Page 1

years of the Storied league couldl be better than it has ever been I

,

/

. i /

By Torn GJ'O(JSCh3n/Enquirersiaffwritcr

\

/

oger Staubach won the Reisman Trophy ! and two Supe~ Bowls.J!e still cre~its his :::~ success to hts formative years m the ,.~ Greater Catholic League. \. U.S. Sen. Jim Bunning (R-Ky.), another GCL"'" ~ alumnus, also has vivid memories of a league he · calls the best in Ohio.

R

The GCL, celebrating its 75th anniversary this season, has long been one of Ohio's top leagues. The league also has made frequent claims as Cincinnati's best, including Monday when GCL team Moeller (11-0) moved up from No.2 to No.1 in the Enquirer Division I area coaches' basketball poll. The Crusaders this Friday visit No.3 St. Xavier which had been ranked No.1 most of this season- in a monster GCL South division game. Pro Football Hall of Fame quarterback Staubach (Purcell class of 1950) and Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher Bunning (St. Xavier '49) are among many famous GCL alumni. GCL schools have won 110 Ohio state "team" championships in the league's 74 previous years. "We competed at probably the highest level in high school, real· ly, across the country," Staubach said recently, speaking by telephone from his business office in Texas. "Everything I was taught was at Purcell. That was the building block for my life." Bunning, known as one of the fiercest competitors ever to take the pitching mound, said the GCL was not for the meek. "It was really intense," Bunning said, speaking via telephone from his Senate office in Washington. "I don'tthinkanybodywill dispute it was the best league in Ohio, whether it was baseball, . tennis, golf or whatever."

Utri3d inerasts The GCL also counts baseball's Ken Griffey Jr. and Barry Larkin (Moeller) and Olympic swimming gold medalist Joe Hudepohl (St. Xavier) among a galaxy of sports greats. U.S. Rep. Steve Chabot (La Salle) and actor Martin Sheen (Dayton Chaminade-Julienne) also hail from GCL mem· ber schools. When Staubach was at Purcell - which is now Purcell Marian he also played basketball and baseball. He later won the football Reisman Trophy at Navy and quarterbacked Dallas to two Su· per Bowl wins. Staubach is now a successful businessman, chairman of the Dallas-based Staubach Company that deals in commercial real estate. But he still attends annual reunions with about a half-dozen former Purcell teammates, and the old GCL juices start flowing. "We beat Elder when I was a senior, and make sure you tell them I didn't step out of bounds on that 75-yard bootleg (touchdown)," Staubach said, laughing. That was a 20-14 Purcell win at the Elder "Pit." Bunning, who also played basketball at St. Xavier, is a Northern Kentucky native (Southgate). He attended St. X in an era when Ohio permitted non-residents to play prep sports. See G1:L, Page C5

Roger Staubach's ca• ..:c; began at f ~ •.. , . -' a Heisman Troph}< end two Super Bowl titles. Hudepohl

b~

the

l:Jls~Eling

. ;..., :.. ;..;

•••

The Greater Cathnic League began 75 years ago with four

·~.

-;;11 · members- Elder, Pu,.cell, Roger Bacon and St. Xavier. The

league originally was called the Greater Cincinnati League and was al!-male Schools. · MembeTShip changes have included school ~--:....:_ --~! mergers, With Roger Bacon and Purcell Marian goLarkin • . ing co-e::l mthe 1980s. By 1990, the GCL had ex· panded t:: include Dayton-area schools and split ' ·. __ . . into its current North (smaller schools) and South (larger scrools) divisions: '

'I!

GCL soum '

Bder la Salle Moeller s:. Xavier

·\.

~ ~

l

· ;_ /.

~

GCL V.ORTH Badin Chaminade-Julienne Kettering Alter McNicholas Purcell Marian Roger Bacon

~Jim Bunning went from St. Xavier to

) ':he big leagues to the U.S. Senate.

j,•


I' •

_,1

'7 ,- :>

Ias-

.

THE ENQUIRER

Area higb school signings Name High school Andre Amos Middletown Daniel Barnes Moeller Corey Borden Mount Healthy Robert Brewster Wyoming Vince Brown Winton Woods Brandon Bryant St Xavier Terrill Byrd Colerain Tirrdell Byrd Colerain Craig Carey Elder· Matt Chacksfield CHCA Brayden Coombs Colerain Daronce Daniels Princeton Jovon Davis Withrow Mike Donoghue Cov. Cath Drew Douthit Lakota East Michael Federle La Salle Jamal Ferguson Winton Woods Bryan Gibson Fairfield Dominick Goodman Colerain Madaris Grant Mount Healthy Theo Hall Winton Woods Stephen Heis Anderson Ryan Huber La Salle Thomas Hurley St. xavier Rob Janning Beechwood Jeremy Jonas Hamson Uam Kelly Turpin Damian Kelley Wyoming Eric Kenkel Elder Cullen Kennison Holmes Anthony Kummer La Salle Brad Ubis Moeller Dante love Withrow Zach Marshall Mason Bryant McMillon Hughes Dustin Menetrey Beechwood Jordan Meyers Harrison Ben Miller La Salle Brady Minturn Loveland Mike Mitchell Highlands Justin Moore Colerain EJ. Morton-Green Princeton Derico Murray Moeller Jordan Nevels Highlands Vince Palmer Anderson Ryan Pollock lakota East Dixie Heights Greg Preston Austin Pritchard Lebanon Drew Quinn St. xavier Indian Hill Zach Reckman Andre Revels Colerain I Gary Rice Hamilton Ryan Routhier Lebanon ' Robby Schoenhoft St xavier Mister Simpson Colerain Winton Woods Richard Stokes i Brandon Sullivan Harrison I Matt Tennant Moeller Cordelle Thompson Middletown Adam Myers-White Hamilton Trey Williams Withrow Chris Wright Middletown Anderson Michael Zeis I

I

Pos. Ht. WR 6-1 RB 6-3 RB 5-11 OT 6-5 LB 5-10 LB 6-1 Dl 6-0 Dl 6-0 6-4 QB LB 6-3 DB 6-1 DB 5-10 OL 6-4 Ol 6-4 TE 6-4 OL 6-1 5-10 QB Dl 6-5 6-1 QB TE 6-5 DB 5-10 OT 6-6 DT 5-9 DB 5-9 OL 6-3 TE 6-5 6-2 QB DE 6-5 Dl 6-3 DE 6-3 6-2 QB OT 6-2 5-10 QB OT 6-7 RB 5-10 RB 6-1 LB 6-1 Ol 6-4 Dl 6-5 DB 6-0 DB 5-11 WR 6-4 DB 6-0 LB/DB5-11 5-11 QB OL 6-3 6-3 QB LB 6-5 LB 6-2 OL 6-5 LB 6-1 RB 5-11 Ol 6-4 6-6 QB RB 6-0 RB 5-10 OT 6-6 OL 6-5 LB 6-1 DB 6-4 WR 5-11 DB 6-0 WR 6-2

Wt. 161 210 190 325 200 217 285 237 213 225 180 195 314 288 215 272 185 265 196 210 175 270 223 160 280 248 180 205 230 210 205 290 175 270 190 190 218 297 240 190 175 205 185 180 185 245 210 211 236 245 240 152 297 235 208 185 310 250 205 190 160 171 175

College Ohio State Tiffin Tennessee-Martin Ball State U. of Charleston Vanderbilt Cincinnati Tennessee-Martin Cincinnati Georgetown (Ky.) MiamiU. Elon Tennessee-Martin Louisville Tiffin Ohio Dominican U. of Charleston East Carolina Cincinnati Ball State Mercyhurst (Pa.) East Carolina Tiffin Princeton Georgetown (Ky.) West Point Prep Morehead State Villanova Ohio University Georgetown (Ky.) Illinois State Duquesne Ball State Maryland Akron Georgetown (Ky.) Ohio University Wofford Bowling Green Ohio University Eastern Illinois Miami U. Kent State Kentucky U. of Charleston Dayton Tennessee-Martin Western Michigan Columbia Purdue Cincinnati Buffalo Tiffin Ohio State Michigan Mercyhurst (Pa.) Tiffin Boston College Bowling Green Tennessee Morehead State Bowling Green U. of Charleston


Ohio State Buckeyes 2005 recruiting class Name High school Andre Amos Middletown Alex Boone St. Edward Jim Cordle Lancaster Todd Denlinger Troy Brian Hartline GlenOak Malcolm Jenkins Piscataway James Laurinaitis Plymouth Freddie lenix Glenville Jamario O'Neal Glenville Brian Robiskie Chagrin Falls Anderson Russell Marist Rob Schoenhoft St Xavier Austin Spitler Bellbrook Donald Washington Franklin Central Maurice We!ls Sandalwood Ryan Williams Mission Viejo Lawrence Wilson St. Vin.-St. Mary Doug Worthington St. Francis

Pos. WR/CB OL OL DL WR DB LB LB DB TE DB QB LB WR RB DL DL DL

Ht. Wt.

Hometown Middletown Lakewood Lancaster Troy Canton Piscataway (NJ.) Wayzata (Minn.) Cleveland Cleveland Chagrin Falls Atlanta Cincinnati Bellbrook Indianapolis Jacksonville (Aa.) Mission Viejo (Cal.) Akron Athol Springs

6-1 182 6-8 310 6-5 290 6-3 285 6-2 180 6-0 185 6-3 235 5-11 200 6-1 190 6-3 190 6-0 197 6-5 230 6-2 225 6-1 185 5-10180 6-5 245 6-5 240 6-7 255

C.incinnati Bearcats 2005 recruiting class Name H.S.fJr. College Kazeem Alii Hazelwood Cent. Trevor Anderson Crockett Technical Connor Barwin U. of Detroit Jesuit Terrill Byrd Colerain Craig Carey Elder Thomas Claggett Frederick Douglass Tyler Clifford Portsmouth ' Nick Davila Caffey JC Steve Gawronski Rogers Marshawn Gilyard Ragler Palm Coast Dominick Goodman Colerain Brad Jones McKinley Chris Jurek Southfield-Lathrup Jeffrey Unkenbach Margaretta Jared Martin Clyde Mike Mickens Wayne Patrick Mimms Frederick Douglass ! leo Morgan Lackawanna JC Andre Re\ •Is Colerain Corey Sml. Salem Curtis Smitl Glenville Derrick Stew 1 Ursuline Cedric Tolbert Xenia Marcus Waugh Toledo St. John's

Pos. TE DE TE Dl QB DT DE QB Ol RB QB DB Ol Ol WR DB DE lB LB LB/RB DE WR DB RB

Ht. Wt.

6-3 225 6-2 258 6-4 225 6-0 285 6-4 215 6-2 270 6-4 223 6-3 195 6-3 275 6-1 180 6-1 196 6-2 190 6-2 252 6-6 315 6-1 175 6-0 165 6-3 265 6·1 230 6-1 240 6·1 208 6-2 240 5-11175 6-0 195 5-11230

Hometown St louis (Mo.) Detroit (Mich.) Hazel Park (Mich.) Cincinnati Cincinnati Temple Park (Md.) Portsmouth Alta Lorna (Calif.) Toledo Palm Coast (Aa.) Cincinnati Canton Southfield (Mich.) Castalia Green Springs Huber Heights Cheverly (Md.) S. Windsor (Conn.) Cincinnati Salem (NJ.) Cleveland Youngstown Xenia Whitehouse

Miami RedHawks 2005 recruiting class Name High school Andre Bratton Woodbridge Antonio Brunson John Carroll Heath Cartwright Chesterton Brayden Coombs Colerain Travis Craven Snider Brad Goatley Maumee Joe Hudson Piqua Sean Kavanagh St. Ignatius Brian Klesmith Ottawa Hills EJ. Morton-Green Pnnceton Daniel Raudabaugh Coppell Kevin Sam~ Jacksrn Jeff Thompson Kilb01~ oe

Pos. RB DB/WR Ol DB DE LB LB DB OT WR QB DL DB

Wt. 5-11 180 5-11 175 6-6 265 6-1 180 6-4 220 6-2 220 6-2 218 6-1 205 6-6 276 6-4 205 6-4 205 61 255 5-10 175

Ht.

Hometown Woodbridge (Va.) Ft. Pierce (Ra .) Westville (Ind.) Cincinnati Ft. Wayne (Ind.) Maumee Piqua westlake Grand Rapids (Mich.) Mason Coppell (Texas) Ca7ton Wcd.hington


路... 路' ,_ -路 路''

'-' . ~ ~

Editorial

\

.

Colerain's Saturday night lights It isn't every day that your hometown team earns the chance to win a state football championship in the largest division in the Ohio High School Athletic Association. But the Colerain Cardinals get that chance Saturday night in Canton, and Greater Cincinnati should support them in huge numbers. It'll be a special time for thousands of parents, players, coaches and fans. A caveat: They can complete a dream season on hallowed

ground- Canton's 22,000-seat Fawcett Stadium- home of the National Football League Hall of Fame game. The stadium also doubles as the home of the opponent, Canton McKinley High School, ranked 13th qationally by the Associated Press at year's end. Playing McKinley on its home field was the luck of the draw for Colerain. Pro-style Fawcett Stadium usually provides a neutral venue for the state championship game.

Bah, humbug! to an expected heavily partisan crowd. A victory in Canton can only sweeten the glory for Colerain, which has won all14 of its games this year. Colerain, ranked No. 5 in the nation by USA Today, is the overwhelming favorite. To outsiders, it may seem that Colerain has come out of nowhere and risen to prominence. But the team is loaded and wellcoached. Four players were named to the all-Ohio team, and Coach Kerry Coombs shared

coach-of-the-year honors with a Cleveland coach. The team has also overcome adversity. Nine years ago, it was kicked out of the playoffs because of an ineligible player. Its climb back to the top is a testament to hard work and determination for the school, which for years has lingered in the shadow of super Cincinnati schools such as Moeller and St. Xavier. On Saturday night, we wish them good luck.


·Division I AI-Ohio List COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) -The 2004 AP DiviSion I All-Ohio high school football team, based on the reo· ommenda~ons of a state mediB pan~ ., .

£f41<:L

=':'.!

1

i.

,,~~/"

OfRNSE: Ends-Mario Manningham, Wanen Haldmg, 6-foot-0. 175 pounds.' senior, G1J,~Il':n, Hubef Hts. Wayne, 6-4, 200. Sf., 1'111 Wlllt, , 6-1,185, or. Linemen-Alex Boone, lakewood St Edwald. 6-8, 320, sr.; J1mmy Coldle, lancaster. 6-5, 275, sr.; Bnan Mellott. Youngs. Au~ntown FitCh, 6-3, 252, sr.. llriln Sloollon, CG1on111, 1-4, 240, or.; MIChael Russell. Cle. Glenville, 6-2. 310, 51.; Mille Shendan. Cle. St. lgna~us. 6-3, 275, 51.; Phillip Pollaid. Westerville South, 6-4, 280, 51.; Oante campbell, Wanen Halding, 6-1.280. SI.;Tom Ingham, Cen· terville, 6-0. 240, 51. Quanerbacl<s--JJ. Fought Tol. Whitmer, 5-11, 170, 51.; Tyler Homer, Clayton Hor1h· mont 6-3, 190, 51. BaCkS-Chnsten Haywood, H1lllald DaVIdson, 5-8, 180, Jr.; Ryan Brtnson, canton McKinley, 5·9, 175. Sf.; Tommy Tarnasi<a, Centerville. 5-11. 205. sr.; Brandon Shimils, Solon, 5-9, 170,jr.; . . . CGionlll, 1-4, 208, or~ Tim Conner. Cle. Glenv1lle. 5-11, 190, 51. Kicker-Jimmy Spencer. Sylvania HorthYiew, 5-10, 175, Sf.

tor...._,

IIIFEIIIE: unemen-T.,. ~ CG1on111, 6-0, Zll,or~ThaddeusGIDson, Eudid, 6-3, 207,jr.; J1m Ramella, Cle. St. ignatius. 6-4, 235, Sf.; Brandon

Long, canton GlenOak, 6-3, 230. SI.;Jameson Hartke, Centerville, 6-5, 245, Sf.; Todd Denlinger, Troy, 6-3, 285. 51. Linebackers-Marcus Waugh, Tol. StJohn's, 5-11,230, 51.; Marko Cosic, Brunswick, 6-2.240, 51.; Jay Bednar, canton GlenOak. 5·10, 210, sr.; N1ck Si· mon, Shaker Hts., 6-3, 225. 51.; Freddie lenD<, Cle. Glenville, 6-0, 205, 51.; . . . . . . . . . . t.lor*. 6-1, 240, or~ 1heo Goodrtgtll canton McKinley, 510, 175, sr. Bacl<s--Joldan Gaffortl, WorthlngiDn Kll· boume, 6-1, 195, Jr.; Sean Kavanagh, Cle. St Ignatius, 6-1. 200, sr.; Jamario O'Neal, Cle. Glenville, 6-0, 190, sr.; Charley Howald, Gahanna Uncoln, 6-4, 200. sr.; Kyte Andrews, Tot. Whitmer, 6-3, 190, sr.; Fred Weidenthal. Youngs. AustintOWn All:h, 5-11, 180, sr.; Kurt Coleman, Clayton Northmont 6-2, 190. jr. Punt· ers-Jared Kanasch, Reynoldsburg, 6-1, 175, sr.; Blal<e Haudan, Tol. StJohn's, 6-2,200, sr. OllooooM .,._.. llf lie _ , Alex Boone, lakewood St Edwald; Ryan Bnnson, can. McKinley.

.,...... ,._. "' ... -= ,... .,.., -= c:.-

~

Colclloo "' ... Keny c:.o.lio, rollo; Teo G1nn Sr.. Cle. Glenville. 5ecGnd , _ Locolo OfRNSE: Unemen-Matt Tennant Moeller,

6-4. 270. sr; Zach Mar>l\all. Mason, 6-7,280. sr. IIIFEIISE: Brandon Bryant Sl xa.ler, 6-1, 220. 51. Backs-Drayden Coombs, Colerain, 6-1, 180, sr.; Oane Romero, lakota West. 6-2, 185, sr. PuntersMilCh Reynolds. lakota East5-11. 183. 51.

Spoclol ...... Locolo Chrts Cionnl, St xavier; Ertc Kenkel, Elder; Jal<e

All<inson, Mason; Derico Munav. - · •


SJ?!tra~~~~~a}!Lc!!f~~st ~~~f37.5~mw

Enquirer staff writer

Colerain today can proclaim its 2004 football team the best in Cincinnati high school history. But, great championship teams from Moeller, Princeton, Elder and Purcell Marian are among others that can make that claim. Regardless, the '04 Colerain team ranks among the greats after Saturday's re-

ofCantonMcKinleyintheDivision I championship game. The Cardinals (15-0), ranked No. 5 nationally by USA Today, are Cincinnati's best ever- at least in one notable statistical comparison. They scored 46.3 points a game and allowed just 6.5 a game, with the 39.8 average winning margin the best among unbeaten Cincinnati bigschool state champions. "I think they're one of the

Tum to C9 for a commemorative page to honor the state champion Cardinals. best teams the city has ever had," said former Moeller coach Steve Klonne, whose 1982 Crusaders were named national champion by USA Today. Klonne is now defensive coordinator at McNicholas, whichfacedColeraininapre-

"It's difficult to compare teams," said Klonne, the Moeller head coach from 1982-2000. "Our '82 Moeller team was very good. The '83 Princeton team (No. 2 in final USA Today ratings) was very good. Butman forman, Colerain is as good as we've had for a while." The closest big-school comparison, in terms of average victory margin, was the 1976 Moeller team that won

Moeller went 12-0, averaged 40.8 points and allowed just 3.3 points a game. "I didn't even realize we had the biggest margin," Colerain coach Kerry Coombs said. 'That's really something." Coombs is hesitant to call his team the best, but he was feeling good Sunday afternoon as thousands of redSee COLERAIN, Page C2

BIGGEST BLOWOUTS Colerain's 50-10 win over Canton McKinley was the largest margin of victory in Ohio big-school title-game history. A look at the biggest blowouts: 40 points: Colerain 50, Canton McKinley 10 (2004) 38 points: Moeller 43, Gahanna Lincoln 5 (1976) 34 points: Moeller 41. Parma Padua Franciscan 7 (1979) 33 points: Warren Harding 41, Upper Arlington 8 (1974) 31 points: Warren Western Reserve 37, Princeton 6 (1972) 31 points: Cleveland St. Ignatius 37, St. Xavier 6 (2001)


High school football! Colerain 34, Moeller 6

ardinals cruise into state semis

The Enquirer/Ernest Coleman

Colerain quarterback Dominick Goodman goes airborne as he's hit by Moeller's Greg Jones (49) and Alex Jaeger (40) on a first-quarter run Saturday night. Goodman rushed for two touchdowns.

Goodman, ground game wear down Crusaders "'tlz..llot./ By Tom Groelchen

EnqJtirer staff writer

Next week

Colerain (13-0)

wi~

play

OXFORD - Colerain Worthington Killboume (11-2) footba!l fans took their sweet time leaving Miami's Ya~r Stadium Saturday night, reveling in a 34-6 Division I regional championship thumping of Moeller. Coach Kerry Coombs, per ills postgame custom, climbed a sideline bench and animatedly addressed the Cardinal masses afterward. Coombs was drowned out several times by cheers, as Colerain celebrated its first trip to the state semifinals since 2000. "After the last three years, I'm glad our kids and our fans can stand back and take it all in," Coombs told

in the state semifinals at 7 p.m. Saturday.

reporters, practically yelling above the din. 'This was a closer game than it looks, but our kids came up with big plays whenever there was adversity." Colerain advances to the state semifinals next Saturday, tentatively at Dayton's Welcome Stadium, vs. Worthington Kilbourne. Kilbourne was not ranked in the final Associated Press Top Ten state poll of the regular season. Next week's site will be made official today by the

The Enquirer/Ernest Coleman

Colerain's Jeremy Hartmann (86) drags Moeller's Alex Urban into the end zone for a first-quarter touchdown.

Ohio High School Athletic Association. Ticket demand might cause the game to be moved to a larger site such as UC's Nippert Stadium, but for now, Welcome Stadium is the scheduled site.

A crowd of 21,541 watched Saturday as Colerain nursed a 7-6 lead into the second quarter. But the Cardinals stretched their See COLERAIN, Page B3


THE ENQUIRER

. ' ;;.,.,/. J' L1 (

Moeller

Crusaders' plan all about the air Moeller didn't include rushing scheme By Carey Hoffman Enquirer contributor

In more than 20 years of coaching, what Kerry Coombs saw from Moeller Saturday night was as radical an approach as he has faced. "I can't ever remember seeing that, and I've been coaching 23 or 24 years," Coombs said of Moeller's pass-only approach to offense. "Sometimes guys will go to something like that to shake you up (early), but they did it and just kept doing it." Moeller had only one ball-carrier all night: quarterback Chris Reisert The only time the team's leading rusher for the season, Daniel Barnes, came near the football was on a failed shuttle pass late in the game. The rest of the night, it was Reisert operating out of the shotgun, looking for his favorite receivers down the field. 'The game plan was just to throw it all night," Reisert said. "It was a quarterback's dream- just put the ball in my hands." Said Moeller coach Bob Crable: "Throwing the football was going to be where we hung our hat And we had them on the run for a while." Moeller answered Colerain's first touchdown of the night with a 20-yard TD pass from Reisert with 5:31 left in the first quarter. After Colerain went ahead 14-6 eru:ly in

the second quarter, Reisert connected on four straight passes to move Moeller from its own 23 to the Colerain 14. But then Colerain's Brian Edwards cut in front of a Reisert pass in the end zone for a momentumkilling interception. "I saw it and thought it was open, and their kid just made a great play," Reisert said. Colerain's Coombs actually had a different interpretation: It turned into an interception only because Colerain was in a blown coverage. "We blew a coverage," Coombs said. "Two of our best players were out there, and luckily, Brian has great catch-up speed on the ball." Reisert finished the night 26of-47 passing for 292 yards. His favbrite receiver, Pat Watt, had a huge night with 15 catches for 159 yards. Tyler Dierkers and Justin Smith also caught five passes each. Moeller also put in a new pass protection scheme, which frustrated Colerain and kept Colerain's sack total to just two, even though the defensive line didn't have to worry about the run. 'That was very effective," Coombs said. 'They took away our zone blitz game with what they did." Said Crable, "We lit up the skies tonight, and that was all part of our plan."

The Enquirer/Emest Coleman

Colerain running back Mister Simpson is upended by Moeller's Scott Rotterman on a first-quarter run Saturday night at Yager Stadium.


Go1era1n: uaras oack

in state semifinals From

Page Bl

lead to 21-6 by halftime, and four Moeller turnovers kept the Crusaders from making a serious run. "We said we couldn't turn it over and expect to have success against them," Moeller coach Bob Crable said. 'They're the best, and we didn't measure up to what the best is." Colerain (13-0), ranked No.1 in the state and No.5 nationally by USA Today, had been knocked out of the playoffs three straight years by Elder. The last two times came in the regional finals, including a particularly bitter 24-23 loss last year. ''We got that monkey off our back," Colerain senior quarterback Dominick Goodman said. "Butnow we've got to complete our goal and go to state." Goodman rushed 29 times for 168 yards and two touchdowns, as the Cardinals' triple-option offense wore Moeller down. Fullback Mister Simpson rushed 14 times for 60 yards and a TD, Dan Magness ran six times for 47 yards, and Terrence Sherrer rushed six times for 41 yards. Colerain held a 374-292 edge in total yards, with 305 yards rushing. All Moeller's 292 yards were passing, as quarterback Chris Reisert completed 26 of 47 passes with one touchdown and three interceptions.PatWattcaught15passesfor 159 yards for Moeller. Moeller's only running plays came on eight scrambles by Reisert, netting zero yards: With Colerain allowing only 51 yards per game rushing, Moeller went strictly via air. 'They've proven time and again ' how good they are against the run," Crable said. "Our only hope was to put the ball in the air. " Colerain snuffed that, too, ineluding interceptions by Brian Edwards, Justin Moore and Andre Revels. Revels took his interception back 89 vards for a touchdown with

Playoff scores DIVISION I • Can. McKinley 35, Brunswick 14 • Colerain 34, Moeller 6 • Glenville 22, St. Ignatius 14 • Worthington Kilbourne 35, Hilliard Davidson 34 DIVISION Ill • Canal Fulton NW 14, Thornville Sheridan 0 • Cle. Benedictine 21, Cuyahoga Falls Walsh Jesuit 0 • Watterson 27, DeSales 6 • St. Marys Memorial 21, Day. Chaminade-Julienne 13 DIVISION V • Amanda-Ciearcreek 27, Wheelersburg 25 • Hamler Patrick Henry 41, Uberty Center 27 • Smithville 41, N. Uma S. Range 14 • St. Henry 41, East Clinton 27

· 2:15left, giving Colerain a 34-6lead and the final icing. 'The last three years really burned in our heart," Revels said. 'That's why we still play every play like it's our last It feels pretty good to get this far." Colerain last made the state semifinals in 2000, losing to eventual state champ Upper Arlington. Moeller's top player, offensive tackle Matt Tennant, suffered a dislocated right elbow last week and did not play. Tennant, who has committed to Boston College, dressed and went through pregame drills. Colerain scored first on a rare pass play, a 27-yard toss from Goodman to wide-open tight end Jeremy Hartmann 4:35 into the game. Colerain's run-heavy triple option sometimes catches opponents napping with pass plays, and that was the case on this one. 0

Colerain 7

13

-34

Moel~: H:runann 21 pass tro~ Goodm~n (Schu~~ kick)

6

M-Smith20passfromReisert(kickblocked) 6

~ =~~~~~n s~~n<~i~~!k~~~~l

~:~~~~~~~~"~~~~~~;a~~~ (Schu~ kick) Records: c 13-o, M10-3.


C6 MONDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2004

SPORTS

â&#x20AC;˘ High school football

Big game requires big effort By Carey Hoffman Enquirer contributor

If you want to see the game of the year in Cincinnati high school football, take this bit of necessary advice: buy early, leave early. Colerain vs. Moeller, as expected, will be played on Saturday at 7 p.m. at Miami University's Yager Stadium, the Ohio High School Athletic Association confirmed Sunday. That Division I game was one of three regional championship games involving area teams to be played next weekend. On Friday, Glen Este will play for the Division II regional title for the first time when it takes on Dayton Carroll at 7:30p.m. at Princeton. On â&#x20AC;˘ Saturday, East Clinton gets a shot at

Fans face challenge getting to Moeller-Colerain at Yager Regional finals Friday at Princeton, 7:30 p.m. Glen Este (11-1) vs. Carroll (11-1) Saturday at Miami U., 7 p.m. Moeller (10-2) vs. Colerain (12-0) Saturday at Sidney, 7 p.m. St. Henry (11-1) vs. E. Clinton (11-1)

the Division V regional championship when it travels to Sidney for a 7 p.m. meeting with St. Henry. The Yager site can create complications because of limited traffic access routes to Oxford. When Elder played Northmont there in last

year's playoffs, some fans didn't reach their seats until well into the second quarter and that was with only one big Cincinnati fan following driving north. "It's a big high school event," said Colerain athletic director Dan Moody. "Fans ought to plan on leaving early to get there, and then tailgate or just enjoy the atmosphere." Moody also recommends that fans buy their tickets in advance. Pre-sale tickets, which will allow the schools to retain 20 percent of the revenue, will go on sale Tuesday. As for the matchup, Moeller coach Bob Crable w~m't underplay

the challenge Colerain presents. 'We have to be pretty perfect," Crable says. 'There's some room for error for them, but we have to be pretty doggone perfect." Glen Este's playoff run returns to Cincinnati, after playing at Washington Court House. But Trojans coach Zak Taylor says that won't make that much of a difference. "Our fans did a good job getting up there. Our side was full," Taylor said. As for this week, he said: "(Princeton's) a fair site. It's halfway between both schools. At this point, we're not worried about where. We just want to know who we're playing and go get them." ~


Crusaders tonight in role reversal Cardinals appear to be unbeatable foe By

1:.:(ro:Jtn f

Enquirer staff writer

Scrappy little Moeller will try to upset big, bad Colerain in the Division I regional football final tonight at Miami University's Yager Stadium (7p.m.). "Holy cow, we don't know if we can come close to them," Moeller coach Bob Crable said, unable to suppress a grin. Moeller (10.2) once was the top prep football juggernaut in America, winning five mythical national titles between 1975-85. But tonight's regional final appearance is the Crusaders' first since 1997. Colerain (12-0) is.rarikedNo.1in the state and No. 5 nationally by USA Today and has flogged opponents by an average score of 48-7. ¡ Colerain beat Moeller 31-6 in a preseason scrimmage, but both sides have downplayed thal

Colerain vs. Moeller What: Division I regional final. Kickoff: 7 p.m. today at Yager Stadi-

um, Miami University. "If we execute and they don't, who knows, maybe we have a chance," Crable said. Crable, speaking before a Crusaders practice earlier this week, couldn't help but notice the irony. As a Moeller All-America linebacker in the 1970s, Crable helped start the Crusaders' run of seven state titles (1975-76-77-79-80.82-85). Moeller had an aura of invincibility. And now it's Moeller fighting a seemingly unbeatable foe. "It's one of the biggest, fastest, most physical teams I've ever seen," Crable said of Colerain. See PlAYOFFS, Page C12


The Cincinnati Post,

Saturday, November 20, 2004

58

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL

Colerain hopes 3rd time charm By Tom Ramstetter Post contributor

Two years ago, the Elder High School football team jumped over a hurdle it took four tries to clear when it beat Colerain 28-21 in the 2002 Division I, Region 4 final at Nippert Stadium. After losing to Huber Heights Wayne in 1999, Colerain in 2000, and St. Xavier in 2001, the Panthers finally claimed their first region title since 1996 and went on to win the first football state title in school history. When the Panthers repeated as state champions last season, they had to hand Colerain another heartbreaking loss in theregional fmal, 24-23, to do it. The Cardinals hope tonight is when they clear that hurdle when they play Moeller in the regional final at Miami University's Yager Stadium at 7. Colerain is the region's No. 3 seed. Fourth-seeded Moeller is making its first appearance in the regional final since 1997 when the Crusaders were state runners-up. "I think there is a huge advantage in having been in this game," Colerain head coach Kerry Coombs said. "I know Doug Ramsey (and Elder) lost it three times in a row and then all of the sudden boom"'ih.~Jh~Y_went.

Post photo

Colerain coach Kerry Coombs refuses to look past tonight's game against Moeller.

We really haven't talked about it with the kids much, we're just concentrating on a way to beat (Moeller)." Even if it hasn't been talked about, there is a good chance the sting of the last two season-ending losses are still fresh in the Cards' minds. Colerain actually outgained the Panthers on offense in both contests - 339-308 in 2002, and a lopsided 379-191 last season. However, big plays hurt Colerain in the end. Then-senior tight end Brian Crowley caught a 26-yard overthe-shoulder pass from quarterback Rob Florian in the back of

the end zone with 1:05 left in the game in 2002, capping a sevenplay, 75-yard drive to give Elder the win. After the game, Ramsey said he couldn't remember the last time Crowley caught a pass ina game. Last season, Colerain quarterback Erick Fitzpatrick ran 14 yards for a touchdown with 1:21 to play, bringing the Cardinals to within a point of Elder, but the extra point was missed and the Panthers held on. "It gives us motivation coming in to this game where we lost two times in a row," senior quarterback Dominick Goodman said. "It gives us motivation to play hard so we can get to another goal, which is playing at state." The focus at practice has been intense and directed at Moeller -not 2002 and 2003. "We haven't even talked about it much," Coombs said. "It's funny because I just don't think we've had a lot of time to spend thinking about that kind of stuff. We just have been working on Moeller and working on winning one game. ' "One of the coaches from one of the teams for next week called me Monday to start talking about film exchange and the honest truth is I didn't know who the other teams were in the other region. I haven't allowed myself,

and we haven't allowed ourselves to have the conversation about what happens after this game. We've just talked about this game. I guess part of that comes from being here so many times before and not finishing." The players plan on finishing this time around, and it is something the proud coach has noticed all season. "I've said it all year long and it's just as true this week as it has been all year," Coombs said. "They just focus on each play. They're not out there in the middle of practice thinking about three plays ago or five plays down the road, and certainly not about nextweekorlastweek. That's the great thing about this team and I think they've played that way on Saturday nights and Friday nights." The first 12 games were all Colerain, the closest one being the season-opener - a 21-3 win over Elder. The Cardinals have outscored Elder and Centerville 73-3 in their first two playoff games. "I'dhavetosayit's all the hard work, starting in the summer with weight lifting, everybody had intensity to win and every day we just look to play hard and do our best," Goodman said. "That's all we came to do and we just have to keep going wifujt."


Colerain vs. Moeller WHEN/WHERE: 7 p.m. today at Yager Stadium. RECORDS: Colerain 12-0, Moeller 10-2. WHAT TO WATCH: Colerain will run its triple-option ground attack, led by QB Dominick Goodman (1,386 yards rushing, 21 IDs) and FB Mister Simpson (1,006 yards, 20 IDs). Moeller QB Chris

Reisert (2,514 yards passing, 23 IDs) will seek WRs Pat Watt and Tyler Dierkers. BOTTOM LINE: Moeller bases its upset hopes on a potent passing offense, but Colerain's starting defense has allowed only two touchdowns.

Playoffs:

Moeller's task huge From PageCl

1

In tum, Colerain coach Keny Coombs said Moeller concerns him more than any team the Cardinals have seen. 'They're the best team we've faced all year," Coombs said. 'They've got the ability to run it or pass it, and defensively they gave up almost nothing against St. Xlast week. That speaks for itself." The Crusaders are physically big in the classic Moeller style, with an explosive offense (34.3 points per game) and improving defense (16.2). The Crusaders have allowed only 14 points in two playoff games. Moeller will rely on its strong passing game. The Crusaders feature some funky, four-wideout alignments including a four-deep "stack" on one side of the field. Other times, it's two "twin" sets on either side. Regardless, it has bothered opponents all year. Senior quarterback Chris Reisert leads the area in passing yards and has run his totals to 2,514 yards and 23 TDs. Receivers Pat Watt (74 catches, 1,000 yards, 12 TDs) and 6-foot-7 Tyler Dierkers (51 catches, 669 yards, five TDs) are the area's top duo of wideouts. Colerain's defense has allowed only 51.1 yards rushing per game, so Moeller obviously will try to pass it. Offensively, the Cardinals rush for 381.3 yards a game. Colerain's triple-option offense, featuring quarterback Dominick Goodman either handing off, pitching the ball or running himself, has continued to run wild in the playoffs. The Cardinals have outscored Elder and Centerville in the playoffs by a combined score of 73-3. Last week, fullback Mister Simpson returned from a one-game hamstring shutdown to rush for 194 yards and three touchdowns. Goodman, who leads Colerain with 1,386 yards rushing and 21 TDs, said the Cardinals respect Moeller .and its Greater Catholic League South pedigree. "We know it won't be easy," Goodman said. 'They knocked off St. X. They're physical and tough, and we know they're a lot better than when we scrimmaged them." Reisert, who was injured in the scrimmage vs. Colerain but returned for the season opener, remembers the Cardinals as physical and hard-hitting. "We've got to play perfect," Reisert said. "No turnovers, no mistakes." Colerain beat Moeller 30-23 in the regional semifinals last year, with a big Moeller comeback falling short. "We remember that," Coombs said. "And that scrimmage this year, forget that. Moeller has gotten better and better. Hopefully we have, too." NOTE: The Colerain-Moeller game will not be broadcast on radio. Mark Bengel, executive director of the local Prep Sports Radio Network, said he was unable to work out an arrangement with Miami University.

E-mail tgroeschen@enquirer.com ¡

,,/~0/ALI.


Division I football I Moeller 10, St. Xavier 7. '

c~~~~~~~rs By Cafey Hfffma:

in region final first time since '97

Enquirer contributor

t

The biggest Moeller victory in at least seven years was made possible in a way few would have believed before the game. Moeller's defense, which was hammered for 35 points by St. Xavier seven weeks ago, redeemed itself repeatedly Saturday, setting up both Crusaders scores and shutting down any St. X comebackhopes in a 10.7 victory in a Division I regional semifinal at UC's Nippert Stadium. St. X's only score came on a punt block recovered in the end zone. "This is what a team is all about," Moeller coach Bob Crable said. "Our offense saved our butts many times, but it was the defense that made the plays today." Moeller (10.2) advances to the regional final and the state's final eight in Division I for the first time since 1997. The Crusaders next will face Colerain, which beat Moeller 30.23 in the regional semifinals a year ago. In this year's first Moeller-St. X meeting, the Bombers ran roughshod all night, gaining 399 total yards, with Chris Cionni rushing for 205 himself. On Saturday, Moeller held St. X to 138 total yards. Cionni ran 18 times for 77 yards, but 40 came on one play. Ohio State-bound St. X quarterback Robby Schoenhoft, under harassment much of the day, was held to a season-low 47 yards on 5-of-19 passing. Moeller intercepted Schoenhoft three times, in a tense game in which each team turned over the ball four times. The amazing aspect was Moeller was so improved without its best defensive lineman - senior tackle Pat Farrell, who had a sprained ankle and was on the field for only four plays Saturdayand with four sophomores often at the point of attack. Sophomore Frank Becker, a 6foot-3, 260-pound tackle, filled in

The Enquirerr;RNEST COLEMAN

Moeller running ba."k Daniel Barnes (31) lean~ forward for yardage in the sa:ond quarter.

for Farrell on the .nside and was credited with 2lh tackles. Classmate Andrew Wenel, a defensive end, had four tackles, a forced fumble and a sack.!\junior, defensive tackle Dombick Iacovone, led the defense w;th 5lh tackles, two tackles-for-loss and a fumble recovery. "We prepared ~ lot and knew every play," said Bocker. "Then it was all about pride,' "I talked to a couple of the sophomores and said th~y had to step up," added Farrell. 'This was the best, by far, that OII defense has played all year." Crable said the scheme Moeller's coaches usedb the first St. X game was adjustedfor Saturday's meeting. Defensive fronts were shifted. "They put a lot :>f guys in the box," St. X coach Steve Specht said. "Sometimes tey had nine in the box and they lilled the gaps. They're a good defense." The defense se-ved notice early that things wotld be different this game. On tre game's third play, Moeller's S:ott Rotterman intercepted Scho!nhoft and returned the ball31 }ards to the St. X 13. That set up ~ 25-yard Mike Carter field goal.

The score stayed at 3-0 until the middle of the third quarter, when St. X's Alex Albright blocked a Carter punt in the end zone. Matt Liguzinski fell on the ball for a TD that put St. X up 7-3. There were still four more turnovers to come, with the game hanging in the balance. The biggest came with 9:48left in the game, when a scrambling Schoenhoft was hit from behind by Moeller's Wersel and fumbled. Iacovone recovered for Moeller at the St. X 10. On the next play, Moeller quar¡ terback Chris Reisert bootlegged right, spun and bounced off two tacklers at the 6 and fell forward into the end zone for Moeller's only TO. "I'm not a good pinball player," joked Reisert, who led Moeller's offense with 118 passing yards and 45 rushing yards. 'That play was just luck. I thought maybe I could put my head down and get a couple of yards, and I ended up in the end zone. That was pretty much luck." That put Moeller up 10.7 with 9:37 to play, and the rest was up to the Crusader defense. It continued to impress down the stretch, allowing St. X only one first down on its final five possessions after the Bombers scored their TD. An interception by Moeller's Matt Held with 2:40 to play ended St. X's last chance. "The defense really stuck together," Reisert said. "Everyone stepped up big time, and the so phs played great." "They had a great game. You can't take that away from them," said St. X's Specht, whose team had beaten Moeller in five of six previous meetings. 'They're a good football team and it will be a good regional (title) game, whomever they play."

:.-=-=-====

3 0

0 0

0 7

7 -10 0 -7

M- Carter25 FG SX - U~nski bioct<ed punt recovered In end zone (Osborne kick) M - Reisen 10 run (Carter kick)

Records: M 1().2, SX I H.

Around the state

Newark Catholic wins title The Associated Press

FAIRBORN - Sarah Clapperhad25kills,l2digsandeight blocks and Newark Catholic defeated Rocky River Lutheran West 21-25, 25-21, 25-19, 25-16 in the Division ill state volleyball championship Saturday. Shannon Wilson added 12 kills for Newark Catholic (27-2). which won its eighth volleyball state championship. Jessica Moses had 16 kills and seven blocks for the Longhorns (28-1).

Division IV volleyball FAIRBORN - lindsay Put¡ hoff had eight kills and five blocks and Kayla Lefeld served five aces to help St. Henry beat Norwalk St. Paul25-15, 25-21, 2517. Puthoff also had six digs for the Redskins (26-3), who won their sixth state championship. Sophomore Betsy Hoying added eight kills and four blocks. Megan Centers finished with a match-high 11 kills for the Flyers (26-3).

Division II soccer COWMBUS - Corey Kirk stopped a Youngstown Mooney goal and had an overtime cross knocked in by the opposing goaltender to lead Pataskala Watkins Memorial to its first state boys' soccer championship with a 1-0 win over Mooney. At 1:56 into the first overtime, Kirk left-footed the ball off the left sideline into the box. Mooney goaltender Jeff Seddon hit it in with his right arm. In the 27th minute, Kiki Willis made a free kick that Kirk knocked away at the goal line.


