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Light a Fire Awards 2020 • Celebrating the Heroes Among Us

NOV 2020 | $5.95

honoring

e

th s

e

above & beyond

in unprecedented times

Served over 12,000 meals to healthcare workers and first responders

Originated $125 million in PPP loans, protecting 10,000 jobs

Cared for the children of healthcare workers at the height of the pandemic

Provided financial assistance and employment mentoring to 175 families

Formed a team of six that handed out 147,459 meals to those in need

Kept our community’s homeless population safely sheltered and fed

Provided food to over 550 households weekly

Saved over 1 million pounds of food from being wasted

Served 450 meals to the homeless

Raised $900,000 for the Greenwich COVID-19 Community Relief Fund


22 Baldwin Farms South 22Baldwinfarms.com | OFFERED AT $8,900,000

Joseph Barbieri

Senior Global Real Estate Advisor (203) 940.2025 GREENWICH BROKERAGE ONE PICKWICK PLAZA, GREENWICH | 203.869.4343

WWW.JOSEPHBARBIERI.COM


For your dream view 61BYRAMSHORE.COM |

GREENWICH, CT

Susie Quinn

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© Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity.


GREENWICH

contentsNOVEMBER 2020 vol. 73 | issue 11

features

departments

68

16 EDITOR’S LETTER 18 NOTABLE NOTES

LIGHT A FIRE 2020

22 FOUNDER’S PAGE Of Secrets and Surprises

For so many in our community, the pandemic created far more than the fear of getting sick. It brought a fear of not being able to meet the most basic of human needs. And that is where our honorees come in. This group of men and women stepped in and stepped up to help small businesses stay afloat, secure loans, coordinate volunteers, feed the hungry, care for children and so much more. It is truly an honor to recognize them in our pages.

27 STATUS REPORT BUZZ Behind the curtain of the whimsical world of puppet theater; Helping kids stay academically focused; Local experts on disaster preparedness HOME Designing

smart work spaces—at home and in the office DO Opening during a pandemic is no small feat. Davis Feliz Salon made it happen; How to boost your immune system this winter; Walking tour of Stamford’s outdoor art GO One out-of-thebox solution to help you get you of Dodge; Roundup of the new electric cars to hit the market EAT Creative catering options 52 G-MOM Small businesses that helped keep our spirits up

b y j i l l joh n s on m a n n

82

56 FINANCE FIX Secrets of high net-worth people that everyone should know

LOVE IT, ACTUALLY

59 PEOPLE & PLACES Greenwich Polo Club; Greenwich United Way, Sole Sisters; Generation Impact Fairfield County; The Undies Project 67 VOWS Mencio–Sutton 91 CALENDAR

82

95 INDEX OF ADVERTISERS Jen Bakker and Corrie Jackson

96 POSTSCRIPT A pretty-in-pink pup

b y rian n sm i t h

on the cover: nicole straight, marc jaffe, alison sherman, pj johns, danielle blaine, dave kuban, ria rueda, bob granata, lana gifas, stephanie webster, michele conderino, margaret tjimos goldberg, david rabin photographs by melani lust GREENWICH MAGAZINE NOVEMBER 2020, VOL. 73, NO. 11 GREENWICH MAGAZINE (USPS 961-500/ISSN 1072-2432) is published monthly by Moffly Media, Inc.205 Main St, Westport, CT 06880. Periodical postage paid at Westport, CT, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes (Form 3579) to GREENWICH MAGAZINE PO BOX 9309, Big Sandy, TX 75755-9607. greenwichmag.com

2

JULIA D’AGOSTINO

Meet Jen Bakker and Corrie Jackson, two charming British best friends who transitioned from their careers in the world of fashion (one a fashion house lawyer and the other a fashion magazine editor) to become thriving entrepreneurs. For these two, home—and friendship—is definitely where the heart is.


©Photograph: Laurent Ballesta/Gombessa Project

C O LLE C T IO N

Fifty Fathoms


JOIN US ! november 2020

GREENWICH ONLINE

CELEBRATING THE PLACES AND FACES OF OUR TOWN

WHAT’S ON OUR EDITORIAL DECK?

WE’VE GOT PLENTY OF GREAT THINGS IN STORE!

FRIEND & FOLLOW

WE LOVE OUR TOWN AS MUCH AS YOU DO. AND WE LOVE SHARING THE MOMENTS THAT WE CAPTURE. SO JOIN US ON INSTAGRAM AND FACEBOOK AND LET’S EXPLORE TOGETHER.

TOP DOCTORS

If there’s one thing that these past months have taught us, it’s that healthcare is of the utmost importance. Our annual Top Doctors issue is here to help.

OUTDOOR LIVING

It may be hard to imagine now, but soon enough we will be digging our hands in the dirt and welcoming spring. We’ve got inspiration to help you create a backyard oasis.

ALSO VISIT OUR GALLERIES ON GREENWICHMAG.COM

greenwichmag.com

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INSTAGRAM PHOTOS BY ALISON NICHOLS GRAY; INSET 1 BY ©DEEMPHOTOGRAPHY - STOCK.ADOBE.COM; INSET 2 BY ©BLUE PLANET STUDIO - STOCK.ADOBE. COM; INSET 3 BY ©PORNPAWIT - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

FAMILY MATTERS

Though the holidays are likely going to look a little different this year, there are plenty of fun and sentimental ways to create new traditions.


PRIVATE COUNTRY SETTING | GREENWICH

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A gated entry leads to a long scenic drive up to this beautifully renovated home on 5+ park-like, professionally landscaped acres. This exquisite English colonial has an additional 2,200 SF finished basement and potential pool site.

Private pool, basketball court and stone fire pit are just a few of the luxuries of this charming colonial. Sunlit open floor plan with all the interior comforts, including master bedrooms on both main and second levels.

$3,895,000 | MLS# 111267 | Listed by Liz Goldman

$3,249,000 | MLS# 110961 | Listed by Dave Wilk

SPECTACULAR NORTH STREET | GREENWICH

BEAUTIFUL & CONVENIENT | GREENWICH

This nearly 7,800 sq ft colonial on 1.5 acres boasts 6 bedrooms, 6.2 baths, and a first-floor plan ideal for entertaining. Unique features include a glassencased exercise room with indoor infinity pool.

Boasting all the comforts of home with sensational views, this 5-bedroom home overlooks the 6th hole of Milbrook golf course. 5,000+ SF of finished living space on four levels. Covered patio and outdoor fireplace, and pool site.

$2,995,000 | MLS# 108752 | Listed by Maria Rüggeberg

$2,249,000 | MLS# 111235 | Listed by Julie Hill

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

NEXT GENERATION JEWELER SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW

Bob Capazzo Photography

O

ffering everything from high-end, oneof-a-kind jewels and fine timepieces to giftware and tabletop items, Shreve, Crump & Low at 125 Greenwich Ave. is the destination. The third generation of the Walker Family bring forwardthinking mindsets focused on the experience of luxury shopping. “It’s the one stop where you can find a statement piece or discover contemporary fine jewelry brands,” says Bradford Walker. Shreve, Crump & Low is America’s most established and prestigious purveyor of fine gifts since 1796, yet this 224-year-old blue-blooded institution brings a youthful vitality and new era of style. “We are curators of a small piece of history here at Shreve, Crump & Low, and look to continue providing top-notch customer service to our clientele,” remarks Olivia Walker. Shreve, Crump & Low takes great pride in the warm relationships they have cultivated and continue to maintain through each customer-employee exchange. Both Brad and Olivia are Graduate Gemologists alongside a well-trained staff of seasoned associates and expert service department, they are able to make celebrating that special moment far more meaningful. 125 GREENWICH AVENUE • GREENWICH 203.622.6205 • SHREVECRUMPANDLOW.COM

Bob Capazzo Photography

NOVEMBER 2020 GREENWICH 7


GREENWICH L I F E T O L I F E S T Y L E S I N C E 1 94 7 vol. 73 | no. 11 | november 2020 creative director

Amy Vischio–amy.vischio@moffly.com

Thinking of selling your home in Greenwich and buying in Naples, Florida?

editor

social editor

Alison Nichols Gray–ali.gray@moffly.com market editor

Knowing how you want to live is the first step in knowing where. There is something for everyone in Naples.

Megan Gagnon–megan.gagnon@moffly.com founding editor 

Donna Moffly–donna.moffly@moffly.com contributing editors

“Your Dynamic Duo” www.teamdebianddawn.com

Debi Foss-Heaviside Broker-Associate 239.272.4494 William Raveis Naples, Florida

editorial

Cristin Marandino–cristin.marandino@moffly.com

Dawn Stuttig Licensed Sales Associate, CT & FL 203.637.4040 William Raveis Old Greenwich William Raveis Naples, Florida

Elizabeth Hole–editor, custom publishing Julee Kaplan–editor, new canaan • darien Diane Sembrot–editor, fairfield living; westport; stamford copy editors

Terry Christofferson, Kathryn Satterfield senior writers

Timothy Dumas, Chris Hodenfield, Jane Kendall, Bill Slocum, Riann Smith contributing writers

Liz Barron, Eileen Bartels, Kim-Marie Evans, Valerie Foster, Malia McKinnon Frame, Chris Hodenfield, Jill Johnson Mann, Riann Smith editorial advisory board

189 Sound Beach Avenue | Old Greenwich, CT | 06870 720 5th Avenue South | Suite 201 | Naples, FL | 34102

Susan Bevan, Susan Moretti Bodson, Alyssa Keleshian Bonomo, Bobbi Eggers, Kim-Marie Evans, Muffy Fox, Lisa Lori, Jessica Mindich art

senior art director

Venera Alexandrova–venera.alexandrova@moffly.com production director

Christine Bachmann–chris.bachmann@moffly.com design assistant

Taylor Stroili–taylor.stroili@moffly.com senior photographer

Bob Capazzo digital media

digital editor

Diane Sembrot–diane.sembrot@moffly.com digital marketing manager

Rachel MacDonald–rachel.macdonald@moffly.com digital assistant

Lloyd Gabi–lloyd.gabi@moffly.com Calendar@Moffly.com Editor@GreenwichMag.com Weddings@GreenwichMag.com

30 years and 3 patents later, Expect Excellence

TO SUBSCRIBE, renew, or change your address, please email us at subscribe@greenwichmag.com, call 1-877-4671735, or write to GREENWICH magazine, 111 Corporate Drive, Big Sandy, TX 75755. U.S. subscription rates: $29/1 year, $48/2 years, $65/3 years; Canada and Foreign, U.S. $69/year. Prices are subject to change without notice.

please call 203-571-1645 or email reprints@moffly.com. All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without express permission of the publisher. ©2020 GREENWICH magazine is a registered trademark owned by Moffly Media. The opinions expressed by writers commissioned for articles published by GREENWICH are not necessarily those of the magazine. FOR QUALITY CUSTOM REPRINTS/E-PRINTS,

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For over a century, Cummings & Lockwood has provided sophisticated legal representation to individuals, families and businesses.

GREENWICH L I F E T O L I F E S T Y L E S I N C E 1 94 7 vol. 73 | no. 11 | november 2020 publisher

Jonathan W. Moffly sales

& marketing

Gabriella Mays

publisher, westport•weston•wilton gabriella.mays@moffly.com

Wills, Trusts and Estate Planning

International Estate and Tax Planning

Philanthropic Giving

Business Succession Planning

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Corporate and Finance

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Karen Kelly-Micka

publisher, stamford, ocean house karen.kelly@moffly.com

Jonathan Moffly

publisher, athome, new canaan•darien, fairfield living jonathan.moffly@moffly.com Jennifer Frank account executive jennifer.frank@moffly.com Hilary Hotchkiss account executive hilary.hotchkiss@moffly.com

www.cl-law.com

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| BONITA SPRINGS | PALM BEACH GARDENS

Rick Johnson account executive rick.johnson@moffly.com Jennifer Petersen account executive jennifer.petersen@moffly.com Kathleen Godbold partnership and big picture manager kathleen.godbold@moffly.com Rachel Shorten events director rachel.shorten@moffly.com Lemuel Bandala sales assistant lemuel.bandala@moffly.com

HOUSEHOLD | PERSONAL | DOMESTIC | BUSINESS

Eillenn Bandala business assistant eillenn.bandala@moffly.com

PROVIDING THE BEST IN HIGHLY SKILLED PRIVATE, PERSONAL, BUSINESS AND HOUSEHOLD STAFF

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Jonathan W. Moffly

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• Personal and Executive Assistant • Estate and House Managers • Private Chefs, Chauffeurs, Butlers and Family Assistants • Housekeepers and Housemen

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John W. Moffly IV & Donna C. Moffly PUBLISHERS OF GREENWICH, FAIRFIELD LIVING, NEW CANAAN • DARIEN • ROWAYTON, WESTPORT, STAMFORD and athome magazines 205 Main Street, Westport, CT 06880 phone: 203-222-0600 mail@moffly.com

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Monica Webster Presents Mid-Century Modern Living

Sports & Entertainment

Dave Brubeck’s Mid-Century Estate | Wilton, CT | $2,750,000 | 8 BR, 5.1 BA | Approx. 7.5 magical acres envelop this Japanese-style residence with soaring ceilings and walls of glass that showcase the amazing surroundings. Highlights include a music studio, indoor pool/spa, zen gardens, pond and brooks. Web# 170339603

Petre Island | Lake Mahopac, NY | $9,950,000 | 6 BR, 3.1 BA | This remarkable private island offers 2 Frank Lloyd Wright-designed homes: the original 1950s guest house and the spectacular 4-bedroom main residence cantilevered over Lake Mahopac. Co-Listed with Margaret Harrington. Web# H4839966

Monica Webster Sports & Entertainment Division of Douglas Elliman Real Estate O 203.622.4900 M 203.952.5226 monica.webster@elliman.com

elliman.com

88 FIELD POINT ROAD, GREENWICH, CT 06830 | 203.622.4900 © 2020 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL

PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


editor’s letter

NOVEMBER 2020 / CRISTIN MARANDINO

F

or more than a decade, every November we have honored the heroes among us—those who consistently and passionately step up to help the most vulnerable in our population. It goes without saying that this year has been like no other. This year, our entire population became vulnerable. We all faced uncertainty in the most dramatic of ways. We feared for our lives and the lives of our family and friends. But take a moment to think of those who were already struggling. How would they make ends meet? How would they stay safe? That is where the men and women that we honor in these pages come in. It is important to remember those early days, when we were being bombarded with terrifying images and statistics and the entire world was shut down. Instead of retreating into a cocoon of fear, our honorees set aside their own anxieties and challenges and emerged to lead the way. They provided support to make sure the most basic of needs—food, shelter, financial assistance and child care—were being met. But they also offered the intangible—hope, empathy and kindness. They let those in greenwichmag.com

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need know that they do not walk alone. Sadly the effects of this pandemic will be felt for years to come and, so, their work will continue. On Thursday, December 3 at 5:45 p.m. we invite you to meet the honorees in our first virtual Light a Fire awards ceremony. Learn about their work; be inspired by their fortitude. Actor, singer and philanthropist James Naughton will once again bring his charm and charisma to the stage at the Wall Street Theater to virtually host the heartfelt evening. This is a night to celebrate all that is right with the world. It is a night to feel hopeful about humanity and our community. To quote a verse from one of my favorite songs, a multi-artist cover of the Foo Fighters’ “Times Like These” benefiting COVID relief, “It’s times like these you give and give again.” Yes, it most certainly is. And we could not be more grateful for those who do. Please join us by registering at lightafireawards.com.

WILLIAM TAUFIC

TIMES LIKE THESE


41 WEST ELM STREET GREENWICH, CT

TEL. 203.622.7000

WWW.VANDERHORNARCHITECTS.COM


notableNOTES and uplifting way. You should be incredibly proud of showing a part of our town that is so misunderstood in such a beautiful way. Thank you, thank you.

SE P T E M B E R 2 0 2 0 | $5.95

SUE BODSON, GREENWICH

TREAT YOURSELF

WHERE IS SHE? Deep inside the Jennifer Dulos investigation

Fall Fashion Pick-Me-Ups

3.

IN THE SPOTLIGHT My wife and I really enjoyed reading the profiles of Hagar Chemali and Brent Montgomery, two people who are doing important work and are part of the Greenwich community. The articles [February: “Political Poise” and “The Rise and Rise of Brent Montgomery”] by Timothy Dumas are exceptionally well written, and illustrations are finely done. They add welcome seriousness and distinction to your magazine.

THEY’VE GOT THIS This year’s Teens to Watch are working hard and leading the way

Arjun Dayal stepped up in the midst of COVID-19 and produced over 2,000 face shields for our healthcare workers.

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Top Dentists in Fairfield County Special A-List guide to Home-Design Pros Expert advice for Your Wedding Day

1.

2.

We absolutely loved the article [September: “10 Teens to Watch: “Here They Come!” by Jamie Marshall]. We are so appreciative of the write-up and the pictures. As parents we are very proud of Arjun and how selfless he has been. Thank you so much—and stay safe!

