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HERE COMES SPRING FASHION

chic trends, hot styles, expert advice

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IN FULL BLOOM

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MARCH 2020 | $5.95

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DJ APRIL LARKEN has something to tell you


For those achieving goals 11SIMMONSLANE.COM | GREENWICH, CT | OFFERED AT$9,600,000

Martha Z. Jeffrey 203.964.7800

© Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity.


Classic Stone Georgian

266 Round Hill Road

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Steve Archino 203.618.3144

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Greenwich Brokerage | One Pickwick Plaza, Greenwich, CT | 203.869.4343 SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM/GREENWICH


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WilliamRaveis Raveis William Chairman & Chairman & William Raveis William Raveis Chief Executive Officer Chief Executive Officer

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ChrisRaveis Raveis Chris Co-President, William Raveis Inc., Co-President, William Raveis Inc., Chris Chris Raveis Raveis President, Residential Sales President, Residential Sales

Co-President, Co-President, William William Raveis Raveis Inc., Inc., President, President, Residential Residential Sales Sales


Welcome Welcome to our real estate family

to our real estate family to our real estate family

In 2019, 2019, we we hired hired 405 405 experienced experienced agents who produced over In In 2019, wein hired experienced agents over $1.3 billion in sales405 volume. In addition, addition, $1.3 billion sales volume. In we who hiredproduced 257 new sales $1.3 billion inwho sales volume. In addition, we hired new associates who are now honing honing associates are now their real estate257 skills in sales our associates who are now honing theirtraining real estate skills in our award-winning William Raveis award-winning William Raveis programs. award-winning William Raveis training programs. Our job job is is to to help help over over 4,000 4,000 William William Raveis sales associates achieve Our Our job is to help over 4,000 William Raveisthrough sales associates achieve success with their clients and customers success with their clients and customers our immersive success withand their clients and customers throughsophisticated our immersive coaching and mentoring, dynamic coaching mentoring, dynamic marketing, coachinglead andgeneration, mentoring, and dynamic marketing, sophisticated technology, lead generation, and powerful social media programs. technology, technology, lead generation, and powerful social media programs. Welcome to to state-of-the-art. state-of-the-art. Welcome Welcome to state-of-the-art.

Recognizedas asthe the Recognized #1 Luxury Brokerage Recognized as Recognized as the the #1 Luxury Brokerage

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130 130 Offices Offices Over 4,000 Sales Associates Offices 130 Offices Over 4,000 Sales 130 Associates Over $12 Billion Residential Sales Over Associates Over 4,000 Sales Sales Associates Over $12 4,000 Billion Residential Sales

9 States - CT, FL, MA, ME, NH, NJ, NY, RI, VT

$12 Billion Residential Sales Over $12 Billion Residential Sales 9 States - Over CT, FL, MA, ME, NH, NJ, NY, RI, VT 203.869.9263 | 45 FIELD POINT RD | GREENWICH | CT 06830 203.869.9263 | 45 FIELD POINT RD | GREENWICH | CT 06830 203.869.2345 | 189 SOUND BEACH AVE | OLD GREENWICH | CT 06870 203.869.2345 | 189 SOUND BEACH AVE | OLD GREENWICH | CT 06870 9 States CT, FL, MA, ME, NH, NJ, NY, RI, VT 9 States CT, FL, MA, ME, NH, NJ, NY, RI, VT 203.869.9263 203.869.9263 || 45 45 FIELD FIELD POINT POINT RD RD || GREENWICH GREENWICH || CT CT 06830 06830 203.869.2345 203.869.2345 || 189 189 SOUND SOUND BEACH BEACH AVE AVE || OLD OLD GREENWICH GREENWICH || CT CT 06870 06870


GREENWICH

contents MARCH 2020 vol. 73 | issue 3

The team behind the scenes at Sebass Events & Entertainment warehouse: Lou Persiani, Liz Lawrence, Sarah Clemente for Warren Tricomi, DJ April Larken, Raymond Richardson and Sebastian Dostman

74 departments

74

HEY, MRS. DJ

April Larken has become a staple on the Greenwich and New York City party circuits— from sold-out fundraisers to wild dance parties. If the fact that she broke into the maledominated DJ world at the age of forty isn’t enough, maybe this will impress you: She did it after battling cancer and surviving with one lung.

18 EDITOR’S LETTER

BEST OF TRENDS A fresh palette, print mix and pulled together looks from spring’s designer collections— with styling advice from our local experts, you’ll be ready to shop the new season now. b y megan g ag non

b y ria n n sm i t h

82

Landscape experts share their advice on how to get the most out of your outdoor living spaces—from privacy hedges and impactful entrances to year-round design options and organic vegetable gardens. b y t om c on nor

22 FROM THE FOUNDERS Of Skiing and Slippery Slopes 29 STATUS REPORT BUZZ Fearless Angels Project; The women behind Dudley Stephens SHOP McArdle’s new line of CBD products GO Hawaii; BMW’s 745E HOME Interior accents with a twist DO Accessible personalized medicine EAT Eugene’s Diner serves up retro gourmet fare

52 FINANCE FIX

90

Use tax time to organize your financial house.

54 G-MOM Sick of your kids being glued to their video games? Sorry, can’t help you there. But we can help you understand the world of gaming—and it’s a far cry from Pong and Pac-Man.

59 PEOPLE & PLACES greenwich magazine’s Best of Greenwich; Catholic Academy of Bridgeport; Greenwich Riding and Trails Association, Silver Horse Ball; Walk/Run for Abilis

71 VOWS Sirabella–Fox; Screnci–Ernst 99 CALENDAR 111 INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 112 POSTSCRIPT In like a lion … on the c over: dj april l arken photo gr aphy by kyle norton GREENWICH MAGAZINE MARCH 2020, VOL. 73, NO. 3 GREENWICH MAGAZINE (USPS 961-500/ISSN 1072-2432) is published monthly by Moffly Media, Inc. 205 Main St, Westport, CT 06880. Periodical postage paid at Westport, CT, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes (Form 3579) to GREENWICH MAGAZINE PO BOX 9309, Big Sandy, TX 75755-9607.

KYLE NORTON

features


WHERE EXCELLENCE LIVES

172 Indian Head Road, Riverside Extraordinary Waterfront Opportunity - The view spectacular. A home of this exceptional quality on such a beautiful property is rare. Special Riverside, Greenwich waterfront stone manor. Elegant, private, tranquil 10,000 sq. ft., 7-bedroom estate on 1.23 acres with sweeping lawn to the water’s edge, dock, and spectacular Western views. Built by Hobbs in 2000, expanded in 2014, architecture by Douglas VanderHorn, beautiful landscape design by world-renowned Peter Cummin, conservatory by the British design firm Amdega, gracious pool, spa and outdoor cabana. Outstanding quality of design and construction in all interior spaces, beautiful terraces and balconies, master suite with his and hers sitting rooms, dressing rooms, sauna and steam shower. A magnificent home on the water for today’s living and entertaining, indoors and out. Rarely do we have a chance to live on such a spectacular waterfront place with such a beautiful home.

Price Upon Request

L in L aver y L i n .l aver y@ g m a il. c o m | w w w. L in L av e r y. c o m Mo b ile : 2 0 3 . 5 3 6 . 0 1 5 2 2 0 3 . 6 2 2 . 1 1 0 0 | 6 6 F ie ld P o in t Road | Green w ich , C T 0 6 8 3 0 | C old w ellBan kerHom es . com Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor agents and are not employees of the Company. ©2020 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.


JOIN US ONLINE! march 2020

GREENWICHMAG.com CELEBRATING THE SCENE STEALERS OF OUR TOWN

WHAT’S ON OUR EDITORIAL DECK?

APRIL

STATE OF REAL ESTATE

OUT & ABOUT

Visit our galleries for all the fun

CAPTURING THE PEOPLE, PLACES AND MOMENTS THAT MAKE GREENWICH EVENTS SO SPECIAL. JOIN OUR ONLINE COMMUNITY TO SEE WHAT’S HAPPENING AROUND TOWN.

An in-depth look at what’s impacting the market, and what buyers and sellers should know.

MAY

SOCIAL MEDIA SUMMIT

We get up-close and personal with some of the hottest local social media influencers.

JUNE

INTERIOR DESIGN

Decor ideas to help turn your home into a beautiful retreat to relax, restore and reconnect.

FOLLOW US ON:

greenwichmag.com

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EVENT PHOTOGRAPHS BY MOFFLY MEDIA’S BIG PICTURE /BOB CAPAZZO; INSET 1: ©MYCREATIVE - STOCK.ADOBE.COM; INSET 2: ©ALEKSEI - STOCK.ADOBE.COM; INSET 3: © MTLAPCEVIC - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

WE’VE GOT PLENTY OF GREAT THINGS IN STORE!


The most advanced orthopedics. The most personalized touch. At Long Ridge Medical Center in Stamford, we know what it takes to help you rebound from the aches, pains and injuries of an active lifestyle. Our team, led by Yale Medicine specialists, works together to personalize treatment plans using today’s most advanced procedures. And, as part of Greenwich Hospital, Long Ridge Medical Center reflects the care and compassion of one of the best community hospitals, with a singular focus on getting you back to the life you love. Services: Foot and Ankle Surgery; Hand and Wrist Surgery; Joint Replacement Surgery; Orthopedic Spine Surgery; Physiatry; Sports Medicine Long Ridge Medical Center 260 Long Ridge Road Stamford, CT 877-YALE-MDS Monday - Friday: 8 am - 8 pm Saturday: 8 am - noon No appointment needed after 5 pm and Saturday greenwichhospital.org/longridge

Craig Tifford, MD


For your dream home

This masterwork by Alex Kaali-Nagy is a modern take on a classic Colonial design featuring 10,000+/- square feet of living space on four finished levels, an expansive rear porch and two plus professionally landscaped acres with a pool site.

500lakeavenue.com $7, 10 0,0 0 0 | L ES L I E M C E LW R E AT H ( 9 17 ) 5 3 9 - 3 6 5 4

© Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity.


Details Matter In Mid-Country

New Construction With Water View

25ORCHARDHILLLN.COM | $3,700,000

27ABAYSIDETERRACE.COM | $3,395,000

Patte Nusbaum 203.249.0078

Steve Archino 203.618.3144

Sophisticated in Riverside

104 Meadow Road

RIVERSIDECLASSIC.COM | $3,195,000

104MEADOW.COM | $2,695,000

Kim Horton 203.915.9100 | Susie Parkin 203.524.4652

Tracey Koorbusch 203.561.8266

South of the Village Perfection

On The Water In-Town

7TOMACCOURT.COM | $2,395,000

11BRELAYPLACE.COM | $2,150,000

Renee Haggquist 203.618.3140

Michele Klosson 203.912.8338

Greenwich Brokerage | One Pickwick Plaza, Greenwich, CT | 203.869.4343 SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM/GREENWICH


M

ake your summertime dreams a reality.

We believe that great properties can transform an experience – creating new summer memories. And memories for every season. That’s why we have been serving the families of Connecticut and New York for over four generations. To find out what we can do for you, visit GlengateCompany.com or call 203.762.2000.

C O N N E C T I C U T & N E W YO R K

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GOODBYE WALL STREET, HELLO PALM BEACH

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Albert Rabil III

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LANDSCAPE: West Palm Beach cityscape, as viewed from Palm Beach island.

TO HEAR AL’S VIEWS ON OUR COUNTY PLEASE VISIT BDB.ORG/HELLOPALMBEACH

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GREENWICH L I F E T O L I F E S T Y L E S I N C E 1 94 7 vol. 73 | no. 3 | march 2020

HOUSEHOLD | PERSONAL | DOMESTIC | BUSINESS

creative director

Amy Vischio

editorial

PROVIDING THE BEST IN HIGHLY SKILLED PRIVATE, PERSONAL, BUSINESS AND HOUSEHOLD STAFF

editor

Cristin Marandino social editor

Alison Nichols Gray market editor

Megan Gagnon

• Personal and Executive Assistant • Estate and House Managers • Private Chefs, Chauffeurs, Butlers and Family Assistants • Housekeepers and Housemen

founding editor 

Donna Moffly assistant editor

Joey Macari contributing editors

Elizabeth Hole - editor, custom publishing Julee Kaplan - editor, new canaan • darien Diane Sembrot - editor, fairfield living; westport; stamford copy editors

Terry Christofferson, Kathryn Satterfield senior writers

Timothy Dumas,Chris Hodenfield, Jane Kendall, Bill Slocum contributing writers

CONTACT STEPHEN IN THE GREENWICH OFFICE

Eileen Bartels, Tom Connor, Kim-Marie Evans, Mary Kate Hogan, Riann Smith, Lynn Stack

203-856-7811 | stephen@privatestaffgroup.com GREENWICH

NEW YORK

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

LONDON

editorial advisory board

Susan Bevan, Alyssa Keleshian Bonomo, Bobbi Eggers, Kim-Marie Evans, Muffy Fox, Lisa Lori, Jessica Mindich, David Ogilvy, Susan Moretti Bodson

art senior art director

Venera Alexandrova senior art director, status report

Garvin Burke contributing art directors

Tim Carr- fairfield living Kim Gilby - new canaan • darien production director

Kerri Rak design assistant

Taylor Stroili senior photographer

Bob Capazzo

digital media digital media manager

Amber Scinto digital editor

Diane Sembrot Calendar@Moffly.com Editor@GreenwichMag.com Weddings@GreenwichMag.com

renew, or change your address, please email us at subscribe@greenwichmag.com, call 1-877-467-1735, or write to GREENWICH magazine, 111 Corporate Drive, Big Sandy, TX 75755. U.S. subscription rates: $35/1 year, $57/2 years, $77/3 years; Canada and Foreign, U.S. $69/year. Prices are subject to change without notice. TO SUBSCRIBE,

please call 203-571-1645 or email reprints@moffly.com. All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without express permission of the publisher. ©2020 GREENWICH magazine is a registered trademark owned by Moffly Media. The opinions expressed by writers commissioned for articles published by GREENWICH are not necessarily those of the magazine. FOR QUALITY CUSTOM REPRINTS/E-PRINTS,

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FINDING A PRIMARY CARE DOCTOR IS EASIER THAN EVER. Stamford Health Medical Group believes primary care is important for keeping you and your loved ones healthy. With more than 130 primary care physicians and specialists across Fairfield County, we make it easy for you to find a doctor close to home. We offer flexible hours that fit your schedule, and we accept most health insurance plans. To make an appointment, visit StamfordHealth.org/PrimaryCare or call 888.898.4876.

DARIEN • GREENWICH • NEW CANAAN • NORWALK • RIVERSIDE • STAMFORD • WILTON


For over a century, Cummings & Lockwood has provided sophisticated legal representation to individuals, families and businesses.

GREENWICH L I F E T O L I F E S T Y L E S I N C E 1 94 7 vol. 73 | no. 3 | march 2020

publisher

Trish Kirsch publisher-at-large

Jonathan W. Moffly

sales & marketing

Wills, Trusts and Estate Planning

International Estate and Tax Planning

Philanthropic Giving

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Probate and Estate Administration

Corporate and Finance

Wealth Protection Planning

Litigation and Arbitration

Fiduciary and Trustee Services

Commercial and Residential Real Estate

sales management

Lisa Hingst–lisa.hingst@moffly.com

publisher new canaan•darien•rowayton AUTOMOTIVE / BUILDERS / LANDSCAPE / SPORTS & FITNESS

Karen Kelly-Micka–karen.kelly@moffly.com publisher stamford TRAVEL

Gabriella Mays–gabriella.mays@moffly.com publisher westport•weston•wilton

ARCHITECTS / INTERIOR DESIGN / HOME FURNISHING / ART & COLLECTIBLES

sales directors Stephanie Delaney–stephanie.delaney@moffly.com REGIONAL TRAVEL

www.cl-law.com

Jennifer Frank–jennifer.frank@moffly.com DOCTORS /DENTISTS / FINANCE / INSURANCE / BUSINESS CONSULTING

STAMFORD

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GREENWICH

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WEST HARTFORD

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| BONITA SPRINGS | PALM BEACH GARDENS

Hilary Hotchkiss–hilary.hotchkiss@moffly.com SCHOOLS & EDUCATION

Rick Johnson–rick.johnson@moffly.com REAL ESTATE / LAWYERS

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Ellyn Weitzman–ellyn.weitzman@moffly.com RESTAURANTS / WINE & SPIRITS / CATERING

event managers

Rachel Shorten Amy Sinclair partnership manager

Kathleen Godbold strategic marketing director

Wendy Horwitz creative services art director

Molly Cottingham

business president

Jonathan W. Moffly vice president/editorial & design

Amy Vischio business manager

Elena Moffly

30 years and 3 patents later, Expect Excellence

cofounders

John W. Moffly IV & Donna C. Moffly PUBLISHERS OF GREENWICH, FAIRFIELD LIVING, NEW CANAAN • DARIEN • ROWAYTON, WESTPORT, STAMFORD and athome magazines 205 Main Street, Westport, CT 06880 phone: 203-222-0600 mail@moffly.com ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: Lemuel Bandala 203-571-1610 or email advertise@moffly.com

greenwichmag.com

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Meet our team, for over 30 years we’ve served Palm Beach as premium real estate advisors with the utmost discretion and professionalism. We thrive on working with Buyers and Sellers as they explore and navigate local investments. We offer exclusive data-rich analyses to assist our clients in their decision making. In addition to the market metrics, we are well versed in sharing or ascertaining the costs associated with building and renovating on Palm Beach. Our marketing is targeted in its domestic and global reach. We’d love to hear from you about your real estate needs and desires. Wishing you and yours the best this year,

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premierestateproperties.com OUR UNRIVALED GLOBAL NETWORK

DISCLAIMER: The written information provided has been obtained and conveyed from third parties such as the applicable Multiple Listing Service, public records as well as other sources. Copyright 2020 Premier Estate Properties Inc. All Rights Reserved.


editor’s letter

MARCH 2020 / CRISTIN MARANDINO

WHAT’S YOUR STORY? O

greenwichmag.com

18

She hadn’t just taken a few DJ classes; she had trained under some of the biggest names in the business. She wasn’t doing this as a hobby; this was her passion, her calling. She wasn’t just keeping Greenwich rocking; she was keeping some of the chicest parties in New York rocking. And then came the proverbial mic drop—she was doing it all as a cancer survivor living with one lung. I’m going to stop there and let you read writer Riann Smith’s account of this amazing woman’s journey for yourself (“Hey, Mrs. DJ,” page 74). I hope you walk away as impressed and inspired as I did. This piece reminds us that more often than not, there’s a story behind the story. And in the end, that story can be whatever we want it to be. WILLIAM TAUFIC

ver the years I’ve had the honor of meeting a lot of truly inspiring women. Their successes are as varied and distinct as the women themselves. But the one thing they all have in common is that every one of them, in some way, has challenged the status quo—refusing to let life happen to them. From facing devastating challenges head on to blazing new paths in the worlds of business, entertainment or fashion, they control their narratives. The woman on our cover has done both. When DJ April Larken first came onto the party scene a few years back, I remember thinking she was a Greenwich mom with a fun hobby. Oh, how very wrong I was. As time went by, and she was blowing out party after party, I thought maybe a Mom-whobreaks-the-mold article would be fun for the magazine. Then I read about her on Penny Goffman’s blog, and it was no longer a maybe.