F

N~~~J8SY foes for ~!:.",!~~h¡v¡ Post contributor

The St. Xavier football team certainly doesn't have the draw for the Division I, Region 4 playoffs that a No. 1 seed might expect. After winning the closest opening-round game last week, 14-3 over eighth-seeded La Salle, the 11-0 Bombers face another Greater Catholic League South rival today in the regional semifinals at noon at Nippert Stadium in fourth-seeded Moeller (9-2). The other two 11-0 teams in the state, Colerain, ranked No. 1 in the Associated Press state poll, and Centerville meet at Miami University's Yeager Stadium tonight at 7. St. X was ranked No. 2, Centerville was third, and Moeller was No. 9 in the state poll. "Well, I tell you, it's a testament totheGCL," St. X first-year head coach Steve Specht said about playing GCL teams in the first two rounds of the playoffs. "It's a strong league; it's a great league. We feel we prepare ourselves each week by playing a great schedule and this is the result. You get into the playoffs and it really doesn't matter who you play. Whether you play a GCL opponent or a GMC opponent, if they're in the playoffs, they're a great team." St. Xaver and Moeller finished first and second in the GCL South this year with the Sept. 24 game that the Bombers won, 35-31, being the difference. Bombers senior quarterback Robby Schoenhoft tossed a 2yard touchdown pass to senior tight end Kyle Gibler with 13 seconds left in that game, spoiling Moeller's fourth-quarter comeback attempt and handing the Crusaders their first loss of the season and their fifth in the last six games against St. X. Senior quarterback Chris Re-

JASON 0. GEIL/The Post

Quarterback Chris Reisert will direct the Moeller offense today in a playoff game vs. league rival St. Xavier.

isert threw three straight touchdown passes to give Moeller 22 unanswered points, erasing a 28-9 Bombers lead. Specht doesn't expect anything different from either team. "I think when you get to this point, you play somebody twice, you know each other pretty well," Specht said. "There's not a lot of secrets out there. We'll tweak a few things and they'll tweak a few things. But basically you are what you are. When you get this far in the season, you don't change things. You're go-

ing to do what you do and you're going to try to do it a little bit better. That's what we're doing and I'm sure they're trying to do the same thing." Junior running back Chris Cionni rushed for 205 yards and two touchdowns on 40 carries in the first meeting, including five rushes that fueled St. Xavier's game-winning 62-yard scoring drive. "They played good, they made a great comeback and we kind of let down," Cionni said. "Once we get up, we can't really

the ability to come back no matter how many points we're up." Cionni said that that's been the focus of practice this week. "We've got really good spirit, it's the best I've seen all year," the tailback said. St. Xavier, however, doesn't have a player on the roster with experience this deep in the postseason. The only player with playoffs experience at all heading into last week's opener was Schoenhoft. The Ohio State recruit suited up as a sophomore in 2002 when the then-eighthseeded Bombers lost their firstround game to top-seeded Elder, 20-14, at Nippert, and the Panthers went on to win the first of two straight state titles. "Most of these kids, this is their first taste of the playoffs," Specht said. "The seniors were sophomores the last time we made it. So, especially for the senior class, this is exciting." Moeller, however, does have experience in its corner. The Crusaders were eliminated by Colerain in last year's regional semifinals, 30-23, in front of 10,378 fans at Nippert. But that's where the players figure the tough schedule and tough firstround game will work to the Bombers' advantage. "I'd rather play a good La Salle team and beat them as opposed to playing some really bad team and rolling over them because they're a bad eight seed," Cionni said. "It just keeps you on top of your game really. "I know I have another year left to play, but I realize that all the seniors don't. So they're really going to be laying it all on the line. And I'll be laying it on the line for them." Moeller will be trying to advance past the second round of the playoffs for the first time since they finished as state runners-up in 1997. St. X was the state runner-up in 2001.


wearlesday, November 1'7, 2004

I SPO

Moeller to ¡face Colerain next By Lonna Kingsbury Contributor

Moeller's steady progression to the regional finals is all about teamwork and when you hold your opposition to an average of 136 yards ta game for the season, your teamwork is evident in the result Moeller's victory of 10-7 over league rival St ~vier was a big one, and their first over the Bombers in. five years, placing Moeller in the regional final game for the' first time since 1997. Despite the loss of defensive lineman senior tackle Pat Farrell, who is struggling with a sprained ankle and was only on the field for four plays, Moeller's defense set up both scores and shut down any St. Xvictory hopes. & JOHN BRADLEY/CONTRIBUTOR Reorganizing their de,ense, at Moeller quarterback Chris Reisert is hit by E:randon Bryant and fumbles times Moeller had nine men in the . the football. box and there simply _were no weak spots. defense," said Head Coach Hob best possible position to score. It:S "Our defense played so well Crable. all about the team," continued and it was such a great team victoThe reorganization paid off as Crable. ry we have to recognize the entire Moeller held Ohio State bound St. eastsports@communltypress.co.ll I 248-7570 Xavier quarterback Robby Schoenhoft to a season low of 47 yards on 5-of-19 passing. They also forced a fumble in the fourth quarter inside the St. Xavier 20 to set up the winning score by Chris Reisert Moeller (10 -2) will put that defensive teamwork to the ultimate test when they meet Colerain (12 - 0) in the .Division I Regional final game. When Moeller met Colerain in the regional semifinals last year, Colerainwalkedawavwitha30-23 . score. This year Moeiler looks forJOHN BRADLEY/CONTRIBUlOR' ~~to tiJ?ping the scales. Moeller defensive. lineman Andy It's ,gem& to be a tough game. Wersel sacks St. Xavier andweretakingthemonegameat quarterback Robbie Schoenhoft a time. We're looking forward to and forces the fumble to set up next week and hopefully we'll do the game winning score. things to place our guys in me


Blue by you, and you, and you JOHN BRADLEY/CONTRIBUTOR

Moeller quarterback Chris Reisert spins away from St. Xavier defenders before running in for the winning touchdown in the fourth quarter of the Crusaders' 10¡7 win Saturday at UC's Nippert Stadium. Moeller meets Colerain in the Division I Region 4 finals at 7 p.m. Saturday at Miami University's Yager Stadium. See Sports, A 11.


~

.

Crusaders start slowly before closing with an offensive flurry . fl/7/~t/ By Mar~ Schmelzer

Enquirercontributor

The Moeller Crusaders needed time to get rolling, but once they did, they were almost unstoppable. Daniel Barnes gained 137 yards and scored three touchdowns and Moeller erupted for 29 second-half points in a 38-7 win over Lakota West in the first round of the Division I Region 8 football playoffs Saturday night at Princeton. "We had hoped to be able to do a few more things offensively earlier in the game," Crusaders coach Bob Crable said. 'They played defense awfully well. No one rolls over at this point. They took some things away from us." Moeller (9-2), which finished the season fourth in the region's Harbin computer ratings and third in the Enquirer's Division I coaches poll, will play St. Xavier game in a regional semifinal next Saturday at the University of Cincinnati's Nippert Stadium at noon, according to Ohio High School Athletic Association assistant commissioner Hank Zaborniak. The Firebirds (8-3), fifth in the computer ratings and sixth in the

Moeller 24' Lak• West 7

"We took the program to new 'heights. We got a taste, and that will fuel our enthusiasm for next year. " West coach Larry Cox

Enquirer poll, lost in the first appearance by a Lakota school in the playoffs since 1995. "We took the program to new heights," Lakota West coach Larry Cox said. "We got a taste, and that will fuel our enthusiasm for next year." The teams combined for three turnovers in the first half, and all three were converted into scores. Moeller's Derico Murray made the first of his two first-half interceptions late in the first quarter, .and Mike Carter gave the Crusaders a 3-0 lead with a 37-yard field goal early in the second quarter.

The Firebirds took a 7-3lead on John Conner's 2-yard plunge following Dane Romero's interception. Moeller gained a 9-7 halftime lead on Barnes' 2-yard run following Murray's second interception, which he returned 30 yards to the Lakota West 13-yard line. Jacob Giltrow blocked Carter's point-after kick. Watts, who finished with 147 yards of total offense, personally accounted for 79 yards to help Moeller open up a 1&-7lead. He returned the second-half kickoff 47 yards to the 50, then took a pitch 11 yards, caught a pass for 14 yards and took another pitch for seven yards to set up Barnes's 22-yard scoring run. Moeller added fourth-quarter touchdowns on Barnes' 1-yard run, Alex Jaeger's 7-yard return of a recovered fumble and backup quarterback Pat Redwine's 59-yard pass to Watt with 1:18 left in the game. Lo-West.----Moeller-..- - - · - -..-·

0 0

7 9

0 0 -7 7 22 -38

M- carter37 FG LW- Conner 2 run (Casper kick) M -Barnes 2 run (kick blocked) M -Barnes 22 run (Carter kick) M - Barnes I run (Dierl<ers pass from Reisert) M -Jaeger 7 fumble ret!Jm (Carter kick) M -Watt 59 pass from Redwine Records: LW 8-3, Moeller 9-2


I { ,..,

I 0 .• "D y

JOHN BRADLEY/CONTRIBUTOR

I've got it· Moeller senior wide receiver Tyler Dierkers makes a leaping catch in the Crusaders 38·7 win over Lakota West. Moeller advances to play St. Xavier High School at noon Saturday, Nov. 13, at UC's Nippert Stadium.


Moeller falls short Moeller's Pat Watt tries to escape the grasp of ColeraJI'I's Tyler Moeller (center) and Eugene Clifford (right) after catching a pass from !IU&rterback Chris Reisert. Watt and Reisert combined for 15 completions and 159 yards passing. Colera1i!l defeated Moeller 34¡6 in the Division I regional finals in Oxford. See Sports, A18.


~PORTS & KEC Crusaders fall short· against Colerain

-George SChutt Community Sports Editc

248-757(

II

·~

2 LJ·- D 5

By George Schutte Sports Editor

Coming off a consecutive tournament wins against Lakota West and league-rival St. Xavier, Moeller's season came to a close with a 34-6 loss to Colerain in the regional finals on Nov. 20 at Miami University's Yager Stadium. Moeller trailed only 7-6 after the first quarter, on the strength of a 20-yard scoring strike from Chris Reisert to Justin Smith. That's when Colerain's offense got warmed up and started. moving in high gear. Mister Simpson scored on a 6yard touchdown run, and Dominic Goodman added an Byard score to give the Cardinals a 21-6 halftime lead. Moeller's offense was centered around the pass with Chris Reisert finishing 26 of 47. for 292 yards with one touchdown and three interceptions. He also logged the only Crusader rushing attempts, , carrying the ball eight times for no yards. · Reisert's favorite targef was wide receiver Pat Watt, who finished with 15 catches for 159 yards in the game. 'JYler Dierkers and Justin Smith each grabbed five passes. "We knew Colerain hadn't JIM OWENS/CONTRIBUTOR allowed anything beyond 50 yards Moeller QB Chris Reisert completes a pass to Pat Watt in the third quarter. Reisert was 26 of 47 passing with all season running. It was our one TD and three INTs. He threw for a total of 292 vards.

intent to keep it in the air and we did," Crable said. · Colerain entered the game with a record of allowing only 113 yards of offense per game. Moeller broke that record. "I'm proud of my guys. They played with great character. I'm proud of the effort they put forth, never giving up, but of course, I'm very disappointed," concluded Crable. Moeller .closes their season with a 10-2 record and a secondplace finish in the Greater Catholic League South. "They're a good team. They didn't make mistakes - we did. That's the difference," said Moeller Head Coach Bob Crable. Reisert earned league player of the year accolades after amassing over 2,500 yards and 24 touchdowns in the regular season. Other first team selections for the Crusaders included Alex Urban, 'Daniel Barnes, Derico Murray, Matt Tennant, Par Watt and 1)rler Dierkers. Second team selections were Brad pbis, Joe Farfsing, Justin Smith, Kevin Hurnbel, Pat Farrel and Sean Redwine. Lonna Kingsbury contributed to this article gschutte@communltypress.com 248-7570


Playoffs: Area teams must win on road From Page Cl

~

a ....._ Ol

"' ' ~

0

<.. l.aJ

Springboro will meet Dayton Carroll at 7 p.m. Saturday at Dayton Welcome Stadium in the other Division II regional semifinal. In Division III, Indian Hill will travel to Clayton Northmont at 7 p.m. Saturday to meet St. Marys Memorial. "Wyoming played them and beat them last year in the playoffs," Indian Hill coach Kevin Siple said. Another. Cincinnati Hills League school, Reading, will travel to Xe. nia's Cox Stadium for a 7:30p.m,

game Friday against Plajn City JonathanAlder, the top seed in the Division IV region. In the only game involving an area team in Division V, East Clinton will meet West Liberty-Salem at 7 p.m. Saturday at Springfield North.

Soccer, volleyball titles on line Other fall sports move deeper into tournament competition. Lakota West and CHCA will both play in state semifinal games Wednesday in their respective divisions of the boys' state soccer tour-

nament. The Indian Hill girls' soccer team will play its state semifinal Thursday. Seton, Mercy and Roger Bacon will compete in the state volleyball tournament at Wright State. One area team that found out how difficult the final steps to a state title can be was the Taylor girls' cross-country squad. Coach Chip Dobson didn't find out until more than eight hours after the end of the race Saturday that his team had won the Division II state title. A computer malfunction caused officials to delay declaring a winner. _


Valley Courier I Valley Sports Journal

Page 19

December 15, 2004

The 20 4 All-Valley Football Defense

Todd Pflug - DT Lockland

Derico Murray - DB Moeller This All-State safety picked off seven passes and returned two for TDs. 256 INT return yards1 62 tackles, 9 passes def.

The All-State lineman was the · cornerstone to the Panther defense. 84 tackles from the D-line spot, two sacks

Steve Blome~- LB

Alex Urbau- DB

Princeton

MoeUer

This VIking Co-captain had 54 tackles, seven for loss, one de£. ro, pullet! double duty on 0-line a\ Cf:nter

The AU-GCL de~ive back

was always aroUnd the ball 77 tackles, six for a loss, three picb,.$ix passes defended

Tony Daniels - DTILB Princeton

LaKristopher DeVant Roger Bacon· .

Best defensive player on this squad two years running. All-State defender had 101 tackles, 13 for loss, 5 sacks

Teams ran away from this AU-State defensive end 48 tackles, 13 for a loss, three sacks

John Bogucki - DE Reading

Jonlan Hosmer .. LB ·wyomiag

All-State end had RHS record 18 sacks this season.. 78 total tackles, 21 for a loss, 4 forced . fumbles and blocked 5 k:icb

Alt..State linebacker led CowOOys in tackles for sec.ond ·sttaigbt ~ Jloubled as ID

eft'eenve.fbiJback on oft'ease

~Seal« :f..Xl'oCIIII1811l aud.

.

led.tlle

. 't0..3 c~ mtbtal

tactle8 With' .h)t;

Bamiaa·Xetley .. DE WyorldDg ·

1St Team Allo.CHL AdiSruptiveforoeathis

defensive- ead spot Led team in t~atdies_with 13 for 180 yds

............ staarp- DB Prillietou Alaother All-OMC pick at DB, Sharp came on stronc in the ~

baJffot Vikes.

43 tllckles, twO lN1s

.KeviD Kyler- DB.- R,....g .

BriaJI Bm.ant .. DB

Prblcetna · All-GMC piqt ~ defensive beck -With' 21 tacldes. three INTs, seven passes defended..· returned one INT- for ro

.

Matt Colley ...Us· . Loeklaad '

This AIJ...MVC selection bad 62 stops· at middle linebackN . ·for the sugvisiDg Panthers 2Dd year oa AU.;'Ntey team ' ' '·

..WAU.:GCt:

.:

···-~

Sophomore defensive. back led hiS team in INTI with three. · wbo eolleded 42.tadc.tes. five tor a loss,·a:m. . . . , three ss taddes, 2 Wrced fumbles aDd seven pp~es defended ';fumble tee;. one for a TD

De~Betrtus

.

Roger Baeoa

..,:-u-

.. LB e

t'hia All-OCL ~led the . SpartanS in Uddes. wil&77. t5 tac:kles for- a loss, 3. sacks Bacon's Most ~Mcker

·

. AD-GMC ~did a bitof~.fot the voouas. 29 taekles, S for loss, lCommitted to Hofstra ODiv.


St. X will meet Moeller at UC

,fBI cc..f· By CareyliOffman Enquirer contributor

Other playoff teams hit road for next game

Playoff fever will be hitting the road early this year. Game locations and times for the second round of the high school football playoffs were announced Sunday, and just one game will be played in Cincinnati and only one other is less than an hour's drive from downtown. Those two closest games are the Division I regional

semifinals: St. Xavier will meet Moeller at noon Saturday at the University of Cincinnati's Nippert Stadium, while Colerain will take on Centerville at 7 p.m. Saturday at Miami's Yager Stadium. The early start time is the most notable aspect of what was anhounced Sunday. "I personally would rather play early, just because I hate

sitting around all day (on a game day)," said St. X coach Steve Specht. Colerain will be playing at Yager for the first time in school history. "To be honest with you, I was thinking during the week about where a second-round game might be, and I thought it might end up being at Middletown or at (:Dayton) Wel-

come Stadium," Colerain coach Kerry Coombs said. "I would have preferred Yager to either of those." Glen Este's reward for its first playoff victory is to travel to Washington Court House to meet Jackson at Miami Trace High at 7:30p.m. Friday in Division II. See PLAYOFFS, Page C4

High school football playoffs DIVISION I Saturday • (1) ST. XAVIER (11-0) vs. (4) MOELLER (9-2) at UC's Nippim Stadium, noon • (2) Centerville (11-0) vs. (3) COLERAIN (11-0) at Miami University Yager Stadium, 7 p.m. DIVISION II Friday, 7:30 p.m. • (8) Jackson (9-2) vs. (5) GLEN ESTE (10-1) at Washington Court House Miami Trace Panther Stadil:lm • (3) SPRINGBORO (10-1) vs. (2) Dayton Carroll (10-1) at Dayton Welcome Stadium

DIVISION Ill Saturday, 7 p.m. • (1) INDIAN HILL (10-1) vs. (5) St. Marys Memorial (10-1) at Clayton North mont Stadium DIVISION IV Friday, 7:30 p.m. • (4) READING (7-4) vs. (1) Plain City Jonathan Alder (9-1) at Xenia Cox Stadium DIVISIONV Saturday, 7 p,m. • (2) West Uberty-Salem (11-0) vs. (3) EAST CLINTON (10-1) at Springfield North Panther Stadiurr


Colerain is eager for test by La Salle L1 · . J~la.t,./0 By l(.D GrisChiaf

Enquirer staff writer

Top-ranked Colerain has crushed its 2004 opponents so badly, the Cardinals actually can't wait to play No.6 La Salle this week. La Salle •(&-3) could be the first real challenge for Colerain (9-0) since August Colerain beat Elder 21-3 to open the season, and the Cardinals since have won by an average score of 56-8. 'They11 be a playoff team, and it's basically a playoff game," Colerain coach Kerry Coombs said. "We11 find out what kind of team we have." Both: teams are projected to make the Division I playoffs by computer points expert Steve Shuck. This is the final week of the regular season. Colerain has reigned atop the Enquirer Division I coaches' poll all season. La Salle's only three losses are to Greater Catholic League South rivals Elder, Moeller and St. Xavier. The Lancers; led by senior quarterback Anthony Kummer, have one of the area's top 1 passing offenses. ' La Salle coach Tom Grippa is under no illusions. Colerain is rated No.1 in the state and No.5 nationally by USA Today, and Grippa is one of many local coaches who have said the Cardinals look invincible.

Ohio polls T-

D~NI 9.() 9.() 7-2

I. Colerain (8) 2. St Xllvier 3. Moeller 4. Lakota East 5. Elder 6. La Salle 7. Mason 8. Lakota West 9. Winton Woods

.....

I 2. 3 4 5 6 9 7'" 8

9.()

6-3 6-3 7-2 7-2 6-3 4-5

10.. Failfield

Paiats

80.

n

61

53 51

40 31 24 15

NR

7

l'>s.

Paiats

Olben: Lebanon 5, Anderson 1.

TNIII I. Withrow (7) 2. Glen Este (1) 3. Kings

4. Norwood 5. Spnngboro 6.1ndian Hin 7. Mount Healthy 8. Reading 9. Roger Bacon 9. (t) East Clillton

DMSIONS II·VI Roconl

9.()

I

78

8-1

2

67

7-2

3

9.()

6

52 45 43

8-1

8

39

8-1

4

38 11 f>-4 10 9.0 NR 10 Olben: I.Dveland 9, Shroder Paideia 7, Wyoming 7, North College Hill 6, Fenwlcl< 4, CHCA 4, McNicholas 3, Cllnton-Massie 2. Ross 2, lockland 2, Batavia 1.

7-2 6-3

5 NR 9

"Colerain could be the best team I've ever seen," Grippa said. "If they play their 'A' game, they won't get beat We've played a good schedule, and hopefully 1that helps us compete." The Week 10 schedule includes several traditional rivalry games, led by Colerain-La Salle, MoellerPrinceton, and Oak Hills-Elder. St. Xavier (9-0), ranked No.2 in the Enquirer poll, should have an easy time with Hamilton (0-9) in another season finale. In Divisions II-VI, Withrow (9-0) continues to rank No. 1 and Glen Este (8-1) is No.2.


Crusaders start slowly before closinJ! with an offensive flurry By Mf//s"!ite~r

Enquirer contn'butor

. Moeller 24 Lak West 7 '

The Firebirds took a 7-3lead on John Conner's 2-yard plunge following Dane Romero's interception. Moeller gained a 9-7 halftime lead on Barnes' 2-yard run following Murray's second interception, which he returned 30 yards to the Lakota West 13-yard line. Jacob Giltrow blocked Carter's point-after kick Watts, who finished with 147 yards of total offense, personally accounted for 79. yards to help Moeller open up a 16-7lead. Hereturned the second-half kickoff 47 yards to the 50, then took a pitch 11 yards, caught a pass for 14 yards and took another pitch for seven yards to set up Barnes's 22-yard scoring run. Moeller added fourth-quarter touchdowns on Barnes' 1-yard run, Alex Jaeger's 7-yard return of arecovered fumble and backup quarterback Pat Redwine's 59-yard pass to Watt with 1:18 left in the

The Moeller Crusaders needed · "We took the time to get rolling, but once they program to new did, they were almost unstoppable. heights. We got a Daniel Barnes gained 137 yards and scored three touchdowns and· taste, and that will Moeller erupted for 29 second-half fuel our points in a 38-7 win over Lakota West in the first round of the Divienthusiasm for sion I Region 8 football playoffs Saturday night at Princeton. !i'ext year. " "We had hoped to be able to do a West coach l.arTy C.x few more things offensively earlier in the game," Crusaders coach Bob Crable said. 'They played de- . Enquirer poll, lost in the first apfense awfully well. No one rolls pearance by a Lakota school in the over at this point. They took some playoffs since 1995. things away from us." "We took the program to new Moeller (9-2), which finished heights," Lakota West coach Larry the season fourth in the region's Cox said. "We got a taste, and that Harbin computer ratings and third will fuel our enthusiasm for next in the Enquirer's Division I coach- year." es poll, will play St. Xavier game in The teams combined for three a regional semifinal next Saturday turnovers in the first half, and all game. at the University of Cincinnati's three were converted into scores. IJikola West ...............--. 0 7 0 0 Moeller's Derico Murray made Moeller ____ .........-·-···· 0 9 7 22 Nippert Stadium at noon, accordM -Carter 37FG ing to Ohio High School Athletic the first <>f his two first-half interLW- Conner 2 run (Casper kick) M - Barnes 2 run (kick blocked) Association assistant commission- ceptions late in the first quarter, M - Barnes 22 run (Carter kick) and Mike Carter gave the Crusader Hank Zaborniak. M - Barnes 1 run (Oier1<ers pass from Reisert) M -Jaeger 7 fumble return (Carter kick) The Firebirds (8-3), fifth in the ers a 3-0 lead with a 37-yard field M - Watt 59 pass from Redwine romn11tPr mtinrrs :mrl sirlh in thP

vo::~l

P::trlv in t.he SPconci nuarter.

R - : LW ~-3. Moe!i<!r Q.?

-7 -38


THE ENQUIRER

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL

Moeller 37, Princeton 22

~rn;~aders ' By Colleen Kane Enquirer staff writer

Moeller coach Bob Crable said there are still plenty of things for his team to work on before the playoffs start, but Friday night was a step forward after last week's step back. The Crusaders rode a 23-point halftime lead to a 37-22 victory over Princeton Friday night. The win came one week after a 41-17loss at Lakewood St. Edward. The Crusaders• only other loss of the season came at St. Xavier on Sept. 24. Moeller finishes its regular season 8-2 and is all but assured a playoff spot in Division I, coming in fourth in Region 4 in: Harbin analyst Steve Shuck's predictions before the game. "We still made a lot of mistakes.

march on to playoffs

We're not playing with great confidence," Crable said. "We've got to do some things better to do well in the playoffs - read coverages better, know all of our assignments on defense. There are plenty of things to work on." Princeton finished its season 3-7 after going 8-2 last year. The Vikings are 7-36 all time against Moeller, the most losses to one team by 29 games. They've lost 13 straight to the Crusaders. "We're disappointed. We thought we were going to be a better football team," Princeton coach Brian Dodds said. "We constantly gave up big plays all year. oo• The key to this game was big plays in the first half we were unable to do anything against. oo• It's the story of our year." Moeller's offense, the second000

best in the area behind Colerain with an average of 398.2 yards a game entering Friday's contest, got a break from its defense in the first half. The Crusaders recovered a Princeton fumble and picked off two Princeton passes to fuel the 23-0 first half score. The first interception came with Princeton approaching the end zone midway through the second quarter. Senior defensive back Derico Murray grabbed a Josh Harrison pass at the 3-yard line and sped 97 yards for a touchdown to put the Crusaders up 16-0. Afew plays later, Moeller linebacker Alex Jaeger intercepted Sam Dawes and returned it to Princeton's 26-yard line. Moeller scored when 6-foot-7 Tyler Dierkers grabbed a Charlie Fischer pass to go up 23-0. "We got after it early," Crable

said. ''When you have players like Derico Murray step up and do things like that in a football game, it helps you to get over the hump." With many of the starters on the bench in the second half, Moeller's offense stalled two times in a row within field goal range, and the Crusaders' Mike Carter missed both. But Moeller's Justin Smith caught 41- and 35-yard touchdown passes in the half for the final score. Moeller finished with 366 total yards to Princeton's 302. Moeller ...............· - · - - ·

9 14

7

7

-37

Princelan - - · - - · 0 0 8 14 -22 M: Team safety M: Barnes 35-yard run (Carter kick) M: Murray 97-yard interception return (Carter ~ck) M: Dierl<ers 27-yard pass from Ascher (Carter kick) M: J. Smith 40-yard pass from Reisert (Carter kick) P: D. Woods 2-yard run (Woods run) P: Morton-Green 41-yard pass from Dawes (Kick failed) M: J. Smith 35-yary pass from RedWome (Carter kick) P: Mathews 58-yard pass from Hamson (Nichols pass) Records: M 8-2 (2-2 GCLS) P 3-7 (2-5 GMC)


; -Coacn ~ receives finest honor jÂŁi (:<u?Tj

Mancuso put Princeton, area football on map By Mark Schmetzer Contributor

Perhaps the most significant piece of memorabilia Pat Mancuso has kept at his home in Fairfield's Wildwood complex from his days as Princeton's head football coach is a straw hat with a band proclaiming Massillon's win over the VIkings in the 1972 state playoffs. It's significant because it was premature. Princeton beat the near-legendary Tigers, 17-14, in the semifinals at Ohio Stadium in a watershed win both for the VIking program in particular and for Southwest Ohio football in general. It's not "Dewey Defeats TruriU!rt," the .!infamously wrong Chicago Daily Tribune headline about the 1948 Presidential election, but when it came to local high school football, it was big. "I think it was the best win for Southern Ohio football," Mancuso said. "People down here just didn't realize or recognize what Massillon meant. I did because I lived up there." Mancuso regards that win - in the first of his 12 playoff appearances, three of which ended in , championships - as the crowning achievement in a career that was celebrated again this past Friday

RYAN PODRACKY/CONTRIBUTOR

Former Princeton head football coach Pat Mancuso was honored at Friday's game by having the figld at the high school named in his honor. With Mancuso is former Moeller head football coach Gerry Faust.

when the field at VIking Stadium was named in his honor. Earlier, in September, ¡he was among the charter inductees into the Princeton Athletic Hall of Fame. He also has been inducted into, among others, the Ohio and national high school football

coaches halls of fame - just rewards for an overall record of 323-100-14 and Princeton record of 305-76-11. He led six VIking teams to the state championship game and coached 29 league champions. He is tied for 26th nationally in career wins for high

school coaches. Mancuso, 75, retired as Princeton's football coach after the 1996 season and as athletic director one year later. He remains involved in football in several ways - when, COACH j CmmNUED

A?


Coach I Man.cuso built up Prjnceton fo'otball

From A1

Tli...' t:.o.s-ua¡"r'f. PvPSS N/'3/6'{

that is, he isn't visiting friends from Union, he landed the job as Leetonia's head coach before deciding likely, playing golf. There's a reason to tackle a bigger program such as he and his wife Ernie, whose son Princeton's. The Leetonia superinSteven Patrick teaches at Miami tendent, Paul Hayes, formerly University, live next to a course. worked in the Princeton district "I just do those kinds of things," and hooked Mancuso up with said Mancuso, who carries a 12 to then Princeton superintendent 14 handicap. "It's kind oflaid back. Roy Lucas. "I do miss the coaching phase "See, I always thought the job of it on Friday nights. I go to all the at (Youngstown) Boardman would games. I enjoy that, and I enjoy be a premium job," Mancuso watching practice. I go to various recalled. "I thought I would come places to watch practice. But dur- down here and get some experiing a cold rain or the very hot, hot ence at a big school for when the two-a-days- then I don't miss it" Boarqrnan job opened up. When Mancuso is a native of Leeto- . Dr. Lucas first talked to me, he nia, Ohio, which is south of said, 'You know, Pat, we want to Youngstown and west of Canton have good team and we want to be near the Pennsylvania line. He competitive, but we know we'll played defensive back and offen- never be like the Massillons and sive end at Leetonia High School Can~ons.' and Mt. Union College, where he "When I got here, I liked everyonce blocked two punts in one thing about it.:_ the area, the Reds, game and had two interceptions the Bengals later, UC, Miami. Xavier had a team at the time. I in another. â&#x20AC;˘ After graduating from Mt. never wanted to leave. I had San Diego to Toronto or, more

,

opportunities to get into college coaching, but I never wanted to leave." Mancuso turned down offers from, among others, Michigan coach Bo Schembechler and Ohio State coach Earle Bruce to stay with Princeton. "Those were tempting," he admitted. "I just liked this level of kids. I felt like I was going to have some impact on their life, and I liked that. I liked dealing with them.'' "I think the thing I admire the most is, through all of the awards and accomplishments and the things he's done, he still puts the kids front and center," said Princeton athletic director Scott Kaufman. "Even when you listened to his talk at our Hall of Fame banquet, he mentioned the coaches and the kids who played for him. "Pat's passion still is Princeton and the kids.'' tricciuntypress@communitypress.com


Rivalry week I Moeller, St. Xavier meet again

The Enquirer/ERNES r COL3v1AN Moeller senior safety Derlco Murray says beating St. Xavier to avenge a regi.Jar-season loss is the team's main motivation heading into Saturday's playoff matchup.

Crusad·er hopes rest .on defense Bom~ers 1d/p.. oe{!>

have won five· of past six meetings

By C~rey offman

Moeller mindset 1) The Crusaders betterandourlinebackershavetniill

Enquirer contributor

will be vying to break a rare drought their responsibilities," said Crable.

If Moeller fails to knock off St Xavier on Saturday in the Division I regional semifinals, then a reclassification in terminology will be in orderSt X officially will move from "rival" to "nemesis." The Bombers, who have proven to be a recurrent pain in the side by winning five of the last six meetings with Moeller, will be fighting to deliver the cruelest cut yet- a ticket out of the playoffs to end a season of optimiSiil for Moeller. "You just never know what is going to happen. History is history, and you can't change it," said Moeller coach Bob Crable. 'The only way to change it is to properly prepare yourself, and dot your i's and cross your t's." Both teams are hoping to advance to a berth in the regional final and a potential meeting with Colerain. St Xavier (ll.O) is ranked No. 2 in the Enquirer Division I area coaches' poll, and Moeller (9-2) is ranked No.3. As if that isn't motivation enough, •here are two more factors in the

in their proud tradition, having not advanced beyond the second round of the playoffs since 199'7; and 2) they will be looking to avenge a 35-31 regular-season loss to St Xavier that the Bombers won on a 1D pass with 13 · seconds left in the game. 'That's our main mo&.11tion. This is our second chance," said Moeller senior safety Derico Murray. "You have to take advantage of it" To do that, Moeller'sdefense can't afford another night like it experlenced in the irst St X meeting. Bombersjuniortailback Chris Cionni ran for 205 yards. 1hat was the most yardage Moeller allowed any running back all year. "Vole have a pretty special back in Chris Cionni," St X coach Steve Specht said. "He might be 5-7 and 150 pounds soaking wet, and we talked as coaches earlier in the year that there was no way we could give him the ball more than 20 times in a game, and he's just proven to be a tough kid." Cionni ran 40 times in the first Moeller game. "Our defensive line has to play

"'Wedidn'tdoagoodjoblasttimefilling the gaps ... and obviously, a running back like Cionni will find a~ to run when that happens.~ If Moeller can force St Xto turn to the pass, then the ga:ne will move in the direction of one of the stars to emerge tor Moeller this year- Murray, at his free safety positioiL Helead!OMoellerwithseveninterceplions, two of which he has returned for touchdowns. ~Every time he touches the ball, he's a threat," Crable said of the 6foct 185-pound Murray. "He doses on people because he's ... one of the fastest kids in our school. last week agailst Lakota West he came from the middle af the field all the way to the sideline to get a ball." Murray is the nephew of Yada Murray, an all-state safety on Moeller"s 1985 state championship team. His cousin. Dante, was a defensive back on Moeller's 1997 team that finished as state runner-up. "You almost have to establish the run against them, because he's that good against the pass," Spedl1 said of Derico Murray.


W•o."-

,,._J r-~-~7 /3~JL(

Jo anyone who has closely followed high school

football in Greater Cincinnati the last three-plus decades, no one game personifies its depth of competition and quality of play more than the annual regular

Moeller Crusaders at Princeton Vikings Moeller 7-2 36 18 Bob Crable

Tale of-the Tape

Princeton Current Record 2-6 16 Average Points Per Game Average Points Allowed 25 Brian Dodds Coach

The Final Bell. •• Emotions should be high for Princeton, which would love to win a game for injured running back Victor Thompson and former coach Pat Mancuso. But Moeller has too many weapons on the GCL's highest-scoring offense.

Prediction: Moeller 41-20

season finale between Moeller and Princeton. It's hard to imagine this game not being played. But that's what will happen after this Friday, when these perennial state and one-time national powers are scheduled to meet for the final time in their storied histories. Kickoff is 7:30 p.m., at Princeton's historic Viking Stadium. It seems only fitting that a halftime ceremony that night will dedicate Mancuso Field, in honor of legendary Princeton coach Pat Mancuso. He led the Vikings to state championships in 1978, 1983 and 1987 before retiring. We can only hope legendary Moeller Coach Gerry Faust will be in attendance, too. All Greater Cindnnati schools should thank Moeller and Princeton for putting this area on the prep football map, not only in Ohio but throughout the United States. That's not to mention the impact these two programs have had on their dty counterparts. Essentially, area programs had two choices after Princeton and Moeller dominated the gridiron in the 1970s and early 1980s: Continue to be pummeled year after year or get better. They chose to get better, making Greater Cindnnati football a hotbed of blue-chip programs and talent virtually every year. Football in the tristate is more competitive than ever, and fan interest continues to grow. Moeller and Princeton own a combined 10 state

With Tom Gamble Tom ~mbte, 1 fonMr lrigll sdlool sports editor of Th OltdniHlti ~ is hallder 1nd dii'Ktor of DSA Prwp Sports. A clfvi-. sion of Cincinnati-based Don Schumldler &AssoNtH,Inc.. DSA Pnp Sports is dediclted tu autiag. !Uibting, promoting lnd operlting first-class high school sports l¥lflts.

championships, with a record seven belonging to Moeller. Before the playoffs were expanded, this game would determine not only who would represent the area, but also who would likely win state. Friday's game won't have that same aura. Moeller is looking to pick up momentum heading into the playoffs while Princeton is looking to salvage what has been an uncharacteristic season. But this game isn't about just this year. It's about this series, which will be discontinued. The Greater Miami Conference, of which Princeton is a member, is switching its league games from weeks three through nine to four through 10. As of right now, the two schools aren't scheduled to play next year or beyond. I'll be there Friday. Maybe this one won't be a classic, but that doesn't matter. I can still vividly remember some of the previous Moeller-Princeton games, and that's good enough. If you saw them, you'll remember too. For now, the memories are all this series has left. That's a shame.

~ i~~~!w.~


THE ENQUIRER

FN

SPORTS

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2004 BU

St. Xavier, Colerain, Moeller are all in By Tom Groesclten Enquirer staff writrr

St Xavier, Colerain and Moeller are guaranteed to make the Division I football playoffs, according to computer points expert Steve Shuck. St. Xavier (8-0) was considered a lock even before beating St. Francis (N.Y.) last week. The Bombers host Northeast Ohio power Cleveland St. Ignatius (7·1) Saturday, and a win would only enhance St. Xavi· er's bid to host a playoff opener. Colerain (8-0) and Moeller (7-1) also have joined Shuck's "sure thing" list in Division I this week. Centerville (8-0), St X, Colerain and Moeller are projected to finish Nos. 1-4 in the area and would host first-round playoff games. 'The top four should open the olayoffs at home, hilt whether they

Shuck's projections remain in the current projected position is still in question," Shuck said.

Elder (f>-3), two-time defending state champion, is projected to finish No. 6 in regional computer points. That means the Panthers would travel to Colerain for a playoff opener, with the Cardinals seeking to end a run of three straight playoff losses to Elder. Tonight's Lakota Bowl (East vs. West) is big for both teams. Shuck projects East (8-{)) to beat West (7-1), with East eventually to finish fifth and West seventh in computer points. La Salle (f>-3) is projected to grab the eighth and final Division I play-

off spot. In Division II, Withrow and Springboro figure to host playoff openers. Shuck, commissioner of the Greater Miami Conference, has a weekly projection list used each October by the media and local schools. Shuck calculates final projections based on his predictions of remaining games. ThetopeightteamsineachOhio region make the playoffs. The top four teams in each region will open at home, and the bottom four travel for their first game. The regular season ends next weekend. Postseason play begins Nov.S. The following list includes some teams that are on the playoff "bubble" at No. 9 or lower. Cincinnati ar· ea teams are noted in boldface:

Division I, Region 4 Team ICUmall !. Cecte"""' (!HI) 2. St. Xavier IU) 3. Coleraln III-OJ 4. Moeller 17-11 5. Lll<ota East IU I 6. Elde< 15-3) 7. Lll<ota West 17·11

8. 1.11 s.n. 15-31 9. Northmont(7-1)

Prolected Final points 1()-() &-1 1().(1 8-2 1().(1 7-3 11-2 6-4 9·1

Division II, Region 8 TUM ICumnl)

lUI 2. Sprqboro lUI 1.~

3. Dayton Carroll (7-1) 4. Klnp 1&-21 5. Glen Est• 17-1) 6 . - 17·11 7. Mount lleallll)" 16-21 8. Cntllicome (5-3)

Projoctod

1().(1 Sol 9-1 8-2 &-1 Sol 8-2 6-4

36.6 34.5 34.4 33.8

28.0 27.2 26.3 25.8 23.3

1. ChG~!~Jdt."-Jultcr.!'e (7-1)

2.1/t>:TII Tmce (8-ll) 3. Be'ib""'k 16-2) 4.St.MJ!)'S(7-I) 5. WJomlnl 16-21 6. C:!t'e,:::e 16-2) 7.1ndlan HIU 17-11 8. Lor,Jn Elm (6-2)

Prciecled Final points

1. - - 16-21 2.JonathanAider(7-1) 3. Reodlnc 15-31 4. Kenton Ridge (6-2) 5. Versa•lles 16-2) 6 . - 14-41 7. C.riosle (4-3) 8.-14-41

8-2 8-1 7·3 8-2 8·2 6-4 6-3 6-4

9. Batavlo 15-31

7-3

19.9 19.7 18.6 16.8 16.7 14.6 14.4 12.59 12.13

Division V, Region 20 Final points 31.4

30.9 30.2 24.5 24.1 21.8 20.2 19.3

Division Ill, Region 12 T..,. ICutrenll

Division IV, Region 16 T... ICUmall

Prolected Final points 8-2

27.0

1().(1 7-2 9-1 8-2 11-2 &-2 8·2

22.4 22.3 22.2 21.4 20.9 20.9 19.3

Team ICUmall I. Mwton Pleasant (8-ll) 2. Wo>t lJbetty Solem (8.0) 3. East Clinton lUI 4. Anna (7-1) 5. COlumbus Hn~ley (5-2) 6. Zone Trace (7·1) 7. Feawldc !6-21 8.--16-21

Prolected Final points 1()-()

to-o

6-1 9-1 6-3 9-1 8-2 7-3

22.2 21.35 21.27 17.9 17.8 17.0

16.8 15.2

Division VI, Retdon 24

T-ICUmall

I. MecllarttsllU!gl7·1)

2. Cln. c-try Day 16-21 3. DeGraff R«e.,;,de(6-2) 4. Dolo Haroin Northern (8.0) 5. TtOY cnnstlan (6-2) 6. Sprmg. Cent. C.thal~ (5-3) 7. New Bremen (5-3) 8. Marton Lilcal (3-5)

~~ Flnalpolnts

9·1 8-2 8-2 8-2 7·3 6-4 5-5 5-5

18.3 13.3 13.1 12.6 10.9 10.1 8.6 8.2

MIKE SIMONS for the Enquirer

St. Xavier and Robby Schoenhoft

(above) will make the playoffs.


.,

Colerain, St. Xavier are unanimous 1-2 in poll ~

I

'

By Tom Groeschen Enquirer staff writer

High school football

Colerain (8-0) remains a unanimous No. 1 in the Enquirer Division I coaches' poll, but the unanimous No.2 also looks quite strong. St. Xavier (8-0) comes off a 27-0 rout of St. Francis (N.Y.), which had beaten Ohio power Cleveland St. Ignatius 28-13 earlier this season. And, now, St. Xavier will play St. Ignatius (7-1) Saturday at St. Xavier at2p.m. "It doesn't get any easier for us," St. Xavier coach Steve Specht said Monday. "We're getting better, but

we've still got a lot of improving to make if we want to do well in the playoffs." St. Xavier has just run a four-game Specht g~ut that began With Greater Catholic League South wins over Moeller (35-31), Elder (33-30, double overtime) and La Salle (34-20). Bombers quarterback Robbie Schoenhoft led comeback wins in each of those games. Against St.

