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Ng HM and Fadeyi MO (2020). Development of a solution to optimise the process for consolidating asset information into asset information requirements (AIR) template. Built Environment Applied Research Sharing #02, ISSUU Digital Publishing Platform.

Š BEARS reserves the right to this applied research article

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Development of a solution to optimise the process for consolidating asset information into asset information requirements (AIR) template Ng Hui Min and Moshood Olawale Fadeyi,* Sustainable Infrastructure Engineering (Building Services) Programme, Singapore Institute of Technology, 10, Dover Drive, Singapore 138683, Singapore *Corresponding author’s email: fadeyi.moshood@singaporetech.edu.sg

ABSTRACT The maintenance and operations of building to ensure suitable building performance require consolidation of complete and accurate building asset information. The consolidation of building asset information is done in the asset information requirement (AIR) template. The AIR template is designed according to the building owner’s requirements. The risk of consolidating inaccurate asset information into an AIR template increases with an increasing number of building asset information to be consolidated. The current practice in the industry involves manual on and forth coping of critical asset information from PDF file and pasting on excel template cell by cell. This practice causes more time to be spent on consolidation. To reduce the time taken, companies usually deploy more several staff to do consolidation tasks. The risk of errors occurring in the current manual consolidation practice is high due to inherent human error. An automated solution was developed and tested to examine how it could aid accurate consolidation of building asset information into an AIR template within a short period and with potential for lesser manpower. The developed solution reduces the time taken to consolidate asset information into an AIR template by 99% with zero error. The developed solution also reduces the need for experienced staff to do the consolidation. The findings suggest the number of staff required, even with a large building with many critical assets can be reduced significantly. The solution developed and reported in this paper is essential to the effort needed to improve productivity in the facility management industry.

Keywords: Facility management, Asset information, Asset Information Requirements (AIR), Digital Facility Management, Productivity

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BEARS #02 1. INTRODUCTION Facility managers and technicians depend heavily on building asset information in the delivered as-built drawings and the operation and maintenance manual to perform their duties efficiently and effectively (Love et al. 2015). Thus, appropriateness, accuracy, completeness, and creditability of the delivered building asset information at the design, construction, and occupancy stages are essential. As technology advances, appropriateness, accuracy, completeness, and creditability of the building information can be expected to improve. Building information modelling (BIM) is identified in the industry as a means of using digital technology to eliminate wastes and deliver value through the integration of the process of infrastructure delivery and people involved in the process. People involved in the process will benefit from digital technologies, and their productivity will improve if the information generated is well documented and updated. The documentation and updating of building asset information are of particular importance to people involved in the management and operations of buildings. To increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the current facility management practice, the BIM model should be integrated with building asset information to enhance asset management productivity. The integration will facilitate the exchange of building asset information throughout the lifecycle of the asset, especially the critical asset (Patacas, 2016). In facility management terms, critical asset refers to assets which are utilised in the building operation, such as space and building system equipment. When integrating BIM models with asset information, it is important to understand and define asset information requirements (AIR) appropriately and to ensure that all the required critical asset information is accurate and defined according to the owner’s requirements (Cavka et al., 2017). Asset information should be accurately integrated into the building architecture and mechanical, electrical, and plumbing (MEP) BIM models to optimise the usability of BIM models for facility management and operations. The integration of building asset information with BIM models will also facilitate effective usage of a facility management information system such as a computerised maintenance management systems (CMMS), energy management system (EMS), and building automation system (BAS). However, the main issue with the integration of asset information with BIM models is to ensure accurate consolidation of asset information into an AIR template. The consolidation of asset information usually 3


BEARS #02 requires information to be keyed in manually from several sources. The number of building assets might be in hundreds or thousands, depending on the building size. By keying building asset information manually, human error is likely, causing the information to be inaccurate. Furthermore, the fragmented and incompleteness of the building asset information would lead to more time needed to consolidate critical assets information into an AIR template. Inaccurate building asset information would increase the risk of maintenance failure (Holmgren 2016). There is a need to develop a solution that will ensure the accuracy of consolidating building asset information into an AIR template in an efficient manner. This present study aims to provide a solution that can improve the current process of consolidating the building asset information into an AIR template. The objectives of the study are to explore the development of a solution that could (i) reduce the time taken in consolidating building asset information into an AIR template (ii) potentially reduce manpower needed to generate and validate the building asset information consolidated into an AIR template, and (iii) increase the accuracy of consolidating asset information into an AIR template. 2. CURRENT SITUATION IN THE INDUSTRY This section discusses current AIR adoption in the industry. The focus is on AIR current market strategies and AIR standard and template. 2.1

