation of the iconic Strathmore Thistle. Capon was a skilled and successful artist with a career spanning the first half of the 20th century.

1968

ARE YOU AFRAID OF STRATHMORE?

This is one example from an ad campaign that ran throughout 1968 and was illustrated by Simms Taback, whose career included stints at CBS Records and the New York Times.

1969 HiFi

In 1969, Kenneth Kuenster designed this two-product printed sample relying heavily on letterforms and bold color to convey the oh-so-’60s theme: HiFi.


18 MOHAWK

BRAND MIRROR

The best brands in the world aim to inspire instead of simply to sell. BY

D O R A D R I M A L AS

MAKER

QUARTERLY

As we move about our day, we’re bombarded with thousands of branded images. Most of them are white noise, but others manage to cut through the clutter and intrigue us. They allow us to escape to a remote island in the Mediterranean, imagine the excitement of hiking a trail in Iceland or envision eating a farm-to-table meal prepared by a local chef in West Marin. These particular images stop us in our tracks because they touch on something special to us and find a way to speak to the inner voice inside our head—the voice that still breaks out for dreams while the rest of our body is acting like it’s working. These images get in. They infiltrate the imagination and then run wild. A normal day for me is pretty busy. I think it is for most of us. We fill our days with to-do’s, rushing from point A to B. I have found the brand images that resonate best with me amplify who I am; they have a familiar quality yet ref lect a better version back to me. They have the power to inspire me — they can make me think about a nicer rendition of the sweater I’m wearing or the vacation I have planned. Once I connect the experience to myself, to bettering my life, and a brand makes me feel something, I’m in. I’m on board for the ride, and I’m going to continually check back in to what they are broadcasting about me because, frankly, it’s great. An improved version of me without any effort? Sign me up! Some brands do this exceptionally well. They weave the familiar and the aspirational into tremendous narratives. Sometimes these narratives are things we mortals can relate to and sometimes it’s the stuff of epic mythological worship. For example, Nike presents all of its products within the larger “culture of sport.” Nike’s product is your ticket into this world and culture. You may resonate with the product—perhaps something that you’ve owned in the

past, like a pair of trainers—but then the inspiration comes in: The models in photoshoots are athletic and real. The context of a running trail or a city run looks good. It’s an aspirational alternative to just walking in the shoes. If the trail looks good, then a marathon looks even better. And if the marathon looks great, why not check out the Olympic track and field events? Nike puts forth many entry points into its narrative. Then it’s up to your imagination to find the right adventure and escape. You feel better about yourself and you’ve barely even purchased the shoes. You see a better you in the world Nike presents. Over time, I’ve started to think of this “better me” effect as The Brand Mirror. The brands that “know” me and manage to inspire me become the brands that I follow and become loyal to. I never feel like I’m being sold anything (I hate selling, so this is good). The next time you see a campaign that speaks to you, ask yourself why that is. Do you see yourself in that brand? And more important, do you see a better version of yourself in that brand? If so, The Brand Mirror is in effect, and that’s the hallmark of a truly successful creative endeavor.

ILLUSTRATION

MIKE ANDERSEN


19 ISSUE 08:

FEEL

THE

THING THE BOOK

When artists create every facet of a book, from cover to page numbers to index, it becomes a work of art. BY

B RY N M O OTH

Artists Jonn Herschend and Will Rogan have made a habit and a business out of playing with form. THE THING Quarterly, their collaboration with designers and artists, is in function a publication available by subscription. In form, it’s highly experimental. THE THING Quarterly may resemble a book or magazine. Or it may be a wall clock, like artist Tauba Auerbach’s Issue 20, which displays 24-hour military time. Because it doesn’t read as we’re accustomed to, Auerbach’s clock demands that we take a deeper look and engage more fully with the concept of time. Or it may be a bottle of Vermont maple syrup with an accompanying poster (artist Shannon Ebner’s edition) or a birch boomerang (Gabriel Orozco) or Michelle Grabner’s all-weather, gingham-print soccer ball.