Francis, Schoenhoft threw for 174 yards and three TDs as St. Xavier rolled to a 21-0 halftime lead. St. Xavier has lost a key player, tight end Kyle Gibler. Gibler, who caught the game-winning 2-yard TD pass vs. Moeller on Sept. 24, is out for the year with a broken ankle. "He was having a great year," Specht said. 'They hope to have him back for basketball by mid-Jan-

beaten Lakota West 69-20 last week. The most hyped game of the week will be No. 4 Lakota East (8-0) at No.7 Lakota West (7-1), as both programs seek their first playoff berths. In Divisions II-VI, Withrow (8-0) remained No. 1 by winning its 14th consecutive game overall. The Tigers are considered a lock for the program's first playoff apuary." pearance. Atop the poll, Colerain has Glen Este (7-1) is No.2, and reigned all season and will be heavi- Kings (6-2) is No.3. Both received ly favored to beat Oak Hills (4-4) one first-place vote. this week. Colerain routed previously un- E-mail tgroeschen @enquirer. com

DIVISION I

r.... I 2. 3. 4

Colerarn (8) St ){aVJer Moeller Lakota East 5. Elder 6 La Salle 7. Lllkota West 8. Winton Woods 9. Mason 10 let>anon

lleconl 8-0 8-0 7-1 8-0 5-3 5-3 7-1 6-2 6-2 5¡3

Othon: Oak HillS 1. Fairfield

..... I 2 3 4

Points 80 72 62 53

5 7 6 8 9 10

36 33 24 21 9

48

I,

DIVISIONS II-VI Team

1

w.t~.,.

2 3. 4 5.

Glen Este ill 1\mgs (1) Norwood Mount Healthy

181

lleconl 8-0

n

6-2

..... I 2 3

7I

4

6 Spnngboro 1. wYomirg 8. lndtan Htll

6-2 8-0 6-2 7-1

5t 51 7 8

9. Roger Bocon 10. Loveland

5-3

9

4-4

10

Points 88 88 72 55 50 42 34 33 27 22

Othon: Wilmington 12. Fen~~<:k 8, McNich<>las 7, Sh~ r Paldeia 5, Cl1nton-Mass1e 3, East Clâ&#x20AC;˘nton 3, Readmg 3.

-


,Moeller 24, Col. DeSales 19 After scoring a touchdown with _ one minute left, DeSales recovered ¡ an onside kick, but the Moeller defense held on downs. Crusaders quarterback Chris Reisert was 1fH>f-26 passing for 189 yards and three touchdowns. Tyler Dierkers had eight receptions for 96 yards, and Pat Watt had six receptions for 66 yards and two touchdowns. , Running back Martez Williams ' . added 22 rushes for 101 yards for Moeller. 9-/Q 'of//,[ oc.f - - - -..- ........

0 7

6 7

6 7

7 3

M-S. Redwine 24 pass from Reisen (Corter kick) 0-Killlla 15 pass from Mangini (run failed) M-Watt 13 pass from Reisert (Corter kick) 0-Manginll run (pass failed) M-Watt 10 pass from Reisert (Corter kick) M-FG. carter 29 yards I>-Thomas 4 pass from Mangini (Tnncipi kick) Rerords: M 7-1. 0 4-4

-19 -24


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2004 B9

HIGH SCHOOLS

Shuck's .projections

Colerain would stay at home By Tom Groeschen · Enquirer staff writer -

Colerain, Moeller and St. Xavier will open the Division I playoffs with home games, according to' Ohio computer ratings expert Steve Shuck. Elder, defending two-time state champion, will open the playoffs with a road game under Shuck~s projections. And, this also could be the first time that all four Greater Catholic South League teams {Elder, La Salle, Moeller, St. Xavier) make the playoffs in the same year. The top eight teams in each Ohio region make the playoffs. The top four teams in each region will have home playoff openers, and the bottom four travel for their first game. "If the season ended today, all four members of the GCL South would advance," Shuck said. Shuck, commissioner of the Greater Miami Conference, has a weekly projection list used each October by the Enquirer and various local schools. Shuck calculates tifial projections based on his pre-

dictions of remaining games. Shuck's projections would bring the following Division I pairings: Projected No.1 seed Colerain would host No.8 Lakota West; No.2 seed St. Xavier would host No. 7 La Salle; No. 3 Moeller would host No. 6 Elder; and No. 4 Centerville would host No.5 Lakota East. The regular season ends the weekendofOct. 29-30,andpostseason play begins Nov. 5-6. The Ohio High School Athletic Association uses the Harbin computer rating system to determine playoff participants. First-level points are awarded for victories; for example, victories over a Division I school bring more points than victories over Division II schools. Second-level points also are awarded, based upon a defeated opponent's victories during the remainder of the season. In Division II, Withrow stands to finish No.1 in its region and make the school's first playoff appearance. Springboro and Glen Este also would host playoff openers, with Kings, Norwood and Mount

Healthy playing road openers. The following list includes some teams "on the bubble." That inVisit Cin~:innati.Com for the latest cludes Edgewood, the 2003 Divihigh school football scores. sion II state runner-up.

dl!ttl®iift•

Division I, Region 4

Team (Current) 1. Colerain (6-0) 2. st. Xavier (6-01 3. Moeller (5-11 4. Centerville (6-Q)

5. Lakota East (6-01 6. Elder (4-21 7. La Solie (4-21 8. Lakota West 16-01 9. Northmont (5-1)

Projected

Final points

10.0 9-1 8-2

35.0 34.5 34.4

9·1

33.1

10.0 7·3 8-2

27.3 27.2 26.4 26.3

9-1

24.5

6-4

' Division II, Region 8

Team (Current) 1. W"rthrow (6-0) 2. Sprin&boro (6-01 3. Glen Este 16-01

Projected

F"mal points

10.0 9-1 10.0

31.7 31.3 26.2

4. Dayton Carroll (5-1)

B-2

25.6

8-2 9-1

24.6 21.9

7. Jackson (6-Q)

10-0

21.6

8-2 8-2

20.5 19.3

Division Ill, Region 12

Team (Current)

I. Chaminade-Julienne (5-I)

Projected B-2

Final points

10-0 9-1 7-2

26.9 23.3 22.6 22.3

5. Wyominc (4-21

8-2

21.4

6. Circleville (5-1) • 7. KetteringAiter(4-2) B. Valley VIew (5-I) 9. Logan Elm (5-1)

B-2 7-3 7-2 7-3

2L3 19.3 !B.2 17.0

10. Indian Hill (5-11

7·3

16.9

2. Miami Trace (6-<J) 3. St. Marys (5-I) 4. Bellbrook (4-2)

Projected

Fhull points

I. Jonathan Alder (6-Q)

9-0

24.1

2. Reading (5-11 3. Clinton-Mallie (4-21

8-2 8-2

22.0 19.8

4. Versailles (5-1)

B-2 6-4 B-2

15.2

5. Madeira (3-31 6. Kenton Ridge (4-2) 7. Ca~lsle (2-3)

8. Batavia (5-11 9. Mariemont (2-41

17.1 15.0 !4.5

6-3

8-2

14.0 13.5

6-4

Division V, Region 20

5. Klnp (4-21 6. Norwood (5-11 8. Mount Healllly (4-21 9. Edgewood (4-21

Division IV, Region 16

Team (Current)

Team (Current)

I. Marion Pleasant (6-Q) 2. West Uberty-Salem (6-<J)

Projected

Final points

10-0 10-Q

22.B • 21.2

3. East Clinton (6-01

9-1

20.8

4. Columbus Hartley (4-2) 5. Zane Trace (5-1) 6. Anna (5-ti 7. Arcanum (5-I) B. St Henry (5-1)

6-3 9-1

B-2 B-2 B-2

17.5 17.0 15.2 15.0 13.9

9. Shroder (4-21 10. Fenwick (4-21

7·3 7·3

13.6 12.5

Division VI, Ret!ion 24

Team (Current)

I. Mechanicsburg(5-1) 2. Troy Christian (5-I) 3. Cln. Country Day (5-11 4. New Bremen (4-2) 5. Covington (4-2) 6. Dcla Hardin Northern (6-Q) 7. DeGraff Riverside (4-2) B. No. Lewisburg Triad (3-3)

-~ 9-1 9-1

Final points

9-1

15.7

7-3

12.B5 12.84 12.2 10.1 9.4

B-2 B-2 7-3 6-4

IB.O 15.B


Moeller's Pnt \'\l.att (Z4)

~r.:i

D' :niL

M:oeller: Holds t)ff comeback "Ht;s is ::r: t:1i.rd ~tn!l.~h~ v;cck we've gn\1cn JrjJle:l in Hw f'.r,:t half," Eld:•r Cll1t\ ;, Dong: ' Nnti;t.~~u.:y sai(:.

' '\"r:'· cf:[:· ~f .:;:c(..'fJ :u~~ ntlwr. I tlor..:~:. kn(~\\ t~tc: an~,:,.cr~ 1·y::t w('-\t• !C:Ot tG s:t "r p!aJ g;1.rne.'"' i.t)g one hal: aaci

:\1c:d.lc:"

0

.r•;;>-:),

itr.;

?a~~::r;~ a~t:tc: ·; ur..~ t~,~~·~I ~~;-t~k

.~.·

nwuP'.l cl.r.:-fcu:c .~ t~: wm. l.lc Cm-

:':tdcr:' !•;ldcr c1J chJ\'c";JS :'cYcml <1~::(rc.T' tb.: l )ifJ.7~1(:fS ~~4' 111:::.\ /L1 \~,·.;·~-~;: 2 Hi I~'ft :~l th(' t11ird. q~.a:~~-·~". t<d;;n1 tl:.~l '<': fn:· .5E:l yards ~~~.~~- t\~_r::'·(; h.:.-: h-~ ~~ ~~ K' :5.:-~:t hH::~ a~ :Hoc[L·r tcnk Ll 2·(1<; l:~::f"bw Jc~1~::. ]\vo nf t:.K.~ TI}s ·r(c·~1: to \:.'[~~c·

rcct:h'LT __ 't~~

'

i ;:. :,..,:::-

[.:i;f

\Y~u~~, Ht~i~c:t

e~~.~c::"cd a~ ~:r.<\ ~-:-:'g" c·:' \'o'ith 1/J~ ~·iT2~:~ 2I~.::" ~.C ~.;~~!) Walt c t~c::ccl :n ::1c top

I :'C\T.wr :n: kt.'::, viW1 :':{) ('~_;;.tc~JJe~ f:t: :·J1 r~t.rt.~: ~~:J:dl ~(:'1{~

e:;c~:<:efr: ~at VH1~t

n::TJil:~.

\\D ;:; ;:;'::;: g ci~::~:ection ~::r

malws a s:::sctacular .:::atcll as re foils Elds:'s f\y:e Rudo 1 ~.

Watt h;cd c·; r~:.Jt c;;;.tc:.w:; fo:- lOG !"<:rdo;. Tyler I:ic·rkcr;; 'll~n had Ht:b; r.:::n;:r : :or fiS ya:-ds aml '"i~-;~tt catctc~~. ·~;·r 12,~ y·t~~rc:.~t 1:~•.rte;; ',\Tl.fu Jd for 5:1. E:c.~·:-'" :;.::r: . 'cfi~''\':·l:::td rj.r:H." \ i,''rC' COJ113:J.Jcl t:K' c;e(c;w:- fGr 1:1 yc.:"d:-:. m~c! t\m ec ( -~ ~~ . sc:~e~Iu:t' ~o::- bo~h :;:tr· TD~. inc:ndin!{ ;H lOyt~rc! ·;;, :r fbish::d 2°: ad E!.· ~~'rJr~l v~.it.~l (!:} ~,--::\-·:.n1d:,; 1'(f1, d.c:' :.,2 h; tb': ~-:J~J.C. St. Xavier f:r;" 1 t :f:K:: t:cfca~rmc 1:.:1 Sc:.lk r:~rc,r"s Cn1~"f Car~··r \,. ?~~ 3tJ'~ :,;::~·~: of).(i ;1m;si:c;; i lt :riC y .:·::~, a':ltd ;;Jz:: t\\'D ~~~!)s, t~~1(. [J.c: u:~G ·.'tztl for a ';.~.:·~"[~?It~.(-~ :11d r" ;,~g~-ofi ate1o· ~t~_·:;~t~. Eldk··~ ~;~. · ,1~S yard.::; ty::.inl of c;cL S:1~:tL r·.J.~~l::~:g. ~r.J(n{lc:: L~.·.~ ~!18

r

r~~·£:1,;J.c·~.

P'~.s~ ·

in t?:.t1 120 r~~; 'tJ.~F-L l{df1 ~J~:>~n

IoJc~cr

1

c :c0

neec!.ci! ~(;: \T:I~ to

bac~t~

:v!ocllc~.~ \\"Ort [k:·spf.~t~ ~:1c ab~,~··::.~,~~

of the team's ~op run.I1is1::: hac;~. !J;J:',1· id BanK:>, v.,:w didn't ;1ky bt·L~:iU\·L' o: a han:s:..."'icc-r iuju:y. ~;~;:;;;:;·:::: ~~-=~-:~::::,:_

1~

··· ::;:e:

"

•,:

7 7

.,.,

14 "'Zl Q 27 00


Ohio standard-bearer Sees rivals catch up _Moeller High thriving on longtime success, but other Cincinnati schools are in the game

Heads of the dass Using its final high school football rankings from 1982 to 2003, USA TODAY identified the nation's top 25 programs (actually the top 26 because of a tie at No. 25) overthat 22year span. Schools were awarded 25 points for a first-place season finish, 24 points for a second-place finish and so on: Times Highest R.ank,school _ __ranked ftnlsh(es) 1. Concord(Calif.) ---1\1998,2000 De La Salle '01 ,'02,'03) 2.Valdosta(Ga.) _ 7___ 1(1984,'86) 3. Cleveland St.b:natius-- 8 - ----n1989.'93) 4. central Bucks{Pa.)West 8 3(19911 5.Be..WiCk(Pa.J 6 -fC1983;'92,'95l 6. Santa Ana (Calif) 5 I (1994,'96) Mater Dei 7.LongBeachPoly 5 2(1997,2000) · 8.Union(N.J.) 6 4(1991) 9. East St. LouisOII.l 5 1 (1985) 10. Evangel Christian 6 2 ( 1999) (Shreveport, La.) 11. OdeSsa\Tex.iSYPermlan 4 -2 (1989,'91 l 12. Cincinnati Moeller 4 1 (1982) 13. New Lenox (Ill.) 5 8 (2001) Providence Catholic 14.FarmmgtonHills(Mich.) 6 5(2001) Harrison 15.1ndianapolisBen DaVis 4 ---;r[f988,2001 J 16. Chicago Mount Carmel 4 6 (1988, '96 l 17.)enks(Okla.) 4 _ 2(2QQ1l 18. Pittsburgh North Hil~ 4 1 (1987) t9. Hainpton\VaT 4 2 (19.96 1 20. Brockton(Mass.) 4 _ 5(1987) 21. Charlotte Independence 3 _ 3 (2002) 22. RichmondcountvCN.C.l 4 5(19891 23. West Monroe(La.) 4 5(2000) 24. Oradell (N.j.) 4 9 (1998) Ber~:en Catholic 25. DeMatha 5 b(1986) (Hyattsville, Md.) 25.Midland___ - - 3 1(1999) (Texas) Lee The next 10:27. Honolulu St. Louis; 28. Brentwood (Tenn.) Academy; 29. Kansas City (Mo.) Rockhurst; 30. Louisville Trinity: 31. PeQsacola (Fla.) Woodham; 32. Jefferson City (Mo.); 33.Athens(Ga.) Clarke Central; 34. Montvale (N.J.) St. joseph Regional; 35. Joliet (Ill.) Catholic, 36. Katy (Texas).

r.r-

;o/" ll'd-

BySa{R~~ I and Steve Wieberg USA TODAY Cincinnati's Moeller High was once the epitome of a big-time high school football powerhouse. With 12 undefeated teams since 1963, seven Ohio state titles and one USA TODAY No. 1 finish, Moeller played the game at the highest level. When Notre Dame was looking for a head coach after the 1980 season, it passed over veteran college coaches to pick Moeller's Gerry Faust. Moeller is no longer the dominant football power in the USA, Ohio or even Cincinnati. In the 2004 Cincinnati Enquirer preseason rankings, the Crusaders were fifth, and rivals Elder, Colerain and St. Xavier were 1-2-3. In the latest rank~s. Colerain is No. 1, followed by St XaVIer, Moeller and Elder. For the men who run the 1,000student. all-male school's athletics program, that's not·a disaster: In a 2003 Enquirer polL the school finished No. 1 in six of 10 ranked sports. Football was not oneofthem. "At one time - 20 years ago in the Faust era -we were perceived as a football-only kind of school where the other sports simply didn't get the dollars," athletics director Barry Borman says. "Football and basketball are the two sports that people are most interested in. Yet our community sees us striving for excellence in evervthingwe do." Football hasn't withered on the vine, however. The reality is that other schools in Ohio began to copy the hUdllY successful formula of Moeller, whiCh iS

w:~T·•

'f

.JI!IJ'~

~~-·~~-,~··

~ ... ~·

fourth nationally in all-time winning percentage (.826) but hasn't won a state title since 1985. When Faust started the program in 1963, he created one of the area's first high school weight training rooms - in an assistant's basement As the program prospered, practice fields were added • and the beefed-up weight room moved to Moeller's suburban campus. Six years ago Moeller built a $3 million gym and $1.5 million athletics department wing that included a weight room and a wrestling room. The $4 million capital projects campaign is renovating practice fields and installing allweather field turf. In the ensuing arms race with its local rivals, however, the school simply could not add any more weapons. 'When we finish this project, we will have done all the upgrading we can do," says Borman, who has spent 36 years at Moeller, 14 as athletics director. "We have no other land. We will have maxed out the building facilities we need." Meanwhile, his competition was making headway. At top-ranked Colerain, a public school on Cincinnati's booming west side, head coach Kerry Coombs and athletics director Dan Moody put their energies into building bridges to the community to stem the tide of good athletes flowing to parochial schools. Since Coombs arrived in 1990, the Cardinals are 118-30 overall and 57-4 at home. The school established the little Cardinals youth football program, which identifies potential team members. On Elementa!y Alumni Night, children from area schools are invited onto the field

By Steven M. Herpptch, 1M Cfndnnatl Enqulm"

Hanging in there: Moeller High football coach Bob Crable says he's limited by who can go to his school because he can only draw from one district. before the game to form human tunnels, one for each school. Players who attended those schools are introduced and then run through the tunnels, slapping high-fives with the younger kids as the school's band plays the fight song. "My son has done that and says it was one of the most moving experiences he's ever had," says Moody, who played at Colerain. "He had goose bumps." Colerain has upgraded its 5,000-seat stadium with a pro-level Field nuf artificial surface, thanks to fundraising by the school's booster club. Moeller head football coach Bob Crable says his biggest competitive problem is one he is powerless to control. His

team can hold its own with public Colerain and Catholic Elder, he says, but can't overcome the advantages of St Xavier, a jesuit prep school assodated with the Chicago Province instead of the local Catholic diocese. St. Xavier defeated Moeller 35-21, its fifth win in the teams' last six meetings, on Sept 21. St Xavier "has the advantage in the caliber of players they get They bring kids in from all over the dty, and the rest of the schools are limited to a district" In the long run, Borman says, attitude is what keeps the Moeller machine purring: "People look at our tradition and say, 'You know what?l want to go to Moeller to play football.' "


B4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2004

SPORTS

Higb school insider

Forfeits hurt the players While teams doublecheck rosters, maybe it's time to change rules

akewood St Edward's four football forfeits are a red alert for other Ohio schools, who are scrambling to check and re-check their player eligibility lists. The common, if unspoken a football team." thought St Ed was 6-0 and ranked No. 2 Please, Lord, don't let that hapin the Ohio Division I state poll pen to us. The forfeits sent the team to 2-4, "It makes you sick to and a playoff berth is now if. fy. ' your stomach for those kids, because they didn't · When this happens, evdo anything wrong," St Xaeryone starts stepping lightvier coach Steve Specht ly. Players' ages, grades and said. transfer papers get checked Specht's Bombers were and re-checked- or so you one beneficiary of the would hope. St Ed forfeits. St. Xavier Colerain coach Kerry lost 23-17 to St Ed in a seaCoombs can identify. son opener, but the BombIn 1995, Coombs' CardiTom ers now get credit for a 1-0 nals reached the Division I Groeschen state championship game. win. St Xavier already was But on the Monday before the game, Colerain was found to projected to make the playoffs by Harbin computer points expert have used an ineligible player all Steve Shuck, but the road just got a season. The Cardinals had to forfeit little easier. all13 wins and were barred from "We won't turn our backs on the playing in the state computer points, but St Ed's beat final. us head to head," Specht said.•"It's 1bis year, Colerain is ranked a shame, because they're a heck of No. lin the Enquirer area Division

L

'The football tournament regula· tion system is adopted by our boart of control," Moore said. "Eachyear it's inspected and approved by the members. If they want to say at some point they don't like the applicability of it, they have ample oppor. tunity to look at it" With eight teams making the playoffs from each region, what if you're No.9 and you miss out because of somebody else's forfeits? Maybe you could take St Ed's points away, but don't give those points to schools they had beaten. But then you might have a Harbin computer meltdown. "HAL" Harbin might stage a hostile OHSAA takeover akin to 2001: A Space Odyssey. At the very least, the administrators/ coaches responsible for major ineligibility gaffes should pay. If they're not reassigned or demoted, how about a harsher penalty. Such as, you could make them watch 2001: A Space Odyssey for about 2,001 consecutive hours. But seriously, please don't keep penalizing the kids.

I coaChes' poll and the state poll, and No. 5 nationally by USA Today. Everyone is eligible, everyone · checks out "It's unfortunate that in our sport, these types of problems give you the death penaltY," Coombs said. "If this was any other sport, the kids don't have to pay that kind of price.'' A basketball team, for instance, can forfeit games and usually not have its postseason affected. That's not true in football, where computer points determine playoff teams. 'The rules are made in consultation with our schools," said Debbie Moore, an Ohio High School Athletic Association assistant commissioner. "Every school system in the state signs on to the rules every year. It's their rules, not the OHSAA's." In other words, if the schools want to change this rule, then change it E-mail tgroeschen@enquirer. com..


High school footbaU~1 Elder drops second straight .in GCL South

Five years' futility ends Moeller fends off Elder comeback toto/., en~ streak oc..J By Tom Gr sChen

Enquirer staff writer

Moeller led Elder 27-0 late in the third quarter Friday, and hundreds of fans began streaming for the exits at Lockland Stadium. Those who stayed watched the Crusaders fight off a furious Elder rally to win 27-21, as Moeller ended a five-year losing streak to the Panthers. With heavy traffic and red tail lights visible outside the stadium, Moeller's Sean Redwine covered an Elder onside kick with 25 seconds left to ice it. "It's a great feeling to beat Elder, after all these years," Moeller standout guard Matt Tennant said. 'We knew we'd have to play hardfor 48 minutes." Crusaders quarterback Chris Reisert threw for 288 yards and three touchdowns and ran for another score. Elder, two-time defending state champion, mounted a frantic comeback but could not quite pull it off. 'The Panthers scored their 21 points im the fina115 minutes of play. 'We had it in the back of our minds that they would come back, because they're a great team," Reis- Moeller's Sean Redwine makes a catch for a 26-yard touchdown past Elder's Ricky Stautberg in the first ert said. "It's just great for our senior quarter at Lockland Stadium Friday. It was the first score of the game for either team. class to beat them and leave a little legacy." A sellout crowd of about 7,000 . watched the Greater Catholic League South rivals play at Moeller's home field. A large chunk of the crowd was gone by game's end. "At halftime, we told our players • St. xavier won the Greater Catholic the score was still 0-0," Moeller League South, going 3-0 in the league by coach Bob Crable said. "Elder is a beating La Salle 34-20. bunch of fighters, and you knew they wouldn't go away. I'm just glad • Wyoming scored nine unanswered points we didn't go to overtime." in the fourth quarter to defeat Reading 30-21 MoellerisrankedNo. 3andElder in Cincinnati Hills League play. is No.4 in the Enquirer Division I • Withrow rolled to 7-0, defeating Western coaches' poll. Hills 33-8. Elder was coming off a 33-30 dou' • Winton Woods pounded the running ble OT loss to St. Xavier, having fallgame at Glen Este, and the Warriors took en behind 20-6 at halftime. Two control in the Fort Ancient Valley Conference weeks before, Elder rallied from a Buckeye division with a 42-21 victory. 21-0 deficit to beat La Salle 38-35.

FRIDAY'S HIGHLIGHTS

See MOELLER, Page Cll

St. Xavier's Chris Clonnl is brought down by La Salle's Rick Betsch. Cionni rushed for148 yards and one touchdown.

Stories and scores, C10-C11·

..


Moeller's

Pat Watt looks to break through the hole against Elder in their game at Lockland Stadium Friday.

n.COM

SCORES AND MORE IN SPORTS

FRIDAY NIGHT

TOP REGIONAL GAMES Moeller 27 Elder 21

St. Xavier 34 LaSalle 20

Winton Woods 42 Glen Este 21

Norwood 41 Little Miami 34

Wyoming 30 Reading 21

Withrow 33 Western Hills 8

....................................................; ....................................................;....................................................

F00TBALL

MORE PHOTOS ONLINE AT CININNATI.COM

'HE CINCINNATI ENQUIRER ;JI.ttm» ,,,,ill ;j •ti'M.t; a (e] :)

I .

EAST EDmON

50


~ ~. I

I

/.--·

I

·I

, 1\ I

:.

l.

~./"\ ~ ·;.n~-· 0 i ,-j 11 ·.

(~

!

'/

n

.. n I rl ~~ ~r-_"1 ~ ~~ ~ C ~

'll-~j\___Al -: '

[:

rno~

L.

/

\

I.

lf70 [./"\L :I tj

/>_~L.l_j __ j\:_!j

I

II

.

·

1

I

1

.

:

I

I

I'

/

\I \ l

. - ...../

~ __

I

j

Enqui•er photos/ERNEST COLEMAN

i.'ioeller qua1'terback Chris Relsart (top left), receiver Pat Watt (top right) and coach Bob Crable (above)

have helped the Crusaders be compared t:> the school's dominant teams from the 1970s and '80s.

2004 recalls giieat teams in school's history Dy Tc::J Grocscl!~n Enquirer staff writer Moeller might not be the football , juggernaut it was, but the 2004 · team has strred memories of the Crusaders' greatest teams. Scoring 43.2 points per game and allowing just 12.8, the Crusad· ers (5-l, 1-1 Greater Catholic League South) are ranked No. 3 in the Enquirer Division I coaches' 1 poll and No. 6 in the Associated Press state poll. With two-time defending state champion Elder (4-2, 1-1 GCLS) visiting tonight (Lockland Stadium. 7:30p.m.), Moeller hopes to regain the upper hand. Elder has beaten the Crusaders five straight years. "We've been talking all year about how we're out to bring the glory days btck to Moeller," said Pat Watt, a senior who is the Crusaders' top wi:le receiver. "We hear stories all the time about the great teams here, and we'd like to be one of those teams." With coaches Gerry Faust, Ted Bacigalupo anrl Steve Klonne at the 1 forefront, Moeller began its run of national glory in the mid-1970s. From 1975-85, Moeller won seven state championships and five mythical national titles. But, the Crusaders' last state ti· tie was in 1985. They haven't reached the state finals since 1997. "TliTies have changed," said Moeller athleti: director Barry Borman. "Twenty years ago, we were a step ahead of some people with things like offseason programs and weightlifting. Other programs developed to wht:Te it's a pretty even playing field." Moeller coach Bob Crable, like Borman a veteran of several decades at the school, also can speak with authority on the subject. Crable was a prep All-American linebacker at Moe1er in the 1970s, a college All-American at Notre Dame and an NFL player for six years with the New York Jets. Crable becaJle Moel •r h~ad 1

Enquirer fi:e photo

Gerry F£cst r:;.~s ona of several Moeller coaches from the mid-70s to 1985 who helped the school build a powerhouse football program.

1

['1.\:czz~[~..,t) 1hZl:[t~~[ Gl!CGI~]C~ Pl;yofl tppellrances: 22 (1973-7 4-75-76-77-79-80-81-82-83-84-8588-89-90-93-96-97-99, 2000-02-03). Stl:te tit as: 7 (1975-76-77-79-80-82-85). Stl:to ru~:nor-t:p: 4 (1981-89-93-97). i':.ythlctl n11t1onnl titles: 5 (1976-77-79-80-82). t~OTE: Moeller's 22 playoff appearances, seven state championships and five national titles are all Cincinnati prep football records. coach in 2001 and has a 25-14 career record. Moeller made the playoffs in 2002 and '03 and seems headed there agaia As for the Moeller dynasty, Crable said it's best to just appreciate how it was. "I don't think you'll ever see that again," he said. "In those days, we were the option if you wanted to get a Division I college scholarship. Kids just flocked here. But now kids know they can get a Division I scholarship playing at other schools, too "And that's fine, you can't blame them. The culture is just different now, and you've got a lot of very good programs out there." That incl.tdes reigning power Colerain, which handled Moeller in a preseason scrimmage. Colerain is ranked No.~ in the city and state and No.5 by USA Today- ratings once routine at Moeller.

But this '04 team is very good. Quarterback Chris Reisert leads the city with 1.432 yards passing and l6TD passes. Watt is his top receiver, with 36 catches for 554 yards and seven TDs. Offensive guard Matt Tennant is one of the state's top-rand:ed players and has committed to Boston College. Defensively, the list of standouts ' includes defensive backs Derico Murray and Matt Held, linebackers Alex]aeger, Kevin Hum bel and Pat Grau and lineman Patrick Farrell. They will all play important roles against Elder tonight. "It'd be nice to beat them, because they've been the powerhouse for a few years," Watt said. Said Crable: "I don't look at it as making any statements. This is just our game this week, and that's as far as we're loo:illlg." E-mail tgroescilen@enq~tirer.com


Barnes' big night powers Crusaders . '

The Enquirer

Senior running back Daniel Barnes scored three touchdowns and rushed for 115 yards on 28 carries to lead Moeller to a 33-14 victory over La Salle in a Greater Catholic League South game at La Salle. The Crusaders, the fourthranked team in the Enquirer Division I coaches' poll, took advantage of four interceptions. Moeller senior quarterback Chris Reisert was 1~of-24 for 293 yards and a touchdown pass to senior receiver Pat Watt. Watt caught six passes for 127 yards. La Salle senior running back Erick Morton got the Lancers on the board first on a 15-yard touchdown run. Morton also had five receptions for 39 yards. Senior quarterback Anthony Kummer, returning from a wrist injury the third game of the year, was 24-of-42 for 309 yards, two touchdowns and four interceptions. Moeller had 449 total yards to La Salle's 326. 1286-33 lloeller---- 7 7 7 0 0 -14 Salle-¡---l-Mortnn 15 pass froM Ku:r.'ller (WMnmger kick) 1,.,

IM-Bames

2

run (Caner k'ck) M-Reise~ 6 run (k'ck failed) M-Bames 6 run (pass failed) L-Wiegele 13 pass from Kummer (Wanninger kick) M-Watt 48 pass from Reise~ (Meytr pass f:l>m Reise~)

~~:SJ~~.(Ft'G~~~l4-2,0-2

,

/


86 TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2004

HIGHS

High school football

Under Gamble, Withrow moves up to No. 2 ranking By Tom Groeschen

Team

Enquirer staff writer

Coach Doc Gamble has lifted Withrow to football heights last seen when a player named Doc Gamble was the Tigers' quarterback. Withrow (6-0) has risen to a season-high No. 2 in this week's Enquirer Divisions IT-VI coaches' poll. Gamble, a former Withrow quarterback in his second year as Tigers coach, has guided the team to 12 consecutive wins dating to September 2003. "Each game gets us closer to tlie playoffs," Gamble said. "That's the main goal." The playoffs are familiar turf for teams such as Colerain (6-0), which remains a unanimous No.1 in the Enquirer Division I poll. But for Withrow, a playoff spot would be the first in school history. Last year's team just missed a Division IT postseason berth. Gamble led Withrow to a 25-5 overall record when he was a threeyear starting quarterback in the late 1980s. He returned as head coach of a struggling Tigers program in 2003. Last year's team started~. then finished 6-0. Add that to this year's 6-0 start, and the 12-game winning streak ties a· school record set in

DMSIONI

1. Colerain (10) 2. St Xavier 3. Moeller 4. Elder 5. Lakota East 6.la Salle 7. Lakota West B. lebanon 9. Winton Woods 10. Mason

Record 6-0 5-1 5-1 4-2 6-0 4-2 6-0 5·1 4-2 4-2

Pvs. Points 1

3

100

90

4

72

2

69

6 5 7

51 45

8

26

9 NR

21 13

55

othen: A"derron 3, Pcnceton 2. Oak Htlls 2. Fa•rfield t

Team

DIVISIONS II·VI

1. Glen Este (10) 2. Withrow ( 1) 3. Kings 4. Reading 5. Mount Healthy 6. Norwood 7. Springboro 8. Wyoming Enquirer file 9. Roger Bacon 10. Indian Hill Withrow coach Doc Gamble has

led a once struggling team to 12 straight wins since last year.

Gamble's playing days. Withrow seeks a 13th straight win Friday when Western Hills visits. Withrow is led by quarterback Dante Love, guard]ovon Davis, defensive end Kallen Wade and linebacker Shawn Redd. "We have a number of underclassmen doing well," Gamble said. "Actually we thought next year would be our best year, but this team has already learned how to

Record 6-0 6-0 4-2 5-1 4-2 5-1 6-0 4-2 3-3 5-1

Pvs. Points 1 3

109 91

6

78

7 8 2 4 NR NR 10

49 47 45 39 31 30 23

others: Lo'eland 22, Edgewood 13, McNicholas 8. Ross 7. Cin. Country Oay 5, Fenwick 3, East Cl!nton 2. Bata-.a I, C!mton-Massie 1, Wilmington 1.

win." Withrow moved from No.3 to No. 2 this week, after previous No. 2 Norwood lost to Kings 14-7. Kings improved from No.6 to No.3. In Division I, St Xavier rose from No. 3 to No. 2 after beating previous No. 2 Elder 33-30 in double overtime.

E-mail tgroescllen@enquirer. com


High school football! St. Xavier wins thriller over Moeller 35-31

Schoenhoft leads rally Winning score comes with :13 rell!aining ~

By Tom Groeschen

'

~

'

...

Enquirer staff writer

Rob Schoenhoft showed Friday night why he is rated one of the best high school quarterbacks in America. The St. Xavier senior led his team on a game-winning drive in the final minutes, throwing the winning touchdown with 13 seconds left as the Bombers beat Moeller 35-31 in a thriller at St. X. Schoenhoft, off a play-action fake, hit tight end Kyle Gibler with a 2-yard TD pass to decide it. That made it 34-31, and John Milligan's extra point made it 35-31. Schoenhoft, who has committed to Ohio State and is widely ranked as one of the top 10 prep quarterbacks in the nation, was still trying to gather his thoughts in the onfield mob scene afterward. He marched the Bombers 64 yards over the final3:22 of play. Overall he completed 11 of 18 The Enquirer/ JEFF SWINGER passes for 143 yards, two TDs and an interception. St. Xavier's (21) Chris Clonnl is escorted by lineman Sean Duesing (72) on a touchdown run against "Unbelievable," Schoenhoft Moeller Friday. Cionni had 205 rushing yards, 45 receiving yards and scored three touchdowns. said. "We've worked too hard for too long to lose this one. Our offenFriday's sive line was unbelievable, my receivers made great catches, and highlights we ran the ball great." St. Xavier's Chris Cionni rushed • Amishandled snap led to the 40 times for 205 yards, caught two game-winning field goal for No. 3 passes for 45 yards and scored Elder, as the Panthers rallied for a three times. 38-35 victory over Greater Catholic Moeller started its final drive on League rival and No. 4-ranked its 6-yard line. With one play left, La Salle. the Crusaders tried a hook-and• Top-ranked Colerain improved to ladder pass. Chris Reisert hit Tyler 5-0 with its 70-3 victory over GreatDierkers, who flipped the ball to a er Miami Conference foe Milford. trailing Pat Watt. • Hosea Simpson rushed for a Watt was run out of bounds at school-record 402 yards to carry his own 35-yard line as time exWinton Woods to a 48-28 victory pired. A sellout crowd of 8,000 over Harrison in the Fort Ancient The COLEMAN Valley Conference. watched at St. Xavier. See ST. XAVIER, Page Cll

Colerain's Terrill Byrd (left) and Tyler Moeller take down Milford quarterback Chris Ryan for a loss in Colerain's 70-3 victory.

Coverage, C12-13


812 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2004

High school insider

Colerain's Coombs not falling for all the hype he Colerain football team looks unbeatable this year. A state title ¡ seems inevitable. But then, you've heard that before. Right here, for instance. "Be kind to the Colerain Cardinals," a longtime Tom Moeller booster Groeschen advised me recently. ''Remember that year when Princeton was out of this world?" Sure do. It was 1985, and Princeton had that invincible look A certain young Enquirer sportswriter (me) wrote that Princeton was untouchable, unbelievable, the greatest thing since Paul Brown invented football. (Or was that Marvin Lewis?). Of course, unbeatable Princeton lost 24-12 to Moeller in the playoffs. Moeller went on to win the state title, and veteran Crusaders fans haven't forgotten. All right, I was wrong! Yet there we were last winter, doing it to Moeller this time. Many felt Moeller had one of the

T

greatest basketball teams the city has ever seen. Andrew Brackman, Josh Duncan and Bubba Walther already had won the state title as juniors. Longtime, respected coaches including Lakota West's Mike Mueller called Moeller the most talented team they had ever seen. But Moeller was upset by Columbus Brookhaven in the regional final. So now, Colerain football. The Cardinals are 5-0 and are just crushing people. They are ranked No. 6 by USA Today. They held Elder to minus-22 yards rushing. They're scoring their usual4(). plus points a game. Elder coach Doug Ramsey said Colerain has the best defense he has seen in eight years as a head coach. Anderson's Vmce Suriano said Colerain is the best team he has seen in 31 years of coaching. Princeton's Brian Dodds compared Colerain to the great teams he saw when coaching in Florida Sycamore's Tom Adams said Colerain might be the best defense he has seen in 29 years of coaching. Colerain coach Kerry Coombs isn't falling for it 'The state champion (Elder) is still right down the road," Coombs said. Coombs believes other teams

will use this "unbeatable" thing

against Colerain. And he's right ''Keep pumping them up," a rival coach recently told me, smiling. 'That's just fine." Can anyone beat Colerain? When people ask, I usually give it this: 'They're very good ... One of the best teams fve ever seen ... But in the playoffs, you never know." How's that for politically correct? And please hold those cards and letters, as they said back in the old says. Such as 1985. IWJ.INDUCTEES: Anderson recently inducted former principal Mike Hall and former football quarterback Steve Lainhart (1966-69) into its Hall of Champions. GOOD SPORTS: Several local schools recently were named recipients of the 2003-04 Ohio High School Athletic Association Harold A Meyer Award for sportsmanship, ethics and integrity. Honored were Amelia, Anderson, Glen Este, Goshen, Kings, La Salle, little Miami, Loveland, Madeira, Mason, Northwest, Norwood, Reading, Ross, Turpin, Wilmington, Wmton Woods and Cincinnati's Nagel Middle School.

E-mail tgroeschen@enquirer.com l


THE ENQUIRER

r/z_5/of

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL

St. Xavier: Schoenhoft leads late rally From Page Cl

~

The area's No. 5-ranked Bombers rallied to beat the No.2 Crusaders in a big Greater Catholic League South game. 'There's not much to say,"Moeller coach Bob Crable said. "I thought we showed a lot of character coming back." Moeller roared back after trailing 28-9 after three periods. Reisert completed 24 of 39 passes for 341 yards, three IDs (all in the fourth period) and was intercepted three times. Moeller went ahead 31-28 on a 64-yard ID pass from Reisert to Justin Smith with 3:27 left, the ball being caught after~ Bombers de. fender tipped it. St. X coach Steve Specht was thrilled for Schoenhoft, who had missed two games this year with a sprained ankle. "People can talk about stats all they want, but like Robbie said, it's all about winning," Specht said. "We're 4-1, and that's all that matters. I love that kid, and he showed tonight how good he is. Heck, this whole team did the job. I have a great staff and great players, and I

The Enquirer/JEFF SWINGER

St. Xavier's Brandon Bryant celebrates a fumble recovery Friday in the Bombers' victory.

want to emphasize that." Carter as the first half ended. St. Xavier built a 14-9lead by halfCionni rushed 17 times for 105 time, after falling behind 6-0. yards in the first half alone. Schoenhoft threw a 29-yard TD Moeller visits La Salle next pass to Cionni and scored on a 9- week. St. Xavier travels to Elder. yard run in the first half. ......................-..... 6 3 0 22 -31 Moeller chopped its deficit to Moeller St. Xavier......... -................. 0 14 14 7 -35 14-9 on a 28-yard field goal by Mike

M¡Williams 1 run (kick blocked) SX-Cionni 29 pass from Schoenhoft (Milligan kick) SX-Schoenhoft 9 run (Milligan kick) M-Carter 28 FG SX-Cionni 17 run (Milligan kick) SX-Cionni 1 run (Milligan kick) M-Watt 4 pass from Reisert (Carter kick) . M-Barnes 12 pass from Reisert (Carter kick) M-Smith 64 pass from Reisert (Dierkers pass from Reisert) SX-Gibler 2 pass from Schoenhoft (Milligan kick) Records: M 4-1 (0-1 GCL-S), SX 4-l (1-0).

.,


The Cincinnati Post,

Saturday, September 25, 2004

58

Elder tops Lancers on late field goal Kick completes Panthers comeback Post staff report

D. J. Hueneman kicked the game-winning 26-yard field goal with three seconds remaining Friday night to complete a fran tic comeback by the Elder Panthers in a 38-35 win that denied former coach Tom Grippa a win in his first trip back to the Pit since leaving the Elder sidelines. While penalties stalled Elder early, La Salle's offense struck for scores on its first two possessions, expanding the lead to 21-0 when senior Eric Morton cut against the grain for a 59-yard touchdown run. Elder responded by mounting a long drive that ended with Nick Zeiser's 2-yard touchdown plunge, then taking advantage of a late turnover to score again before halftime. After Zeiser tied the score at 21 with the only third-quarter score, the teams took turns surging into the lead. Junior quarterback Tyler Sheehan, who finished 16-of-26 for 221 yards, connected for his second touchdown pass to put La Salle ahead 28-21. Elder took its first lead after a pair of touchdown runs, the second a 32-yard Zeiser sweep with 4:55 to play. The score was his third of the night to go along with 125 yards on 23 carries. The Lancers took just more than a minute to tied the score on Morton's second touchdown run, then appeared poised to complete the upset by forcing Elder to punt. La Salle's drive stalled at its own 32, however, and Elder senior Mark Menninger fell on the ball after a high snap derailed the Lancer's punt attempt. That play set up Hueneman for his gamewinning kick. La SALLE 14 7 0 14 at ELDER 0 14 7 17 l-Wiegel16 pass fo!Til Sheehan (Wanninger kick) l-Sheehan 16 run (Wanninger kick) l-Morton 59 run (Wanninger kick) E-Zeiser 2 run (Hueneman kick) E-Carey 14 run (Hueneman kick) E-Zeiser 3 run (Hueneman kick) l-Wiegel 25 pass from Sheehan (Wanninger kick) E-Wittwer 14 run (Hueneman kick) E-Zeiser 32 run (Hueneman kick) l-Morton 7 run (Wanninger kick) E-Hueneman 26 FG Records: Elder 4-1. 1-0 GCL; La Salle 4-1, 0-1.

35 38

COLERAIN 70, MILFORD 3 Colerain racked up 443 total yards, all on the ground, and scored all 70 points in the first

three quarters of the game at Milford. Cardinals senior quarterback Dominic Goodman rushed seven times for 103 yards and three scores in less than two quarters of work. Daniel Magness,· one of five Cardinals to reach the end zone, ran seven times for 69 yards and two touchdowns. COLERAIN 28 28 14 at MILFORD 0 0 D C-Magness 3 run (Schutte kick) C-Goodman 1 run (Schutte kick) C-Sherrer 12 run (Schutte kick) C-Goodman 12 run (Schutte kick) C-Magness 41 run (Schutte kick) C-Goodman 12 run (Schutte kiCk) C-Sherrer 39 run (Schutte kick) C-Lemons 33 run (Schutte kick) C-Curry 10 run (Eberhard kick) C-Curry 30 run (Eberhard kick) M-Gulick 14 field goal RECORDS: Colerain 5-0, Milford 1-4.

