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COLOR ISSUE

h au t e s t u f f

p ro p i c k s

SUNSET HUES

COLOR INFUSION

goods

MUTED SHADES deep dive

COOL CORAL fa s h i o n h o u s e

NATURAL TONES

+ ro o m s e rv i c e

POWER PALETTES

$5.95 MAY/JUNE 2019

athomefc. com


AMY AIDINIS HIRSCH INTERIOR DESIGN

boathouse by SBP Homes

amyhirsch.com

n

203 661 1266


s

MORGAN HARRISON HOME DESIGN & ARCHITECTURAL INTERIORS New Canaan, Connecticut 203.594.7875 morganharrisonhome.com


contents MAY/JUNE 2019 vol. 14 | issue 3

features

departments

72

31

BOLD MOVES

8 EDITOR’S NOTE

Five designers use color to make a statement.

42

10 GET THE GOODS Color trend: Sunny Yellow; Sea Inspired; On Mute

MODERN MELD Contemporary elements and pops of pattern update an older home.

52

MADE TO SUIT Luscious hues and midcentury moments set the tone in Greenwich.

16 FASHION HOUSE All Natural 18 HAUTE STUFF Take It Outside

72

20 SHOP TALK Local design news, the latest collections, haute happenings and more

CLASS ACT Color mixed with neutrals creates a sophisticated yet livable home.

26 HOUSE PARTIES Business of Design 92 LAST WORD Pros share ways to soak your home in assorted hues

i nt e rv i ews by l au re n f et t e r m an

ATHOME IN FAIRFIELD COUNTY MAY/JUNE 2019, VOL. 14, NO. 3. ATHOME IN FAIRFIELD COUNTY (ISSN 1941-9503) is published six times annually (Jan/Feb, Mar/Apr, May/Jun, Jul/Aug, Sep/Oct, Nov/Dec) by Moffly Media, Inc., 205 Main St, Westport, CT 06880. Periodical postage paid at Westport, CT, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes (Form 3579) to ATHOME IN FAIRFIELD COUNTY, PO BOX 9309, Big Sandy, TX 75755-9607. US subscription rates: $19.95/1 year, $29.95/2 years; Canada and foreign US$40/1 year, US$60/2 years.

on the c ove r amy aidin is hi rsch i nterior desig n, l l c | ph ot o gr a ph y a m y vi schio athomefc.com

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203.489.3800 y

hiltonarchitects.com


vol. 14 | no. 3 | may/june 2019

creative/editorial director

Amy Vischio editorial

sales

senior editor

sales management moffly media

Lauren Fetterman market editor

Megan Gagnon advisory editor

Donna Moffly contributing editors editor, stamford

Camilla A. Herrera editor, new canaan - darien

publisher, greenwich

Trish Kirsch publisher, new canaan - darien

Lisa Phillips Hingst categories: automotive/builders/ landscape/sports & fitness publisher, stamford

Karen Kelly category: travel

Julee Kaplan

publisher, westport

executive editor, greenwich

categories: architects/interior design/ home furnishing/art & collectibles

Cristin Marandino

Gabriella Mays

editor, fairfield living; westport

Diane Sembrot art art director

Garvin Burke production director

Kerri Rak design assistant

Taylor Stroili digital media manager

Amber Scinto

sales directors

Jennifer Petersen category: jewelry

Monique de Boer categories: fashion and beauty

Stephanie Delaney regional account executive, southeast category: regional travel

Jennifer Frank categories: doctors/dentists/finance/ insurance/business consulting

digital editor

Rick Johnson

Diane Sembrot

categories: real estate/lawyers

business

categories: restaurants/wine & spirits/ catering

Ellyn Weitzman president

Jonathan W. Moffly vice president/editorial & design

Amy Vischio business manager

Elena Moffly cofounders

John W. Moffly IV & Donna C. Moffly

Hilary Hotchkiss category: schools & universities

marketing executive director, event marketing

Laurinda Finelli partnership manager

Kathleen Godbold strategic marketing director

Wendy Horwitz creative services art director

Molly Cottingham

TO SUBSCRIBE, renew, or change your address, please e-mail us at subscribe@athomefc.com, call 1-877467-1735, or write to athome in Fairfield County Magazine, 111 Corporate Drive, Big Sandy, TX 75755. U.S. subscription rates: $19.95/1 year (6 issues); $34.95/2 years (12 issues); $44.95/3 years (18 issues). Canada and foreign, US $36/year. Prices are subject to change without notice. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without express permission of the publisher. ©2018 athome in Fairfield County Magazine is a registered trademark owned by Moffly Media. The opinions expressed by writers commissioned for articles published by athome in Fairfield County are not necessarily those of the magazine. FOR QUALITY CUSTOM REPRINTS/E-PRINTS, please call 203-571-1645 or e-mail reprints@mofflymedia.com PUBLISHERS OF GREENWICH, FAIRFIELD LIVING, NEW CANAAN • DARIEN • ROWAYTON, WESTPORT, STAMFORD and athome magazines, 205 Main Street, Westport, CT 06880. Phone: 203-222-0600; email: mail@moffly.com ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: Lemuel Bandala: call 203-571-1610 or email advertise@moffly.com

athomefc.com

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35 elm street westport serenaandlily.com


editor’s note /COLOR THEORY

celebrating 10 years!

LAST CALL FOR ENTRIES! ATHOMEFC.COM

a-list 2019 deadline: May 13 Want to win? Then take the first step before taking the stage and enter before May 13th!

W

hen it comes to color, I lead a double life. By day, I’m drawn to color and pattern, to their layering and mixing, as the creative and editorial director for athome. I’m captivated by projects that feature saturated shades, innovative combinations and imaginative applications. But by night, I’m ready to return to my own home grounded in black and white. While I prefer living in neutral tones, I’ve always had a love affair with color, and I love how my own duality illustrates that color truly is a personal experience. Maybe you’ve loved color your entire life, maybe you rarely push the boundaries of your tonal comfort zone. But the beauty of color is that whether it’s used sparingly or to extremes, it’s all about the feelings it ignites in you. ¶ To celebrate all the shades of life, this issue is showcasing the use of color in a variety of ways. First, in Room Service, we highlight five spaces that set the mood with powerful palettes (“Bold Moves” on page 31). Then we stop by a home in Riverside, where designer Brooke Crew incorporated modern elements and patterned pieces to update an older home for a young family (“Modern Meld” on page 42). Next we head to Greenwich, where Amy Aidinis Hirsch infused a range of shades amid midcentury notes to create a home that’s luxurious yet livable (“Made to Suit” on page 52). Finally, we step inside a new waterside build in Westport, where Lisa Friedman layered in color grounded in neutrals for an open space that beautifully flows (“Class Act” on page 72). ¶ To designers, architects and landscape professionals: this is your last reminder to enter the A-List! In addition to our 17 categories, we’ve added a new product design category. To enter or to learn more, visit athomefc.com/alist and read the FAQs and submission guidelines. We’ve extended the deadline to May 13, so you still have time to get those projects in!

AMY VISCHIO Creative/Editorial Director amy.vischio@moffly.com

athomefc.com

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AMY VISCHIO AND LAUREN FETTERMAN: JULIEN JARRY; A-LIST WINNERS: BLUE BACKGROUND: KYLE NORTON; BLACK BACKGROUND: JACEK DOLATA

Me and Lauren Fetterman


goods/COLOR by megan gagnon

SAY HELLO TO SUNNY YELLOW

HERMÈS

swatch to watch

Mini “Kelly” Picnic bag with calfskin; $13,900. Greenwich; hermes.com

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS Forsythia

2

1

MITCHELL GOLD + BOB WILLIAMS Ikat diamond pillow; $390. Greenwich; mgbwhome.com

3

5

bright yell ows in gener al are happy c ol ors: vibr ant and sexy, fun and fresh. they define energetic vibes and appeal t o our senses.

BLU DOT Hot mesh armchair; $199. bludot.com

—gilles clement, gilles clement designs

GUBI

Grasshopper floor lamp by Greta Grossman; $1,030. Design Within Reach, Stamford, Westport; dwr.com

6

Dua melamine dinnerware; starting at $4.95. Westport; crateandbarrel.com

4

TERRAIN Swirling lines napkin; $16. Westport; shopterrain.com

athomefc.com

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ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF DESIGNERS/BRANDS

CRATE & BARREL


WAKEFIELD design center

Curated by Designers for Designers

Instant Gratification | Finishing Touches and Makeovers by Appointment Only

To The Trade Only 652 Glenbrook Road, Stamford, CT 06906 T: (203) 358-0818 info@wakefielddesigncenter.com | wakefielddesigncenter.com


goods/SEA INSPIRED

2

MAKE REEF-READY CORAL YOUR GO-TO PINK

swatch to watch BENJAMIN MOORE

1

Coral Gables

4

cho ose a wall c overing for a shade like c or al. the qualit y of the paper diffuses the intensit y and imparts a beau tiful depth t o the c ol or. i like gr acie studio’s tea paper. a c or al entry would be stunning in it!