41 W EST E L M S T R EET, G R EEN W ICH , CT

TEL . 203.622.7000

W W W.VA N DER H OR N A RCHI T EC TS . COM


YA R D TO TA B LE

WE SOW THE SEEDS, YOU REAP THE REWARDS

Who doesn’t love the taste of summer? Crisp lettuce and deep green spinach,

IC

.

EN . . S ...............

weekly visits from April through November, ensuring that your garden is as

S

That’s where Homefront Farmers comes in. We’re the area’s leading experts

M E RG A R

VEG

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grow their own successfully.

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tender new potatoes. Unfortunately, not everyone has the time or knowledge to IN

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fresh-picked strawberries bursting with flavor, juicy vine ripened tomatoes, or

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THE BEST ORTHOPEDICS BY FAR IS NEAR. HSS Orthopedics and Stamford Health have teamed up in Connecticut. The same expertise that earned HSS U.S. News & World Report’s

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founder’s letter

MARCH 2020 / DONNA MOFFLY

T

When we reached the top where the lift pauses to allow people to disembark, [my instructor] got off while I, still talking, kept going.

here aren’t any mountains in Ohio. That’s why I was so reticent about taking to the slopes—that is until I married Jack Moffly, who had a way of getting me to try just about anything. So after we moved East, my first challenge was Stowe. No fancy new equipment for me, of course. Jack was old-fashioned, from Philadelphia. Any pair of long wooden boards—like the ones he had learned on—had been good enough for him. But by all means, Donna, borrow whatever you need. So Karen Dustin, an avid skier who I met at Greenwich Hospital while our little boys were having their tonsils out, was nice enough to loan me her gear. The boots seemed to fit, sort of; but by the end of the first day my ankle bones were bloody, and I had to insert foam donuts around them to keep going. What’s more, I was terribly nearsighted, and my glasses were either all fogged up or covered with snow. Nope, skiing wasn’t much fun. But I persevered. Next I tackled Stratton, enjoying my time off the slopes much more than on, because we’d stay at Nancy and Jim Vaughn’s farmhouse with a bunch of Riverside fun-lovers and have a wonderful time learning about how maple sugar is made and how calves are born. Same was true when Jack, unbeknownst to me, bid on two ski houses at a silent auction for the Greenwich Symphony, figuring he’d get one, only to hear it announced from the stage of the SUNY Performing Arts Center that he was the proud winner of both. Yuck. But we gathered our friends again and made it work. Besides, greenwichmag.com

22

the Rindlaubs’ house in East Rupert, Vermont, had a hammock in the kitchen—a great spot for watching other people cook dinner. But skiing is a lot of work, for sure. Once we rented a lovely little house near Bromley with another couple, and I spent most of the time cleaning and making sandwiches. It had been trashed by the owner’s unruly teenagers. Arms fell off of chairs; one bathroom had a light that never went off, another a light that never went on; the foot of the master bed collapsed (with Jack and me in it); the vacuum caught on fire; and a neighbor’s puppy pooped on the living room rug and growled at Jack when he rubbed its nose in it. But our kids had a great time, and even the long ride home was memorable. For some odd reason, cars kept honking at us. Turned out that eleven-year-old Audrey and her friend Wendy Lewis had entertained themselves in the back seat holding up a sign that read: “HONK IF YOU THINK WE’RE PRETTY!” The finale of my downhill experience came when I was sitting beside my ski instructor on a chairlift ride up Stratton mountain. Tod Groo, owner of Blue Angel, had bestowed on my husband the honor of skippering his boat back to Newport after the Bermuda Race in June, and Jack was mad at me because I wouldn’t join him. I’d been there, done that on Newbold Smith’s Reindeer and vowed never again. So when I discovered that my instructor was dying to go on such a voyage, I began super-selling him on it, thinking Jack would be happier with a young gorilla than me,

VENTURE PHOTOGRAPHY, GREENWICH, CT

OF SKIING AND SLIPPERY SLOPES


AMY AIDINIS HIRSCH INTERIOR DESIGN

amyhirsch.com

n

203 661 1266


founder’s letter

Get Your Photo Published in Greenwich Magazine! We are looking for fantastic photos of Greenwich and Greenwich people to feature every month on our new back page. If you would like a chance to be published in Greenwich magazine and win $100 here’s what you should know: • Photos can be whimsical, historical, serene, funny or beautiful but they all must be taken in Greenwich. • Photos must be submitted digitally to editor@mofflymedia.com and be 300 dpi and 7 inches high or larger. • We will need: 1) Photographer’s name, address, phone number and e-mail 2) Subject of the photograph (identify people in the photo) 3) Location of the photograph 4) Inspiration behind the photograph 5) Any interesting anecdote about the photograph or featured subject

We can’t wait to see your view of Greenwich!

anyway. But when we reached the top where the lift pauses to allow people to disembark, he got off while I, still talking, kept going, as did the chairlift. This was instant decision time: Quickly jump off or ride back down in disgrace? I jumped—landing in a heap of skis and poles circled by concerned witnesses. The only thing bruised was my pride. Downhill just wasn’t for me. After that, I turned to cross-country, which Barbara King and I did on occasion at Okemo when we weren’t shopping in Manchester. Once we rented a house right on the slopes; and after the gents took off the first morning, we quickly did the breakfast dishes, eager to get to the Enchanted Dollhouse and discount stores. But just as we were leaving, there came a knock on the door, and opening it, we found an apparition in a ski mask saying: “My boots fell off!” It was Jack, standing there in his liners with a trail of plastic pieces in his wake. Due to the extreme cold, his old boots had detonated. It ended with him having to buy new boots, new bindings and since “you don’t want to put new bindings on those old skis” (said the salesman), the latest in new skis as well. I don’t remember the final tally, but it was a whole lot more than I spent in Manchester. I found cross-country skiing particularly great for going through cemeteries in Austria and checking out the headstones with all the beautiful little enamel portraits of those lying beneath. That was the Christmas we took our teenage kids skiing in St. Anton. We arrived at the Munich railroad station on December 23 with seventeen pieces of luggage (including our skis) that we had to get onto a train to Innsbruck. Porters were scarce and all signs were in German, but we could read “Innsbruck”; so pushing a giant cart Jack had commandeered somewhere, we headed for the platform. Audrey and I boarded the train and stood in the corridor, while Jack and Jonathan passed us everything through an open window, and we shoved it into a cushy compartment behind us. Done. The boys got on, the train got rolling, and the conductor eventually came greenwichmag.com

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There came a knock on the door, and opening it, we found an apparition in a ski mask saying: “My boots fell off!” around for our tickets. But guess what? We were on the wrong train! It was going to Innsbruck all right, but this was the very special one that people reserved a year in advance. Well, Merry Christmas to the dumb Americans—he didn’t throw us off. Besides, we were going too fast. So from the beginning, our Alpine adventure was another noteworthy ski trip, which Audrey would immortalize at her father’s memorial service thirty-seven years later. A highlight: She and Jack had ridden the gondola to the very top of the mountain and started down, crossing a huge snow bowl the size of two football fields— he taking one route, she another. Then when she stopped to adjust her socks, she saw a tiny figure coming right at her. It had to be her father, because nobody else was up there. Not even trees were up there. “Hey, Dad, stop! Stop!” she yelled. But he didn’t. “We were the only people on the top of that mountain,” she recalls, “and wham! He knocked me right out of my skis!” In any case, Jack wanted me to join him in every sport that turned him on, which was every sport except deer hunting (he couldn’t pull the trigger)—be it sailing, skeet shooting, horseback riding, waterskiing, whatever. The only one I was better at was ice skating, having grown up at the Cleveland Skating Club. (I distinctly remember having a crush on Dick Button and, dressed as a little Dutch girl, chasing him around backstage on my tiny figure skates.) I’ve promised myself that someday I’m going to write a book called I Married a Jock. Meanwhile, I’m old enough now to do whatever I want to do, which is wonderful—but not nearly as much fun. G


STUNNING DREAM HOME | GREENWICH

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The ultimate in living, this exceptional home with impressive interior is sited on nearly 2 acres of lush land. Complete with a chef’s kitchen, spectacular master suite, and sparkling pool. Private and ready for its new owner! $3,650,000 | MLS# 107877 | Janet Milligan Associates | 203.869.9263

Equestrian’s delight to this gated 6.35-acre estate on the Greenwich Riding Trail in a private association, cul-de-sac that borders the Audubon. Luxurious country living that is stunning, sophisticated and chic. $3,499,000 | MLS# 104473 | Janet Milligan Associates | 203.869.9263

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Fantastic 5-bedroom Georgian colonial made of the highest quality materials. Dramatic 2-story entry foyer with open staircase, and French doors to a flagstone terrace. SItuated on 2 acres of lush lawns. $3,495,000 | MLS# 107601 | The Magyar Team | 203.869.9263

G R E E N W I C H 2 0 3 . 8 6 9 . 9 2 6 3 • O L D G R E E N W I C H 2 0 3 . 6 3 7. 4 3 2 4


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Terms, conditions and fees for accounts, programs, products and services are subject to change. This is not a commitment to lend. All loans are subject to credit and property approval. Certain restrictions may apply on all programs. This offer contains information about U.S. domestic financial services provided by Citibank, N.A. and is intended for use domestically in the U.S. ©2020 Citibank, N.A. Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender. NMLS# 412915. All rights reserved. Citi, Citi and Arc Design and other marks used herein are service marks of Citigroup Inc. or its affiliates, used and registered throughout the world.


Greenwich | 105 Parsonage Rd Greenwich | 105 Parsonage Rd

$5,395,000 Riverside | 16 Normandy Ln $5,395,000 Riverside | 16 Normandy Ln

Price Upon Request Price Upon Request

Sophisticated new construction, minutes from town on 1.2 acres. Sophisticated new construction, minutes from town on 1.2 acres. 10,500+ sf. with 7 BR, 7.2 BA & Smarthome capabilities. 10,500+ sf. with 7 BR, 7.2 BA & Smarthome capabilities.

This elegant 6 BR, 4.2 BA Colonial home sits on a level wooded This BR, 4.2 BAon Colonial home sits on a level wooded acre.elegant Close to6 everything a lovely cul-de-sac. acre. Close to everything on a lovely cul-de-sac.

Greenwich | 7 Chieftans Rd Greenwich | 7 Chieftans Rd

Old Greenwich | 4 Little Cove Ln Old Greenwich | 4 Little Cove Ln

Julianne C. Ward | 203.231.1064 Julianne C. Ward | 203.231.1064

$3,395,000 $3,395,000

Private gated association with 24-hour security. Stunning Private gated sf. association 24-hourManor security. Stunning private 8,594 4 BR, 7.2 with BA, English on 1.76 acres. private 8,594 sf. 4 BR, 7.2 BA, English Manor on 1.76 acres.

Giselle Gibbs | 203.536.2723 Giselle Gibbs | 203.536.2723

GREENWICH | 136 East Putnam Ave.| 203-869-0500 GREENWICH | 136 East Putnam Ave.| 203-869-0500

Ann Simpson | 203.940.0779 Ann Simpson | 203.940.0779

$3,200,000 $3,200,000

5 BR, 4.1 BA, waterfront colonial. Close to schools, train, & village. 5 BR, 4.1aBA, waterfront colonial. Close schools, train, & village. Launch kayak/paddle-board from theto associations private beach Launch a kayak/paddle-board from the associations private beach

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OLD GREENWICH | 200 Sound Beach Ave. | 203-637-1713 OLD GREENWICH | 200 Sound Beach Ave. | 203-637-1713

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© 2019 An independently operated member of BHH Affiliates. Equal Housing Opportunity. © 2019 An independently operated member of BHH Affiliates. Equal Housing Opportunity.


buzz STATUS REPORT

A MOTHER’S JOURNEY by lynn stack

WHEN IZABELA O’BRIEN’S DAUGHTER WAS DIAGNOSED ON THE AUTISM SPECTRUM, SHE DIDN’T KNOW THAT

FIGHTING FOR HER DAUGHTER WOULD SET HER ON A PATH TO CHANGE THE LIVES OF OTHERS

BOB CAPAZZO

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earning that her two and-a-half-year-old daughter had pervasive developmental disorder (not otherwise specified), Izabela O’Brien found herself on foreign terrain, struggling to make sense of a prognosis certain to alter her family’s life. “When Alina was first diagnosed, I really shut down,” Izabela recalls. “I didn’t want to go to friends’ homes because I didn’t want pity. And I didn’t want to scare their children with a sound or behavior that Alina might make.” Instead, Izabela threw herself into researching early-intervention therapies and immersing her daughter in educational opportunities, therapeutic activities and biomedical treatments for children on the autism spectrum. The experience was eye-opening. “I would sit in waiting rooms talking to parents who were emotionally, physically and financially drained,” she says. “It’s truly devastating.” Grateful for the financial resources that she and her husband had to provide

Izabela with her husband, Dan, at the 2019 Fearless Angels benefit at Greenwich Country Club

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for Alina, Izabela vowed to help others less fortunate. In 2104, THE FEARLESS ANGEL PROJECT (TFAP) was launched to help economically challenged families raising a child on the spectrum. Since its inception TFAP has awarded scholarships to fifty-three children, and funded a multitude of therapeutic and biomedical interventions, including applied behavioral analysis, occupational, speech, aquatic and equine therapies. Attending therapeutic classes benefits children and parents alike. “Many people go into seclusion with this diagnosis,” says Izabela. Attending classes helps break through the isolation by getting parents connected to others experiencing similar challenges. While early intervention is vital, what’s also needed is empathy. “What’s most hurtful is when I see adults [responding to] special-needs children without considering what that child may be going through,” Izabela says. A little compassion does indeed go a long way.


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A Swift Ascent In just five years, The Fearless Angel Project has evolved into a dynamic, impactful organization under the vision and determination of founder Izabela O’Brien. Committed to serving children on the autism spectrum, TFAP also supports scholarship recipients’ families and educates the broader community. Here, some of the accomplishments of which Izabela is most proud.

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Scholarship funding for licensed therapists and physicians is made available immediately, allowing children to begin or continue a program without delay. Most other financial awards take time to process, leaving children without the support they need until the monies are released.

International families with children on the autism spectrum are often shunned within their communities. Many travel to the U.S. to seek treatment and therapy. Welcoming all, TFAP has awarded scholarships to children from as far away as Nepal.

EXPEDIENCY Alina (center) with her sisters Ireland and Yvette by her side, placed gold in speedskating at the 2019 Special Olympics Connecticut winter state championships.

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INTENTIONAL EXPANSION Founded in Greenwich, TFAP has grown to serve children in Connecticut, New York and Massachusetts, and plans to expand into New Jersey, Pennsylvania and various Midwestern states in the year ahead. By 2025, the organization hopes to be available in all fifty states.

WINGSPAN

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COLLABORATIVE PARTNERSHIPS TFAP fosters synergistic relationships with therapeutic and biomedical providers dedicated to improving the lives of special-needs children. Quite often, providers match TFAP scholarships, extending recipients’ services twofold.

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SUPPORTIVE COMMUNITIES TFAP families draw strength from one another. Through their shared experiences, parents gain confidence and esteem without fear of judgment or ridicule and often educate others unfamiliar with an autism diagnosis.

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The Fearless Angel Project Junior Ambassador Program fosters compassion and activism among youth, inspiring a new generation of philanthropists. School-age volunteers create their own fundraising events and frequently present scholarships to the recipients.