0

3

70' ALTER 7 7 14 0 28 3 MCNICHOLAS 0 14 7 0 21 A-Fortner 22 run (Glavin kick) A-Fortner 71 run (Glavin kick) M-B·oehn 4 run (Honkenon kick) M-Dean 11 pass from Klonne (Honkenon kick) A-Krystolik 42 interception (Glavin kick) A-Roark 3 run (Glavin kick) M-Kionne 3 run (Honkenon kick) Records: Kettenng Alter 3-2, 1-0 GCL North; McNicholas 3-2, 1-1.

ST. XAVIER35, MOELLER 31St. Xavier senior quarterback Robby Schoenhoft tossed a 2yard touchdown pass to senior tight end Kyle Gibler with 13 seconds left, spoiling Moeller's fourth-quarter comeback attempt and handing the Crusaders their first loss. Senior quarterback Cris Reisert threw three straight touchdown passes to give Moeller 22 unanswered points, erasing St. Xavier's 28-9 fourth-quarter lead. Junior running back Chris Cionni had 205 yards and two touchdowns on 40 carries, including five rushes that fueled St. Xavier's game-winning 62-yard scoring drive. MOELLER 6 3 0 22 31 at ST. XAVIER 0 14 14 7 35 M-M. Williams 1 run (kick blocked) SX-Cionni 29 pass from Schoenhoft (Milligan kick) SX-Schoenhoft 9 run (Milligan kick) M-Carter 29 field goal SX-Cionni 17 run (Milligan kick) SX-Cionni 1 run (Milligan kick) M-Watt 4 pass from Reisert (Carter kick) M-Barnes 12 pass from Reisert (Carter kick) M-Smlth 64 pass from Reisert (Dierl<ers pass from Reisert) SX-Gibler 2 pass fo!Til Schoen haft (Milligan kiCk) RECORDS: St. Xavier 4-1, 1-0 GCL; Moeller 4-1, 0-1.

WINTON WOODS 48, HARRI· SON 28- Winton Woods sophomore running back Hosea Simpson had 19 carries for a school-record 402 yards and also tied a school record with five rushing touchdowns. Simpson broke Brandon Miree's rushing record, and the sophomore accounted for all four ofWinton Woods second-half touchdowns. Senior quarterback Jamal Ferguson added 84 yards and a score on 12 carries for the Warriors, who finished with 483 yards on the ground.

°

HARRISON 1 1 14 at W. WOODS 14 7 20 7 WW-Stokes 4 run (Ebert kick) H-Jonas 45 pass from Elrod (Bunnell kick) WW-Simpson 67 run (Ebert kick) WW-Ferguson 23 run (Ebert kick)

TAYLOR 49, DEER PARK 21Taylor coaches credited running back Jake Tamaska with 352 yards on 21 carries as the Yellow Jackets claimed their first Cincinnati Hills League win of the KmERING ALTER 28, MCNI· year. TAYLOR 11 12 14 12 49 CHOLAS 21 - Senior running at DEER PARK 0 7 0 14 21 back Danny Fortner carried the T-Ashcraft 22 FG 4 run (Wilkening run) ball 23 times for 163 yards and T-Tamaska T-Tamaska 1 run (kick failed) T-Tamaska 15 run (kick failed) two touchdowns to pace Alter. H-Bunnell 29 pass from Elrod (Bunnell kick) WW-Simpson 53 run (Ebert kick) WW-Simpson 34 run (Ebert kick) WW-Simpson 6 run (kick failed) H-Dake 8 pass from Elrod (Bise pass from Elrod) H-Eirod 2 run (pass failed) WW-Simpson 61 run (Ebert kick) Records: Winton Woods 3-2, 3-0 FAVC Buckeye; Harrison 0-5,0-3.

28 48

READING 23, MARIEMONT 16 - Reading rallied with two Mason Smith touchdowns in the game's final six minutes to win a matchup pitting teams ranked in the top 10 of the local Ohio Division IV computer ratings. Reading, the highest-ranked local Division IV team at No.3, trailed 16-10 heading into the fourth quarter against Cincinnati Hills League rival Mariemont, ranked No. 10 in the computer ratings. The Blue Devils capped a sustained drive with Smith's first score, a 1-yard keeper off tackle. Smith's second TD, a 5-yard run, was set up by sophomore Kevin Kyler's interception with 5:42 to play. Junior running back Justin Isaacs powered Reading's ground game, rushing for 110 yards on 16 carries, including a 37-yard touchdown in the third quarter. MARIEMONT 7 -3 6 0 at READING 0 0 10 13 M-Haffner 11 pass from Phillips (Haffner kick) M-Haffner 25 FG R-Gilland 29 FG R-lsaacs 37 run (Gilland kick) M-Singer 61 run (kick failed) R-Smith 1 run (Gilland kick) R-Smith 5 run (kick failed) Records: Reading 4·1, 3-0 CHI.; Manemont 2-3, 1-2.

16 23

BATAVIA 14, HILLSBORO 0 Batavia junior Errik Meadors gained 62 yards on 14 carries with a touchdown as a tailback andreturned a fumble four yards for a score on defense. HILLSBOR - - - _ 0 0 0 0 at BATAVIA o 1 o B-Meadors 4 fumble return (Snell kick)