3

—robin henry, robin henry studio

5 1 DEVON & DEVON Admiral cast iron bathtub; price upon request. devon-devon.com

2 RELATIVITY TEXTILES Peacock wallpaper in blush; $300 for double roll. relativitytextiles.com

7 3 HAUTE DÉCO

4 FRONTGATE

Knobs by MarieVeronique Swannell; starting at $106 per knob. hautedeco.com

Seaside scallop guava designer umbrella; starting at $896. frontgate.com

athomefc.com

12

5 ABC CARPET & HOME Fringe towels in salmon; $20. New York; abchome.com

6 OOMPH Easton mirror in Tucson Coral with gold accent; $1,650. Greenwich; oomphhome.com

7 CHARLES EDWARDS Gothic wall lantern in red; to the trade. charlesedwards.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF DESIGNERS/BRANDS

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THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE

LILLIAN

A N U N PA R A LLE LE D S E LEC TI O N O F C U R ATE D D E S I G N R E SO U RC E S .

N O R WA L K D E S I G N C E N T E R

|

G R E E N W I C H AT E L I E R

|

S TA M F O R D WA R E H O U S E S H O P

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T R A D E W E LC O M E

|

L I L L I A N AU G U S T. C O M


goods /ON MUTE

TURN THE VOLUME UP WITH SUBTLE OCEAN HUES

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3

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1 ARTERIORS Wilson pendant; $805. Tusk Home + Design; Westport; tuskhome anddesign.com

2 CIRCA LIGHTING Penelope table lamp by Alexa Hampton; $709. Greenwich; circalighting.com

3 SAMUEL & SONS Chevallerie double tassel tie back; to the trade. New York; samuelandsons.com

swatches to watch FARROW & BALL

4 SKAGERAK By Your Side table; $385. shophorne.com

Stone Blue

FARROW & BALL

5 STARK

4

Breakfast Room Green

Rug #123119E; to the trade. Stamford; starkcarpet.com

6 LIGNE ROSET Paipaï sofa by LucidiPevere; starting at $5,185. New York; lignerosetny.com

7 LILLIAN AUGUST

5 7

mu ted blues and greens are so easy t o use. they are calm and inviting h ues and can be the ac cent t ones in the ro om. as an alternate use, they’re strong enough t o create a mono chromatic scheme. —sandra oster, sandra oster interiors

athomefc.com

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8 SERENA & LILY Campania pillow cover; $128. Westport; serenaandlily.com

8

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF DESIGNERS/BRANDS

6

Essex chest; $2,298. Greenwich, Norwalk; lillianaugust.com


Come visit our new Westport showroom for an interactive stone experience

WESTPORT SHOWROOM

203.227.5181

BETHEL SHOWROOM

203.790.9023 Exceptional Products, Personal Service

gaultstone.com


fashion house/ ALL NATURAL by megan gagnon

ROOMS THAT START ON THE RUNWAY

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1 6

5 4

room: A villa living space designed by Sa Aranha & Vasconcelos model: Chanel/ Spring 2019

3 1 ARTERIORS

2 LILLIAN AUGUST

3 JULISKA

4 GIOVANNI TRAVASA

5 THE CITIZENRY

6 SELAMAT

Vianca chandelier; $2,145. Beehive, Fairfield; thebeehive fairfield.com

Rattan chair; $245. Greenwich, Norwalk; lillianaugust.com

Quinta natural cork ginger jar; $164. Stamford; juliska.com.

Foglia lounge chair; $7,875. Property Furniture, New York; propertyfurniture.com

Naga rattan side table; $275. the-citizenry.com

Edith mirror; $698. Fofie & Mia’s, Larchmont; fofiemia.com

athomefc.com

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7 WILLIAMS SONOMA HOME Rattan in acrylic bath accessories; starting at $60. Westport, 203-221-1065; williams-sonoma.com

ROOM: MONTSE GARRIGA GRAU/SA&V. ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF DESIGNERS/BRANDS

2


ARTERIORS BAKER BETHEL INTERNATIONAL BRADBURN BLUEPRINT BUNGALOW 5 CENTURY CHELSEA HOUSE CORBETT LIGHTING CURREY & CO. CYAN LIGHTING DANA CREATH DECORATIVE CRAFTS DUNES AND DUCHESS EMISSARY FINE ARTS LAMPS GABBY GLOBAL VIEWS GO HOME HAMMERTON HUBBARDTON FORGE HUDSON VALLEY LIGHTING JAMIE YOUNG JULIAN CHICHESTER KELLY WEARSTLER LIGHT & LIVING MADE GOODS MAITLAND‑SMITH MR. BROWN NUEVO PALECEK PORT 68 REGINA ANDREW RO SHAM BEAUX ROBERT ABBEY INC. ROOST SELAMAT SHINE BY S.H.O. THEODORE ALEXANDER UTTERMOST VISUAL COMFORT WILDWOOD LAMPS WORLDS AWAY ARTERIORS BAKER BETHEL INTERNATIONAL BRADBURN BLUEPRINT BUNGALOW 5 CENTURY CHELSEA HOUSE CORBETT LIGHTING CURREY & CO. CYAN LIGHTING DANA CREATH DECORATIVE CRAFTS DUNES AND DUCHESS EMISSARY FINE ARTS LAMPS GABBY GLOBAL VIEWS GO HOME HAMMERTON HUBBARDTON FORGE HUDSON VALLEY LIGHTING JAMIE YOUNG JULIAN CHICHESTER KELLY WEARSTLER LIGHT & LIVING MADE GOODS MAITLAND‑SMITH MR. BROWN NUEVO PALECEK PORT 68 REGINA ANDREW RO SHAM BEAUX ROBERT ABBEY INC. ROOST SELAMAT SHINE BY S.H.O. THEODORE ALEXANDER UTTERMOST VISUAL COMFORT WILDWOOD LAMPS WORLDS AWAY

BRIGHT IDEAS

LIGHTING FOR THE LUXURY HOME SCHWARTZDESIGNSHOWROOM.COM | TO-THE-TR ADE ONLY | STAMFORD, CT | ME TUCHEN, NJ


haute stuff / TAKE IT OUTSIDE by megan gagnon

MAKE THE FLEETING HUES OF SUMMER SUNSETS LAST WITH THESE OUTDOOR FABRICS

1

R OBERT ALLEN Nomadic tile in orchid; to the trade. D & D Building, New York, 212-421-1200; robertallendesign.com

2

GASTON Y DANIELA Clark in frambuesa; to the trade. New York Design Center, 212-725-0340; kravet.com

3

S CALAMANDRÉ Antigua weave in hibiscus; to the trade. D & D Building, New York, 212-355-7186; scalamandre.com

4

S. HARRIS Kroo in blush; to the trade. Lillian August, Norwalk, 203-847-3314; fabricut.com

IMAGES COURTESY OF DESIGNERS/BRANDS

5

MICHAEL S. SMITH INC. Jasper in Indian garden red; to the trade. John Rosselli & Associates, New York, 212-593-2060; michaelsmithinc.com

athomefc.com

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6 DONGHIA

Moxie in coral; to the trade. New York, 212-935-3713; donghia.com

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SUNBRELLA Monterey-87 in sunny coast; $89.90 per yard. sunbrella.com

8 P ERENNIALS

Bazaar in melon; to the trade. D & D Building, New York, 212-871.9717; perennialsfabrics.com

9

LEE JOFA Searchin Urchin tiki/ orange; to the trade. New York Design Center, 212-725-0340; kravet.com

10 SCHUMACHER

Pisces print in punch; to the trade. New York, 212-415-3900; fschumacher.com

MAY/JUNE 2019

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athome


shoptalk THE LATEST DESIGN NEWS

Claim to Fame

A high-end STONE SUPPLIER carves out her name in the industry above: Fame Luxury Stone’s 30,000-square-foot stone and tile showroom and warehouse is designed to accommodate jobs of all sizes. below: Fame Cohen, CEO of Fame Luxury Stone

Where did it all begin? Fame Luxury Stone was created to deliver high-end luxury stone to the Connecticut area. I come from a very long line of international stone suppliers, and when I opened my own operation, I noticed that Connecticut wasn’t getting the best selection of stone. I designed FLS to service architects, designers and developers and expand on their visions.

allow me to find nearly any stone you can imagine. On more demanding projects, we source directly from overseas.

What does FLS offer? We provide unparalleled customer service, design assistance and the highest quality and variety of natural stone as well as quartz, porcelain (tiles and slabs) and glass. Our facility is set up like a slab gallery so clients have perfect visibiIity when viewing inventory. Our slabs and tiles are hand-selected and inspected, and I invest in the most luxurious stone to import for my clientele. I work with my clients to source exactly what they need. My close ties in the stone world

What sets FLS apart? It is a woman-owned luxury stone brand. My approach to the stone trade is unique from the mass market, and my variety of stone sets my brand apart. It’s not common to find Amazonite Quartzite or Calacatta Borghini in Connecticut. My attention to detail allows my clients to have confidence in my stone, and most of my inventory is made in Italy. Our design assistance is also a big plus because purchasing stone can

FINE LINE FAME LUXURY STONE’S NEW MADE IN ITALY LUXURY LINE OFFERS HIGH-END STONES INCLUDING:

What is your service area? I’m a direct importer and wholesaler, so I service industry professionals who build nationwide. Once I establish a relationship with a designer, architect or developer, I become their supplier anywhere they need stone. I do a lot of work out East, and I’m currently working on some homes that are being rebuilt in Malibu after the devastating fires. I have the ability to supply stone to any place in the world.

be quite a big task with very little educational information available. How do you source your stone? My process is unique—I actually take a long time to put my containers together. I run a lot of my selections by talented designers in the luxury market before purchasing. I like unique selections and ones that deliver information when you walk into a room. I don’t like boring, common material. So what’s next? I’m very excited about opening a FLS showroom out East this summer. The first floor will be a workspace for clients to curate their selections, and the second floor will be an art gallery with a focus on Sandy Cohen. Stone, art and design all tie in, and the FLS brand is known for delivering the best that Mother Nature has to offer, which is why I selected a talented gallery and museum artist to be the focus. The art exhibited will be in the purest form. No stencils, no manufactured art, just true craftsmanship. 11 Kimberly Avenue, West Haven; 646-241-5172; fameluxurystone.com

CALACATTA BLACK

CALACATTA VAGLI

This option in the Arabescato family has gained popularity in luxury baths for its perfectly bookmatched floorto-ceiling wall installations and bathtub designs.