For an article about public housing [September: Status Report: Buzz—“No Place Like Home” by Valerie Foster] to make it to the pages of greenwich magazine and to portray it in such a positive light is truly wonderful and so very gratifying. You did an exceptional job of demystifying what Greenwich Communities is all about—not low-income housing in Greenwich but an integral and positive part of our wonderful town. My eyes teared up seeing the vision of Greenwich Communities explained in such a positive

TEENS TAKE IT ON

SHASHI DAYAL, GREENWICH

Editor’s Note: In the middle of COVID-19, Hackley School student Arjun Dayal made 2,100 face shields and masks to donate to healthcare workers.

JOHN DIXON, OLD GREENWICH

I’ve been at Sundance/New Orleans for another TV market and am now off to the Super Bowl but flew home for a night and got to check out what is probably the single best press I’ve ever gotten. Tim really captured the story and told it in a fun way. The amount of people who have reached out is insane, and I’m very lucky to have done it. And [photographer] Kyle Norton did an incredible job, considering the subject. Thanks so much .

HOME RUN

BRENT MONTGOMERY, GREENWICH

4.

DOG DAYS Once again you’ve touched our hearts! We all had to catch our breath when we saw the Senior Paw Project in greenwich magazine [September: People &

Greenwich magazine welcomes letters that are timely and relevant to material published in our magazine. All letters become the property of Greenwich magazine, which reserves the right to edit them. Please include your name, address and day and evening telephone numbers for verification. Mail: Letter to the Editor, Greenwich magazine, 205 Main Street, Westport, CT 06880; fax: 203-222-0937; or email editor@greenwichmagazine.com.

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Places—“Because Pets Are Family” by Ali Gray]. The smiling faces, the love that our volunteers pour into their efforts and the animals that are reached were a perfect reflection of what the work we are doing represents. Thank you for sharing the project with your readers. Truly, I am grateful! JENNIFER HUBBARD, GREENWICH CATHERINE VIOLET HUBBARD ANIMAL SANCTUARY

Editor’s Note: The sanctuary was created in honor of her six-year-old daughter who was killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012.

5.

WEDDING BELLS We found such a wonderful surprise in the July/August issue [Vows: “Brooke Elizabeth Nordholm and Randall John Weisenburger II” by Ali Gray]. Of course, many issues were purchased and mailed to family members all over the U.S. And I couldn’t get to the framer’s fast enough. Now hanging are both of our children’s greenwich magazine wedding mementos. Ali really captured the wedding. CATHY WEISENBURGER, GREENWICH

6.

SKI SHENANIGANS I just read Donna Moffly’s tribute to skiing, sports and Jack [March: Founder’s Letter—“Of Skiing & Slippery Slopes”] and loved it! I could hear her voice in each sentence. JILL OBERLANDER, GREENWICH

OMG, the Founder’s Letter is hilarious. I remember all those family skiing years when we owned the house in Peru near Bromley from 1969 to 2004. Absolutely fabulous to think about the Enchanted Doll House. I, too, am “old enough now to do whatever I want to do,” but I do still love to ski! SUSIE BAKER, RIVERSIDE


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founder’s page

november 2020 / d onna moffly

U

Sometimes I surprise myself with what I find in that closet.

h oh, it’s November, the threshold of the holidays, time to determine who’s on your gift list and take inventory. For me that means heading for my Surprise Closet, which is filled with things ungiven—yet. I squirrel them away all year long. Some have been in there forever, awaiting the right recipient. It’s the only place in my house that’s locked. For good reason. It’s a cardinal rule: Nobody is allowed in there but me. But when daughter Audrey was about three and meant to be napping, I found her sitting on the floor by her crib, playing with a baby doll she’d helped herself to from that closet (and tried to hide when she heard my footsteps). It had been for her birthday. So I put Audrey and the doll into the car, drove over to Cos Cob and together we popped it into the Goodwill box behind the Food Mart—for some little girl somewhere who played by the rules. As luck would have it, the Goodwill pickup truck pulled in just as we were leaving. I asked the driver if he happened to have a little girl at home. He did. So I told him there was a brand-new doll in there right greenwichmag.com

22

on top—complete with box—and we’d like her to have it. Lesson learned. And closet, from then on, locked. So what’s in there now? Before I run out to do some serious Christmas shopping, best I take a look. Among other things, some pocket drones from Hammacher Schlemmer for the older grandsons. A small Windsor chair from the Winterthur Museum, perfect for a baby girl present, especially with a pint-sized Raggedy Ann doll to sit in it. And a 104-piece construction set for making plastic drinking straws so big brother doesn’t feel left out. There’s a Wizard of Oz pop-up book I might give to myself; two Klutz how-to books on making paper flowers and foam gliders; bags full of prizes for the winners of our annual family fishing contest; and three needlepoint pillows (by Donna) for special wedding presents. Oh, and a box of Mickey Mouse golf balls—reminiscent of the time Jack and I took ourselves (without children) to Disney World, visited Epcot every morning and played golf every afternoon. Did you know they have sand

VENTURE PHOTOGRAPHY, GREENWICH, CT

OF SECRETS AND SURPRISES


founder’s page traps in the shape of Mickey Mouse heads? From other great trips, there are two Pinocchio marionettes from Prague, a miniature tea set from Vienna embossed with the portrait of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and a gold-plated souvenir spoon depicting train cars from Rovos Rails in Africa. Closer to home, from the Basin Harbor golf course on Lake Champlain, are a bunch of seagull feathers I’ve been meaning to give to the fouryear-old kid across the street for his collection. Audrey has always been into pigs. She once had a real live potbellied pig named Beanie that Cheryl Howard (wife of Ron) was kind enough to teach her how to train, and a much-loved 1,200-lb. Oscar, who died with his head in her lap as she sat in the snow outside his pen. So awaiting her is a pink pig puppet that oinks. In the realm of the political, there are Trump playing cards, a Hillary Nutcracker and, until last month, a tiny tin of Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s

“Judgmints” that I slipped into a birthday card for a special League of Women Voter friend. There’s a stack of greenwich magazine baseball caps to give to our fans, and I’ve saved the New York Times from the dates of our grandchildren’s birthdays—to present at their rehearsal dinners or some other auspicious occasion. Among family treasures, I just ran across a lovely fan that Jack’s grandfather Kane brought home to Philadelphia from Paris for his wife in 1898—green silk with metallic gold thread and tortoise shell stays. I’m going to take it down to Marcos at Images to frame for granddaughter

It’s a cardinal rule: Nobody is allowed in there but me.

Sasha Moffly for Christmas. Don’t tell! Sometimes I surprise myself with what I find in that closet—like a little framed poem typed on paper now discolored by age. It reads: “There’s the wonderful love of a beautiful maid/ And the love of a staunch true man/ And the love of a baby that’s unafraid — /All have existed since time began./ But the most wonderful love, the love of all loves,/ Even greater than the love for Mother,/ Is the infinite, tenderest, passionate love/ Of one dead drunk for another.” I’ve no idea how it got there, but it must have been a memento from the Flask & Bottle Club, which Jack and some of his fun-loving friends from Philadelphia dreamed up during their college days. What to do with it? A hostess present for over somebody’s bar? Who knows, but meanwhile it gives me a good laugh. And that’s a good thing, what? Now it’s about all this other stuff... . G

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buzz STATUS REPORT

PUPPET POWER

PUPPETRY HAS HIT THE WORLD STAGE, THANKS TO

THE HENSONS

by d onna moffly

PHOTOS (TOP TO BOTTOM): RICHARD TERMINE; INGRID HOFER; DEL ANKERS; SAVERIO TRUGLIA

W

e Greenwich folk have a special place in our hearts for the Henson family—including Kermit, Miss Piggy and fellow Muppets. After all, Jim and Jane once lived in our town with their five children, who are carrying on their father’s work with great success. “Having American puppetry acknowledged on Author Leslee Asch, longtime the international stage was trustee of the Jim Henson Foundation a longstanding dream of my father’s,” says Cheryl Henson, who’s seen to it his dream came true. It was Cheryl with Old Greenwich resident Leslee Asch who brought five International Festivals of Puppet Theater to New York between 1992 and 2000—the last involving 166 artists and 638 puppets from fourteen countries, plus a national tour. The New York Times noted that the festivals were “too large to ignore.” “We were puppet missionaries … determined to expand the flock,” says Leslee, whose new book Out of the Shadows is an impressive chronicle of puppet theater. Starting with Henson in 1977 as a puppet builder (Elmo being one!), she is now a recognized expert in the field. Worked with hands, strings and rods, puppets come as little as your finger and as big as War Horse on Broadway. There are Indonesian shadow puppets and life-sized puppets attached to Japanese dancers. They’re in operas (The Magic Flute) and movies (The Lion King). All the arts are involved. And since 1982, the Henson Foundation has granted some $2.5 million to support over 850 artist projects across the United States. As the late Jim Henson dreamed, puppetry has indeed become a serious business very much on the world map. Leslee’s book says it all. right: Gustav the Clown, with famous marionettist Albrecht Roser pulling his strings during a Henson festival.

above:Teaching a class in France in 1987, Jim and Brian Henson watch the monitor as their puppets chat. right: Early Henson puppets Wilkins and Wontkins used for a Wilkins coffee commercial below: Metaphor for festival direction: Bill Blair, founder of the Chicago International Puppet Theater Festival, the largest in the U.S., pushing a wild boar puppet.


buzz

FACE TIME

With the school year well underway and UNPRECEDENTED TIMES STILL UPON US, parents have growing concerns about their children regressing academically JESSE BASS CAN HELP

In this new environment, students are finding themselves less bound by their next standardized tests, which means that it might be the perfect time to think about hiring a tutor. And, thanks to Zoom, the convenience of athome educational resource assistance has never been more convenient. Bass finds online tutoring to be just as effective as in-person learning and relies on factors such as eye wandering to help him keep tabs on students who are losing focus.

No. 2

TAKE ACTION NOW Instead of waiting to take action defensively when you see your child struggling, Bass suggests an offensive approach. He explains that “a golfer would never consider changing their swing mid-season” and that “most growth comes during the off-season when you’re not afraid to fail.” Most learning comes from making mistakes, so now is the time. Normally Bass tutors students for six to ten weeks in preparation for big

T

here once was a time (pre-2020) when schools and parents relied on test results to measure progress. In today’s world, assessing academic standing has become more challenging. We reached out to Carnegie Prep tutoring guru Jesse Bass, aka “The Math Whisperer,” for some helpful insights into keeping kids on the right academic track. Having tutored more than 600 students over the past fourteen years, Bass has logged over 600,000 minutes of experience; and yet, he says that he’s never met a student who was “maxed out on math.”

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tests, but now that he’s seeing more students “studying indefinitely,” having a tutor is a great way to stay on track.

No. 3

SEEK FREE HELP In addition to seeking learning assistance from a professional, there are numerous great free resources available for online help; and there has never been a better time to take advantage. Bass often suggests that students visit the graphing website desmos.com. It has built-in lessons for students but can also be a great tool for them to explore on their own. The college board and the ACT have also released free, easyto-access resources that Bass highly recommends.

a real- life situation. Bass instructs students to take the RASA (read, assess, set up a game plan and then attack) approach when looking at an equation. Most important, Bass reminds students that their job is to figure out how to do everything that a calculator cannot.

No. 5 WHO NEEDS MATH Do your kids need convincing? Share how real-life skills come from being good at math. • An ability to anticipate what’s next • Being efficient with your time • Reading comprehension and interpretation • Problem solving —Liz Barron

No. 4 THE RASA METHOD “We often think that math is simply about adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing, but what it’s really about is developing the necessary critical thinking skills,” says Bass. He aims to help students learn techniques to find solutions to problems in the same ways that they would with

©METAMORWORKS /STOCK.ADOBE.COM

The Math Whisperer

No. 1


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buzz

left: Founder Jesse Levin above: The Readiness Collective teaches practical skills in a setting that is not intimidating—seen here, hanging seats, community table and, far left, the medical area with emergency-kit and go-bag training

GET READY

THE READINESS COLLECTIVE , BY TACTIVATE, LAUNCHES TO PROVIDE

PREPAREDNESS TRAINING FROM EXPERTS IN OUR MIDST by diane sembrot

P

top: The check-in area and, at right, the training area for homesteading skills below: The space for Community Emergency Readiness Workshops

andemic. Hurricane. Tornado sightings. Major power outages. Winter on the horizon. Jesse Levin, a Westport native, timed his new business well. He runs Tactivate (an advisory firm that applies emergency-response expertise to prep individuals, businesses and communities and deploys expeditionary entrepreneurial capabilities in the aftermath of disasters), and its new offshoot: The Readiness Collective. “Through our parent initiative, Tactivate, we have been conducting disaster-response and economic-stability efforts worldwide for over a decade,” he says. “We have worked with leading experts from military Special Operations personnel to communications, water-purification and supply-chain specialists. We are curating the best trainers, gear providers and subject-matter experts to teach classes, offer insight and provide training and outfitting for our community in a new breed of schoolhouse and training club.” The takeaway: Don’t wait until something happens—work out scenarios and responses ahead of time. “EMT-B training, for example,”

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he says, “sounds like a heavy lift, but it really is doable. How about learning to use a chainsaw safely or how to operate the generator you purchased and never unboxed? If you don’t have a generator, purchase one and learn about the different types, gas shelf life versus diesel or solar versus other systems.” The business is all about preparedness. “We launch ventures hand in hand with military Special Operations veterans and use the cash flow to sponsor teams to conduct disasterresponse and emergency economic-stability operations worldwide,” Levin says of the broad strokes. But if that sounds heavy, take heart, because he’s bringing preparedness to the masses. “Our main focus through all privatesector projects has been experimenting with how to really socialize ‘readiness’ in a non-militaristic, prepper or fringe manner to make the skills more palatable and accessible.”   So, while skills are important when a threat looms large, so too is understanding that an effective response is linked to the community. “People should get to know their neighbors, come to understand what resources and


ALL IMAGES, INCLUDING RENDERING BY RYAN STUDIO ARCHITECTURE, PROVIDED BY THE READINESS COLLECTIVE

buzz skills exist on their street and work to fill any gaps,” Levin says. “Maybe someone has a whole-house generator, while someone else is a doctor, and yet another neighbor is an arborist. Cultivate community, learn to be capable, have backup power and start training to be a provider and protector versus a dependent.” (Ouch, but true.) “Make it an adventure and bring in your family or group of friends to train in readiness disciplines. Most important, wherever you decide to go, seek training, make friends, cultivate community and prepare as if the community depended on you.” So why have emergency pros? “The best way to support first responders is to reduce the burden on them,” he explains. The key is to be more self-reliant. He wants to show you how. “Purchasing a prepackaged medical kit, a mountain of toilet paper, thousands of rounds of ammunition and firearms does not equate to preparedness. Much of the information presented publicly in the vein of ‘prepping’ and survival is focused on isolating and a we-vs-they mentality. In actuality, as anyone that has been through a major disaster will tell you, it takes a community,” he says. The Readiness Collective, serving as a hub for teaching new skills and connecting one another, focuses on ensuring people and businesses are not just reacting, but are proactive. In short, it covers “situational awareness, medical, communications, logistics, group dynamics, equipment to homesteading and mental and physical resilience” on-site, with “high-touch customized training and outfitting.” Translation: You won’t be sitting in a chair. “We are now bringing together over a decade of both brick-and-mortar venture launch and disaster-response expertise to launch the first emergency-readiness training club and gear gallery and outfitter in the country. This will be an emergency-readiness trade school of sorts and social club to bring best-in-class trainers, equipment and expertise to the community. The good news is readiness is a lifestyle and discipline is a blast to cultivate.” While learning medical skills, how to operate a HAM radio, and what to pack in a vehicle emergency kit, people are making

connections. “We facilitate social collisions through training and gatherings among first responders, veterans, creatives, business owners, etc., so there will be familiarity, connectivity and a baseline competency,” he says, “creating a more collective and capable group dynamic.” Launching at the SoNo Collection, it even offers certifications. More at readinesscollective.com and tactivate.com.

PREPARE, DON'T PANIC “From Tequila and Tourniquets, our famous Happy Hour medical class, to learning how to build chicken coops or set up emergency solar generators and panels, this is the first social club for readiness. Topics range from navigation, off-grid communication, medical skills, social movement theory to breath control, food security and trade skills like how to change a tire, build a water collection system and more.” —Founder Jesse Levin

Emergency Readiness is a discipline and a practice that requires cultivation, no different than diet and exercise. It’s a team sport. jesse levin, founder

above: The plans for the new venture show the various training stations, from vehicle preparedness to body/mind focus techniques

NOVEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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go homeward bound P

Generally it’s less expensive and quicker to obtain citizenship in the Caribbean. However, European citizenship can be more desirable. Much like you might join the local swim and tennis club while waiting for membership at the golf club, some applicants are obtaining Caribbean citizenship while also pursuing European passports. Due to increased demand, some governments have made their programs more enticing. St. Kitts is offering a limitedtime sale on its citizenship. Nuri Katz, the founder of Apex Capital Partners who specializes in immigration, says that in the spirit of competition, some countries are even expanding the definition of “dependent” to include siblings or parents. In 2017, Katz estimated that around 5,000 people per year acquired citizenship abroad through CIPs. In 2020, he puts that number closer to 25,000, though no official numbers exist.

rivate jets won’t get you around international travel bans, but a second passport could. Citizenship by Investment programs (CIPs) have been the quiet secret of wealthy global travelers since St. Kitts and Nevis launched the first program in 1984. Some programs don’t even require a visit to the country. Yet, the investor (and family) gain lifetime citizenship and passports that allow for greater travel flexibility than the U.S. passport does currently. More than sixty nations, the U.S. included, allow legal residents to apply for citizenship after meeting specific criteria. But only about a dozen countries allow nonresidents to purchase citizenship outright. You read that correctly: You can buy citizenship, and a more powerful passport, in several countries worldwide, without ever leaving home. Is this legal? There is no law against a U.S. citizen holding dual citizenship. Here’s what to know. (And the first thing is, it’s gonna cost you.)