0

0

14

1

0

~~~:, B~~~an J~;,e~i~~"t:'Jro 1-4. . NEW RICHMOND 28, CLER· MONT NORTHEASTERN 19 - Junior Eric McMonigle scored two touchdowns to lead New Richmond to its first victory. n

-

_

CLERMONT N.E. 7 6 0 6 19 at N. RICHMOND 0 21 0 7 28 RECORDS: New Richmond 1-4, Clermont Northeastern 0-5.

BETHEL-TATE 7, GREENFIELD yards and two touchdowns. 14 7 0 7 MCCLAIN 6- Bethel-Tate stop- atFAIRFIELD SYCAMORE 3 8 0 0 ped Greenfield McClain on S-Hancher FG 23 run (kick failed) fourth-and-goal at the 4-yard-line F-Ball1 F-Benjamin 30 pass from Ball (Ball run) F-Patilla 14 pass from Ball (Strong kick) with 1:15left to secure the victory. S-T. Kel~ 45 run (Norl<ey fumble reoovery In end zone) BETHEL-TATE 0 7 0 0 0 0 6 0 at MCCLAIN BT-McDavid 21 pass from ~uiKan (Mien KICK) GC-Caton 34 pass from Amot (pass failed) Records: Bethel-Tate 1-4, Greenfield McClain 3-2.

7 6

CHAMINADE-JULIENNE 45, ROGER BACON 23 - Senior tailD-Gavin 1 run (Trischler kick) back Javon Ringer finished with T-Wilkenlng 3 run (Ashcraft kick) 31 carries for 227 yards and three T-Tamaska 60 run (Ashcraft kick) T-Tamaska 50 run (kick failed) touchdowns to pace Chaminade0-F. Serra 10 pass to Beard (Tnschler kick) D-Grant 25 run (Trischler kick) Julienne. T-Hawk 18 run (~ck failed) Senior running back Kyle Records: Taylor 2-3, 1-2 CHI.; Deer Pari< 2-3, 0-2. Chouteau led Roger Bacon with LAKOTA EAST 42, HAMILTON 101 yards and a touchdown on 17 14 -Paul Bowen's 33-yard carries. touchdown run highlighted a CHAM.-JULIENNE 3__ ___ 7 13 22 - 45 182-yard, four touchdown per- at ROGER BACON 7 7 3 6 - 23 1 run (Chouteau kick) formance in the Thunderhawks' RB-Pride CJ-Rosenbauer 28 FG CJ-8ruggeman 1 run (Rosenbauer kick) win. RB-Chouteau 7 run (Chouteau kick) CJ-Bonner 56 pass f10m Bruggeman (kick failed) After breaking around the left sideline, Bowen broke through ~B-:_~~r~;a~~~~~osenbauerkick) Big Blue tacklers on his way to ~=~:~~; ~ ;~~ ~~~s~~b~:~r kick) CJ-Jones 3 run (Rosenbauer kick) the end zone. RB-Bie!Tilan 2 run (run failed)

28 11

F-Sneed 31 run (Stockum kick) Reoords: Fairfield 2-3, 2-1 GMC; Sycamore 2-3, 1-2.

GLEN ESTE 58, WALNUT HILLS

0 - Glen Este's defense held Walnut Hills to minus-56 yards. Senior linebacker Rob Keller returned a fumble 35 yards for a touchdown and senior cornerback Jesse Taylor intercepted a pass and blocked a punt. 0 WALNUT HILLS 0 0 0 0 58 at GLEN ESTE 26 13 7 12 GE-8utts 5 run (kick failed) GE-Keller 35 fumble return (Winegardner pass from McCalla) GE-Terry 14 fumble retum (kick failed) GE-Jackson 13 run (kick failed) GE-Frye 13 blocked punt return (kick blocked) GE-Jackson 24 run (Martin kick) GE-Talbott 46 run (Martin kick) GE-Schmldt 8 run (kick blocked) GE-Schmidt 1 run (kick blocked) Records: Glen Este 5-0, 3-0 FAVC Buckeye; Walnut Hills 1-4, 1-2.

DAYTON DUNBAR 35, WEST· ERN HILLS 6 -The Mustangs' offense had SeVen turnoverS in• • ' LAKOTA EAST 14 14 7 7 42 Records: Chaminade-Julienne 4-1, 2-0 GCL North; Roger eluding foUr In the firSt quarter. at HAMILTON 0 7 7 0 14 Bacon 2-3,0-1. Juruor · Jamar Howard proVl'dL-Bowen 16 run (Reynolds kick) l-Greene 11 run (Reynolds kick) KINGS 33, LITTLE MIAMI 0 - ed Western Hills' lone score with H-Santos 1 run (Delong kick) Collin McCafferty ran 13 times a 5-yard pass to senior Seth Anl-Greene 1 run (Reynolds kick) l-Bowen 27 run (Reynolds kick) for 172 yards, capping the game's derson in the second quarter. l-Bowen 33 run (Reynolds kick) H-Rice 35 pass from Bierly (Delong kick) scoring with a 91-yard burst DUNBAR 35 14 6 8 7 l-Bowen 7 run (Reynolds kick) 6 0 6 0 0 at W. HILLS through the line. Records: Lakota East 5-0, 3-0 GMC; Hamilton 0-5, 0-3. D-Poweii-Davis 1 run (Mynck run) Junior Mike Mitchell of Kings 0-Poweii-Davis 25 run (run failed) MIDDLETOWN 27, OAK HILLS D-Barrage 1 run (run failed) two sacks.13 20- Middletown senior receiver had KINGS 14 _ W-Anderson 5 pass from Howard (kick failed) 0 6 33 MIAMI 0-Safety, Intentional groundmg In end zone. Cordel Thompson caught two 65- at LITTLE 0 0 0 . . 0. 0 O-Conner 5 yard retum of blocked punt (kick failed) 3 run (Canc1la kick) D-Saln 30 pass from Myrick (Saln kick) yard touchdown passes from se- K-Atkmson K-Dav1s 8 pass from Z1to (kick blocked) Records: Dunbar 4-1 2-1 SOPL· Western Hills 1-4 0-2. ' ' ' nior quarterback Chris Wright, K-McCafferty 39 run (pass failed) 64 pass from Zlto (Davis kick) MASON 10 LOVELAND 6 including the go-ahead score in K-Schnee K-McCafferty 91 run (Canclla kick) ' Reoords: KJngs3-2, 3-0 FAVCCardinal; uwe Mlaml3-2, 1-2. Mason's defense mounted two the fourth quarter. ANDERSON 56, AMELIA 6 - goal-line stands in the second Wright threw for 222 yards and three touchdowns on 9-of-16 Senior quarterback Vince Palm- half, including one with 4:10 to er completed 14 of 17, passes for go, and kept Loveland out of the passing. 6 7 - '20 222 yards and three touchdowns end zone to preserve the win. 0 OAK HILLS 7 at MIDDLETOWN 0 7 7 13 27 6 OH-Conners 10 run (Conliff kick) ~ ~ g ~ and added a rushing touchdown ~?~~~~ 10 M-Amas 41 pass from Wnght (Brandabur kick) and 50 yards on the ground. M-Collins 34 field goal M-Thompson 65 pass from Wnght (Brandabur kick) · l-Wexler 40 field goal OH-Rosenberger 9 run (kick failed) S 0 Ph om ore J a k e D aVIS re- M-Mustard 9 run (Collins kick) OH-Besl1 run (Conllff kick) turned the opening kickoff for a L-Wexler 34 field goal M-Thompson 65 pass 110m Wright (Branda bur kick) TD, and led the Redskins with 81 RECORDS: Mason 3-2,2-1 FAVC Buckeye; Loveland 2-3,1-2. M-Davis 33 pass from Wright (kick failed) RECORD: Middletown 2·3. rushing yards on just four carMOUNT HEALTHY 28, DAYTON NORWOOD 49, NORTHWEST ries. COLONEL WHITE 26 - Senior 14 - Senior quarterback Mark AMELIA o o o s s running back Corey Borden 14 21 7 14 56 punched in the winning score Schibi was 11-of-16 passing for 130 atANDERSON 90 kiCkoff retum (Tufano kick) • yards and score, and ran the ball AN-Dav1s AN-Sersion 5 pass from Palmer (Tufano kick) from fiVe yardS OUt With 50 SeC6 run (Tufano kick) d · · 13 times for 52 yards and a touch- AN-Palmer AN-Kius 57 pass from Palmer (Tufano kick) on S remauung. 26 COL. WHITE 14 6 0 6 down to lead Norwood, which im- AN-Howard 28 oass from Palmer (Tufano kick) 28 AN-Fields 3 run (Vortkamp kick) at MT. HEALTHY 14 7 0 7 proved its record to 5-0. AN-Welling 2 run (Vortkamp kick) MH-Borden 1 run (Enel kick) AM-Coon 5 run (kick failed) CW-Barton 9 run (Woodruff run) . Senior running back James AN-Davis 76 run (Olivera kick) MH-Woods 3 run (Ertel kick) Nichols racked up 123 of Nor- Records: Anderson 3-2. 2-1 FAVC Buckeye; Amelia 0-5,0-3. CW-Woodruff 48 run (run failed) FAIRFIELD 28' svcAMORE 11 MH-Johnson 2 run (Ertel kick) Wood'S 344 total rUShing yardS 'I CW-Woodruff 8 run (run failed) and scored twice on 19 carries. Senior Kenton Sneed rushed CW-Tillman 1 run (run failed) ............................ •wnonmo<>• u... 0 7 7 14 fi d MH-Borden 3 run (Ertel kick) at NORWOOD 2 7 20 20 49 or 218 yar Sand a touchdown on Records: Mount Hea~hy 3-2, 2-1 SWOPL; Colonel White 3·2, NO Safety, snap out of end zone 28 carries and junior Kenny Ben- 1-1. NO-M. Reynolds 12 run (A. Reynolds kick) · • AIKEN 30' DA~ON BELMONT ND-Schibi 3 run (A. Reynolds kick) Jam In a d'd ed 116 yardS on the II' NO-Nichols 11 run (A. Reynolds kl.ck) ground on J. ust four carries 14 - Freshman Sir Abernathy NW-Pieasant 65 run (Dombrowski ~ck) • • NO-Hilton 8 pass from schibi (kick tailed) The Indians finished with 283 rushed for 235 yards and a prur of ND-Chltwood fumble recovery in end zone (kick failed) d hi d 6 t hd 31 · t 1 NW-Davls 53 pass from Bellamy (Dombrowski kick) yar S ruS ng an 4 5 OVerall as OUC ownS on CarrieS 0 ea d ND-Barbro 65 run (A. Reynolds kick) junior quarterback Derek Ball Aiken (3-2 2-0 SWOPL) over DayNO-Nichols 1 run (Tumboll kiCk) ' RECORDs: NoiWood 5-o. Northwest 2-3. completed 10 of 20 passes for 182 ton Belmont (3-2).


Spotlight No. 2 Moeller at No. 5 St. Xavier

N

<i

·.~'9 v

THOM~S

E. WI TIE for the Enqurrer

St. Xavier quarterback Robbie Schoenhoft, 6 feet 6 and 235 pounds, has a wealth of talent but doesn't care about statistics. "The only thing that matters to me is the 'W,' ·the Ohio State recruit said.

QBs at forefront

Schoenhoft, Reisert set for GCL showdown

• Schoenhoft

By Tom Groest:hen Ewruirf'r stf.:tj'rnif!''

QB comparison

St. Xavil'r senior quarterback Robbie Schoenhoft is tlw man \vith tht• goldm gun. Big (6 feet 6. 2:{5 pounds) and strong \vith a cannon arm, Schoenhoft is an Ohio Stall' n·cruit rated onl· of America's bt·~i. Moeller st•nior quarterback Chris Reist•rt (h-2, 190) is the first to admit he's no Schocnhoft. Reisert's arm is decent. When he l'lrow;; a spiral, it's new;;. And if he lands \vith a Divi~ion III college team, great. But as Modh:r (4-0), ranked :-:o. 2 in the EnqttirerDiV:sion I area coaches' poll, visits No. 5 St. Xavier (3-1) in a key Greater Catholic League South league opener tonight. it's Reisert with tl1c big statistics. Rcisl'rt has thrown for 798 yards and 12 touchdowns, \villi two inter· ceptions. Schocnhoft has thrown for 271 yards and two touchdowns (no interceptions) but also has missed 2'·- games bt·cause of an ankle injury. All lliings t:onsidered, the two quartl·rbacks could not be happk·r for each othl·r. "I've sem him play, and he's good." Schomhoft ;;aid of Reisert. "Anybody who can throw for 400 yards on Louisville S:. Xavier is good." Reis<-rt furewfor a school-record 437 yards and fivl' touchdowns when .:-.lot>llcr beat Louisville St. Xavier 43-21 St·pl 5. Schol•nhoft al!\o startec quickly. with a 73-yard touchdoY.n pass on his first throw of the season. But he sprained an ankle that day and missed two games bdure returning for last week's 47-10 rout of Westerville ~orth. "He\; a _great pla~w. and hats off to him for a great career." Reisert said of SchoPnhuft. "But honestly.

Chris Reisert, Moeller Pass attempts: 85 Completions: 59 Yards: 798 (199.5 per game) TDs: 12 Interceptions: 2 Efficiency rating: 190.2

Chris Reisert's passes aren't always pretty. but 12 have gone for touchdowns for Moeller.

Robbie Schoenhoft, St. Xavier Pass attempts: 28 Completions: 12 Yards: 271 (135.5 per game) TDs: 2 Interceptions: 0 Efficiency rating: 14 7. 7 (Note: Missed two games with ankle injury)

it's not me against him. I'm think- over llie summer. ing more about facing llieir dl'"I don't care about stats." fensc.~ Schoenhoft said. "The only thing Schoenhoft has similar that matters to me is thl· 'W.' Pl:'oplt· llioughts, remembering St. Xavi- can ta:k about me as much as they er's lG-!J loss to Moeller last year. want, !>ut if we v.in I'm happy." He was sacked at a key pointlatl' in Reisert said hl' feels the same. lliatgame. And if Moeller keeps winning, Cru"I've got a picture of that play," saders coach Bob Crable bt•licvcs Schoenhoft said. "It's the screen- more college scouts \vill notice. saver on my computer and my Crable said some Divi~ion III phor.c, just to remind me." schools have looked at Rri~C'rt. Schot•nhoft completed just 37 With Reisl•rt standing nt•arby, percent of his passes last year and Crable and thl· player bolli start is hitting 43 percent this year. St. X grinnbg whE·n diS~.·u,;;;ing Rei;;l•rt's cw•.c:1es say the inaccurdcy is a pa~sing style. combination of dropped passes and "The number of spiral~ Chris Schocnhoft's eagerness to make furow,; might equal the number of plays. \villi Bombers receivers bad balls Rob Schm·nhoft might St•mctimes unable to snare his fast- throw." Crable said. "It may not alballs. ways be pretty. but he has a great "I've told Robbie, 'God thn·w a knack for finding receivers." It's a good quarterback year in lightning bolt down on you when he gave you that arm,' " St. Xavier the GCL Soulli. Specht also menCIJac~ Steve Specht said. ';He's tioned Elder's Cntig Carey and w.xking on his composure and pa- La Sai:e's 1-2 punch of Anthony tience, and he's getting much btt- Kummer and Tyll'r Shl'ehan. ll'r." 'There aren't a lot of leagul'~ Schoenhoft is the :-:o. 6-ratcd with that kind of quartC'rback play," prep quarterback in America by Specht said. "It's a special year." 1ndnsidl·rs.com recruiting Web si:e He committed to Ohio State E-mail tgroesclten@enquirer. com


THE ENQUIRER

v~

J/ Q f./

'SPOi

High school football

GCL South play this week could scramble Div. I poll By Tom Groeschen Enquirer staff writer

Colerain, which defeated Sycamore 49-0 last Friday, remains a unanimous No. 1 in this week's Enquirer Division I area football coaches' poll. The Nos. 2-5 spots could see a shakeup after this week's games, with the four Greater Catholic League South powers entering league play. On Friday, No 2 Moeller (4-0) will visit No; 5 St Xavier (3-1) and No.3 Elder (3-1) will host No.4 La Salle (4-0). GCL coaches have said all year that there is no clear favorite in the league. Early results have borne that out 'The league might be as balanced as I've ever seen it," La Salle coach Tom Grippa said. 'There's no bad team. At the end of the year you could see all four of us in the playoffs." For now, everyone is chasing Colerain (4-0). The Cardinals' next three opponents (Milford, Middletown, Fairfield) have a combined 3-9 record. Their final three oppo-

Others: Mason 4, Pnnceton 3, Sycamore 2.

DIVISIONS II·VI

Team 1,GienEste(6) . . .j; EdgeWoM 5. Norwood ( 1)

Record

Pvs.

4-0

1

Points 89

:,.,·,.,:. \'l'Li: >:'' :•.3· · ··' •·::13

2.McN!i:li01as> 3. 1\fltllTO!f (2)

4-0

:·3,1;.

·

t~rn:eoot6(1}····· 8i. . Lli~&1artd.•. :.:.: •. :•.... . ·

6

;: : ;(

4-0

5

.

68

64 56

~~: ···.·:~~·,: ·••x~~ ,,. · ·. ::.· .:::9'"':'><: ::<;w

,•. •>-1-2.

St Mount Healthy 2-2 6 20 ti),R~aatng' : ,''; . :.·,:·. il :3;1 i NR : i<;18 Others: Roger Bacon 15, Indian Hill 9, Madeira 6, North

<

College Hill 6, Rnneytown 6, Turpin 6, Blanchester 5, New Miami 4, Shroder 4, Batavia 3, Wyoming 3, East Clinton 3, Wilmington 1. ·

The Enquirer/ JEFF SWINGER

Receiver Matt Winterhalter will try nents (Lakota West, Oak Hills, to help No. 4 La Salle beat La Salle) are a combined 10-2. No.3 Elder at the Panthers' In Divisions II-VI, Glen Este "Pit" on Friday night. (4-0) remained atop the poll after a 12-7 victory over Loveland. Withrow, after an 0-4 start in Withrow (4-0) made the biggest 2003, has won 10 consecutive jump in Dhjsions II-VI. The Tigers games overall. moved from No. 6 to No. 3 after beating Mount Healthy 30-25. E-mail tgroeschen@enquirer.com ·,


C4 MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2004

Moeller 43, Lou. Sl X21

Air attack crucial in win for Crusaders By Carey Hoffman Enquirer contributor

Chris Reisert, Moeller's senior quarterback, passed for a school-record 437 yards ~d five TDs to lead the Crusaders to a 43-21 rout of last year's Kentucky 1 Class 4A state runner-up, Louis- , villeStXavier.Thegamewasthe leadoff of the i-Wrreless Prep Classic at Paul Brown Stadium and was the first high school football game broadcast live on local Cincinnati 1V (Ch.l9). Reisert struggled last year as Moeller got off to an 0-2 start, and he threw for a modest 133 yards in last week's 2004 opener. "Our game plan really revolved around the passing attack, because we didn't think we could run against them," said Moeller coach Bob Crable, whose team is 2-0 and ranked No.3 in the Enquirer Division I· coaches' poll. 'The goal was to loosen them up and then run the ball a little bit, but when things get on a roll like that, youjustgotta keep it going." St. X beat Moeller 31-17 in Week 2 a year ago. Through two games at the time, Reisert had a 33.3 completion percentage and three interceptions. Sunday ' he!ped erase those memories with a 35-for-51 passing performance. 1\vo receivers topped the 100yard mark. Utility back Pat Watt caught 12 passes foi- 142 yards and a TD, while 6-foot-7 basketball center Tyler Dierkers caught eight passes for 105 yards and three TDs. Seven turnovers by St. Xkilled the Tigers' chances. Four fumbles, two of which were recovered by defensive tackle Pat Farrell, came in the first seven minutes, helping Moeller to a commanding 23-0 lead. The only time the game was in doubt came with 55 seconds left in the first half, when St. X's Philip Blakely picked off a Reisert pass and returned it 51 yards for a TD that cut the lead to 29-14. Moeller went right back to the air and Reisert moved Moeller 65 yards in 51 seconds. A 39-yard · field goal on the last play of the half missed wide, but Moeller's message was delivered. "I think we were a little shellshocked and confused defensively," St X coach Mike Glaser said. "But the credit goes to them; they made the plays." Reisert had eight completions of 20 yards or more, as the Crusaders came open often on streak patterns down the middle. ''We were able to exploit some things," Reisert said. 'They were playing cover-3, and we'd get them to shift the safety to one side and then exploit the seams." Reisert, Watt and Dierkers have played together since grade schooL which helps explain the kind of day they enjoyed Sunday. ''We just have this communication," Watt said. "He knows where to throw the ball, we know where it's going, and now we're all reunited again." What that says for the rest of the season remains to be seen, but Moeller's 1V debut had to make an impression on prep fans around the city. "I think as a team we are a much more confident group," Reisert said. ''We've worked hard, and we're working toward getting a chance at a state championship." Lou. st.xmer____ 1 Moeller ..- - - · 23

1 6

o 7

1 -21 7 -43

M-CMer25 FG M- Farrell fumble recovery in end zone (kick blocked) M- Williams 20 pass from Reise~ (caMr kick) M- Watt 25 pass from Reise~ (caMr kick) SX- Brown 4 run (DOI•gherty

~ck)

M- Dierkers 6 pass from Reiserr (~ck wide) SX- BIBkely 51 interception return (Dougherty kick) M- Dierkers 18 pass from Reisert. (Carter kick) SX- Brown I run (Dougherty kick) M- Dierll.ers 26 pass from Reisert lCart:er Jcir.Jcl


THE ENQUIRER 1

I

9/t 9 I~ '{

Football

: Crusaders post shutout I

The Cincinnati Enquirer

Aiken 19, Jacobs 0

Senior quarterback Chris Reisert played one quarter and was 3-for-3 passing for 47 yards and three touchdowns as Moeller (4-0) rolled to victory over MotherTeresaSecon (London, Ontario) 64-0 Saturday night. Junior running back Martez Williams had 85 yards rushing, including a 21-yard score. Moeller had a total of 321 yards, including 310 yards rushing. Moeller plays at St. Xavier Friday night.

Senior quarterback Will McGivens scored on a 1-yard touchdown run, and freshman running back Sir Abernathy had a 25-yard 1D run to lead Aiken (2-2, 1-0 SQPL). Abernathy had 188 yards on 19 carries. Senior linebacker Alvin Ushery had a 14-yard fumble recovery in the fourth quarter to help seal the win. Jacobs (0-4) is at Jefferson Friday, while Aiken plays at Belmont.

MolherTensaSecon.__ Moeller_,, _ _ _ _ _

lacobs-............._,__

28

14

M-Fischer 8 pass from Reise~ (CaMr kick) M-Smith 24 pass from Reise~ (CaMr kick) M-Dierllers 15 pass from Reise~ (CaMr kick) M-Bames 2 run (CaMr kick) M-Watt 24 pass from Redwine (CaMr kick) M-Farfsing 4 run (CaMr kick) M-Williams 21 run (Mooreman kick) M-Ruby 21 run (Mooreman kick) M-Sharp 50 run (kick failed) M-Coletti safety Records: M 4-0, 0-1

14

8

-0 -64

Aibn------........,____

12 0

0 0

A-McGivens 1 run (kick failed) A-Abemathy 25 run (pass failed) A-Ushery 14 fumble recovery (McGivens kick) Records: J 0-4 A 2-2

Other scores Colonel White 40, Hughes 16 Dunbar 62, Woodward 14 Harmony 36, Dayton CMstian 12

0 0

7 0

-19 -0


,,

Colerain outpolls Elder for top spot Cardinals' Coombs is lone dissenter, vot~s1 f2fl ~anthers By Tom GfoesC!Ien

c..;

Enquirer staff writer

Kerry Coombs was the only coach not to vote Colerain No.1 in the Enquirer preseason Division I coaches' football poll. Coombs' Cardinals were the choice on all other ballots and are ranked in the top 10 of several national polls, including Student Sports magazine (No.5) and PrepNation.com (No.7). "I was kind of hoping we wouldn't be No.1," Coombs said. "I'm still putting Elder up there." Elder, the reigning two-time Ohio Division I champion, was No. 1 in both the 2002 and '03 preseason Enquirer polls but is No.2 this year. St. Xavier, featuring Ohio State recruit Rob Schoenhoft at· quarterback, is No.3. The last time Colerain was the preseason No. 1 pick was 2001. The Cardinals lost to Elder in 1. Colerain (13) 139 123 the regional 2. Elder (1) 104 semifinals. 3. St Xavier

DIV. 1

4. Moeller

95

In Divisions 5. Princeton 68 IT-VI, Edge- 6. La Salle 65 wood is the pre- 7. Mason 55 season No.1 af- 8. Anderson 42 ter being 9. Hamilton 32 Division n state 10. Lebanon 13 runner-up last Arst-place votes in(). Othen: Lakota East 10, year. Fellow Dll Middletown 9, Oak Hills 9, Woods 9, Sycamore powers Kings Winton 4, Lakota West 2. and McNicholas are Nos. 2-3, respectively. 1. Edgewood 174 In Division I, (12) Elder must re- 2. Kings (2) 136 place 15 regu- 3. McNicholas 124 lars, including (1) 4. Wyoming (1) 74 quarterback Rob Florian and 5. Mount Healthy 67 65 running back 6. Loveland Bradley Glat- 7. Harrison (1) 60 8. Norwood 56 thaar. 9. Glen Este 52 Colerain re49 turns 15 start- 10. Turpin Othen: Reading 47, Roger ers, including Bacon 46, Withrow 44, senior fullback ~~~~ri~:;~ ~~·.Indian Hill Mister Simp- Martemont 23, Ross 20, Badin 18, Talawanda 16, SOn, WhO haS Bata~a 7, New Richmond 7, committed to ~~~:;:" ~:~~~~~' 3, Michigan. CHCA 2, Purcell Martan 2, "I believe ~i~~i ~ethel-Tate I, uwe Colerain is the odds-on favorite to win the state," Elder section A look ahead to coach Doug high school footbalL Ramsey said. In today's Enquirer. Colerain returns many standout players from a team that lost 24-23 to Elder in last year's regional final. lineman Terrill Byrd and linebacker Andre Revels; both Division I college prospects, lead the defense. Quarterback Dominick Goodman succeeds Erick Fitzpatrick in running the Cards' potent triple-option offense. Elder likes its role as a relative underdog. "We can look at it as . motivation," Ramsey said. The No.1 question will be settled early. Elder meets Colerain in a season opener Aug. 28 in the Skyline Chili Crosstown Showdown at UC's Nippert Stadium. The. Ohio season opens during the Aug. 26-28 weekend, starting with two Skyline Showdown games at Princeton High School on Aug. 26 (Roger Bacon vs. Boone County, 6:15 p.m., and La Salle vs. Covington Catholic, 8:15).·

DIV. II•VI

Special

Erma# tgroeschen@enquirer.com


INSIDE "melia •••.••.•.• 2 Batavia ••••••••. 3 Bethel •••.••..•.& 'Burg .•..••.•••.5 McNicholas ••...•3 Milford ••••••••• 2 Glen Este •.••....4 Goshen .••••••••• 5 CNE ......... ·... 2 Moeller ••.••... '.4 New Richmond •••• 4

GAMES NoT TO MISS

AugUit 27

East Central at Milford - Indiana &e,tember17 October 22 power comes to Ohio for Milford's Williamsburg at Batavia - Even though Octaber1 Williamsburg is down, there's always Goshen at Ross Brad Monk and Glen Este at Amelia - Neighborhood first test. a good battle between these two company looking to turn heads with rival schools could merge in the next teams. upset in this one. couple seasons .

......... 3

McNicholas at Loveland - McNicholas OctoberS reloads for another go in Division II while Loveland prepares for a tough Moeller at St. Xavier - The always Clinton-Massie at Bethel-Tate -A October 21 tense meeting between the two GCL strong test for a Bethel team trying to Moeller at Princeton - Reliving the run in the FAVC Buckeye. days of Faust and Mancuso. rivals. Football doesn't get any better find an identity.

. . . . . 24

......... 10

Clinton-Massie at New Richmond Clermont NE at New Richmond - Ben October 11 - Gerry Reardon's squad will find out Bird returns to coach against his alma Williamsburg at Western Brown - Every SBC team still remembers where they stand in the league in this mater. 'Burg running up score with Bainum. one.


GREATER CATHOLIC LEAGUE SOUTH

£N(}(,

Players to watch: Senior Rob Schoenhoft (committed to Ohio State), at 6 feet 6 and Division: I 235 pounds, has all the physical tools. He Coach: Doug Ramsey (72-15) completed just 37 percent of his passes last Last year: 14-1 (3-0 GCLS, state champion) season but has improved greatly during spring and summer workouts. Most of his Last league title: 2003 top WRs are back; RBs Matt Feldhaus and . Players to watch: Senior QB Craig Carey, Chris Cionni look good; LBs Brandon Bryant who was a TE last year. At RB, senior Mike and Drew Quinn are among veterans on a Priore and juniors Gerald Walker and Nick perennially strong defense; DB Thomas HurZeiser are candidates to start. Defensively, ley could become one of the Bombers' bestlineman Eric Kenkel, DB Rick Stautberg and ever secondary players. LB Nick Williams are returning. Key returnees: Offense - QB Schoenhoft, Key returnees: Offense - QB Carey, WR Billy RB Feldhaus, RB Cionni, WR Matt Uguzinski. O'Conner, WR Ben Wittwer, PK D.J. Hueneman. Defense- DL Kenkel, DB Stautberg, LB Defense- LB Quinn, LB Bryant, DB Hurley, Williams, DB Parker Smith, DB Brian Bailey. DL Tommy Nurre, DL Sean Duesing. Fonnatlons: Offense - Multiple/2-back. · Fonnatlons: Offense: Multiple I. Defense: Defense - 50. 4-3. Outlook: New coach Specht has the talent Outlook: Look for Elder again to challenge to get St. Xback to the playoffs after a onefor a GCLS title and deep playoff run. year absence. Schoenhoft is the key, and he seems set for a big year.

ELDER

ST. XAVIER

Division: I Coach: Steve Specht (first year) Last year: 6-3 (0-3) Last league title: 2001 ~

MOELLER Division: I Coach: Bob Crable (20-13)

r 11t I" '-1

...

Last year: 8-4 (2-1) Last league title: 2000 (shared) Division: I Players to watch: Senior G/DL Matt Tennant Coach: Tom Grippa (121-60 overall) is one of the most heavily recruited players in the Cincinnati area; senior QB Chris Reis- Last year: 6-5 (1-2) Last league title: 1995 (shared) ert (927 yards passing, 5 IDs, 7 intercepPlayers to watch: Senior QB Anthony Kumtions) started most of last season; RBs Pat Watt and Martez Williams will see a lot of mer has five returning WRs from the GCL work; WR Tyler Dierkers, at 6-8, is a big tarSouth's most prolific passing attack. Kummer threw for 1,605 yards (8 IDs, 14 interget and also a Division I basketball prospect; defensively, lineman Patrick Farrell is ceptions) last year and rushed for 757 yards getting lots of college attention. (8 IDs); WR Mike Wiegele led GCL South Key returnees: Offense- QB Reisert, GTen- receivers in catches (46) and yardage (527) nant, T Brad Libis, RB Watt, RB Williams, RB last year; TE Matt Winterhalter (27 rec.) also was all-league; OG Ben Miller and DL Keith · Daniel Barnes, WR Dierkers. Defense - DL Farrell; LB Kevin Humbel, DB Derico Murray, Henry are the top returning linemen; senior RB Eric Morton (5-6, 150), a transfer from LB Pat Grau, LB Alex Jaeger. Purcell Marian, should be the top rusher. Fonnatlons: Offense- Multiple I. DefenseKey returnees: Offense - QB Kummer, WR 50. Outlook: The Crusaders have gotten better in Wiegele, TE Winterhalter, G Miller. Defense DL Henry, DB Brandon Knose, LB Ricky each of Crable's three seasons, including Betsch, LB Jeff Brennan. consecutive playoff appearances. Another playoff bid is possible, with veteran QB Reis- Formations: Offense - Spread. Defense ert and OL/DL Tennant key components. The 4-3. defense must replace three-year starting LBs Outlook: La Salle reached the playoffs last year for the first time since 1985. "We think Ryan Lukens and Beau Goodhart. we'll have a chance again," Grippa said.

LASALLE

"


TOP 10 PROSPECTS ROBERT BREWSTER School: Wyoming Position: OL Height: &-5 Weight: 320

The buzz: Ohio State and Iowa are among many to express interest. Brewster, an agile big man, also plays basketball and can dunk. He might wait until after the season to commit to a college.

CRAIG CAREY School: Elder Position: QB Height: 6-4 Weight: 215

The buzz: Ohio, Indiana, Cincinnati, Ball State and Iowa are involved. '----"-"'------' Played tight end the past two years on Elder's state title teams. Older brother Collin Carey is backup QB at Cincinnati.

ZACH MARSHALL

JORDAN MEYERS

BRADY MINTURN

School: Mason Position: OT Height: &-7 Weight 280 Tbe buzz: Has commit-

School: Harrison

School: Loveland Position: OL/DL Height: &6

Posltlon:llnebacker Height: &-2 Weight 215

ted to Maryland; also considered Michigan State. Excels in pass protection. Helped lead Mason to Division I playoffs last year.

The buzz: A real playmaker, he shared the Fort Ancient Valley Conference Buckeye regular-season tackling title with 114last year. Has offers from Ohio U., Akron, Toledo and Indiana.

Weight: 260 Tbe buzz: FAVC Buck- -

rG

eye defensive player of the year in 2003. South Carolina, Kentucky, Louisville, Miami U., Akron, Bowl· ing Green and Cincinnati have shown interest.


!N~ "f,,;-1<) '(

â&#x20AC;˘ ADAM MYERS-WHITE School: Hamilton

Position: DB Height: 64 Weight: 190 1be buzz: Rated the No. 2

safety in America by ESPN.com analyst Tom Lemming. Ohio State is the leader for his services, but he also is considering Purdue, Florida, Tennessee and Southern Cal.

ANDRE REVELS

ROB

School: Colerain

Position: LB Height: 6-1 Weight 240 The buzz: Colerain coach

Kerry Coombs says Revels, a second-team allstate player last year with 161 tackles, could be best LB he ever has had. Indiana, Ohio U., Michigan and Purdue are pursuing him.

TOP 10 PROSPECTS

SCHOENHOFT

MISTER SIMPSON

MATT TENNANT

School: St. Xavier

School: Colerain

School: Moeller

Position: QB Height: 6-6 Weight: 235

Position: FB Height: &0 Weight 208

Position: OL Height: 6-5 Weight 250

The buzz: Committed to

The buzz: Has narrowed

The buzz: Has commit-

L......---_J

ted to Ohio State. Has huge arm, quick release and improved touch. At recent EA Sports "Elite 11" national QB camp, was voted most likely to lead a college team to a national title.

Michigan, where he grew up. Highly productive back who has rushed for more than 2,500 yards in career. Great speed and power; could play FB or HB in college.

his choices to Purdue, Boston College and Penn State. Good frame; moves well (4.8 speed) for his size. Could play either OL or DL in college; is projected as OL


=======H=I=GH=SC=H=OO=L=FOOTB==A=ll=PR=E\li=EW====================TH=E=CI=-N~CIN_~~n ENQUIRER

GCL North spotlight I Succeeding a lege11d .,

-----.

.

.

' l ,.

Ti:~· £n:p'rcr/GJ..C:\~<

i-'ARTQc;G

ilav!d Wirth (left), Badin's new head coach, has the support of his predecessor, Terry Marone, the winningest coacfl ;n Ohio h;gh school football history, with 360 victories. Malone retired at the end of rast year after 46 seasons.

Wirth takes helm at Badin 8¥ Carey Hoffman E·qr:ircr co;:tnbrrtor

sa young coach taking on his fll's_t head coaching role this year. Dave V{rrth did not opt for the easy road. He wc:tt into ll}e Greater Catholic Lec:guc !\:orth conference. And he t•;ol~- on the mantle of successor to Terry Malone, the only coach Badin had! lmmvn in 46 seasons and the \nn"li.nge!'t co;;ch in Ohio fo:ltball itisto~y 11rrc t::tir;L7 ha'>'C been other nc'"r--t·rrn c;opn,rtunitics for the 29yeur-olu 'Wirth, such as succeeding Lynn ~::· at Covington Catholic, wl:ere Wirth has been defensive coordinat'lr the past three years- but at heart, he's a GCL kind of guy. "My entire family is born and bred GCL. They all went to Purcell, cz;ccpt fi1r me," said Wirth, a 1993 gruduatc of Moe:kr. "The people at

A

''My entire family is born and bred GCL." David Wll'!l;

Badin have been great in making this transition as smooth as humanly pelssibk." Which is not the same thing as !'illring it has been easy. Some of the longtime supporters who did the jobs big and small dec':):r;:l to hang it up with Malone. U;T1iili£! '\\ruth, for instance, to spend a Sunday afternoon this month lining the school's football field. The entire varsity and JV coaching staff also had to be replaced not always a simple task for a firsttime coach. '\\rrrth was able to tum to his father, Dave "rrrth Sr., for some help. \Yirth Sr., who has had assistant

coachina stints at Purcell and Moeller, 'l"'ill coach the offensive line. Wirth will migrate from his CovCath duties to the other side of the ball and coordinate Badin's offense. He found another veteran coach. fonner Talawznda ass1.stmt Joe Jackson, who will s;;rve as defm~ sive coordinator. "Our kids are adaptin~ well," Vrrrth said. "One of the first observations I had in coming in was that they have a rrreat capacity for hard work. Obviously Terry had demanded that of them. One of the big adaptations is how do Wl' get them to work hard in diff~rent ways? Hov," do we get them to put forth the srune effort and intensity,

but do it so they're giving attention to something else besides just getting themselves bi[{gcr?" Badin's reputation has been as a big, physical team that wants to play smash·mouth football. The size is still there this year, but Wirth is trying to add an increased dement of athleticism. Offmsr:vdy, he's shooting for a balanced attack but ultimately hopes to be able to wear dov.n opponents. Defense, which was a problem in last year's 3-7 Badin sea~ son, will have a new emphasis on each player up front controllir.g gaps and relying on technique rather than just pure power. "Although we're the smallest school in the GCL. we've traditionally had some of the biggest kids,~ Wirth said. 'They've always been able to run the ball doYm people's throats. Now we have to dcve:op some of their athktici:-m."


THE ENQUIRER

.-

SPORTS

New surface, same result for Colerain By Tom Groeschen Enquirer staff writer

Top-ranked Colerain dismantled another respected team Saturday night, as the Cardinals routed visiting Princeton 45-12. The Cardinals, ranked No. 1 in the Enquirer Division I area coaches' poll and No.6 nationally by USA Today, extended their Greater Miami Conference winning streak to 31 games (since 1999). Colerain senior fullback Mister Simpson rushed 22 times for 178 yards and three touchdowns. Cardinals quarterback Dominick Goodman rushed 12 times for 76 yards and a touchdown, and completed his only pass attempt for 27yards. An overflow cro'Wd watched at Colerain, including hundreds sitting on the grassy hills surrounding the stadium. f3 ·A Princeton, ranked· No.9 in the Enquirer area coaches' poll, was considered Coletam's top GMC challenger this ~:but fell behind 38-0 after three Pyriods. The Vikings 'Joihed then-No. 2 E\der (21-3) andiilien-No. 5 Ander-

son (48-10) on Colerain's list of victims. "I think we're playing well, but we can play better," said '-'U""•·•·~ linebacker Tyler Moeller, who an interception. "If we don't come out and play well, any team can beat us." Cardinals offensive tackle Conner Smith said the team's lofty rankings are not big topics of conversation. "Coach (Kerry) Coombs won't let us get the big head," Smith said. "We're just thinking about our next game right now, and that's Sycamore." Coombs lifted most of his starters entering the fourth period. Princeton -12 Colerain .......... _ ....~'*"-_ _ __ Colerain held a 381-136 edge in total C-Simpson 1 run (Sthullll ~14:~} -45 offense (354 yards rushing), but C-Schutte 43 FG C-Ciifford 27 interre!ltl~~ return (Schutte kick) stuffed Princeton for only six yards C-Goodman 31 rur, (Schutte kick) 1 run (Schutte kick) rushing during the three quarters. C-Simpson C-Simpson 23 run (Schutte kick) "I certainly don't think we've P-Dawes 1 run (kicl< blocked) C-lemons 19 run (Schutte kick) played our best game, but we never P-Rive!S 1 run (kick blocked) • Records: P 1-2 (0-1 GMC), C 3-0 (1-0). do early," Coombs said. "I think our effort has been very, very good, and I'm pleased with No. 2 Moeller 45, that." The top remaining team on Cole- Tol. St. Francis De Sales 0 rain's ·schedule is Enquirer No. 5 Senior quarterback Chris ReisLa Salle Oct. 29. ert, who passed for a school-record

Colerain's Mister Simpson (35) gets tangled in a pile with Princeton defenders Saturday night at Colerain. Simpson rushed for 178 yards on 22 carries as the Cardinals extended their GMCwinning streak to 31 games.

The Enquirer/ ERNEST COLEMAN

437 yards last week against Louisville St. Xavier, completed 10 of 13 passes for 181 yards and two touchdowns to lead Moeller, the secondranked team in the Enquirer Division I area coaches' poll. 0

0

-o

Moeller ....... -...................... 14 3 28 M-Murray 54 interoeption return (ca~er kick) M-Watt 69 pass from Reise~ (Ca~er kick) M-CaMr20 FG M-Bames 43 run (CaMr kick) M-Fartsing 1 run (Ca~er kick) M-Fischer 18 pass from Reise~ (Ca~er kick) M-Ruby 23 run (Ca~er kick) Records: D 2-1, M 3-0.

0

-45

SL Francis...........................

0

0

"


SPORTS

Moeller 43, Lebanon 7

Watt leads No. 4 Crusaders past lOU!-ranked Warriors By Alex Blumer

; \

¡

I ~

'

Enquirer contributor

Moeller began its season 18 hours later than expected, but it was worth the wait for the Crusaders. Moeller, ranked fourth in the Enquirer Division I preseason coaches' poll, defeated No. 10 Lebanon 43-7 in the finale of the Skyline Crosstown Showdown on Sunday at Princeton. The game was rescheduled for Sunday afternoon due to weather delays Saturday Moeller outgained Lebanon 296 yards to 107. 'Their worst mistake was to call it off last night, because we had another day just to think about it," Moeller senior running back Pat Watt said. Watt had 104 all-purpose yards, including five catches for 84 yards, and three touchdowns. Martez Williams recovered a fumbled punt return inside the Lebanon 1 to set up Moeller's first score.

I

Williams ran the ball in two plays later to give the Crusaders a 7-0 lead. Moeller's good fortune continued at the beginning of the second quarter. Watt recovered teammate Daniel Barnes' fumble and took it 15 yards to make it 14-0. "When it bounces your way, it bounces your way, and you try to take advantage," Moeller coach Bob Crable said. "We were fortunate to have those opportunities." Moeller's defense held the Warriorstojust55yardsofoffense after the first quarter. Alex Jaeger had two sacks for the Crusaders. Lebanon was paced by 56 yards from senior tailback Ryan Noe. The domination continued after halftime, as Moeller scored two touchdowns in just five plays before taking out many of its starters. 'That's what you try and do," said Crable of his team's balanced play. "We talked a lot about playing all phases of the game." Moeller senior Chris Reisert was 11-of-18 passing for 133 yards

and two scores in two and a half quarters of play. Barnes led the Crusader running attack with 79 yards and a score. Williams ran for two touchdowns as well. "It's a phenomenal way to get things started," Crable said. "Ifeel pretty good about how we played today."

=-====-~=:::::: ~ ~ 1~ ~ ~~ M-M. Williams 2 run (Caner kick) M-Watt 15 fumble recovery (Caner kick) M-Watt 35 pass from Reisen (kick blocked) M-M. Wt!liams 3 run (caner ktck) M-Bames 5 run (caner kick) M-Watt 23 pass from Reisen (kick blocked) M-eaner 31 field goal L-T. Smith 1 run (Tepe ktck) Records: M 1-0. l 0-1

SCHOENHOFT UPDATE: St. Xaer quarterback Rob Schoe sprained his right ankle strained his Achilles' tendo Saturday's 23-17loss to Lake St. Edward. Schoenhoft, w committed to Ohio State, is day and hopes to play Fri Indianapolis Cathedral. "He should be fine, b1 not going to rush him," S Steve Specht said Sund

-Tom

/


Glen Este becomes school's first No. 1 By Tom Groeschen Enquirer staff writer

The Enquirer/ERNEST COLEMAN

Colerain's Andre Revels (50) pulls down Princeton's Ted Rivers in last Saturday's Cardinals victory, which kept them No. 1.

DIVISION I Tum

Pvs.

Points

1. Colerain (9) 3-0 1 2. Moeller 3-0 2 3. Elder 2-1 3 4. La Salle 3-0 5 5. St Xavier 2-1 4 6. Lakota East 3-0 7 7. Lakota West 3-0 6 8. Anderson 2-1 8 9. lebanon 2-1 NR 10. Sycamore 2-1 NR Others: Princeton 5, Mason 4, Fairfield 2, Oak Hills 2.

Roconl

90 77 72 58

57

44 38 25 11 10

DIVISIONS II-VI Tum

Roconl

Pvs.

Points

1. Glen Este (7) 3-0 2 89 1 72 2. Ed~ewood 2-1 3. McNicholas 2-1 3 66 3. Sprin~boro (2) 3-0 10 66 5. Norwood 3-0 5 57 6. Withrow 3-0 6 55 6. Mt Healthy 2-1 4 55 8. Indian Hill 3-0 7 45 9. Loveland 2-1 7 39 10 10. Uttle Miami 3-0 NR Others: Kings 9, Madeira 7, Wilmington 7, Blanchester 5, Reading 5, Purcell Marian 4, East Clinton 3, Roger Bacon 3, Wyoming 3, Shroder Paideia 2, Ross 2, Batavia 1.

Glen Este made school history Monday, as the new No. 1 team in the Enquirer Divisions II-VI football coaches' poll. Glen Este coach Zak Taylor and athletics director Dan Simmons both said the Trojans' football program had never been ranked No. 1 in an Enquirer poll. 'We knew we'd have a pretty solid club," Taylor said. In Division I, Colerain (3-0) remained a unanimous No. 1 after beating Princeton 45-12. Glen Este (3-0) rose from No. 2 to No. 1 in the Divisions II-VI rankings after a 14-6 road upset of Division I Mason. Glen Este, led by running back/ defensive back Kenny Wilson, running back Todd Butts and quarterback Kyle McCalla, is enjoying an unprecedented run of success under fifth-year coach Taylor.

High schools The Trojans last year recorded therr fourth consecutive winning season, the longest such streak in school history. Glen Este has made one playoff appearance, in 2000. "It's nice to be ranked up there, but we've got Loveland this week and we'd better bring our 'A' game," Taylor said. Previous No. 1 Edgewood was upset 14-6 by then-No. 10 Springboro last week. In Division I, La Salle (3-0) slipped ahead of St. Xavier (2-1) for the No. 4 spot as the two teams exchanged positions. La Salle beat Xenia 17-14 on a late field goal, while St. X beat Columbus DeSales 21-0. Lakota East (3-0) jumped one spot to No. 6, bumping rival Lakota West (3-0) to No.7. East had a tough 36-28 win over previous No.100akHills, while West routed winless Milford 48-25.


Cf.. z!)-oY.

Hfgb school football! St. Xavier wins thriller over Moeller 35-31

Schoenhoft leads rally Winning score c~mes with :1,3 remaining By Tom Groeschen Enquirer staff writer

Rob Schoenhoft showed Friday night why he is rated one of the best high school quarterbacks in America. The St. Xavier senior led his team on a game-winning drive in the final minutes, throwing the winning touchdown with 13 seconds left as the Bombers beat Moeller 35-31 in a thriller at St. X. Schoenhoft, off a play-action fake, hit tight end Kyle Gibler with a 2-yard TD pass to decide it. That made it 34-31, and John Milligan's extra point made it 35-31. Schoenhoft, who has committed to Ohio State and is widely ranked as one of the top 10 prep quarterbacks in the nation, was still trying to gather his thoughts in the onfield mob scene afterward. He marched the Bombers 64 yards over the final 3:22 of play. Overall he completed 11 of 18 passes for 143 yards, two TDs and The Enquirer/ JEFF SWINGER an interception. St. Xavier's (21) Chris Clonnl is escorted by lineman Sean Duesing (72) on a touchdown run against "Unbelievable," Schoenhoft Moeller Friday. Cionni had 205 rushing yards, 45 receiving yards and scored three touchdowns. said. "We've worked too hard for too long to lose this one.· Our offenFriday's sive line was unbelievable, my highlights receivers made great catches, and we ran the ball great." • A mishandled snap led to the St. Xavier's Chris Cionni rushed 40 times for 205 yards, caught two game-winning field goal for No. 3 passes for 45 yards and scored Elder, as the Panthers rallied for a three times. 38-35 victory over Greater Catholic Moeller started its final drive on League rival and No. 4-ranked its ~yard line. With one play left, La Salle. the. Crusaders tried a hook-and• Top-ranked Colerain improved to ladder pass. Chris Reisert hit Tyler 5-0 with its 70-3 victory over GreatDierkers, who flipped the ball to a er Miami Conference foe Milford. trailing Pat Watt. • Hosea Simpson rushed for a Watt was run out of bounds at school-record 402 yards to carry his own 35-yard line as time exWinton Woods to a 48-28 victory pired. over Harrison in the Fort Ancient A sellout crowd of 8,000 The Enquirer/ERNEST COLEMAN Valley Conference. watched at St. Xavier. Colerain's Terrill Byrd (left) and Tyler Moeller take down Milford Coverage, C12-13 quarterback Chris Ryan for a loss in Colerain's 70-3 victory. See ST. XAVIER, Page C13


St.~ Xtvier:

Schoenhoft leads late rally

From PageC1

The area's No. 5-ranked Bombers rallied to beat the No.2 Crusaders in a big Greater Catholic League South game. 'There's not much to say," Moeller coach Bob Crable said. "I thought we showed a lot of character coming back." Moeller roared back after trai~ 28-9 after three periods. Reisert completed 24 of 39 passes for 341 yards, three TDs (all in the fourth. period) and was intercepted three Hmes. Moeller went ahead 31-28 on a 64-yard TD pass from Reisert to Justin Smith with 3:27left, the ball being caught after a Bombers defender tipped it St. X coach Steve Specht was thrilled for Schoenhoft, who had missed two games this year with a sprained ankle. "People can talk about stats all they want, but like Robbie said, it's all about winning," Specht said. "We're 4-1, and that's all that matters. I love that kid, and he showed tonight how good he is. Heck, this whole team did the job. I have a great staff and great players, and I

The Enquirer/ JEFF SWINGER

St. Xavier's Brandon Bryant celebrates a fumble recovery Friday in the Bombers' victory.

want to emphasize that." Carter as the first half ended. St. Xavier built a 14-9lead by halfCionni rushed 17 times for 105 time, after falling behind 6-0. yards in the first half alone. Moeller visits La Salle next Schoenhoft threw a 2~yard TD pass to Cionni and scored on a ~ week. St. Xavier travels to Elder. yard run in the first half. Moeller •••- - · - - · · · · 6 3 0 22 -31 Moeller chopped its deficit to SL Xavier•••••••••-····-··-···· 0 14 14 7 -35 14-9 on a 28-yard field goal by Mike

M-Williams 1 run (kick blocked) SX-Cionni 29 pass from Schoenhoft (Milligan ~ck) SX-Schoenhoft 9 run (Milligan kick) M-Carter 28 FG SX-Cionni 17 run (Milligan kick) SX-Cionni 1 run (Milligan ~ck) M-Watt 4 pass from Reisert (Carter ~k) M-Bames 12 pass from Reisert (Carter ~k) M-Smith 64 pass from Reisert (Oierkers pass from Reisert) SX-Gibler 2 pass from Schoen holt (Milligan kick) Records: M 4-1 (0-1 GCL-S), SX 4-1 (1-0).


College commitments The Enquirer will publish college commitments for all football and basketball players, and Division 1-A commitments in other sports. These and all commitments will be posted online at Cincinnati. Com, High Schools link. Recent commitments include: GIRLS' BASKETBALL • Sarah Esterkamp, McAuley: Otterbein • Nicole Fantetti, North College Hill: Mount St. Joseph

• Jon Hufford, Badin Ol: Wofford • Kevin Hum bel. Moeller lB: Ohio pgmjnjcag •

Kyle Kollstedt, Badin Ol: Hanover

I

Brad Ubjs Mpeller OJ- puquesne

• Tim Meiner, Talawanda WR: Mount St. Joseph • Mac Phillips, Mariemont QB: Marietta I

Crjs Rejsert Moeller OB; Ohio Dominican

• Peter Shell, Mariemont MG: Muskingum • Jason Singer, Mariemont RB: Marietta • lan Vanness, Talawanda WR: Marietta • Tyler Ward, McNicholas DB: Mount St. Joseph • Brian Wexler, loveland PK: Denison • Chris Zimmerman, Talawanda QB: Centre • Jake Blatt, McNicholas lB: Wittenberg BOYS' GOLF • Kevin Cady, Talawanda PK: Miami Univer- J1 Rpb Chappell Moeller. Dayton sity* BOYS' SOCCER • Justin Cain, Mariemont Dl: Muskingum I Tom Gannon Moeller Robert Mprrjs • Andy Clark, Talawanda DB: Thomas More GIRLS' TENNIS • Brian Crable, Moeller Ol: Butler • Jessie Holland, loveland: Marshall • Bryan Dean, McNicholas WR: Avila • lindsay King, loveland: Charlotte University BOYS' TRACK/CROSS COUNTRY • Ryan Doran, Purcell Marian DB: Marietta • luke Beuerlein. Moeller: Xavier • Vanessa Harvey, Fairfield: Mount St. Joseph • Christina Smith, lockland: Mount St. Joseph • Erika Strasinger, Bethel-Tate: Mount St. Joseph FOOTBALL

I

GIRLS' TRACK/CROSS COUNTRY

Joe Earfsjng Mgeller IE· Objo Dgmjnjcao

• Jon Feazell, Talawanda OL/Dl: Oberlin • Patrick Farrell. Moeller Dl: Western Kentucky • Chris Grant, loveland DB/WR: Wittenberg • Jordan Hosmer, Wyoming lB: Butler • Ryan Huber. La Salle FB: Marietta ,

Becky Clark, St. Ursula: Xavier

• Jacqueline Jaworek, Turpin: Dayton • Jennie Mertens, St. Ursula: Saint louis • Ellen Nienhaus, Turpin: Dayton •walk-on


Moeller ready to face familiar rival The Cincinnati Enq:tirer

Crusaders determined to avenge last season's loss

The Moeller football team gets a chance at redemption Saturday in the first round of the state playoffs at Lockland High School. Moeller (7-3), which will face Huber Heights Wayne in the playoffs for the second straight year, lost to the Warriors last season, 35-34 in overtime on a botched twopoint conversion attempt that would have won the game. "If I had to do it over, I would have gone for two again," Moeller coach Bob Crable said. "!probably would

have called a different play, though." After an 0-2 start, the Crusaders won seven of their final eight games, including victories against St. Xavier, La Salle, Columbus DeSales, Lakewood St. Edward (ranked No.8 in the state at the time) and Princeton. "We dug a hole early in the season. It was frustrating as a coach, because I knew this was a good football team," Crable said. 'The East Central game was a big win. We started taking everything one

By John Schutte

High school action Indian Hill defeated Tipp City 2-0 in a Division II girls soccer regional semifinal. 84

game at a time." "Team" defines Moeller, which doesn't have superstars or huge statistics from any one player. "This team does not have one strength. The offense picks up the defense at times and vice versa," Crable said. "One of the most gratifying as-

pects of this season is we have developed as a team." Moeller quarterback Ben McGrath, who missed the first seven games of the season with a hamstring injury, is back at full strength. ''We're feeling pretty good about playing Wayne again," McGrath said. ''We're a better team than we were last year." The Crusaders will use multiple formations and spread around the ball to keep Wayne's defense off balance. The defensive philosophy is similar: Show multiple for-

mations to confuse Wayne. 'They're a very athletic team," McGrath said. "If we stick with our game plan, though, we will be able to drive the ball on them." Linebackers Beau Good- ' hart and Ryan Lukens are the heart of the defense. Goodhart leads the team with 119 tackles and Lukens is second at 113. Strong safety David Starvaggi leads the team with four interceptions. ''We have come light years this season," Crable said. "We just need to take one game at a time. Hopefully some teams will look past us since we've lost three."

Moeller coach Bob Crable and his Crusaders get a shot at payback when they face Huber Heights Wayne in the first round of the playoffs Saturday. Moeller fell 35-34 in overtime in last season's playoffs to the same Wayne team.

Enquirer file/STEVEN M. HERPPICH


Division I All-Ohio List COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP)- The 2004 AP D>vision I AII-Oh10 h1gl1 school football team, based on the recommendations of a state media panel:

DMSIOHI

First Team OFFENSE: Ends-Mario Manningham, Warren Hardin& 6-foot-0, 175 pounds, senior; Greg Orton, Huber Hts. Wayne, 6-4, 200, sr.; Pat Wilt, Moeller, 6-1,185, sr. linemen-Alex Boone, lakewood St Edward, 6-8, 320, sr.; J1mmy Cordle, lancaster, 6-5, 275, sr.; Brian Mellott, Youngs, Austintown Fitch, 6-3, 252, sr.; Brian Shelton, Colerain, 6-0, 240, sr.; Michael Russell, Cle. Glenville, 6-2, 310, sr.; Mike Shendan, Cle. St. lgnabus, 6-3, 275, sr.; Phillip Pollard, WesterVIlle South, 6-4, 280, sr.; Dante Campbell, Warren Harding, 6-1,280, sr.; Tom lngl1am, CenterVIlle, 6-0, 240, sr. QuMerbacks-J.J. Fought, Tol. Whibmer, 5-11, 170, sr,; Tyler Homer, Clayton Northmont, 6-3, 190, sr. Backs-Chnsten Haywood, Hill>ard Davidson, 5-8, 180,jr.; Ryan Brinson, Canton McKinley, 5-9,175, sr.;TommyTamaska, Centerville, 5-11. 205, sr.; Brandon Shimits, Solon, 5-9, 170,jr.; Mister Simpson, Colerain, 6-0, 208, 8'.; Tim Conner, Cle. Glenville, 5-11, 190, sr. Kicker-J>mmy Spencer, Sylvania Northview, 5-10, 175, sr. DEFEIIS£: linemen-Terril a,nl, Colerain, 6-0,289, sr.; Thaddeus Gibson, Euclid, 6-3, 207,jr.; Jim Ramella, Cle. St Ignatius, 6-4, 235, sr.; Brandon Long, Canton GlenOak, 6-3, 230, sr.; Jameson Hartke, Centerv>lle, 6-5, 245, sr.; Todd Denlinger, Troy, 6-3, 285, sr, Lmebackers-Marcus Waugl1, Tol. StJohn's, 5-11,230, sr.; Marl<o Cosic, Brunswick, 6-2,240, sr.; Jay Bednar. Canton GlenOak, 5-10, 210, sr.; Nick Simon, Shaker Hts., 6-3, 225, sr.; Fredd>e lenix, Cle. Glenville, 6-0, 205, sr.; Andre Revels, Colerain, 6-1, 240, sr.; Theo Goodrig11t, Canton McKinley, 510, 175, sr, Backs-Jordan Gafford, Worthington Kilbourne, 6-1, 195, jr.; Sean Kavanagl1, Cle. St lgnabus, 6-1,200, sr.; Jamarto O'Neal, Cle. Glenville, 6-0, 19D, sr.; Ghartey Howard, Gahanna lincoln, 6-4,203, sr.; K~e Andrews, Tol. Whibmer, 6-3, 190, sr.; Fred We>denthal, Youngs. Austintown Rtch, 5-11, 180, sr.; Ku~ Coleman, Clayton Northmont, 6-2, 190, jr. Punters-Jared Karrasch, Reynoldsburg, 6-1, 175, sr.; Blake Haudan, Tol. St John's, 6-2, 200, sr. Ofhnsiye players of the year: Alex Boone, lakewood St Edward; Ryan Brinson. Can. McKinley.