A

B

ALL PHOTOGRAPHY

A .

B O O K MAR KS

When Rogan and Herschend produced a longer-form edition, they tinkered with the elements that make a book a book as we know it. Their introduction to The Thing The Book: A Monument to the Book as Object frames it as a museum experience: “When we decided to make a book, our first instinct was to turn the book into an exhibit space.”

DANIEL DENT

DAV I D S H R IGL E Y

B . FLI P B OO K : “ DAN C E RS” DAV E M U L L E R

They handed every element over to more than 30 artists, designers and writers. Auerbach created the page numbers, which grow in size throughout the book. Miranda July added a racy message to an errata sheet slipped between two pages. It’s a sort of meta-book: the book as commentary on the nature of books.

C.

FO LI OS

P O E M PAI NTI N GS

In her essay “The Artist as Bookmaker,” Gwen Allen writes of an imaginary book conceived by poet Stéphane Mallarmé: “Instead of being read privately by individuals, the book would be performed aloud and collectively.” Mallarmé never actually created Le Livre, but his concept of book-as-object/experience inf luences Herschend and Rogan: “We believe that objects, with all the magic and stories that they carry, speak to the importance of art in our daily lives.”

C

TAU B A AU E R B ACH CH R IS JOH A NS ON


20 MOHAWK

MAKER

QUARTERLY

WHY DESIGN MATTERS

Design has a profound affect on how we feel. And Alain de Botton, author of “The Architecture of Happiness,” believes that good design can even help us become the best versions of ourselves. BY

A L A I N d e B OT TO N


23 ISSUE 08:

Design is the posh word for thinking a lot about how stuff looks. A designed object is one whose makers worked long and hard to get it just right. Sadly, most of the world has not been well-designed. It’s full of office towers, door handles, beds, lamps and plates that have been deeply unloved and were thrown together in a hurry.

FEEL

A bright, airy bedroom with cool wood tones and minimal decor makes you feel one way. An opulent, gilded bedroom filled with color, texture and pattern evokes a totally different feeling.

environments change who we are. We may be further from or nearer to God depending on what’s on the wall and how high the ceiling is. We mold ourselves to the spirit that emanates from the objects around us. We become a little as they are.

Design matters because our identities and moods are f luid and shifting; and it’s often the quality of the designed environment that determines whether we’ll feel confident or defeated, at ease or guarded, generous-spirited or alienated.

Even if we’re not always able to say quite how objects make us feel, we all sense a spirit, better or worse, that emanates from a given set of objects.

One of the great debates about how much design matters took place in the 16th and 17th centuries in European churches.

We’re generally good at playing that game where you try to imagine what sort of person a work of design would turn into if it miraculously became human.

Broadly speaking, one faction of Christianity didn’t believe in spending money on design. They put up simple, functional churches, painted them plain white inside, with little focus on decoration. Many of today’s churches echo that minimalist aesthetic.

When we call an object of design “beautiful,” what we’re really saying is that if it turned into a person, it would be someone we like: someone maybe dignified or selfpossessed, intelligent or adventurous… Beauty is a promise of goodness.

When many people around the world lack the bare necessities, it can be tempting to say that good design can’t matter that much. But it does, desperately so, because of a weird quirk of our psychology: What we see affects how we feel, how we act and, in a sense, who we are. A dark brooding sky brings out certain feelings, while a bright blue one others.

The intellectual thought behind this approach was that what really matters is certain ideas and that those ideas enter your mind through your understanding, not through your senses. You can get close to God by reading the Bible in a hayloft. You don’t need a fancy building. But others begged to differ. They invested so heavily in design — in stunning stained glass windows, beautiful carved angels and passionate renditions of the life of Christ — because they fervently believed that our

Ugliness is evocative of nothing short of despair and evil. And that’s why beautiful design matters: because it encourages our better sides, while ugly design stokes our worst ones. We need to make sure the world around us is well-designed, not out of some superf luous expensive quirk, but because good design helps us to be the best versions of ourselves.