HOW DOES IT WORK? In the Caribbean, Antigua and Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, St. Lucia, and St. Kitts and Nevis offer citizenship through investment. Investors either donate to the government (yes, that is the terminology) or invest in a government-approved real estate project. In Europe, there are multiple programs, Cyprus

by kim-marie evans

and Malta being the most sought after. Some require applicants to set up nonprofits, establish companies that create local jobs, or live in the country for a specified period. Others enable applicants to invest in government bonds, real estate and development projects remotely. For a comprehensive list of programs and rules, see websites such as HenleyGlobal .com or ApexCapital.Partners.

HOW MUCH DOES IT COST? For anywhere from $100,000 to several million dollars,

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you can buy a second—or a third—passport. Antigua and Dominica are the least expensive with a $100,000 investment requirement, and Cyprus, one of the most costly, is over 2 million dollars. Cyprus and Malta are more desirable because citizenship grants the applicant and their family unlimited access to live and work throughout the European Union. These prices don’t include processing fees, which can run to almost six figures. Each program has specific criteria, and all require a strict vetting process. Malta claims to reject 20 to 25 percent of all applicants. It’s not strictly “pay to play,” but it’s close. Do your due diligence. Each program is unique, and it takes research to know which suits your particular needs. Plans come and go: Ireland no longer allows citizenship by investment, and there are rumors that Albania will launch a program soon. A specialist can help you navigate the many options, and for goodness sake, don’t wave your new passport on Instagram (we’re looking at you Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson). Some things are best kept to oneself.

PHOTO BY ©MEGAFLOPP - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

MONEY MAY NOT BE ABLE TO BUY LOVE, BUT IT CAN BUY CITIZENSHIP

(wherever that may be)


go

Cadillac plans to re-enter the electric arena with the Lyriq in 2023.

CHARGING FORWARD

S

ince introducing the Prius in 1997, Toyota alone has sold 11 million hybrids. But equally influential is the brand that turned the automobile industry on its ear, Tesla, which is nearing its millionth sale and clearly gearing up to conquer the world with a long list of new styles to come. And now, automobile brands are rushing to copy the all-electric whoosh of highly stimulating propulsion. So here’s what’s up. Coming environmental regulations guarantee it, and manufacturers know it. The most desirable Ferrari now, for instance, is

the new SF90 Stradale that offers silent running from its three electric motors as well the shrieking fortissimo of its turbo V8, producing altogether nearly a 1,000 horsepower. Porsche fanatics love their wonderful engines, but gracing the showrooms right now is the brand’s sleek Tesla-fighter, the Taycan, an insanely fast EV. The Taycan’s urgency is matched by Porsche’s electric intentions. Cadillac abandoned its hybrid Escalade model seven years ago, but is now hustling one back into the showrooms, all the while preparing us for its new Lyriq in

by chris hodenfield

2023, an electric vehicle with lines as swoopy as its name. Jaguar, which already sells the I-Pace crossover, is about to introduce a new electric flagship XJ model. Audi has already been selling electric versions of its Q-model SUVs in Europe and will now bring them here. BMW and Mercedes also have electric offerings. Ford is about to do the unthinkable this year with the Mustang Mach-E, a version that grafts those classic Mustang lines on an EV crossover. They promise 300 miles of range, too. Sounds interesting.

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Anyone who has experienced the eyeball-flattening thrill of a Tesla knows any of these models promise excitement. But what about, you know, more reasonable options? Sensible shoppers will still want to examine Hyundai’s Kona Electric, a nifty pepper pot that provides 250-mile range for about $40,000. Maybe the cheapest way to jump into an electric ride is the new Mini E at around $30,000. The range is limited to 100 miles, but anyone with a garage-charger could make do. One thing we do know from our electric-car experience: It will be fun to drive.

CONTRIBUTED

ELECTRIC POWER IS GIVING SERIOUS JUICE TO THE FUTURE


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elliman.com 88 FIELD POINT ROAD, GREENWICH, CT 06830 | 203.622.4900 © 2020 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL

PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


home by diane sembrot

left: Expect a mix of in-office and virtual work—and create a professional-looking and productive space at home. below: Christine Stucker and James Veal, the creative force of Fairfield County’s DistanceDesigns

the new of f ice

S M A R T D E S I G N I N T H E T I M E O F C O V I D - 1 9 W I T H DISTANCE DESIGNS’ J A M E S V E A L

J

ust like that, The Office is dated. When Covid-19 blew into town, desk workers flew out of their offices and quickly set up shop at home. So what does the global pandemic mean for office space in Fairfield County? JAMES VEAL and CHRISTINE STUCKER are on it. They recently launched DistanceDesigns, an area architecture and interior design studio that addresses office health and safety issues and creates sustainable solutions. They look beyond retrofitting space to meet new policies and to proactively design for productivity and interaction in the new normal. Here’s what James Veal shared.

If the traditional office is outdated due to Covid-19, what’s the future of workspaces? “Post-Covid, companies need to change on an operational and habitual level. A redesign must be more than just placing desks six feet apart and adding hand-sanitizer stations, which could eventually erode work culture and have a negative implication on productivity. Reduce the footprint, lessen the touchpoints and ensure that activity-based tasks can be accomplished with the safety aspect built right in. Companies still need an office space that will enhance and reinforce their brand and corporate culture, while growing and enticing talent—no matter what the industry.” What’s the new overall goal? “Our goal is to empower people through design while achieving proper social distancing. We are redesigning and reimagining spaces that reinforce a brand culture but in the safest way possible. We solve problems through design as we ‘futureproof’ the modern workspace. There are tons of positives to office working environments. We just need to eliminate the negatives.”

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How do I deal with constant volatility? Markets will always fluctuate. But whatever way they move, a comprehensive financial plan is one of the best strategies to stay on track toward your goals. Your UBS Financial Advisor monitors the current environment and will work with you to ensure your plan and your portfolio reflect changing conditions. Volatility may be unsettling, but with a long-term plan in place, you can feel more confident about the future. For some of life’s questions, you’re not alone. Together we can find an answer. Thomas Mantione, CEPA®, CFP® Managing Director–Wealth Management Private Wealth Advisor Andrew Shantz, CEPA®, CFP® Senior Vice President–Wealth Management Private Wealth Advisor Greg Merrill, CEPA®, CFP® Private Wealth Advisor

Scan to listen to our recent podcasts.

Shantz Mantione Group UBS Financial Services Inc. Private Wealth Management 750 Washington Boulevard, 11th Floor Stamford, CT 06901 866-860-7266

ubs.com/team/shantzmantione

As a firm providing wealth management services to clients, UBS Financial Services Inc. offers investment advisory services in its capacity as an SEC-registered investment adviser and brokerage services in its capacity as an SEC-registered broker-dealer. Investment advisory services and brokerage services are separate and distinct, differ in material ways and are governed by different laws and separate arrangements. It is important that clients understand the ways in which we conduct business, that they carefully read the agreements and disclosures that we provide to them about the products or services we offer. For more information, please review the PDF document at ubs.com/relationshipsummary. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP® and Certified finanCial PlannerTM in the US. Private Wealth Management is a division within UBS Financial Services Inc., which is a subsidiary of UBS AG. © UBS 2020. All rights reserved. UBS Financial Services Inc. is a subsidiary of UBS AG. Member FINRA/SIPC. CJ-UBS-1271590827 Exp.: 09/30/2021


home

left: The new work space must define traffic flow and allow for social distancing in collaborative spaces. below: Revised floor-plan design by the team

How do you start designing a new office? “Out with the old and in with the new, as they say. We are breaking with the traditional model of an office space catering to the company as a whole and packing employees into a space. New design focuses on and improves the employees’ experience and well-being. We are well-versed in this concept through our background in retail design, where we are primarily focused on the consumer experience in the environment. We break down how

consumers walk through the space, how they feel and interact with that space, what is the best for them—and then we design from that perspective. We are applying that discipline to the corporate workspace to create healthy, empowering and sustainable environments that employees will want to come back to and do their best work.” What about technology? “Technology plays a huge role and is a perfect example of how design can solve problems. First, it will drive and support health and safety, as every control will be done from a personal device with limited physical touchpoints. For example, we will use technology—primarily our smartphones—to automatically turn on and off the lights, control the heating or book a meeting room. There will be docking stations for your laptops in order to limit communal electronics. All this will help enable social distancing. Second, it needs to reinforce activity-based tasks and promote productivity. Good technology is key for collaboration, communicating with teams and supporting remote working. Our viewpoint is less is more: Companies should have three tech platforms for collaboration that are super easy, otherwise people will not use it. Seamless technology must be in place to support the activity for those in the office and those simultaneously working remotely.”

HOMEWORK James Veal on Setting Up a Remote Workspace

No. 1 FOCUS

The biggest problem that people have working remotely is distractions. They are everywhere—from the kids and the pets to the laundry and homeimprovement projects. We can all get distracted while working from home. So, start by finding a room with a lockable door.

No. 2

FUNCTION No matter your budget, design a comfortable and inspiring space—ergonomic furniture and good-quality lighting are key and help your energy level. The design is more important, as it serves as the backdrop to many meetings via video conferencing.

No. 3 EXTRAS

Invest in good, professional technology, and we also recommend plants to increase your air quality and aesthetics.

No. 4

REMINDERS Figure out how you work best—what time of day, in short or long bursts. And always take time to recharge—take walks and hydrate. Finally, a ‘Do Not Disturb’ sign would help, too! NOVEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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CONTRIBUTED IMAGES

If remote work is working, why have an actual office? “The major factor people miss from the office is socializing and collaboration. In our recent survey, we found that if office space design was optimized for specific tasks like collaboration, 66 percent of respondents said they would be more likely to want to undertake the specific task in an office. In addition, they are concerned about career development. When questioned about how being in an office affects career growth, more than 72 percent of respondents answered that they believe working in a physical office with a boss, manager, mentor or colleague—as opposed to working remotely and individually—will help their career growth. Workspaces have to be a hybrid model that empowers people where they do their best work, both at home and in an office.”


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do by valerie foster

Precision cutting

A CUT ABOVE

The first thing you’ll notice is that clients are standing while stylists cut their hair. Davis uses what’s called the French cutting technique, created by Jacques Dessange of Paris. He explains that his cuts accentuate facial features— the shape and structure of each face. “I start in the back of the head, cutting perpendicularly to the scalp, with clients standing,” he explains. As for 2020 hair trends, Davis says that although many are staying with their pre-pandemic color and style, he is seeing longer hair and gray, with the LOB– long-hair bob–the leading style choice.

COVID THREW A WRENCH IN THE WORKS FOR THE OPENING OF THE NEW DAVIS FELIZ SALON. BUT THE DOORS ARE NOW OPEN, AND THE STYLISTS ARE READY FOR YOU!

Owners, Davis and Meagan Feliz

I

COVID-19 precautions

magine it’s January 2020, the salon where you

Guests check in from the car and are called when their station is ready.

work announces it’s closing in March, and you and your wife decide to buy the salon—

and then Connecticut goes into lockdown. Earlier this year DAVIS and MEAGAN FELIZ

Temperature checks Belongings are placed in a bag.

bought the Frederic Fekkai Salon at 2 Lewis Court, and as both say, although the timing

Sanitizing stations and alcohol wipes

wasn’t perfect, they took a gamble and are as excited about their new venture today as they

Face masks Limit of ten people, including staff

were when they made the decision. As a child Davis emigrated to New York City

Six-feet distance between guests, although Meagan says in most cases it is ten—if not twenty—feet.

“Davis looks at everyone as individuals, understanding that we all need a different cut,” says Ginger Drysdale of Rowayton, owner of a children’s clothing company. “He cuts my hair so that there’s no maintenance, which works since I have a family and work about 100 hours a week. I never have to worry about my hair.” “Now that his wife is always at the salon, it is a family affair, intimate, not corporate, and I appreciate that,” says Samantha Berkowicz of Purchase, who found Feliz five years ago. “It’s as if I’m a guest in their home.” greenwichmag.com

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Surfaces and tools are regularly disinfected.

2 Lewis Court 203-861-6700 davisfelizsalon.com Hours: Tuesday–Saturday, 8 a.m.–6 p.m. Mondays: private appointments for one guest or a small family with one stylist. Services: Haircuts start at $135; color $150

CONTRIBUTED

from the Dominican Republic with dreams of becoming a major league baseball player. But his passion was cutting hair, first his own, and when his friends started noticing his cuts, theirs, too. He started as a barber and kept learning and growing as a stylist. In addition to Fekkai, he’s also worked at Elizabeth Arden Red Door and Julien Farel. “I’ve incorporated what I learned as a barber, and that detailed, precise work has continued today,” he says. “I was also very fortunate because I found myself surrounded by people willing to help me, to teach me. I’m always growing, learning, evolving to provide the best services possible.”


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Are there supplements we all should be taking right now? Dr. Herbert:

number of colds but more high-quality studies are needed. There is no conclusive evidence that any herbal remedies impact the incidence of the common cold and many have unsafe side effects for children. The current recommendation is that they should be avoided in children. vitamin E has also commonly been used because it has been shown to decrease the number of colds; however, it is associated with an increase in all-cause mortality and therefore should be avoided.

No supplements have been proven to prevent Covid-19. Many claim to improve immunity but these claims often lack scientific evidence. Some supplements or combinations have the potential to be harmful [interactions with one another, high doses, mixing with prescription medication, etc]. It is always best to check with your physician regarding supplements. For general health, commonly used supplements that are safe at the appropriate doses are multivitamins, melatonin, vitamin C, zinc and vitamin D.

THE BIG REBOOT BUILDING A HEALTHY IMMUNE SYSTEM CAN BE KEY TO GETTING

THROUGH THE WINTER MONTHS

by liz barron

P

andemic or not, it’s pretty safe to say that keeping our immune systems strong is an important element to staying healthy. And, with the cold and flu season ramping up, now is clearly the time for a reboot. We spoke with local medical experts JOSH HERBERT, M.D., medical director, primary care, at Stamford Health Medical Group, and KAREN BECKMAN, M.D., pediatrician at Riverside Pediatrics LC in New Canaan for their advice on what could help.

Will we see less sickness in general because of mask wearing and socialdistancing orders? Dr. Herbert: Masks work. Covid-19 has been demonstrated to spread via respiratory droplets (although airborne transmission continues to be studied). Therefore, maintaining physical distance (6 feet) and wearing a mask decreases transmission. Masks are critically necessary in decreasing transmission from asymptomatic Covid positive people. Areas that adapted mask wearing, distancing and hand washing have proven to show decreased spread of infection. The R0 (“R naught”) of an infectious disease refers to how contagious it is or, more specifically, how many people are likely to become infected from one contagious person. Based on that mathematical

Dr. Beckman: Children living in the Northeast should be taking vitamin D3 supplements during the school year. I recommend 400 to 600 IUs for infants and children up to puberty and 1000 IUs starting at around age 11. A multivitamin (with vitamin D) is useful for children with limited diets. Some studies show that vitamin C dosing of at least 200 mg/ day helps prevent upper respiratory infections. Studies show that zinc helps shorten the course of the common cold when given at a dose of 50 mcg/kg/day up to a maximum dose of 2000 mcg/day but should never be given intranasally. There is also some evidence that probiotics may help decrease the

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formula, Covid-19 is more contagious than influenza. So if we are taking measures to prevent Covid, we automatically decrease the spread of flu. Just do not wear a mask with an exhalation valve or vent. These types of masks potentially allow the contagious virus to be exhaled out the vent. Should I worry about my child’s immune system more now than ever? Dr. Beckman: For most children, there is no need to evaluate their immune system. Taking preventative measures, wearing masks and ensuring proper hand washing should be enough. For children who are suffering from more than “their share” of infections, especially repeated bacterial infections, or infections severe enough to result in hospitalization— further testing should be pursued to look for underlying immunodeficiency disorders. How can we maintain a healthy immune system? Dr. Herbert: Everyone’s immune system is different and is affected by multiple factors— some that are modifiable and others that are not. Health conditions, prescription medications and advanced age can put certain individuals at higher risk of infection; focusing on factors that can be controlled is key.