With its dreamy white background, this looks incredible in luxury kitchens, on statuesque fireplaces and in white marble bathrooms.

athomefc.com

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PHOTOGRAPHY: DANIEL D’OTTAVIO

F

ame Cohen is the CEO of Fame Luxury Stone, a 30,000-square-foot stone and tile showroom and warehouse in West Haven. We checked in with Cohen to learn more about her story and what’s in the works:

What drew you to this industry? My father and uncles have been in the stone business for over thirty years. I’m the first woman in the family to open my own operation and become an international importer. I was working in my father’s Chelsea showroom when I was 5 years old, answering phones on the weekends, so you could say I had a natural affinity for it. I always loved stone, but growing up I was under the assumption that it was too much of a man’s world for me. It’s been an interesting experience since I decided to throw on a hard hat and source stone in the depths of a cave. Now I’ve solidified my position in this industry.


YA R D TO TA B LE

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TASTE THE JOY OF SUMMER…

ETABLE

Longing for tasty, homegrown, organic vegetables, but short on time or experience? Homefront Farmers is here to help. From the first spicy radishes of spring through summer’s juicy heirloom tomatoes and on to a bountiful fall harvest of potatoes and squash, our expert organic gardeners do everything that’s needed to keep your garden productive and beautiful. Want to get your hands dirty yourself? Join in for a lesson as often as you like! And if you don’t have a garden yet, our skilled craftsmen can build you one that is as beautiful as it is functional. So give us a call today, and let us help you create the garden of your dreams.

Your Own Beautiful, Organic Vegetable Garden. Done Right. Made Easy. 203 . 470.3655 : info@homefrontfarmers.com : homefrontfarmers.com : Like Us on Facebook


shoptalk

COMING TO LIGHT A NEW BOUTIQUE LIGHTING RETAILER ARRIVES IN HISTORIC SONO Chloe Winston Lighting Design, a premier retail lighting destination, has opened its doors in South Norwalk. Located at 68 Water Street, the urban-chic 1,400-squarefoot showroom boasts exposed brick walls, stone pillars, hardwood floors and coffered ceilings. As a women-owned business, Chloe Winston offers a collective forty-plus years of experience in high-end lighting design with its owners, designers Candace Pereira and Rina DiMarte, formerly of the largest home design center in the region. Offering signature brands such as Visual Comfort, Hudson Valley, Feiss, Crystorama and Fourteenth Colony, Chloe Winston serves the discerning homeowner as well as the area’s robust design community, including interior designers, architects and builders. “We’ve even been approached by a commercial customer to provide lighting for a 40,000-square-foot facility,” says DiMarte. Pereira and DiMarte have intimate, first-hand experience with the products they sell. “We’ve dedicated our entire careers to this industry and found a great home to express our creativity and cater to the Connecticut and Westchester markets,” says Pereira. With access to more than 10,000 products from long-term brand partner relationships, Chloe Winston is well-equipped to fulfill any lighting need. 68 Water Street, South Norwalk; 203-957-8686; chloewinstonlighting.com

above and below: Visitors to the new Roche Bobois showroom will find pieces from its Les Contemporains collection and the Nouveaux Classiques collection.

Grand Opening R

enowned luxury furnishing brand Roche Bobois has opened a new showroom in Greenwich. Located at 26 East Putnam Avenue in the furniture district, the 4,000-square-foot space offers not only iconic pieces from the brand but design services to clients. “The furniture district of Greenwich is the perfect home for an upscale luxury furnishing brand like Roche Bobois,” says Pierre Berardo, general manager of Roche Bobois North East U.S. “We chose the space because of its strong visibility and potential in the already flourishing residential neighborhood.” The showroom includes signature Roche Bobois elements such as exclusive custom wallpapers, suspended ceilings and porcelain flooring that create a warm yet modern design. Visitors will see

above: Chloe Winston’s new showroom has brick walls and hardwood floors for an industrial feel. athomefc.com

22

notable pieces from Roche Bobois’ Les Contemporains collection such as the Mah Jong sofa, Digital sofa, Scenario sofa, Astrolab table, Profile sofa and Speed Up buffet as well as pieces from the Nouveaux Classiques collection. A large TV wall situated at the entrance welcomes clients with a captivating digital display of the brand’s most recent designs, and the space also includes a fireplace for a truly luxurious and welcoming atmosphere. In addition, the new showroom houses one of Roche Bobois’ unique offerings: an innovative Design Studio, where a team of experienced design consultants is available for client consultations, which include product selection, customization and advanced 3D planning. 26 East Putnam Avenue, Greenwich; 475-897-5820; roche-bobois.com

PHOTOGRAPHY: CHLOE WINSTON: COURTESY OF CHLOE WINSTON; ROCHE BOBOIS: COURTESY OF ROCHE BOBOIS

ROCHE BOBOIS opens a new showroom in Greenwich


shoptalk

welcome home

A recently opened COS COB BOUTIQUE has everything you need to mix it up

I

MODERN UPDATE CATCHING UP WITH DESIGN WIZARD JONATHAN ADLER

“S

mile, you’re home” is the tag line for Jonathan Adler’s Now House line, a new collaboration with Amazon selling furniture, rugs, bedding and décor. And it’s impossible not to smile when entering a Jonathan Adler space, marked by bold colors, graphic patterns and whimsical accessories. (You’ll find everything from needlepoint pillows embroidered with Bestie/ Worstie to giant acrylic pills.) His brand has over twenty stores worldwide, in addition to residential and commercial projects, and Adler remains true to his vision of creating

Habitat’s selection of home goods and gifts includes pieces with a story: reclaimed wood stools, benches made from tree roots, hand-glazed mugs from Denmark, chunky wool throws from a Russian artisan. Original art covers the walls with paintings by Allison Meyler, Katy Garry and Rebecca Stern and photo art by Alicia Sands Tiberio. Need help pulling together a room? Caravella can assist with small and large home design projects through C&C Interior Design, a design business she shares with Claudia Duvall. Caravella’s eye for accessories veers toward items that have a tie to charity, such as the Sea Change candles she stocks, which benefit an organization that helps people get access to clean drinking water. Natural materials and coastal colors figure prominently, as Caravella loves the beach and serves on the board of Friends of Greenwich Point. 234 East Putnam Avenue, Cos Cob; 203-900-1233; habitgreenwich.com —Mary Kate Hogan

FRESH PICKS

1

FEATHER THE NEST “I have a thing for birds,” says Caravella. Avian accessories are scattered around the shop: old cement and stone birds and some crafted from papier-mâché.

2

EVERYDAY UPGRADES Organic shaped pottery— a range of plates, bowls and cups imported from the Netherlands—updates any table.

3 CHIC TOASTS A resin champagne bucket with leather cord handles makes a festive gift.

a world filled with delights both eclectic and elegant, irreverent and glamorous. We sat down to chat at his Greenwich store. Do you have a favorite piece right now?

My favorite is always the last thing I made. Right now it’s the Reform credenza, which I’m kind of obsessed with. Dream project? I say this every time I get asked this question, and nobody seems to be listening, but I just want to design a car. How does New York inspire you? New York is like my muse, lover, tormentor, enemy, frenemy. It’s madness, like constant stimulus overdrive. And I love/hate it. What do you love about coming to Greenwich? Greenwich is a singular place

that captures the spirit of modern American glamour that I try to put into my work. That WASPy-chic vibe is one of my great inspirations. —Megan Gagnon athomefc.com

24

above: Club Cloud chair; Reform credenza; and Facet tray

PHOTOGRAPHY: HABITAT: COURTESY OF HABITAT; JONATHAN ADLER: COURTESY OF JONATHAN ADLER

above: Habitat offers everything from sisal rugs to candles to avian accessories.

f you step into Habitat Greenwich and find yourself wanting to sit down and stay awhile, this is by design. The chock-full-of-treasures store in Cos Cob, owned by Kim Caravella, brings together all of the elements of a cozy, well-furnished home: sisal rugs, gorgeous lighting fixtures, chill music, striking original art, a mix of new and vintage furniture, and accessories you won’t find elsewhere. “My philosophy is that your home is a place where you should walk in and say, aahhh. It should smell great and feel great,” says Caravella, who has decades of experience as a designer, including years at Orrick & Co. and Mitchell Studio before starting her own firm. Her new boutique reflects her old-world-meetsnew-world sensibility as well as her love for mixing modern and traditional and a range of materials, from high gloss to earthy textures. For instance, she pairs Lucite lamps with an antique wood table, and Moroccan tiles with a giant modern light fixture.