Current practice in the industry

AIR template is supposed to be tailored according to the client’s requirements (Cavka et al., 2017). AIR template defines the type of asset information required throughout the assets lifecycle, which will affect the operation and maintenance process. It is crucial for asset information in an AIR template to be updated regularly to enhance knowledge and information management, especially when the following takes place: significant addition and alterations works, changing of assets, a new installation of assets, and change in client’s requirements (Argyres, 1999). The typical asset information needed to be recorded in an AIR template is the description of assets, vendor details, operational asset data, and asset dependencies (Australasian BIM Advisory Board, 2018). However, the required building asset information is fragmented between systems and across the whole building lifecycle.

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BEARS #02 Accurate consolidation of building asset information into an AIR template is one of the main tasks required to facilitate effective BIM implementation in facility management practice. However, consolidation of asset information into AIR templates are usually done manually in the industry. Building asset information can be retrieved from building information received, equipment list, BIM models, and onsite verification photos. During the onsite verification, photos of assets nameplates are taken for the consolidation of building asset information. Several sources of asset information cause difficulty in the consolidation. The compiler would need to refer across multiples sources to complete the consolidation of critical asset information. Such practice creates an avenue for errors to occur in the consolidation. Currently, the Standard of Procedures (SOPs) in place to minimise error is to have different people to verify the accuracy of consolidated building asset information in an AIR template. This results in the consolidation process of asset information to be time-consuming and requires a high number of workforce. Currently, in the market, no solution is able to quicken the consolidation process and ensure all asset information in the AIR template is accurate. A solution that can help bridge this gap is needed.

2.2

AIR Standard and Template

Consolidation of asset information, usually stored in PDF format, for all critical assets, should at least have all the information listed in the AIR template example shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Critical asset information required in an AIR template (Source: Building and Construction Authority, 2018)

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Under COBie Standards, the minimum information for all critical assets required to be in an AIR template are Type Name, Category, Type Description, Manufacturer, Model Number, Expected Life, Component Name, Storey Number (Level), Location, Component Description, Serial Number, Installation Date, Warranty End Date, and Asset Identifier. However, critical assets information available in practice is usually different from the information listed in COBie Standards. Building owners typically engage BIM professionals and real estate management team to revise the asset information required in an AIR template.

A local company that provides digital facility management (DFM) services developed an AIR template relevant to the local industry based on the type of information which is critical while conducting maintenance. Information in the local company’s DFM AIR template can be found mostly in all equipment’s nameplate. The information includes Equipment Type and Description, Equipment Label (Asset Code), Floor (Level), Room Name, Local Motor Control Panel (LMCP), Manufacturer, Brand, Model Type, Capacity, Serial Number, Installation Date, Warranty Expiry Date, and Vendor information. However, consolidation of asset information is still done manually.

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DEVELOPMENT OF SOLUTION

The practice of automating the consolidation of asset information into an AIR template is new to the FM industry. Thus, there is very little information to support the automation process we intend to produce. To gather more information, several research methods were adopted to show the difficulties which the current industry faced in the consolidation of asset information into an AIR template and why automated process is important. Firstly, interviews were conducted to gather feedbacks on the current manual process of the asset information consolidation into an AIR template. Secondly, experiment was conducted to examine the time taken and accuracy to consolidate AIR information by comparing the developed automated solution and the current manual practice in the industry. 3.1

Interviews

Interviews were conducted with a group of people with experience in the manual consolidation of asset information into AIR templates to understand the difficulties which users usually faced. 6


BEARS #02 The understanding provided insight into how the difficulties can be solved. Information was gathered through phone interviews. Ten staff from a local company offering DFM services were interviewed. Figure 2 shows the typical process, as gathered from the interviewees, of consolidating asset information into an AIR template. The on and forth coping of critical asset information from PDF files and pasting on excel template cell by cell can take several days of work when working on large buildings. The interviewees revealed that the tedious effort can be mentally draining and make the staff lose focus, thereby resulting in incomplete and inaccurate consolidation of asset information in an AIR template in excel format. All the interviewees thought automation of the entire process of consolidating the asset information will help reduce the time and number of manpower used in this process. However, all of them are still not able to find alternative solution to improve the entire consolidation process.