Defensive pia"" of the year: Terril a,nl, Colerain. Coaches of the year: Keny Coombs, Colerain; Ted Ginn Sr., Cle. Glenville. Second Team Loc.ls OFFENSE: Unemen-Matt Tennant Moeller, 6-4,270, sr.; Zach Marshall, Mason, 6-7,280, sr. DEFENSE: Brandon Bryant, Sl Xavier. 6-1,220, sr, Backs-Brayden Coombs, Colerain, 6-1, 180, sr.; Dane Romero, Lakota West, 6-2, 185, sr. PuntersMilCh Reynolds, lakota East, 5-11, 183, Sr. Special Mention Loc.ls Chris Cionni, St Xavier; Eric Kenkel, Elder; Jake Atl<inson, Mason; Derico Murray, Moeller.

Division II All-Ohio List COWMBUS, Ohio (AP)- The 2004 AP Di~sion II All-Ohio higl1 school football team, based on the recommendations of a state media panel:

DIVISION II First Team OFFENSE: Ends-Dusty Smith, Cols. West, 5foot-11. 190 pounds, senior; Quenton Upshaw, Chillicothe, 5-10, 165, sr.; Aaron Waldie, S~vania Southview, 5-11, 175, Sr.; Drew Kuhn, Louisville, 6-0, 175, jr,; Luke Alexander, Spring. South, 6-0, 180, Sr.; Trey Stross, Avon lake, 6-4. 190, sr. Unemen-Mike Cross, Cols. Marion-Franklin, 6-6, 305, sr.; Jesse Haney, New Philadelphia, 6-4, 300, sr.; M1ke Godsil, Mansfield Madison, 6-2, 260, sr.: AJ. Haas, Copley, 6-0, 295, sr.; Erik Gohmann, Day. Carroll, 6-3, 250, jr.:Tim Reed, Madison, 6-3, 280, sr. Quarterbacks-Jared Humphreys, Jackson, 6-1, 175, sr.; Matt Vela in, Carrollton, 6-0, 185, sr.; John Rutan, Uniontown lake, 511, 195, sr.; Brennan Glass, Spring. South, 6-3, 205, jr.; N1ck Lester. Willoughby South, 5-10, 205, sr. Backs-Brandon Morton, Cols. Independence, 6-2. 195, Sr.; Justin Reinbolt, Tiffin Columbian, 6-0, 193, sr.; Ron Pickens, Sandusky, 5-6, 180, sr.: Bobby Do~e. Avon lake, 5-10, 195, sr.; Delone CMer, Copley. 5-11, 185, jr.; lyle Garrison. Day. Carroll, 5-11, 177, sr.; Alex Knipp, Amherst Steele, 6-1, 190, jr. Kickers-Dan Amato, Tol. Cent. Cath., 5-9, 165. sr.; Arthur Zurcher, New Philadelphia, 6-0, 155, sr. DEFENSE: linemen-Torrance Nicholson, Cols. Marion-Franklin, 6-2, 255, Jr.: Corey DeWitte, Maumee, 6-5,215, sr.; Jake Ballard, Sprl.......,, 6-7, 250, jr.; Stephen Zywotek, Avon lake. 6-3, 243, sr lJnebackers-Brenton Wa~and, Jackson, 5-11, 1B5, sr.; Mark Sexton, New Philadelph18, 6-2, 220, sr.; Austin Power, louisville, 5·11, 210, jr.; Mike Dinard, Panna Padua Franc1scan, 6-2, 225, sr.; Alex Daniels, Cols. Brookhaven, 6-4,230, sr.; Cory Kampf, Amherst Steele, 6-2, 235. sr. Backs-Dom~nic Jones, Cols. Brookhaven, 5-9,186, sr.: AlexJunga, Maumee, 5-11, 170, sr.; Marcus Council, Akron Garfield, 5-11, 190, sr.; Adam Campbell, Uniontown lake, 5-11, 185, sr.; Nate Miller, Spnngfield South, 6-4, 235, sr.; Andrew Means, Avon lake. 6·2, 205, sr. Punter-Zoltan MeskO, Twinsburg Chambertin, 6-4, 225, sr. Ofhnsiye pia,.,. of the year: Bobby Doyle, Avon lake. Defensive player of the year: Stephen Zywotek, Avon lake. Coaches of the year: Steve Hale, Powell Olentangy libe~; Joe VassalottJ, Tallmadge; R1ch Turner, Parma Nonnandy.

Second Team Loc.ls OFFENSE: linemen-Chris Burgin, Kings, 6-3. 290, sr. Kickers-Zach Johnson. Spnngboro, 6-0,150, sr DEFENSE: linemen-Brady M1ntum. Loveland, 6·5, 240. sr. LJnebackers-Adam Hay, McNicholas. 6-0, 180, sr. Backs-Bobby Pangallo, McNicholas, 6-3, 190. sr.

Special Mention Loc.ls Bryan Dean, McNICholas: Tyler Trent. Springboro: Jovon Davis, Withrow; Dennis Nance, Wilmington: Ed· d1e Welch, Springboro: Kenny McDonald, Norwood: Jordan Meyers, Hamson; Ken Wilson, Glen Este; Chns Grant, loveland.


t

Page 1 of3

USATODAY.com- Cincinnati schools play catch up with Moeller

®2004'

Classifieds: Cars_ I Jobs Home News Travel Money Sports Life Tech _ _ ____;W.;..e....;a..;.th;....e...;.r-:

l»m!D!11 Personals

I USA TODAY ~-

Preps • E-MAIL THIS • PRINT THIS • SAVE THIS • MOST POPULAR • SUBSCRIBE Posted 10/5/200411:19 PM

Updated 10/13/2004 9:10AM

l_._____ se_arch,] Cincinnati schools play catch up

Advertisement

powe~~Googlec@ with Moeller High~b_ool

Preps home

Super25index Recruiting

Did you vote for

By Sal Ruibal and Steve Wieberg, USA TODAY Cincinnati's Moeller High was once the epitome of a bigtime high school football powerhouse. With 12 undefeated teams since 1963, seven Ohio state titles and one USA TODAY No. 1 finish, Moeller played the game at the highest level. When Notre Dame was looking for a head coach after the 1980 season, it passed over veteran college coaches to pick Moeller's Gerry Faust.

Answer to get $50 I Moeller is no longer the dominant football power in the USA, Ohio or even Cincinnati. In the 2004 Cincinnati Enquirer preseason rankings, the Crusaders were fifth, and rivals Elder, Colerain and St. Xavier were 1-2-3. In the latest rankings, Colerain is No. 1, followed by St. Xavier, Moeller and Elder.

PaicHor>

Your

Prep grid facilities race Chat

For the men who run the 1 ,000-student, all-male school's athletics program, that's not a disaster: In a 2003 Enquirer poll, the school finished No. 1 in six of 10 ranked sports. Football was not one of them.

• Ir~!l§l<riRl;_LJ~ TQJ)J

Wieberg offers answe1

Photo gallery •

V~JQ_qAt~,Ga.,_..§P_11L~§

football pride "At one time- 20 years ago in the Faust era- we were perceived as a football-only kind of school where the other sports simply didn't get the dollars," athletics director Barry Borman says. "Football and basketball are the two sports that people are most interested in. Yet our community sees us striving for excellence in everything we do." Football hasn't withered on the vine, however. The reality is that other schools in Ohio began to copy the highly successful formula of Moeller, which is ranked fourth nationally in all-time winning percentage (.826}, but

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/preps/football/2004-1 0-05-moeller_ x.htm

Runaway spending on football • Budgets mushroominc • WbJ.ChP.[9J!H!.ITIU~!lls.

• 'Winnersville, USA' sp· Valdosta • How money is being s • S9miLC9~c!Le§'P~Y§f

• Boosters pick up wher leaves off

1118/2004


Page 2 of3

USATODA Y.com - Cincinnati schools play catch up with Moeller

hasn't won a state title since 1985.

Jgp_p[Qg_r~!J)l:;§~lLSQI

less When Faust started the program in 1963, he created one of the area's first high school weight-training rooms- in an assistant's basement. As the program prospered, practice fields were added and the beefed-up weight room moved to Moeller's suburban campus.

• CinGinn~ti's on~:oom

in Today's Top Sports Stories

Six years ago Moeller built a $3 million gym and $1.5 million athletics department wing that included a weight room and wrestling room. The $4 million capital projects campaign is renovating practice fields and installing allweather field turf. In the ensuing arms race with its local rivals, however, the school simply could not add any more weapons. "When we finish this project, we will have done all the upgrading we can do," says Borman, who has spent 36 years at Moeller, 14 as athletics director. "We have no other land. We will have maxed out the building facilities we need." Meanwhile, his competition was making headway. At top-ranked Colerain, a public school on Cincinnati's booming west side, head coach Kerry Coombs and athletics director Dan Moody put their energies into building bridges to the community to stem the tide of good athletes flowing to parochial schools. Since Coombs arrived in 1990, the Cardinals are 118-30 overall and 57-4 at home.

• Curtain call for Steelers - 11 :o3 PM • Patriots start new streak with true 11:26 PM

• Earnhardt prevails in Phoenix, m: cozier- 12:15 AM • Goosen rally caps tough season· finale- 12:42 AM • Carter keeps Raptors perfect - 5:; 89_g__l)$8JOD8Y.Gomb~9QiinE'l?Jo . ;

nckets Buy and sell tickets to premium and so Search a region for sports eventl: Location ~~~~~~t~-~~~i? Sport ~~~~~~t~ sport .

Ticket holders: Looking to sell tickets quick? Register

At the school in 1998, Ron Rabe and Everett Johnson established the Little Cardinals youth football program, which identifies potential team members. On Elementary Alumni Night, children from area schools are invited onto the field before the game to form human tunnels, one for each school. Players who attended those schools are introduced and then run through the tunnels, slapping high-fives with the younger kids as the school's band plays the fight song. "My son has done that and says it was one of the most moving experiences he's ever had," says Moody, who played at Colerain. "He had goose bumps." Colerain has upgraded its 5,000-seat stadium with a pro-level Field Turf artificial surface, thanks to fundraising by the school's booster club. Moeller football coach Bob Crable says his biggest competitive problem is one he is powerless to control. His team can hold its own with public Colerain and Catholic Elder, he says, but can't overcome the advantages of St. Xavier, a Jesuit prep school associated with the Chicago Province instead of the local Catholic diocese. St. Xavier defeated Moeller 35-21 Sept. 21, its fifth win in the teams' last six meetings. St. Xavier "has the advantage in the caliber of players they get. They bring kids in from all over the city, and the rest of the schools are limited to a district." In the long run, Borman says attitude keeps the Moeller machine purring: "People look at our tradition and say, 'You know what? I want to go to Moeller to play football.'"

http://www. usatoday .com/sports/preps/football/2004-1 0-05-moeller x.htm

11/8/2004


Page 1 of3

Living up to tradition

POST

I

WCPO

I

GIN WEEKLY

I

Classifieds

I

Cars

I

Homes

I

Jobs

I

Custome C1

Jl.Jjjj)6jj}J)jJ;j

4

Enquirer • PllSt• 9WCPO•CiN ~ly HOME ENQUIRER SPORTS POST SPORTS WCPOSPORTS REDS BENGALS PREP SPORTS Football

uc XAVIER MIAMI

UK NKU osu CINCINNATI.COM The Enquirer The Post WCPO CiN Weekly

NEWS

L-------------------------------------------------~ ENTERTAINMENT SPORTS REDS BENGALS LOCAL GUIDE MULTIMEDIA ARCH IV

Friday, October 8, 2004

Living up to tradition 2004 recalls great teams in school's history By Tom Groeschen Enquirer staff writer

SUBMIT A STC Do you know• player we sho1 you have an id school sports cover? Send u our online for~

COLLEGE • Class of 2004

Moeller might not be the football juggernaut it was, but the 2004 team has stirred memories of the Crusaders' greatest teams. Scoring 43.2 points per game and allowing just 12.8, the Crusaders (51, 1-1 Greater Catholic League South) are ranked No. 3 in the Enquirer Division I coaches' poll and No.6 in the Associated Press state poll.

Moeller head coach Bob Crable talks to his players. (Ernest Coleman/The Enquirer)

With two-time defending state champion Elder (4-2, 1-1 GCLS) visiting tonight (Lockland Stadium, 7:30p.m.), Moeller hopes to regain the upper hand. Elder has beaten the Crusaders five straight years. "We've been talking all year about how we're out to bring the glory days back to Moeller," said Pat Watt, a senior who is the Crusaders' top wide receiver. "We hear stories all the time about the great teams here, and we'd like to be one of those teams." With coaches Gerry Faust, Ted Bacigalupo and Steve Klonne at the forefront, Moeller began its run of national glory in the mid-1970s. From 1975-85, Moeller won seven state championships and five mythical national titles. But, the Crusaders' last state title was in 1985. They haven't reached the state finals since 1997. "Times have changed," said Moeller athletic director Barry Borman. "Twenty years ago, we were a step ahead of some people with things like offseason programs and weightlifting. Other programs developed to where it's a pretty even playing field." Moeller coach Bob Crable, like Borman a veteran of several decades at the school, also can speak with authority on the subject. Crable was a prep All-American linebacker at Moeller in the 1970s, a college

http://www .cincinnati .com/preps/2004/ 10/08/ohadv08 .html

11/8/2004


Page 2 of3

Living up to tradition

All-American at Notre Dame and an NFL player for six years with the New York Jets. Crable became Moeller head coach in 2001 and has a 25-14 career record. Moeller made the playoffs in 2002 and '03 and seems headed there again. As for the Moeller dynasty, Crable said it's best to just appreciate how it was. "I don't think you'll ever see that again," he said. "In those days, we were the option if you wanted to get a Division I college scholarship. Kids just flocked here. But now kids know they can get a Division I scholarship playing at other schools, too. "And that's fine, you can't blame them. The culture is just different now, and you've got a lot of very good programs out there." That includes reigning power Colerain, which handled Moeller in a preseason scrimmage. Colerain is ranked No. 1 in the city and state and No. 5 by USA Today- ratings once routine at Moeller. But this '04 team is very good. Quarterback Chris Reisert leads the city with 1,432 yards passing and 16 TD passes. Watt is his top receiver, with 36 catches for 554 yards and seven TDs. Offensive guard Matt Tennant is one of the state's top-ranked players and has committed to Boston College. Defensively, the list of standouts includes defensive backs Derico Murray and Matt Held, linebackers Alex Jaeger, Kevin Humbel and Pat Grau and lineman Patrick Farrell. They will all play important roles against Elder tonight. "It'd be nice to beat them, because they've been the powerhouse for a few years," Watt said. Said Crable: "I don't look at it as making any statements. This is just our game this week, and that's as far as we're looking."

E-mail tgrgeschen@IJflqiJ.jrer&Q!JJ

BASEBALL/PLAYOFFS _Long, short of it: Bra_v~~._.ca_r::_q_~_wJn Arroyo makes most of opportunity Atlanta digs self out of hole Ca.rds_don't need lon_gball LaRussa expects to return to Cards Don't expect Twins to roll over C_ltbJ; fine Sosa a day~_s_p_ay_:_Slli_~ CLliZJ.~~y_es Reds aJ;_Jree agent BENGALS/NFL

http://www.cincinnati.com/preps/2004/10/08/ohadv08.html

11/8/2004


Page 1 of4

Big Moe again

NQUIRER

1 POST I

WCPO

I

CIN WEEKLY

I

Classifieds

I

Cars

I

Homes

I

Jobs

I

Custome

4 Enquirer• Post•9WCPO•IlN Weskly HOME ENQUIRER SPORTS POST SPORTS WCPOSPORTS REDS 'BEN GALS PREP SPORTS Football

uc XAVIER MIAMI

UK NKU osu

NEWS

L-------------------------------------------~ ENTERTAINMENT

SPORTS

REDS

BENGALS

LOCAL GUIDE

MULTIMEDIA

Sunday, November 14, 2004

Big Moe again Crusaders in region final first time since '97 By Carey Hoffman Enquirer contributor

ARCHIV

SUBMI Do you know; player we sho you have an i! school sports cover? Send 1 our online for1 SPOR

Pick the wi Whowillwint games? M~.k.e

The biggest Moeller victory in at least seven years was made possible in a way few would have believed before the game.

iWireless 1 Check out the will be coverir si~ See where the is going to col

College Moeller's defense, which was hammered for 35 points by St Xavier seven weeks ago, redeemed itself repeatedly Saturday, setting up both Crusaders scores and shutting down any St X comeback hopes in a 10-7 victory in a Division I regional semifinal at UC's Nippert Stadium. St X's only score came on a punt block recovered in the end zone. "This is what a team is all about," Moeller coach Bob Crable said. "Our offense saved our butts many times, but it was the defense that made the plays today."

(31) leans forward for yardage in the

second quarter. The Enquirer/ERNEST COLEMAN Zoom

More photos: Moeller (1 0-2) advances to the regional • SatlJfm_RrElQJ.9Qtbi!!Lgallery final and the state's final eight in Division I for the first time since 1997. The Crusaders next will face Colerain, which beat Moeller 30-23 in the regional semifinals a year ago.

In this year's first Moeller-St X meeting, the Bombers ran roughshod all night, gaining 399 total yards, with Chris Cionni Watt Clilli!I:Jf21tliiS rushing for 205 himself. after the Crusaders held on for a 10On Saturday, Moeller held St X to 138 total yards. Cionni ran 18 times for 77 yards, but 40 came on one play.

7 victory over GCL rival St. Xavier Saturday. The Enquirer/ERNEST COLEMAN Zoom

Ohio State-bound St X quarterback Robby Schoenhoft, under harassment much of the day, was held to a season-low 4 7 yards on 5-of-

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041114/SPT0301 01/411140428/1... 11122/2004


Page 2 of4

Big Moe again

19 passing. Moeller intercepted Schoenhoft three times, in a tense game in which each team turned over the ball four times. The amazing aspect was Moeller was so improved without its best defensive lineman- senior tackle Pat Farrell, who had a sprained ankle and was on the field for only four plays Saturday- and with four sophomores often at the point of attack. Sophomore Frank Becker, a 6-foot-3, 260-pound tackle, filled in for Farrell on the inside and was credited with 2 Y:z tackles. Classmate Andrew Wersel, a defensive end, had four tackles, a forced fumble and a sack. A junior, defensive tackle Dominick lacovone, led the defense with 5 Y:z tackles, two tackles-for-loss and a fumble recovery. "We prepared a lot and knew every play," said Becker. "Then it was all about pride." "I talked to a couple of the sophomores and said they had to step up," added Farrell. "This was the best, by far, that our defense has played all year." Crable said the scheme Moeller's coaches used in the first St. X game was adjusted for Saturday's meeting. Defensive fronts were shifted. "They put a lot of guys in the box," St. X coach Steve Specht said. "Sometimes they had nine in the box and they filled the gaps. They're a good defense." The defense served notice early that things would be different this game. On the game's third play, Moeller's Scott Ratterman intercepted Schoenhoft and returned the ball 31 yards to the St. X 13. That set up a 25-yard Mike Carter field goal. The score stayed at 3-0 until the middle of the third quarter, when St. X's Alex Albright blocked a Carter punt in the end zone. Matt Liguzinski fell on the ball for a TD that put St. X up 7-3. There were still four more turnovers to come, with the game hanging in the balance. The biggest came with 9:48 left in the game, when a scrambling Schoenhoft was hit from behind by Moeller's Wersel and fumbled. lacovone recovered for Moeller at the St. X 10. On the next play, Moeller quarterback Chris Reisert bootlegged right, spun and bounced off two tacklers at the 6 and fell forward into the end zone for Moeller's only TD. "I'm not a good pinball player," joked Reisert, who led Moeller's offense with 118 passing yards and 45 rushing yards. "That play was just luck. 1 thought maybe I could put my head down and get a couple of yards, and I ended up in the end zone. That was pretty much luck." That put Moeller up 10-7 with 9:37 to play, and the rest was up to the Crusader defense.

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.d1Varticle?AID=/20041114/SPT030101/411140428/l... 11/22/2004


----

-----

---

Page 3 of4

Big Moe again

It continued to impress down the stretch, allowing St. X only one first down on its final five possessions after the Bombers scored their TD. An interception by Moeller's Matt Held with 2:40 to play ended St. X's last chance. "The defense really stuck together," Reisert said. "Everyone stepped up big time, and the sophs played great." "They had a great game. You can't take that away from them," said St. X's Specht, whose team had beaten Moeller in five of six previous meetings. "They're a good football team and it will be a good regional (title) game, whomever they play."

Moeller

3 0 0 7 10

St. Xavier

0 0 7 0 -7

M -Carter 25 FG

SX - Liguzinski blocked punt recovered in end zone (Osborne kick) M - Reisert 10 run (Carter kick) Records: M 10-2, SX 11-1.

SPORTS • Good Sports: A hqbby and then some • What's up with that? • Getting to .500 not enough for LeBron • ~arts digest • Sports today on TV, radio COLLEGES • MAC East showdown Saturday • Slow start dooms OSU • Loss caps rough week for Buckeyes • Iig~rs sure to g~tyQt~rs' attention • Boyd makes most of final home start

uc • Kirkland steps up in win over So. Ind. • G_yiduQll, Hall t~ls~LQ!.l_odabout (Qut~sJgJ)_Q BEN GALS • Win comes close to shutout • 'D' wants more ups, fewer downs • Qpn't pout, just_yvin • Bengals-Redskins: Who has the edge? • N~xt Game NFL • Chargers' Brees is making it look easy • Jets ponder strategy against Ravens' stout D • §_l,_md~y's best pets • C!Jrnutte's NFL pQ_w~r ranking_s

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041114/SPT030 1011411140428/1... 11/22/2004


Page 4 of 4

Big Moe again

REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS • High school sports results. schedules OHIO HIGH SCHOOLS • Title caps stellar run for Spartans • ln!:lli'Ln_!:fiJLIQ$.~§2n!:l§ti9l9ht fingJ • Newark Catholic wins title • IQLA_LUrs_yl~__g.ets best of GGC!, • Bizzarri. See lead runners to glory OHIO PREP FOOTBALL • Simpson's 3 TDs pace rout • SigMge_9il9in KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOLS • $t!g_y_e__ygur:_he~q,Q_Qac_b_ • Pandas threat to win state

• Q_gyQ_gJh,J)_~QUJe9m§JQJ:!ec:it • Scott likely in 37th District Local news to your home or office every day. Guaranteed delivery by 6 a.m. Subs~ribJuJow.

Search our site by keyword:

&quirw• Plm•9WCPO• CiiN W.ly CINCINNATI.COM

I

ENQUIRER

L. .

r;;::..l .. . . . . . . . !~

Search also: News 1,!o_~s I H.Q!lles I ~MS. I ~L1!5_$_1fieds I Obits I COUJtC!r:!.s I !;vents I QJnlng Movies/DVDs 1 Video Games 1 Hotels 1 Golf 1 Visitor's Guide 1 Maps/Directions 1 Yellow Pa

POST

I

WCPO

I

CIN WEEKLY

I

Classifieds

I

Cars

I

Homes

I

Jobs

I

Custo1

Search I Questions/help 1 News tips 1 Letters to the editors 1 Subscribe Newspaper advertising 1 Web advertising 1 Place a classified 1 Circulation Copyright 1995-2004. The Cincinnati Enquirer, a Gannett Co. Inc. newspaper. Use of this site signifies agreement to t~rmsotse.!Yi!;.~ updated 12/19/2002.

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.d1Varticle?AID=/20041114/SPT030101/411140428/l... 11122/2004


High school football! Colerain 34, Moeller 6

J 1- 21-0

â&#x20AC;˘

The Enquirer/Ernest Coleman

Colerain quarterback Dominick Goodman goes airborne as he's hit by Moeller's Greg Jones (49) and Alex Jaeger (40) on a first-quarter run Saturday night. Goodman rushed for two touchdowns.

It's usual formula: Punishing ground game and defense By T111 Grteschen Enquirer staff writer

Next week Colerain (13-0) will play

OXFORD - Colerain Worthington Kilbourne (11-2) football fans took their sweet time leaving Miami's Yager Stadium Saturday night, reveling in a 34-6 Division I regional championship thumping of Moeller. Coach Kerry Coombs, per his postgame custom, climbed a sideline bench and animatedly addressed the Cardinal masses. Coombs was drowned out several times by cheers, as Colerain celebrated its first trip to the state semifinals since 2000. "After the last three ~ years, I'm glad our kids and our fans can stand back and take it all in," Coombs told

in the state semifinals at 7 p.m. Saturday. reporters, practically yelling above the din. 'This was a closer game than it looks, but our kids came up with big plays whenever there was adversity." Colerain advances to the state semifinals next Saturday, tentatively at Dayton's Welcome Stadium, vs. Worthington Kilbourne. Kilbourne was not ranked in the final Associated Press Top 10 state poll of the regular season. Next week's site will be made official today by the

The Enquirer/Ernest Coleman

Colerain's Jeremy Hartmann (86) drags Moeller's Alex Urban into the end zone for a first-quarter touchdown.

Ohio High School Athletic Association. Ticket demand might cause the game to be moved to a larger site, such as UC's Nippert Stadium, but for now, Welcome Stadium is

the scheduled site. A crowd of 21,541 watched Saturday as Colerain nursed a 7-6 lead into the second quarter. See COLERAIN, Page B3


ill!!: i U"Ut:i !Vl Ult:

"t:d~VU,

Udlllt::l

Barnes, came near the football was on a failed shuttle pass late in the game. The rest of the night, it was Reisert operating out of the shotgun, looking for his favorite receivers down the field. 'The game plan was just to throw it all night," Reisert said. "It was a quarterback's dream- just put the ball in my hands." Said Moeller coach Bob Crable: 'Throwing the football was going to be where we hung our hat And we had them on the run for a while." Moeller answered Colerain's first touchdown of the night with a 2(}.yard TD pass from Reisert with 5:31 left in the first quarter. After Colerain went ahead 14-6 early in the second quarter, Reisert con-

1\.t::l:St::H Wll:Sllt::U

Ult:: 1llg11l .::;o-

Of-47 passing for 292 yards. His favorite receiver, Pat Watt, had a huge night with 15 catches for 159 yards. Moeller's 292 total yards all came through the air. That marks the most yards Colerain has allo~d this season. The Cardinals came into the game allowing just 113 yards of offense a game. Moeller's new pass-protection scheme frustrated Colerain and kept its sack total to just two, even though the defensive line didn't have to worry about the run. 'They took away our zone-blitz game with what they did," Coombs said. Said Crable, "We lit up the skies tonight, and that was all part of our plan."

The Enquirer/Ernest Coleman

Colerain running back Mister Simpson is upended by Moeller's Scott Rofterman on a first-quarter run Saturday night at Yager Stadium.

Colerain: Cards back

in state semifinals From Page Bl

But the Cardinals stretched their lead to 21-6 by halftime, and four Motllier turnovers kept the Crusaders from making a serious run. "We said we couldn't turn it over and expect to have success against them," Moeller coach Bob Crable said. 'They're the best, and we didn't measure up to what the best is." Colerain (13-0), ranked No.1 in the state and No. 5 nationally by USA Today, had been knocked out of the playoffs three straight years by Elder. The last two times came in the regional final, including a bitter 24-23 loss last year. "We got that monkey off our back," Colerain senior quarterback Dominick Goodman said. "But now we've got to complete our goal and go to state." Goodman rushed 29 times for 168 yards and two touchdowns, as the Cardinals' triple-option offense wore down Moeller. Fullback Mister Simpson rushed 14 times for 60 yards and a TD, Dan Magness ran six times for 47 yards, and Terrence Sherrer rushed six times for 41 yards. Colerain held ·a 374-292 edge in total yards, with 305 yards rushing. All Moeller's 292 yards were passing, as quarterback Chris Reisert completed 26 of 47 passes with one touchdown and three interceptions. Pat Watt caught15 passes for 159 yards for Moeller. Moeller's only running plays came on eight scrambles by Reisert, netting zero yards. With Colerain allowing only 51 yards per game rushing, Moeller went strictly via air. 'They've proven time and again how good they are against the run," Crable said. "Our only hope was to put the ball in the air. " Colerain snuffed that, too, including interceptions by Brian Edwards, Justin Moore and Andre Revels. Revels took his interception back 89 yards for a touchdown with

Playoff scores DMSION I • Can. McKinley 35, Brunswick 14 • Colerain 34, Moeller 6 • Cle. Glenville 22, Cle. St. Ignatius 14 • Worthington Kilbourne 35, Hilliard Davidson 34 DIVISION Ill • Canal Fulton NW 14, Thornville Sheridan 0 • Cle. Benedictine 21, Cuyahoga Falls Walsh Jesuit 0 • Cols. Watterson 27, Cols. DeSales 6 • St. Marys Memorial 21, Day. Chaminade-Julienne 13 DIVISION V • Amanda-Ciearcreek 27, Wheelersburg 25 • Hamler Patrick Henry 41, Uberty Center 27 • Smithville 41, N. Uma S. Range 14 • St Henry 41, Fast Clinton 27

2:15left, giving Colerain a 34-6lead and the final icing. 'The last three years really burned in our heart," Revels said. 'That's why we still play every play like it's our last It feels pretty good to get this far." Colerain last made the state semifinals in 2000, losing to eventual state champ Upper Arlington. Moeller's top player, offensive tackle Matt Tennant, suffered a dislocated right elbow last week and did not play. Tennant, who has committed to Boston College, dressed and went through pregame drills. Colerain scored first on a rare pass play, a 27-yard toss from Goodman to wide.<> pen tight end Jeremy Hartmann 4:35 into the game. Colerain's run-heavy triple option sometimes catches opponents napping with pass plays, and that was the case on this one. ColwM!-----1

Moeller

··--····-····-·-··--&

14 0

13 -34

0

0

0

-6

C- Hartmann 27 pass from Goodman (Schu!tJ! kick) M - Smitll 20 pass from Reisert (k.'ck biOCl<ed) C - S:mpson 6 run (Schu!tJ! k:ck) C -Goodman 8 run (SChu!tJ! k:ck) C -Goodman 5 run (k«:k la:led) C - Revels 89 inten:eption retum (Schu!tJ! kick)

Reco:ds: C 13.0. M10-3.


-

High ~chool football playoffs I Colerain routs Elder 38-3

Cards break through vs. nemesis Panthers Dominating 2nd half ends 3-year playoff skid vs. Elder By Tom Groeschen Enquirer staff writer

Colerain football coach Kerry Coombs paced the field nervously before Saturday night's playoff showdown with Elder, admitting to having some butterflies. Halftime was another antacid test, with Colerain ahead only 10-3'. As it turned out, Coombs need not have worried. The Cardinals, ranked No. 1 in the Associated Press state poll and seeded third in the playoffs, crushed two-time defending Division I state champion and sixthseeded Elder 38-3 in a playoff opener at Colerain, in a game that was tight for 2lh quarters. A sellout home crowd of about 10,000 watched Colerain emphatically halt its three-year playoff losing streak to Elder, which included a bitter 24-23 defeat in the 2003 regional finals. "111 be honest with you, it gets in your head," Coombs said of Elder's recent playoff dominance against the Cardinals. "If I said to you it wasn't crossing my mind tonight, I'd be lying. But it's not in our heads anymore." Colerain's seven-point halftime lead had Coombs wondering, but then the Cardinals blew the Panthers away with a 21-0 third quarter.

The Enquirer/ERNEST COLEMAN

Colerain quarterback Dominick Goodman picks up yardage in the second quarter. The topranked Cardinals led only 10-3 at halftime, but they took control with a 21-0 third quarter.

See COLERAIN, Page 813

Colerain's Terrence Sherrpr drags an Elder player into the end zone for a touchdown in the second quarter. Sherrer had 110 yards rushing and two touchdowns subbing for injured standout Mister Simpson. Colerain held a 320-146 edge in yards, 307 coming on the ground.

FOOTBALL PLAYOFFS Colerain 38, Elder 3 St. Xavier 14, La Salle 3 Moeller 38, Lakota West 7 Centerville 34, Mason 7 Indian Hill 45, Logan Elm 7 W. Lib. Salem 19, Fenwick 13 East Clinton 52, Zane Trace 7

Coverage, 813

The Enquirer/ ERNEST COLEMAN

This, finally, should be The Year for Colerain he Tune Is Now. That's the expectation on the back of the Tshirts worn by the fans at Colerain High. That's the hope, the burden and the demand. The football playoffs are here, and with them the familiar, frightening sense at Colerain that this is The Year. They've had Years before at Colerain. That's what happens when you go 49-1 in the last five regular seasons but exit early in the playoffs.

T Paul

Daugherty

Years end too soon. The worry beads are never far away. A state title is a goal, an expectation, a quest and an exorcism. It's all of that at Colerain, depending on whom you talk to. The Cardinals have been so close. Heart-achy close, wide-right close, ineligible-player close. Thisclose. This is the year. Should be. Looks to be. You never know. Lord, let it be the year. We talk about football pride and

passion at places like Elder. It's real enough, but it's no greater than at Colerain, where the football boosters can tell you how the seventh- and eighth- grade teams are doing. What's it like when a community holds its breath for what it hopes will be a five-week run to a state title? The Colerain community would love to find out. See DAUGHERlY, Page 813


The Er:pA'r/ JEFF SWi~GER

Moeller's Pat Watt (24) and Dillon Ruby celebrate a first-half touchdown against Elder.

Moeller: Holds off comeback From PageCl

"This is the third straight week we've gottt:n killed in the first half," Elder coach Doug Ramsey said. "We can't keep losing one half and losing the other. I don't know the answer, but we've got to start playing a whole gaJne." Moeller used its devastating passing attack a"ld had just enough defense to win. The Crusaders stopped Elcer on downs several times before the Panthers scored with 2:16 left in the third quarter. Reisert threw fer 210 yards and three TDs in the first half, as Moeller took a 2~ halftime lead. Two of the TDs went to wide receiver Pat Watt. Reisert entered as the area passing leader with 1,432 yards and 16 TD passes. Watt enterec as the top Division I receiver in town, with 36 catches for 554 yards and seven IDs. Watt had eight catches for 106 , yards. Tyler Dierkers also had eight catches, for 124 yards. Elder's Ben Wittwer had nine catches for 136 yards and two late TDs, including a l()..yard score with 25 seconds left. Elder's Craig Carey was 30of-46 passing for 374 yards and two TDs, and he also ran for a score. Elder netted just 46 yards ' rushing. Moeller had 288 yards pass__ .:~ 1'lC _,.,\..:-- •• .:.\.. ll:11--

The Enqu:rcr,i JEFF SWiti:GER

Moeller's Pat Watt makes a spectacular catch as he falls backward after a deflection by Elder's Kyle Rudolf.

Ruby running for 55 yards and Martez WilliaJns for 53. Friday's gaJne concludtd the three-gaJne GCL schedule fer both teaJns. Moeller finished 2-1 and EIder 1-2 in the league. St. Xavier finished 3-0 after defeating Lc. Salle 34-20 Friday. The gaJne had a playoff atmosphere, typical of GCL South gaJnes. Elder probably needed to Vl'.ffi to ..... ~---~~ .... 1.. ... . - .... -1 ....... .,,..-t+

~ ... ._ ....

Moeller won despite the absence of the teaJn's top running back, Daniel Barnes, who didn't play because of a haJnstring injury.

=...

.

~

1:

~

.. ~:1:. . , 26 r.:·· ''" · r. : t :c... · :: :;:;:g~ ~~; :~: ~· c~ :~· ,~,~ ; ,

i'! ·J ~·::,)C. :~ ,,

i

t::. ;'"t3J<•:~c":;IH.:·:· r~·,: :~,':;r

~:

;;;;:""

10 ~;-·:

'~

----

c~:~·j lif:···~

· ; :1

·:>"

E 4-J il -2 G:ts 1. ·-· ~ 1 ,2.~:.

.I

I

1 :

:

~


Shuck's playoff picture

St. Xavier tops Harbin Loss to Mason is costly for Lakota East By Carey Hoffman Enquirer contributor

Mason's overtime victory over Lakota East Friday is going to change the playoff landscape among area Division I teams. That's the conclusion of Harbin computer expert Steve Shuck, who has tracked the race for the playoffs for the Enquirer all season. East, even with its 9-1 record, now appears on the outside looking in, with Mason slotted for the No. 7 spot among the eight Division I teams that will qualify in Region 4. As of late Friday even-

ing, the Division I playoff matchups looked to be: No.8 La Salle vs. No.1 St. Xavier; No. 7 Mason vs. No. 2 Centerville; No. 6 Elder vs. No. 3 Colerain; and No.5 Lakota Westvs. No.4 Moeller. A number of key scores were still missing among the area's smaller school divisions. Withrow, Springboro, Kings, Glen Este, Norwood and Mount Healthy are all solidly in among Division II teams in Region 8. Indian Hill is comfortably in in Division III Region 12. One class where there

was a significant development was Division IV, where Finneytown lost to Ross to create a logjam of teams vying for the eighth and final berth in Region 16. Finneytown, Mariemont and Batavia are all in contention. Madeira fell out of the chase after losing Friday. Reading is comfortably in in Region 16. Cincinnati Country Day left its playoff fortunes up in the air in Division VI by losing Friday night. CCD, Lockland and Mississinawa Valley are all in contention for the eighth and final spot.


Moeller 37, Princeton 22

Crusaders march on to playoffs By Coleen Kane Enquirer stajfwriter

Moeller coach Bob Crable said there are still plenty of things for his team to work on before the playoffs start, but Friday night was a step forward after last week's step back. The Crusaders rode a 23-point halftime lead to a 37-22 victory over Princeton Friday night. · The win came one week after a 41-17loss at Lakewood St. Edward. The Crusaders' only other loss of the season came at St. Xavier on Sept. 24. Moeller finishes its regular season 8-2 and is all but assured a playoff spot in Division I, coming in fourth in Region 4 in Harbin analyst Steve Shuck's predictions before the game. "We still made a lot of mistakes.

We're not playing with great confidence," Crable said. "We've got to do some things better to do well in the playoffs - read coverages better, know all of our assignments on defense. ... There are plenty of things to work on." Princeton finished its season 3-7 after going 8-2 last year. The Vikings are 7-36 all time against Moeller, the most losses to one team by 29 games. They've lost 13 straight to the Crusaders. "We're disappointed. We thought we were going to be a better football team," Princeton coach Brian Dodds said. "We constantly gave up big plays all year.... The key to this game was big plays in the first half we were unable to do anything against. ... Ifs the story of our year." Moeller's offense, the second-

best in the area behind Colerain with an average of 398.2 yards a game entering Friday's contest, got a break from its defense in the first half. The Crusaders recovered a Princeton fumble and picked off two Princeton passes to fuel the 23-0 first half score. The first interception came with Princeton approaching the end zone midway through the second quarter. Senior defensive back Derico Murray grabbed a Josh Harrison pass at the 3-yard line and sped 97 yards for a touchdown to put the Crusaders up 16-0. Afew plays later, Moeller linebacker Alex Jaeger intercepted Sam Dawes and returned it to Princeton's 26-yard line. Moeller scored when 6-foot-7 Tyler Dierkers grabbed a Charlie Fischer pass to go up 23-0. "We got after it early," Crable

said. "When you have players like De!ico Murray step up and do things like that in a football game, it helps you to get over the hump." With many of the starters on the bench in the second half, Moeller's offense stalled two times in a row within field goal range, and the Crusaders' Mike Carter missed both. But Moeller's Justin Smith caught 41- and 3!>-yard touchdoWn. passes in the half for the :final score. Moeller finished with 366 total yards to Princeton's 302.

Moeller·--·----·-·""""-"

l'ltncelon - - - · - - · -

9 14 0 0

7 7 8 14

-37 -22

M: Team safety M: Barnes 35-yard run (Carter kick) M: Murray 97-yard interoeption return (Carter kick) M: Dler1<ers 27-yard pass from FtSCher(Carter kick) M: J. Smith 40-yard pass from Reisert (Carter kick) P: D. Woods 2-yard run (Woods run) P: Morton-Green 41-yard pass from Dawes (Kick failed) M: J. Smith 35-yard pass from Redwome (Carter kick) P: Mathews 56-yard pass from Harrison (Nichols pass) Records: M 8·2 (2·2 GCLS) P3·7 (2·5 GMC) •


High school football Elder drops second straight in GCL South I

Five years' futility ends Moeller fends off Elder comeback to end streak By Tom Groeschen Enquirer staff writer

Moeller led Elder 27-0 late in the third quarter Friday, and hundreds of fans began streaming for the exits at lockland Stadium. Those who stayed watched the Crusaders fight off a furious Elder rally to win 27-21, as Moeller ended a five-year losing streak to the Panthers. With heavy traffic and red tail lights visible outside the stadium, Moeller's Sean Redwine covered an Elder onside kick with 25 seconds left to ice it. "It's a great feeling to beat Elder, after all these years," Moeller standout guard Matt Tennant said. "We knew we'd have to play hard for 48 minutes." Crusaders quarterback Chris Reisert threw for 288 yards and three touchdowns and ran for another score. Elder, two-time defending state champion, mounted a frantic comeback but could not quite pull it off. The Panthers scored their 21 points in the final15 minutes of play. "We had it in the back of our minds that they would come back, because they're a great team," Reis- Moeller's Sean !Redwine makes a catch for a 26-yard touchdown past Elder's Ricky Stautberg in the first ert said. "It's just great for our senior quarter at Lockland Stadium Friday. It was the first score of the game for either team. class to beat them and leave a little legacy." A sellout crowd of about 7,000 watched the Greater Catholic League South rivals play at Moeller's home field. Alarge chunk of the crowd was gone by game's end. "At halftime, we told our players • St. Xavier won the Greater Catholic the score was still 0-0," Moeller coach Bob Crable said. "Elder is a League South, going 3-0 in the league by bunch of fighters, and you knew beating La Salle 34-20. they wouldn't go away. I'm just glad • Wyoming scored nine unanswered points we didn't go to overtime." in the fourth quarter to defeat Reading 30-21 Moeller is ranked No. 3 and Elder in Cincinnati Hills League play. is No. 4 in the Enquirer Division I • Withrow rolled to 7-0, defeating Western coaches' poll. Hills 33-8. Elder was coming off a 33-30 dou• Winton Woods pounded the running ble OT loss to St. Xavier, having fallen behind 20-6 at halftime. Two game at Glen Este, and the Warriors took weeks before, Elder rallied from a control in the Fort Ancient Valley Conference The Enquirer/TONY JONES Buckeye division with a 42-21 victory. 21-0 deficit to beat La Salle 38-35. St. Xavier's Chris il:lonnl is brought down by La Salle's Rick Stories and scores, C10-C11 Betsch. Cionni rushed for 148 yards and one touchdown. See MORLER, Page Cll


Football

Crusaders post shutout The Cincinnati Enquirer

Aiken 19, Jacobs 0

Senior quarterback Chris Reisert played one quarter and was 3-for-3 passing for 47 yards and three touchdowns as Moeller (4-0) rolled to victory over Mother Teresa Secon (London, Ontario) 64-0 Saturday night. Junior running back Martez Williams had 85 yards rushing, including a 21-yard score. Moeller had a total of 321 yards, inclJ.!.ding 310 yards rushing. Moeller plays at St. Xavier Friday night.

Senior quarterback Will McGivens scored on a 1-yard touchdown run, and freshman running back Sir Abernathy had a 25-yard TD run to lead Aiken (2-2, 1-0 SOPL). Abernathy had 188 yards on 19 carries. Senior linebacker Alvin Ushery had a 14-yard fumble recovery in the fourth quarter to help seal the win. Jacobs (0.4) isatJeffersonFriday, while Aiken plays at Belmont.

MolherTeresaSecon ....•. _..

Moeller.......................... 28

14

M-Fischer 8 p~ss from Reisert (Carter kick) M-Smith 24 pass from Reisert (Carter kick) M-Dier1<ers 15 pass from Reisert (Carter kick) M-Bames 2 run (Carter kick) M-Watt 24 pass from Redwine (Carter kick) M-Farfsing 4 run (Carter kick) M-Williams 21 run (Mooreman ~ck) M-Ruby 21 run (Mooreman kick) M-Sharp 50 run (kick failed) M-Coletti safety Records: M 4-0, 0-1

14

8

-0 -64

Aiken-·--·············-··-··

Jacobs ............................... _.

12 0

0 0

A-McGivens 1 run (kick failed) A-Abernathy 25 run (pass failed) A-Ushery 14 fumble recovery (McGivens kick) Records: J 0-4 A 2-2

Other scores Colonel White 40, Hughes 16 Dunbar 62, Woodward 14 Hannony 36, Dayton Chnstian 12

0 0

7 0

··19

-0


C. e..,.. P~-. "l- Z<i-o'-'

â&#x20AC;˘

Moeller's loss abig one, but one to grow on By Lonna Kingsbury Contributor

"If my kids had played as hard with their heads as they did with their hearts - we would have won the game," said Head Coach Bob Crable. And with the hearts of lions the Crusaders fought with everything they had against the St. Xavier Bombers. Chris Reisert completed 24 out of 39 passes for 341 yards and three touchdowns, all in the fourth. Down 28-9 at the end of the fourth quarter Moeller still had fight in them as they took back the lead going up 31-28. But St. Xavier scored again to end the game with

Xavier 35, Moeller 31. "My kids played great and I'm proud of them. They really showed courage in coming back. They showed great character," continued Crable. Senior quarterback Chris Reisert, junior receiver Justin Smith, senior tailback Daniel Barnes, senior receiver Pat Watt and senior wide receiver Tyler Dierters - all played a great game. Senior safety Alex Urban was something to watch. A close game at the half with a score ofl4-9, it looked like Moeller could pull it out. But after four turnovers and St. Xavier taking serious advantage of two, the

Bombers were able to take a 28-9 lead at the start of the fourth quarter. But that last three minutes of the game was amazing to watch as the Crusaders showed just what makes them a team to be envied, but it was not to be their time. Next game: LaSalle. It is going to be an interesting season with everyone so closely matched. "They're all really good teams it's going to be a good season to watch," said Crable. Moeller's courage and conviction will be tested. eastsports@communitypress.com 248-7570


SPORTS Colerain's Mister Simpson (35) gets tangled in a pile with Princeton defenders Saturday night at Colerain. Simpson rushed for 178 yards on 22 carries as the Cardinals extended their GMCwinning streak to 31 games.

The Enquirer/ ERNEST COLEMAN

Princeton - · · · - - - 0 0 0 12 Colerain------ 7 17 14 7 C-S:-:-:):i~:<: 1 r.;:'] (S::-:~:ttc tt ~~;} C-Sc~:1~0

43 >G

-12 -45

I.

g-~~:~~;;~7 ~~~;~7~~~~;;~~-~~~~~7~ ~f;;

g~~:;~~~~ ~3rur:~~~~:;~: t;i~;·) PAD.:;:·:;~s

1 rur. (i'..Cit b·nr;:€'1)

19 ru:-: (Sc::;.;~\.1 t: (tj P ~ ·;~:-:; 1 r..;~ :K:-:::• t:::;-r;;;:Z) <?:oo--:<o: P 1-2 (0·' G-:.:;.: 3-0 ~~--0).

C-~~:":':u~s

437 yards last week against Louisville St. Xavier, completed 10 of 13 passes for 181 yards and two touchdowns to lead Moeller, the secondranked team in the Enquirer Division I area coaches' poll. SL Francis---·---- 0 MaeDer 14

0 0 3 28

:!-4 ·r_~'::::q:~~·~:: ~l~;~.-: (CJ~IJ~ ~::::;.,~ 1 .'.:t~ G3 p.::s-:; hr:': R!'-:!!:!1 (Garto:r k,~~·)

~/" -~: ;;-..-~'f

No. 2 Moeller 45, Tol. St Francis De Sales 0 Senior quarterback Chris Reisert, who passed for a school-record

~~

~:-~::::: 20 ;::;:; i!-5:.-·:-:::'- 43 ~;--: ~:::r::r: i-;:t:;;) :.~ -~:...f~ :·.: 1 :-. -~ ~:;-::::~ ;.; ::~:} rt -~·,:·.'·:-; !B ~.:--~:. ~.:~~ R:::::c-:r: {C-:~·=r t; :~~) t!.· ~.:~; 2Z :,:~ (C·:::"":.:-:" t; :;:;) Rc~n~:1~:

D 2·1 Y 3.-tl.

0 0

-0 -45


I

o .. 13 ... o~

GREG LORING/CONTRIBI.ITOR

Second place 11~~~

wn.\.,

IMoeller runningback .laslill.lafdlullunges forward for extra'j~ge in the Cn::saders 27·21 wirn over Elder on Friday nlghL The win locked up seco11td.:RI& In the GCIL South for Moeller. ?~c..-


Moeller's

Pat Watt looks to break through the hole against Elder in their game at Lockland Stadium Friday.

SCORES AND MORE IN SPORTS

FRIDAY NIGHT

TOP REGIONAL GAMES Moeller 27 Elder 21

St. Xavier 34 LaSalle 20

Winton Woods 42 Glen Este 21

Norwood 41 Little Miami 34

Wyoming 30 Reading 21

Withrow 33 Western Hills 8

...................................................; ...................................................,.................................................... .

F00TBALL

MORE PHOTOS ONLINE AT CININNATI.COM

..

'HE CINCINNATI ENQUIRER An.coM

Ji:i ill d.t,\l•r; (,] :) ij ;I!Wln•J 1

EAST EomoN

so


High school football! Elder drops second straight in GCL South

Five years' futility ends Moeller fends off Elder comeback to end streak By Tom Groeschen Enquirer staff writer

Moeller led Elder 27-0 late in the third quarter Friday, and hundreds of fans began streaming tor the exits at Lockland Stadium. Those .who stayed watched the Crusaders fight off a furious Elder rally to win 27-21, as Moeller ended a five-year losing streak to the Panthers. With heavy traffic and red tail lights visible outside the stadium, Moeller's Sean Redwine covered an Elder onside kick with 25 seconds left to ice it "It's a great feeling to beat Elder, after all these years," Moeller standout guard Matt Tennant said. "We knew we'd have to play hard for 48 minutes." Crusaders quarterback Chris Reisert threw for 288 yards and three touchdowns and ran for another score. Elder, two-time defending state champion, mounted a frantic comeback but could not quite pull it off. The Panthers scored their 21 points in the final15 minutes of play. "We had it in the back of our minds that they would come back, because they're a great team," Reis- Moeller's Sean Redwine makes a catch for a 26-yard touchdown past Elder's Ricky Stautberg in the first ert said. "It's just great for our senior quarter at Lockland Stadium Friday. It was the first score of the game for either team. class to beat them and leave a little legacy." A sellout crowd of about 7,000 7 watched the Greater Catholic League South rivals play at Moeller's home field. A large chunk of the crowd was gone by game's end. "At halftime, we told our players • St. Xavier won the Greater Catholic the score was still 0-0," Moeller League South, going 3-0 in the league by coach Bob Crable said. "Elder is a bunch of fighters, and you knew beating La Salle 34-20. they wouldn't go away. I'm just glad • Wyoming scored nine unanswered points we didn't go to overtime." in the fourth quarter to defeat Reading 30-21 Moeller is ranked No. 3 and Elder in Cincinnati Hills League play. is No.4 in the Enquirer Division I • Withrow rolled to 7-0, defeating Western coaches' poll. Hills 33-8. Elder was coming off a 33-30 dou• Winton Woods pounded the running ble OT loss to St. Xavier, having fallgame at Glen Este, and the Warriors took en behind 20-6 at halftime. Two weeks before, Elder rallied from a control in the Fort Ancient Valley Conference The Enquirer/TONY JONES Buckeye division with a 42-21 victory. 21-0 deficit to beat La Salle 38-35.

FRIDAV S HIGHLIGH

See MORtER, Page Cll

St. Xavier's Chris Cionni is brought down by La Salle's Rick Betsch. Cionni rushed for 148 yards and one touchdown.

Stories and scores, C10-CU


The Enquirer/ JEFF SWINGER

Moeller's Pat Watt (24) and Dillon Ruby celebrate a first-half touchdown against Elder.

Moeller: Holds off comeback From PageCl "This is the third straight week we've gotten killed in the first half," Elder coach Doug Ramsey said. "We can't keep losing one half and losing the other. I don't know the answer, but we've got to start playing a whole game." Moeller used its devastating passing attc.ck and had just enough defense to win. The Crusaders stopped Elder on downs several times before the Panthers scored with 2:16left in the third quarter. Reisert tlrrew for 210 yards and three TDs in the first half, as Moeller took a 2~ halftime lead. Two of the IDs went to wide receiver Pat Watt. Reisert entered as the area passing leader with 1,432 yards and 16 TD passes. Watt entered as the top Division I receiver in town, with 36 catches for 554 yards and sevenTDs. Watt had eight catches for 106 yards. Tyler Dierkers also had eight catches, fur 124 yards. Elder's Ben Wittwer had nine catches for 13€ yards and two late TDs, including a ll).yard score with 25 seconds left. Elder's Craig Carey was 3(). of-46 passing for 374 yards and .two IDs, and he also ran for a score. Elder netted just 46 yards rushing. M:>eller had 288 yards passing and 126 rushmg, with Dillon

The Enquirer; JEFF SWINGER

Moeller's Pat Watt makes a spectacular catch as he falls backward after a deflection by Elder's Kyle Rudolf.

Ruby running for 55 yards and Martez Williams for 53. Friday's game concluded the three-game GCL schedule for both teams. Moeller finished 2-1 and Elder 1-2 in the league. St. Xavier finished 3-0 after defeating La Salle 34-20 Friday. The game had a p)ayoff atJno• sphere. typical of GCL South games. Elder probably needed to win to secure a home playoff game.

Moeller won despite the absence of the team's top running back, Daniel Barnes, who didn't play because of a hamstring injury.

:=.;;----- ,:

~

M-Redw>ne 26 pass from ReiSelt(Carter kick)

~:::~ ~~ ~= ~~ :::~~ :~n"7;,':; 1 M-R•isert I run (Carter kiCk) E·Carey 3 run (Huene man ktek) E-Wrttwer 13 pass frc-m Carey (Hueneman kick)

~~:.~'l~-~~~-;':L~re~~","U'~fn kockl

~

1

~

:

~


,., .

'

'

~1mÂť~ gets a!?~~roo~~~~~~~~~~!~t !.~~~~~eN>

Enquirer staff writer

Steve Klonne is a head football coach again. Klonne, winner of two state titles and one national championship while coach of Moeller High School (1982-2000), was named head coach at McNicholas Monday. He had been a McNicholas assistant coach since 2001. ~ :rm excited about being a head ~¡,.

.... -

,

said. "I still love the game, and we'll see where it goes from here." At Moeller, Klonne's teams won Klonne Ohio Division I state championships in 1982 and '85 and the inaugural USA Today national title in 1982. He had a 169-48 record (. 779) and coached 12 playoff teams at Moeller.

the playoffs in 2000, but he resigned under pressure after that season. Dan Ledford, then Moeller's principal, said at the time, "Any healthy high school program needs new . ideas and new direction." Klonne moved on to become an assistant at McNicholas, where at various times he helped coordinate both the offense and defense. Klonne, 58, prefers not to discuss what happened at Moeller.