A dark brooding sky brings out certain feelings, while a bright blue one others.

A bright, airy bedroom with cool wood tones and minimal decor makes you feel one way. An opulent, gilded bedroom filled with color, texture and pattern evokes a totally different feeling.

ILLUSTRATIONS

MIKE ANDERSEN


20 MOHAWK

MAKER

QUARTERLY

WHY DESIGN MATTERS

Design has a profound affect on how we feel. And Alain de Botton, author of “The Architecture of Happiness,” believes that good design can even help us become the best versions of ourselves. BY

A L A I N d e B OT TO N


23 ISSUE 08:

Design is the posh word for thinking a lot about how stuff looks. A designed object is one whose makers worked long and hard to get it just right. Sadly, most of the world has not been well-designed. It’s full of office towers, door handles, beds, lamps and plates that have been deeply unloved and were thrown together in a hurry.

FEEL

A bright, airy bedroom with cool wood tones and minimal decor makes you feel one way. An opulent, gilded bedroom filled with color, texture and pattern evokes a totally different feeling.

environments change who we are. We may be further from or nearer to God depending on what’s on the wall and how high the ceiling is. We mold ourselves to the spirit that emanates from the objects around us. We become a little as they are.

Design matters because our identities and moods are f luid and shifting; and it’s often the quality of the designed environment that determines whether we’ll feel confident or defeated, at ease or guarded, generous-spirited or alienated.

Even if we’re not always able to say quite how objects make us feel, we all sense a spirit, better or worse, that emanates from a given set of objects.

One of the great debates about how much design matters took place in the 16th and 17th centuries in European churches.

We’re generally good at playing that game where you try to imagine what sort of person a work of design would turn into if it miraculously became human.

Broadly speaking, one faction of Christianity didn’t believe in spending money on design. They put up simple, functional churches, painted them plain white inside, with little focus on decoration. Many of today’s churches echo that minimalist aesthetic.

When we call an object of design “beautiful,” what we’re really saying is that if it turned into a person, it would be someone we like: someone maybe dignified or selfpossessed, intelligent or adventurous… Beauty is a promise of goodness.

When many people around the world lack the bare necessities, it can be tempting to say that good design can’t matter that much. But it does, desperately so, because of a weird quirk of our psychology: What we see affects how we feel, how we act and, in a sense, who we are. A dark brooding sky brings out certain feelings, while a bright blue one others.

The intellectual thought behind this approach was that what really matters is certain ideas and that those ideas enter your mind through your understanding, not through your senses. You can get close to God by reading the Bible in a hayloft. You don’t need a fancy building. But others begged to differ. They invested so heavily in design — in stunning stained glass windows, beautiful carved angels and passionate renditions of the life of Christ — because they fervently believed that our

Ugliness is evocative of nothing short of despair and evil. And that’s why beautiful design matters: because it encourages our better sides, while ugly design stokes our worst ones. We need to make sure the world around us is well-designed, not out of some superf luous expensive quirk, but because good design helps us to be the best versions of ourselves.

A dark brooding sky brings out certain feelings, while a bright blue one others.

A bright, airy bedroom with cool wood tones and minimal decor makes you feel one way. An opulent, gilded bedroom filled with color, texture and pattern evokes a totally different feeling.

ILLUSTRATIONS

MIKE ANDERSEN


24 MOHAWK

THE

MAKER

QUARTERLY

MOVEMENT CHAMPIONS OF CRAFT

A

Small Room Collective Mobile mercantile and gallery space At Large

S MALLROO M CO LLECTIVE .CO M

“ I hope our customers are inspired and feel their brains clicking with ideas. I want people to feel awake to their own creative process and empowered to do their thing. I also want people to feel connected to a bigger story, even in a small way, like finding a piece of art someone else made in the opposite part of the country that makes them go, ‘Huh’ or ‘Yeah!’ or ‘Wow.’ And if someone just wants to feel comfortable and sit on our couch, that’s cool, too.”