NOW IN CONNECTICUT

above: The Surface showroom features a custom island designed by studioripostella topped with a custom fabricated Vetrazzo countertop by the Stone Workshop. The island was made by George Custom Cabinetry.

COOL SURFACE

A NEW SHOWROOM HIGHLIGHTS THE ORGANIC AND DRAMATIC BEAUTY OF STONE

COME VISIT OUR NEW SHOWROOM D ES I G N E D BY B RA D FO R D

PHOTOGRAPHY: COURTESY OF SURFACE

O

pening the doors to its new stone showroom in Westport, Surface is a design collaboration between Daniel Manetta and Mario Muralles, the owners of a custom stone fabrication company in Bridgeport, and Jo Ann Ceasrine, an artist and designer who specializes in custom design projects. Playing on the belief that the color and artistic beauty in stone always captivates, the new showroom portrays a “room environment,� where stone is creatively engineered and displayed with beautiful lighting, wall coverings, tile and plumbing. Surface sources its materials from Italy and other parts of the world, and it offers a vast selection of options that include new stone, porcelain and quartz materials that provide amazing design possibilities for fabrication. The team offers scheduled appointments to provide a comprehensive design experience for clients, and after a carefully articulated and extensive process in designing the showroom, Surface is excited to be an integral element of the design community in the metropolitan area. 1320 Post Road East, Westport; 475-999-8658; surfaceofwestport.com

A N D F U R N I S H E D BY FA I R . 1 3 9 E T H A N A L L E N H I G H W AY, R I D G E F I E L D

SPECIALIZING IN WOOD FLOORING, PA N E L I N G , A N D B E A M S . M I L L E D I N P I N E P L A I N S, N EW YO R K .

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house parties BUSINESS OF DESIGN Wakefield Design Center, Stamford

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6 1 George Snead, Beth Dempsey, Sandra Oster, Amy Vischio, Sandra Funk 2 Francine Gardner, Samantha Bertrand 3 Judith Fisher, Christin Engh 4 Lori MonteHubbard, Lora Mazurak 5 Tara Vessels, Callan Vessels 6 Molly Hirsch, Michele Fogarty, Beth Rosenfield 7 Beth Krupa, Victoria Vandamm, Britt Newman 8 Elisa Billings, Gwynneth Jones 9 Gianna Santoro, Victoria Meany 10 Tori McBrien, Ginny Losito

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Photography by Phil Nelson Photography

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house parties BUSINESS OF DESIGN

2018 WINNER

Wakefield Design Center, Stamford

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6 1 Elizabeth King, Carey Karlan 2 Jill Saunders 3 Sandra Oster, Sandra Funk, Amy Vischio 4 Kim Burke 5 Elena Phillips, Bobbie Sue Smart 6 Ellen Hyde Phillips, Donna Moss Photography by Phil Nelson Photography

Southport | Quogue | apdarchitects.com

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PHOTOS BY KRISTIN BURKE HYNES

LAST CALL! celebra ting

1 0 years

awards

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room service/ BOLD MOVES FIVE DESIGNERS USE COLOR TO MAKE A STATEMENT AND SET THE MOOD

Color is the ultimate power player. Whether a palette is monochromatic, warm or cool, subtle or strong, color has the ability to make us feel everything from cozy and comfortable to revived and energized. With spaces that range from fresh to fun to edgy, five designers describe how color pays off in every way.

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The scene: While this space was in a showhouse, we still created it with a client in mind. In this case, we envisioned a young mother with a few small children. She likes to host family events, but not in what might be considered a “traditional” way, so she wasn’t looking for anything too precious. The room read builder-grade and unfinished, and it lacked archi-

// M C C O R Y I N T E R I O R S

fun space that optimized the environment without coming across as too heavy or serious. We always start with a color story, and we were hungry for nice weather and beautiful colors, but we wanted to bring them to life in a lighter, more modern and crisp manner. From that point, we added dimension and detail to the space with soft hues echoing

tectural details or symmetry to define the space. With the house being set in a rather wooded area, we wanted to give her a light, bright space in which she could create family memories! The concept: Our design concept was based around the classic Northeast fight against the winter blues combined with a desire for a

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spring and topped it off with the perfect Hunt Slonem bunny. The color: Springtime was the driving force behind the color palette we chose, as it was a rather cold and bare winter. The window treatment fabric is a beautiful chinoiserie by Schumacher that really worked to influence the color scheme. I’d been obsessed

PHOTOGRAPHY: KYLE J. CALDWELL

kristen mccory


with it for some time, so it was a very kismet moment when it jumped out at me! The impact: The window treatments really played such a crucial role in setting the tone for this space. With so much natural light, the tones struck the perfect balance of “fresh and bright” against the exterior

environment, while also letting us walk the fine line between traditional and contemporary that we were working toward. Resource: Interior designer: McCory Interiors, Burlington; 860-922-8727; mccoryinteriors.com 

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michelle morgan harrison // M O R G A N H A R R I S O N H O M E

The concept: The architect,

James Schettino Architects, stacked the library’s two floors of shelf-lined rooms over each other and also created an opening in the second floor for light to spill from the skylight above; light just pours into the space. The open railing above allows you to peer below as well as up at the book-filled shelves. The second floor has window seat nooks for reading, and the first floor has a proper desk for working and a game table for playing chess.

The color: We knew we didn’t

want another gray library, and the deep blue steel gray was a rich choice that played off of some of the other fabrics in the house. Once we found the cowhide rug in the right shade, we tweaked the color of the paint to best coordinate with the area rug. The ombré curtains by Osborne & Little capture every shade of the steel blue and are the perfect window treatments.

area rug from Castelluxe— both are equal wows. You’re never supposed to have two wows in the same room, but since they’re monochromatic, they don’t compete. Resources: Interior designer: Morgan Harrison Home, New Canaan; 203-594-7875; morganharrisonhome.com Architect: James Schettino Architects, New Canaan; 203-966-5552; schettinoarchitects.com

interview with k athryn herman, d oyle herman design asso ciates | phot o gr apher neil l andino

The impact: It’s a tie between the

Builder: LSC, New Canaan and

Fine Paints of Europe high-gloss paint and the cowhide studded

Bridgeport; 203-972-9144;

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lsccompany.com

PHOTOGRAPHY: JANE BEILES; PORTRAIT: NEIL LANDINO

The scene: This home was new construction, and while the library is technically the husband’s office, it’s really for the entire family. The chess table and ottomans are for father and son to play against each other, and the son can also pull up to the main desk to work with Dad when he’s studying. The library was designed as a two-story space, and the second story is for the kids’ books. Each of the clients’ three children has a section, and they fill the shelves with their favorite reads.


denise davies The scene: This project was

a two-year labor of love. I combined two properties in bucolic Litchfield County for the clients, who use this palatial estate as their weekend escape from their Upper East Side apartment. This amazing waterfront oasis is on Lake Lillinonah and is situated on thirty acres in Bridgewater. The home was

built in the ’90s and was very dated. The main house is over 14,000 square feet and required a complete gut renovation inside and out. Every detail was meticulously designed by me and my team of architects and artisans; we changed every inch. This space in particular originally had brown wood cabinets and was traditional in style.

// D 2 I N T E R I E U R S

The concept: We designed this

colorful and fun room for the clients and their three kids, ages 6 to 9. It serves as the kids’ hangout space, a bar/kitchen for the pool and a grown-up entertainment space complete with a large-screen TV, pool table and foosball table. Because this room has full lake views and also serves as a pool house, the vibe is fun,

colorful and sophisticated with an organic feel. We absolutely love the custom Lucite coffee table filled with real gumballs. We handpicked the gumballs and designed the pattern of the table— the clients love it. Another highlight is the vintage hand chair. I found the chair in Miami on one of my shopping trips and had it recovered.


The color: Because this space has direct lake and infinity pool views, we wanted to play on the color palette of nature on steroids. The blues were key in mimicking the water. The impact: For sure, the hand-

painted cement tile on the bar is everything! The clients trusted me, and the result is amazing.

Resource: Interior designer: D2 Interieurs, Westport/Weston; 646-326-7048;

PHOTOGRAPHY: JANE BEILES; PORTRAIT: DEBRA SOMERVILLE

d2interieurs.com

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graham veysey

// G O O D B O N E S D E S I G N B Y G R A H A M V E Y S E Y


The scene: I designed this room for a husband who wanted a space to kick up his feet, watch sports and sip some tequila…oh, and it had to be familyfriendly, since they all pack in there: the wife, the kiddos and the dogs. The den was a reddish, dark-stained wood that we all vividly remember from the late ’90s, and it did not reflect my client’s taste at all. He is more modern, so we decided that instead of staining the entire room again, we would kick it up a notch and go with red. Luckily, he trusted me. The concept: I wanted the room to pack a punch when you walked in, but I also wanted it to feel like a warm hug, inviting you in to sit on the sofa and waste some time. The color: I had never worked with red, white and blue together, as it tends to feel very coastal. I wanted to spin the color combo on its head by leaning away from the coastal and leaning in for some funkiness. The Kyle Bunting zebra carpet certainly helped in that department.