HABITS FOR GOOD HEALTH 1 GET ENOUGH QUALITY SLEEP 2 EAT A BALANCED DIET Limit sugar and processed foods, and increase amounts of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, healthy fats, and lean protein. 3 STAY HYDRATED Gargling with water three times a day has been shown to reduce the incidence of the common cold. 4 EXERCISE Target 150 minutes per week of cardio for adults. 5 MAINTAIN PROPER WORK/ LIFE BALANCE especially when working from home 6 LIMIT ALCOHOL 7 REDUCE STRESS 8 TAKE BREAKS FROM SCREENS

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do


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ART WALK

H AL F A C E N TU R Y O F SCULPTURES ON DISPLAY IN F ULL VIE W (AN D F R E E ADMI SSI ON!) by diane sembrot

phot o gr aphy by garvin burk e

L

3 OF VARAMO’S MUST-SEE PICKS

ooking for some entertainment al fresco? Why not go for a walk and see Stamford in a new light. Refresh your state of mind with a little outdoor art appreciation. The city is filled with historic and creative pieces. To help, we’ve done some background on a few. We admit, some wellknown and spectacular pieces aren’t listed here—for example, Stamford Luminata (it needs new lights) and Within Reach (the courtyard of Stamford Plaza office buildings is private property). You’ll find plenty more across the city and even up at the Bendel Mansion at the Stamford Museum & Nature Center (stamfordmuseum.org). This mini-guide is indebted to JOHN VARAMO, program manager for Stamford Arts & Culture, for sharing his expertise. More at choosestamford.com/visit.

1 fabricated: 1957 artist: Robert Cronbach title of art: Waves location: Summer Street Garage Facade, Summer Place Entrance

THRUST (4) “Russian artist Alexander Liberman created Thrust in 1980, and it’s his classic big and bold style. Three more of his sculptures are at the Storm King Art Center in New Windsor, New York.” MORNING SUN, NOONDAY SUN, EVENING SUN (3) “This beautiful piece was created by Jean Woodham in 1972 for GE’s campus. BLT purchased the office building and got the sculptures. They display them at the entrance of their new Harbor Landing.”

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2 fabricated: 1964 artist: Reuben Nakian title of art: Hecuba location: Kiwanis Park, 61 Atlantic St.

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3 fabricated: 1972 artist: Jean Woodham title: Morning Sun, Noonday, Evening Sun location: Harbor Landing's Courtyard

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4 fabricated: 1980 artist: Alexander Liberman title of art: Thrust location: 1600 Summer St.

5 fabricated: 1984 artist: Reuben Nakian title of art: Sea Odyssey location: Old Town Hall Garden, 175 Atlantic St.

FOOTPRINT BY ADOBESTOCK.COM

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SEA ODYSSEY (5) “Reuben Nakian was a Stamford-based sculptor of international acclaim with works at the Guggenheim, the Whitney and the Smithsonian. Sea Odyssey depicts an almost ethereal scene of a young woman swimming with dolphins."


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MUST-SEE MURALS

Stamford can boast many sculptures on public display, but here are a few painted works worth seeing.

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9

2

1

5 6

7

Black Lives Matter This protest-and-awareness street mural was created downtown. artist: multiple location: corner of Broad St. and Bedford St. at Ferguson Library

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6 fabricated: 1989 artist: Mary Preminger title of art: The Cube location: 300 Atlantic St.

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7 fabricated: 1999 artist: Brian Clarke title of art: Stamford Cove location: Gateway Park, 677 Washington Blvd.

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Life Is Beautiful Jean Gabriel, business owner of Soul Tasty, commissioned the mural to be done as a way to brighten up the neighborhood. artist: Don Balladin location: 29 Main St. (at Clinton Ave.)

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fabricated: 2012 artist: Kevin Barrett title of art: Big Cat location: Vela on the Park, 1011 Washington Blvd.

fabricated: 2017 artist: Katie DeGregory title of art: Pirรกmide Bermudas location: Gay St.

NOVEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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Stamford Art Association Mural Rainbow droplets of paint dancing on the side of the two-story building artist: Bob Jones location: 39 Franklin St.


eat

“We want to be educators on how we can change the way people buy, package and consume food.” —

above: Nit Noi's signature broth can be added to recipes or taken as a healthy supplement.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

THREE LOCAL CULINARY GROUNDBREAKERS NOT ONLY NOURISH, BUT THEY ALSO KEEP THE ENVIRONMENT IN MIND AS THEY DO IT by malia mckinnon fr ame

W

ho doesn’t like new food options? How about having someone set up an impressive spread for a dinner party? Lucky for us, these special food businesses have sprung up to deliver fresh, delicious food to your door.

Nit Noi Provisions Nit Noi Provisions, a broth company that offers organic vegetable broth, pasture-raised chicken and pasture-raised beef bone broth and other Thai-based menu items, was started by North Shutsharawan and his wife, Jillian. Shutsharawan grew up in Bangkok and later owned a Thai food catering company in New York. When he moved to Norwalk several years ago, he noticed that people and businesses ordered takeout a lot. “I wanted to bring that convenience to people by delivering healthy food to their door,” he explains. With the idea that his company could be a big fish in a small pond, he began selling at the Westport Farmer’s

Market. In no time, Shutsharawan garnered a big following, with customers waiting in line to buy his broths as well as dumplings and other popular dishes, including guay teow gai, known as GTG. “It’s like the chicken sandwich of Thailand, featuring one of our broths combined with rice noodles,” he says. Everything on Nit Noi’s menu is either made with, or comes with, a side of broth that he makes from his mother’s recipes. Try the traditional guay teow gai with rice noodles, baby bok choy and organic chicken ($12) or a paleo version with veggies instead of noodles and your choice of chicken or vegetable broth ($14) among a slew of other options. greenwichmag.com

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“I believe that sampling ethnic food is important, and experience has shown me that while people may not make a full Thai dish, they use a little bit of our broth or condiments to enhance the flavor of their current recipes,” he says, noting that Nit Noi means “a little bit” in Thai. He adds, “Eighty percent of people we surveyed at the Westport Farmer’s Market say they drink our broths as a healthy supplement, and some add them to their current recipes to improve flavor, but we want to encourage people to incorporate broth with every aspect of their meal.” In addition to providing delicious, healthy meals, Shutsharawan’s main mission is to be a sustainable food company, from the sourcing of the product to the packaging. “We want to be educators on how we can change the way people buy, package and consume food. We need to be more cognizant of how we treat the planet,” he says. Currently, Nit Noi uses paper soup containers for packaging but hopes to move to metal cans, a more sustainable option, in the future. You can find Nit Noi’s products at Myx Kitchen in Greenwich, Mike’s Organic Market in Stamford, the Westport Farmer’s Market, Double L Market in Westport, Walter Stewart’s Market in New Canaan and Village Market in Wilton. Preorder for pickup online the night before at nitnoiprovisions.com (delivery available to Norwalk, Westport, Darien and downtown Stamford). Or stop into the kitchen in South Norwalk to grab and go. »a below: Everything on the menu comes with broth.

CONTRIBUTED

north shutsharawan


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aspect of your life.” Besides eating in a way that fuels your body, Van Loan encourages people to enjoy their meals. “Mai kana” means “come and eat” in Fijian. “Fijians love mealtime, and this is an invitation they use frequently,” she says. Menu items stay seasonal and change weekly. Van Loan designs the menus, and nutritionist Katie Kiehl is on-staff to make sure meals are balanced. “When you use Maikana, you get your own experienced chef, a personal nutritionist, and through my blog there’s a spiritual aspect as well,” says Van Loan.“Nothing makes me happier than being able to share a wholesome, happy approach to eating.” Offerings change, but choices like pulledpork tacos with pineapple-broccoli slaw and harvest healing bowls with turmeric-roasted cauliflower and a lemon-tahini-ginger dressing are just a couple of the offerings. Place an order on maikanafoods.com. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are offered as a one-off (roughly $10 per meal), or you can purchase weekly ($40) or monthly subscriptions that include fifteen meals per week. Orders must be received before 3 p.m. for next-day delivery. Maikana offers free delivery to Greenwich, Darien, New Canaan, Norwalk, Stamford, Westport and Wilton. Delivery to other towns incur a fee. »

above and below: Healthy, colorful bowls are always on Maikana's menus.

Maikana

Jamieson Van Loan, who has lived all over the world and loved cooking from a young age, was destined to be in the food business. She grew up in Fiji, moved to Darien for high school, attended college in North Carolina and planned to go to law school. “Food was always a passion for me. I grew up reading Gourmet magazine and eating amazing meals cooked by my mom, but I never thought you could be a chef and actually make a career out of it,” she says. Van Loan ended up going to culinary school in NYC instead of law school and never looked back. The next several years brought her success as a caterer and personal chef before moving to Costa Rica in 2011, where she opened, owned and operated a restaurant for five years. “Organic and farm-to-table food is a way of life there, and in my beach-fusion restaurant we served everything from eggs

Benedict to fish tacos,” she remembers. When Van Loan moved back to Darien in 2015, she had to run from store to store to source the best of everything. “I had never struggled to eat healthy, but it was so inconvenient to go to several different places to find what I needed. I thought others must be struggling, too, so why can’t I build a business that combines healthy food with convenience?” Not long after, she founded Maikana. “At Maikana, we’re believers in conscientious, mindful eating,” she explains. Van Loan is an avid yogi and incorporates a mind/body/spirit attitude in her business. “I’ve noticed that a lot of people count calories and make eating a very stressful process,” she says, referring to the pervasive fearmongering about food these days. “My goal is simply to provide clean, organic balanced meals. Eating well makes you feel better, which affects every greenwichmag.com

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CONTRIBUTED

eat


eat

TOASTs

Christine Naylor and Stephanie Sisk have been good friends for over a decade. In 2017, the two moms attended an event that helps bridge the gap between motherhood and the workforce. Naylor and Sisk left with the idea that they wanted to get back to work together and on their own terms. “Neither of us wanted to do our previous life’s work [Steph was in finance, and Christine owned a frozen baby food company] and we knew we brought different strengths to the partnership—a yin and yang of sorts,” explains Sisk. She holds a master gardeners certification, which helps her better understand the connection between gardening and food, and Naylor graduated from the California Culinary Academy in San Francisco and brought an entrepreneurial vibe, plus both women love to cook. After much discussion and deliberation on how best to satisfy their creative outlets and serve our local area, TOASTs was born. “We know you taste with your eyes first, so

we wanted healthy, beautiful, environmentally conscious food that we love to eat,” explains Naylor. Over time, the company evolved into what others wanted, too. TOASTs’ most popular items are their grazing tables, which start at four feet by eighteen inches, are customizable and as beautiful as they are delicious. Sisk and Naylor personally arrive and in about an hour “build” a feast atop your favorite table, kitchen island or other surface. Amidst an artistic layer of fresh fruit, veggies, cured meats, cheeses, crackers, chocolates, bread and freshly made dips, Sisk tucks in seasonal flowers or other flora, making the end-product look like a gorgeous painting. TOASTs offers themed tables, too, like its Wellness Table with smoothie shots, fruits and veggies, and a Spring Grazer that includes a subtle pastel palette, to name a few. In the summer, TOASTs has lots of requests for outdoor grazing tables. The company’s Culinary Boxes ($60 to $165) are another big seller. Its popular Charcuterie Box includes a selection of cheeses, meats, greenwichmag.com

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CONTRIBUTED

above: One of TOASTs' grazing tables, set up on an outdoor deck. below: Details of a grazing table include sweet and savory snacks.

grapes and dried fruits. “We started to do these for happy hour, and now businesses order them for meetings; people have them for cocktail parties; and during holidays like Thanksgiving some families use them as a pre-dinner course,” says Naylor. Also offered are their Salad, Skewer, Steak, Chicken and Dessert boxes. Sisk and Naylor source and buy all the food locally, and hand-prep and deliver everything in glass containers or washable mesh bags from their local kitchen in Darien. All of TOASTs’ serving pieces are made of paper or bamboo and can be reused or recycled. “We really think about ways to reduce environmental waste,” Sisk says. As far as cleanup, it’s a nonevent. “With our boxes or grazing tables, roll up the butcher paper or close the box and throw it away or compost it,” says Sisk. Everything is fresh, made to order and customizable, and the TOASTs ladies love to help people plan their perfect event. “We, ourselves, have been entertaining for so long that we’re always thinking of how to make hosting easiest on the host,” explains Naylor. After all, the duo named their business “Toasts” because they want others to celebrate meals and be inspired by special occasions as much as they are. For more info, check out toastsct.com, and to place an order, email order@toastsct.com. G


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g–mom by eileen bartels

Mothers’ Helpers PLENTY OF PEOPLE HAVE HELPED US GET THROUGH COVID—THE STAFF AT GREENWICH HOSPITAL, THE POLICE AND FIRE DEPARTMENTS, GROCERY S T O R E W O R K E R S , M A I L C A R R I E R S A N D T E A C H E R S . MANY BUSINESSES ALSO PIVOTED AND OFFERED A BIT OF NORMALCY IN VERY ABNORMAL TIMES. H E R E ARE A FEW THAT HELPED ME FEED AND CHEER MY FAMILY

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LIFTING OUR SPIRITS

As Winnie the Pooh says, no one can be uncheered by a balloon. Trying to find ways to celebrate birthdays and life achievements, I turned to Cos Cob’s PAPER, PARTY & THINGS. Forced to close its doors in late March, owner Julie Salerno wasn’t sure what she was going to do until her friend Victoria Haines had an idea. She asked Julie to create and deliver four balloon bouquets with a printed card that said “I miss your face.” Certain feelings were universal. Everyone wanted to support a small business and everyone missed their friends. As people heard about the fun offering through social media and apps like Nextdoor, word quickly spread. By April, Julie was working thirteen-hour days trying to keep up with orders. Challenges with shipping and supply-chain demand led to an actual balloon shortage. Working with another shop that would normally be a competitor, East Putnam Variety, the stores took turns driving to a Massachusetts balloon supplier. At one point Julie even had a neighbor driving to pick up out-of-state balloons. Spring quickly turned to graduation season and demand continued. In July Julie was able to open her doors again. She stresses her gratitude for the support she received from so many local business owners and the people of Greenwich who want to keep small businesses thriving. partypaperandthings.com

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Just weeks into rehearsals for its big spring musical, OPEN ARTS ALLIANCE found itself with a large Mary Poppins cast and the impossibility of continuing rehearsals in person. How do you corral seventy kids ages seven to seventeen for online rehearsals? Very strategically. The talented staff held weekly Zoom rehearsals as well as choreography and voice lessons. The old adage “the show must go on” unfortunately did not prove true, and the show had to be canceled. But the structure and comradery of rehearsals gave kids a sense of normalcy in a spring that was otherwise filled with uncertainty. And I have to say, lockdown was a little sweeter with “A Spoonful of Sugar” emanating from my dining room, aka our Zoom office, every week. openartsalliance.com greenwichmag.com

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BALLOON BY ©SHOTSSTUDIO - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

FROM STAGE TO SCREEN


LIFE

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GETTING THE GREEN LIGHT After months of driving classes and road hours, my daughter had reached the finish line of getting her license—and then the DMV shut down. Her driving school FRESH GREEN LIGHT stepped up. In June when the DMV began to reschedule months of backlogged canceled road tests, FGL was in contact with me and hundreds of other parents anxiously awaiting a road test, helping to facilitate scheduling. The road to independence was a little less rocky thanks to Fresh Green Light. freshgreenlight.com

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THE BEST WAY TO DINE IN To know me is to know my love of Tex-Mex and, in particular, BOXCAR CANTINA. I have eaten there once a week for over a decade. Like so many other restaurants in town, Boxcar stayed in business through takeout (I was in the pickup line weekly) and delivery. This year has taught us all about the importance of our favorite restaurants— how they support us and how we can support them. When I couldn’t face another home-cooked meal, Boxcar was there with my favorite comfort food and margarita mix available for pickup or delivery. boxcarcantina.com G

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TOP LEFT PHOTO BY ©FABIOMAX - STOCK.ADOBE.COM; BOTTOM RIGHT BY © RICKA_KINAMOTO - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

Sure, I loved the amazing prepared food before, but this past spring AUX DELICES saved me. I have not cooked and fed my family three meals a day, seven days a week, ever. I have a family of four that eats like a family of six. Suddenly I was confronted with safely procuring ingredients and creating tasty daily meals. At first, I thought I would just order a few ready-made items, but the shop quickly pivoted and, in addition to its classic entrees, began offering staples like sugar, butter and even highly coveted toilet paper. With an easy online order form, I could get everything from Port Chester’s Kneaded Bread to yeast to make my own. All deliveries were contactless and deposited at my doorstep. The shop’s ability to adapt to the needs of clients made those isolated spring days a little more tasty. auxdelicesfoods.com


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fınance fıx

MONEY / BY CAROL LEONETTI DANNHAUSER

THE PAY OFF

THE (NOT SO) SECRET STEPS OF THE ULTRA-RICH THAT ALL OF US SHOULD KNOW

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ooking at your neighbors and wondering, Why are they so rich? It’s probably not off-shore hideaways, start-up equity or complicated alternative investments. The “secrets” of the rich sound like practices of the comfortable, with a few tweaks. High-net-worth households (more than $1 million in liquid assets) are not hard to find here. According to Census statistics, our state counts more than 100,000, with concentrated pockets in Fairfield County. Ultra-high-net worth households (with more than $30 million in liquid assets) seem like a different breed altogether. Yet their strategies for money management can be remarkably similar, says Scott Patten, senior advisor at Northeast Financial Consultants in Westport, which serves high-net-worth and ultrahigh-net-worth clients and counts more than $3.3 billion in assets under management. Often, these clients exercise “a holistic approach” to their saving, spending, investing and tax management. “It’s not reaching for the stars and there’s no magical cure-all,” he says. “It’s save and invest over time.”

index funds or exchange-traded funds. With your credit cards, opt for low to no annual fees and a cash-back option. Yes, Patten assures, the rich get cash back on their cards, “and they have it deposited into a brokerage account.” Pay off your credit cards each month. Look to refinance your mortgage if you’re paying 4 percent or more. And “don’t overreach on your spending,” he says. Don’t buy the bigger house, the vacation home or the fancy car if you have to dip into an account you’re targeting for another goal. Spread out your savings. Don’t limit your savings to retirement accounts. Financial security later in life is only part of the equation. Start a simple investment account using whatever money you can spare. “When people think of large numbers, it tends to act as a mental block in their ability to get started. But when you get started with small numbers—$50 a month, then $100, then $200— it makes a huge difference. Over time that continues to build on its own, as long as you’re not pulling it out.”