B

Olimpia Zagnoli

C

Vibrant illustrations with strong contrast Milan, Italy O LI M PIA Z AG N O LI .CO M

“ I like contrasts. I like when two colors don’t really go together at first and then somehow they do and they become magic, something else. Like yellow and brown or a sad green with some fuchsia. They become mysterious and glamorous. I’d like my illustrations to evoke freedom. Freedom of expression, freedom to be green, freedom to have more than two eyes, freedom to show things that are usually covered like feelings or boobs.”

Sebastian Cox

Sustainable designer and craftsman London, UK S E BASTIAN COX .CO.U K

“ Once I’m in the timber yard, the selection process is heavily led by my own emotional connection to my material. I have a much greater level of affection for timber that is particularly characterful and expresses the variety that makes British hardwoods so spectacular. Timber like that, with colorful detailing, f lecking, defined grains, knots and shakes, elicits a great feeling of excitement within me because those features are true manifestations of the beauty of my material. It’s those features that drive my creativity and the designing process.”


27 ISSUE 08:

FEEL

PHOTOGR A PH E R S / I L LUST R ATOR S RYA N K U L P & DA N I E L SI LV E R M A N OL I M PI A Z AGNOL I PET R K R E JCI

A. B. C.

D. E. F. G.

J U L I A N N E A H N & DUST I N F ENST E R M ACH E R B A RT CE L E ST I NO JACOB S EN S A LT S H E LT E R S OCI A L CLU B

D

E

Dinosaur Designs

Object and Totem Handmade ceramics and jewelry studio Brooklyn, New York

Handmade resin jewelry and housewares Sydney, Australia & New York City

O B J ECTAN DTOTE M .CO M

D I N OSAU R D ES I G N S .CO M

“ When you’re hand throwing ceramics, if you’re having a bad day, it’s going to come out in what you make no matter how much you try and control it. I think of each piece as being scribed onto a record of sorts, like these nuanced moments where even though they all look very similar, I know there’s an innate chronology to each one. There are subtle rings left on the inside of each piece from my fingers, and now that I’m familiar with a certain kind of pace of throwing, it’s obvious to me what felt like the beginning or the end of a day — something rushed or slightly slower — by the way the inside of a piece feels.”

F

Jacobsen Salt

“ When we started, we only designed jewelry, so when we began creating our homeware, it was like jewelry for the home. When we design jewelry, the way a piece feels on the body is incredibly important. As the home has become an extension of the self, so the touch and feel of every piece has to be right. I hope people feel a warmth and softness like a pebble that has been tumbled by the sea.”

G

Flake and kosher sea salts harvested off the Oregon coast Portland, Oregon JACO B S E N SALT.CO M

“ We hope that tasting our salt and adding it to a dish sparks people’s taste buds and brings a smile to their face. Salt is such a simple thing and, unfortunately due to its commoditization in the aftermath of the industrial revolution, an underappreciated item in the kitchen pantry. What we’re trying to do is re-elevate this fundamental cooking ingredient, and show people that the most efficient and effective way to bring your food to the next level and delight your taste buds is to use good salt— and use it every day.”

Shelter Social Club

Hospitality group creating community-oriented spaces Various Locations S H E LTE RSO C IALC LU B .CO M

“ We try to fully understand the ethos of a community before we start the design process. We’re grateful to work with artists who inspire us and have helped us create environments that relate to the towns in which our properties exist. We also work with local entrepreneurs who help us curate experiences (movie nights, dinners, healing workshops, craft and design workshops, music performances) that help engage our guests and give them a behind-the-scenes look into the local communities.”


24 MOHAWK

THE

MAKER

QUARTERLY

MOVEMENT CHAMPIONS OF CRAFT

A

Small Room Collective Mobile mercantile and gallery space At Large

S MALLROO M CO LLECTIVE .CO M

“ I hope our customers are inspired and feel their brains clicking with ideas. I want people to feel awake to their own creative process and empowered to do their thing. I also want people to feel connected to a bigger story, even in a small way, like finding a piece of art someone else made in the opposite part of the country that makes them go, ‘Huh’ or ‘Yeah!’ or ‘Wow.’ And if someone just wants to feel comfortable and sit on our couch, that’s cool, too.”