PHOTOGRAPHY: TRISHA ESTILL

The impact: The client’s favorite part of the room is the Urban Electric pendant light, so I guess that answers the question! However, for me, the piece with the most impact is a toss-up: it’s either the light or the Kyle Bunting carpet—it’s bold, and it allows the room to distance itself from a typical coastal red, white and blue room. Resources: Interior designer: Good Bones Design by Graham Veysey, Greenwich; 203-340-9147; goodbonesdesign.com Accessories: Putnam & Mason, Greenwich; 203-900-1414; putnammason.com

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The scene: This space was

designed for a family of five who live nearby. They were looking for a place to house their vintage car collection as well as a space to create a party garage to hang out in and gather with friends and family. This space was originally used for a shipping business, so it was a wide-open, bare-bones space. There were no walls dividing the family room

// D B D E S I G N

activities into one space— there is a video game room loft, rock climbing wall, wraparound bar, dining space, and recording studio—as well as create cozy places to hang out, eat and drink, watch television and play games. We finished it off with flashes of color and an urban, off-thewall vibe. This was the perfect opportunity to push the limits with color and with the clients,

space and workshop, there was no upstairs loft, and there was a lot of brown paint. The concept: The idea was to seamlessly and safely combine a vintage car collection and a play space for kids and adults, and we wanted to be edgy and provocative while still being family-friendly. We tried to incorporate as many games and

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to marry a classic working garage with a party room, to showcase fun art, and to play with color and an edgy vibe. The color: The driving influence

behind the palette was that anything goes. Since the clients were car collectors, the cars would come and go, so we knew the colors wouldn’t always be the same. The rest of the space had

PHOTOGRAPHY: JANE BEILES; PORTRAIT: ALIX MARTINEZ

diana byrne


to be ready for anything, and it had to look great no matter what color cars were parked front and center in the garage. Because of this, I tried to incorporate as many different colors as possible throughout without making you feel dizzy or the space feel overdone.

made the most impact. There isn’t a lot of it, but it opened the door to a rainbow of tones. Resources: Interior designer: DB Design, 646-246-2617; dbdesigninc.com Builder: William Riehl, The WARJAM Group Ltd., Rye Brook, NY; 914-761-2500; warjamgroup.com

The impact: I think the graffiti

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this spread: Design Within Reach counter stools offer plenty of seating at the large kitchen island, where the young family of four often eats their meals. The pendant lights are from Circa Lighting.

interview with bro oke crew, bro oke crew interiors | phot o gr apher jane beiles

modern meld An infusion of contemporary elements , paired with a dose of pattern , updates an older home for a young family

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this page: With no need for a formal dining room, the clients opted for a breakfast nook that could just as easily host dinner parties. A set of wishbone chairs from Design Within Reach and a Currey and Company rattan pendant add warmth to the space. The artwork is by Lisa Kennedy. opposite: White oak floating shelves in the kitchen echo the existing beams in the ceiling. The built-in bar area, which was previously a closet, is painted the same color as the island: Benjamin Moore’s Cosmopolitan.

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Who lives here, and what was the overall goal for this project?

The clients are a young family with two young boys, and they wanted a modern look. This is an old house in Riverside, so we needed to achieve a balance between respecting the history of the house and respecting the client’s young and modern sensibility. In order to do that, the kitchen is where the dining room once was, the family room is where the kitchen was, and the mudroom was originally part of the garage. Did you help design any of these changes? The clients had a preliminary

plan when they hired me; an architect had drawn the structural elements. After seeing the plans, we reworked the kitchen and mudroom so those spaces would function how they needed them to. But the clients knew the layout—they knew the kitchen would become the family room, the dining room would become the kitchen. Those were all their ideas. So the breakfast nook needed to double as a dining room? The clients

entertain a lot, so we knew that area had to function as an entertaining area, but not like a formal dining room. We made the island really large so it’s like a kitchen table, and they eat there a lot. They had lived in the house for a few years and realized, “We don’t really need a formal dining room. That’s not who we are or how we live.”


above: By removing walls and relocating rooms, the kitchen, breakfast nook and family room now all flow seamlessly into each other. Light wood floors travel throughout the open space. opposite: All of the furniture in the family room is new, including the large custom ottoman covered in a Carolina Irving fabric. The animal-print rug is from Stark.

shelves, and that led to the rattan. We chose the wishbone chairs around the breakfast table because the counter stools are molded plastic, and the chairs felt a bit warmer against those.

What did you consider when deciding which colors to incorporate?

My concern was that if everything was too modern, it would feel cold and not like the house. So in the mudroom, we started with that wallpaper. The client liked the colorations of it, and with two young boys, the paper felt boyish, and we knew a dog shower was going in there. For the kitchen, I was afraid an all-white kitchen would be too stark, and it’s large in comparison to the other rooms. We did open shelving and a large pantry area, and we painted that taupe. For the family room, the prints are sort of modern interpretations of block prints, and they nodded back to the modern table and modern counter stools. And then the light fixture over the breakfast nook is a modern shape, but it’s rattan. We put in warm elements so it didn’t feel cold.

The mix of patterns in the family room is great. That’s just what I love

to do. I didn’t want to scare the client away with too many patterns, but I wanted to personalize the space. I thought if we did all modern solids, the room wouldn’t have interest. She actually loved the animal-print rug, and the window treatments are a stripe but a very subtle tonal stripe, so she was comfortable with those. The patterns on the window seat are modern in feeling, and she was drawn to those right away. I could see what she liked and what she was drawn to, and then I filled in the gaps.

Speaking of rattan, how did you choose materials and finishes?

In the kitchen, the beams had to be there for structural reasons, and the client wanted light floors. That’s what led to the white oak floating

And then the dog shower is amazing! We actually reworked the architect’s plans—we moved the shower around in order to get the cubbies in

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“We needed to achieve a balance between respecting the history of the house and respecting the client’s young and modern sensibility.” —brooke crew


this spread: The family room is a mix of modern and traditional and carefully chosen patterns. The roman shades are crafted from a Cowtan & Tout fabric, the patterned chairs are in a Carolina Irving selection, and the window seat back and seat cushions are in picks from Zak + Fox. The clients wanted a window seat in the room, so Crew extended and deepened the seat so the boys could lie down and read comfortably. athomefc.com

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“Each area needed to flow yet feel interesting

on its own.” —brooke crew

left: Carleton V wallpaper in a fun animal print adds a sense of whimsy to the mudroom. The dog shower was moved a bit to accommodate cubbies, and its low curb allows the clients to hang wet coats and sports equipment after practices and games.


and to separate it a bit more from the mudroom. There is also a pocket door that can close off this area if needed. With the wallpaper, I initially wanted something fun but not trendy, something that was an animal print, something that would make a statement since this space is off of the kitchen, which is white with wood tones. Since you can see all of these areas, each area needed to flow yet feel interesting on its own.

the dog shower is designed the way that it is, and that it’s not higher, is that the client also wanted a place to hang wet coats, dripping swimsuits and wet sports equipment. This was all her idea—she knows her family and what they need. I don’t have one favorite piece in this project, but I do think the mudroom ended up being the statement of the house. —interview by lauren fetterman

The tile floor is beautiful, too. What was the thought behind that choice?

Resources:

They’re an outdoor and sports family, and the kids play hockey. So my thought was, “This is an important area. They’ve waited for this, so let’s take it over the top and make it look as good as it functions.” The reason

Interior designer: Brooke Crew Interiors, brookecrewinteriors.com General contractor and millwork: JJM Building & Woodwork, johnjmetz.com Project management: HL Corbin, LLC, 202-262-1902

bottom: The Carleton V wallpaper continues in the powder room, located off of the mudroom. As they come in from the garage, the family can hang coats and store belongings in the built-in cabinetry. The tile covering the floor is from the Cement Tile Shop.

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this page: In the family room, two Thayer Coggin Twiggy lounge chairs in Holland & Sherry’s Brunswick fabric in Salt Water are pulled up to an Imperial ball foot ottoman from CF Modern. opposite: In the entry hall, coat closet doors were covered by Artistic Upholstery in Joseph Noble’s Wilbur vinyl in Wily and studded with nail heads; a Bocci 28.16 chandelier cascades down the main stairwell; a crown stitched natural cowhide area rug from TibeTano covers the dining room floor.


interview with amy aidinis hirsch, amy aidinis hirsch interior design, ll c | phot o gr apher amy vischio

MADE TO SUIT

An irresistible combination of luscious colors and midcentury moments

sets the tone for this Greenwich home

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“We are a fun and energetic family. We wanted these qualities represented in our home, so we chose bold and warm colors throughout.” —the homeowner

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below: Phillip Jeffries’ Silk and Abaca II wallcovering in Mediterranean Sea envelops the family room, while existing sliding doors provide privacy when needed. A Poliform Bristol sectional in Pollack’s Solo fabric in Caribbean adds another layer of color. “This is my favorite space,” says the homeowner. “I love the various shades of blue and the textured wallpaper. The large, cozy sofa allows all of us to kick back and enjoy being together while still appreciating the aesthetics of the room.” opposite: Branching sconces from The Future Perfect line the hallway into the family room, where an Infinity brass round wall mirror from CB2 is above the mantle. A Knowlton Brothers Halcyon console table from The Bright Group nods to midcentury design. The flowers throughout are from Green of Greenwich.