Put Junior to work. “For children earning summer income, I recommend they start a Roth right out of the gate. Put at least half their earnings in.,” he says. “That long-term tax-free compounding helps you grow tax-free wealth. It’s continuous, a bit here and there.”

Generate passive income. Get money working for you, growing on its own, whether in brokerage accounts, real estate, rental income, side businesses. The more sources, the better. “The idea is to get it in a position to grow on its own.” G

Watch your fees. The rich can be penny-pinchers. Do what they do and keep costs and spending to a minimum. In your investments, aim for low-cost or no-load options, such as S&P 500 or NASDAQ

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THE PLAN Beware the Invisible Predator: TAXES Your assets can grow, grow, grow, but a tax bill between you and liquidity could mean a lot less money than you anticipated. The rich don’t cut corners when it comes to strategic tax planning, says Patten. “Taxes are such a huge part of wealth management. How you structure your assets should always be taken from a tax perspective. You have to be fluent in that.” Nuances in the tax law dictate whether to sell a great investment, exercise stock options or pull forward your bonus, and how to structure trusts and estate plans. “It’s your money. Ask questions and stay on top of the news,” he says. “Educate yourself.”

PORTRAIT, CONTRIBUTED; TAX PREP ©DEVRIM_PINAR - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

Scott Patten

Start early. Wealth is built over time. Many of our millionaire neighbors started simply: making money, saving some of it and investing that savings. As weeks turned to months, to years and to decades, return on their investments compounded. Says Patten, fancy investments and hedge funds are “not the panacea. Building wealth is diligence over time. Come up with structures where you’re minimizing your fees, minimizing your tax impact and contributing over time.” If you’re just starting out, try to contribute to your 401(k) at least to a match level, Patten says. Max out your Health Savings Account and invest the HSA money. Pay medical bills out-of-pocket, while your HSA grows tax-free. When you’re older and you need the money for medical costs, you can pull it out with no tax consequence.


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he Greenwich Polo Club fields were the place to be the last two weekends in September. Local vendors and fabulous folks came out to see some serious Polo. Social distancing and masks were in full effect, but even that could not put a damper on the major Sunday Funday vibes. » 1 Kimberly and Ike Stowers with their son, August 2 A sculpture outside the Brandt Foundation Art Study Center 3 Julia Doria, Glenn Manacker 4 John Ferris Robben 5 Stephanie Block and Jeffrey Selden 6 Polo ponies in action 7 Justin Pasha from The Cup Bearer 8 Inna Lazar, Jenny Lundell 9 Awards from Michaelangelo of Greenwich 10 Julia Zottner, Tara Post NOVEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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his year’s fifteenth annual Sole Sisters Luncheon, cochaired by Kirsten Riemer and Nicole Kwasniewski, went virtual to help support the Greenwich United Way’s work to fund community solutions in the areas of education, self-sufficiency and health. The “luncheon” featured a conversation with Hagar Chemali, cable news political commentator and founder of Greenwich Media Strategies, and Candace Bushnell, author of Is There Still Sex in the City? We love the Sole Sisters mission—women stepping up to help others step forward. greenwichunitedway.org »


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eneration Impact hosted its “Big Give” event online this year and awarded its second annual $10,000 grant to Norwalk-based nonprofit, Open Door Shelter. The grant will fund a program leader to oversee and implement afterschool education and enrichment activities for homeless children. Generation Impact was inspired by the thoughtful and powerful giving of Impact Fairfield County, a collective giving circle that engages women of Fairfield County in local philanthropy on a deeper level. To learn more and be a part of the team, visit impactffc.org. G greenwichmag.com

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Get Your Photo Published! We are looking for fantastic photos of Greenwich and Greenwich people to feature every month on our new back page. If you would like a chance to be published in GREENWICH magazine and win $100 here’s what you should know: • Photos can be whimsical, historical, serene, funny or beautiful but they all must be taken in Greenwich. • Photos must be submitted digitally to photos@mofflymedia.com and be 300 dpi and 7 inches high or larger. • We will need: Photographer’s name, address, phone number and e-mail Subject of the photograph (identify people in the photo) Location of the photograph Inspiration behind the photograph Any interesting anecdote about the photograph or featured subject

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ean and Caroline met as students at the University of Michigan, but it wasn’t until they both moved to New York City that the sparks flew. A few fun-filled years later, Sean proposed to Caroline in November of 2018, overlooking the Long Island Sound at Tod’s Point. Monsignor Jude O’Doherty officiated at the ceremony at Epiphany Catholic Church in Miami. The reception followed at the Perez Art Museum Miami. The bride, daughter of George Mencio Jr. and Cecilia Altonaga of Miami, graduated from Our Lady of Lourdes Academy and the University of Michigan. Caroline is currently a student at Columbia University in the Doctoral of Nursing Practice and Family Nurse Practitioner division. The groom, son of Mark and Nina Sutton of Riverside, graduated from Greenwich High School, the University of Michigan and NYU College of Dentistry. Sean is currently practicing with his father, Dr. Mark Sutton, at Greenwich Dentistry in Cos Cob. The Suttons spent their honeymoon in Round Hill Resort, Montego Bay, Jamaica. They call Manhattan home. G

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margaret tjimos goldberg

david rabin

alison sherman

LIGHT A Honoring those who went ABOVE and BEYOND

lana gifas

dave kuban

marc jaffe


nicole straight

bob granata

ria rueda

david kuban

FIRE by jill johnson mann | phot o gr aphs by mel ani lust

danielle blaine

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in UNPRECEDENTED TIMES stephanie webster

pj johns

michele conderino


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e have honored our Light a Fire winners—our admirable neighbors who donate their time, money and passion to myriad causes—for thirteen years, but this year is like no other. This year, when the COVID-19 pandemic put Fairfield County in the eye of the storm, most of us just wanted to curl up in a ball with a laptop and Netflix subscription and wait it out. Authorities gave us an excuse, even a command, to stay at home. But brave people among us—some essential workers and others who determined volunteering was more essential than ever—masked up and did what our Light a Fire winners always do: put everyone else ahead of themselves. Only this time, going to work at a homeless shelter every day, delivering hot meals to families who usually depend on school for that, providing childcare to healthcare workers—these deeds carried with them the risk of grave illness and even death. To the organizations honored here, the people who run them and the volunteers who serve them: our deepest gratitude and thanks for all you have done and continue to do in these unprecedented times. One theme kept recurring during the interviews for this story—the struggle is not over. People have lost their livelihoods, homes, loved ones, and economic recovery will be slow. The need for food, shelter, support and hope will continue to be overwhelming this winter. Read about each of these organizations and consider where and how you might help. Perhaps you will find yourself in these pages next year.

Join us for a virtual celebration of our honorees hosted by James Naughton. 2020 Light A Fire

AWARDS

DECEMBER 3 /

THURSDAY 5:45-6:45PM greenwichmag.com

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REGISTER AT LIGHTAFIREAWARDS.COM


2020 Light A Fire

AWARD * HOMELESSNESS IMPACT *

ORGANIZATION

Open Doors MICHELE CONDERINO, Executive Director

WHAT WERE THE FIRST STEPS YOU TOOK WHEN THE PANDEMIC HIT IN MARCH? We evaluated our physical [shelter] space, made sure we had enough PPE to keep everyone safe and suspended our volunteer program. We had to find every way to reduce exposure to people and advocate with the state to hotel our guests. All of our older population were situated by late March and the rest of our population by April 6.

WHAT WERE THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES TO KEEPING YOUR CLIENTS SAFE? At the beginning, there was so much we didn’t know. We were reading constantly, seeing what the CDC was saying, and fine-tuning our policy daily and having a lot of honest conversations with clients. We explained: “You need to protect yourselves. We’ll do what we can, but it’s about the interactions you are having also.” I had a lot of fear as a leader; I wanted everybody to be safe. I worked on-site right through the pandemic; I don’t know how many hours. I felt it was important my staff knew I wasn’t asking them to do anything I wasn’t willing to do myself.

WORDS OF PRAISE

WHAT ARE THE ACCOMPLISHMENTS YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF FROM THESE MONTHS?

During unprecedented times, government officials mandated stay-at-home orders, but complying with that directive requires having a home,” says board member Barbara Blasso. “At the outset of the COVID-19 threat, Michele and her team quickly assessed the high risk of exposure given the shelter environment and took immediate steps to reduce the risk of transmission among our most vulnerable.

How this organization has taken on its mission and really seen it through. We understood that what we do can be the difference between life and death. We had to do everything we could to keep people safe, and the staff really bought into it. I said to them, “Fifty years from now we will talk about this moment. I’m really proud we helped people. I hope you are, too.”

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HOW ARE YOU PREPARING TO WEATHER WHAT THIS STORM MAY BRING IN 2021? With a lot of reality. Even through the darkest moments of COVID, I knew the real challenge would be over the next couple of years— as unemployment rates rise, extra benefits end and eviction moratoriums end. Our true test will be the long term. We have the highest number of housing placements in the county at this time. We have to decrease capacity due to social distancing. We do everything we can to move people forward; there is a line waiting for that bed. There is a lot of fear in that, not only from COVID but from the elements as we approach winter. It gives us a lot of motivation to do the best we can. »

Impressive Stats Open Doors has remained open throughout the pandemic Kept 40-plus homeless clients safely sheltered through the crisis Secured payroll funding to protect the salary of every staff member Spearheaded a plan for the future with other community leaders serving the homeless Continued to provide meals through its kitchen and pantry, pivoting to takeout Continued running its employment program


2020 Light A Fire

AWARD * GRASSROOTS IMPACT *

NICOLE STRAIGHT, Founder RIA RUEDA, ALISON SHERMAN, STEPHANIE WEBSTER, Cofounders ORGANIZATION

Food for the Front Lines

ni cole straight

HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH THE IDEA FOR FOOD FOR THE FRONT LINES? NICOLE STRAIGHT: My daughter called and said she was coming home from college. She is an EMT. Within three days at home, she was back doing her volunteer work. I started thinking, what can I do? Maybe I could buy

dollars had come in. I reached out to anyone who could connect me to the local ERs and it just started to snowball. Within a few days Stephanie Webster [founder of CT Bites] called me and said, “I love what you’re doing. I want to help. I know all the restaurants.” She created the logo and handled the social media. Ria Rueda [a PR professional] texted me: “I want in.” Alison Sherman [former communication manager at Food Rescue, current CEO of The IfLife Foundation] joined in soon after and helped with print and TV PR. Margorie Almansie at Social Venture Partners offered to help with the back end, paying the restaurants; sometimes we were buying 2,000 meals a day. A big shout out to Tim Roof and Raleigh Leahy, also at SVP. Soon people all over started reaching out saying, I want to do this. At one time there were four Food for the Front Lines going on around the state.

some meals for the EMT staff. I contacted Bill Taibe [chef and owner of several area restaurants] and asked if he’d be willing to make some boxed dinners. That’s how it started. I told my daughter, “Your service is what moved me to volunteer.”

HOW DID YOU EXECUTE YOUR PLAN? It wasn’t meant to be more than a one-night thing. But that initial bill was $750, so I posted on Facebook, asking if anyone wanted to contribute. By the next day, literally a few thousand

WORDS OF PRAISE

Food for the Front Lines raised money to pay restaurants to prepare food for Fairfield County hospitals and responders,” explains Monica Moore, one of several nominators of FFTFL. “They also helped start locations in New Haven, Hartford, Litchfield and Westchester counties. They then pivoted to raise money for pantry food essentials for unemployed restaurant workers, many of who are not getting unemployment, stimulus checks or food stamps. To date [August], they have hosted two food drives, feeding 3,200 people.

NOW THAT YOU’VE MOVED BACK TO YOUR HOME STATE, CALIFORNIA, HOW DO YOU REFLECT ON THIS EXPERIENCE HERE? I think it was the perfect storm. I was so lucky to have lived in

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Westport for twenty-one years. I have a lot of friends there. The moment was right. I will look back at COVID and remember we busted our butts for eight weeks and kept a lot of people employed. It was a remarkable thing the four of us were able to pull off.

Impressive Stats Raised over $130,000 in eight weeks Served over 12,000 meals to healthcare workers and first responders in Fairfield County in eight weeks Contracted with forty restaurants/caterers, helping them stay in business Served Bridgeport, St. Vincent’s, Norwalk, Stamford and Greenwich Hospitals, as well as first-responder units in Greenwich, Stamford, Trumbull, Danbury, Weston, Westport and Darien


WORDS OF PRAISE

Board member Juanita James raves about First County Bank’s response during the pandemic: “The staff worked around the clock to help complete applications, answer questions and get loans approved, when some banks weren’t even returning phone calls. They added staff to handle the additional volume so they could process as many loans as possible. For the second round, they anticipated the demand and went the extra mile. One employee was even prepared to come in at 12:01 a.m. to be ready as soon as the SBA portal reopened. larger banks and came to us. On the commercial side, we usually originate $100 million in loans in a year. It was a huge task to do the same amount in a few months. There were new rules coming out daily. Everyone pitched in, making sure we were all safe and had all the PPE we needed. No employee contracted the virus from an internal source. This honor is for our employees and board of directors. I applaud them.

WHAT LESSONS DO YOU THINK WE CAN ALL LEARN FROM THIS UNPRECEDENTED TIME? Recognizing that we are all in this together. We are a community, whether restaurants, the bakery down the street, the pizza joint. Perseverance is key. Being essential workers gave us a little privilege, but we were meant to be doing what we did. »

WHAT WAS THE RESPONSE FROM THE CUSTOMERS YOU HELPED? We are putting out ads with all the testimonials. We went out of the way to help them, and they’ve been ecstatic. Large banks couldn’t respond. With us, they could actually speak to a person and finalize a PPP loan, saving their businesses. We were also able to help nonprofits dramatically. That’s a testament to being a community bank. The founders were not looking to raise a profit; they wanted a bank to help foster and build the community. We’ve continued to honor that.

2020 Light A Fire

AWARD * SMALL-BUSINESS IMPACT *

ORGANIZATION

First County Bank

CAN YOU SHARE THE MOST MOVING EXPERIENCE DURING THIS TIME? I’m going to choke up, because I actually came down with the virus. I battled through it, but I had to go the hospital. Our team came together and stepped up, while I was off the phone for several days. We had built the foundation as a team together, and they followed through. Having COVID, being in the hospital—it was an emotional experience. I’m still emotional about it today.

BOB GRANATA, Executive Director

WHAT ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF IN TERMS OF FIRST COUNTY BANK’S IMPACT DURING THIS PANDEMIC? The most striking thing is how our employees pulled together

as essential workers, helping out an immense number of people, setting up consumers with online banking and debit cards, helping them pay bills online. People left

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Impressive Stats Originated 1,150 Paycheck Protection Program loans, totaling $125 million and protecting 10,000 jobs Donated 10,000 masks to Stamford and Norwalk hospitals Donated $10,000 to the COVID-19 Relief Fund Donated $8,000 to local shelters and food pantries Dedicated its annual Reyno A. Giallongo Jr. Award to frontline healthcare workers, with $5,000 donations each to Stamford, Norwalk, Greenwich, St. Vincent’s and Bridgeport hospitals


2020 Light A Fire

AWARD * OUTSTANDING VOLUNTEER *

PJ JOHNS, VOLUNTEER ORGANIZATION

Filling in the Blanks TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT FILLING IN THE BLANKS AND HOW YOU GOT INVOLVED? Shawnee Knight and Tina Kramer founded Filling in the Blanks to stamp out childhood hunger by providing meals to children in need on the weekends. I was their personal trainer, and we’ve been friends for over fifteen years. Whenever they’ve needed something, I’ve been available to them. I’ve helped out with backpacks for the holidays and putting together meal bags with Grace Community Church, where I’m a youth leader.