B

Olimpia Zagnoli

C

Vibrant illustrations with strong contrast Milan, Italy O LI M PIA Z AG N O LI .CO M

“ I like contrasts. I like when two colors don’t really go together at first and then somehow they do and they become magic, something else. Like yellow and brown or a sad green with some fuchsia. They become mysterious and glamorous. I’d like my illustrations to evoke freedom. Freedom of expression, freedom to be green, freedom to have more than two eyes, freedom to show things that are usually covered like feelings or boobs.”

Sebastian Cox

Sustainable designer and craftsman London, UK S E BASTIAN COX .CO.U K

“ Once I’m in the timber yard, the selection process is heavily led by my own emotional connection to my material. I have a much greater level of affection for timber that is particularly characterful and expresses the variety that makes British hardwoods so spectacular. Timber like that, with colorful detailing, f lecking, defined grains, knots and shakes, elicits a great feeling of excitement within me because those features are true manifestations of the beauty of my material. It’s those features that drive my creativity and the designing process.”


27 ISSUE 08:

FEEL

PHOTOGR A PH E R S / I L LUST R ATOR S RYA N K U L P & DA N I E L SI LV E R M A N OL I M PI A Z AGNOL I PET R K R E JCI

A. B. C.

D. E. F. G.

J U L I A N N E A H N & DUST I N F ENST E R M ACH E R B A RT CE L E ST I NO JACOB S EN S A LT S H E LT E R S OCI A L CLU B

D

E

Dinosaur Designs

Object and Totem Handmade ceramics and jewelry studio Brooklyn, New York

Handmade resin jewelry and housewares Sydney, Australia & New York City

O B J ECTAN DTOTE M .CO M

D I N OSAU R D ES I G N S .CO M

“ When you’re hand throwing ceramics, if you’re having a bad day, it’s going to come out in what you make no matter how much you try and control it. I think of each piece as being scribed onto a record of sorts, like these nuanced moments where even though they all look very similar, I know there’s an innate chronology to each one. There are subtle rings left on the inside of each piece from my fingers, and now that I’m familiar with a certain kind of pace of throwing, it’s obvious to me what felt like the beginning or the end of a day — something rushed or slightly slower — by the way the inside of a piece feels.”

F

Jacobsen Salt

“ When we started, we only designed jewelry, so when we began creating our homeware, it was like jewelry for the home. When we design jewelry, the way a piece feels on the body is incredibly important. As the home has become an extension of the self, so the touch and feel of every piece has to be right. I hope people feel a warmth and softness like a pebble that has been tumbled by the sea.”

G

Flake and kosher sea salts harvested off the Oregon coast Portland, Oregon JACO B S E N SALT.CO M

“ We hope that tasting our salt and adding it to a dish sparks people’s taste buds and brings a smile to their face. Salt is such a simple thing and, unfortunately due to its commoditization in the aftermath of the industrial revolution, an underappreciated item in the kitchen pantry. What we’re trying to do is re-elevate this fundamental cooking ingredient, and show people that the most efficient and effective way to bring your food to the next level and delight your taste buds is to use good salt— and use it every day.”

Shelter Social Club

Hospitality group creating community-oriented spaces Various Locations S H E LTE RSO C IALC LU B .CO M

“ We try to fully understand the ethos of a community before we start the design process. We’re grateful to work with artists who inspire us and have helped us create environments that relate to the towns in which our properties exist. We also work with local entrepreneurs who help us curate experiences (movie nights, dinners, healing workshops, craft and design workshops, music performances) that help engage our guests and give them a behind-the-scenes look into the local communities.”


28 MOHAWK

MAKER

QUARTERLY

PHOTOGR A PH E R S / I L LUST R ATOR S ROBI N DR E Y E R K I R K CH A M B E R S

A

A. B.

C.