Figure 2: Typical process of consolidating asset information at facility management (FM) stage 3.2

Prototyping Process

From the interview results, the importance of automating the consolidation process was recognised. Before creating the prototype, research was conducted on the type of software to be used before creating an Automated AIR Template. 3.2.1 Prototype Software Microsoft Excel is an international spreadsheet programme which is commonly used around the world. Excel is applicable in a situation when the consolidation of information is needed to be integrated with third-party software to develop a dashboard. Excel's ability to support Visual 7


BEARS #02 Basic for Applications (VBA) – a programming language for accessing data from external sources – makes its usage very popular. In DFM practice, the AIR template is consolidated using Microsoft Excel, as the information will need to be integrated into a third-party platform. The developed Automated AIR Template reported in this paper will be using Microsoft Excel to solve the problem of consolidating asset information into the AIR template. 3.2.2 Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) Programming software is required to automate the process of consolidating asset information. With the function of VBA, the consolidation of asset information can be done semiautomatically. VBA works similarly to other programming software, such as C++ Programming, that allows code to be written to automate the overall process of consolidating asset information. The embedment of VBA into Excel enables users to create tables for filling in information automatically. 3.2.3

Automated AIR Template design

The user interface of the developed Automated AIR Template should be easy to understand and in accordance with the AIR Standard set by COBie. The prototype solution is expected to be implemented into the DFM services working process of consolidating asset information. Thus, the prototype solution should adhere to the AIR template standard in the DFM services. As the main functions of the developed solution are to allow users to upload multiple PDF files and extract information from the PDF files into the developed Automated AIR Template, there should be two buttons clearly showing the icon for uploading of the folder (Browse) and extracting of information from PDF files. Asset information should be categorised into different types of building services to provide a more organised and clearer display of information for all critical assets. With more organised structure, clients or technicians will be able to find specific asset information efficiently. Figure 3 shows the user interface of the developed Automated AIR Template, which is a default page that users will see once they open the file. The Automated AIR Template is not complicated as it is straightforward, which even users with no experience in consolidating asset information into an AIR template will know what they need to do. The information reported in this paper will also serve as guidance for new users to know the critical information needed in the AIR template and how to consolidate the information.

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Figure 3: A user interface of the developed Automated AIR Template

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BEARS #02 3.2.4 Programming of Prototype The following are the basic working principles of the developed prototype solution. Step 1: Upload function which allows users to upload the folder containing different PDF files of the building equipment list, operation, and maintenance Manual, etc. Step 2: Users to click on Extract function, which indicates the start of the extracting information process. If a user forgot to upload a PDF folder, a pop-up message would prompt the user to upload. The user will also be guided to where to upload. Step 3: Identification of the PDF folder where information will need to get extracted from. Step 4: Conversion of all PDF files into Excel files.. Step 5: After conversion, converted excel files will be added into the working file as new sheets named “Setting”. Step 6: Information will be copied from the “Setting” sheet into the main working sheet of the working file under the following criteria: 

Identification of the matching building services in which the copied information will be pasted on by detecting keywords.

Identification of the column header of which information in the “Setting” sheet belongs to and paste the information

. Steps 1 and 2 are action-based coding, which requires users to perform a specific action for the coding to start and proceed to the next step. Steps 3 to 6 are based on backend coding. The users will not be able to see the programme running. They will only be able to see the result in the developed Automated AIR Template. The coding for the developed solution is separated into three main parts which consist of Uploading Function, Extracting Information Function, and Copy Paste Function. Function 1: Uploading Function Coding Figure 4a shows the coding, which allows users to select the folder which contains the PDF files. Firstly, it identifies a name for picking PDF Folder name as PDFFldr and sets it to the Excel application function, which is a Folder picker. Secondly, a pop-up window will prompt the user to select the desired PDF Folder, as shown in Figure 4b. Lastly, the coding will identify the path of the folder and display it on the AIR template. After completing the overall coding for Uploading Function, it is crucial to assign the set of coding to the “Browse” button, as 10


BEARS #02 shown in Figure 4c. This is to ensure the set of coding will be activated after the user clicked onto the “Browse” button.