HOW HAVE THE NEEDS AND YOUR VOLUNTEER WORK RAMPED UP SINCE MARCH? The pandemic hit, and they called me to pick up meal bags and deliver them to churches. They were short staffed, so I stayed to help out. On March 23rd, I delivered 600 bags. I’ve been there ever since. Our group stayed small, with six of us working alongside each other for twenty-three weeks. It used to be just Fridays, but I saw the need and said, “We have to do this Monday, Wednesday, Friday.” Sometimes the town could only give one dinner to last two nights. I said, “One night these kids can’t be fed. Can we bring meal bags?” This is how Filling in the Blanks literally fills in the blanks. We also gave out boxes and boxes of detergent and grocery items.

WORDS OF PRAISE

For many who are frightened to leave their house due to the virus, volunteering is not an option. But not for PJ—he comes equipped with his backpack of masks, gloves, hand sanitizer and his trademark black hat on backwards to go out and help the community,” says Filling in the Blanks cofounder Tina Kramer. “His smile lights up a room, and he treats those who need help with dignity and honor. This is a beautiful soul who is giving selflessly of himself in this critical time.

WHAT WAS THE RESPONSE FROM THOSE YOU SERVED? There were a lot of proud people who couldn’t afford to eat for the first time in their lives. We greeted everyone with a smile, learned their names, and took care in what we were doing. We weren’t just handing out food; we were offering hope and encouragement. Some people came in wrecked. We tried to meet

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each person’s needs. An elderly Russian woman, Antonella, loved mac-n-cheese. I bought her thirty boxes, and she teared up when I gave them to her, saying “Thank you and God bless you,” over and over in Russian. She would bring us trinkets—we knew it was her way of saying she wanted to give also. We made cupcakes for kids’ birthdays. A mom told us, “You didn’t have to do this for my children. They will never forget it.” The community is forever changed. An act of kindness has a ripple effect for a long time.

LESSONS WE CAN LEARN FROM THIS TIME? I have a greater appreciation for even the smallest of things: If I want to go to Starbucks or the supermarket, I can. When you go through something difficult, concentrate on others—that’s how I was raised. God is there for you and will take care of you and your family. This time has given us a chance to pause, get closer to our families and help our neighbors. This was the most rewarding thing I could have done.

Impressive Stats PJ and his team of six handed out 147,459 meals, including 49,000 meal bags from Filling in the Blanks Volunteered on seventy days in a span of twenty-three weeks, for a total of 315 hours


WORDS OF PRAISE

During this difficult time, Women’s Mentoring Network realized that the WMN programs and services are needed now more than ever,” says board member Shirley Hu. “WMN is on the front lines of this pandemic, as it works with disadvantaged women who are seeking employment after losing their jobs as a result of the pandemic. HOW DID YOUR ORGANIZATION NEED TO PIVOT WHEN THE PANDEMIC HIT? We transferred all of our services over to the online platform. We are doing all of our workshops online and have more than doubled their frequency. We bring in professionals from the community—banks, companies, staffing agencies—to present to our clients. We have been helping the unemployed and underemployed for thirty years, but everything had to pivot: holding workshops two to three days a week, changing the focus to applying for unemployment and PPP loans, learning how to interview on Zoom. Our mentormentee program, which is thriving during this time, transitioned to virtual as well. Now is a good time for clients to reevaluate their situation and transform themselves. Any emails we send out now are more focused on getting our families through COVID. We are part of the Stamford Food Collaborative and Cradle to Career. We pivoted our United Way funding to a drivethrough food pantry.

2020 Light A Fire

AWARD * WOMEN’S IMPACT *

HOW HAVE YOU HELPED YOUR CLIENTS STAY ON THEIR FEET AS THIS CRISIS EXACERBATED THEIR CHALLENGES? Our mission focuses on helping clients find employment and become economically secure, but we’ve pivoted toward education so they can make the most of their unemployment. Online and digital literacy have become so important. Also helping them find food resources and manage their budgets.

ORGANIZATION

Women’s Mentoring Network LANA GIFAS, Executive Director

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and may not have family or friends to talk to about their needs. They really look to us as a mentor to help them get through, especially now. We are just one piece of the puzzle, and we help connect them to everything they need to move forward in their lives.

WHAT LESSONS CAN WE LEARN FROM THIS TIME? If you are focused and resilient, you will be able to move forward. We had to do that and our clients need to as well. We have had women find jobs. But many don’t have computers and are applying for jobs from their phones. We have raised some funding to get kids computers for virtual school. When a student gets a computer, the family gets it. People are so grateful for that. I still have a waiting list of over 100 who need computers. So many people coming out to donate and volunteer, communities coming together, the focus on diversity and inclusion with Black Lives Matter—these are very positive things in a time when it can be hard to stay positive. »

Impressive Stats Provided $37,000 in financial assistance to 175 families, enabling clients to eat and pay rent while awaiting stalled unemployment checks Provided over 250 individuals with support services to help find employment and manage finances Distributed over 100,000 pounds in food via a drive-through food pantry


2020 2020 Light A Fire

AWARD * COMMUNITY IMPACT *

ORGANIZATION

Neighbor to Neighbor MARGARET TJIMOS GOLDBERG, Executive Director YOU RECEIVED THE FIRST GRANT FROM GREENWICH UNITED WAY [GUW] IN THE PANDEMIC. HOW DID THAT COME ABOUT? When we all recognized the gravity of the situation, David Rabin [CEO, GUW] called me and asked, “Margaret, what do you need?” That was a perfect example of trust and communication in the community. I’ll never forget that. We then applied for another round of granting, which we received for continuing needs.

WHAT ARE SOME WAYS YOU HAVE USED THE FUNDING AND PARTNERED WITH OTHER ORGANIZATIONS? We had a summer program to provide for families with children, a supplement to what the school district was distributing. We worked with the Southwestern CT Agency on Aging, distributing groceries to 200 households each Friday. Words can’t describe the effort with our community partners. The impact has been remarkable. Thanks to Kyle Silver and the town of Greenwich, we were able to move to the Arch Street Teen Center after the Christ Church campus closed. That has been a godsend. We also have an internal focus, making sure staff and volunteers are taken care

of. It is very stressful. We are now looking at mid-2022 before we can even think about a hint of things stabilizing. How do we make sure there is nourishment all around, not just groceries but also health and well-being? It’s a delicate balance, but the work we are doing provides such a clarity of focus. It’s so energizing and inspiring.

HOW DID YOU FIND WAYS TO HELP PEOPLE FEEL CONNECTED IN SUCH AN ISOLATING TIME? By communication and consistent messaging that is easily understandable, conveyed across various platforms. We’ve gotten a lot of attention in the newspapers and on social media. The TAG drivers know the individuals in the households, which creates connection. We have young families with newborns, with a growing need for diapers and formula. We connected on Facebook and were able to get them what they need. I met face-to-face with a ninetyeight-year-old client today and made sure he got his food delivery. When calls come into my office, I immediately provide people with my cell phone number, ensuring they know we are here for them. If we can’t provide what they need, we reach out to other agencies.

Impressive Stats WHAT LESSONS CAN WE LEARN FROM THIS PANDEMIC? There is an awful lot that we just don’t know and a lot we don’t control. We have learned to walk together in confidence with our partners, staff and board, and find pathways to opportunities. We have to continue to move forward together. Don’t walk alone. Seek support with confidence and you’ll find a way. We’ve proven that many, many times already.

Committed food for 550 households weekly (and growing) Provide weekly snacks to 100 students Provide supplemental fruit to Meals on Wheels deliveries Completed the weekly Summer Supplement delivery to 225 households

WORDS OF PRAISE

During the COVID-19 Pandemic, NTN acted to prepare for an increase in families in need. They realized early that this was a crisis situation,” says NTN donor Brooke Urban. “NTN began to establish or strengthen partnerships with Greenwich Teen Center (larger space), TAG (distribution to clients), Greenwich United Way, the Junior League of Greenwich, Jewish Family Services, churches, schools and many more organizations. greenwichmag.com

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WORDS OF PRAISE

Jeremy Nappi, Senior Director of Fund Development & Operations; Robert Moore, Director of Community Impact; David Rabin, CEO

Not only did the GUW raise and distribute the most impactful fund in town, the organization also served as a matchmaker—bringing together key stakeholder organizations and residents who wanted to help in different ways but didn’t know how to go about it, and connecting them with those who needed assistance that could not otherwise be found,” says Karen Hopp, longtime supporter and volunteer who now works on PR for the agency. the board about a COVID-19 relief fund. Even before that, we gave an emergency grant to Neighbor to Neighbor. One-third of Greenwich residents are already in need, and we knew the pandemic would exacerbate that. We acted quickly—that’s what we do. We know the community’s needs more than anyone. In December/January we will be coming out with a robust needs assessment, which we do every five years. We partnered with Fairfield University’s Center for Social Impact. We created an online interactive map; you can click on an area of Greenwich and see what the needs are.

HOW DID YOUR ORGANIZATION PIVOT DURING THIS TIME? We started the relief fund. We got the grant committee together weekly to handle grant applications and rapidly deploy funds. In the past, the CEOs of human services organizations in town met every four months. We shifted to weekly calls and made scores of connections to address critical needs, such as food delivery of breakfast and lunch daily. Of the 9,000 children in Greenwich Public Schools, 20 percent are on free/reduced lunch. We connected the superintendent with an organization that could deliver meals to these families. We made a connection for Greenwich Hospital for mask donations. We organized a book donation for Title 1 children. We acted as a fiduciary for Greenwich Comes Together, which was not a 501c3 yet.

2020 Light A Fire

AWARD * NONPROFIT IMPACT * ORGANIZATION

Greenwich United Way DAVID RABIN, CEO WHEN DID YOU HAVE A SENSE OF THE DEVASTATION AHEAD WITH THIS VIRUS? This crisis is exactly why we are here. The Greenwich United

WHAT IS YOUR PROUDEST ACCOMPLISHMENT DURING THIS PANDEMIC?

Way was founded eighty-seven years ago during another crisis, the Great Depression. On March 15, my staff and I had a phone conference and then approached

We never skipped a beat. We raised almost $900,000 in three months and granted it quickly without compromising our

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process. With COVID grants, we request monthly reports on how the money is spent, so we can report back to donors to show they had the greatest outcome.

HOW DID THE COMMUNITY COME TOGETHER TO SUPPORT YOUR EFFORTS? Greenwich responded like Greenwich always does. We put out the clarion call, and it was answered rapidly. »

By the Numbers Spearheaded the Greenwich COVID-19 Community Relief Fund, which raised $900,000 (as of August) Issued twenty-one grants to the most vulnerable in the community (as of August) Delivered 5,200 meals through Caritas, 6,784 meals through Filling in the Blanks and provided funding for 57,204 meals supplied through Neighbor to Neighbor Provided Zoom calls to 360 families through River House during the first month of the crisis Gave $400 each to 125 individuals to meet basic needs through Family Centers Provided 549 teen talk counseling sessions through Kids in Crisis Paid for 250 meals for frontline workers through Nathaniel Witherell


2020 Light A Fire

AWARD

* OUTSTANDING PHILANTHROPIC BUSINESS *

DAVE KUBAN, Owner ORGANIZATION

Planet Pizza, Norwalk HOW DID YOUR BUSINESS ADAPT DURING THIS PANDEMIC? We are in a high corporate area, so we lost those patrons and our rent is high. We adjusted our prices to a little above cost, so we could keep doing high volume. Everybody likes the doctors, nurses, police, so we started asking for donations and sending pizzas out to them. Melissa and Doug donated. Lemberg Law would donate $200 or $300 a day. We’d write a message from Lemberg Law on the pizza box, and the nurses would write and thank Sergei Lemberg directly. It took off. Crossfire Motorcycle Club bought 500 sandwiches, chips and waters—for $6 not our usual $11— and personally delivered them by motorcycle to Norwalk Hospital. I’m involved with the community on a normal basis, so this was easy for me. I grew up in Norwalk, with no money. Now I try to give back what I can.

HOW DID YOU HELP FAMILIES IN THE AREA? We raised $9,000 to provide food for kids and worked closely with guidance counselors to get healthy meals—grilled chicken,

broccoli, rice—to families. Rice is not on our menu, but we were buying six or seven fifty-pound bags a week. Someone asked for bologna; I don’t sell it but I wasn’t going to turn anyone down! I sent my driver for some. Matt Corey, who teaches lacrosse in Norwalk, donated $2,000 out of his own pocket, and we gave families Planet Pizza gift cards for wellrounded meals, including protein, veggies, milk and juice. With Malta House and social services, we delivered hand sanitizer, paper towels—anything to keep kids from getting sick.

WHAT WAS THE RESPONSE FROM THOSE YOU SERVED?

Impressive Stats

So many people called to thank us, crying—saying that was the only food they had for the week. I felt so bad, I started dropping off $50 gift cards. I told my wife at night, “I don’t feel right sitting down and eating dinner.”

and fed all the homeless under the bridge. Then we fed all the homeless by the bridge in South Norwalk, then at Stratford’s Home Depot, and then by the train station in Bridgeport. One lady there had six kids with her, living in a tent. I gave her the money in my pocket. They were charging the food truck; they were so appreciative.

MOST MOVING EXPERIENCE? M2 Tactical gun shop and Saugatuck Financial each donated $2,000. We made 450 bagged lunches, took my food truck, drove over to Exit 6 in Stamford

Raised $27,000 for hospital employees over three-anda-half months Raised $9,000 to donate meals to families once schools closed Served 450 meals to the homeless

WORDS OF PRAISE

Dave raised money to feed hospital employees over and over,” Cristy Gonzales, a teacher who works with lowincome kids, says of owner Dave Kuban. “He has his guys delivering meals to needy kids for free, then he tips his drivers himself. He has been sending food to everyone who is taking care of our community—store employees, postal workers, nurses, doctors—and keeping his employees working. When schools closed, I panicked thinking about how many kids would go unfed each day. I called Dave and he stepped up! He is now feeding so many that I’ve lost count. greenwichmag.com

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2020 Light A Fire

AWARD * BEST FRIEND TO CHILDREN *

ORGANIZATION

Children’s Learning Centers

MARC JAFFE, Chief Executive Officer HOW WERE YOU ABLE TO COME TOGETHER AS AN ORGANIZATION AND TAKE ACTION WHEN THE PANDEMIC HIT? My team is really dedicated and mission driven. We knew the Greenwich/Stamford area was going to be overwhelmed by COVID. We have a long-standing relationship with Stamford Hospital; it’s the largest employer of our families. When the Project 26 program was announced, the OEC (Connecticut Office of Early Childhood) approached us and our response was: “Whatever it takes.” We were fortunate that we had a core team who demonstrated real courage and commitment and raised their hands.

WHAT ACCOMPLISHMENTS DURING THIS TIME MAKE YOU MOST PROUD?

closed, we almost immediately pivoted to remote learning, serving 940 children at home. These are younger kids who can’t read yet, don’t have technology, and whose parents are often non-English speakers. Philosophically we don’t believe in having children on screens, but we realized staying connected to the children, and engaging with the parents was really important. Our family engagement increased tenfold. We have committed to building a robust remote learning platform for pre-K, which doesn’t really exist.

Certainly Project 26. We ran a program for eight weeks and managed to do it without any children or staff getting sick. The healthcare workers deeply appreciated knowing their children were cared for and happy—you could see that in the faces of the children. We’re now serving 380 children in our seven sites. That also means 500 parents are going to work, so we are supporting the community and getting the economy back on its feet. We learned in running Project 26 how to mitigate risk, enabling us to reopen quickly. Also when we

WHAT ARE YOUR GOALS FOR 2021 AS WE FACE THE UNKNOWNS OF THIS VIRUS? Having our robust remote learning platform in place. Hopefully it becomes a model for the state, maybe the nation. Have as many children at our sites as we can safely accommodate. Continue to support not only our children and families, but our staff and team members, who are under a fair amount of stress. And to be cognizant of the challenges around race and equity as revealed by the George Floyd incident and respond to those challenges. Our staff is 85 percent female, 95 percent minority. »

WORDS OF PRAISE

Many CLC families were disproportionately impacted by the economic ravages of the virus,” explains Sue Bodson, who nominated CLC. “Food insecurity and unmet basic needs were very common problems, and CLC demonstrated how an organization leans in and shows up despite never-beforeseen challenges.” Sue, along with Bobbi Eggers, was planning CLC’s annual benefit when the pandemic hit. They quickly pivoted to a virtual Instagram party—over 600 participants attended, and the event raised $113,000.