JA S ON ROT H EN B E RG A DA M SI LV ER M A N

B

Brothers & Craft

New media and creative agency founded by four brothers Charleston, South Carolina B ROTH E RSAN D C R AF T.CO M

Penland School

International center for craft education Penland, North Carolina PE N L AN D.O RG

“ People come to Penland and engage fully with a particular material, process or an approach to creative work. They connect their hands with their minds. They are surrounded by a beautiful mountain landscape filled with sounds, smells, colors and textures. They are encouraged to work hard, tackle difficult problems, draw inspiration from their instructors and their peers, make friends, laugh, and converse. When it works best, they leave with new skills, ideas and objects, and also with new knowledge of themselves.”

C

Adam Silverman Handmade textured pottery Glendale, California ADAM S I LVE R MAN . N E T

“ My works are intentionally very textured and tactile. They are meant to have many layers of colors and textures to create depth in what is essentially a surface or skin. The tactility is intentional as both a result and as a process. It is important to me that the tactility is a counter to what are typically very simple geometric forms. The tactility also alludes to many other things in nature and urban life with which the viewer can draw their own personal associations.”

“ Who we are, what we wear, where we go and how we engage the world around us is often closely connected to what feels most familiar. Our shoots, no matter if they’re fashion, lifestyle, travel or some other setup, are all designed to remind people that everyone is invited to live more fully. Everyone can discover or rediscover who they are, or who they always wanted to be. We hope the aesthetic we’ve created can serve as a sort of clarion call that reminds people of their own potential, and just how much beauty exists all around us just waiting to be explored.”


28 MOHAWK

MAKER

QUARTERLY

PHOTOGR A PH E R S / I L LUST R ATOR S ROBI N DR E Y E R K I R K CH A M B E R S

A

A. B.

C.

JA S ON ROT H EN B E RG A DA M SI LV ER M A N

B

Brothers & Craft

New media and creative agency founded by four brothers Charleston, South Carolina B ROTH E RSAN D C R AF T.CO M

Penland School

International center for craft education Penland, North Carolina PE N L AN D.O RG

“ People come to Penland and engage fully with a particular material, process or an approach to creative work. They connect their hands with their minds. They are surrounded by a beautiful mountain landscape filled with sounds, smells, colors and textures. They are encouraged to work hard, tackle difficult problems, draw inspiration from their instructors and their peers, make friends, laugh, and converse. When it works best, they leave with new skills, ideas and objects, and also with new knowledge of themselves.”

C

Adam Silverman Handmade textured pottery Glendale, California ADAM S I LVE R MAN . N E T

“ My works are intentionally very textured and tactile. They are meant to have many layers of colors and textures to create depth in what is essentially a surface or skin. The tactility is intentional as both a result and as a process. It is important to me that the tactility is a counter to what are typically very simple geometric forms. The tactility also alludes to many other things in nature and urban life with which the viewer can draw their own personal associations.”

“ Who we are, what we wear, where we go and how we engage the world around us is often closely connected to what feels most familiar. Our shoots, no matter if they’re fashion, lifestyle, travel or some other setup, are all designed to remind people that everyone is invited to live more fully. Everyone can discover or rediscover who they are, or who they always wanted to be. We hope the aesthetic we’ve created can serve as a sort of clarion call that reminds people of their own potential, and just how much beauty exists all around us just waiting to be explored.”


32 MOHAWK

MAKER

QUARTERLY

PAPER GRADES QUICK REFERENCE

MOHAWK PAPER SELECTOR

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Superfine

Options+Navajo

Mohawk Superfine is the finest printing paper made today. No other paper has the same reputation for quality, consistency and uniformity. Superfine inspires great design with its superb formation, lush tactility, archival quality and timeless appeal.

Options features Mohawk’s exclusive Inxwell surface technology, combining the tactile feel of uncoated paper with the ink density and sharp detail of coated. Now including ultrasmooth Navajo, Options features six premium white shades to complement a range of styles.