prove, after 35 years of coaching," he said. "At this point, I'm just doing this because I enjoy the kids and still have a passion for the game." Klonne replaces John Rodenberg, who resigned last week to become head coach at Covington Catholic. ''We had another candidate we talked to, but obviously Steve with his experience is very qualified for the job," McNicholas athletic director Dave Boettger said.

cholas junior who will return as the team's starting quarterback next season. David Klonne threw for 1,844 yards and 18 touchdowns this season. Steve Klonile said he plans to coach McNicholas beyond his son's graduation. "I'm going to do this for three or four years, then take a look at where we are," he said.

E-mail tgroeschen@enquirer.com

j:


Knapke 1 Matt Knapke Writing Seminar: Journalism 625-001 May 29,2005 . Professor Jon Hughes

West Side Rivalries A Tradition in Cincinnati Sports The most intense sports rivalries bring about a certain great historical presence when you say their names. Ali vs. Frazier, Yankees vs. Red Sox, Ohio State vs. Michigan all carry with them fond memories of great games and contests decided by the determination of the victors. There are rivalries like these in the prep sports haven of Cincinnati. Elder vs. St. Xavier, Moeller vs. LaSalle, St. Xavier vs. Moeller, LaSalle vs. Elder Moeller vs. Elder, and St. Xavier vs. LaSalle are some of the these rivalries that have been around for over three decades that make the Greater Catholic League South division what it is today. These all male Catholic high schools have an overpowering sense of pride in their schools and a tradition of excellence that is unparalleled in the legends of Cincinnati prep sports. The rivalries have existed with a purpose for years as a barometer of just how good Cincinnati high school sports is for any particular yelu. lfthe teams in the GCL South have good years then the city of Cincinnati's prep sports scene is all the better for it. They have also been a test to those teams that play in the city but not in the Greater Catholic League South, to see just how good they really are. The competition that it creates takes on a whole new meaning to those who are directly involved in these rivalries. To those distinguished alumni who were fortunate


Knapke 2 enough to play varsity sports for their high school team usually have some pretty damn good stories to tell about their collective experiences against other teams in the GCL. Thanksgiving Day Games to State Championships Dave Dabbelt has been the Elder High School athletic director since 1990 and has seen many great sports moments in his time there. He graduated Elder in 1966 and would later teach history there in 1970. He was also on Elder's inaugural wrestling squad in the 1962-'63 season and is credited with winning the Panthers first wrestling match against Princeton. Dabbelt thus has first hand experience in dealing with the GCL rivalries on the West side of Cincinnati, having watched it for over 35 years. He also knows of the legends and the lore of Elder's early days as a competitive entity prior to the present day Ohio state champions of football and baseball. "Going back to the early 1920's and 30's the rivalries and the Thanksgiving Day games were important to the early prep sports scene," Dabbelt said. The Thanksgiving Day games he speaks of were end of the year contests between the football teams of Elder and Western Hills, a nearby public high school down the street from the home of the Panthers on Glenway Avenue. They were games that marked the end of high school football season in the area and in the state as well. Before the establishment of this game, from 1924-'28 Elder's varsity football squad used to play versus a team of Elder alumni on Thanksgiving Day before Western Hills high school was established in 1929. "With the Thanksgiving Day games, it was traditionalized (in 1929) because of the proximity of the schools," Dabbelt said. "There was more intrigue, because there


Knapke 3 were no state playoffs and there weren't barely any teams playing football at the time, so you could extend the season for this game." As the decades of Elder football moved along, the Panthers started to gain more rivals who seemed to be even more competitive and tougher than Western Hills. Most notably among those rivals that started to come out were the Catholic high schools of Purcell High School and Roger Bacon. Both schools started to play the Panthers when Elder was established in 1923, but both of the rivalries didn't gain steam until three decades later. "Roger Bacon made it a more intriguing rivalry when we started to play them more regularly," said Dabbelt. "The tension with Purcell was back in the '50's and 60's also when Bacon started to make a rivalry with us. Throughout the years, Elder's athletic excellence really has been a center or a target for other Cincinnati area prep schools to see how they match up against one of the city's top teams. If you lost to Elder you knew that you had a ways to go if you wanted to contend for a playoff spot, especially in football, but if you beat them it was a sign that your team could be the team to watch out for in the city. "Most teams want to be able to knock off an Elder because really that means a lot to them," Dabbelt says of teams looking for exposure. "Sometimes there are teams that look out for us and beat one of our other rivals so they can have a shot at knocking us off later in the year." The seeds of the football rivalry with Purcell were planted a few years before the contests ofthe '50's and '60's according to George Merz, a 1951 graduate ofElder High


Knapke 4 School. Merz is a huge fan and alumni supporter of Elder athletics who has seen some of the best contests between Purcell and Elder. "When I went to high school our biggest rival in football was Purcell and they were very good," Merz recalls of Purcell's GCL dominance of the '40's and 50's. "We beat them in '48 to stop their winning streak which was a high point for our season, because Purcell was winning the GCL all the time for five or six years." Merz was a student at Elder from 1947-'51 when the football team was in a sort of rebuilding state and just beginning to win regularly in the GCL again. It was about three years after he graduated from Elder that he would see one of the best teams in the history of the school. "The football team was overall so-so when I went to school there, in 1949 they had a pretty good team when Father Rudemiller was coaching the team," Merz says of his time at Elder. "The 1954 team was one of the best teams in the city that year as well as the state." Merz's favorite memory ofElder football was a game in 1950 against Hamilton Public High School held at The Pit, the Elder Panthers historic football stadium. "(Hamilton) had two players name Boxcar Bailey and Sidecar Bailey who were both very good players who could break a game open," Merz recalls. "We lead up until the end of the game losing a close one 27-22." Dabbelt's favorite memory in his time of watching Elder sports is a game that he affectionately calls "The Miracle in Middletown." This was an Elder playoff game that was played in 1999 against Centerville at Bamitz Stadium in Middletown, Ohio.


Knapke 5 "We were down by 21 with 4:00 to play in the fourth quarter and we came back to win the game 49-42," Dabbelt said. "It signified that 'never say die' attitude that we try to stress to our players." "Fans coming back from that game had their heads held high, but were also in a shocked state because they really couldn't believe that they had seen what they saw that day." West Side has the Best Games in the City

In the city of Cincinnati, there is a widely known and regarded belief that on the city's west side is where all of the good prep sports competition comes from. Mostly the rivalries between schools on the west side exist and are so intense because of the proximity of the schools to one another. As a result there are many alumni at football and basketball games, plus the amount of school spirit flowing from these schools' students is off the charts while being measured by the amount of school colors being shown in the seats by fans. Most of West Side schools alumni live very close to their old school according to Dabbelt and Dan Flynn, LaSalle's athletic director for the past several years. Both agree that the high amount of school spirit exuded by LaSalle and Elder is the result of the tradition of sports excellence at their respective schools. "I think that the West Side is a lot more loyal that the East," Flynn said. "About 85% of LaSalle and Elder grads live within a 10 mile radius of the school and that is what breeds this sense of competition and school spirit." When asked why he thinks the West Side athletic teams attracts so much citywide attention, Flynn states that winning is the key.


Knapke 6 "The only way to get attention is to win, because if you win you get the press coverage and if you don't win you don't get the press," Flynn said. Dabbelt believes that a large fan base, in addition to winning ball games is the key for West Side teams to get all the attention they deserve. "We do our part by having that large fan base and Elder people are loyal," Dabbelt said. "Now with so many good teams there is more news coverage that never used to be there because of the fan base." The neighborhood in which a school lives also determines how strong the culture on the West Side is according to Dabbelt. "I think that it goes back to the solidity of the neighborhood that has a lot to do with the dedication and loyalty of the fans," Dabbelt said. "This goes back to the loyal attitude of the West Side, their roots are here in town." Dick Beerman, who was Moeller High School's athletic director for 12 years from 1992-2003 says that the West Side of Cincinnati has kids that are more in tune with the concept of teamwork and that kids on the East Side are the ones who haven't grown up there and don't know about the traditions that the West Side holds. "I think the main reason that the West has it up over the East is that these kids are more team-oriented," Beerman said. "When I was in high school in the 1950's no one thought that anybody in Cincinnati could win a baseball title on the West Side and now there has been five baseball state championships won by the GCL South."


Knapke 7 "The East Side is more transient because they came to the East Side for their jobs so their kids go to those schools, more of the people that move in to the East Side comes from the West Side as well." Dabbelt also mentions that this West Side versus East Side rivalry is blown up too much by the press and that history serves the West Side well in terms of importance of their sports teams. "I think that the West Side versus East Side debate it overblown," said Dabbelt. The Catholic parishes have developed our athletics over the years and the West Side has a better longevity of tradition. Youth football is a community oriented experience, kids dream about playing in The Pit, this adds to the allure of the sport." "The West Side is more solidified, while the East is more transient. More people stay on the West Side than the East, those people want to be here," Dabbelt stresses. GCL South has the Rest of Ohio Beat

The GCL South has a tradition of excellence and winning that is unparalleled in Ohio high school athletics. According to Beerman the GCL South has won over Ill team state championships in different sports. The majority of these championships have been won within the last 30 years. Elder has the most team championships with 24 while having 12 of those being won in baseball. The Panthers won the state baseball title this year to reify their hold as a baseball power in the state of Ohio. Beerman believes that there is no question GCL South schools have a certain superior competitive quality about them than some other schools around Ohio.


Knapke 8 "I just think that at any given time, no matter what, I would rather play a GCL team because no one plays you harder," Beerman said. "When you play a GCL school you had better strap it on, because you are not going to get a tougher game all year." He also says that there is a certain element that keeps all of the GCL rivalries together and going for so long. "The beauty ofthe GCL is when the game is over, it's over which keeps the rivalries healthy and prevents an ugly scene from breaking out." The Future of West Side and CGL Rivalries

The recent successes of Elder and Colerain in high school football has seemingly created a power shift that goes to Southwest Ohio athletic teams. With this has come some national recognition. The USA Today ranked Elder No. 6 in the country after their last state football championship in the 2003 season when they finished 14-1. More recently Colerain High School has made the biggest waves nationally after their undefeated 15-0 season garnered them the Ohio Division I state title and a No.5 ranking in the USA Today high school poll. Colerain has also made headlines by scheduling a game with a high school team in Texas to be played in Columbus later this year at Columbus Crew Stadium, which will most likely be televised nationally by one of the ESPN networks, most likely ESPN2. The game will help to hype up the Ohio State versus Texas college football game that will be played that next week. Flynn sees this as being a good thing for the exposure of the West Side and GCL rivalries, but at the same time worries about how it will be handled. He thinks it could tum in to a battle of the have's and have-not's.


Knapke 9 "The publicity of the rivalries will become bigger and bigger," Flynn said. "There will be a trickle down effect where high school sports will follow college sports into the arena of making national headlines." "Before you didn't have tailgating, radio or television coverage, now it has become common place," Flynn said of the increased popularity of high school sports in Cincinnati. "My question is that 'Is this what high school athletics should be about?,'" Flynn asks. I am worried about enrollment and that it will increase at a rapid pace, I think that you will see more have's and have-not's in high school sports, but above all else I am worried about the future of our GCL rivalries." Beerman says that the West Side and GCL rivalries will be here for a very long time because of the sportsmanship of the competitors and the schools commitment to excellence. He also feels that Cincinnati is more prep sports driven than any other city, which is why it will be a force in high school sports in Ohio and the rest of the country. "The fact that Cincinnati is so high school-oriented makes it more prominent than any other city in the country when it comes to prep sports," Beerman said. "All of those aspects make it very good competition." "I would much rather go see a good GCL game than see the Reds or Bengals play, because as you leave the stadium there is no sniping or biting of other team's fans, there is more of a 'We'll get you next year' mentality that keeps it all going."


Knapke 10


. :·HE ENQUIRER

_ 1

SPORTS

Distinguished alumni

Cradle of coaches

The GreatefCatholic League [!; celebrating its 75th anniversary during the 2004-05 school year. Distinguished GCL graduates include: BADIN Ill Greg Jolivette, Ohio House of Representatives Ill Jim Tracy, manager, Los Angeles Dodgers · DAYTON CHAMINADE·JULIENNE Ill Martin Sheen, actor II Gerry Faust, former Moeller HS : and Notre Dame football coach LASALLE - . - Ill Steve Chabot, U.S. House of . : Representatives . Ill Tim Naehring, Cincinnati Reds :executive ELDER Ill George Schaefer, President and. :_: CEO of Fifth/Third Bancorp . Ill Bill Hemmer, CNN anchor KEITERING ALTER Ill Vice Admiral Timothy Keating, .: Commander, U.S. Naval Force Central :~'command and Commander, u.s. --·Fifth Fleet. . Ill Jim and John Paxson, NBA play' -ers/ executives. .. McNICHOLAS Ill Pat Tabler; former major 'league ::: baseball player ~ .Ill Jerry Couzins, former University - of Cincinnati basketball player · . MOELLER B Barry Larkin, former Cincinnati ··Reds· All-Star shortstop llill Ken Griffey Jr., Cincinnati Reds : All-Star outfielder · PURCELL MARIAN · llill Roger Staubach, Pro Football .· Hall of Fame quarterback IIIII Tyrone Power, actor ROGER BACON IIlli Dave Foley, formerNFL Pro Bowl -lineman · Ill Buddy LaRosa, founder of . LaRosa's restaurants . - ST. XAVIER . 1!11 Jim Bunning, U.s.' Senator (Ken. tucky) · llill Joe Hudepohl; U.S. Olympic gold medal swimmer

The Greater Catholic League is known for its long list of outstanding coaches. In football, there have been Badin's Terry Malone (the all-time Ohio wins leader), Elder's Walter "Babe" Bartlett, Virgil ,Scardina, Tom Grippa and Doug Ramsey; Ed Kluska, Jim McCarthy, Herb Woeste and Tom Stickley at Purcell; Bran Bat:evich and Dan Starkey at Roger Bacon; Moeller's Gerry Faust, Ted Bacigalupo, Steve Klonne and Bob Crable; St. Xavhir's Tom Ballaban, Steve Rasso and Steve Specht; La Salle's Rasso, Ray Heidorn; Jim Louder and Grippa; . . Enquirer file photo McNicholas' George Marklay and Before Gerry Faust was coach at Moeller and later Notre Dame, John Rc:>denberg, and Dayton Chami- · he was a student at Dayton Chaminade-Julienne. nade-Julienne's Jim Place. Moeller has won five mythical na- legend at Kettering Alter; Bill Cady, a of state champions is headed by Eltiona I football titles, four under Faust St. Xproduct who was a longtime , der's 11 titles. The list of GCL state and one under Klonne. coach at La Salle; Dick Berning imd baseball champs dates to 1935, During the 2004 football season, ·Scott Martin at Xavier; Paul "Hans" .when Roger Bacon won the league's state champion Colerain (of the rival Frey and Joe Schoenfeld at Elder; Jer- first Ohio big-school title in that sport. Greater Miami Conference) clearly ry Doerger at tioth Moeller and McNiGCL baseball state title coaches was the best team. But all four GCL cholas; Carl Kremer at Moeller; Dan include Roger Bacon's Ed Burns. ElSouth members - Elder, La Salle, Fleming at La Salle; John "Socko" der's Bartlett, George Lemme!, Don Moeller and St. Xavier- made the Di- Wiethe, Bob Callahan and Bill Brewer ·Ruberg, Ray Dieringer, Jim Massa, vision I playoffs, a first for the league. at Roger Bacon; Hep Cronin at both Jerry Federle and Mark Thompson; in basketball, the league has pro- Roger Bacon and La Salle; Jim Stoll Purcell's Jack Hanlon and Dan Robduced such coaches as Joh1fDromo, and Mike Gergen at Purcell Marian; erts; Moeller's Mike Cameron; Chamiwho moved on from success at St, . Gerry Weisgerber at Badin; and Joe nade's Richard Wessels: Badin's Xavier to more success at the Univer- Staley atChamin.ade-Julienne. Mark Maus; Mc"Nicholas' Willy Corsity of Louisville; Joe Petrocelli, still a In baseball, the league's long list bett; and St. Xavier's Bill Slinger.

-list provided by Greater Catholic · League president Paul Schildmeyer.

Before Martin Sheen was an actor in such programs as '!The California Kid" in 197 4 • he was a stu-

Associated Press file

L:

Press file

Before Jim Tracy was the. Dodgers' manager, he was a student at Badin High School.

Big·"tiliffieS, succe

From PageCl The .Ohio High School Athletic Association now stipulates all ath. letes must reside in-state. "When I was a senior, four of our· five basketball starters were from Kentucky," Bunning said. "I took the bus to school every day." In those days, St. X was located in downtown Cincinnati. The -school moved to suburban · .•. ;;=~;~~~~~t?eca~ce_aft~~": The offamous players and games goes on and on. In the early days, from the 1930s to the late 1960s, the GCL played Suriday foot~ ball do~bleheaders mostly at Xavier University's old Corcoran Field. In recent decades, there was St. Xavier's Greg-Frey passing for 487 yards~still acityrecord -in an epic 56-42 football loss to Moeller in 1985. . .. In oaseball, there was .Elder's Billy Meier clinching the state title in 1984 with a game-ending home ·run. In basketball, there was Roger · Bacon upsetting LeBron James' Akron St. Vmcent-St. Mary team . for the 2002 Division II state title. The GCLis believed to be Ohlo's oldest continuous prep league, according to Ohio High School Athletic Association spokesman Bob Goldring. The 98-year-old OHSAA cannot find records .of a current league that pre-dates the GCL. . The league originally was dilled the Greater Cincinnati League, with Elder, Purcell, Roger Bacon and St Xavier the first four members in 1928. The first full season of -league competition was the 1929-30 school year, hence the 75th anniversruy this season.

Origina11y, all boys The league, origimilly all-boys schools, has undergone various membership changes including Roger Bacon and PurceU going coed in the 1980s. The GCL's biggest change was a 1990 expansion that brought the league to its current 10 members, · split into North (smaller schools) and South (larger schools). The expansion included Dayton-area ·schools Alter and Chaminade-Juli. enne, prompting the league to drop )its "Cincinllati" name in favor of -. .1_, Greater Catholic League.

es

An all-time high? The 75tlr GCL anniversary arrives at one of the most successful junctures in league history. The GCL has won five of the last seven Ohio big-school cllampionships in 'the so-called Big Three sports of football, basketball and· baseball. Elder won state football titles in. 2002 and '03, Moeller won ·the basketball title in '03 and basein '03 .. "Ifirrnly believe we have the best league in Ohio, and it might be the most competitive in the country," said Paul Schildmeyer, a Roger Bafile con graduate and GCL president' St. Xavier's baseball team(above), Elder's football team and Mcielsince 1981. ' ler's basketball teqm all brought home state titles in 2003. Chris Lawlor, the USA Today . . prep writer who compiles the SuSt. Xavier's cross country team · per 25 national ratings in ·four Rev. Ed Rudemiller, a former El-: der athletic director (1962-80) in 2003 won its third state title in six sports, ·said he monitors the GCLin lmown. as "Father Rudy" ru'ound years under Larry Merkel, and St: every sport. GCL teams almost antown, traces the league's success to Xavier has battled Frank Russo's nually crack the USA Today rathighly motivated student-athletes, La Salle team for state supremacy ings, including Elder (football) and coaches, administrators and par- in recent years. Russo's La Salle Moeller (basketball, baseball) durtrack teani won a state champion- ing the 2003-04 school"year. ents. · "The GCL is as good as it gets in 'We don't fall apart when things ship in 1994. go wrong, anq we don't get the big Elder won five state cross coun- high school sports;" Lawlor said. head when we're successful;" Rev. try titles between 1973-89, includ- 'The tradition in that lea!,'Ue is un· Rudemiller said. 'The teams are all ing ·four championships under matched· by any other league in competitive as heck, but what's coach Steve Spencer and one un• Ohio and the Midwest." made the GCL succeed is eve1yone der Gil Wendling. Moeller basketball coach Carl working for the good of the whole. In soccer, the league has .won Kremer, winner of two state titles since 1999, said the GCL schedule Our schools all take pride when an- eight state championships. other school in the league does In golf, Alter has won four state. often is the hardest part of the sea, titles, most recently in 1999. son. · well." GCL teams love tobeateach othEric Kenkel, an Elder senior "One reason we've been really er, but they also take pride when a football defensive lineman, said the good in state tournament play is befellow league member wins a state players follow the lead of outstand- ·cause every team in our league is so title. ing GCL coaches in all sports. competitive, plays great defense 'The coaching here is a lot more and has such an aggresshJe ·style of. · A scene from June 2003 was typical, after St. Xavier (Division I) and advanced tl1an it is in some play," Kremer said. ~'Our kids are Purcell Marian (Division II) both leagues," Kenkel said. really battle-tested by tournament "No coaches get more out of time. had won state baseball titles. While traveling home from the champion- their teams." ·. Steve Specht, St. Xavier football ship games in Columbus, the two Kenkel is like many GCL ath~ coach anda former Bombers footteams' buses happened to arrive in letes who are'"legacy" products. ball player, said the athletic excelthe same restaurant parking lot. "My dad and my brother played lence starts with outstanding "feedThe playerS got out of the buses at Elder," he said. "Ifs. something er'' programs in elementary and staged an impromptu pep rally, that brings families and the com- schools. munity together. I really can't ex~ 'That, and at the South Oarge) chanting, "GCL! GCL!" Some GCL schools' sports pro- plain it, butit's something that's re- schools we still have the all-male grams also list the league's rumual al." environment that I think is a big trophy haul with full-page spreads St. Xavier football linebacker part of the discipline involved," entitled, "Ohio's League of Cham· Brandon Bryant said the drive for Specht said. ·· pions." excellence stretches tlrroughout "Because of that, I think our kids seem to oe a little more focused. Rarely does a year pass without a the league. "We have lots of talent on our You look at the legacy and traclition GCL state title in some sport, with St. Xavier's:swim team having won teams, arid th.e coaching is the at the schools, and everyone wants 26 championships itself- including best," Bryant said. 'The quest for to live up to that." · the last sixiri a row under coach success is.inherent in all the GCL schools." E-mail tgroeschen@enquirer.com ' Jirll Brower.

·~~~~------=-====----------~~--~--~-------------------------


Arlington 314,-3. Coffman.319, 4; St Charles319, 5. Elder320, 6. Ptckertngton Nort.h 321,7. Findlay329, 8. Ashland 331, 9. St Ignatius 340. ! Moeller golfers: Gunsweiler 76, Kroeger 77, Nieman 77, 6Uf'l'5 77; Chappell SO. Elder golfers: _Linneman 79, Conklin ·79, Hartoin 81, Spille 81, Beall 84. Anderson 34, Hamson 20 Batavia 47, Bethel"Tate 8. Beechwood· 48, Ho.lmes 31 Mason 5, Northmont 0 Blanchester 42, Wi!lia,msburg 0 A.Martle d. Malo 6-3, &-2; Downey d. Herman ·carro!l27, Bishop Fenwick 7 6·2, 6·1; Sheaks d. Webb 6·2,_ 6-1. Doubles: Central Crossing 40, Harmony 0 . . . Flaherty~S.Martie d. Hams..Sowma.n o.o, Hll~lmbus Cincinnati Co.untry Day 41, Dayton Cllristlan 16 d. Ferrara-Eiovltz 6·1, 6-1. RecOrds: M 5-6, N 5-5. CHCA 53, Gin. Christian 6 . Se\'en Hilts 5, Urbana 0 Clintoi)·Massle 50,' New Richmond 12 . H!bbert d. Michael 6·2, 6-4; ·Decker d. Covington Catholic 38, Simon Kenton 0 HendriCks 6·2,· 6-1; Houston d. Moore 6·2, _6·3. Dayton 28, Owen County 15 Doubles: Ackerman·Hoguet d. Crabill-Hanigan 7~6, Dlx~ Heights 60, Uoyd 7 6-0, Kalnow-Gerson d. ThUrman·Shackle 6-2,.6-3. Ea~t Central (lnd.):49, Franklin' County 7 Records: U 9·2, SH 6-1. · East Cinton 39, Adena 20: . Northwest s, Nonvood 0 " . Elder 64, Western Hills 6 Deininger d. Diers!ng· 6-3, 6·2; · Barker. d. Fairfield 23, Middl.~town 10 Marshall6·3, 7-5; McClain d. Thornbury 6--1, 6·0. Glen Este 14, Mason 6 Doubles: Dlnes·Moning d. Brown-Bowman 6-3, 4·6, Hlgh!and.s 55, BoOne County 14 . · 6-2; Taylor-Fiechier d. Kaufman-Maynard 6-0, 6·0, Indian Hill31, Taylor 12 Records: Nort 4-3(2·2 FAVC). . Kings 31, Turpin 3 la Salle 17, Xenia.'14 lakota East36, Oak Hills 28 lakota West 48, Milford 25 Elder 1, Colerain 0 lebanon 32, Ta!awanda 22 _ _~~utout Kerstln~. Goals: E- Reed.' Recrirds: E Little Miami 31, Northwest.28 loVeland 49,·Ametia·o Lebanon 1, Middletown 0 Madeira 28, Deer Park 0 Shutout: Jones (7 saves). Goals: Smitti, McNicholas 28, Sidney 13 RecordS: l5-1, M 14-1, Miamisburg 49; Franklin 7 La Salle 3, Oak Hills 1 . Mooot Healthy 39, Hughes 0. Gcials: l~Hoeweler, Thinnes, Kramer. o. Rigney.' Newport Central Catholic 19, Campbell Co. 0 . Records: l· 5·1. Newport 26, Bellevue 13 Northwest 3, Hamilton 0 North College H11122, LocWand 14 NOIWOOd 53, Goshen 21 • 1 Abbo~uri~~-~rd~;u~i-~~~i ~:browoskl, Kane,-, Reading 30, Flnneytown 7 Clinton Massie 1, Western Brown 1 Ross 2D, Wilmington J Goals: C- Medley, W- Ernst Records: W 1-4-2 Scott 29, Grant County 7 (1-1·2 SVC), C 2-1-3 (1-0-3 SVC). South Dearborn 2B, Connersville 13 · MiHord 1, Mason 0 Splingboro 14, Edgewood 6 Shutout Slusher (6 saves), Goals: Jetting, St. Xavier 21, Colllmbus Desales o Records: Ml 4.0 {1-0 GMC), Ma 3-2. . Summit Co~nuy Day 21, New Miami 14 Mariemont 2, Seven Hills i Sycamore 49, Hamilton 7 Goals;M..,Weber, Bezerra; S-Kalubi. RecOrds; M Western Brown 28, CNE 0 3-3-1. Winton Woods 47, Walnut Hills 0 McNicholas 1, Walnut Hills 0 . Withrow 36, Dayton Dunba·r 22 Shutout: Barkey. Goals: M-Fey. Records: M 1..4, Wyomlng 22, Mariemont 13 . W3-4• Springboro 31 Troy 1 _ _8,~~~~~-Eisenhut 3. T- Delcamp •.Records: s Midwest Meet of Champions CHCA 2, Wyoming 1 SKat Mill Run GOals: C- 1 own goai, Bergh. W- Fogel Record: Hilliard, OH Team Standings: l.Ciarkston 76, 2. Bowling CHCA 3-3-1. Cincinnati Christian 3, Western 'Hills 0 Green 83, 3. St. Ursula 151, 4. Goodrich 172, 5. Shutout:· Hen!)' '{1 save). Goals: C·Morrison, · Cathedral173, 6. Colerain 210, 7. Turpin 229. Henry, Coombs. Records: C 2-3, W 0-2. Top Finishers: '10. Rago~z.is (Col) 18:59, 19. Clark MontesS<>ri 9, Dayton Stivers 0 Meiners (St.U] 19:25,.20. Detzei(Col) 19:28,22. 0. Shutout: Sloat (6 saves). GOals: Wallace 2, Vila Jaworek (Tur 19:35, 23. Clark (St.U) 19:37, 31. Warren (SlU) 19:50, 36. M. Jaworek (Tur) 19·57 i:o~~~~ :i. stephen, Mllz, Minges. Records: c . 38. Schroeder (SlU} 20:01, 40. Shaw (StU) 20:03: Thomas Worthington 1, Lakota East 0 46. Corcoran (StU) 20:09, 47. J. Jaworek (fur) Records: L 2-f·t 20:09, 49. McCUllah (Coi]2D:15, 51. Scherer (Stu) Ross 1, Wllinlnglon 0 . 20:16, 53. Bisbing, (Tur) 20:18, 71. Deans (Tllr} Shutout: Cre.elman (5 saves). Goals:. Herron. 20:43, 93. Nienhaus 21:35, 100, Narbrugh 22:05. Records: R 2-3~1. ·· · , Middletown Invitational Indian Hilll, BeUbroOk 0 5K at Armco Pari< ShutOut Buckles {5 sa11es). Goal: !-Acquaviva .. Team Standi.-gs; 1. Middletown 23 2 Records: 14·2-1, B 3·2~1. An.derson 48, 3. Kettering Fairmont61, 4. Arid~rso~ Fabfield 0, St. Xavier 0 ~ ~_am 114, 5. Monr~ 144, 6. Middletown BTeam, ShlltOut s Brueggeman (9 saves). Recorlls: F Top FinisherS: 1. See {Mid) 16:04, 2. Kerns; 3-2·1, s 2·2-1. ·. Lakota West 3; Turpin 0 (Mid) 15:35, 3. Taylor(Fal) 16:54, 4. Puelllo (And) Shutout: Chambers {3 saves). Goals: Almer, 16:58, 5. McMOfllgle (Mid) 16:59, 6. Fyffe (And) Flandzickl, Bertz. Record: L-4-1, 2-3~1. · 17:14, 7. Sauter (Mid) ~7:14, 8. Meiser(Mid) 17:21, Anderson 2, Moeller 2 9. Senko (And) 17:39, 10. Baker (Mid) 17:40. . 'Goals: M- Delaney, Wujel\. A- DeZarn, Scheller. Trffin CI'OSS Counby Carnival Records: A3·2-1, M 1·2-1. . SKat Hedges-Boyet Pari<

Girls' tennis

'Boys' soccer 40

3

.Girls' ·cross .country

61

1

3

4

·

CNE 2, Bethel·Tate 1

:Trffin,OH

.Team Standings: 1. Center-.rilie . 114

2

Massil!onJaoks~n 118, 3. Magnificat 129, 4. MercY'. 130, 5. Notre Dall)e Academy (Toledo) 204. Top Finishers: 1. McCort(Hoo) 18:35, 2. FlasK (PicN) 18:59, 3. Knoph (Mer) 19:06. 4. Lawnard (Mer) 19:17,5. Krupka (Marl) 19:21. · Mercy runners: 13.Yauch 19:43,43. Simpson· rg~~~·a~tiaHir~~rsmith 21:04, 95. Wirth 21:35, Kings runners: 2~. K. Goodwin 21:08, 94. C~ Goodwin 22:43,95. Wolf22:43, 106. Klemt22:57, ~~~:i~.alllna 22:58,125, Kieffer23:23, 137. Ludlo~

:DivisonliA

.

Team Standings: 1. Taylor 83, 2. Napoleon 167, 3. Uberty-Benton 176, 4. Van Wert 237 5. CVCA 271. · ' . Taylor Runriers: 3. 'fhompson 19:08, 18 Sullivan 19;57, 19. Kraus 19:58, 20. Stanley 19:5!\ 23. Lariccia 20:01. · Milson Invitational SKat. MaSon · TeamStandings:.1. Mason 34, 2. Ursuline 59, 3. Sycamore 111, 4. Mt Notre Dame 123, 5. McNicholas 166, 6, Wyoming 194, 7. lakota East 204,8.- Princeton 241, 9. PICI\erington central266, 10. Fairfield 284, 11.l.akota West290, 12. liartison 311,13. Seton341, 14. Uamiltan36115. Glen Este 376, 16. Miiford 446. ' Top Finishers: 1. Bizzarri {Mason).18:39.9, 2. Macleof {Mt Notre Dame) 18:53.7, 3. Chaney (Meson) 19:03.2, 4. Dewitt (Mt NoliE Dame) 19:07.0, 5. Keefer(lakota East) 19:08.7,,6. Chaney (Mason) 19:15.2~ -7 ., Davlin (U~ut!ne) 19:15.6, B. Aaherty (Mason):19:20.0, 9, Burger (lakota West) 19:31.0, 10. Ross (Ur>ullne) 19.40.3. Winton Woods lnvftati'anal

SKatWWMS.

I

Team Standings: 1.l0veland 19, 2. Mercy44, 3. Oak Hills 70, 4. Indian Hill 106, 5. summit ~~~~~i~~: 12~, 6.·Roger Ba~on 165, 7. Purcell Top .Finishers: 1. leeper {Lov) 19:08, 2. Beachy 20:22, 3. Bauer(lov) 20:49,4. Walls (Lov) 21:47, 5, Lenahan (Mer) 22:11, 6. Hilmer (IH) 22!15, ·7. Hemtzelman.(Lo'l).22:20, B. Mead(CCH) ~~~;~: 9. Dun~n (Nor) 22:43, 10. lawton (Lov)

Goals: c.· Lay, Laird._ B- Marshall. ReCords: C 2-4-1, B 2·2·1.

Girls' soccer Colerain 2, MND 1 , Goals: C. McFarland, Ma.slyn. MND- J. Dean .. Records: C 2·2-2. · Lakota East 2, .Thomas Worlllington 1 Goals: L- Carter, Drth. T· Acker. Records. L

4-0·1, T4-1. Monroe 0, Valleyview 0 · . Shutout M· ~randy Hubbard {6 saves), vt..aura Tippton (15 saves). Records: V3·1-2, M3-2·1. Fairfield 3, Ursuline 0 Shutout: Fontaine (15 saves). Goals: F·. Capelle, SChumacker, Hoffart Records: F 4-1-1 (1-0 GMC). Indian Hi114, Bellbrook 0 ShUtout: 1- Wiggers (13 saves). Goals: 1- Rogers 2, Schoney, StolPer. Records: B 3-1-0,13-1-L McAuley 2, Dayton Wayne 0 · Shutout CO.rhn (8 saves). Goals: M- Green, FteddeQohn. Records: M 2·0·2, W3-3~1. St. Ursula 5, Columbus De Salles 0 . Shutout: Lameler.-· Goals; Fader 2, Proffit, Yauch, COom. Records: StU 4·1, c 2-3-2 •. Feficily Franltlin 1, Blanchester 0 Shutout: F-·Scheidler(18 saves). Goals: Brown. ReQords: F3-3, B 1-5. Norwood 2, Deer Pa rl< 2 . Goals: ·N· Goodman 2. DP· Moore, Berry, Reooros: N 1-5-2, 0 D-3·1 (0·3-0 CHL). Batavia 31 Georgetown 2 · 'Goals: B- Theilyoung, Stewart, Krusling. G. Hudson, Mayes. Records: 13 5·0 (4-D), G 3·2-1. Madeira 9, Pum!ll Marian 0 Shutout Gilligan, Kuz.niskl. Goals: M- Reynolds ~i ~~g~~~· A.E. Kean 2, Mlsleh,Schnelder•. Records: HamiHon 4, Edgewood 2 GOa.ls: H· Johnson 2, Tonlch, Bresch. E- Allen, Campton. Records: E2-5.0, H 3-1-2.

Dayton Northmont4, Norllrwest3 Goals: S- Schierloh 2, Donovan. Records: N

3-3.

-=::: .~CJ.a~ Mo.~~rti.G, J_ayton ~ers 0 , . SllUtOut-West. Go·aiS: Schlieltlei-27-i.-Au~ · Triggs, Rogers,_ Rentz. Records: C 3-1-2, D·0-4. Ross 31 Wyoming 2 Goals; R- Johnson 2,·Ramonl. W- Marteney 2. Records: R 6·0-0, W 2-2-2 (1·0·1 CHL). . Taylor 2, CCD 2 Midw~~~=mpions Goals: T-Bowling, Schmidt; C-Haines, Jacobs. Records: T 3--0·3, c 2-1·2. Hilliard, OH ·Sycamore 2, Mercy 0. Team Standings;_ ~ .. Milford (Mich.) 51, 1 2. Shutout. Maclean (B saves). Goals: S-Dshita, _Hamllton Southeastern (IN) 59, 3. St. Xavier 81; 4. R. Yanow. Reoords; S 2·1-2; . . Dexter (Mich.) 103, 5. la Salie 122, 6. HiH1ard Oak Hills 9, Harrison 0 , . Davidson 146,:7. Elder 149, 8. Turpin 209,: 9. .ShutOtrt- Hunt(6 sav.es}. Goals: D-Schroeder2, Cathedral (IN) 244, 10. Colerain 268. . ~ Wamdorf,Jone~ Moore, Hils, S. Thaxton 3. Records:· St. Xavier:·mnners: 8. Rick Klng'16:36, '13. 0 2-4, H 0-6. Randy King 16:46, 19. Ruberg 16:48, 20. Pend\ Winton Woods 9, Wilmington 1 . 16:56, 21. Hasse 16:56, 34. Keaung 17:13, 35. Goals: W" Beachy 3, Johnson ·2, Smith 2, Thaler 17:18. . Marshall, Albers. Records: V/W 3-2~1.. · La Salle rUnners: 16. Spriggs 16:48 17. Bethel-Tate 3, CNE 2 Heister16:51, 25. 8itner17:02, 26.larig17:04, 38. Goals: 8- Fischer, MoSs, Swartt. C- Tellep, Stehi 17:22, 41. Bader 17:26, 46. Heusmimn suri:lsau. Records: c 2-3-1;6 4-1-1. 17:42. . Milford 3, Anderson~ 0 ' Turpin rUnners:_· 23. Humke 16':56,· .39. Shutout Bruck (7 saves) .. Go.als: M-·Richards Khacofe 17:22J 45. Schwartz 17:40, 49. Boutelle Morgan, lewis. Records: M 4-2, A 2-4-1. .. ' ~~~~i ~~; Metzger 18:03, 54. Petro 18:05, 56. Mariemont I, Se-ven Hills 0 Shutout: Weber {8 saves). GOal: M-Groppe; Middletown Invitational Records: M 4-0-1. . iSKatAnncoPark : Team standings: 1. Anderson 37, 2. Kettering Falrmont57,-3 .. Middletown 66, 4. Masllllon~Perry 71, 5. Anderson 8 Team 16D, 6. Withrow 167, 7. Sacred .Heart {KY) 3, Ursuline 0 Perry B Team.175, 8. Middletown B Team 187. . Records: S 7·0, U 1-2. Top Finishers: 1.. GIIbert (KetFai) 18:22, .2. Maumvee Valley 1, Mt. Notre Dame 0 Emhoff (Per) 19:30, 3. Michno (Fal) 20:09,4. Goals: B_ech. Records: M 6-0, MND 2-1. McDaniel (And) 20:24, 5. Kerns (Mid) 20:55, 6. · SL Ursula 2, Dublin Scioto 0 Baker(And) 21:04, 7. Kohen (And) 21:08, 8. Tegge _ . Goao: St.U- Perrino, Grote. Recorrt: StU 2-1. o (And) 21:25, 9. TUmer(Mid) 21:28, 10. Kelsey (FaO 13 21:31. 1 St.· Ursula 1, St~ Fn:incls Louisville 1 Trffi~ CroSs Country Carnival Goais: St.U-·Fehr. St.F·Greene. Records: StU SKat Hedges-Buyer Pari< 2c1·1, 2-3. . . Trffin,OH Team Standings: 1. St Ignatius 165, 2. Reynoldsburg· 174, 3. Kings 206, 4. MasSllion Jackson 218, 5. Padua Franciscan 226, 6. St:Johns Ursuline (4·2) d. Piqua 25·20, 25·11 233, 7. Moeller249, 8. Medina 281, 9. Salem'316, UrsuUne (5--2) d. Sycamore 25-15,25-23 10. S)'_lvania Narthvlew 341. ; McNicholas (7·0, 1-0) d. lakota East(2-3, 0-1 Moeller irunners: 1 Beuerlin 15:30,: 35, GMC] 23-25, 25,22, 15-10 Auclello 16:43, 43. McWilliams 16:58, 62Aiteyar McNtcl10las (8·0, 1-0) d. Milford 25-11, 25-21 17:13, 116. Mamh 17:44. 136. Gertz 18:00 , 138. lakota East (1·3, 0-1) d. Milford 25-9, 25·21 Nishlmori 18:03. .' ~ Sycamore def. Piqua 25-19, 20-25, 20·15 Kings minters: 13. Morgen·16:08; 18. Wiflebar Schroeder {5·0) def. Ross 17-25, 21·25, 16:17, 23. Rover 16:26, 33. Gar-.rin·16:3S,: 124. 25-21, 25-12, 15-11 8uckl1;51,.142. Jamieson 18:07, 191. Stephenson Seton d. Magnificat25·21, 25-21 1B:63. Mariemont d. New Rlchmon(i 25-20,·25·13 Divison II . Batavia d New Richmond 25-17, 25-20 Teain Standings: 1. McDonald 148, 2. Taylor Mariemont d. Batavia 25~10, 25·19 178. 3. Edgewood 181, 4.-:svSM, 5. Logan. Kings d. Madison 25-11, 25-14 . Taylor , Runnel'S! 16. , O'Brten :16:59, Kings d. Middletown Fenwk:k 25-16, 23-25, 3D:Crawfford 17:05, 40Jriplett 17:28, 42. 15-9 McAulhar 17:32,53. Branson 17:47. Champ: Klngs (6·1) d. Springboro 25-16, Mason Invitational 23-25, 15-12 AI Mason Ciark Montessori (3·3) d. Lockland 28-26; Team Standings: 1. Syca·more 43 2. -lakota 15-25, 25'16, 25-16. . west 79, 3. :FairfieiP 99, 4. lakota East 110, 5. Columbus Bishop Watterson (4-1) d. McAuley Mason 122, ;6. ~ilford 127, 7. Ha11ison 161, 8. (1-3) 25-21, 25-27, 25-27, 25-23, 15-B · Celi.na 230, ~- Pickerington Central 245, 10. Glen Ripley def. Georgetown 25-21, 13·25, 15·13 Este 275, 1L Moeller 277, 12. Princeton 282, 13. Eastern Brown def. Fayetteville 25-12, 25-12 Ham!\ton 386. GeorgetoWn def. Fayetvllle 26·24, 25-14. ToP Finishers: 1. Candella (lak West) 16:08.9, _ ~hamp: Eastern Brown def. RipleY 25-12, .. 2·._ Rose.n (Syc) 16:15.7, 3. Showman (Fair) 16:28.7, 4. Petem (lakEast) 16:29.9, 5. Arris (Syc) 15:36.8, Oak Hills d. Turpin 25-23, 25-18 6. lnanU (Syc) 16:48.5, 7. Rapp (Mas) 17:03.3, 8. Oak Hills d. Anderson 25-18 25~10 Weber (Syc) 17:03.3, 9. Trennepohl (Fair) 17:06.9, 1Anderson d Turpin 25-21, 26-16 10. P!lllllps (Pic) 17:08.1. Colerain d. Purcell Marian 25.22, 28~26 Winton Woods Invitational Colerain d. Simon Kenton 25~16, 22-25,15·5 . SKatWWMS · . Purcell Malian d. Simon Kenton 25-18, 25-22 · Team Staridings: 1. Loveland 27, 2. Xavier Simon Kenton d. Turpin 25-9, 25·18 52, 3. St Xavier B 104, 4. Oak Hills U9, 5, Winton Purcell Man·an d. Anderson 25-21, 26-24 Woods 124, 6. Purcell Malian 158, 7. Summit Champ: Oak Hills d. Colerain 25·23 25-9 Country Day, 187, 8. NOIWOOd 231, .9. Rog~r Back Princeton d. St Bernard 25-10, 25~14 23a . . Glen-Este d. Deer Park 25-19, 22-25• 16-14 Top FiDishers: 1. Pe!l}' (Win) 1'7:33, 2. Indian Hill d. CNE 26·24, 25-14 Ascolese (lov) 17:34, 3. Weden (Lov) 17:49, 4. CNE d. Deer Park 25-10, 25-12 Purcell (Pur) 17:52,5. Rahm (lov) 18:05, 6. K<Etoff CNE d. St Bernard 25·10, 25-16 (Rn) 18:08, 7. SUer (Lo~"18:12, 8. Brllli (St X) Princetr>n d. Norwood 22-25, 25-19, 16-14 18:29, 9. SChleetEr (StX) 1B:3L 10. Summit(SCO] Indian Hill d. G!eil·Este 17-25, 25·16, 15·9 18:35. Glen Este d. Norwood 25-20, 25-21 Champ: Prin~eton d. Indian Hill 25-15, 26-24

Boys' cross country

11

Girls' field hockey

Girls' volleyball

25 2

St;

Girls' golf

Bowling Green lnri!ational · . . Team Standings: 3. Notre Dame 336,: 5. Villa . Madonna 347 · . . ' Local Medallst:-Stamper {VMA}·shot five-oVer , 72 on Crosswinds. ~ers.: Zembmdt (NDA) 81, Reger(N0~)82, o·srlen (NDA)84, Hawksley(VMAJ 87, Lottman (NDA) 89, Pavei(VMA) 89.

FootbaU CONNER 49, HOLY CROSS 7 Conner....................... 13 7 15 14 -49

Holy Cross.................. 0 C- Stellman 1 run (kick fail)

0

0

7 •• 7

C· Delk 29 run (Krumweide kick) C. Martin 59 run {KrumWelde kick) C- Botts 6 run {Stellman run) C· Botts 25 pass from Stellman (KrUmweide kick) H· Hungler 44 pass from Koch (Smith kick) Vandaia BuUer lmifational C- Stellman 9 run (Krumweide kick) At Cassel Hills C··McQueen 1 run (Krumweide kick) (Vanda&a, OH) . Team:; Results; 1. Fairfield (Red} 300, 2.' · Record• C 3-0, H 0-4; Middletown 304, 3. lakota East 314, 4. Oakwood Dayton Belmont 16, Jacobs 13 315, 5. Vandalia Butler315, 6. Beavercreek 316 7 Belmont...................... 0 8 0 8 -16 Farimont 316, 8. Sycamore 325, 9. lakota Wes't B Jacobs ....................... 13 0 0 0 -13 368. ' Medalist: Aaron Crist of M1ddletown with a J-Strout 25 pass from Davis (Burton ·kiCk) J-Williams 4 run (kick failed) 4·ui1der 67. others: 2. Schneider (Fairt) 72, 3. B-40 pass {pass good) J~u1\~a ~.a,!rt) 72, 4. Ba!wln (Midd) 73, 5; Higgins 8~3 run (pass good) Records:. B 1·3, J Q-3. Worthington Kilbourne Invitational Akron St. Vincent-st. Mary 10, Roger Bacon-6 Team Standings: l Worthington 'Kllboume 3!0 (Uebreaker85), 2. St Xavier31 (tiebreaker88), St. Vincent·St. Mary ..;.. 0 7 3 0 -10 3. Big Walnut 313, 4. Hilliard Davidson 322, 5. St Roger Bacon """""'""" 0 0 ' 0 6 -6 Johns 324, 9. Mo'eller 332, 12. Lakota West 353. S-Scyant 3 run (Ochsenhirt kick) Medalist Stew . Jaf'(lieson . '(Thomas S-FG 21 yard Ochsenhlrt Wort.hington) shot one-over 71 at Worthington Hrlls R~Pnfi!; 5 run (~ck fai~d) cc. Records: S 2·1, R 1-2. OUrers: Beausejour (St. X) 73, Martin (St X) Westemlle 38, Pur<eu Marian 28 75, Mazza (St X) 78. .·

Boys' golf

7

Upper Arlington Invitational

At Scolio Caunby Club, Par 7l Teaf!l Resu~: 1. Moeller 307, 2. Upper

Westerville................. Pun:ell Marian............. Records: W3-0, P 1-2.

7 14

0 17 -38

7

7' 14 -28

0


,Girls' tennis ·.Greater Cine I~~tgaches Classic

Team Standings: l.loveland 190, 2. Princeton 1B5, 3. CHCA 165, 4.Lakota West 160, 5. Sycam01e 140, 6. Seven Hills 85, 7. Ursuline 75, 8.1ndlan Hill 50. First Singfes: Semifinal~ •• Oucro {CHCA) d. ' Belsky(Sycamore) 6-2, 6-4; ~nn (love) do Regenold (Princeton) 6-4, 7-6 (7 -3). Finals •• Ducro d. Zlnn 6-1, 6-2.Third place- Belskey,d. Zinn 8-D. Second singles: Semifinals- Holland (love) d. Thinnes (CHCA) 6-4,2-6, 11-9. Finafs-lonergan (Princeton) d. Holland (love) 6{), 6-1. ThirdplaceThlnnes (CHCA) d. Decker (Seven Hills) 8-2. Third singles: Semifinals:- Jackson (Princeton) d. Houston (Seven) 6-0, 7-5; Neldhoid (Ursuline) d. Goyal (lakota West) 6-1, 6-1. Finals·· Jackson d. Neidhold .7-5, 6-0. Third place.:.. Blake (CHCA) d. GoyaiB-3. : First doubles: FinalS·· Koetter-Bokulic (Syca~ .more) d. Kelly-Suddleson (lakota West) 6-4, 6-3. Thin! place- fijng-J. Holland (love) d. AckermanHoguet (Seven) B-4. Second doubles: Finals -~ohnson·Rue (lako· ta West) d, Fltzgerald·Zlnn (love) 6·3, 6-3. Third place ··.Copland-Mitra (lndlari) d. Wenn--Ebetino (Sycamore) 8-6. ·

Fligld B Team Standings: 1.la~ota East 210, 2. Mercy 200, 3. Turpin 190, 4. Sl Ursula. 180, 5. summit caunt!)'Oay1DO, 6. W)'oming 90; 7:Anderson50, 8. CCD30. • · · First singles: Finals •• Shennan (Mercy) d. Bruck (11\'omlng) 4-6, 6-Q, 6-1. 1'hird place- Keebler (lakota EasQ d. Ernst (SL u~ula) B.S. Second singfes: Finals·· ~11slc (Mercy) d. Deye (Sf. Uffi"'a) 6-0, 6-0. 1'hlrd place - Hanlfy (lakota East) d. Thress (Turpin) 8-2. Third singles: Finals"" Russell (Lakota East) d. Meszher (SL Ursu~) 7-6, 3-6, 6-3. Third place .. Thornton (Anderson) d. O'ConneR (Turpin) 8-6. First doubles: Finals •• M. GeracJ.I<. Geraci (Turpin) d. Jantsch-Steele (Summit) 6-2, 7-5. Third , place - Russell-Hensley (lakota East) d, _TysoeBhaskar (CCD) 9-7. · Second doubles: Finals ~- Slonim-Wessels (TUrpin) d. M~Grath-Gibler(SL U~U)a) 6-1, 6-2. Third place- Kraemer-Ke!ly(Lakota East)d. Steinbeck-La· count (Anderson) 8-5.

FligldC Team Standings: 1. Mariemont 210, 2. McNi· cholas 180, 3. Oak Hills 175, 4. Badin 140, 5. Walnut Hills,135. 6, Sycamore 120, 7. loveland'90. First Singles: Finals·· B~nk (MeN) d. Rannery (Bad) 6-4, 6-2. Third-,Place·· England (WH) d. Harmon (Syc) 8-0. · Second singfes': Semifinals·· Broderick (Oak) d. Freeman (WH) 6-2, 6-3. Finals·· Allers (Bad) d. 8rqderick (Oak) 6-3, 7-5. Third place •• Badanes (Merim) d. Freeman (WH) a-o. :· · Third singles:.Semffinals -~Heckmann (Oak) . d. Latimore (WH) 2-6, 6-4, 10-7. Finals •• Nye (lov) d. Heckmann (Oak) 6·3, 6-2. Third place- Latimore (1\H) d Baravkaf(Syc) 8-6 First doubles: F1nals •• He~amp-Murphy (Mariemont) d. Elllngwolti-Rettenma1er (Sycamore B) · 7·5, 6-4. Semifinals~· Smith-Alexander (Dak Hills) d. Curran-Dlneen (McNichoias) 8·6. Second doubles: Finals - Smith-Donovan (Mariemont) d: Phiaips--Saln (McN.Icholas) 6-2, 6*2, Third place- Jlndai·Ba!! (Walnut Hi!fs) d. EhnnanMahon (Oak HDis) ~-6.

Aigttt D

i . - ,Team standings: 1. Kings 210, 2. Waynesville 210,_3. Fa!rffeld 175, 4. Mason uA" 165, 5. Seton 125, 6. MJ!ford 120, 7. Mason "B" 60. First singles: Finalsu Ismail'( Kings) d. lssaacs (Way) 6·2, 6-0. Third place··Guellther(Falr) d. Duffey (Set) 8-2. Second singfes: Finals - Ginsbllrg (1\ings) d. Downey (MasA) 6·1, 6·1. Third pJace- u (Mil) d. Isaacs (Way) 8·2. Third singfes: Finals ~· OSbourne (Way) "d. Sheaks (MasA) 6·3, 6-0. Thirdi place •• Mi!iler (MasS) d. ReeVe (Kings) 8·3. First doubles: Finals- Ma~ewS..Hemberger (Set) d. ll-Underwoood (Ml!) 2-6; 6-0, 6-2. Third place ... Raherty-Martie (MasA) d. Davis-Quinn (Kings) B-3. Second doubles: Finals ~ Reed-Schubert (F~r) d. Raao-Raab (Way) B-4, 6-0. Third Place-Hill-imbus (MasA) d. Emst·F'Ialko (Kings) 8-3. FUgitt E Team Standings: 1. Mt NOtre Dame 280, 2.Co!erain 230, 3. lakOta East190,: 4. Hamilton 105, 5. McAuley100, 6. WVimington 90, 7. Harrison 65. First Singles: Finals- Coneley (H) d. Schulte (Har) 6-4,6'4 · Second Singles:· Finals .:.. _Tempennan d. Mouch (MeA) 7-5, 6-1 Third Singles: Finals - Callahan d. Gilliam (MtN) 6·0, 6·0 • , First Doubles: Finals..; Sp8ncer-Thomasella (MtN) d. Kop-Cocoran (lE) 6-0,6-3 Second Doubles: Finals ..:.· Anderson~McAII (Mt N) d. Bauer-McDaniel 7-5, 6·2 F1igbt: F Team standings: Madeira 255, little Miami 170, Ross 160, Batavia 165, F:nne~wn 135, Amelia . 90, Beth~I-Tate 85. Firstsingfes~Finafs -· Goddei1 (UttleMiami) d. Hauck (Batavia) 6·3, 6-2. Third place •• Selden (Ma, ~· deira) d. Haegele (Amelia) 8-2. ' ~ Second singles: Finals .. Sv/ortwood (Madei; ra) d. Shinsato (Batavia) 2-6, 6·2, 6-4. Thfrd place :-Feldman (Ross) d. Cluxton (Bethei-Tatc)8-2. ·. Third singles: FinalS- Hodgson (Uttle Miami) 1 d. Jay~e_ ~_ome (Ba~a) 5· 7, 6-2, 6·3. Third place ·-Mills (Ross) d.-cox (Madetra).8·3, , . ___Frrst·doub_les: Anolls~~· .Maatma.n-Wri,!fl·t(·Fi fin!l-

1

17:05.21. Senko 17:07. Central Ohio Invitational (3.1 miles at Franklin Park! Team resufts: 1. LaSalle37, 2. Reynoldsburg 74, 3. Hilliard Darby95, 4. Westerville North 126, 5. Lanc~er 127, 6. Oientangy Uberty 176, 7. Whitehall 202, Bi WesteNUleSouth 213, 9, PlckeringtonCentra! 230, 10. Brookhave2B2, 11. GmveCity304, 12. walnut Ridge 368. La Salle Finishers: 4. Bittner 16:53, 5. Lang 16·.56, ·6. Spdggs 1W2. 8. Bader 17:07, 14. lupp 1n4.18. Stain 17:38,22. Mink 17:50. :16th annual Bethel-Tate Invitational (3.1 miles at Bethel-Tale) TS:..m results: 1. St Xavier48, 2. Goshen 112, 3.·NewiR!chmond 115, 4. Walton-Verona 119, 5. Sl Xavier'B'141. 6. Western Brown 170, 7. Felicity 171, 8. Rlpley188, 9. Rooding 196, 10. Norwood 204, 11. Fayetteville 225,· 12. Western Hills 341 Top finishers: 1. Singleton (Goshen) 17:04, 2. Finan (New Richmond) 17:58, 3. Sheets (SL X) 18,14, 4. Ashby (Readog) 18:15,5. 8~ns (F~Ic~y) 18'30, 6. Rossman (Goshen) 18:32. 7, Cahall (Georgetown) 18:33, ~-Brown (Goshen) 18:36,9. Krumpelbeck(SL X) 18:4~, 10. Brady (st. X) _18:45. i Eaton Invitational (3.1 miles at Port St. Claire) Team results: 1. Kings 36, 2. Eaton 83, 3. Mason 115, 4. Miamisburg 141; 5. McNicholas 158, 6. Greenon 160; 7. Wyoming 172, 8. Springfield· Shaw· nee, 9. Northeastern 220, 10. lemon-Monroe 240. Top finishers: 1. Morgan (Kings) 16:09, 2. Mitchell (Syd) 16,1B, 3. Winebar (Kings) 16:23, 4. Darren (Lern) 16:25, 5. Rover (Kings) 16:33, 6. Garvin (Kings) 16:50, 7. Weller (Eat) 16:56, 8. Jones (\\Yo) 16,59; 9. Jenssen (Spn) 17:10, 10. Slivers (Ea~ 17:12. McNicholas- 12. TeK!Jive 17:15, 20. Hackett 17:31,_32. Gammeter 17:58,45. Ratnierl1B:21, 49. Edwards 18,25. Princeton Invitational (3,1 miles at Princeton) . Team results: 1. loveland 37, 2. Lakota East 56, 3. Fairfield 89, '4. Hamson 162, 5. Oak HH!s 185, 6. Wlnto:n Woods 202, 7. Moeller •an 227, 8. Prince-· ton 271,1 9. La sane "B~ 276, 10, Glen Este 317,11. Mariemorn: 335, 12. Chaminade-Julienne 341, 13. Flrmeytown 37.9,14. Eastern Brown 382, 15. Amelia 401, 16.'·Roger Bacon 408, 17. St Bernard 438, 18. · Seven H!lls 481, 19. Summit 493, 20. Madeira 522. Top finishers: 1. Peters (lakE) 16:19, 2. Fisher (lakE)16:31, 3. Asculsse (lov) 1B:13, 4. Waden (lov) 16·33, 5. Tighe (Pur) 16:38, 6. Peny (WinWood) 16:39, 7,. Webb (Fair) 16:42 •. 8. Stier (lov) 16:50, 9. · Kostuff (Fin) 16:53, 10. Oligee (LOV) 17:02. · Malone Invitational Teain stalldings: 1. St. Ignatius 107, 2. Padua 185, 3. Union Town Lake 192, 4. Massllon Perry 201, 5. Massilon Jackson 212, 6. Moeller 236 , Top runners: 1. l.ts'ke Beuerleln(M) 2. 16:24 Taylor 16.:46 3. Sullivan St. Ignatius, 16:47. Moeller finishers: 23. McWilliams 17:34,31. Meyer 17:46. 84. Auciello 18:15, 97. Marsh 18:26.

Boysr soccer Walnut Hills 1, Oak Hills 0 Shutout Sucietto J2 saves). Goal: Kramer. Records: W5·4, 02·4·2 . Milford 3, Amelia I Goals:M* Poplch, Teiting, Wuest A-Bradley. Re· cords:M 7-0, A1-5-1. :. Kings 3, Wilmington 0 Shutout ~tt (5 saves). Goals: McCnrkle, Begley, Baird. Records: W3-3-2, K 3-0-5 (FAVC 2-0-1). LitHe Miami 7, CNE 0 ShutOut Dufour. Goals: L-Beya 2, McKeehan, Blanton; Dufour 2, Overberg. · Mount Healthy 9, Stivers 1 · Goal~: Mt.H- Ertel3, Tensing 2, Asmeron, Pannley, Cass.·Maker. S-James. Records: MtH 4-0, s 1-4 Madeira 2 Summit 0 Goats: M-D .Ibarra, Weisbrnad. ShutOut Eberle(7 saves)Records: M 5·2·2 s 4-5 Clark 5, Deer Park 3 Goals: C-W811ace3, Hanes, Rolley. OP· Bolton 2, Rascona. Records: C4-2-1, DP 2-4-2 Withrow, 5 Middleton 2 GoalS: W-Sow 3, Beya, Sanchez. M·WUkerson, Turner, Records: W 4-1~0 Holy Cross 7, Villa Madonna 2 Goals: HC· Kersting 3, Martin 2, Fortner 2. V~ Love, Barzak. Records: HC 6·2·1, V 2·4. Hsmilton 4, Cincinnati Christian 1 Goals: H-Wolf, Tonich, Bresch, Johnson. C. Phelps. Records: H 4-2·2, C2·5. · ' Lakota East 1, Turpin 0 Shutout: Neal (5 saves). Goals: Stelletetl. Re· coros: E 4,1-1. Loveland 1 Sycamore 1 Goals: l-DIAngel!s. S-Kirkpatrick. Records: l5· 2·2 S 1·5·1 After 2 Roger Bacon 1 _ RG~a!s.;A·Mccarty,Mowbrny.R-Hader. Reqords:A

41 ~

Ross 7, North College Ifill 1 .Goals: R-Herron 2, O'Brien 2, Partin 2, Linville. N-Kel!y. Records: R 3-4-1. Moeller 3, North Central Und.)3 Goals: M·WUjek2, Gannon. N-Seabrooke 2, Trublood. Records: M 2·2·2, N 7·1-3. Colerain 2, Anderson 1 Goa lsi C..Rowekamp 2. A-Kelly. Records: A5·3*1, C5·2. i .Filineytown 2, Seven Hils 1 Goals; F*Young,-Robblns. S~Schultz. Records: F 6·1·1, S 4-4. · • Piinceton 3, Mason 2 GoalS: P-McGrath, Porter 2. M:.Moore, Mason. Records: M3-3·1, P 4-2-2. Badin 4, McNicholas . Goals:: B·RUhe, Myers, ·Nelson, Doody. M-M·. Hansbauer: Records: B 7-1 (GCl2·1), M 2-5 (GCL 0·1). i Mariemont 3, Glen Este 0 ShutoUt Hatch (9 _saves). Goals: M-Weber 2, own gOal. Records: M 4·4-1. Pur~~l! f!r_'laria_n Q, ~.ha_ml~~-de-Julie!Jne 0

ne;it6Wi\)li''S'rnltfl=M'ueller(l\ii1ei~T6't;'6'2;'ifili; •• :-·'~"slfuroqt:•·P-8ulfingtonc(!1-savesrc'sipeS\4~ 'saves). ReC5lrds:~2-3-3 (GCL0-0*1), P3-1·1(0·0-1).

:.Place - Dinnen-Tumer-Colllns (Madeira) d. Engel_;_~~haptscher (Ross) 8-3. • :Second doubles: Finals '''sWami'Schmldt (Madeira) d. Haubner·MIIIs (Ross) .6·1, 6-0. Third place •• Trotta-Wilker (Frnneytown) -d.- Eaton-Hunt (BetheHate) 8-1. ·

Flight G

:,

..

Team standings: tRogerBacon 370;2. Cincinnatl ChrlsUan200,3. Winton Wo0ds160, 4. Deer Park 130, 5. NOrv.·odd 90, 6. Glen· Este 50, 7. Reading so. : First singles: Finals·~ Kemper(RB) d. Morgan : lg~f~~24, 6-2. Third place- Whlte(WW) d. Schuler SeeoJJd singles: Finals •• Ceddia (RB) d. Me· laughlin (DP) 6-1, 6-0. Third place,. Ashley (CCD) d._Abemathy (WW) 8-4. Third singles: FinB:Is •• Jcitdan· (CCO) d. Bauer .