The O’Brien family: Dan, Ireland, Alina, Yvette and Izabela; (right) Alina with her ribbons at the 2019 Endeavor horse show in Bedford greenwichmag.com

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CONTRIBUTED

UNDERSTANDING & ACCEPTANCE


UNDER THE SKIN Through July 19, 2020

BRUCE MUSEUM Greenwich, CT | www.brucemuseum.org


buzz

PARK SLOPE TURTLENECK

Each style is named after a Brooklyn street or neighborhood

Lauren, Bonnie and Kaki

CLOSE KNIT

by megan gagnon

rest of the country. The sisters credit the app with building a community that has remained loyal, while showing off their designs on real women. As their popularity grew, Kaki and Lauren remained focused on strategic partnerships, starting with pop-ups in boutiques and more recently, appearing at the Goop store in Chicago and online at Tuckernuck. In February 2019, they set up shop in Greenwich in what they call the Dudley Stephens Townhouse—a showroom space to host trunk shows, events and meetings. In only four years, the company has expanded to include more silhouettes, accessories, outerwear, pants and options for kids and men. All the pieces are made of high-quality fleece (the majority spun from plastic bottles) sourced in the U.S. and manufactured in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. What started with one turtleneck has grown to a full collection with new designs introduced each season. Mom Bonnie is still involved (unofficially as a full-time promoter), and the sisters attribute their success not only to the timeless styles that appeal to women of all ages, but to their focus on keeping Dudley Stephens a family business. dudley-stephens.com

DUDLEY STEPHENS WANTS YOU TO

GIVE FLEECE A CHANCE

COBBLE HILL TURTLENECK The original design in neon pink, one of the twenty available colors

PACIFIC VEST

One of the brand’s newer outerwear pieces in double layer Vello fleece

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Lauren models Dudley Stephens on Greenwich Avenue

PORTRAITS; JULIA DAGS; CLOTHING; RYAN SCHERB

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or sisters Kaki McGrath and Lauren Stephens, Mom really does know best. After all, they have their mother, Bonnie, to thank for sparking the idea that led them to create DUDLEY STEPHENS, a fashionable fleece line with a devoted and rapidly growing following. An avid boater, Bonnie would grab outerwear pieces that worked on the water but didn’t translate to an evening out once on shore. Armed with a plan to come up with a stylish solution, she helped Lauren create the design and prototype for their iconic Cobble Hill turtleneck, with a stand up collar and flattering fit that have become the brand’s signature. As young moms around town (Kaki lives in Darien, Lauren in Greenwich), the sisters were the perfect models for their label. It didn’t take long for their turtlenecks to become the uniform for stylish women-on-the-go. Beyond Fairfield County, the direct-to-consumer company utilized Instagram to introduce Dudley Stephens to the


THE CROWN JEWEL OF PALM BEACH ONE OF A KIND PENTHOUSE ABOVE TIFFANY’S ON THE ICONIC WORTH AVENUE

ROOFTOP POOL

All images are renderings

Largest penthouse in Palm Beach. Located in the Tiffany Building on Worth Avenue. 2nd level living quarters | 3rd level rooftop bar, dining and pool area Approximately 13,000sf total

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1111 LINCOLN RD, MIAMI BEACH, FL 33139. 305.695.6300 © 2020 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


shop by beth c o oney fitzpatric k

NATURE MADE

THE CBD CRAZE HAS TAKEN OFF, AND WE FOUND SOME GREAT PRODUCTS IN A SURPRISING PLACE above: From gelcaps to salves and extracts, McArdle’s offers a variety of options for those interested in finding out what the CBD craze is all about.

things they are doing,” she says. The CBD line is a natural extension of McArdle’s focus on connecting people with the plant world as a healthful resource. Its staff works with customers interested in choosing plants that contribute to an overall sense of well-being. “We believe in the power of plants, so exploring this made sense,” says Christine.

What’s In Store A look at the McArdle’s line of CBD products DOG TREATS

Christine notes that canines lack a human’s tendency to benefit from a placebo effect. So if Fido is a little more chill after noshing on one of these protein-packed CBD infused treats, you’ll know why.

FACE MASK

This calming mask includes CBD in a deeply hydrating serum that leaves complexions dewy and revitalized.

CBD SUPPLEMENTS

More Than Just A Pretty Face Plants you can put to work

Orchids, like all plants, absorb carbon dioxide and emit oxygen. “But they are night owls that do all their hard work when we’re sleeping, so having one in the bedroom is a great idea,” says Christine. Think of them as the plant world’s antidote to a good night’s sleep.

Aloe is the perfect starter succulent for anyone interested in creating a medicinal home garden. Gel harvested from its thick, fleshy leaves can be slathered on sunburns and other skin irritations for naturally soothing relief.

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Snake plant is known as nature’s air purifier. This hearty statement plant recognized by its sword-like leaves is easy to maintain and particularly efficient in clearing the air of toxins.

The McArdle’s line of CBD treatments was created to suit a variety of palates. Options include fastacting tinctures, gel capsules and colorful, sweetened gummies.

BALM RUB

Rub some of this balm into achy muscles and joints for a botanically sourced alternative to over-the-counter pain-relieving ointments.

CONTRIBUTED

T

he team at McArdle’s Florist & Garden Center has been sharing the beauty and benefits of Mother Nature with customers for more than a century. So as consumers grew curious about plant-based cannabidiol (better known as CBD) as an elixir for everything from anxiety to chronic pain, McArdle’s botanicals experts were answering more and more questions about its potential benefits. “What we were seeing were customers curious and even a little tentative about trying CBD products,” says Christine McArdle. So the McArdle’s team tapped into its expertise of all things botanical to develop a signature line of CBD products, ranging from dietary supplements to beauty products and dog treats. From the outset, the McArdle’s team was focused on creating top-of-the-line products, working closely with a Colorado supplier to source a high-grade CBD that contains zero percent THC (or delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol), the more notorious marijuana molecule that produces a high and those telltale munchie cravings. “Unfortunately, so much of the CBD being sold now is processed overseas. It isn’t coming from great soil and the processing isn’t up to par either,” explains Christine, the granddaughter-in-law of founders James and Mary McArdle.“We wanted to produce something we could feel good about putting our name on and that our customers could trust.” Citing strict FDA guidelines as well as ongoing research into CBD’s potential benefits for a variety of ailments and conditions, Christine is careful not to tout its products as a panacea for anything. “I can tell you that a lot of people who seek out CBD are trying it as a natural alternative [therapy] for things like anxiety and pain, or they are using it to complement other


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by kim-marie evans

SEAS THE DAY FINDING THE MAGIC IN MAUI IS ABOUT FAR MORE THAN THE

H

undreds of guidebooks have been penned promising visitors access to the “real” or “hidden” Hawaii. They include advice on where to find secret waterfalls and unspoiled beaches, and which stop on the Road to Hana will lead to the “Hawaii of your dreams.” The thing these guidebooks miss—and it’s at the heart of experiencing authentic Hawaii—is meeting the Hawaiians themselves. There is a Hawaiian word, mana, that means the life energy that flows through all things and humans. Though I have traveled to this remote island chain

many times, I had never experienced mana. Until, as unlikely as it sounds, I checked into a very special beachfront hotel on Maui. Kaliko Storer’s title is Cultural Advisor at the Andaz Maui. However, it’s not possible to reduce what she does to a simple title. To those of us with scant knowledge of Hawaiian history, this role could seem unnecessary. As I peppered her with trite questions about where to find the elusive real Hawaii that greenwich magazine readers would be eager to visit, she gently returned me to the same answer again and again. Meet the people, sit, listen, be. I had a lot to learn.

MICHAEL MAXWELL - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

GORGEOUS BEACHES AND STUNNING LANDSCAPE


TO DO ON-PROPERTY

BELOW: PACIFIC DREAM PHOTOGRAPHY

above: The outrigger experience is a must-do activity righ: Chef Isaac at the Andaz Maui below: Wilson Evans explores the beach

We know that Hawaii became the fiftieth state in 1959, but what many of us don’t know is that natives believe their monarchy was overthrown and their land illegally annexed. Teaching the Hawaiian language was banned until 1987. And by then, only 1 percent of the population could speak it fluently. Part of the resurgence of the local culture is the language. Kaliko’s job isn’t just teaching tourists, but also the staff. One of her many efforts is to normalize the Hawaiian language. “We have a Hawaiian word of the day program that we launched. I think it’s important to reclaim the Hawaiian names for places and other things.” Disney’s Moana taught us that ancient voyagers could navigate the stars using just their hands. Standing under the boundless night sky measuring the distance to the North Star with my palm, I learned that I could as well. Classes on celestial navigation are another of Kaliko’s educational efforts. Kala Tanaka looks a bit like Moana, young and sweet. But she is a serious Wayfinder

who guided an entire crew and hulking double-hull canoe through dark waters using nothing more than her diminutive hand. When asked how she would know if we were off course, she replied that she could feel it—in the waves and in the wind. Learn more about the legacy of ancient voyaging at hokulea.com. Though the Andaz Maui was recently voted one of the best hotels in the world by Conde Nast Traveler, it’s not the modern design or the cascading infinity pools that make it worth a visit. The resort spans fifteen beachfront acres just up the coast from the more well-known Four Seasons Maui. The term “house reef ” is used by hotels to indicate that guests can swim to a coral reef from the property’s shore. The Andaz has a house reef, and a swim around the rocky corner reveals an entire playground of sea turtles. Though you can borrow snorkel gear and rent a kayak, you won’t meet an octopus without a little help from an expert. Book the MARCH 2020 GREENWICH

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Get a Lomilomi massage at the Awili spa, ask for Jamie. The one-hour massage is $190. Add the custom oil blending experience and create your own massage oil using local ingredients; for $55 you’ll leave with your creation and the hotel will keep your recipe on file for future use. Book a Chef’s Table dinner at Ka’ana kitchen. Only four guests are seated per night and the six-course meal is created “a la

minute” for each guest and can be accompanied by expert wine pairings. Ask for Charlie the sommelier, and if you’re lucky he might pour some of his 1927 port or other rare vintages. Capture the perfect photo with a complimentary session from Pacific Dream Photography. The forty-five-minute shoot is free and guests get a $50 credit toward prints. Digital images start at $79.


go

TO DO OFF-PROPERTY

two-hour outrigger snorkel expedition ($139 per person). Ask if you can get on Koa’s boat. Kekoa Cramer is the beach crew manager, a competitive outrigger canoe rower and erstwhile sea-life whisperer. We had been in the water for about ten minutes when he swam up cradling an octopus. He assured me that as soon as he “calmed it down,” I could hold it. On a two-hour trip, we met Honu (sea turtles), octopi and all manner of tropical fish. Though the hotel offers guests complimentary new GoPro video cameras, leave it in the room for this outing. Be in the moment, and Koa will snap the photos. left: According to Open Table, Mama’s Fish House is the second-most popular restaurant in the United States. below: Rooms with a view at the Andaz Maui

GETTING THERE:

There are no direct flights to Maui from the East Coast. Either fly to Honolulu from JFK and then connect to Maui (airport code OGG) or connect through San Francisco or Los Angeles. The Andaz has 301 rooms, including thirty-five suites and eleven private villas. All rooms have a private lanai.

Eat at Mama’s Fish House. It sounds like a tourist trap, but it’s not. This iconic waterfront restaurant serves up some of the best— and most expensive— food you’ll ever eat. Reservations are hard to come by, so book early. Taxis are expensive on the island; rent a car from the hotel’s on-site Enterprise. While there, drive a mile up the road and watch the real surfers ride the waves at Ho’okipa. If you’re not an expert, don’t try to get in on the action; a lifeguard will stop you. Some lessons are learned the hard way. mamasfishhouse.com Spend the day relaxing on nearby Makena Beach, also known as Big Beach. Follow signs for Makena, the beach is through the trees. Though it’s rated the No. 1 beach in Maui, it’s not crowded and is great for boogie boarding, though the shore break can be rough. The beach has lifeguards, restrooms and food trucks.

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CONTRIBUTED; TOP PHOTOGRAPH BY ©FOTOGESTOEBER - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

above: Makena Beach is one of Hawaii’s largest undeveloped beaches—a perfect place to escape the crowds of some on Maui’s more crowded beaches.

Learn to surf in nearby Kihei. The combination of warm, shallow water and gentle rolling waves makes this the perfect place to learn. Maui Waveriders promises that you’ll stand up during your first lesson or it’s free. A private lesson, $150 for two hours, includes the board, rash guard and booties. Your glory will be captured by photographers from No Ka Oi—it’s only $30 for all your digital images. (Fun fact: historians believe the phrase “pursuit of happiness” in the constitution was inspired by surfers.) mauiwaveriders.com


Heaven in ConneCtiCut Far from the madding crowd, in the Litchfield Hills, lies a quiet getaway. Set on 113 acres and bordering extensive woods and lakes, Winvian Farm was created to recharge and indulge. The five-star cuisine, the wines, the spa and the service are as unexpected as the experiences that one ultimately enjoys— and it’s just around the corner.

winvianfarm.com


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ELECTRIFYING THE LUXE BMW’S 745E ADDS A TOUCH OF HYBRID POWER by chris hodenfield

magnificence. Our optioned-up tester had it all, including the “Panoramic Sky Lounge LED roof,” the M Sport package, and luxury rear seating complete with TV monitors and massage seats. For the price, you’d expect the sound acoustics of Carnegie Hall, and Harman-Kardon Surround System does in fact present a sonic wallop. Mastering the controls was not difficult (an area in which some manufacturers have failed miserably). BMW offers other engine packages that either lessen or increase the cost. All of them feature the 7-series’ burly front

Fairfield County. Driving to the station on a cold winter’s morn, you are sparing the engine while the electric motor (which alone will take you to 80 mph) eases you silently down the road. When the EV battery is drained, the gasoline-fueled turbo 6 alone is a mighty accomplice. Long-distance drives take you past 400 miles. Normal jaunts around town will deliver a combined mileage in the mid-30s. The all-wheel-drive system adds to driver assurance. On the road, the 745e again presents two faces. For all its heft, it’s devilish fun to drive even as it coddles you in a soft leather

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grill, which is something you’d expect in a monster truck. In an era when luxurious SUVs hold sway, it is still a welcome, regal romp to light out in a swift, well-made sedan like the 745e.

STATS BMW 745E XDRIVE Base price: $95,550, as tested: $119,875 Drivetrain: 280 hp 3.0-liter turbo 6 with 111 hp electric motor. 388 hp combined. AWD EPA mileage ratings: 19 city/ 26 highway EV range: 18 miles

CONTRIBUTED

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MW’s new 745e delivers just what you want out of a posh German styler: an opulent interior, confidence in the curves, and hell-raising power. The “e” tag in the name signifies something else—100 horses’ worth of electric boost. The 745e is what you might call a “sorta hybrid.” Officially it’s a plug-in hybrid, although in my thoroughly wonderful week in this car, I never actually bothered to plug it in. Braking and coasting will restore juice to the EV battery, which supplies a max 18 miles of added, electric-only range. It’s a useful configuration for


Smilow Cancer Hospital brings you the most advanced care in Greenwich. At Smilow Cancer Hospital, our focus is on understanding how specific cancers develop. So that we can diagnose them sooner and treat them more effectively. It’s a commitment by physician scientists who are leaders in genomic research, cell biology, immunotherapy and other sciences to deliver the most targeted treatment possible. This means your treatment is unique to your cancer. And you’re cared for by a medical team assembled just for you. It’s all available at the Smilow Cancer Care Center in Greenwich. Services: Clinical Trials; Breast Center; Genetic Testing; Medical and Radiation Oncology; Hematology; Lab & Pharmacy Services; Palliative Care; Patient and Family Support; Survivorship Program Smilow Cancer Care Center 77 Lafayette Place Greenwich, CT closertofree.com

M. Sung Lee, MD


home by megan gagnon

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TURNED UP

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A NEW TWIST ON SPINDLES AND SPOOLS

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5 we really l o ok t o tr aditional shapes and turned wo od for inspir ation, because these cl assic forms never go ou t of st yle. —stacy kunstel, dunes and duchess

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Spool chandelier; $8,200. paulmarra design.com

2 JENNY LIND

Gray bookcase; $299. Crate & Kids, Westport; crateandbarrel.com

3 CURREY & COMPANY

4 WILLIAMS SONOMA HOME

Coventry natural table lamp; $ 1,490. Lillian August, Norwalk; lillianaugust.com

Spindle leather chair; starting at $1,795. Westport; williamssonoma.com greenwichmag.com

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5 CENTURY

Artefact bobbin dining table; price upon request. century furniture.com

6 THEODORE ALEXANDER Rivera end table; $1,530. Safavieh, Stamford; safaviehhome.com

7 DUNES AND DUCHESS Classic bar; $2,650. Schwartz Design Showroom, Stamford; schwartzdesign showroom.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF DESIGNERS/BRANDS

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ROBERT BENSON PHOTOGRAPHY


do Going to a concierge doctor means you have access to 24/7 on-call care.