A

B

C

Figure 4a: Uploading function coding; Figure 4b; Excel PDF folder selection pop-up window; Figure 4c: Automated AIR Template “Browse” button.

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BEARS #02 Function 2: Extract Function Coding Extract function coding is the crucial part of the developed Automated AIR Template which will perform PDF file conversion to Excel, and the combination of converted excel files with an active working file. Before the extraction of asset information, there are times when users forgot to upload their PDF folder. Hence, the developed Automated AIR Template should be able to identify if the PDF folder path was left empty. Figure 5a shows the set of coding, which will prompt users and guide them to upload their respective PDF folder. After identifying that users did not upload their PDF Folder, the message pop-up box will first pop-up to notify users about the issue, as shown in Figure 5b. Then they will proceed to upload their folder.

Figure 5a: Coding which will prompt users and guide them to upload their respective PDF folder.

Figure 5b: Message pop-up box to notify users

After users uploaded their PDF folders containing all the PDF files to extract information from, the developed Automated AIR Template will need to be able to identify where the PDF folder is and which of the files in the folder are in PDF format. Figure 5c shows the coding that aid the Automated AIR template identification of PDF folder and files. 12


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Figure 5c: Coding that aid the Automated AIR Template identification of PDF folder and files

Coding involving loops was developed to identify the files in PDF format. ‘For Loop Function’ is utilised in the set of coding stated in Figure 5d after identifying which PDF folder to extract the files from. The set of coding will run through all files in the PDF folder and identify if there is a PDF formatted file. If PDF formatted file is identified, the programme will open the file with Microsoft Word, select all contents in the document and copied all the selected contents.

Figure 5d: Coding that aids the Automated AIR template identification of PDF formatted files in folder

A new sheet will be created and named as “Setting” which all the copied contents from Microsoft Word will be pasted on. Figure 5e shows coding for extracting PDF information into Setting. However, the template in the “Setting” sheet, See Figure 5f, is not identified as the AIR Standards. Hence, asset information will need to be copied and pasted over to the “Automated AIR Template” sheet which follows COBie and DFM standards.

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Figure 5e: Coding for extracting PDF information into Setting

Figure 5f: Setting Sheet with PDF information Function 3: Copying Paste Coding In Function 3, the set of coding will be able to perform the action of copying information from the “Setting” sheet and paste on the Automated AIR Template sheet based on the criteria identified in Function 2. Firstly, the coding will need to perform the main criteria, which is to identify the type of asset information from the “Setting” sheet to be pasted in the Automated AIR Template sheet by just detecting the keywords. Figure 6a shows a set of coding for finding matching asset information. The selected information will be copied and pasted onto the Automated AIR Template sheet according to which asset it belongs to.

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Figure 6a: Coding that aids the identification of matching building services information

As the column header of Setting and Automated AIR Template sheets are named differently, mapping of the column header was listed on a hidden sheet as a backend setting. Figure 6b shows coding for finding matching column information by running through information in each column. If matching header were found, asset information would be copied and pasted onto the mapped column. After going through the three functions, the Automated AIR Template will be filled with critical assets information of different building systems– see Figure 6c. The sets of coding also help to remove empty rows between the information, which allows the developed Automated AIR Template to be more compact.

Figure 6b: Coding for finding matching column information

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Figure 6c: End Result of Automated AIR Template

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4.