How did this project begin? The clients reached out to me because they

wanted to spruce up their home for their family of six. The client is very vibrant and loves pattern and color, and she came to me with a stockpile of colorful imagery and all of these ideas. What did the project entail? We ended up doing an extensive renovation

to the house, more so in the kitchen and master suite. Though we didn’t totally gut the kitchen, it did get a massive facelift—we reused the countertops, replaced the appliances and removed upper cabinetry to put in the new backsplash and floating shelves. We kept the construction of the lower cabinetry but refaced everything. In the butler’s pantry, we added this great resin-coated countertop, changed out the faucet and sink and added the backsplash and hardware. We changed the surround on the family room fireplace and also gave the clients a better den and workspace for the kids. Two powder rooms got a refresh, and then her closet and their master bath got a total redo. All of the furnishings were

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brand-new; we didn’t reuse anything. The only part that stayed were the kitchen countertops.

I was really inspired by what I was doing with Rooms With a View, and I implemented that into their home.

How did the plan for all of this come together? We created this master

How did the color palette evolve? I think the palette is wonderful in that

list with Julio DiBiase from Dibico and did the master planning ahead of time. The only rooms we didn’t touch were the children’s spaces and the living room. Dibico executed everything, and the client played an integral part. What I loved about it is that she wanted color. At the time, everybody was into gray and wanted this transitional approach, and the introduction of color and the saturation of green here were really energizing. That was the driving force behind what we were doing.

it changes. There’s this element of gold, and the shininess of it, and then this apple green—it makes you really happy when you see it. The family room is smothered in that seafoam blue and is kind of monochromatic, and as you leave that space, everything else is a bit brighter. There is a lot of white that offsets everything. The den is moodier and cozier, and we used Farrow & Ball Hague Blue in there. When we designed the kitchen, we went for this backdrop of green tile that says, “This is the statement.” You see it from the family room, you see it from the breakfast room, and with the connection it makes back to the dining room, it was a huge union. I think the colors speak to one another without competing.

What colors was the client drawn to? The aqua and the seafoam, and

then we introduced the green Gracie panel. She had shown me an image of Andy Cohen’s apartment, which was very stylish, and I think that’s what was missing. At the time, I was doing Rooms With a View, and I had done this closet. The client went crazy over it, and her closet stemmed from that.

Was there a particular starting point for you? There is a part of the client that is very traditional, and my background is a bit traditional, but she

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this page: The RangeCraft hood is just one of many showstoppers in the kitchen. opposite: Beneath a Ramirez chandelier from Arteriors Home, a custom banquette easily accommodates gatherings of any size. “Our family lives in the kitchen, so having a custom-designed breakfast nook was essential,” says the homeowner. “Now our large family can enjoy meals together without being cramped.”

“The introduction of color and the saturation of green were really energizing . That was the driving force behind what we were doing.” —amy aidinis hirsch


above left: Picking up the brass thread that runs through the home, the butler’s pantry features a New Ravenna Moderne waterjet stone mosaic backsplash from Greenwich Tile. The accessories are from Putnam & Mason. above right: A Thompson Traders Gari sink is paired with a Waterworks Henry one hole high profile bar faucet with metal cross handle. opposite: An ILVE Magestic range and Tom Dixon Mirror Ball pendants are additional standouts in the kitchen.


“The green backsplash makes the kitchen extremely inviting .” —the homeowner

above: Floating kitchen shelves are set against a stunning backsplash of Grove Brickworks Nori field tile in the Glossy finish from Waterworks. The green-hued selection was chosen for its old-world feel. athomefc.com

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this page: Comfy pillows, one in Holly Hunt’s Great Plains Casablanca fabric in Sea Mist and the other in Schuyler Samperton’s Caledonia fabric in Grasshopper from John Rosselli, pad the banquette.


this spread: Gracie Studio’s Greenfield hand-painted wallpaper is used to stunning effect in the dining room, where Baker Knapp & Tubbs cane side chairs sit underneath a Petal chandelier of polished gold and clear and white satin Murano glass from Edward Ferrell & Lewis Mittman. “The wicker bamboo chairs were the perfect choice for natural yet uniquely elegant seating for family and friends,” says the homeowner. A custom mirror brings an Art Deco feel to the space.

“I wanted a dining room that was warm yet felt continuous with our outdoor surroundings. The Gracie wallpaper does just that with its green color and playful imagery.” —the homeowner

did want an influx of midcentury pieces. In the family room, we tried to incorporate elements that were more midcentury instead of being ubertraditional. I think the mix is quite interesting. You’ll see it in the shape of legs, in the caning of the dining room chairs, how they’re more angular in the back; that’s not a traditional approach. The Saarinen table in the breakfast room is very iconic, yet the banquette has a channel back and is a bit more structured and traditional. That was our starting point, finding a way to blend these two elements together; it wasn’t necessarily the color. Is the family room where everyone tends to gather? This space is the

heart of the home. The sliding doors with the cut-outs were existing, and they offer privacy without completely closing off the room; they’re like graphic artwork. The Phillip Jeffries grasscloth was hands down the right choice because before, it was just white on white, and you couldn’t see the clever detailing that existed within the space. The furniture is more streamlined, a bit more modern, with little nuances of midcentury, like with the coffee table and the credenza. How did you know that green tile in the kitchen was “the one?”

It’s from Waterworks, so it has this very old world feel to it; it doesn’t look brand-new. I wanted to use a dominant color, and the client isn’t afraid of color, so I said, “If you’re craving color, let’s do it in a really big way. Let’s MAY/JUNE 2019

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this page: In the den, draperies were crafted from Holland & Sherry’s Prima Alpaca Bouclé fabric in Lavender Grey. Next to a BDDW Tripod lamp, a pair of chic Jonathan Adler Marcello lounge chairs are perfect for diving into a good book. opposite left: In the den workspace, a Beetle dining chair from the Danish Design Store is pulled up to a custom built-in with a live-edge walnut countertop. The room is grounded in Farrow & Ball’s Hague Blue.


not be so traditional with upper cabinetry; let’s do floating shelves on a really pretty background.” The color stemmed off the dining room, and the house does really well with green. Around the property, all you see is green—beautiful meadows, a garden with wild flowers—so it’s very natural. It was fitting that green was the color of choice.

a human scale, which some homes aren’t, and in situations like this, you have to be clever with the real estate that’s available to you. The butler’s pantry’s backsplash is beautiful, too. That was about picking

such a dominant role. The client wanted this kitchen to feel authentic, so we used unlacquered brass so it tarnishes. She wanted the stove and hood to be the showstopper, so we designed the kitchen around the hood, the lights and the brass. The brass is the thread, the connection, throughout.

up on the brass. If you look at the kitchen, the brass travels around the crown, where I inlaid this brass detail. I wanted this nook to feel very special, so we did this great Carrara marble with brass inlay, and the countertop is an amazing product from a Brooklyn artist that we use a lot. It’s brass encased in resin, and it almost looks like it’s floating. It’s burnished, so it has a patina, and it’s soft to the touch. I think butler’s pantries are meant to be little jewels. In this connection from one space to another, I think that’s important.

What led you to include a banquette in the breakfast room? Originally, they just had a table and chairs, and I thought that wasn’t conducive to a family of six, and that’s not including other people who come and go within the house. We took advantage of what was here by creating this banquette. It encompassed the space, which was great real estate, and maximized the size of the table and additional chairs. The rooms in this house are definitely comfortable, but they’re not enormous. It’s on

How did the dining room come together? It is a generous space, and originally, it felt a bit like a conference room. We kept the silver leaf on the ceiling as an homage to the past, and we added the beautiful wallcovering, which has a hint of blue in it. From the things the client had shown me, I really pushed the Gracie panel. As we were developing the master plan, we felt like the dining room was missing. I saw this beautiful Gracie panel, and it reminded me of her—she’s very feminine and loves flowers,

And how did you choose the metal? When I look at this home, brass plays

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“I especially love the use of pink and blue throughout our bedroom, providing a perfect balance of feminine and masculine

aesthetics.” —the homeowner

this spread: “I love the bed because of the tufting,” says Hirsch regarding the master bedroom’s king Ruché bed from Ligne Roset, topped with Euro shams covered in Cerney Floral fabric in Cameo from Stroheim. Elements such as the Hopsack Shaker wallpaper from Romo, Inc., drapes in Savile Row Sable fabric from Créations Métaphores, and the chaise dressed in King Mohair fabric in Champagne from Pollack marry the room’s masculine and feminine notes together. MAY/JUNE 2019

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“What brought me such joy is that this client really let me do my job. She let me bring ideas to the table and implement them. She was game for everything.” —amy aidinis hirsch

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this spread: A Larie chandelier from Arteriors Home crowns the client’s luxurious closet, and a custom ottoman in Issoria fabric in Blush from Zoffany NY is a comfy perch. A Cavallini Bianco hide from Edelman Leather is a textured backdrop for hanging clothing, jewelry and hats, and a selection of the client’s shoes is backed by a custom upholstered wall by Artistic Upholstery covered in Angora Mauve fabric from Duralee. “The closet is my own special place, and I love the color—it’s feminine, vibrant and fun,” says the homeowner. “I told Amy I wanted a space that reflected my personality, and she delivered. The different textures and pop of color make it both dynamic and inviting.”


above: Benjamin Moore’s Cherry Malt was the perfect shade of pink to make the space. In the hallway leading to the master bath, Hirsch set a Grey Mother of Pearl dresser in a gray resin finish from Mecox Garden against one wall of Ashley Woodson Bailey’s Into the Garden wallpaper in Blush,

and the color was so electric. I presented it to her, and she went for it, which was shocking. The beautiful Petal chandelier is graceful and traditional, but then, in the back, the custom-made mirror has an Art Deco feel to it. We did this great table and then a cowhide rug, so it’s a mix.

as intense as what was initially there, and it still grounded the space. We introduced femininity with orange, pink and lavender, and the beautiful nubby wool curtains offset that. The color combination is odd, but it just works really well. This is the perfect example that shows there are no rules with color. You can combine anything.