CONCIERGE CONVERTS with higher technology and a very personal touch.” Going concierge allows Karol to carefully limit how many patients she sees, which enables her to listen closely and do diagnostics in the office instead of sending people to many specialists or for unnecessary testing. Dr. Puglisi cites one example how concierge care can be life changing. He mentions a 55-year-old male patient who was obese,

PRIVATE PRACTICE

Pros and cons of going concierge PROS ●

24/7 on-call physician care ●

Personalized attention and detailed wellness plans

Insurance coverage for some tests, procedures and medications

CONS ●

Pay an annual membership fee

You will likely need to have a health insurance plan in addition to the concierge doctor Most large insurance plans will not cover concierge services

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here’s a good deal of buzz surrounding “concierge” medicine, as well as an equal amount of debate about whether it’s a service that only the wealthy can afford. Recently, we sat down with a couple of concierge doctors to separate fact from fiction. Dr. Glen Puglisi, cofounder of Glenville Medical Concierge in Greenwich, says he started his practice five years ago because he was searching for a way to provide more time for his patients. He saw a concierge practice as a way to do just that. “While the concierge model has fully delivered on that promise, the benefits have been even more profound than I originally envisioned,” he says. “My relationships with patients, nurtured with undivided attention and a deepening knowledge of what’s going on in their lives, have grown to the point where I consider each a member of my extended family—and I care for them in just that way.” Similarly, Dr. Nina Karol at Concierge Physicians of Westport says her decision to go concierge occurred as a result of factors affecting medical care across the country. “The increased pressure to see more than 20 patients daily and document every detail in a cumbersome electronic record culminated in some burnout,” she says. “I wanted to get more control over my medical career and derive more enjoyment from seeing my patients. My partners and I wanted to run a new practice more like an old-fashioned medical one, but

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prediabetic, and sedentary when he first visited. The concierge practice allowed time for them to work together on a wellness plan, with constant communication and ongoing monitoring. “We completely reversed the course of his condition,” he explains. “He lost 25 pounds as a result of eating and exercising very differently than he had previously. He is no longer prediabetic, dramatically decreased his risk of cardiovascular disease, and most importantly, is enjoying all the benefits of a fuller, more vibrant life. Being able to achieve that transformation is the greatest reward of being a concierge physician.” So, are there any downsides? “As soon as you say the word ‘concierge,’ people assume this is a service only for the very wealthy,” Dr. Karol says. “We all pay a lot for our medical insurance, me included. What people do not understand is if something goes wrong, how important it is to have a personal guide helping to steer you. Not having a caring, involved doctor is like trying to navigate choppy seas in the dark without a boating license when you are at your most vulnerable. Our practice accepts insurance and is in-network, something patients do not associate with ‘concierge’ care.” While all concierge practices structure their fees individually, most of them assess an annual membership fee, typically around $2,500, and also submit bills to insurance.

PHOTO BY © LIGHTFIELD STUDIOS - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

A NEW TREND IN PERSONALIZED MEDICINE IS NOT JUST FOR THE ULTRA WEALTHY by christ y c ol asurd o


eat

by mary k ate ho gan photog raphs by thomas mc govern

THEN & NOW THIS “DINER” INSPIRED BY THE ERA OF THE BRADY BUNCH AND CHARLIE’S ANGELS NAILS EVERY RETRO DETAIL MINUS THE MYSTERY MEAT—THE FOOD HERE IS PURE 2020 DECADENCE

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hrowbacks aren’t just for social media. Step inside Eugene’s Diner & Bar in Port Chester and every detail of the decor—from the wood paneling and sunflower yellow booths to the formica counters and latch-hook rugs on the wall—says you’ve been teleported to the 70s or maybe walked onto a movie set. It’s a concept that chef and restaurateur David DiBari, who also owns Dobbs Ferry eateries The Cookery, The Parlor and The Rare Bit, had been dreaming about for years. Dave grew up going to the diner every Sunday after church with his grandfather and named the place after greenwichmag.com

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above: Welcome to the 1970s—grab a seat at one of the sunflower yellow booths or the Formica-topped bar


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eat him. Though there are modern touches in the cuisine (and a menu of gluten-free options), the nostalgia feels like permission to indulge in old-school guilty pleasures such as tiki cocktails, mashed potatoes with gravy and pancakes for dinner. Turns out that this diner-inspired joint and its flashback setting have broad appeal, even for those too young to remember the aughts much less the seventies. My daughter and her tween friends can’t get enough of the shakes and pancakes. We’ve eaten here multiple times for dinner and the place has been more crowded each time, in particular on a recent Friday night when a slew of Capitol Theatre– goers caused a short wait for seating. If you’re a fan of all-day breakfast, this part of the menu is well worth exploring. The custardy yolks on a generous slice of toast (Wave Hill Bread’s buttermilk bread) is rich and lush with the option to add caviar—why not? What a combination—those salty black pearls adding a brininess to each bite. We also loved the crispy Salt and Pepper Eggs, fried up with garlic, ginger and scallions. Fluffy pancakes earn their name: Three of them make up a stack so lofty that it’s as tall as the retro harvest-gold water glasses. You can add foie gras to the French toast and bone marrow to the waffle plate; the waitstaff wears T-shirts bearing the slogan Burgers, Shakes, Pancakes and Caviar. Diner classics, including those burgers and shakes, are a definite draw. In addition to basic vanilla and chocolate, there are shakes called Stickabutta and Blueberry Pie, each containing an actual blended piece of pie! Continuing in the more-is-more spirit, the burger is a double with melted cheddar, pickles and “happy” sauce. This sandwich as well as the slow-cooked pastrami and fried bologna are available with lettuce buns for people seeking gluten free. Anyone dreaming of a classic meatloaf won’t be disappointed with this one—a hefty piece of savory goodness topped with a mushroom sauce and paired with mashed potatoes and gravy. There’s also a roasted turkey entrée for a taste of Thanksgiving any time of year; it comes with stuffing and cranberry relish. greenwichmag.com

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opposite page, clockwise from top left: Options abound! Custardy yolk on a slice of Wave Hill buttermilk toast • House cured bacon • Crispy Salt & Pepper Eggs • Waffles and bone marrow • Fried eggs and bologna this page, clockwise from top left: Chef/owner David DiBari • TV dinner du jour • Flamingo Beach • Fried avocado • Housemade hot dog with mustard, crisp onion and sauerkraut • French fries with cheese sauce »

turns ou t that the din er-in spire d joi n t and its fl ashback set ting hav e broad appea l, even for those t o o young t o remember the aughts much less the seven ties .


eat EUGENE’S 112 N. Main Street, Port Chester, NY 914-481-5529; eugenesdiner.com

HOURS Tuesday & Wednesday 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday & Saturday 11:30 a.m. to 12 a.m. Sunday 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Chef/owner David DiBari pours syrup over a lofty stack of pancakes. • Rainbow cookie cake • Espresso anyone? • Banana cream pie with chocolate crumble crust • Vanilla and chocolate shakes

Craving lighter fare and veggies? There’s a Greek-style chopped salad, kale salad and a trout entrée with Brussels sprouts, smoked almonds and mustard that was particularly tasty. However, the dishes we enjoyed most were slightly more decadent: thinly sliced beef with shaved broccoli, wild rice and Hoisin sauce that channeled classic Chinese food and the tangy Brussels sprouts with puffed rice and parmesan. For the ultimate nostalgic meal, try the TV Dinner du jour. It’s served on a molded plastic tray with compartments resembling the old Swanson varieties but tastes a hundred times better. On the night we tried it, we had a flavorful mini beef Wellington with mashed potatoes, corn fresh off the cob, Bibb lettuce, and excellent peanut butter and jelly cake in the dessert slot. On the topic of sweets, Eugene’s is a dessert destination. True to the diner format, there’s a large rotating glass case that flaunts the tempting array of baked goods, which recently included a banana cream pie, rainbow cookie cake, cheesecake, hazelnut chocolate cake and blueberry pie. One night our server brought us dulce de leche milkshake shots at the end of the meal, just for fun. This playful eatery strikes the right blend of retro and modern, serving up delicious memories while leaving room to G make new ones.

QUICK BITES Chef’s Favorites The house-made deli meats—from pastrami to bologna, sausage, bacon and hot dogs—are all made using local, all natural ingredients. So you can enjoy a thirteen-inch all-beef, all-natural hot dog while still feeling good. The motto here is “looks dirty but eats clean.” Hot Dishes The Salt & Pepper Eggs are fun and sharable. Sunny-side up eggs battered and fried in a light, crispy tempura batter that’s gluten free: Crunchy outside with a slightly runny yolk. They’re tossed with crispy ginger, garlic and scallions. The personal-sized meatloaf with whipped potatoes, maple-marinated mushrooms and Swedish gravy is a favorite that’s based on The Cookery’s famous meatball recipe. Private Dining Check out the space upstairs for shared dinners from six to twelve people. It’s a private room, but you look down at the action in the restaurant. They offer prime rib or whole suckling pig (carved tableside) along with apps, sides and dessert for a set price.


HOURS: Open Daily 5:00-10:00pm 540A Willett Avenue | Port Chester, NY 10573 | 914.4690.2000 | APPETITBISTRO.COM

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fınance fıx

MONEY / BY CAROL LEONETTI DANNHAUSER

SPRING CLEANING TAX TIME IS A CHANCE TO GET YOUR FINANCES IN ORDER

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ax time means hunting for documents in creaky file cabinets, overstuffed shoe boxes and worn-out envelopes, only to shove them back again once returns are filed. This season, maybe you can get your financial documents in order just as you tackle the rest of your spring cleaning. Then when you’re done, ahhh, everything is in its place. A systematic approach works best: gather, organize, shred, take action. Pick a day (or weekend or month) and commit to the task. “Pull the Band-Aid off,” says Daniel E. Paige, Director of Financial Planning at Wunder Financial in Westport. “It’s an effort outweighed by many benefits.” First, gather all of your account statements, whether paper or electronic. If you don’t know what you’re looking for, look to your tax return for help. “Lots of people have money sprinkled all over the place,” he says. “You can use your 1099s to inform you. They list

Is there an old card that you’re not using anymore? Is it worth getting a new card?” Paige says. Online calculators, such as on bankrate.com, let you compare mortgage variables. Wallethub .com helps you compare credit card rates, fees and features. While you’re online, order a free annual credit report, just to make sure everything is in order. Look to annualcreditreport.com, the only website authorized by the Federal Trade Commission for a free report. Track your budget. (The free tool mint.com can help.) “Even for many high-net-worth folks, there’s an emotional stress to spending. You might feel a sense of deprivation” if you don’t buy what you want, Paige says, but spend too much and your pile shrinks too fast. You’ll need to

know how much you take home, after taxes, retirement funding and everything else. In these days of direct deposits, many people aren’t paying attention to how much actually gets deposited. Then, gather a year’s worth of credit card and bank statements to see where your money goes. Try not to judge; you’re on a reconnaissance mission. Consider a bucket approach: Create goal-specific accounts (include fun purchases) and automatically fund them each month. X goes into the recurring bills fund, Y into the new car fund, Z into the vacation fund. The key is to automate the savings. G Note: Daniel E. Paige uses Wunder Financial as a marketing name for doing business as representative of Northwestern Mutual (NM). Wunder Financial is not a registered investment adviser, broker-dealer, insurance agency or federal savings bank. Paige is a representative of Northwestern Mutual Wealth Management Company®, a subsidiary of NM and limited purpose federal savings bank. Financial Representatives do not render tax advice; consult a qualified tax professional.

SHRED IT AND FORGET IT WHAT SHOULD YOU KEEP? » Seven years of tax returns and supporting documents » One year of bank statements » Your annual credit card statement » Shred your old insurance policies when the new ones arrive. » Hang on to your homeimprovement receipts at least until you sell your house, and then treat them as tax-supporting documents. » Keep annual 401(k) statements until you retire.

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HEADSHOT, CONTRIBUTED; SHREDDER, © LOLOSTOCK - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

Daniel E. Paige

the source of your income, gains, interest, distributions and the like.” Bundle similar accounts— savings in one pile, checking in another, retirement in a third, and so on. First, compare fees. Then reduce your number of savings accounts and maximize the interest on your cash stash. Your savings accounts might be earning a small percent interest rate right now, when there’s a chance you could earn more in a CD or high-yield savings account. A financial advisor can recommend an account best suited for your individual financial needs. And consider poking around online sites such as nerdwallet.com and bestcashcow.com to get an idea of what is offered. Consolidate 401(k)s and other retirement accounts, but consult with an advisor or accountant to avoid costly tax errors. While you’re at it, rebalance your asset allocation. If you don’t have an advisor, the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (napfa.org) can help you find a fee-only planner nearby. Do the same with your debt— car loans, credit cards, student loans, mortgage, etc.—with an eye on reducing interest. “I don’t think a lot of people understand that they can have lower debt. Look at your statements. With your mortgage, what’s the rate and the terms? Is it worth refinancing? With your credit card, look at the fees, the interest and the benefits.


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g–mom by eileen bartels

KEEPING SCORE

Much like movies, the video game industry has a ratings system that considers such factors as violence, language and adult themes. The Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) determines age appropriateness and issues the ratings. The system is voluntary, but most gamemakers comply, as the main hardware manufacturers (Xbox, PlayStation and Microsoft) will only play rated video games. Ratings range from E for everyone to A for adults only (intense violence, graphic sexual content or gambling with real currency).

NOT TODAY

In addition to requiring games to have an ESRB rating, major hardware manufacturers also provide ways to block games based on ratings. Your kids won’t like me telling you this, but on esrb .org there are easy instructions on how to block games based on ratings. There’s even a mobile app you can download that offers ratings and brief descriptions. Another great source of information is commonsensemedia .org. The reviews are neither preachy nor judgmental. They just give you the facts so you can determine what’s right for your child.

WHAT’S OUT THERE?

Games can be played on everything from Xboxes and Nintendo to laptops and smartphones. You can still purchase physical copies, but your kids are most likely downloading them directly. Categories include builder games like Minecraft and Roblox, race games such as Mario Brothers, sports games like FIFA, NBA 2K and Madden Football, team tactical games like Overwatch and League of Legends, and grittier first-person shooter games like Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six and the wildly popular Call of Duty.

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LOOK WHO’S TALKING

Another parenting dilemma is the advent of open chat. Over the past ten years, technology has changed to allow players to talk to opponents or engage in team play. On the positive side, open chat turns what could be a socially isolating pastime into a more communal activity, allowing kids to converse, create an online community and play with friends. However, it’s important to note that parents can neither control the nature of what’s being said nor know the ages of the people your children have a gaming relationship with.

CONTRIBUTED

PACMAN, WHERE ARE YOU?

ACCORDING TO THE TECHNOLOGY WEBSITE CNET, OVER 91 PERCENT OF KIDS PLAY AT LEAST ONE VIDEO GAME ON A REGULAR BASIS. AND, MY, HAVE TIMES CHANGED SINCE WE WERE KIDS. WE’RE HERE TO HELP YOU NAVIGATE THE WORLD OF GAMING—’CUZ WE ALL KNOW YOUR KIDS WON’T


CHART TOPPERS: WHAT YOUR KIDS MAY BE PLAYING live

ONLINE COACHING GAMERS, STREAMERS AND INFLUENCERS GIVING TIPS ON HOW TO PLAY SPECIFIC VIDEO GAMES IS A BOOMING BUSINESS. THERE ARE THREE PRIMARY PLACES TO WATCH STREAMERS:

twitch microsoft mixer youtube

HEADPHONES BY © SPICYTRUFFEL - STOCK.ADOBE.COM; CONTROLLER BY ©ONE PIXEL STUDIO - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

These websites stream programming on phones, computers and smart TVs.

1. Twitch, owned by Amazon, currently rivals major cable networks in viewership. Viewers can watch personalities and professional gamers such as Dr. Lupo play Fortnight or Riot Games’ tournaments of League of Legends for $4.99 a month or free with Amazon Prime. 2. Mixer is Microsoft’s venture into a game streaming platform. It made a splash by bringing over highprofile gamer Tyler “Ninja” Blevins, known for playing Fortnight with celebrities. A recent price drop to $4.99 a month indicates the platform is looking to take on Twitch. 3. YouTube is home to not only live streamers but gamers and teams like FaZe Clan who post vlogs and trick-shot videos. Streamers and Influencers post videos on how to improve game play and stream live. YouTube is free.

MINECRAFT

OVERWATCH

This decade-old Swedish game allows players to construct 3-D worlds using cubes. Other activities in the game include gathering resources, crafting and combat. Multiple gameplay modes are available. Cost varies based on format.

Team-based multiplayer online firstperson shooter video game assigns players into two teams of six. Each player selects from a roster of over twenty characters that have a unique style of play and fall into one of four general categories: offense, defense, tank and support. Players on a team work together to secure and defend control points on a map in a limited amount of time. The most recent version costs $40.

FORTNITE Drawing over 125 million players in less than a year, the newest addition to the Fortnite game series, Battle Royale, was a huge success. The game itself is free, but character skins and dance moves will cost you. One appeal to this game is that it allows players to play on a number of formats, including Nintendo Switch, iOS and Android devices.

MARIO BROTHERS The newest game in the successful Mario Brothers universe is Luigi’s Mansion 3, costing $60. The Super Smash Brothers game series follows a traditional style of gameplay where players control a character and use attacks to weaken their opponents. It features a wide variety of game modes, including singleplayer and multiplayer.

FUN FACT:

ROBLOX This is an online multiplayer game that allows players to create their own virtual world. The company’s main source of revenue comes from the Builders Club virtual benefits, offering in-app purchases.

GAMING HAS BECOME A BILLION DOLLAR BUSINESS AND IS POISED TO OUTPACE BOTH THE MOVIE AND MUSIC INDUSTRIES IN THE NEXT FIVE YEARS.