METHODOLOGY FOR TESTING SOLUTION EFFECTIVENESS

The experiment was conducted to test the effectiveness of the developed Automated AIR Template and have insight into improvement needed and its possible application in the market. The Automated AIR Template solution is developed to ensure the users will need to upload their asset information, and the solution will be able to extract and tabulate the information according to the AIR standard template automatically. Even if the process had been shortened, the accuracy of the information should not be compromised, and it should be 100% accurate. Additionally, users with no experience in consolidating AIR information should still be able to use the solution. Six participants were recruited to fulfill the objectives of the study. Three of the participants have experience in consolidation of asset information into an AIR template while the other three participants have no such experience. Only six people were recruited for the study because the main goal is to get an indication of the effectiveness of the developed Automated AIR Template. We believe that preliminary adoption or a field study of the developed Automated AIR Template in actual practice in the industry will be more appropriate to confirm its effectiveness. The three participants with experience were from a company in Singapore, providing DFM services. The other three participants without any experience asset information consolidation in the AIR template have a building services engineering background. Asset information consolidation training was provided to participants with no experience before the start of the experiment. Each participant was involved in two sets of experiments. The first set of experiments involved the manual entry of data from PDF file to conventional AIR template. The second set of experiments involved the use of the developed Automated AIR Template to consolidate asset information. A total of 42 critical assets were used for the study. The time taken to complete each experiment was recorded. The participants did not participate in the experiment at the same time. The experiments were conducted at the agreed time by the participants. Each of the participants did their experimental sessions in an air-conditioned room. Efforts were made to ensure the participants were comfortable with the indoor environmental conditions and were feeling well throughout their experimental sessions. Time taken by each participant to consolidate asset information into an AIR template was recorded. The time recorded was the actual time spent by the participants in completing the consolidation of AIR information. The 17


BEARS #02 time taken for breaks or questions on the consolidation of asset information was excluded. The authors anticipated that the possible stress caused by the manual entry of AIR information could lead to employees to take many breaks, including breaks to relax or go to toilet and other needs that may ease their stress. Break time could also be a source of errors in the consolidation of asset information. The developed solution was tested several times to ensure that the information extracted will be accurate and avoid any problems that might be left undiscovered in the development of the solution. The measure was taken to ensure the Automated AIR Template solution is error-free for users to use. Any unforeseen problem with the developed Automated AIR Template may be a source of error in experimental data. All AIR template submitted, after the manual and automated solution, by each participant were checked three times for possible errors. The principle behind the error check is described below. A full (100%) check of all asset information in the AIR template was conducted. When no error was found, the second round of checking was conducted because it was possible to have missed one due to human error. In the second round of checking, 50% of the asset information across all building systems was randomly checked. When no error was found, the final round of checking was conducted on 25% of the asset information randomly checked across all building systems in the AIR template. Whenever errors were found in any round of checking, the type and quantity of error found were documented. Checking of information did not proceed to the next stage when an error was found. The next stage of checking will only proceed after correcting all the errors.

5. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 5.1

Time taken in consolidating asset information into AIR template

The primary purpose of the Automated AIR Template is to have a single button that will allow the accurate transferring of asset information in several PDF files into the AIR template with a single click. The time taken when asset information was consolidated manually and automatically consolidation process is not the same as expected. Table 1 shows the comparison between the time taken by all the participants, irrespective of their experience status when required to use the manual and automated method of consolidating asset information. It was observed that participants took between more than 25 minutes and about 1 hour 15 minutes for the manual method. However, when the participants used the developed automated solution, 18


BEARS #02 the time taken by the participants was from 22 seconds and up to 39 seconds. On average, the time recorded for using the developed Automated AIR Template is 28 seconds while the manually consolidated asset information, on average, 2588 seconds. There is a 99% time saving when automated method – the developed Automated AIR Template is adopted. The finding shows that the developed automated solution could significantly reduce the time taken to consolidate asset information into an AIR template. Table 1: Time taken by all the participants when manual and automated methods are adopted to consolidate asset information into an AIR template.