Does the whole family use the den? Yes, but it wasn’t practical before. Everything was behind a closed door, and having a desk in the middle of the room wasn’t user-friendly. This room wasn’t initially on the table, but we added it during the latter part of construction—the clients realized that if we didn’t finish this room, the other spaces were going to be more approachable. What I love about this room is the color combination and the fact that it has dual uses. It’s a great sitting area—the family reads a tremendous amount—and then on the opposite side, you have this fabulous custom built-in with a live-edge walnut counter, storage and a workspace for the kids. This space was darker before, and while this Hague Blue is darker than the turquoise in the family room, it wasn’t

The upholstered bed in the master suite is so chic. I’m in love with this

bed, and I love it because of the tufting. The key to this space was to make it feminine yet masculine. It was about marrying those together, and the blue on the walls, which is a vinyl paper that looks like textured raffia, was the marriage of that. Adding the blue and pink was like the yin and yang. The beauty of this bed is that it comes in two sizes, and we went for the higher headboard, which was the better choice. The bed is its own architecture within the space. The bedroom is long but not wide, so we centered the bed on the fireplace and added the seating area on the other side. There was no construction within this room; it was a total redecoration.

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above: In the master bath, the clients’ existing tub now sits on Kallista Thassos Carrara and Nero tile from Greenwich Tile. A milk glass countertop tops the vanity, and the Opus low profile three hole deck mounted lavatory faucet with crystal egg handles is from Waterworks.

How did you then make over her closet and their master bath? Her

What was the most rewarding part of this project? Their home is a

closet is a total jewel box; it’s crazy in every single way. It was originally a combination of an exercise room and closets that were all behind cabinetry. The closet I designed for Rooms With a View was a tiny, eightby-eight-foot space, and this space exploded because it’s so big. We were able to really play up what she needed and what was important to her. She wanted it to feel feminine, and while I don’t do pink often, it was the right move in this case. It has a bit of that bohemian style that she identifies with. I also love the walnut in here—I used it down in the kitchen and the den, and it was only fitting to carry it up to her closet; it’s another thread that travels through the house. The brass trim from the kitchen also came up here; it’s all cohesive. There’s also a textural element that comes into play with the upholstered elements and the lacquer. I didn’t want anything to feel unfinished. And the master bath was one area where we said, “Let’s not continue the femininity.” We kept it clean, changed the finish, did black and white and introduced nickel. It felt like a completely different space and also more masculine so the husband could use it as well.

representation of who they are, and I think that’s the best gift as a designer that I can give. I think this project is one of the best things I’ve done in a really long time. I don’t know if it’s because of the color or the choices, but I think that the most successful projects are when the clients truly trust you and let you use your creative energy. It’s not about me or anyone else; it’s about them. With that notion, there are no boundaries. What brought me such joy is that this client really let me do my job. She let me bring ideas to the table and implement them. She was game for everything. —interview by lauren fetterman Resources: Interior designer: Amy Aidinis Hirsch Interior Design, LLC, Greenwich; 203-661-1266; amyhirsch.com Contractor: Dibico, Inc., Greenwich; 844-434-2426; dibicoinc.com

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right: Glass-fronted doors lead into the foyer, where a custom Halo chandelier from Holly Hunt hangs overhead. Meighan Morrison’s “Untitled #101617” and wood accent pieces from Urban Zen and Bungalow add interest to the entrance. opposite: A Michele Raymond sculpture sourced from Bungalow sits on top of a Harlow bench from Holly Hunt, and a silk J.D. Staron rug is underfoot. The family room can be glimpsed beyond.

interview with lisa friedman, lisa friedman design

| phot o gr apher stacy bass

Color mixed with neutrals creates a sophisticated yet livable home that beautifully flows

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opposite: In the family room, a Holly Hunt sofa is upholstered in both a Holly Hunt leather and fabric. The custom coffee table, also by Holly Hunt, is composed of lacquer to match the Benjamin Moore shade Steam and bleached wood. A brass John Lyle screen covers the fireplace, and the wall-mounted ribbon wood art sculpture above the mantle is by Jeremy Holmes. below left: A pair of custom Matka silk lounge chairs by Mar Silver flanks a Caste Design side table. below right: A linen ottoman by Mar Silver offers an extra seat when needed. The coffee table accessories are from Bungalow, and the walls are painted in a custom shade.

How did this project come to be? The clients are a young professional

couple with two children, and they were referred to me by another client. This house was a custom waterside build in Westport, and the clients hired me fairly early on during the first set of plans, when they were still connecting rooms and planning spaces. It’s a very open, modern space with full anodized-steel-and-glass doors, glass within the house and bleached floors. The clients had two colors they wanted to use, and it was a very thoughtful process to determine how we were going to use color along with neutrals so each room felt like it belonged with the next. There was no place for the rooms to “hide” on the first floor, except for one or two, so it was an open space that had to flow beautifully. That was my job. Did you work with the architect and builder? I often sit with the architect

and builder on projects, but that wasn’t really the case here. I never

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this spread: Soft gray wool sheer draperies by Rogers & Goffigon frame the views to the water and gently filter light into the space. The custom rug and wood root sculpture are from Mar Silver, and the pillows are dressed in Great Plains and Loro Piana fabrics.


this spread: The family room flows directly into the kitchen, where brass notes include Holly Hunt dome pendants and a Newport Brass faucet. The Corian countertop and custom-designed glass chevron backsplash sourced from Karen Berkemeyer Home are reflective touches, and a wooden bench from Mar Silver is stowed under the island next to counter stools from Design Within Reach. Additional accessories, including the Michele Raymond sculpture, are from Bungalow.


above: At the island, the dinnerware and cutlery are from Design Within Reach. The window treatments in the breakfast nook are from The Shade Store, and the European hand-carved boards on a wood pedestal are from Bungalow. opposite: A Miele wall oven is accented with a brass handle in the kitchen, and the backsplash serves as an elegant backdrop for a Japanese Raku pitcher and cup on a handmade platter.

worked with the architect, and the only time I worked with the builder was once the house was under construction. The client would work on the plans and send them to me, I would give my input, and then she would go back to the builder. The client was the middle person, and it really kept the process fluid and clean. She knew what she wanted.

the color, and then it was important that the blue bled through the house. The family room is really soft, and we used the constancy of the bleached wood to keep the lightness. What I do is take one element in a room and bring it into the next. What I bring into the following room may not be the same element, but I always pick something, like bleached wood, a color or a metal finish, so there is a flow and it doesn’t look like, “Oh, my client wanted navy and orange, so I made it work.” That’s not what I did—I wanted it to feel organic and to keep a high level of sophistication. I think that’s an important message: You can have a sophisticated home and still make it usable.

And what was that? She wanted a modern space using her two favorite colors, navy and orange, and it needed to be family-friendly and have durability. They truly live in their home and have a black Lab, so the home had to be usable. The entire family was often part of the decision-making, especially with accessories—they were family discussions.

How did the family room come together? It came together like a dream; I can’t even explain it. That room is ethereal, in my opinion. We used wool and leather for durability, and the client wasn’t afraid to have off-white chairs because the material can be cleaned, and they respect it. Every single piece in that room was completely customized, and that’s true for the entire house. The room was a process, but I knew it was a home run, even while everything was on order. Since we worked from a floor plan before the house was completed, this footprint was embedded in my brain, and

How did you begin creating a palette that featured navy and orange?

We started with the kitchen. The client wanted a navy-and-white kitchen, and we chose a beautiful navy for the large wall of cabinetry. At the time, brass was on the cusp of becoming popular, but we didn’t want it to feel that way, so it was important that what I used would be beautiful, current and timeless. There are brass elements, but they’re used carefully and beautifully. I think the kitchen is smashing. That’s where we started with

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“It was a very thoughtful and careful process to determine how we were going to use color along with neutrals so each room felt like it belonged with the next.” —lisa friedman

In the dining room, reclaimed wood beams were added to the ceiling, entryways were opened up, and a Roberto Dutesco photograph printed on canvas, a treasured purchase by the clients, commands the spotlight. The chairs were customdesigned by KR Interiors and made by Chris Upholstery. opposite: The sultry powder room features “wooden” Élitis wallcovering and a vanity custom-designed by KR Interiors and built by Grace Design Build. The Prince photograph was a purchase from Morrison Hotel Gallery.


this page: A wall of custom navy lacquered cabinet doors with Colonial Bronze hardware makes a chic statement. opposite: The breakfast nook holds its own against the kitchen and family room. Fritz Hansen Grand Prix chairs are pulled up to the clients’ existing table, and the Matthew McCormick light fixture was a must-have. A linen, wool and jute rug by Stark rounds out the space.


“It was an open space that had to flow beautifully .

That was my job.” —lisa friedman

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above left: In the dining room, ceramic vessels from Bungalow are displayed on a Holly Hunt console crafted from bleached wood and hand-forged iron. above right: Phillip Jeffries’ Against the Grain wallcovering spans two levels of the focus wall behind the open glass staircase. The runner on the stairs is by Stark. left: The dining chairs, covered in a deep navy leather, and the bronze Spanning light pendant are by Holly Hunt. The ink blue silk rug is from Stark, and the art and accessories are from Bungalow, including the antique wooden Burmese gong carriers.