ROCKET LEAGUE This vehicular soccer video game using rocket powered cars retails for $20. Rocket League has up to four players assigned to each of the two teams, using vehicles to hit a ball into an opponent’s goal and score points over the course of a match.

FIFA 20, NBA 2K20, MADDEN NFL 20, NHL 20 You name the sport, there is a video game where your child can be anyone— from Steph Curry to Patrick Mahomes. In addition to the cost of the game, typically $60, gamers can trade and buy players for additional money.

LEAGUE OF LEGENDS In this multiplayer online battle arena, players assume the role of a character and battle a team of players or computercontrolled champions. The game is free to download, but in-game purchases through Riot Points will cost you real money. In the most popular game modes, the goal is to destroy the opposing team’s nexus, a building that lies at the heart of a base protected by defensive structures. G


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people&PLACES by alison nichols gr ay

PHOTOGRAPHS BY BOB CAPAZZO 1

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BEST OF GREENWICH / Hyatt Regency Greenwich

Simply the Best

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his year we brought our annual Best of Greenwich bash to a new venue—the atrium at the Hyatt—and the response was an enthusiastic thumbs up from partygoers. Guests mingled and cocktails flowed in the lush setting filled with palm trees. Local restaurants offered delicious bites and live music filled the air. See you again in November! »

1 Taylor Stroili, Briana Man 2 Sarah Bamford, Hilary Cox, Joia Calderaro, Andrea Blume 3 Dr. Lynne Haven, Paul Rinaldi 4 Tony Capasso, Frank Gaudio 5 Caley Fry, Jamie Appelberg 6 Alann Grossmann, Traci Gwozdz 7 Victoria Newman, JoAnn Slattery MARCH 2020 GREENWICH

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1 Steilos Stavrianos from Cylinder Vodka 2 Spencer and Diane Lampert 3 Manny’s Ultimate Bloody Mary mix 4 Rachel Texeira from Michael David Winery 5 Mathew Gish, Karina Zaleska, Aldo Camara from New Country Porsche 6 Nicolo Bertaccini, Matteo Pozzi 7 Debra Ponzek, Jeff Abate, Elizabeth McDougall, Chris Berzolla from Aux Delices 8 Janice Perna-Nicholas, Anny Ortiz, Gerslyn Silva, Dennis Radovic from the J House 9 Denise and Pete Rosato, Maria Oliva, Penny Lore 10 Mike Cusato 11 Anne Franscinoi, Heather Woodbridge 12 The team from The Golf Performance Center greenwichmag.com

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13 Fernando J Alva Miras 14 Andrew Ciavarelli, Teagan Barnes-MacVicar, Victor Martinez 15 K Dong, Chef Steven Chen from Miku Sushi 16 Trevor and Oliver Koffman 17 Meredith Bach, Jonathan Moffly 18 Joey Boucher, Jennifer Booth, Brian Hayslip from Fjord 19 Marrietta Contadino, Luige and Anthony Carratello 20 Rich Granoff, Tom Telesco, Paul Senecal 21 Cynthia Mansfield, Anthony George 22 Alessandra Messineo Long, Trish Kirsch 23 Mary Kate Hogan, Tom Anderson 24 Sabrina DiMare, Donna Wrigley from DiMare Pastry Shop Âť

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CATHOLIC ACADEMY OF BRIDGEPORT / Polpo Restaurant

Educate to Elevate

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olpo Restaurant in Greenwich recently hosted an intimate dinner to benefit the Catholic Academy of Bridgeport and celebrate ten years of fundraising. The “hands up for scholarship” part of the evening helped to push donations for the evening over $300,000. All funds raised will support the school, which educates nearly 900 students on four campuses in the city of Bridgeport, most of whom live below the poverty level. catholicacademybridgeport.org »

PHOTOGRAPHS BY AMY MORTENSEN

1 Indra Nooyi 2 Jody Myers, John Kennedy, Cheryl Tokarski 3 Wendy Banbury, Colleen Leth, Barbara Evans 4 Jim Bailey, Ron Rosa, Sr. Joan Magnetti 5 Andrew Byrne 6 Paul Queally, John Myers, Frank Cammisa 7 Brad Evans 8 Heather Kreitler 9 Angela Pohlen, Jill Patricio 10 Sheila Clancy, Marylou Queally Salvati 11 Sarita Hanley, Barbara Ripp, Pam McGinley


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1 Patrick and Krissy Blake 2 Neal and Karen Neilinger 3 Anita Keefe, Luke McCarthy 4 Ralph and Shelly Lynch 5 Kate Bykowski, Sarah Carrs, Jen Badalamenti 6 Jennifer and Larry Goichman 7 Carole and Stefano Acunto 8 Brad and Alex Demong 9 Jackie Ekholm, Vicky Skouras, Reid Chase 10 Michael Kovner, Jean Doyen Montaillou 11 Cynthia Gates, Dan George, Beverly Keyes

GREENWICH RIDING & TRAILS ASSOCIATION / Round Hill Club

Giddyup

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his was no barn stable crew; everyone was decked out to the nines for the Greenwich Riding & Trails Association (GRTA) Silver Horse Ball. Karen Neilinger, Barbara Vogt, Leslie Pottow and Suzanne Branch put together a fabulous party at the Round Hill Club, complete with a life-size silver horse, but of course. The GRTA preserves, protects and promotes open space, historical trails and the tradition of horseback riding for future generations. thegrta.org greenwichmag.com

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12 GRTA chairs Leslie Pottow, Barbara Vogt, Karen Neilinger, Suzanne Branch 13 Diane Desrosier, Mary Shaw Halsey Marks 14 Jordan and Andrew Terner 15 Christina and Don Truesdale 16 Equestrian trinkets 17 Trudie and Ben Larrabee 18 Stacey Adams, Will Moriarty 19 Tanya and Michael Grunberg 20 Angus Beavers, Ellen O’Connell 21 Ruth and Patrick Stiefel 22 Lynda Solsvig and Alice Fisher 23 Sean and Rosary Murphy  MARCH 2020 GREENWICH

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NURSERY & GREENHOUSES, LLC EST. 1930

ROUNDABOUT

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Steps in Time

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APRIL 3, 2020 7:00 PM THE BRUCE MUSEUM 1 MUSEUM DRIVE GREENWICH, CT

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1 Walkers and runners at the starting line 2 Fitness celebrity Billy Blanks Jr. warming up the crowd 3 Local teens supporting Abilis 4 Siena’s squad

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY CARA GILLBRIDE

A Family Affair

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Even Even in in aa town town as as kind kind as as Greenwich Greenwich can can be, be, we we see see the the result of miscommunication and full, stressful lives. result of miscommunication and full, stressful lives. Here are Here are 23 23 Acts Acts of of Kindness Kindness we we can can all all practice practice aa little little bit bit more. more. Let’s show how kind Greenwich can be. Let’s show how kind Greenwich can be.

23 23 ACTS ACTS of of KINDESS KINDESS

Make kindness your default setting. Make kindness your default setting. Put your phone away and be an active listener. Put your phone away and be an active listener. Send a hand written thank you note. Send a hand written thank you note. Remind yourself that everyone is the hero of their own story. Remind yourself that everyone is the hero of their own story. Tell your child you think they’re awesome Tell your child you think they’re awesome (and be prepared to answer why). (and be prepared to answer why). Hold the door for the next person. Hold the door for the next person. Refrain from honking your horn unless it is a safety issue. Refrain from honking your horn unless it is a safety issue. Avoid interrupting others. Avoid interrupting others. Say please, thank you, and you’re welcome. Say please, thank you, and you’re welcome. Smile... great! Now smile at someone while making eye contact. Smile... great! Now smile at someone while making eye contact. If they are in a hurry or with children, offer to let the person in line behind you go first. If they are in a hurry or with children, offer to let the person in line behind you go first. If you can, say yes. If you can, say yes. If you have time, please let the other driver have that parking space, even on the Avenue. If you have time, please let the other driver have that parking space, even on the Avenue. Send flowers. They light up a day. Send flowers. They light up a day. Compliment often. It is easy: Great tie, pretty earrings, love that color. Compliment often. It is easy: Great tie, pretty earrings, love that color. Laugh more ... outloud. Laugh more ... outloud. Practice patience and grace. Practice patience and grace. Refrain from saying anything hurtful, especially on social media. Refrain from saying anything hurtful, especially on social media. Be self confident enough not to correct others. Be self confident enough not to correct others. Be extra kind to people in the service industry. Be extra kind to people in the service industry. Don’t rush when driving, pay attention, and never tailgate. Don’t rush when driving, pay attention, and never tailgate. Say a prayer instead of a curse for people who annoy you. Say a prayer instead of a curse for people who annoy you. Support your local everything! Buy local. Read local. Support your local everything! Buy local. Read local.

Brought Brought to to you you by by our our friends friends at at The The Greenwich Greenwich Sentinel Sentinel Foundation. Foundation.


vows by alison nichols gr ay

TAYLER JANE SIRABELLA & PETER HUNTINGTON FOX 1

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY MOLLY LO

eter and Tayler met their junior year at Elon University after both were selected to represent Elon in a CFA (chartered financial analyst) case competition. Although the two had taken a class together sophomore year and were at the same Halloween party freshman year, they had never met. The couple dated for five years. Peter proposed on his birthday in Chicago by Lake Michigan with a photographer hiding nearby to capture the moment. Tayler says he chose the date so he would never forget the day.  Pastor of St. Aloysius Parish in New Canaan, Robert Kinnally, officiated at the ceremony at St. Augustin’s Church in Newport, Rhode Island. The reception followed at Ocean Cliff in Newport. The bride, daughter of Anthony and Diane Sirabella of Pound Ridge, graduated from Sacred Heart Greenwich and Elon University. Tayler works for JPMorgan Chase & Company in Manhattan The groom, son of Andy and Muffy Fox of Greenwich, graduated from Millbrook School and Elon University. Peter works for Coller Capital in Manhattan. The newlyweds spent their honeymoon in New Zealand and Fiji. They call New York City home. »

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1 Phebe and Brecky Huth, Jack and Muffy Fox, Bill King, Tayler and Peter, Barbara King, Andy and Carter Fox, Abby, Halsey, Boo and Hank Huth 2 Tayler and Peter 3 Morgan Crabtree and Jack Fox 4 Muffy Fox and Carroll Crane Yandell (the groom’s godmother) 5 The wedding cake with sweet fox topper 6 Madison and Anthony Sirabella, Tayler and Peter, Diane Sirabella MARCH 2020 GREENWICH

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vows 1

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ALESSANDRA NICOLE SCRENCI & JOSHUA MICHAEL ERNST

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1 The newlyweds 2 The bride and groom with their siblings: Michael Screnci, Rachel Ernst, Daniela Screnci, Katie and Ben Ernst 3 Molly Infante, Alessandra Screnci Ernst, Daniela Screnci, Lauren Wood (all Greenwich High School graduates) 4 Cutting the cake 5 Fiore, Josh, Alessandra, Daniela and Michael Screnci 6 Sealed with a kiss 7 Mike and Kathy Ernst, Josh, Alessandra and Fiore Screnci greenwichmag.com

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY RACHEL GIROUARD

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lessandra and Josh met in Denver, Colorado, where they were serving a ten-month term in the AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps. They were friends for six months but started dating while volunteering throughout the Southwest. After their service, Josh completed another term while Alessandra returned to Connecticut. Later, Josh began working for Teach for America and was relocated to Memphis, Tennessee, Alessandra joined him there. Soon they were moving again, settling in Boston to be closer to friends and family. Five years into their adventure, Josh proposed to Alessandra in the Chattahoochee Forest deep in the Smoky Mountains of Georgia. The couple’s friends Leah Tingley and Casey Eisenreich officiated at the ceremony at the Glastonbury Boathouse, where a reception followed. The wedding was dedicated to the memory of the bride’s mother, Elyse Screnci, who passed away in May 2015. The bride, daughter of Fiore Screnci of Monroe, and the late Elyse Screnci, graduated from Greenwich High School and Quinnipiac University. Alessandra is a medical social worker at Cambridge Hospital. The groom, son of Michael and Kathy Ernst of Massachusetts, was homeschooled and then graduated from Springfield College. Josh is a teacher at Match Community Day School. The newlyweds honeymooned in Tahiti and Bora Bora. They call Boston home (for now). G


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On location at Sebass Events & Entertainment Warehouse; Hair by Sarah Clemente for Warren Tricomi; Makeup by Raymond Richardson; Jewelry by Shreve, Crump & Low


ottle service is flowing, a female drummer is spanking the bongos, and Beyoncé’s “Run the World” has a packed dance floor of women chanting, “We run this motha…” At forty-six seconds in, DJ April Larken slides her headphones on and says, “Watch this.” She slows down the BPMs and cranks up the bass on her Pioneer mixer. With her left Chanel fingerless-gloved hand, she slams the crossfader hard right; and with Queen Bey becoming a muffled memory, her free hand scratches in and drops in those three, notorious “Uh…Uh… Uhs,” belonging to none other than Biggie’s “Hypnotize.” A certain phenomenon happens. It’s almost primal. People drop their drinks. Bodies run from the bathroom to the dance floor. Even the too-coolfor-school bartenders get that deadeyed neck-bop, and waitresses start gyrating in the corners. Call it One Night Stand, a sicker than your average night in Greenwich. It’s April’s annual roving dance party with a New York City nightclub vibe, popping up again on April 3 at Douro (stay tuned at djaprillarken.com). The draw, she says, is basic: “People want to let loose. No auctions, no ball gowns. It’s all about the music.” »


April sporting Madonna’s custom-made Chanel gloves from the music icon’s 2012 MDNA world tour


April with her tools of the trade (for the tech geeks out there: Pioneer DJM‑S9 battle mixer wth Magvel Pro crossfader and Pioneer CDJ-2000NXS2 Digital DJ Turntables)

MUSIC MAMA For April Caroline Larken, born in Tom’s River, New Jersey, it has always been about the music. “I was that kid making mix tapes for friends, burning hundreds of CDs in college, following the DJs,” she says. While earning her bachelor’s degree in Art History at NYU and a fashion design degree from FIT in the mid-nineties, April hit the city hard most nights, all black lipstick and braided head knots, slipping into parties hosted by Funkmaster Flex, Danny Tenaglia and Junior Vasquez back when DJs still lugged crates of records to clubs. To this day, she holds onto a hot pink ticket for SSL Shift Thrust Gothic Slam from Limelight, the church-turned-nightclub that was white-hot twenty-five years ago. It’s a point of pride for

April, who practices up to fifty hours for highprofile gigs, all to underscore the fact that she is not just some “housewife with a hobby.” In fact, it was the fear of being branded #housewifenolife that propelled April behind the turntables in 2017. “I went to a friend’s fortieth and people were introducing me as ‘April, Wife of World Rackets Champion Jonathan Larken and Mother of Jasper and Ella.’ I love my husband, I love my kids, but where was I in there? Jo, in his British way, said I should stop complaining and do something about it. So I did.” Later that night, fueled by liquid courage, she signed up online for Scratch DJ Academy. Her goal: to train under DJ Dirty Digits, who mentored Mad Marj (aka Marjorie Gubelmann), a force on the NYC social scene who became a DJ in her mid-forties. Serendipitously, April ran greenwichmag.com

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into Marj at the Polo Bar months earlier and picked her brain, thinking one day she might follow in her fabulous footsteps. He trained one housewife and made her magic…maybe he could do the same with me, April remembers thinking. She almost chickened out her first day in the studio. Picture a forty-two-year-old Elle Woods walking into a room of wall-to-wall gold records from Run DMC, past rows and rows of vinyl turntables. “Digits looked at me sideways. Even I thought, What am I doing? This is so far from my comfort zone,” she says. “He asked me if I was doing this for fun. I said no. We started talking music, and he said, ‘I got you. You have the knowledge but need to learn the technology.’” Fast-forward six months to her final session, and there was DJ April, spinning a thirty-


minute medley of The Sugarhill Gang, The Chainsmokers and A Tribe Called Quest in front of Digits, triple-Grammy-nominated producer DJ Scratch and TJ Mizell (son of Jam Master J). At the end, Scratch gave her the ultimate stamp of approval: “That drop was dope.” Digits, who isn’t big on compliments, nodded from the couch. It spoke volumes. “For once,” she says, “I felt like I fit in; I was in the club.”

Imagine Dragons. That’s her, that’s Nina. Connecting the song to the survivor felt incredible. People went crazy, they cheered, they jumped up. Amazing vibes, best vibes of any gig.”