5.2

Consolidation of asset information using manual method – Time Taken (h:m:s)

Consolidation of asset information using the automated method – Time Taken (h:m:s)

0:25:45 0:35:50 0:30:35 0:40:50 1:15:20 0:50:30

0:00:23 0:00:22 0:00:25 0:00:39 0:00:32 0:00:28

Impact of experience on time taken to consolidate asset information

On average, the experienced participants spent 1843 seconds, while non-experienced participants spent 3333 seconds. Thus, the difference between experienced and nonexperienced participants was 1490 seconds. However, when an automated method – Automated AIR Template – was adopted, the need for the experience was reduced. The difference in the average time spent between experienced participants and nob-experienced participants was only 10 seconds. On average, the experienced participants spent 23 seconds, while non-experienced participants spent 33 seconds. What the findings mean is that new staff with no experience can complete the consolidation of asset information into an AIR template in a short possible time if the automated method is adopted. Table 2: Comparison between the time taken by experienced and non-experienced participants to consolidate asset information when manual meth is adopted Consolidation of asset information using manual method Experienced participants – Time Taken (h:m:s)

Non-experienced participants– Time Taken (h:m:s)

0:25:45 0:35:50 0:30:35

0:40:50 1:15:20 0:50:30

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Table 3: Comparison between the time taken by experienced and non-experienced participants to consolidate asset information when automated process is adopted Automated consolidation method using Automated AIR Template

5.3

Experienced participants – Time Taken (h:m:s)

Non-experienced participants – Time Taken (h:m:s)

0:00:23 0:00:22 0:00:25

0:00:39 0:00:32 0:00:28

Experienced vs Non-Experienced Participants Accuracy of information

All generated information by participants during the experiment were consolidated and verified against the original equipment list. After conducting the 100% check of all information, there were errors found in the submission of the non-experienced group. One common mistake was that they copid the wrong Equipment Type and Description from the equipment list, as shown in Figure 7.

Figure 7: Error found in consolidated AIR (left) compared to correct information (Right)

After conducting a 100% check on the manually consolidated information, errors were found in the AIR template submitted by 3 of the 6 participants. Out of the 3 participants, 2 participants were from the non-experienced group. After that, 50% check was conducted after rectification 20


BEARS #02 was made to the identified errors. Errors previously not identified errors by adopting the 100% check. After conducting a 50% check, errors were found in the AIR template submitted by 4 participants – 2 participants each from the experienced and non-experienced group. This observation means committing errors when manually consolidating asset information into the AIR template does not depend on users having experience or not. Even with the experienced staff, errors can still be committed mostly due to human errors. As errors were found during the 50% check, the authors did not proceed to conduct a 25% check on the manually consolidated AIR information.

Instead, checks were made to consolidate asset information into the AIR template automatically. No error was found after conducting the 100% check. Thereafter 50% check was conducted, and no error was found in the consolidated asset information. The authors proceeded to conduct a 25% check on the automatically consolidated asset information in the AIR template. No error was found after conducting the 25% check. Being through the three stages of verification check with no error suggests that the developed Automated AIR Template has the capability of ensuring the accuracy of information when extracting the information within a short period of time.

5.4

Discussion

The shortage of qualified and skilled manpower is a major problem in many companies providing DFM services. Additionally, staff may have to handle several projects at the same time with limited deadlines. The shortage of manpower and pressure posed by one staff handling several projects at the same time within limited deadlines will increase the vulnerability of staff to committing errors. Our experience of the DFM services industry suggests that as little as two staff may be required to consolidate more than1000 critical assets within two days. After consolidating information, different stages of verifying and checking of information will need to be done by different people. The verification process is time-consuming, and more manpower is required to perform the verifications. With our developed Automated AIR Template, consolidation of asset information can be done within a few minutes or even a few seconds for large buildings with accuracy. Whereas, the manual process can take hours or days depending on the extent of the 21


BEARS #02 critical asset information to be consolidated. Even though the developed Automated AIR Information is able to resolve the issues which the current market is facing, there are still some advanced feature which can be integrated into the system to improve its effectiveness further.

5.4.1 Cross reference to multiple PDF files After the first stage of automatic consolidating asset information into the AIR template, there will always be some information that is missing. Usually, when there is missing information, the person who consolidates the asset information will need to check across multiple PDF files and images such as operating and maintenance manual, equipment catalogue, as-built building model, equipment nameplate, and onsite photos. Automated AIR Template will need to include a function which can check across multiple PDF files, detect missing information, copying and pasting of missing information into the AIR template.

5.4.2 Reading of asset information directly from BIM authouring software As the current matching header setting in the developed solution is done according to the simulated equipment list. In a future implementation, the developed Automated AIR Template should be able to read the equipment list with BIM authoring software details, e.g., Revit, as a header. As buildings are required to have Revit models, it will become an international language as the header of the generated equipment list.