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THE ULTIMATE PAPER

The Mohawk product portfolio is designed to bring craftsmanship, tactility and quality to all the ways you print. Be it digital, offset or even letterpress, the Mohawk product portfolio has the perfect paper to bring your project to life.

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THE INXWELL PAPER

Carnival+Via

Loop

Curious Collection PAPER FOR THE SENSES

THE RESPONSIBLE PAPER

EXPRESSIVE COLOR & TEXTURE

Extraordinary papers for those special projects where you need saturated color and unusual texture. Choose from seven unique surfaces and an expansive palette of colors. The Curious Collection is manufactured by Arjowiggins Creative Papers and distributed solely by Mohawk in North America.

Mohawk Loop is a complete collection of extremely high PCW recycled papers to support sustainable design. With a range of print surfaces and a fashionable palette of whites, pastels, jewel tones and earthy fibered shades, Loop enables environmental responsibility the Mohawk way.

Carnival + Via represents the most comprehensive and economical family of premium writing, text and cover papers in the market today. The combined portfolio offers a FSCÂŽ certified choice for virtually any design project with many shades of white, a palette of fresh colors, ten distinctive textures and an extensive offering for digital printing.

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Digital

Strathmore

Packaging Papers

Mohawk features a comprehensive collection of digital substrates, including a family of reliable and economical coated and uncoated papers specially made for digital presses, as well as a unique offering of specialty substrates for digital printing that help place you and your customers on the cutting edge.

Setting the standard for design and innovation since 1892, the Strathmore Collection is a diverse assortment of cotton papers, colors and finishes that honor tradition while striking new ground with contemporary colors and surface technologies. They add an image of luxury to all print communications.

Appealing to the eye and touch, Mohawk packaging papers deliver rich imagery, deep color and fine detail to help luxury brands stand out in the retail environment. With a suite of options, this collection helps create consistency across a range of packaging and promotional materials.

THE IMAGING PAPERS

Brought to you by:

THE LUXE PAPER

465 Saratoga Street Cohoes, NY 12047 +1 (518) 237-1740 insidesales@mohawkpaper.com mohawkconnects.com

D ES I G N & CU R ATI O N

PAPE R

Hybrid Design Hybrid-design.com

Mohawk Strathmore Wove, Riviera Rose 80 Text (118gsm), Pg. 1-2, 31-32

T Y PE FAC ES

Chalet New York Nineteen Sixty, Sentinel PR I NTE R

The names, symbols, logos, photographs and all other intellectual property of the companies, brands, and people appearing herein are the exclusive property of their respective owners and should not be interpreted as an endorsement of or by Mohawk; any legal and equitable rights in their intellectual property are exclusively reserved to those owners. SUBSCRIBE AT: Mohawkconnects.com/cultureofcraft

THE VERSATILE PAPERS

Sandy Alexander Clifton, NJ Sandyinc.com I N KS

4cp, 2nd black, match dark red, spot dull varnish, UV inks. 4cp, 4 hits of white, UV inks on Pg. 1-2, 11-12, 21-22, 31-32. ITE M N U M B E R

76-702620415 January 2016

Curious Collection Particles, Silver 80 Text (120gsm), Pg. 3-4, 29-30 Mohawk Strathmore Wove, Platinum White 80 Text (118gsm), Pg. 5-6, 27-28 Curious Collection Metallics, Ice Gold 80 Text (120gsm), Pg. 7-8, 25-26

Mohawk Strathmore Smooth, Platinum White 80 Text (118gsm), Pg. 9-10, 23-24 Curious Collection Skin, Black 91 Text (135gsm), Pg. 11-12, 21-22 Mohawk Strathmore Cambric, Platinum White 70 Text (104gsm), Pg. 13-14, 19-20 Mohawk Strathmore Pastelle, Bright White 80 Text (118gsm), Pg. 15-18

Mohawk Maker Quarterly Issue #8 | Feel  
Mohawk Maker Quarterly Issue #8 | Feel  
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