STOPPED SHORT

BCA PHOTOGRAPH BY MOFFLY MEDIA’S BIG PICTURE/BOB CAPAZZO

BLIND FAITH Getting gig-ready was a faster process than April expected. “My first big break was warming up the crowd for Flo Rida for the Greenwich International Film Festival. Wendy Stapleton hired me on blind faith,” she recalls with gratitude. “Women have been my champions from the start. They don’t question my experience, my rate. They get the job done. It has given me the confidence to keep growing.” More jobs followed, largely rocket-boosted by women. Think: spinning for Valentino’s Fall Gala at The Plaza; rooftop galas at the Mandarin Oriental; Friends of the Hudson River Park at Chelsea Piers; Allure’s Best of Beauty Awards at the Condé Nast headquarters at One World Trade Center; and curated sets for Bridal Fashion Week and Michael Kors. “People like to throw shade, like, ‘Wow, you must have a lot of connections,’” she says. “Hell, yeah, I do. I’ve worked ten, twenty years for these connections. I value my relationships.” While April continues to broaden her reach, local causes remain paramount. “My mother delivered babies for thirty years,” she says proudly. “I chaired Greenwich Hospital’s Under the Stars in 2015 and DJ’ed the event the past three years, which has been amazing.” The Breast Cancer Alliance Fashion Show is another event she has been working for three years running. “I gravitate toward women’s health issues. That’s where I do my time, all my volunteer work. It’s what I care about.” The clincher is her connection to the women on the runway. “I have friends who are survivors, like Hillary Corbin and Nina Lindia, who walked this past October. Nina’s only request to me was, ‘April, don’t play that f-ing Sara Bareilles song, “Brave”.’ So I played “Thunder” by

(top) April keeping the runway rocking at the 2019 Breast Cancer Alliance luncheon and fashion show • (middle) April and Flo Rida at GIFF 2017, the gig she considers her big break • (bottom) Mementos from the days of partying at New York City’s hottest clubs

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It would be enough to call April bold for doing a career-180 in midlife, making the kind of scary but ultimately satisfying shift many restless people only talk about when they’re three drinks in. But there is a bigger reason for a shout-out: April has been spinning all of this magic on one lung. Let’s rewind to 2005. April was a newlywed, fresh from her honeymoon, and killing it in the world of bridal design. Former stints at Carolina Herrera, Serafina Bridal House and Romona Keveza had primed her for her biggest job yet: Vera Wang. Fittings for J. Lo and Jessica Simpson? Just another day at the office. Nothing could get in April’s way—especially not the asthma-like symptoms she’d been battling the past year. But pregnancy goals forced her to get a chest X-ray so she could get a better medication, since the inhalers she’d been prescribed weren’t working. “I was on my lunch hour at work,” she remembers. “I had one of my best friends, a pattern maker, with me, and I was like, ‘Let’s just do this really quick and then we’ll get lunch.’ It was such a joke, something stupid.” The X-ray technician asked her if she’d swallowed a plastic bottle cap. When she answered no, he disappeared and came back with a group of doctors. “They told me, ‘There’s a mass that’s in your bronchus that’s so big it looks like it’s gone into your lung and it’s closed up your entire left lung.’” She was essentially a hot air balloon, half-deflated. “I was a kid, I was thirty. I wasn’t a smoker. But I had lung cancer. A month later I was being operated on at Memorial Sloan Kettering and having my left lung taken out,” April says, voice quavering. “I couldn’t even fathom what the rest of my life was going to look like. Maybe I’d have oxygen tubes in my nose. Maybe I wouldn’t live at all. I had this dream of being a mom and all these things, but at that point I thought, Okay, I’ve gone this far, if this is it.” Post-surgery in


IN THE FLOW, YO April lays down five tips to keep your dreams on track

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NO EXCUSES “At every single gig, women come up to me and say, ‘I wish I had the guts to do that.’ I tell them they do, and they tell me they don’t have enough time or money or willpower or support to start a business, change their lives. That’s just fear talking. If you want it that bad, take a step that locks you in. Mine was signing up for a course I couldn’t back out of.”

3 5 2 4 BE YOUR BRAND

MENTORS MATTER

“I read about Mad Marj long before I met her, so the questions flowed when I ran into her. I asked her, ‘Who was your mentor?’ Then I went to the source. When you have an example to follow, someone you’re inspired by, it’s that much easier. You can’t get intimidated. People, for the most part, want to help.”

“There’s lots of DJs who are so good, so hot, and doing it in bikinis. Digits told me, ‘Don’t try to be like the girls in bikinis. You’re in couture one night then on the soccer field with your kids the next morning. That’s your brand.’ I turn down gigs if they aren’t on brand. Figure out what your own brand is, how to be true to who you are while holding space for who you want to be.”

STAY LIT

KNOW YOUR PRICE

“Good DJs aren’t cheap, and cheap DJs aren’t good. I charge what I do because of all that. Many clients say to me, ‘I can’t afford you, will you do it for this?’ I turn down work, unless it’s worth it to me personally. If you make yourself small to meet people’s expectations, you’re selling yourself short.”

“As moms we tend to put our children’s and husband’s lives before our own, and doing this for years leads to a big pile of resentment. Don’t forget to keep your own candle lit. If people don’t get it when you take more Me Time, remind them that they’ll get more out of you if you get more out of life.”


Ella and Jasper proudly wear their pride for mom • The family coming out to support April when she opened for Gavin DeGraw at Under the Stars in 2017 • April and Jonathan renewed their vows (especially the “in sickness and in health” part) in 2014 to celebrate ten years of being cancer-free • In April’s hometown on the Jersey Shore

Jonathan is a two-time winner of both the New York City (shown above) and London legs of the Rackets World Championships in doubles • Rocking out for Halloween 2018 • April and Jonathan at Under the Stars 2015, the year she cochaired • The Larken family hits London at Christmastime

PACU was no cakewalk, either. “You’re on machines helping you breathe, helping you exist,” she says. “You’re hooked up to life support, basically. You’re in there on your own, and the doctors are just watching and praying your body can accept the trauma.” Fortunately, April’s did. From there, it was the ICU, then six weeks of rehab at MSK, with a constant epidural to blunt the pain—which meant she was bed-bound. “My gay friends came and did my hair. We watched Absolutely Fabulous. They were Feng Shui-ing the flowers, moving the furniture around. The doctors came in and were like, ‘You need to put things back the way they were.’ My friends’ responses were, ‘We’ll have the filet mignon, she’ll have the Jell-O.’ It was morbid and horrible and body bags would go rolling by, but we found a way to have a party.” Part of that levity was possible because of Jonathan, a husband who was reeling from the possibility of losing his bride, but never let on. “Jo moved into the hospital with me,” April

says matter-of-factly. “His attitude was, ‘You’re young. This was a mistake, a blip, we’re going to get through this.’ He was the secretary, the scheduler, he asked all the questions. He had a binder of research five inches thick. Every doctor that came in there, he knew their first name, and he asked questions they never thought anyone would ask. I used to joke, ‘I’m just a piece of meat lying on a table, being injected with dyes and being cut open. Jonathan is the patient.’”

SECOND CHANCES April looks back at lung cancer with mixed feelings. “It was the worst thing that happened to me and the best thing that happened to me,” she says. “If not for cancer, I would have still been in Manhattan, working like a dog and not have time for people. I’d be a different person … someone I don’t like very much.” Slowing down brought what mattered most—creating a family—into focus. But it was the very nest she built that crystallized the importance of having MARCH 2020 GREENWICH

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her own life, her own thing, her own song. “I’m a proud member of the second chances club, which means I’m not wasting a second of my time on things I’m not passionate about,” she says. “Music is my passion, lifting up women is my passion.” Next month, April performs in Washington’s Union Station for the LUNGevity Foundation’s D.C. Celebration of Hope. She DJ’ed its NYC gala for the past two years, and was also honored in 2018. “There aren’t many lung cancer survivors, and just me being up there telling my story is inspirational to them. Someone who had it fifteen years ago helps them to see that it’s possible.” What else is possible? DJ April Larken scratching vinyl. She’s been back at it with Digits, shuttling into the city, messing up, mixing it, making strides. “A female on vinyl is really rare. If I show up at a gig where there are vinyl turntables, I want to be able to do this,” she says, steadfast. “I’m still counting beats. I’m still G learning. I’ll always be learning.”


A perennial garden is bordered by steel edging, punctuated by boxwood globes.


ADVICE FROM THE EXPERTS ON HOW TO TURN THAT OUTDOOR SPACE INTO AN ENTICING, VIBRANT OASIS

garden envy W

ith the darkest days of winter behind us (we hope), it’s time to swap those mittens for gardening gloves and get back out to the garden. Or, we could just contact one of the many talented landscape architects, designers, contractors or gardening experts in our area. Their seasoned advice, along with professional services, can turn the most static of yards into a dynamic, verdant paradise. Here, some of the best local gardeners and landscapers around share their projects and expertise on everything from designing winding paths and walkways to creating cozy outdoor rooms and lush organic gardens.

PHOTO BY NEIL LANDINO

by t om c on nor


above: Double herbaceous beech hedges frame a distant resting place, which is aligned with the living room window. The hedges change color with the seasons.

THE LAY OF THE LAND path bordered with splashes of perennials and grasses; on the other side, a jigsaw composition of stone walls that contain a rain garden—for capturing storm water runoff while addressing the steepness of the site. If a new vegetable garden is the object of summer desire, location on the property is a key consideration. “Garden location is generally a compromise between which spots get the most sun and which are most accessible, close to the house and near water,” says John Carlson of Homefront Farmers in Redding. “If the property isn’t getting six to eight hours of sun a day, there’s not a lot we can do.” What Carlson might suggest, though, is cutting down or trimming back trees to gain another hour or so of sunlight. An app on his crew’s cell phones tells them how much sun different parts of a site get at any time of the day and year.

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“garden location is generally a

compromise between which

spots get the most sun and which are most accessible, close to the house and near water. ” —john carlson, homefront farmers

PHOTO (LEFT) BY NEIL LANDINO, PHOTO (RIGHT) BY HEATHER O’NEILL

O

ne common issue for some homeowners is almost always living with yards that challenge conventional notions of landscaping. But these are grounds of opportunity for professionals. The best thing homeowners can do before contacting a professional, however, is to have a clear idea of their goals for the property. “Draw up a list of the things you’d like to do,” says Dan Mazabras at Odd Job Landscaping in Norwalk. “If there are things you missed, we can make suggestions and give you the options to spend more or less depending on your budget.” For a mansion in Byram with a 30-foot grade change from the house to the shoreline, Wesley Stout Associates of New Canaan designed a vanishing-edge pool with waterfall on the outer edge. That element, which can be walked through in hot weather, presents to sailors the equivalent of curb appeal. To one side of the sloping terrain is a winding


PATHS, STEPS AND GATES

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efore the entrance to the yard, thoughtfully designed paths and gates introduce a property, reflect the owners’ tastes and welcome guests, and lead from one outdoor room to the next. For a collector of New England antiques in Westport, Diane Devore, of Devore Associates Landscape Architects in Fairfield, designed a path from the street to the house with a gate that plays off architectural elements from Colonial Williamsburg. Modern architecture, meanwhile, would seem to defy logical landscape design, but again, not to landscape architects. For a walkway that bridges a modern main house and studio outbuilding in Greenwich, Wes Stout designed a straight line of plinth-like steps but also a serpentine path that winds through the green space between the structures. “It’s really like a labyrinth,” he says of the meandering path. “If you walk the curves, it’s very meditational. Otherwise, if you’re in a hurry, you can take the steps and walk straight across the space.”

left: Well-designed garden paths hint at the mystery and beauty of what lies around the next turn.


OUTDOOR ROOMS

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PHOTO (TOP LEFT) BY WARREN JAGGER , PHOTO (BOTTOM LEFT) BY JEFF MCNAMARA, GARDEN PHOTOS BY CAM GOULD

s the world intrudes, homeowners are increasingly interested in staying at home to enjoy the outdoors for as long as possible. As a result, outdoor rooms have become both popular and wellequipped for year-round living, with fireplaces, firepits, grilling stations and kitchens. Behind a country house in Westport, Wes Stout worked with Beinfield Architects to create interlocking indoor and outdoor spaces that are at once rustic and sophisticated. A massive stone mantle over the outdoor fireplace, rich in age and patina, anchors the patio that’s used year-round. “We refer to these spaces as social opportunities," says Stout. “More and more, we find people wanting spaces outside where they can gather around a fireplace or firepit.” More formally, in the Belle Haven section of Greenwich, Southport architect Mark Finlay designed a series of courtyards and outdoor rooms, intimate as well as open, that extend the style of life lived inside an elegant French manor. A terrace outside the greenhouse is used for brunches and teas. A twist on the “room” motif is a maze, hedged with thuja aborvidae, Diane Devore designed for the children of a Fairfield couple that attracts adults as well. Pivoting gates change the configuration of the paths. "Williamsburg had one of the first mazes in America,” says Devore. “This maze and the crabapple trees lining the driveway recreate a traditional New England landscape.”

right: Outdoor rooms (in Greenwich, above, and in Westport, below) extend living space and the entertaining season. newcanaandarienmag.com

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above: Homestead Farmers uses cedar frames for raised beds of vegetables. below: Boxed containers of berries bring order to home gardening.

“Organic really is more about the practice

than about the products.” —john carlson, homefront farmers

ORGANIC GARDENS

trending

I

This spring, according to designers and contractors, homeowners in Fairfield County are looking to install or upgrade the following features on their property:

nterest in the environment and sustainability is leading homeowners to Homefront Farmers in Redding, where owner John Carlson and his crew design and build handsome raised beds and fenced spaces for growing organic vegetables and berries. Ranging from six by eight feet to 40x80, the gardens cost from $7,000 to $100,000 with amenities, although the plants themselves are extra, as is Carlson’s crew doing the planting and maintenance. The company also builds and installs covered boxes for strawberries, as well as enclosed patches for blueberries. In Wilton, Carlson constructed a 25x40-foot garden framed in cedar for durability and fine-mesh wire fencing to keep smaller critters out. “Organic really is more about the practice than about the products,” Carlson says. “It’s about starting with the soil and making sure that the soil is healthy, that it has the right structure, the right nutrition. It’s also about having a balance of different crop families, and the right kind of flowers to attract the right kind of insects. Balance will keep the garden fairly healthy.” MARCH 2020 GREENWICH

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1 2

Outdoor rooms for being with family and entertaining friends

Well-constructed organic vegetable gardens for sustainable living

3 4

Natural screens and buffers for privacy and serenity

Ornamental gardens that keep their structure throughout the year:“Homeowners today want structure as opposed to bunches of flowers,” says Heather O’Neill of Second Nature Landscape Design in Darien, “and they want contrasts—a horizontal green hedge and a vertical white birch tree, for example.”


EVERSCREENS

S

maller yards and homes set close to neighbors or the street benefit from privacy hedges that screen the property from neighbors and passersby. “The biggest demand over the past couple of years has been for Giant arborvitae, which are fast-growing, easy to care for and can grow up to 70 feet high,” says Jay Nathans, a designer at Sam Bridge Nursery & Greenhouses on North Street in Greenwich. “When you have the space to let it go, it’s very effective.” For smaller yards, Nathans recommends Emerald Green arborvitae—narrow, pyramid-shaped

evergreens with bright, glossy-green foliage—that are also fast-growing but top out at 15 feet in height. “If you’re planting Green Giants and have 20 feet between the hedge and the house," he says, “it’s only a good idea if you really dislike your neighbors.” Otherwise, he says, stick with birch and holly. A more subtle screening is an allée—a walkway lined with trees—between the house and property line. It’s a European look Wesley Stout Associates used to great effect on the Byram shorefront property, where shaped linden trees line either side of a broad, gravel walkway that does double duty as a dog run.

Giant arborvitae are a great option for natural privacy screens.


GARDENS FOR ALL SEASONS

W

EVERGREENS PHOTO BY © RM211171 - STOCK.ADOBE.COM, PATH PHOTO BY HEATHER O’NEILL, COURTYARD PHOTO BY WARREN JAGGER

here professional landscape designers can be particularly valuable is designing gardens that look good all year round, no matter the season or weather. Kathryn Herman of Kathryn Herman Design in New Canaan mixes low, horizontal plantings and vertical elements to extend the life of gardens through the fall and winter. In New Canaan, she framed a very formal courtyard with a continuous line of high plantings and lower boxwood that, in turn, encloses a series of squared beds of globed boxwood and perennials, including freeranging allium. In one, a young magnolia tree delivers verticality and reinforces the bed with a compelling structure. “It’s important to have something evergreen in the garden,” Herman says. “Anything that’s really structural has a presence and maintains that presence even in winter, when it can be very beautiful in snow.”

above: Grasses, installed by Heather O'Neill of Second Nature Landscape Design, look good all year-round.

PERENNIAL VALUE

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above: Southport architect Mark Finlay's 'Marrakesh' garden, with inlaid motif, references details of the formal French country style home he designed in Greenwich. MARCH 2020 GREENWICH

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n the end, sophisticated landscape design is simply a good investment for when it comes time to downsize or head to a warmer clime. “First impressions are really important to a potential buyer,” says Maggie Smith, a Realtor at Coldwell Banker Riverside Real Estate in Westport. “A well-groomed landscape signals that the home is also wellcared for. If done thoughtfully, cohesive, crisp and colorful landscaping is a home improvement investment that immediately adds value.” But owners should keep maintenance in mind. “Homeowners need to make sure that lawns and gardens are adequately watered and mulched, and fertilized and limed in the spring and fall,” says Manny Pelez of Pelez Landscaping and Design in Fairfield. “Even weekend warriors can easily handle these jobs,” adds Dan Mazabras at Odd Job. “If you're not able to maintain the property yourself, hire a professional horticulturalist or arborist to protect your investment.”