I knew what that room was going to be before I picked the first fabric. There are a lot of elements that come with good architectural and mathematical planning, and we made pieces to fit those requirements. The height of one of the sofas was important because there needed to be a clear view to the TV, and the arm heights were based on their ergonomics. There were a lot of specific details that went into the planning of that room, but the essence of the space was always there. How does the breakfast nook integrate into this open space? The area needed to maintain the kitchen and the family room since it’s all one space. We found that spectacular light fixture, and it just needed to be there. The table was hers—she had bought it for temporary use when they moved in, and it worked. We found those fabulous chairs in a white wood so they’re durable, and the rug was perfect. It’s minimalism at its best. It’s durable but white, and it’s hard to combine those two. It gives homage to the outstanding kitchen, and it didn’t fight the rooms but rather added to them. I didn’t want this area to be a detraction, but I also didn’t want it to be the baby sister; it was just as important as the other two spaces.


this page: The dining room’s remaining walls are wrapped in Phillip Jeffries’ Sateen Club silk wallcovering. An antique French dough bowl is centered on the Holly Hunt bleached wood dining table, and in the background, the niche showcases a Gêbas print photographed by Belgiumbased artist Serge Anton. A bench upholstered in a clover green velvet offers a comfortable perch, and an old Indonesian fisherman’s oar stands guard nearby.

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“You can have a sophisticated

home and still make it usable .” —lisa friedman

opposite top left: Backed by Phillip Jeffries’ Parisian cloth wallcovering, the lower-level family room is furnished with a Verellen linen sectional and coffee table. The artwork on the wall is by Paul Kremer. opposite top right: The kitchen area is accented with ember horizontal stacked tiles. An orange Puli pouf by Jonathan Adler brings in some color, and the Belgian linen chair with nubuck strap arms is from the South of France and sourced by Bungalow. The Balinese wooden figure from Urban Zen, the antique Han clay pots and the wooden painted prayer wall on a stand are additional points of interest. opposite bottom: Pillows made from vintage Moroccan textiles sourced by Bungalow dot the sofa. Additional finds include a Thai Albizia Saman wood side table from Bungalow, a metal sword with carved wood handles from Urban Zen and an antique Moroccan hand-painted pedestal bowl. this page: The lowerlevel cabana bath and laundry area features glossy orange penny rounds. A braided-raffia-and-rope ottoman from Bungalow is seated next to a white Belgian linen chair from the South of France, and extra towels are stashed in a woven string basket from Bungalow.


opposite: In the husband’s office, two custom pumpkin-colored leather Herman Miller Eames lounge chairs and ottoman incorporate one of the clients’ desired colors. Knoll stacked pedestal tables in Studio White sit in between, and an Arne Jacobsen floor lamp offers a reading light when needed. The rug is by J.D. Staron, and motorized Solar Shades soften the natural light. The artwork is Meighan Morrison’s “Untitled #X12819A.” left: A Maori tribe black-and-white photograph and “Untitled #61617” by Meighan Morrison create a vignette in the corner along with a wood root side table and vessel from Bungalow. right: The office builtins are painted in Benjamin Moore’s Ozark Shadows to match the walls. A Knoll Ufficio Tecnico 1971 Spoleto side chair sits on one side of the Herman Miller desk, while an Eames Executive desk chair with custom leather sits on the other. Giobagnara leather desk accessories keep items organized.

By keeping it white and adding in the bleached wood elements, those chairs that make a statement, and the rug that makes a huge statement, we accomplished that.

and beautiful woven baskets and, keeping within the use of color, carried through the Zen-like feeling I create. Do you have a favorite piece in this home? I have two: the family room window treatments and coffee table. The window treatments were the first element I chose for that room, and while they’re a gray neutral, they emanate a soft lavender tone that says, “We’re bringing color into a neutral space.” The coffee table was a dark wood ottoman table with tufted green leather, and it became this dream of lacquer and bleached wood. It’s functional yet breathtaking.

What was the concept behind the dining room? The client wanted a navy

dining room. We were going to keep the walls white, but as we worked more and more in that room, we talked about painting the walls navy, but I thought that would be too cold. So, to create warmth, we went with a beautiful silk Phillip Jeffries wallcovering that wraps the room. Standing in the room, it’s a navy room, but if you’re passing through the house and see the reflection of the wallcovering, it embraces and anchors that room. We went with lightweight, sheer window treatments so light could come in, navy leather chairs for durability, and bleached wood to keep some light in the space. She fell in love with the light fixture early on, and the rest evolved.

What do the clients think of the end result? They love it—it’s what they

wanted. They brought in the art, and I approved it; it was definitely a collaboration. The aesthetics plus functionality was of the utmost importance to them. The client told me that when she sits in the family room, she can’t believe it’s hers. She said she feels like she’s in a magazine. The clients are very smart and knew what they needed and wanted, and I’m so happy I was able to deliver it. —interview by lauren fetterman

I see some orange in the lower-level family room. Tell me about that.

This was a space where the children could hang out with their friends and the clients could entertain, and you can access the pool and outdoors from here. We chose the orange penny rounds in the cabana area, and we knew orange would be an integral part of that space. I wanted it to be whimsical yet practical and to be the same level of sophistication as the rest of the house. We carefully integrated the color and materials, and we took our time planning the space so it functioned the way they wanted. The main thought was orange, and we found a neutral that looked beautiful with orange, and the rest is history. I used a lot of textures, whimsical pillows

Resources: Interior designer: Lisa Friedman Design, Westport; 203-292-8568; lisafriedmandesign.com Project manager: Jenna Friedman Builder: Coastal Construction Group Accessories and styling: Bungalow, Westport; 203-227-4406; bungalowdecor.com

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last word/COLOR INFUSERS

THE PROS SHARE WAYS TO SOAK YOUR HOME IN ASSORTED HUES

Every spring, color makes a comeback.

Inject the hues you love into your home and see your favorite spaces in a new light. From tile to fabric to paint, there are so many ways to set a new tone:

AMY ANDREWS

MELISSA LINDSAY

HOLLY JAFFE

BUFFY GOODWIN

AMY ZOLIN

AMY ANDREWS FOR HILTON INTERIORS hiltonarchitects.com

PIMLICO INTERIORS pimlicointeriors.com

WOWHAUS wowhaus.com

DEANE, INC. deaneinc.com

CLARITY HOME INTERIORS clarityhomeinteriors.com

PAINT:

BENJAMIN MOORE FAN CORAL As much as I love tone-on-tone neutral palettes, recently I’ve been wanting to put warm coral tones into my schemes. Maybe it’s the Pantone Living Coral color of the year, a tropical spring break or the long winter? But I envision a living room with Benjamin Moore’s Fan Coral on the walls. Filled with textured cream-colored upholstery, it’s an inviting space, centered on a huge ottoman covered in the gorgeous Lance Woven Leather Croce Linea weave. Everyone can gather and put up their feet!

PAINT:

FINE PAINTS OF EUROPE DUTCH DOOR GREEN

This luxurious raised velvet fabric gives a distinct nod to Art Deco but still feels like a unique geometric pattern with a very current color story. I love the purple-mauve mixed with champagne undertones. This fabric would make a great statement upholstered on the back of dining room chairs. I would pair it with warm beige and gold tones (versus a predictable cool palette).

I’ve always loved green—in fashion, in furniture and, recently, in cabinetry! It gives a rich, sophisticated and surprisingly fresh look to a kitchen, bar or butler’s pantry. I love deep teal, emerald green and my new favorite, Dutch Door Green, from Fine Paints of Europe. It evokes images of old estate doors and shutters but can be used seamlessly in a transitional or contemporary space in a high gloss or even matte finish. It also pairs beautifully with warm bronze or satin brass hardware and even a weathered, rift cut wood trim detail.

TILE:

LUNADA BAY HANDMADE GLASS MIZUMI TILE IN CLOUD At Wowhaus, we love this tile in the kitchen for a backsplash. The hand-hewn quality of the glass, with its beautiful surface irregularities, captures and reflects light and enhances the marble, wood and hardware of countertops and cabinetry. We did it in a custom blend of natural (clear), pearl (iridescent) and silk (translucent white). It bathed the kitchen in an ever-changing kaleidoscope of light.  

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WALLPAPER:

CHRISTOPHER FARR CARNIVAL IN MOSS At Maison & Objet, the Paris launch for fabric houses, pink was everywhere. I’m passionate about the Christopher Farr Carnival print from the archive of Michael Szell, a fabric designer from the ’70s. The pattern is fresh and lively, and the color is transformative. I can imagine this paper on the ceiling of a woman’s dressing room. I would paint the cabinets in the subtle olive color and add window treatments in the same printed linen fabric. Très chic!

PORTRAITS: AMY ANDREWS: NEIL LANDINO; MELISSA LINDSAY: AMY VISCHIO; HOLLY JAFFE: CONTRIBUTED; BUFFY GOODWIN: KAREN MORNEAU; AMY ZOLIN: CHICHI UBIÑA

FABRIC:

CASTEL MAISON GROPIUS IN BROWN AND NATURAL


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athome Magazine, May/June 2019  

athome Magazine, May/June 2019