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Impressive Stats Through Project 26, CLC offered childcare to Stamford Hospital healthcare workers for eight weeks in the heart of the pandemic. No child or staff member contracted COVID-19. Safely opened seven of CLC’s eight locations by the end of June, enabling 500 parents to get back to work Distributed 9,000 diapers through Greenwich’s Mothers for Others (ongoing effort) Distributed over 200 meals through Filling in the Blanks in Norwalk Organized a 1,000-volume book drive with Westhill Angels


2020 Light A Fire

AWARD * OUTSTANDING

LEADERSHIP *

ORGANIZATION

Food Rescue US DANIELLE BLAINE, Site Director

WHAT STEPS DID YOU TAKE TO ADAPT TO THE RAPIDLY GROWING NEEDS WHEN THIS PANDEMIC HIT? We usually use our app to communicate between food donors, volunteers and our social service agencies who receive the food. When the pandemic hit, so many agencies and grocery stores closed or changed hours that our app schedule could not reflect the rapid changes. I quickly emailed all of our volunteers and asked who would be able to help at a moment’s notice to move food to people who need it most. I received about 200 responses from volunteers, and we moved our system to fast-paced texting for March and April. The volunteers were incredible. We also launched three new initiatives: our community kitchen program, restaurant meal program and farm distribution program.

WHAT WAS YOUR ORGANIZATION’S EXPERIENCE WITH COMMUNITY SUPPORT OF YOUR EFFORTS? We experienced an unbelievable outpouring of goodwill from volunteers giving their time and companies and individuals providing grants to sponsor our meal programs to our local agencies, helping our local restaurants in the process—a real win-win for all.

ACCOMPLISHMENT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF DURING THIS TIME? Building stronger communities through our volunteers and grocery, restaurant, school and hospital donors, and reaching deeper into the community to find individuals who are not being helped or need more help. When our volunteers reached out to help neighbors in need, it brought the whole community up. One of our agencies said, “The people felt respected and cared about when they saw these beautifully packaged meals coming from our local restaurants and community kitchens.”

Impressive Stats Provided over 840,000 meals (as of August) to the food insecure since the start of the pandemic

WHAT LESSONS DO YOU THINK WE CAN LEARN FROM THIS UNPRECEDENTED TIME? A pandemic can turn things upside down in a moment. Our agencies saw a doubling or tripling of people in line for food—many of them for the first time and many in tears. It could happen to anyone, and by building a stronger community of volunteers we can pivot to help anyone in Fairfield County in more ways than before. We experienced this with the weeklong power outage. We were so ready to jump in and take immediate action to help the stores and agencies get back on their feet quickly. Our

volunteers went to restaurants at a moment’s notice to get food that was going to spoil and take it to people who needed it. Through the pandemic, we have learned to come together as a team and community. The next time it could be us in line for the first time, and I think that has really made people think about equity and helping all people who are economically disadvantaged. G

WORDS OF PRAISE

Food Rescue was a key partner who helped us to develop a sustainable food system to feed hundreds of families during this COVID pandemic,” says Deborah Sims, Executive Director of East End NRZ Popup Market & Cafe. “They provided us with high quality fresh fruits, vegetables and meals, which was essential to our families that faced daily struggles in dealing with hunger. greenwichmag.com

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Kept over 1 million pounds of food out of landfill Grew its team to 1,268 food rescuers (from 1,000 on March 1) Launched five Restaurant Meal Programs, helping more than twenty restaurants stay in business Launched three Community Kitchens— reopening restaurants, hiring back staff and making healthy chef-prepared meals for the food insecure Launched a Farm Distribution Program, recovering excess food from farms


The

Awards

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Business owners and best friends, Jen Bakker and Corrie Jackson

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by rian n smith phot o g r aphs by julia d ’ ago stino

Imagine inviting two charming Brits into your home who leave you with the most exquisite parting gift: a newfound crush on your suddenly streamlined space. MEET JEN AND CORRIE, WHO ARE CHANGING LIVES, ONE JUNK DRAWER AT A TIME


B

est friends and business partners often go together like Jimmy Choos and jogging. Then again, Jennifer Bakker and Corrie Jackson, owners of Greenwich-based bespoke home organizing company Maison Haven, aren’t your typical twosome. For starters, they’re downright telepathic. They knock wood at precisely the same time, and wouldn’t you know it,

they do so in response to whether they’ve ever had a blow-up (their answer: a resounding, “No, thank God!”). They finish each other’s sentences, and if you aren’t following closely, you might wonder which word came from which woman’s lips. “We have a shared language, whether we’re in a client’s home or leading digital workshops, because we just know each other so well. We’re like sisters,” explains Corrie, who grew up twenty minutes apart from Jen in Kent, England, where they met at Sevenoaks school as fifteen-year-olds.

POND HOPPING

negotiating contracts with heavyweights like Emma Watson and Mario Testino. Corrie, an editor at UK glossies Harper’s Bazaar and Glamour, went freelance before transitioning to writing crime fiction “after one too many Kardashian interviews,” she deadpans. Beginning a new chapter with Maison allowed for a different degree of creative autonomy. “One of the things I love so much now about having this company is being able to sort of call the shots,” says Corrie. “We have a very strong creative vision of what the branding should look like, what the voice should be, how our Instagram should look—all of that comes from us, and it’s great to take the skills that we’ve acquired over the years and put that into something we’re so passionate about.” While the duo wears many hats, they’ve naturally carved out distinct roles. “We always joke that Jen handles the big-girl pants stuff, all the kind of grown up things that go way over my head,” says Corrie. “I’m in charge of the words, she’s in charge of the money, and thank God it’s that way round.” Jen is quick to add, “It’s been helpful that we come from different work backgrounds, but our aesthetic is very, very similar. For other women who may be launching businesses, I think it’s an instinctive thing as well. You know deep down, when you really know someone, whether you can work together and you’re aligned in those ways or not. I think you’ve got to follow your instincts.” Follow them they did, and Greenwich proved fertile soil. “It feels more entrepreneurial here than in England, and a lot more people have their own businesses. It feels like there’s more access or it’s somehow easier and more encouraged,” says Jen. “One of the things we noticed among friends and women who were in our orbit was the collaborative spirit amongst the female entrepreneurs,” continues Corrie. “People we see on the school run all the time, seeing them in their professional capacity, was game-

Three transatlantic moves, two husbands, four children and twenty-five years later, the pair is repeating history stateside, living twenty minutes apart in Greenwich (Jen) and Bedford (Corrie), with their eldest sons in the same grade at the same school. Jen, who was born in Greenwich before her family moved to the UK when she was an infant (“The whole time growing up, my mom would tell me the hospital where I was born served her lobster!”), moved to midcountry in 2013 “like a homing pigeon” after a brief stint in Manhattan. She lured Corrie here two years later. “Jen was the only person I knew on the East Coast, and she sold Greenwich really hard to me,” Corrie says with a laugh. Jen is laughing, too. “Are you kidding, my best friend’s going to move over here? Yes, you’re coming! I didn’t tell her…well, there aren’t any bad bits,” Jen stops herself, “but I wouldn’t have told her, even if there were.” Corrie chimes in, “It was September 2015, and James and I moved here that December. I hadn’t entirely unpacked my house from our move back to the UK from Los Angeles, where we’d spent two years. I remember flying to the U.S. to look in Manhattan, and I felt like that ship had sailed. We’d lived the California lifestyle, we had kids, we had a dog. So we went and had lunch with Jen and her husband, Taran, at their beautiful house in Greenwich, and that was sort of that, really.”

GOOD COMPANY

Corrie and Jen formed Maison Haven in 2018 after realizing how important a role home organization played in their busy lives, juggling babies, work pivots and time zone-altering moves. Their former fashion-oriented careers provided the foundation. Jen was an in-house lawyer for Burberry,

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changing for us. It made me view Greenwich in a completely different light. You don’t necessarily know what people are doing behind the scenes, but seeing them in their professional context was fascinating. There’s a lot of ambition here, there’s a lot of talent, and the women are really making waves.”

MINDING THE GAP

Filling a niche in the market for a highly curated edit—a juice cleanse for your home’s gut, so to speak—Maison Haven quickly became a word-of-mouth resource, particularly among multitasking moms. “The main reason people contact us is because they’ve reached a point where they’re feeling overwhelmed, and it could be something as simple as ‘I just opened

PANTRY PERFECT “Anything you’re reaching for more than twice a week needs to be prime real estate,” says Jen. Baskets, labels and more are available on maisonhaven.com.


CAFE CHIC Tip: Ditch messylooking bags and display your beans in sustainable glass containers to visually elevate a cluttered coffee corner.

SHELF ASSURED Cleverly coded items and secret basket inserts keep things neat, while turntables maximize space and make everything within reach.

my pantry and can’t find anything,’ or it could be an entire house,” says Corrie. “Whatever it is, there has been a trigger point that has made them reach out. Generally, people call us not because there’s a crisis, that’s too strong of a word, but they just feel like they can’t do it by themselves. I think this has only been exacerbated by COVID, because we’ve all been stuck at home; and I think people are cooped up and fed up, and the things you can gloss over in your house when you’re really busy and working and racing around and seeing friends—all of those things have been brought into sharp relief.” The ability to provide what Jen calls “an interiors-y take on organizing,” whether it’s bringing in beautiful baskets with luxe brass labels and secret compartments “that hide a multitude of sins” or genius acrylic closet separators that elevate rather than detract from your wardrobe’s design, is what makes Maison next-level.

“A lot of people, before they call us, have really had a good old go at organizing themselves, but often with a mismatch of containers. Or they’ve got their label maker out but the labels aren’t quite on point, so they’ve tried, but they need that accelerator button to take it all the way,” Jen says. Their design system is built upon intuitive zoning, which Corrie dubs “a kind of 3-D brain map.” With your closet, for example, you can close your eyes and know exactly where your denim is, your swimwear is, even if it’s off season, because you designed it that way. Right now, athleisure is their biggest closet challenge. “It’s fascinating because you pull it all out and lay it on their bed and say, ‘Let’s go through,’ and you can see their jaws drop with all of the black Lululemons,” says Corrie. “We sometimes go into people’s closets and cut them by half, and they finally feel like they can see what they have. The less you have, the more you see and the more you use.” »

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We’re living at home in a different way than we were nine months ago. People have had to suddenly REIMAGINE THEIR SPACES AND MAKE THEM

in a way that they didn’t before.

FUNCTION

—corrie jackson

WARDROBE WOW Acrylic rod dividers, huggable hangers, bag organizers, bin clips, drawer inserts and custom labels are clutch staples. “Even in the largest closets we tackle, we never waste space,” says Jen.

SERENE SCENE Hint: Categorize paperwork and clippings into monochromatic binders that will make you exhale instead of cringe when opening cabinets.


WORKING WONDERS

While the team has tackled everything from done-in-a-day small kitchens to six-week, new home projects, most jobs average two days, with an hour-long home consultation followed by a plan mapping out product, time, budget and a customized mood board. “For us, the bigger the mess, the better, because the transformation is more impactful,” says Corrie. “Kitchens and pantries are big, as well as playrooms and home offices. We’re living at home in a different way than we were nine months ago. People have had to suddenly reimagine their spaces and make them function in a way that they didn’t before. It’s tough when you have no worklife boundary and school-life boundary. One of the things we help our clients with is setting boundaries, and the sort of rituals you can create in your day to mark time between work and home and school.” Given our current COVID climate, Maison Haven’s newly launched Bespoke Virtual organizing sessions have become increasingly popular with both locals and far-away fans. “There’s more demand than ever because the attention’s turning inward, into the houses,” says Jen. “We’ll look at the area that clients want to organize over a thirty-minute FaceTime and send a beautiful sketch, a plan with a specific shopping list of links that help them do the organizing themselves, along with a follow up email.” For clients who are comfortable with their signature in-person visits, Team Maison has been masking up and following CDC guidelines to the letter and will safely and quietly get the job done on-site. In fact, you might forget they’re even around. “Corrie and I get it. It can be intrusive having people in your home, so we really do try to disappear in people’s houses so they’re not very conscious of us being there,” says Jen. “One of our clients in Westport, her interior designer suggested that she use us, and she wasn’t sure, but we came in. We started with one room and then we quietly bounced around all over the house. We were there weeks on end because I think it’s one of those things where once you start…” Corrie finishes, “You get hooked. If people bring us in to do their kitchen, once they’ve seen the effects of it, the rest of the house starts to look a bit shabby. They want to start on other areas.” The relationship doesn’t stop there, Jen says. “Clients will often want us to come back for a quick refresh, whether it’s adding new solutions because they’ve had a life change or getting their original systems back in place.” If it sounds like an addictive investment, it is, and one that pays off with every pull of a cleverly managed drawer, every swipe of a serene surface, every contact-high from a newly accessible piece of clothing. “One of the things we’ve learned from organizing so many spaces is that if a space looks beautiful, it’s more likely to stay that way,” says Corrie. Consider it Marie Kondo in the age of domestic detainment. Because every homeweary Greenwichite knows the path to sparking joy is paved not with Legos and laundry and remote controls but with the certainty that while we may not entirely be out of the woods, much less our front doors, at least we can know where our color-coded cashmere sweaters are. And damn, they look brilliant. G

PLAYROOM PEACE “White containers are our hardest working product in playrooms,” says Corrie. Designated craft and schoolwork zones tame the chaos.

SHAG, MARRY, KILL “Instagram is making shopping easier than ever before, and the more you accumulate, the less you see, so the more you don’t think you have, so you keep getting more and more. It’s a vicious circle,” says Jen. Here’s how everyone’s favorite naughty celebrity game will help you stop, take stock and simplify your wardrobe.

1

2

Marry

Kill

“Do you feel like the best version of yourself when you slip it on? While a closet full of one-hit wonders can be tricky, hold onto the pieces that make you feel inspired,” Corrie says. “A thing we do with a lot of clients is create memory trunks, these beautiful, chic, white trunks. If there are things you want to keep but don’t wear often, they are a lovely way to store them without taking up valuable real estate in your closet.”

“Can you create three outfits with that top or skirt or pair of pants? We’re not saying that every single thing needs to be that versatile, but it should either make you feel wonderful or be super versatile,” says Corrie. “I have a pair of Lanvin sandals and I’m on my third pair of soles for them. I keep getting them resoled because I love them so much, and I refuse to believe that they’re going to die, so I keep breathing new life into them.”

“We don’t stand over clients with a gun saying ‘If you haven’t worn this in the past three months we’re taking it away from you,’ but life’s too short to wear something that doesn’t fit,” Corrie says. “We all know in the pit of our stomach, there are things you pick up and put down again because for some reason, you’re not feeling it. We’re all about sustainable fashion and have a great relationship with The RealReal, so we’ll help clients consign and make some money from their closet, or donate to charities.”

Shag

BECOME A HAVEN INSIDER

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3


awards

Celebrating was a virtual success! SPECIAL THANKS TO ALL OF OUR 2020 SPONSORS PRESENTING SPONSORS

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GREENWICH HISTORICAL SOCIET Y PRESENTS

A N T I Q UA R I U S DECEMBER 2–4, 2020

TOGETHER AT HOME The Greenwich Historical Society’s premier annual fundraiser celebrating design, decorative arts, architecture and landscapes, presented in a new content–rich virtual format.

GREENWICH WINTER ANTIQUES & DESIGN SHOW PRESENTED ONLINE BY INCOLLECT

HOLIDAY ENTERTAINING WORKSHOP

HOLIDAY HOUSE TOUR

With decorating & entertaining guru Eddie Ross

Celebrating the work of designers Patrick Mele, Charlotte Barnes, and Heather Georges

HOLIDAY BOUTIQUE

PRESENTED BY QUINTESSENCE

Curated local and popup boutiques for festive shopping

DESIGNER PANEL DJ Carey of CT Cottages & Gardens in conversation with Architect Douglas VanderHorn, Landscape Designer James Doyle and Designer Amy Aidinis Hirsch

Plus, daily email content celebrating Greenwich retailers, entertainers & designers, a special festive gingerbread kit, our annual Festival of Tabletop Trees and candlelit Bush-Holley House tours.

TICKETS ON SALE NOW

greenwichhistory.org/antiquarius Patron and All-event passes available now


calendar ART & ANTIQUES ALDRICH MUSEUM, 
 258 Main St., Ridgefield, 438-0198. Tues.-Sun. aldrichart.org

GERTRUDE G. WHITE GALLERY, YWCA, 259 E. Putnam Ave., 869-6501. ywcagreenwich.org

AMY SIMON FINE ART, 1869 Post Rd. East, Westport, 259-1500. amysimonfineart.com

GREENWICH ARTS COUNCIL, 299 Greenwich Ave., 862-6750. greenwich artscouncil.org

BRUCE MUSEUM, 1 Museum Dr., 869-0376. brucemuseum.org

GREENWICH ART SOCIETY, 299 Greenwich Ave. 2nd flr, 629-1533. A studio school which offers a visual arts education program for kids and adults. greenwichartsociety.org

CANFIN GALLERY, 39 Main St., Tarrytown, NY, 914-332-4554. canfingallery.com CARAMOOR CENTER FOR MUSIC AND THE ARTS, Girdle Ridge Rd., Katonah, NY, 914-232-1252. Caramoor is a destination for exceptional music, captivating programs, spectacular gardens and grounds and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. caramoor.org CAVALIER GALLERIES, 405 Greenwich Ave., 8693664. cavaliergalleries.com CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY PRINTMAKING, 299 West Ave., Norwalk, 899-7999. contemprints.org

Playtime by Paul Rousso, mixed media on hand-sculpted acrylic, 56 x 54 x 12 in.