SP R I N G FA SH IO N 2 0 2 0

BEST OF

produced by megan gagnon


A STYLISH NEW SEASON OF COLOR, PRINTS AND CLOSET STAPLES, FRESH FROM THE RUNWAY AND READY TO SHOP NOW


2020 TREND

HAUTE CHOCOLATE Make cocoa your new fashion flavor

CULT GAIA

Eden heel; $398. cultgaia.com

2

4 OSCAR DE LA RENTA

Wood link earrings; $250. Neiman Marcus, The Westchester; neimanmarcus.com

3

FENDI

Logo Mania brown belt or crossbody convertible bag; $1,690. Mitchells, Westport; shop .mitchellstores.com

1 HOBBS

Bess skirt; $290. Greenwich; hobbs.com

NEW NEUTRAL “brown t ones are extremely versatile and have a warm, sophisticated richness t o them. a great alternative t o bl ack, they'll take you effortlessly from summer through winter. i l ove pairing a cho c ol ate silk slip dress with ch unky cashmere and a gold str appy sandal.” –Michelle Farmer founder + president, Michelle Farmer Collaborate

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5 KARLA COLETTO Joana ruched underwired swimsuit; $396. Soleil Toile, Westport; soleiltoile .com

OSCA R D E

LA R E N TA

6 JOHANNA ORTIZ

Ruched cottonblend top; $495. modaoperandi.com


O R T RY T H I S

7 HENRY'S

Zip top tote; $750. Greenwich; henrysleather .com

SEEING RED A bold and bright take for spring STUART WEITZMAN

Espadrilles; $295. Greenwich; stuartweitzman .com

8

RO KS AN DA

GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI

Betty knot sandals; $895. giuseppe zanotti.com

VIC TOR IA BEC KHA M

J.CREW

FARMER PHOTO BY NEIL LANDINO, FASHION IMAGES COURTESY OF DESIGNERS/BRANDS

Blouse; $98. Greenwich, New Canaan, Westport; jcrew.com

9

YUZEFI

Dolores leather satchel; $595. Saks Fifth Avenue, Greenwich; saks.com

VINCE

Double breasted blazer; $485. Greenwich, Westport; vince.com

10 MANDKHAI

Yak wool ribbed jumper; $622. Michelle Farmer, Greenwich; michellefarmer.com

MICHELLE FARMER

Silk pants; $575. Michelle Farmer, Greenwich; michellefarmer.com MARCH 2020 GREENWICH

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2020 TREND

MIX MASTER

5

PIERRE-LOUIS MASCIA Blouse; $475. West, Westport; west2westport.com

Tie together silky scarf motifs, graphic florals and bold color for maximum effect

6 VERSACE

Pleated silk skirt; $1,225. versace.com

4 LELE SADOUGHI

Small paper lily earrings; $125. lelesadoughi.com

1 HERMÈS

SPRING MIX

Clic H Panoplie Equestre bracelet; $700. Greenwich; hermes.com

“get your spring on with b old pat chworks and bright scarf prints. d on't be afr aid t o mix and mat ch pat terns, just be sure t o stick with c omplimentary c ol ors. our team of st ylists are here t o help you find the perfect print and make it your own.”

3 2 VALENTINO

Valentino Garavani VLOCK Carpet Reedition shoulder bag; $2,945. farfetch.com

ETRO

Patchwork print kimono jacket; $2,830. etro.com

ER DE M

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–Andrew Mitchell-Namdar co-owner, Mitchells, Richards


O R T RY T H I S

7 ALICE AND OLIVIA BY STACEY BENDET

Deonna pleated dress; $595. Greenwich; aliceandolivia.com

TO DYE FOR

Hippie-chic meets high fashion

GI VE NC H Y

D IO R

MITCHELL: CONTRIBUTED; FASHION IMAGES COURTESY OF DESIGNERS/BRANDS

LA VIE REBECCA TAYLOR

Sleeveless tie dye jumpsuit; $325. Fred, Westport; thefredshop.com

THINK ROYLN

Wingman bag in denim tie dye; $218. thinkroyln.com

8 CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN Spetsos sandal; $595. us.christianlouboutin .com

9 LA DOUBLEJ

Palazzo pants; $620. ladoublej.com

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JIMMY CHOO

Love Oasis tie dye pump; $625. Mitchells, Westport; Richards, Greenwich;Â shop .mitchellstores.com


2020 TREND

BUSINESS CASUAL Work these earth-toned separates—vests, utility pockets and all—into your wardrobe

4 MAX & MOI

Vanille camel blazer; $513. Perfect Provenance, Greenwich; theperfect provenance.com

5 WANDLER

Anna leather bag; $660. net-a-porter.com

3

SHONA JOY

Eames utility linen playsuit; $320. intermix online.com

TOP THIS

2

CLUB MONACO

Peechie flat; $198.50. Greenwich; clubmonaco.com

CAR OLI NA HER RER A

1 AGNONA

“i l ove trench c oats and bl azers this season. the trench has a very cl assic l o ok cl osed and belted—great for business—or kept open with the belt tied in the back. l ayer with a great t-shirt and a fl are or skinny je an for a hip, chic, sp ort y l o ok. as for bl azers, a singleor d oublebreasted st yle is one of the best go -t o items you can have in your wardrobe.” –Tina Dragone owner, Tina Dragone

Silk pleated trench; $3,790. Bergdorf Goodman; bergdorfgoodman.com greenwichmag.com

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O R T RY T H I S

6 JOIE

Brently pant; $228. Greenwich, Westport; joie.com

JO N AT H AN

PUFF LOVE When it comes to these sleeves, bigger is better ZARA

Poplin top with bow; $39.90. Greenwich, Norwalk; zara.com

SI M KH AI

7

8

VERONICA BEARD

KATE SPADE NEW YORK

WARBY PARKER

Beale sunglasses; starting at $95. Greenwich; warbyparker.com

Anouka vest; $395. veronicabeard. com

Exotic bloom poplin dress in hot cider; $498. katespade.com

DRAGONE: CONTRIBUTED; FASHION IMAGES COURTESY OF DESIGNERS/BRANDS

ULLA JOHNSON

Puff sleeve cotton blouse; $195. Nordstrom, The SoNo Collection; nordstrom.com

9

GUCCI

Princetown GG canvas slipper; $790. gucci.com

10 LOVESHACKFANCY

L'AGENCE

Celine jacket; $325. Tina Dragone, Darien, Westport; tinadragone.com MARCH 2020 GREENWICH

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Rikki floral cotton top; $265. loveshackfancy .com


6TH ANNUAL

RESTAURANT WEEK SAVE THE DATE

Opening Night Party at Hotel Restaurant Spa Coffee Bar Hotel Restaurant Spa Coffee Bar

March 4 2020 • 6:00 – 8:30 p.m. Hungry for Business? We’re serving up Sponsorships! To be a participating restaurant or for sponsorship opportunities please contact Trish Kirsch • trish.kirsch@moffly.com

Greenwich Restaurant Week 2020 Runs March 6th–13th PARTICIPATING RESTAURANTS

Appetit Bistro • Bella Nona Restaurant and Pizzeria • Centro at the Mill • Eastend • Eugenes La Taqueria • Le Fat Poodle • Little Pub • Mediterraneo • Miku • Myx Creative • Saltaire • Tauk Kitchen and Bar • Terra • The Little Beet Table • Tony’s at the J House • Townhouse SPONSORS

EXCLUSIVE WATER SPONSOR

For all weekly updates, participating restaurants and sponsors

greenwichrestaurantweek.com


calendar ART & ANTIQUES ALDRICH MUSEUM, 258 Main St., Ridgefield, 438-0198. Tues.-Sun., noon-5 p.m.; Fri., until 8 p.m. AMY SIMON FINE ART, 1869 Post Rd. East, Westport, 259-1500. Tues.-Sat., 11 a.m.5:30 p.m., or by appointment. BRUCE MUSEUM, 1 Museum Dr., 869-0376. Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 1-5 p.m. Free for members, $8 general admission. CANFIN GALLERY, 39 Main St.,Tarrytown, NY, 914-3324554. Tues.-Sun., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. or by appt. Fine paintings and sculptures by established and emerging contemporary artists from all over the world. CAVALIER GALLERIES, 405 Greenwich Ave., 8693664. Mon.-Sat., 10:30 a.m.6 p.m.; Sun., noon-5 p.m., or by appt. A showcase of a select group of established and emerging artists who represent the finest in modern painting, sculpture and photography. CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY PRINTMAKING, 299 West Ave., Norwalk, 899-7999. Mon.-Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., noon-5 p.m. CLAY ART CENTER, 40 Beech St., Port Chester, NY, 914-937-2047. Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. or by appt. FAIRFIELD MUSEUM AND HISTORY CENTER, 370 Beach Rd., Fairfield, 259-1598. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., noon-4 p.m.

Hurrah for the Red, White and Blue by Sam Francis

Flinn Gallery The Flinn Gallery is hosting a new exhibit, In Plain Sight, through Wednesday, April 22. The show is sponsored by the Friends of the Greenwich Library and is located on the second floor of the library’s main branch at 101 West Putnam Avenue. The gallery is open daily Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursday until 8 p.m., and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. flinngallery.com

( for more events visit greenwichmag.com )

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FLINN GALLERY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 622-7947. Mon.-Wed., Fri.-Sat., 10 a.m.5 p.m.; Thurs. 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sun. 1-5 p.m. GERTRUDE G. WHITE GALLERY, YWCA, 259 E.

Putnam Ave., 869-6501. Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. GREENWICH ARTS COUNCIL, 299 Greenwich Ave., 862-6750. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., noon-4 p.m. The Bendheim Gallery hosts major exhibitions every six weeks; visit greenwicharts.org to learn about upcoming exhibits. GREENWICH HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 39 Strickland Rd., 869-6899. Wed.-Sun., noon-4 p.m. J. RUSSELL JINISHIAN GALLERY, 1657 Post Rd., Fairfield, 259-8753. Tues.Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Large selection of original marine and sporting art by Christopher Blossom, Frederick Cozzens, Donald Demers, William Duffy, Carl Evers, Flick Ford, James Griffiths, Russ Kramer and many others. KATONAH MUSEUM OF ART, Rte. 22 at Jay St., Katonah, NY, 914-232-9555. Tues.-Fri. and Sun., 1-5 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. KENISE BARNES FINE ART, 1947 Palmer Ave., Larchmont, NY, 914-834-8077. Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m., or by appt. Visit kbfa.com for show information. LOCKWOOD-MATHEWS MANSION MUSEUM, 295 West Ave., Norwalk, 838-9799. Wed.-Sun., noon-4 p.m. Visit lockwoodmathewsmansion .com for program information. LOFT ARTISTS ASSOCIATION, 575 Pacific St., Stamford, 247-2027 or loftartists.com. MARITIME AQUARIUM, 10 N. Water St., S. Norwalk, 852-0700. Daily, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.


calendar and Fordham Rd., 718-8178616. Tues.-Sun. 10 a.m.6 p.m. Sun. 1-April 19, The Orchid Show: Jeff Leatham’s Kaleidoscope. PELHAM ART CENTER, 155 Fifth Ave., Pelham, NY, 914-738-2525 ext. 113. Tues.-Fri. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat. noon-4 p.m.

WESTPORT ARTS CENTER, 51 Riverside Ave., Westport, 226-7070. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., noon-4 p.m. YALE CENTER FOR BRITISH ART, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven, 432-2800. Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., noon-5 p.m. Permanent collection on view.

YALE UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY, 1111 Chapel St., New Haven, 432-0611. Tues.Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thurs., until 8 p.m.; Sun., 1-6 p.m. Permanent collection includes African art, American decorative art, American paintings and sculpture, ancient art, Asian art, coins and medals, and modern and contemporary art.

ROWAYTON ARTS CENTER, 145 Rowayton Ave., Rowayton, 866-2744. Tues.-Sat., noon5 p.m.; Sun., 1-4 p.m. SAMUEL OWEN GALLERY, 382 Greenwich Ave., 4226500 or 325-1924. Mon.Sat., 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. The gallery is committed to exhibiting the work of emerging to mid-career artists, as well as a variety of strong secondary market works. SILVERMINE ARTS CENTER, 1037 Silvermine Rd., New Canaan, 966-9700. Wed.-Sat., noon-5 p.m.; Sun., 1-5 p.m.

Joan Lunden will be the featured speaker at the Greenwich Chamber of Commerce Women Who Matter luncheon at Greenwich Country Club on Friday, April 3 from 11:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Joan will share why her latest book, Why Did I Come Into This Room: A Candid Conversation About Aging, will help everyone undertake the challenge of aging with humor and resilience. Tickets: $100 for a single and $950 for a table of ten. greenwichchamber.com

MICHAEL FLORIO GALLERY, 135 Mason Street, 858-5743. Specializing in established and emerging contemporary artists, marine art and curiosities. Open most days by chance or by appointment, Michaelflorio.com.

NEUBERGER MUSEUM OF ART, Purchase College, 735 Anderson Hill Rd., Purchase, NY, 914-251-6100. Tues.-Fri., 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, Bronx River Pkwy.

STAMFORD ART ASSOCIATION, 39 Franklin St., Stamford, 325-1139. Thurs.-Fri., 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., noon-3 p.m. STAMFORD MUSEUM & NATURE CENTER, 39 Scofieldtown Rd., Stamford, 977-6521. Mon.Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. THOMAS J. WALSH GALLERY, Fairfield University, 1073 N. Benson Rd., Fairfield, 254-4000, ext. 2969. Tues.Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., noon-4 p.m. UCONN STAMFORD ART GALLERY, One University Pl., Stamford, 251-8400. Mon.Thurs. 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Fri. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

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Planned Parenthood Planned Parenthood of Southern New England (PPSNE) will hold its annual spring luncheon at the Stamford Marriott (234 Tresser Blvd.) on Tuesday, April 7, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. It brings together over 700 supporters from Fairfield County and beyond. Keynote speaker will be Brittany Packnett Cunningham, educator, author, activist and national NBC News and MSNBC contributor. The Community Impact Award will go to Kay Maxwell, past PPSNE board chair, for her longtime commitment to the cause. Cochairing the event are Danielle Eason, Katey Goldberg, Anne Goodnow, Donna Moffly, Sheila Mossman and Brice Russian. To register or make a contribution online go to ppsne.org/luncheon or contact Laurie Diorio at laurie .diorio@ppsne.org or 203-752-2813. »

PHOTOGRAPH OF KAY MAXWELL BY BOB CAPAZZO

Greenwich Chamber of Commerce

SM HOME GALLERY, 135 E. Putnam Ave., 2nd flr. Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. or by appointment. Featuring award-winning regional and national contemporary artists. Visit sandramorganinteriors. com for exhibit information.


An Evening with Laurel House

Honoring 2020 Champion for Recovery Anthony L. Rostain, MD, MA Co-Author, The Stressed Years of Their Lives Chair, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Cooper University Health Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University Emeritus Professor, University of Pennsylvania

Also honoring Town Champions, who make their towns better places in which to live and work: Lily Genovese

Penny Johnston-Foote

Leo Karl

Genevieve Eason

Darien

Saturday, April 25, 2020 6:00 PM

New Canaan

Delamar, Greenwich Harbor

Greenwich Wilton

For more information, please visit www.bit.ly/laurelhouse2020

BUILDING CONNECTIONS for HEALTHY MINDS A SYMPOSIUM ON MENTAL HEALTH MARCH 5, 2020

FEATURING LORNA LUFT

ADVOCATE & BROADWAY STAR Join the daughter of beloved star Judy Garland to get inspired by her story of healing, and be part of building a network of care in our community. Tickets: OPTIMUSHEALTHCARE.ORG/BUILD

Event Sponsors (as of 1/10):

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020 Greenwich Country Club

* KEYNOTE SPEAKER *

CANDACE BUSHNELL CRITCALLY ACCLAIMED BESTSELLING AUTHOR AND EXECUTIVE PRODUCER 2020 Sole Sisters Luncheon Co-Chairs Nicole Kwasniewski • Kirsten Riemer 2020 Event Committee

Angelique Adelina • Sara Allard • Shari Aser • Kathleen Bembenek • Brooke Bohnsack • Hagar Chemali • Lisette Coviello Grace Lockhart Djuranovic • Jaime Eisenberg • Kristen Forlini • Rhiannon Forlini • Sabrina Forsythe • Carey Wunsch Giannetti Jamie Halcom • Clare F. Johnson • Cassaundra Karnal • Kristin Knowles • Victoria LaMura-Finnerty • Olivia Langston • Abbe Large Leslie Lee • Layla Lisiewski • Cricket Lockhart • Virginia Lockhart • Jan Marchand • Clarena McBeth • Erin McCall • Karin B. McShane Beth Miranda • Maria Musante • Caroline Russo • Rebecca Shenkman • Anne Sherrerd • Liz Van Hell • Diane Viton • Olivia Walker Lisa Wanderer • Jill Weiner Greenwich United Way Board Chair Eileen Kim

Proceeds from this year's luncheon will help the Greenwich United Way support community solutions in the areas of education, self-sufficiency and health.

To Purchase Tickets Visit GreenwichUnitedWay.org

Greenwich United Way • 500 West Putnam Avenue, Suite 415 • Greenwich, CT 06830 • 203-869-2221


calendar

Greenwich Historical Society The Greenwich Historical Society honors the centennial of the 19th Amendment with an exhibition spotlighting local women who became national leaders in the fight for the right to vote. An Unfinished Revolution: The Woman’s Suffrage Centennial now through Sunday, September 6. 47 Strickland Rd., Cos Cob.