5.4.3 AIR template dashboard The Automated AIR Template must have the capability of generating a summary or statistic of the overall critical asset information. For example, a dashboard showcasing the type of assets within the building, the total number of assets, and the number of assets at each level. This information is crucial at the initial stage of project management, which is to perform the budgetary estimation. With all the quantities displayed on a dashboard, it helps to simplify the process of counting the number of assets manually, which is time-consuming.

5.4.4 Integrating asset information into BIM Models In the current DFM work process, information of all critical assets is being keyed into each asset Revit model individually. This process is time-consuming and tedious, which errors are 22


BEARS #02 often found due to human error. Errors found in building Revit Models are critical as they will affect the implementation of BIM into facility management and operations processes. As the process of consolidating asset information had become automated, data entry for each asset should also be automated with the use of Dynamo. Critical assets in BIM models should be able to detect which asset information in AIR template belongs to them and copied information into the asset properties in the BIM models.

6.

CONCLUSION

Asset Information Requirement (AIR) is one of the crucial pieces of information to be delivered across different building life stages. In traditional facilities management practice, consolidation of AIR information had always been done manually, which is an inefficient and ineffective method. Having errors in the AIR template with manually consolidated asset information is inevitable due to human error. However, there is no alternative solution which able to resolve this issue currently in the industry. The main purpose of this paper is to study the issue currently faced in the industry when consolidating asset information into the AIR template and develop an appropriate solution. Our findings reveal that the developed Automated AIR Template has the potential to significantly shorten the time taken to consolidate asset information into the AIR template. The developed automatic solution could save time by 99% with 100% accuracy. This study only focuses on the automatic consolidation of asset information into the AIR template. There is still room for improvement. Identified areas for future study include a crossreference to multiple PDF files, reading of asset information directly from BIM authouring software, creation of AIR template dashboard, and integration of asset information into BIM models.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The support of the Singapore Institute of Technology in carrying out this applied research study is gratefully acknowledged. Ms. Ng Hui Min did the work and contents of this paper as part of her BEng final year design project in the Sustainable Infrastructure Engineering (Building Services) programme. Dr. Moshood Olawale Fadeyi guided the development of the prototype solution and experimental design to test the effectiveness of the developed solution. Dr. Fadeyi also contributed to the development of this article.

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REFERENCES Argyres, N. S. (1999). The impact of information technology on coordination: Evidence from the B-2 “Stealth” bomber. Organization Science, 10(2), 162-180. Australasian BIM Advisory Board (2018). Asset information requirements guide: Information required for the operation and maintenance of an asset. Australasian BIM Advisory Board (ABAB). Cavka, H. B., Staub-French, S., and Poirier, E. A. (2017). Developing owner information requirements for BIM-enabled project delivery and asset management. Automation in construction, 83, 169-183. Holmgren, M. (2006). Maintenance-related incidents and accidents: aspects of hazard identification (Doctoral dissertation, Luleå tekniska universitet). Love, P. E., Matthews, J., Lockley, S., Kassem, M., Kelly, G., Dawood, N., and Serginson, M. (2015). BIM in facilities management applications: a case study of a large university complex. Built Environment Project and Asset Management. 5(3), 261-277 Patacas, J. (2016). Supporting Building owners and Facility Managers in the Validation and Visualisation of Asset Information Models (AIM) through open standards and open technologies. Journal of Information Technology in Construction, 1874-4753.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Click the link below to view additional information. Download the PowerPoint slides to view the videos of the proposed solution in the slides. The authors reserved the right to the information provided in the slides. https://www.dropbox.com/s/45zl8rd2f8jn5lw/Supplementary%20Information_Proposed%20 Solution_Ng%20and%20Fadeyi%202020.pptx?dl=0

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Solution for automatic generation of asset information requirements (AIR) template  

Ng HM and Fadeyi MO (2020). Development of a solution to optimise the process for consolidating asset information into asset information req...

Solution for automatic generation of asset information requirements (AIR) template  

Ng HM and Fadeyi MO (2020). Development of a solution to optimise the process for consolidating asset information into asset information req...

Profile for mofadeyi