DISCOVERY MUSEUM AND PLANETARIUM, 4450 Park Ave., Bridgeport, 372-3521. discoverymuseum.org

Samuel Owen Gallery We highly recommend you take a stroll through the Samuel Owen Gallery on Greenwich Avenue. This contemporary art gallery is committed to exhibiting the work of emerging to mid-career artists, as well as a variety of strong secondary market works. Since opening in 2004, owners Lee and Cindy Milazzo continue to build a connection between New York City’s vibrant art scene and the local community. Or, if you would like to enjoy the art from the comfort of your own home, take a virtual tour at samuelowen.com. 382 Greenwich Avenue.

( for more events visit greenwichmag.com )

CLAY ART CENTER, 40 Beech St., Port Chester, NY, 914-937-2047. clayartcenter.org

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FAIRFIELD MUSEUM AND HISTORY CENTER, 370 Beach Rd., Fairfield, 259-1598. fairfieldhistory.org FLINN GALLERY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 622-7947. flinngallery.com

GREENWICH HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 47 Strickland Rd., 869-6899. greenwichhistory.org KATONAH MUSEUM OF ART, Rte. 22 at Jay St., Katonah, NY, 914-232-9555. katonahmuseum.org KENISE BARNES FINE ART, 1947 Palmer Ave., Larchmont, NY, 914-834-8077. kbfa.com LOCKWOOD-MATHEWS MANSION MUSEUM, 295 West Ave., Norwalk, 838-9799. lockwoodmathewsmansion.com LOFT ARTISTS ASSOCIATION, 575 Pacific Street., Stamford, 203-247-2027. loftartists.org MARITIME AQUARIUM, 10 N. Water St., S. Norwalk, 8520700. maritimeaquarium.org NEUBERGER MUSEUM OF ART, Purchase College, 735 Anderson Hill Rd., Purchase, NY, 914-2516100. neuberger.org PELHAM ART CENTER, 155 Fifth Ave., Pelham, NY, 914-738-2525 ext. 113. pelhamartcenter.org »


12 th Annual Greenwich Reindeer Festival

Virtual Greenwich Holiday Stroll

NOVEMBER 27–DECEMBER 22

DECEMBER 1–24

SAM BRIDGE NURSERY & GREENHOUSES

OVER 100 MERCHANTS THROUGHOUT

Hosted by

437 North Street, Greenwich Monday–Saturday; 8:30am–5pm

Reindeer Festival Hosted By

Reindeer Stable Sponsor

Reindeer Sponsor

Featuring

Greenwich, Village of Old Greenwich, Byram, Glenville, Cos Cob, Riverside

Premier Media Sponsors

Media Sponsors

Virtual Holiday Entertainment Sponsor

NURSERY & GREENHOUSES, LLC EST. 1930

Created and Produced By

Community Sponsor

#GreenwichReindeerFestival

#VirtualGreenwichHolidayStroll

G re e n w i ch r e i nde e r F e s t i val . com


calendar Ridgefield, 431-9850. ridgefieldtheaterbarn.org SHUBERT THEATER, 247 College St., New Haven, 800228-6622. shubert.com STAMFORD CENTER FOR THE ARTS, Palace Theatre, 61 Atlantic St., Stamford, 325-4466. stamfordcenterforthearts.org WESTPORT COUNTRY PLAYHOUSE, 25 Powers Ct., Westport, 227-4177. westportplayhouse.org

Reindeer Festival Finally, some good news! Dasher, Dancer and Prancer are “coming to town” for the twelfth annual Greenwich Reindeer Festival at Sam Bridge Nursery & Greenhouses, 437 North Street. Come join the fun from Friday, November 27 through Tuesday, December 22. Visitors can meet the reindeer, shop for Christmas trees and unique holiday gifts. Face masks are required and Santa will be staying at the North Pole this year due to the coronavirus pandemic. greenwichreindeerfestival.com

ROWAYTON ARTS CENTER, 145 Rowayton Ave., Rowayton, 866-2744. rowaytonarts.org SAMUEL OWEN GALLERY, 382 Greenwich Ave., 325-1924. samuelowen.org SILVERMINE GUILD ARTS CENTER, 1037 Silvermine Rd., New Canaan, 203-966-9700. silvermineart.org SANDRA MORGAN INTERIORS & ART PRIVÉ, 135 East Putnam Ave., 2nd flr., Greenwich, 629-8121. sandramorganinteriors.com STAMFORD ART ASSOCIATION, 39 Franklin St., Stamford, 203-325-1139. stamfordartassociation.org STAMFORD MUSEUM & NATURE CENTER, 39 Scofieldtown Rd., Stamford, 203-977-6521. stamfordmuseum.org UCONN STAMFORD ART GALLERY, One University Pl., Stamford, 251-8400. artgallery.stamford.uconn.edu WESTPORT ARTS CENTER, 51 Riverside Ave.,

Westport, 226-7070. westportartscenter.org YALE CENTER FOR BRITISH ART, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven, 432-2800. britishart.yale.edu YALE UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY, 1111 Chapel St., New Haven, 432-0611. artgallery.yale.edu

CONCERTS, FILM & THEATER ARENA AT HARBOR YARD, 600 Main St., Bridgeport, 345-2300. websterbankarena.com AVON THEATRE FILM CENTER, 272 Bedford St., Stamford, 661-0321. avontheatre.org CURTAIN CALL, The 
Sterling Farms Theatre Complex, 1349 Newfield 
Ave., Stamford, 3298207. curtaincallinc.com

DOWNTOWN CABARET THEATRE, 263 Golden Hill St., Bridgeport, 576-1636. dtcab.com FAIRFIELD THEATRE COMPANY, On StageOne, 70 Sanford St., Fairfield, 259-1036. fairfieldtheatre.org

LECTURES, TOURS & WORKSHOPS ALDRICH MUSEUM, 258 Main St. Ridgefield, 438-0198. aldrichart.org

BOWMAN OBSERVATORY PUBLIC NIGHT, NE of Milbank/East Elm St. rotary on the grounds of Julian Curtiss School, 869-6786, ext. 338 BRUCE MUSEUM, 1 Museum Dr., 869-0376. brucemuseum.org CLAY ART CENTER, 40 Beech St., Port Chester, NY, 914-937-2047. clayartcenter.org CONNECTICUT CERAMICS STUDY CIRCLE, Bruce Museum, 1 Museum Dr. ctcsc.org FAIRFIELD MUSEUM AND HISTORY CENTER, 370 Beach Rd., Fairfield, 259-1598. fairfieldhistory.org

AUDUBON GREENWICH, 613 Riversville Rd., 869-5272. greenwich.audubon.org

GARDEN EDUCATION CENTER, 130 Bible St., 869-9242. gecgreenwich.org

AUX DÉLICES, 231 Acosta St., Stamford, 3264540, ext. 108. auxdelicesfoods.com

GREENWICH LIBRARY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 622-7900. greenwichlibrary.org

GOODSPEED OPERA HOUSE, 6 Main St., East Haddam, 860-873-8668. goodspeed.org GREENWICH LIBRARY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 6227900. greenwichlibrary.org JACOB BURNS FILM CENTER, 364 Manville Rd., Pleasantville, NY, 914-7737663. burnsfilmcenter.org LONG WHARF THEATRE, 222 Sargent Dr., New Haven, 787-4282. longwharf.com RIDGEFIELD PLAYHOUSE, 80 East Ridge, Ridgefield, 438-9269. ridgefieldplayhouse.org RIDGEFIELD THEATER BARN, 37 Halpin Ln.,

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Clay Art Center Enjoy a virtual exhibit from the Clay Art Center from Sunday, November 1 through Thursday, December 31. Concepts in Clay features the work of eight black artists and brings together a collective voice that speaks about themes and processes of artists of color working in clay. 40 Beech Street, Port Chester. clayartcenter.org »


calendar KATONAH MUSEUM OF ART, 26 Bedford Rd., Chappaqua, NY, 914-232-9555. katonahmuseum.org STAMFORD MUSEUM & NATURE CENTER, 39 Scofieldtown Rd., Stamford, 977-6521. stamfordmuseum.org

VIRTUAL & OTHER EVENTS IMPACT FAIRFIELD COUNTY, virtual information session and Q&A, Tues. 10, learn about Impact FFC and becoming a member, 7:30 p.m., impactffc.org/upcomingevents.

KIDS’ STUFF ALDRICH MUSEUM, 258 Main St., Ridgefield, 438-4519. aldrichart.org AUDUBON GREENWICH, 613 Riversville Rd., 869-5272. greenwich.audubon.org AUX DÉLICES (cooking classes), 23 Acosta St., Stamford, 326-4540 ext. 108. auxdelicesfoods.com BEARDSLEY ZOO, 1875 Noble Ave., Bridgeport, 3946565. beardsleyzoo.org

N O V E M B E R 2020

DISCOVERY MUSEUM AND PLANETARIUM, 4450 Park Ave., Bridgeport, 372-3521. discoverymuseum.org DOWNTOWN CABARET THEATRE, 263 Golden Hill St., Bridgeport, 576-1636. dtcab.com EARTHPLACE, 10 Woodside Lane, Westport, 227-7253. earthplace.org

BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF GREENWICH, 4 Horseneck Lane, 869-3224. bgcg.org

GREENWICH HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 39 Strickland St., 869-6899. hstg.org

BRUCE MUSEUM, 1 Museum Dr., 869-0376. brucemuseum.org

GREENWICH LIBRARY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 6227900. greenwichlibrary.org

328,676

IMAX THEATER AT MARITIME AQUARIUM, 10 N. Water St., S. Norwalk, 8520700. maritimeaquarium.org KATONAH MUSEUM OF ART, Rte. 22 at Jay St., Katonah, NY, 914-232-9555. katonahmuseum.org MARITIME AQUARIUM, 10 N. Water St., S. Norwalk, 8520700. maritimeaquarium.org NEW CANAAN NATURE CENTER, 144 Oenoke Ridge, New Canaan, 966-9577. newcanaannature.org RIDGEFIELD PLAYHOUSE, 80 East Ridge, Ridgefield, 438-5795. ridgefieldplayhouse.org STAMFORD CENTER FOR THE ARTS, Palace Theatre,

61 Atlantic St., Stamford, 3254466. palacestamford.org STAMFORD MUSEUM & NATURE CENTER, 39 Scofieldtown Rd., Stamford, 977-6521. stamfordmuseum.org STEPPING STONES MUSEUM FOR CHILDREN, 303 West Ave., Mathews Park, Norwalk, 899-0606. steppingstonesmuseum.org WESTPORT ARTS CENTER, 51 Riverside Ave., Westport, 222-7070. Visit westportartscenter.org WESTPORT COUNTRY PLAYHOUSE, 25 Powers Ct., Westport, 227-4177. westportplayhouse.org G

Ownership Statement Greenwich Magazine U.S. Postal Service. Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation. (Required by 39 U.S.C. 3685)1. Publication Title: Greenwich. 2. Publication No.: 961-500. 3. Filing Date: October 1, 2020. 4. Issue Frequency: 11 times. 5. Number of Issues Published Annually: 11. 6. Annual Subscription Price: $29.00. 7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication: 205 Main Street, Westport, CT 06880. 9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor: Jonathan Moffly, Publisher, 205 Main Street, Westport, CT 06880. Cristin Marandino, Editor, 205 Main Street, Westport, CT 06880. Cristin Marandino, Managing Editor, 205 Main Street, Westport, CT 06880. 10. Owner: Moffly Media. 11. Known Bondholders, Mortgages, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities: None. 12. For Completion by Nonprofit Organizations Authorized to Mail at Special Rates: Not applicable to Greenwich Magazine. 13. Publication Title: Greenwich. 14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below: October 2020. 15. Extent and Nature of Circulation: a. Total Number of Copies (net press run): *10,125 **10,032;b(1). Paid/Requested Outside-County Mail Subscription Stated on Form 3541: *991 **946; b(2). Paid In-County Subscriptions: *3,263 **3,116; b(3). Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Non-USPS Paid Distribution: *686 **430; b(4). Other Classes Mailed Through the USPS: *0 **0; c. Total Paid and/or Requested Circulation (Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), (4): *4,940 **4,492; d. Free Distribution by Mail (Samples, Complimentary, and Other Free): d(1). Outside-County as Stated on Form 3541: *0 **0; d(2). In-County as Stated on Form 3541: *2,718 **2,920; d(3). Other Classes Mailed Through the USPS *0 **0; d(4). Free Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or Other Means): *1,484 **1,300; e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3), (4): *4,202 **4,220; f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e): *9,142 **8,712; g. Copies Not Distributed: *983 **1,320; h. Total (Sum of 15f, 15g): *10,125 **10,032; i. Percent Paid and/ or Requested Circulation (15c divided by 15f. times 100): *54.0 percent **51.6 percent. 17. This Statement of Ownership will be printed in the November 2020 issue of this Publication. 18. I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on this form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including multiple damages and civil penalties). Elena V. Moffly, Business Manager/Treasurer, October 1, 2020. *Average No. Copies Each Issue During Proceeding 12 Months. **Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date.

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advertisers index

AUTOMOTIVE

HEALTH & BEAUTY

Karl Chevrolet Co.................................................................. 39

Castle Connolly .........................................................................63 Hospital for Special Surgery . ...................................................29

BUILDING & HOME IMPROVEMENT

Nathaniel Witherell..................................................................... 51

California Closets.................................................................... 11

Nichols MD of Greenwich..........................................................55

Douglas VanderHorn Architects.............................................17

ONS Orthopaedic & Neurosurgery Specialists........................43

Greenwich Property Management LLC..................................14

Rye Vein Laser Center..................................................................8

Karl Chevrolet Co................................................................... 39

Sandra Margoles, MD............................................................... 24

Michael Smith Architects....................................................... 26

Yale New Haven Health/Smilow Cancer Center...................... 21

Vicente Burin Architects, LLC................................................ 65

JEWELRY

BUSINESS & FINANCE

P EO P LE LOV E M AGA Z I N ES. Betteridge Jewelers..................................................23, Cover 4

Castle Connolly .........................................................................63

Manfredi.................................................................................... 3

Cummings & Lockwood - Greenwich . ..................................10

Shreve, Crump & Low........................................................... 6, 7

First Bank of Greenwich........................................................ 57 First Republic Bank................................................................. 9

LANDSCAPING, NURSERY & FLORISTS

Greenwich Advisors............................................................... 33

Sam Bridge Nursery...............................................................64

Private Staff Group.................................................................10 UBS Financial Services Inc./The Shantz Mantione Group..... 37

NONPROFIT

Vault Insurance.......................................................................61

Boys & Girls Club of Greenwich ............................................ 58 Breast Cancer Alliance........................................................... 65

DECORATING & HOME FURNISHINGS

Greenwich Historical Society.................................................90

Amy Aidinis Hirsch................................................................. 41

Junior League of Greenwich...................................................66 Planned Parenthood...............................................................94

EDUCATION & CHILDREN Brunswick School..............................................................19, 53

REAL ESTATE ENTERTAINMENT

Douglas Elliman Real Estate - Greenwich.........................15, 35

Stamford Tent & Event Services............................................61

Houlihan Lawrence - Corp.......................................................12

Greenwich Reindeer Festival................................................. 92

Sotheby's International Realty............................. Cover 2, 1, 20 William Raveis-Shelton............................................................ 5 William Raveis-Your Dynamic Duo........................................... 8

EVENTS A-list........................................................................................89 Greenwich Magazine Photo Contest..................................... 65

REAL ESTATE/DESTINATION

Greenwich Reindeer Festival................................................. 92

John's Island Real Estate Company....................................... 25

Light a Fire.............................................................................. 81 SPORTS & FITNESS Hickory & Tweed Ski & Bike.................................................... 47

FASHION Henry's Leather Company............................................Cover 3 Jerry Sorbara Furs................................................................. 64

MISCELLANEOUS

Roundabout........................................................................... 63

Westy Self Storage.................................................................. 63

FOOD, CATERING & LODGING Marcia Selden Catering...........................................................13 Table 104 Osteria Bar ............................................................49 NOVEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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postscript photog raph by melissa mc cann santangel o

PINK PICK-ME-UP A

pparently humans aren’t the only ones who benefited from some excessive online quarantine shopping. “I bought Daisy this crazy, impractical and expensive sweater. I think a lot of people had one or two ridiculous quarantine purchases, as we were all losing our minds,” says mom Melissa McCann Santangelo. After seeing one too many Instagram ads for the Max Bone sweater, she caved, because, well, who doesn’t need a few pink feathers in these strange times? (Though from the look of it, Melissa may be enjoying the sweater a little more than Daisy does.) G Have a photo that captures a moment in Greenwich? Send it to us at editor@greenwichmag.com for a chance to win $100. Please write photo submission in the subject line.

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Henry’s #7 Leather Sneaker Designed in Norwalk, Connecticut and meticulously hand-crafted in Portugal using only the finest French calfskin and Italian soles. Made to be comfortable from the first minute you put them on.

Henry’s Leather Goods • 5 Lewis Street, Greenwich, CT • henrysleather.com • 203-340-9273


Profile for Moffly Media

Greenwich Magazine - November 2020  

Greenwich Magazine - November 2020