CONCERTS, FILM & THEATER ARENA AT HARBOR YARD, 600 Main St., Bridgeport, 345-2300. Visit websterbankarena.com for shows and times. AVON THEATRE FILM CENTER, 272 Bedford St., Stamford, 661-0321. Visit avontheatre.org for special events and guest speakers. CARAMOOR CENTER FOR MUSIC & THE ARTS, 149 Girdle Ridge Rd., Katonah,

NY, 914-232-5035. For events listings visit caramoor.org. THE CHAMBER PLAYERS OF THE GREENWICH SYMPHONY, Sun. 15, Round Hill Community Church, 395 Round Hill Rd., 4 p.m.; Mon. 16, Greenwich Arts Council, 299 Greenwich Ave, 7:30 p.m., 622-6611. Adult tickets $40; student tickets $10. Visit greenwichsymphony.org for more information. CURTAIN CALL, The Sterling Farms Theatre Complex, 1349 Newfield Ave., Stamford, 329-8207. Thurs. 5-15, Beyond Therapy, Bruce meets Prudence at a restaurant. It

is their first date, and they are both nervous. They shake hands. Bruce gestures Prudence to her seat and sits down across from her. He looks into her eyes. They share a moment. “You have beautiful breasts,” he says, and the worst date in human history is on its way…Visit curtaincallinc.com for more information. DOWNTOWN CABARET THEATRE, 263 Golden Hill St., Bridgeport, 576-1636. Fri. 13-April 5, The Bodyguard, visit dtcab.com for show times. FAIRFIELD THEATRE COMPANY, on StageOne,

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70 Sanford St., Fairfield, 259-1036. Visit fairfieldtheatre.org for dates, shows and times. GOODSPEED OPERA HOUSE, 6 Main St., East Haddam, 860-873-8668. No new show until April. GREENWICH LIBRARY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 6227900. No Friends Friday Films until after the renovation. JACOB BURNS FILM CENTER, 364 Manville Rd., Pleasantville, NY, 914-773-7663. Visit website for titles and times burnsfilmcenter.org.

LONG WHARF THEATRE, 222 Sargent Dr., New Haven, 787-4282. For show information on the 2020 season or to purchase tickets visit longwharf.com. RIDGEFIELD PLAYHOUSE, 80 East Ridge, Ridgefield, 438-9269. For shows and times visit ridgefieldplayhouse.org. RIDGEFIELD THEATER BARN, 37 Halpin Ln., Ridgefield, 431-9850. Fri. 13-April 4, An Evening of One-Acts 2020. SHUBERT THEATER, 247 College St., New Haven, 203-562-5666. »


REACH Prep’s

Co-chairs: Bia Bettamio, Judy Collins & Nisha Hurst

Monday, April 27, 2020

Join us at our Annual Benefit Luncheon to help us empower our students to achieve unmatched outcomes and become future leaders. For over 25 years, REACH Prep has been opening doors for our Scholars and positively impacting not only their lives, but the lives of their families and the communities in which they live, learn and work.

ANNUAL BENEFIT LUNCHEON Hyatt Regency Greenwich 1800 E. Putnam Avenue, Old Greenwich, CT 11:30 a.m.

To purchase tickets, host a table or be a sponsor, visit www.reachprep.org, email development@reachprep.org or call 203.487.0750.

Spring Luncheon featured speaker

Brittany Packnett Cunningham A leader whose “voice is going to be making a difference for years to come.” - President Barack Obama

Tuesday, April 7, 2020 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Stamford Marriott Visit ppsne.org/Luncheon

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THE LARGEST BUS EVENT NESS NETWORKING

FREE

FOOD BEVERAGES VALET PARKING

OF THE

3 GREAT WAYS

YEAR

TO

CONNECT 1) SPONSOR 2) EXHIBIT 3) ATTEND

PRESENTED BY

2020 Grammy Award Winner!

GLORIA

GAYNOR

" e v i v r u S l i "I W

live!

Opening with DJ April Larken!

COCKTAILS, DINNER & DANCING FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 6:00 pm, HYATT regency GREENWICH Tickets: https://clcfc.givesmart.com DISCO ATTIRE OPTIONAL

Questions? (203) 653.1337 A FUNDRAISING BENEFIT FOR CHILDREN'S LEARNING CENTERS OF FAIRFIELD COUNTY

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SAT U R DAY , A P R I L 25 , 20 20 6 : 0 0 P . M . TO M I D N I G H T N E TJ E TS H A N G A R W ESTC H EST E R CO U N T Y A I R P O RT Co-Chairs: Leah Butler and Olivia Walker To learn more, visit redcross.org/redandwhiteball2020

268301-11 2/20


calendar CLAY ART CENTER, 40 Beech St., Port Chester, NY, 914-937-2047. Clay Art Center offers a stimulating space for studio practice, exhibition and educational opportunities. CONNECTICUT CERAMICS STUDY CIRCLE, 1 Museum Dr., Mon. 9. Building a Collection with Adrienne Spinozzi from The MET. Admission for nonmembers of the Connecticut Ceramics Study Circle is $25. For more information visit ctcsc.org, 1:15-3 p.m. FAIRFIELD MUSEUM AND HISTORY CENTER, 370 Beach Rd., Fairfield, 2591598. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., noon-4 p.m. Visit fairfieldhistory.org for tours. GARDEN EDUCATION CENTER, 130 Bible St., 8699242 or gecgreenwich .org. Pruning class, plant doctor series, fruit tree grafting and more. Visit website for classes, dates and times. Preregistration required online. GREENWICH LIBRARY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 622-7900. Variety of programs offered are Blood Pressure Screenings, Drop-In Computer Lab, Chess Club, Volunteer Tax Assistance, Foreign Affairs Book Discussion Group; for dates and times visit greenwichlibrary.org.

Greenwich Boat Show The twelfth annual Greenwich Boat Show will be held Saturday, April 4 and Sunday, April 5 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free, and customers are invited to take boats out to feel how they handle on the open water. Twenty-two dealers will showcase more than 100 new power boats, cruisers and yachts, by forty different manufacturers. Greenwich Water Club, 49 River Road in Cos Cob. greenwichboatshow.com

Visit shubert.com for dates and show times. STAMFORD CENTER FOR THE ARTS, Palace Theatre, 61 Atlantic St., Stamford, 325-4466. Visit stamfordcenterforthearts .org for more shows, dates and times. WESTPORT COUNTRY PLAYHOUSE, 25 Powers Ct., Westport, 227-4177. Next to Normal coming in April.

LECTURES, TOURS & WORKSHOPS ALDRICH MUSEUM, 258 Main St., Ridgefield, 438-0198. Tues.-Sun. noon5 p.m.; Fri. until 8 p.m. Fri. 6, First Fridays: A Contemporary Cocktail Party with live music, 7-9 p.m.; visit aldrichart.org for more information.

AUDUBON GREENWICH, 613 Riversville Rd., 869-5272. Sun. 1, First Sunday Bird Walk at Greenwich Point, 9-11 a.m. AUX DÉLICES, 23 Acosta St., Stamford, 326-4540, ext. 108. Visit auxdelicesfoods.com for menu listings and class dates. BOWMAN OBSERVATORY PUBLIC NIGHT, NE of Milbank/East Elm St. rotary on the grounds of Julian Curtiss School, 869-6786, ext. 338.

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Wed. 4 and 18, Observatory open to the public free of charge, 7-9 p.m., weather permitting. Sponsored by the Astronomical Society of Greenwich. BRUCE MUSEUM, 1 Museum Dr., 869-0376. Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun. 1-5 p.m. The museum offers docentled tours, family gallery tours and toddler tours; visit brucemuseum.org for details.

KATONAH MUSEUM OF ART, 26 Bedford Rd., Chappaqua, NY, 914-232-9555. Guided tours are Tuesday through Sunday at 2:30 p.m. STAMFORD MUSEUM & NATURE CENTER, 39 Scofieldtown Rd., Stamford, 977-6521. Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday night Observatory Visitors’ Night, 8:30 p.m..

OTHER EVENTS & BENEFITS GREENWICH PARADE, Greenwich Ave., 869-1531. Sun. 22, St. Patrick’s Day Parade, 2 p.m. »


Neuroscience, Pediatrics and Women’s Health


calendar

KIDS’ STUFF / MARCH 2020

Saturday Story Time, select Saturdays, 10:30 a.m. MARITIME AQUARIUM, 10 N. Water St., S. Norwalk, 852-0700. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. NEUBERGER MUSEUM OF ART, Purchase College, 735 Anderson Hill Rd., Purchase, NY, 914-251-6100. NEW CANAAN NATURE CENTER, 144 Oenoke Ridge, New Canaan, 966-9577. Visit newcanaannature.org to learn about their monthly Friday Family Fun Night. RIDGEFIELD PLAYHOUSE, 80 East Ridge, Ridgefield, 438-5795. Sat. 28, Chicken Dance, 2 p.m. visit ridgefieldplayhouse.org for more information. STAMFORD CENTER FOR THE ARTS, Palace Theatre, 61 Atlantic St., Stamford, 325-4466. Sun. 1, Bossy Frog, 3 p.m.

Kids (and adults) can use LEGO blocks to create marine life for a large ocean scene during “LEGO Weekend” on Saturday, March 7 and Sunday, March 8 at The Maritime Aquarium at Norwalk. It is free with admission. To learn more visit maritimeaquarium.org.

ALDRICH MUSEUM, 258 Main St., Ridgefield, 438-4519. Tues.-Sun. noon5 p.m.; Fri. until 8 p.m. Sat. 21, Family Art Experiences, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. AUDUBON GREENWICH, 613 Riversville Rd., 869-5272. Sun. 1, bundle up for the first Sunday walk at Tod’s Point, 9 a.m. AUX DÉLICES, 23 Acosta St., Stamford, 326-4540 ext. 108. Visit auxdelicesfoods.com for menu listings and class dates. BEARDSLEY ZOO, 1875 Noble Ave., Bridgeport, 394-6565, open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. One of Connecticut’s top family attractions. See more than 300 animals representing North and South American species and learn about their

endangered and threatened species, which include the Amur (Siberian) tiger, Andean condor, Ocelot, Red wolf, Maned wolf, Giant Anteater and Golden lion tamarin. Then grab a bite at the Peacock Café and take a ride on the carousel. BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF GREENWICH, 4 Horseneck Lane, 869-3224. Visit bgcg.org for events and programs at the club. BRUCE MUSEUM, 1 Museum Dr., 869-0376. Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun. 1-5 p.m. Sun. 1, First Sunday Science at the Seaside Center, 1:30-4 p.m. DISCOVERY MUSEUM AND PLANETARIUM, 4450 Park Ave., Bridgeport, 372-3521. Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.5 p.m.; Sun. noon-5 p.m. The Discovery Museum’s

20,000-square-foot facility includes changing and permanent interactive exhibit galleries, a planetarium, Challenger Learning Center, an auditorium and five multipurpose classrooms where hands-on science classes are conducted for schools, groups and the general public. DOWNTOWN CABARET THEATRE, 263 Golden Hill St., Bridgeport, 576-1636. Sun. 1-29, The Little Mermaid. EARTHPLACE, 10 Woodside Lane, Westport, 227-7253. The mission of Earthplace is to build a passion within the community for nature and the environment through education, experience and action. earthplace.org. GREENWICH HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 39 Strickland St.,

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869-6899. Call to learn more about children and family programs. GREENWICH LIBRARY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 6227900. The library offers many programs for children: Wee Ones, Tales for Tots, Baby Lapsit, Mother Goose Story Time. Call or visit greenwichlibrary.org for dates and times. IMAX THEATER AT MARITIME AQUARIUM, 10 N. Water St., S. Norwalk, 852-0700. Visit website for films and times; also being shown: Hollywood films on IMAX, maritimeaquarium.org. KATONAH MUSEUM OF ART, Rte. 22 at Jay St., Katonah, NY, 914-232-9555. Tues.-Fri. and Sun. 1-5 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Picture This!

STAMFORD MUSEUM & NATURE CENTER, 39 Scofieldtown Rd., Stamford, 977-6521 or stamfordmuseum.org. Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. STEPPING STONES MUSEUM FOR CHILDREN, 303 West Ave., Mathews Park, Norwalk, 899-0606. Open daily 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Ongoing exhibits: Energy Lab, Tot Town, Build It!, ColorCoaster, Light Gallery. Ongoing events: Storytelling Yoga; Zumba Kids; Zelda the Zany Owl; Boogie, Bop, Skip and Hop; Fab Fridays!; Mother Goose; Mini Makers; Mutt-i-grees; Toddler Tales; Resource Center Reads! Story Time; visit steppingstonesmuseum.org for daily classes and times. WESTPORT ARTS CENTER, 51 Riverside Ave., Westport, 222-7070. Visit westportartscenter.org to sign up for workshops. WESTPORT COUNTRY PLAYHOUSE, 25 Powers Ct., Westport, 227-4177. Sun. 15, The Pout-Pout Fish, 1 and 4 p.m. G

MARITIME AQUARIUM

The Maritime Aquarium


advertisers index BUILDING & HOME IMPROVEMENT

Douglas VanderHorn Architects . . . . . 19 Glen Gate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Private Staff Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 SBP Homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

BUSINESS & FINANCE

Citibank/Perry Gaa & Joseph Potvin . . 27 Cummings & Lockwood LLC . . . . . . . 16

DECORATING & HOME FURNISHINGS

Amy Aidinis Hirsch . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

EDUCATION & CHILDREN

Brown Pre-College . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Brunswick School . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Columbia University . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Fairfield University . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

ENTERTAINMENT

Stamford Tent & Event Services . . . . 73

EVENTS

6th Annual Greenwich International Film Festival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 6th Annual Greenwich Restaurant Week . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 American Red Cross/A Salute to Service and Valor Red & White Ball . . . . . 107 An Evening with Laurel House . . . . . 102 Best of the Gold Coast 2020 . . . . . . 68 Bruce Museum's A Masked Affair . . . 101 Bruce Museum's Under the Skin . . . . 31 Children's Learning Centers of Fairfield County/Gloria Gaynor Live! . . . . . 106 Cos Cob Fire Police Patrol 2020 Benefit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Greenwich Boat Show . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Greenwich Chamber of Commerce Business Showcase . . . . . . . . . . 106 The Greenwich Hospital Benefit . . . . 109 Greenwich United Way Sole Sisters Annual Luncheon . . . . . . . . . . . 103 I Stand With Planned Parenthood Spring Luncheon . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Open Arts Alliance Steps in Time . . . . 66 Optimus Healthcare/Building Connections for Healthy Minds: A Symposium on Mental Health . . 102 REACH Prep's Annual Benefit Luncheon . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Women in Business . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

FASHION

Henry's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cover 3 Mitchells/Richards . . . . . . . . . . . . 2, 3 Roundabout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

FOOD, CATERING & LODGING

Appétit Bistro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Bella Nonna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Saltaire Oyster Bar & Fish House . . . . 51 Tauk Kitchen & Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Tony's at the J House . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Winvian Farm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

HEALTH & BEAUTY

Gray Matters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Hospital for Special Surgery Orthopedics/Stamford Health . . . . 21 The Nathaniel Witherell . . . . . . . . . . 63 ONS Orthopaedic & Neurosurgery Specialists . . . . . 35 Park Avenue Vein Laser Center/ H. Majlessi, M.D., FACS, FICS & Vida Yasmin, M.D. . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Rye Vein Laser Center/H. Majlessi, M.D., FACS, FICS & Vida Yasmin, M.D. . . . 16 Stamford Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Yale New Haven Health/ Greenwich Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Yale New Haven Health/ Smilow Cancer Hospital . . . . . . . . 41

WHAT’S IN YOUR YARD?

JEWELRY

Betteridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cover 4 Buccellati . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cover 4

LANDSCAPING, NURSERY & FLORISTS

Homefront Farmers . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Sam Bridge Nursery & Greenhouses, LLC . . . . . . . . . . 66

NONPROFIT

Breast Cancer Alliance . . . . . . . . . . 73

REAL ESTATE

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices . . 28 Coldwell Banker/Lin Lavery . . . . . . . . 7 Houlihan Lawrence . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Sotheby's International Realty . . 1, 10, 11 Sotheby's International Realty/ Martha Z. Jeffrey . . . . . . . . . Cover 2 William Raveis . . . . . . . . . . . . 4, 5, 25

REAL ESTATE/DESTINATION

Business Development Board of Palm Beach County . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Douglas Elliman Real Estate . . . . . . . 33 John's Island Real Estate Company . . 67 Premier Estate Properties . . . . . . 17, 63

MISCELLANEOUS

Greenwich Sentinel . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Westy Self Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 MARCH 2020 GREENWICH

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DREW KLOTZ K IN ET IC SCULPTURE

203 221 0563 DREWKLOTZ.COM


postscript photog raph by angel a zhang

SPRINGING AHEAD?

M

any of us hold steadfast to the notion that March is a spring month. Year after year we’re genuinely shocked, and frankly kind of angry, that our pom-pom hats, bulky sweaters and clunky boots are still wardrobe staples. Although it’s been a mild winter (as of this writing), we’re not getting our hopes up that this year will be any different. So we pay homage to the “in like a lion” part of the month and offer up this beautiful scene at Binney Park taken by Greenwich Academy sophomore Angela Zhang. Who knows? Maybe this will be the March we can actually stroll the park in flip-flops. G Have a photo that captures a moment in Greenwich? Send it to us at editor@greenwichmag.com for a chance to win $100. Please write photo submission in the subject line.

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Profile for Moffly Media

Greenwich Magazine, March 2020  

Greenwich Magazine, March 2020