~~~h69\6-4. Third'place --Kiay!l1an (DP) d. Gray

tirst doubles! Finals- BologtJB-Gierhart (RB) ' d. Haii-Beal (WW) 6-4,6-4. Third place-- WohleberSchmitt- (CC) d. Bowmann·Kaufmann (Nor) 9-8 · (9-7). :. . ' Second. do_ubles: Finals·- 'Dunning*Ahters (RB) d. Fart~y-King (fl) 6~2, 6-2. Third place .~ Smtth-Bmokms (WW) d. Payne-Thornbury (N) 8-6.

Gilfs' CrOSS COUntry'

· G'lrJS.1 SOCCef"

' Northwest 4, Colerain 2 · Goai~:!N-swearingen 2, Schierloh, Meyer. C.lo· sacker, Maslyn. Records: N5·3, C2-2-3. ) .Ross 7, Flnneylown 1 GoalS: .R·Siaughter 3, Hogue 2, Gross, Johnson. F-lelninger.\Records: R6·1, F1-6~1. Goals·: ~f-s:~ 1 Amelia 0 Shutout Brueck Record" M 5-3 A 1-6 .Reading 6 Williamsburg 0 Goals: R·Penter.2, Retcher 2, Fmst, Burw~Ne. Shutout: Watkins and Wiggins(4 saves)Record3: W5~3 R3-1-2

Goals: h1~f;n~~h:t~u~o~~~~:a~(4 saves) Records: S 3*1*3 L-4-3-1 · · ; Indian Hill 2 Oakwood 0 Goals: ~rookS Rogers2 Shutout 1-Sarnh Wiggers (a saves), _Records: 4·3·1. . i Oak Hills 1 Anderson 1 Goals: 0-Schmeder A -Womack. Records: 0 34·1 A3-4-2. · !Lakota East 1, Turpin 0 ShutcotBuns(10saves).Goai:Carter.Records: L 5-1-1, T 7-2. HamiHon·Badin 6, Middletown Fenwick 1 Goals: H· Vlikowaskl2, Anderson, Rains, BUrton, · Brown. F- BrOdlman. Records: H3·2, F 4-4·1. i Little Miami 1, CNE 0 Shutout; Amett (3 saves). Goals: l- Curcio. Records: l3-5.' l Fairfield 2, McAuley I Goals:: f*Capelle, Bl!!er. M·Redd. Records: F 6~ 1*1, (2-0 In' ~_GCL). Mariemont, I Roger Bacon 1 Goals: ~-Groppe. R-Lankford. Records: 'M 5-0-2, · R3-1·1 i CHCA 2, New Richmond 0 Goals::C·Goodwin, Gartin. Shutout: Rally (5·saves) Records: CHCA 3-2-2 GOshen 1, Purcell Marian 0 Shutou,t: Black (1 save). Goals: G- Stewart Re~ cords: G 6-2;1. Monroe 3, SCD 0 Shutout:· Hubbard (9 saves). Goals: M*Hesson2, Sums. Records: M 5·3·1, S 3-5*1. Talawanda 1, Hamilton 0 Shutout:: Leon·Guerrero (4 saves). Goals: Voris, Records: T2 ·5·1, H 2·5·0.

Valkyrie lnvitation&t: (3.1 miles at EPTom Sawyer Park) Team results (30 teams): LColerain 4a; St Ursula 60, Anderson 122, Sacred H.eart (Ky.-) 145, Manual (Ky.) 158. Top finlsllers1 1. Mims (Mercy:Academy, f<Y.) 18:16, 2. Page (Silver creek, Ind.) 18:49, 3. Massey (Manual) 18:57, 4. Ragruzis (COlerain) 19:03, 5. Det* zel (Colerain) 19:14.. St. Ursula: a. Warren 19:38, 11. Clark 19:40, 12, Meiners 19:52, 14. shaw 20:02,15. Schroeder 20:03, 16. Corcoran 20:06, 25. Scherer 20:24. Trinity-Sacred Heart Invitational : {3.1 mile_s at Sawyer State Park, Louisville) : Team results (22teams): 1. Co!eraln48,2. St : Ursula 60, 3. Anderson 122, 4. Sacred Heart 145, 5. :Manuel 158, 6. Sliver Creek 174, 7. Assumption 176, :. 8. R.oyd Central246, 9. Tell City 284, 10. New Albany · 329 : Anderson top finishers: 10. McDaniel 1989, 18. Tegge 20:07, 24. Baker 20:22,~27. A. Cohen · 20·25 44 K Cohen 21·02 ' ' . 3Gtf. ~nnual Beti1ei~Tate Invitational (3.1 miles at Betbei·Tatel Team results: 1. Western BrowTJ: 46, 2. BethelTate 68, 3. WaaonNerona 82, 4. Norwi,lod 84, 5. Fay* ettevl!le 84, 6, Reading 114. Volleyb~ll Top finishers: 1. Runyon (W8)21:04, 2. Mate Lakote west (6-3) d. McAuley (2-4)16·25, 25thews (BT)21:05, 3. Robinson (WB) 21:23, 4.Rhodes 22, 15·11 ; . ·.. . (WB) 21:26, 5. Hill (Fay) 21:45, 6. cantrall (WV) Mercy (6·2) d. McAuley (2·6)25-11, 22-25; 1521:56, 7. Duncan (Nor) 22,17, B. Rosselot (Fay) 12 22:27, 9. Wallace (CNE) 22l33, 10. Goodman (Nor) Lakota West(7-3) d. Merty(7 -2) 25-8,25-21 22:37. Walnot Hills (6-1) d. Purteii.Manan (4-4) 25-15, Eaton Invitational 25-18, 25-17, (3.1 miles) Eastern Brown (11-0) d. Western Pike 19·25, 25· Team re$Uits: 1. Sycaffiore 32, 2. McN.!cholas 14, 15-10 54, 3. CNE 132, 6. 11\'oming 139, 7. Kings 146, 8. Eastern Brown(12-0) d. Georgetown 25~22,25· Greenan 161, 9. Miamisburg 17 4, Kenton Ridge 204, 15 Spn·ngfield Shawnee 209, Valley VieW 214, Eaton Mourn Notre Dame (6·2) d. Watterson 25·17, 296: 22-25, 25-2!, 25-1B Top finishers: L Stafford (Greenon)18:44, 2. Shrader (9·0) d. Western Hills 25-16, 25-23, Sanders (Sycamore) 18:47, 4. Combs'.(McNicholas) . 25-6 19:42, Wills (SYC?more) 19:45, 5. Sykes (Sycamore) Shrader (10-0) d. Jacobs 25-5, 25-5, 25-12 19:57. Sycamore: 10. Steinhardt 20:19, 11. Rogers loveland(2-6) d. Nortl!west25-11, 25-23 20:25,16. Kirgis 20,56, 20. Zhang2l:18. McNicho· Falrfleld d loveland 25-18, 22·25, 17-5 . . las: 4.- Combs 19:42, 10. Robers 20:04, 14. Ritter Hamson (6-2) d. Badin (5-7) 26-24,25-19,2520:32, 15. McKenney 20:42, 20. oav~ 21:05. 21 Princeton Invitational Winton Woods Invitational (3.1 miles at Princeton) Wyorning;d. Mount Healthy 25-10, 25-17 Team results: 1. Mercy44, 2. St. ~rsufa ug• 44, Uttle Miai"ni tf. NCH 25·12, 25-15 3. Loveland 88, 4. Princeton 130, 5. Oak Hills 161, 6. Western Brown d, Hughes 25·15, 25-10 Chamlnade-Jullenne 190, 7.lakota East 191, 8. Fair~otoo Woods d. ~throw 25-21, 22·25, 15-11 fleld205,9.Madelrn 290,10. Hanison 322,11. EastMount Healthy d. NCH 25·10, 25-23 em B~o~n 333, 12. Summit 343, 13. CHCA 359, 14. Hughes d. Withrow 25-14, 25-12 Amelia 422, 15. Glen Este 427,16. Milford 435,17. Ullie Miami d. Wyoming 29·27, 25-22 Roger Bacon 462. Western Brown d. Winton Woods 25-15, 25-10 Top finishersl l. Leeper (lov) 18:04, 2. Keeter . Seventh place (lakE) 18:56,3. Bauer (Lov) 19:03, 4, Knopf (Mer) Withrow (5-4) d. NCH (0-10) 25-15, 25-18 19:06, 5. Beadey (WlnWood) 19:11, 6! Yauch (Mer) F'lfth place 19:17; 7.lewnard(Mer) 19:31,& wesp(Gien)20:07, Hughes (7-5) d. Mount Healthy (3-7)25-15, 25· 9. Walls (Lov) 20:24, 10. Simpson (Mer) 20,43. 21 Alliance Invitational Third place (3.1 miles at Clayton) 11\'0mlng (9-1) d. Winton Woods (4-6) 25-15, Team results: 1. Mason 55, 2. Ce0terville80, 3. 25-22 Turpin 105, 4. Alter 127, 5. Dublin Kaufman 146, 6. Championship Fainnont 192, 7. Beaver Creek 197, B._ Springboro _ ~ttle Mi~mi (5·5)d. Western ~rown (5-5) 25-20, 241, 9. Vandalia Butler 252, 10. Dayton Wayne320. Top finishers: 1. Bluam (Mas) 18:17, 2, Gilbert : . Mason Quad (Fair) lB:3D, 3. Schwieterman (Spring) 18,57, 4. StruMason d. Beaver Creek 25·10, 25·9 b!€ (Butie~ 19:19, 5. M. Chaney (Mas) 19:21, 6. o. Roger BaCon d. Mason 25-9, 25-16 Jaworek (fur) 19:24, 7. M. Jaworek (llJr) 19:24, a. Roger BaCon d. Sycsmore 25-8, 25-14 Neufarth (Center) 19:30, 9, Michna: (Fairyn) 19:31, 10. Sycqmore:d. Beaver Creek 25-18,.22-25, 15·10 Alejandro (SpringNo)19:32. . ; Mason'(Bl3) d. Sycamore (3·8) 25-16, 25-23 Roger Bacon (9-1) d. Beaver Creek (2-Q) 25-8, 25-12 ! Alliance· Invitational (3J miles at Dayton! ;. , Team standings (22teams): 1. GentervllieBB, CHL League Tournament :2. Sl Xavier 100, 3. Sycamore 114, 4.;Beavercreek AfSIIaron Woods, par 70 :133,5. Tuipln 165,15. Mason 424. i Co•medalist: Todd Kramer (Wyoming) , ~Ike , Top finishers: Sycamore.· 8. Rosen 16:24, 12. Deters ( 70. i Harris 16:37, 22.1nanli 16:57, 27. Weber 17:13,45, Team 2.1ndlan Hill 1 Williams 17:44. 59. Sage 17:57, 117. Hue 19:2B. St 325, 3. Fin Mariemont 343, 5. Ma:Xavier • !1. Rl. King 16:35, 16. Ra. King 16:44, 1B. delra-345, 6.. Taylor 355, 7. Reading 399, 8. Deer )Ruberg 16:47,23. Hasse 16:58,:32. Keating 17:23, Park 505. . ! .~37. Britll17:29, 85. Brad King 18:25. Turpin -14. Others: McKimm (\\Yo) 75, Moore (\~o) 77, i Kirafoce 16:42, 21. Humke 16:56. Maso'n -10. Rapp Cardell (Mad) 78. , 16:33. Mason-10. Rapp 16:33. WaHerson·Jnvltational Trinily-Secred Heart Invitational at "'uirfield Village; par 72 (3,1 miles at Saftl'er State Park, LOuisville) Team stai1dlrigs: Upper ArlingtOn 320, Moeller Team results(25 teams): 1. Lou!sVi!teStXavl322, Watterson 329, Hudson 342, Dublin Coffman er 41, 2; Anderson 74, 3. Oldham County 11i, 4. 343. Tdnity 117, 5. Royd Centra1178, 6. John Hardin 210, Medalist: lim Gusweiler (M) with a three over par .1. SINer creek 215, 8. Colerain 221, 9: New Albany 75. OtherMoenernnlshers: Nieman 79, Chappell83, 250,10. Sollth Oldham County 275. Kroeger85. ; Anderson Finishers: 10. Pucillo' 16:52, 13. ! Fyffe 16:58,16. Rasfelq 16:59,19. VonHertsenberg

·

25 1

Boys' cross country ·

,__


II~ 28-o.;i

High school insider

St,adimn debate' fires up .again e go through this every year. Each November, someone is complaining about state football playoff sites. The stadiums are too small, the drive is too long, or there's a conspiracy against (Your School's Name Here). Saturday night, Colerain played Worthington Kil"Qourne in a Division I state semifinal game at Dayton's Welcome Stadium. The site, about a onehour drive for each school, made perfect geographic sense. · The Ohio High School AthleticAssociationrequires the state semifuials to be played at neu1rai venues, with attempts made to find . stadiums of Tom equal driving Groeschen distance between. the competing schools. InDivision I, this is an annual headache for CincinD.ati schools. Last year, Elder football fans deluged the OHSAA with e-mails and got their state semifinal moved from Weleome Stadium (capacity 11,000) ;to Co·lumbus Crew Stadium: (22,555). Elder also played a state semifinal game at Crew Stadium in 2002. In 2001, St. Xavier sought and got a venue change to Crew Stadium. The, problem is that there is no perfect site for the semifinals. , Welcome Stadium is the biggest and most logical fit between here and Columbus, but

,.~capacuyatwaysse~m:sabir~

small for Cincinnati mterests. Colerain has a large fan base ~.did' not try to move the Kil/bOJrrne game. UC's Nippert Sta~ • dium (35,000) and Crew Stadium had been mentioned as . options. , /'If we played in Columbus, ·/,We'd lose some fans.pecause of j that extra hour's driVe "Cole. -·ram:a:thfetic-cliTector:Dan Moody said. "It's a shame there's not a larger stadium between here and Columbus, but that's life." RECOUNT: The announced attendance figures for Colerain's two playoff games at Miami University's Yager Stadium (vs. Centerville Nov. 13, vs. Moeller Nov. 20) did not match the actu\ ai turnstile counts. ""' ··The crowd for Centerville Wp.s announced as 16,127. The MOeller crowd was announced as 21;5_41. The actual turnstile counts: 9,988 for Colerain-Centerville arid 11,664 for ColerainMueller. · • The turnstile figures come from Dan Ross, the OHSAA commissioner. 'Those were the actual turnstile numbers, including passes," Ross said, a few days after the Colerain-Mueller game. Then where did .the 16,127 and 21,541 figures come from?. "I'm not sure," Ross said. Steve Neil, game manager at Miami University; said those figures were estimates. 'Those were general num-_ bers that were given ... assumed numbers," Neil said. f'Sometimes the numbers turn out differently." ; Now, some will insist the Mueller-Colerain crowd was every bit of 21,000. But fans tend to spread out at these games, leaving space between each other and giving the illusion more people are there.. Sportswriters often try to guess crowd sizes because people want to know the atten· dance. Most of us are not good attendance guessers, which is one reason they have turnstiles. O.J. MANIA: No.rth College Hill athletic director Joe Nickel wants it known tliat the OJ. Mayo-led Trojans have not sold out any basketball games- yet

E-mail tgroesdzm@enquirer.com


l4 TH.URSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005

THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005

Best bet

OUTDOOR RECREATION AND PARTICIPATION SPORTS

FA OUS

FA IllES

Cincinnati Cornhole Fest 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Lunken Play Reid, 4750 Playfield Lane, Linwood. Double elimination team cornholetournamen_t. $40 per team. Call to register a team. Call: (513) 281-2316

Fathers set examples for kids in ways big and small.

But when a famous athlete has sports-playing offspring, the connection is more obvious-- ~nd very·gratifying.

Some of the area's top sports families and their athletic accomplishments:

Some of the area's top sports families and their athletic accomplishments:

Buddy Bell (left), who managed the.Rockiesin 2001, has passed baseball to his sons, including Mike. Even Mike's son, Luke, is in on it.

Enquirer file/Sarah Conard

The Griffeys- Junior and Senior- are part of Reds lore._

Ken Griffey Sr. and Ken Griffey Jr. - Arguably the best known father-

son combination i·n baseball histol}', Junior became the 20th member of the 500-home run club on Father's Day 2004 in St Louis. . Senior hit 152 home runs in his 19year big-league career and was part of the Reds' "Big Red Machine." Pete Rose and Pete Rose Jr. Major League Baseball's all-time .hits leader hailed from Western Hills High School. This year, Rose Jr. entered his 16tli season in professional basebali when he joined the L01ig Island Ducks of th_e .Atlantic league. He appeared in 11 games with the Reds at the end of the 1997 season. Kara Molony-Hussey, Lyndsey Molony and Molly Molony ~Molony- Hussey is in her third season of coaching the Notre Dame Academy tennis team, and the Pandas this spting won their 10th consecutive Ninth Region title. From 1998-2001, Mqlony-Hussey played at the University of Cincinnati, where she was an AII-Ametican. This spting, Molony-Hussey was named to Conference USA's all-decade team. Younger sister Lyndsey played at UC from 2001-04; youngest sister Molly plays collegiately for UNC-Wilmington. The Kehoe family- Former St Ursula volleyball standout BIYO finished her freshman season at S:tanford by . winning a national title. Her father, Steve, played volleyball at·Ball State, and her mother, Amy, was a two-time. AII-Ametica volleyball player at Westem Michigan. Bl}'n's grandfather, Fred Kehoe, played football at Ball Stat!'l. The Wolf family - St Xavier basketball standoutJohnny, who will tum 19 Sunday, has signed with Xavier for next season. Johnny is the son of 1979 Xavier graduate Marty Wolf, 47, · a member of the XU Athletic Hall of Fame who was a two-sport star in tennis and basketball for the Musketeers. Johnny's uncle, Steve Wolf, is a former Musketeer basketball captain and 1983 XU graduate. He is the color analyst for Xavier on Fox Sports Net Ohio. Marty had a proud paternal mo,ment duting the St Xavier-Moeller basketball state semifinal last season. Marty got up from his seat near halftime and went to the concession stand. It was then 'he realized Johnny and his brother Nick, 17, were playing in front of 16,000 people. "It was a moment of 'wow,' " Marty Said. "That was really cool."

FA OUS FJA ILlES

By Mike Dyer .Enquirer staff writer

While Sunday is the traditional time to honor fathers, Tun McGee, like many, says Father's Day should be more inclusive thanitsmlmesake. ''Father's Day is special to me because it is a time to reflect and have emphasis on family," the former Bengals wide receiver said. "Ifsmore of a children's day, I'd say." · . 'McGee;4o;istlieheaO. baSketoiifl coachat Ursuline, where his eldest daughter, Kiondra, will be a sophomore next season. "I love it," said McGee, who played with the Bengals from 1986-1992 and 1994-1995. "I had· an opportunity to coach with the Bengals and I've had other offers in the NFL, but I declined. My family is my No.1 passion and love." Pride and love of family were common themes for some of the area's top sports families. Today, we look at some of the better known ones and some of the deserving fathers worthy of being honored on Sunday: No one is doubting pressure exists for athletes who have a successful sports history in their family. But most, whether sons or daughters, are proud to have played. Organizing trips for the busy schedule of summer AAU basketball tournaments can wait Father's Day, says fanner NFL player Carlton · Gray, is time to relax. Who could argue? Gray's daughter,Amber, is a basketball standant at Lakota West 1hls past season, she was nruned to The Enquirer first team and was honorable-mention all-state as a freshman after leadit!g the Greater Miami Conference in scoring (17.3pointsagame) and rebounding (10.4). Carlton, an NFL cornerback from 1993-2001, is now defensive coordinator for the Lakota West football team, and he helps coach Amber in basketball dllling the summer. ''For a while she was my daughter; now it's al· most like I'm Amber Gray's father," said Carlton, who will turn 34June 26. 'That is almost another sense of pride for me." Bruce Kozerski is a fonner Bengals offensive lineman (1984-1995) who is now head football coach at Holy Cross. His son Mattwill be a senior tight end/linebacker this season for the Indians. Matt was six months old when Bruce played in Super Bowl XXIII. "It's been awesome," Matt said of playing for

a

'.'I had an opportunity to. coach with the Bengals and I've had other offers in the NFL, but I declined. My family is my No. 1 passion and love." Fonner Bengals wide receiver lim McGee

left the ground." Matt, 16, said watching his father play football with the Bengalsprovided him with plenty of memories. ·"I could remember the day ofhis last game; he played (and) he got hurt (at Riverfront Stadium)," Matt said. · · "I was sitting in the stands and after the play I looked for his number and didn't ·see it, but I . heardhisnameon the loudspeaker. I jumped out (ofniy seat}. When they wheeled hlin around in. ·a cart, he said he was all right. After that, after every home game, we would go up to the press box and he would tell me everything. It was kind of the worst'and best moment at the same time." Matt said there is pressure playing for his fa. ther, but he hasn't let that affect him. "He was a great athlete, pretty much," Matt said. ''I'm not bad, butlknowmy brother is going to be a whole lot better than me, I'm sure." The pressure to succeed might be more visible if you have yourfather's first name. Leon Mmray said he looks forward to spending time with family on Father's Day each year. Murray was a multisport standoutfor North College Hill :from1970-1974. His younger son, Leon, is the quarterback for the Arena Football League's Nashville Kats. The elder Murray said he attends all of his son's home games. For Mother's Day this year, the family drove to Nashville and saw the Rats win. The Murrays also watched the younger. Leon's games for his previous team in Georgia. There is also son Justin and daughter Jerrika, who play basketball for NCH and will be juniors next school year. Leon, 28, won a high school state basketball title in 1995 in Louisiana. He played college football at Tennessee State and graduated in 2000. "Ifs been a blessing," said the younger Leon of his family. "All my life I have played sports, and for them to drive 3!6 hours to come down and see me play- I'm grateful for their support" Leon has fought adversity, battling injuries and struggling to get a shot at the NFL He is thankful for the example of his father. "I hear all the time about the things he accom-.. plished," Murray said. ''He doesn't say much aboutitanymore ... butmymomhaskeptsome nice newspaper clippings and to see some things he did is unbelievable." ·

his father. "I am just playing like any other guy on the team. He coaches me like anyone else." Added Matt, "If he u-eats me any different; I get a whole bunch of Gunk) from the guys." Kozerski's 11-year-old son, Adam, playsfootball.and baseball, and his 10-year-old daughter, Amy, plays basketball. 'They all have passion for playing," Bruce said. But he keeps his children's athletics in perspective. Kozerski said he is proud of Matt's proficiency in math and science - he carries a 4.0 grade-point average. Still, he has enjoyed coaching his son. ''Ifs the satisfaction of coaching any kid," said Bruce, who retired from the NFL in 1995 after 12 seasons. "Someone throWing a pass or making a catch- now translate that to your kids. When my son {made an interception last season) my feet E-mail mdyer@enquirer.com

The Bell family- The late Gus is a Reds Hilll of Farner. His son, Buddy, recently was named manager of the Kansas City Royals, following previous managetial stints in Detroit and Colorado. Buddy and Gus combined for 4,337 major'league hits ~the secondmost for a father-son duo after Baey and Bobby Bonds, who have 4,348. Buddy's son David plays for the Philadelphia Phillies. He grew up in Cincinnati and graduated from Moeller in 1990. David's brothers, Mike and Ricky, also play professional ball. Bruce and Matt Kozerski - A Bengals offensive lineman from 198495, Bruce is now the head coach at Holy Cross High School. His son, Matt. will be a senior tight end/linebacker this season. · ·-lim and·Kiondra McGee~The ~ former Bengals wjde receiver is the Ursuline basketball coach, and his daughter will be a sophomore on the team next season. McGee was on the Bengals' Super Bowl team in 1988. · Cartton and Amber Gray- Aformer NFL player, Carlton is the defensive coordinator at Lakota West In the summer, he also helps poach his d,aughter, Amber, a freshman basketball standout at West This past season, Amber was named the No, 1 freshman wing forward in America by All-Star Girls Report. She also plays volleyball. Ron and Jake Oesler -Jake, a ·third baseman/pitCher tor McNicholas this past season, has signed to play with Toledo next season. His dad, Ron was a member of the 1990 wortd champion Reds and has a .265 career batting average. He was drafted · by the Reds in 1974 after attending Withrow.· The Murray family~ Leon Murray was a multisport prep standout for North College Hill fiom 1970-74. Murray's son Leon is the quarteiback for the Arena Football League's Nashville Kats. And the elder Leon has two more children at NCH - Jenika and Justin will be juniors next season. Both play basketball. Tom and Tanner Browning- The former Reds left-hander has been a frequent visitor to Covington Catholic baseball games, to watch his son, Tanner. Tom was a member of the 1990 wortd champions and was a major-league All-Star in 1991. -.Mike Dye1


I ••

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005 C7

2005

cent Seven

.............. m .....

These teams were able to hoist their chunk of gold in the end.

COLERAIN: THE BEST EVER?

ROGER BACON: BACK ON TOP

TAYLOR: WELL WORTH THE WAIT

The Cardinals (15-0) won by an average of 39.8 points a game. Among Cincinnati's seven previous unbeaten big~ school state champions, only the 1976 Moeller team (37.5 margin) was close. Defensive lineman Terrill Byrd was named national defensive player of the year by PrepNation.com. Quarterback Dominick Goodman set a Division I title game rushing record with 259 yards and tied a record with fourTDs. Was it Cincinnati's best team ever? "1 don't want to be arrogant about that," coach Kerry Coombs said. "I'll let other people judge that. I think our numbers speak for themselves." Colerain finished No. 5 in the USA Today Super 25 ratings.

The Spartans (27~2) finished No.15 in th~na~ tiona! PrepVolleyball.com poll. The Spartans were considered Cincinnati's best team, including the larger Division I schools. With player of the year Jessica Hoeh leading the way, Roger Bacon won its second state title in four years. Coach Caryl Schawe coached 21 years before her 2001 Roger Bacon team won a title, and that one was as much for her as the team. "The first one, I didn't know if it would ever happen," Schawe said. "I'm not going to be greedy. I wanted this one for the players.n

cdach Chip "Dobson didn't learn his Division !I girls' cross country team had won the state title until about 10 p.m. the night of the meet. Acomputer malfunction caused an 8¥:!-hour delay in scores bein·g posted, but in the end Taylor beat Kettering Alter by six. points. Although Taylor and Alter couldn't bask in glory on the podium, both teams took pictures of each other holding the gold and silver trophies. "I guess it will be put in the humor pile," Dobson said of the silver trophy photos. "Wow, I'm glad that didn't happen." Seventh-place finisher Emily Thompson {left) led Taylor's second state team victory in three years.

MIDDLETOWN: GOES THE DISTANCE Senior Jeff See (left) defentJed his Division I state cross country title in 15 minutes, 25 seconds and led the Middies t~ the team championship. See also was part Vf the state champion Middies track team as a freshman. 'There's a · saying that if you coach for 30 years, there's that one athlete who suppc-:;edly can do it all," Middletown coach Scott DElton said. ''That's how Jeff is to the MiddletoVJn distance program."

WINTER

The Wolf was hungry in big battle with Mayo J

Cross coun.try

Coach Kerry Coombs, witb.Q\lapterback Dominick Good-

man (left) and running ba1;kiMister Simpson (right), led Colerain to an undefeateC fr~tball season and a Division I state championsh'1r.-. -~:he team capped a 15-0 season with a rOut ofCan_o..,~:McKinley.

OHNNV AND OJ.: St. Xavier senior johnny Wolf But this group was intentonprovingthemselves." andNorthCollegeHillsophomoreO.].Mayo,the BATMAN AND FRIEND: North College Hill basket-· area's top prep basketball stars, tangled Dec. 2lin ball star OJ. Mayo gets the national media spotlight, agameatSt.Xavier. Thegamewassoldoutsever- but teammate Bill Walker is also rated a national Top al days in advance. NCH led by two points at halftime, Five sophomore. Walker and Mayo were childhood but St. X won 78-63 after NCH's other star, Bill Walk- friends in the Huntington, W.Va. area before moving er, got into foul trouble. Mayo had 31 points and Wolf to Cincinnati. 'We've been together since Pampers," 22. Wolf electrified the partisaQ St. X crowd when he Walker said. Walker also doesn't mind the attention · Mayo receives: "I'm used to it My stole the ball from Mayo with 24 seconds left, then dunked over a character is Robin, and he's Batman. trailing Mayo. "I knew as soon He's in the public eye, but we both know that Batman and Robin do the as I got the ball thafs what I was dirty Work together." going for," Wolf said. KLONNE RETURNS: Former GOOD BLOODLINES: Lesslee MaMoeller football coach Steve son-Cox, eldest daughter of former Klonne returned to the head NBAAll-Star MarkAguirre, averaged 20 points a game for the Winton coaching ranks over the winter. Klonne was named McNicholas Woods basketball team. Lesslee has head coach for 2005, as former committed to Ohio State. "Mark said head coach John Rodenberg he'll be at a basketball game thinking college coaches want to talk to him, took the Covington Catholic job. Klonne, forced out at Moeller in and they come up to him and say, 'So 2001, was a McNicholas assistell me about your daughter," saidTitantfrom2001-04. "I don't think I na Mason-Cox, Lesslee's mother. Aguirre, now an assistant coach with have anything to prove, after 35 years of coaching," said Klolllle, the New YorkKnicks, said: "It's great who won two state titles and a when I'm in Cincinnati; everyone USA Today national championknows (Lesslee). They don't notice ship (1982) at Moeller. "At this me." point," he said, "I'm just doing GOLDEN GIRL: Brittany Hill oflndithis because I enjoy the kids Johnny Wolf and St. Xavier gave an Hill achieved a rare double, so and still have a passio:h for the North College Hill its only loss rare it had never happened. Hill begame." of the season. Wolf and NCH came the first athlete to win a diving ANDREWS LEAVES: Prince- star O.J. Mayo combined for 53 gold medal and a gold in a swim ton boys' basketball coach Paul points in the Bombers: 78-63 · event (200 freestyle relay) in the Andrews won his 300th career victory. · same year, at the Division II girls' game, after announcing that state meet in Canton. Hill is headed the 2004-05 season would be his last Andrews won a to UCLA next season. BIGWIN:ZachMarshallofMason,anoffensivelinecouple of city championships and also had strong teams at Taft and Woodward in his earlier years. "I man signed with Maryland, won the first wrestling tinever made it to the state (tournament), but that's tleinschoolhistoryat275pounds.Marshallwonthe · life," Andrews said. "It's been a fun ride." Andrews left state finals.7-6 in dramatic fashion, with a takedown in the door open to return to coaching someday. the :final two seconds. Marshall wrestled 1he final two WIRE TO WIRE: Mount Notre Dame lost Ohio Ms. periods with his head bandaged after sustaining a cut Basketball Mel Thomas from its 2003-04 team, which late in first period. ''You could see on his face that he won the Division I girls' state title. Yet, the 2004-05 wasnotgoingtoletanythingstandinhisway,"Mason Cougars led the Enquirer area girls' basketball poll all coach Jerry Schrock said. season and also finished No. 1 in the final Associated BREAKING THE ICE: Moeller became the first Hamil~ PreSs poll. Senior frontcourt players Michelle JoneS· toriCouiltySchooltoreaCh-the state hockey:linalfour,(signed with Cincinnati) and Cassie Brannen (signed which has been held for 28 years. The Crusaders lost with Northern Kentucky) led MND to a state tourna- their state match 5-0 to Ohio power Lakewood St. Ed- mentrunner-up finish. "We're especially proud of this ward. "We're proud of what the ldds did," Moeller group,"MNDcoachScottRogerssaid. "Inpastyears coach Mike Reeder said. 'They hung together all there was a lot of attention on Mel, and deservedly so. year. It was a blast."

SPRING

A big demand for New Richmond's rocket

D

UNCAN WATCH: New Richmond senior pitcher I schools in the major sports of football, boys' basketball . David Duncan went 9-1 with a 0.65 ERA this and baseball. The area has won three straight Division I . spring, and he was projected to be selected dur- football titles (Elder in 2002 and '03, Colerain in '04), two ing rounds 2-5 in the Major League Baseball of the last three boys' basketball championships (Moeldraft. ''In preseason, we had 15 scouts just watching him ler '03, Hamllton '04) and three sh-aight baseball titles throw in a scrimmage," New Richmond coach Brian (St Xavier '03, Moeller '04, Elder'05). The only Division Benzinger said. "Something tells me that's not how they I "major" not won recently -was the '05 basketball title, handle lOth-round picks." Ifs not. but Duncan's :financial with St. Xavier runner-up to Canton McKinley. 700 CLUB: Moeller baseball coach Mike Cameron demands played a part in him slipping to the 14th round this spring reached 700 career (Minnesota Twins). 1bree teams wins. His victory total ranks :first in offered to pick Dllilcan in the secCincinnati-area history, third in ond rom1d on draft day, but DW1Ohio hi!.iory and among the top 35 can's family wanted about $150,000 all time nationally. Reds outfielder more than the $500,000mostteams Ken Griffey Jr. is among 26 former offered. Dtmcan will go to Georgia Moeller players who have been Tech if he can't strike a pro deal. big·leaglle draftees under Carner· EARLY JUMP: Athletes are comon. "It's not about wins and losses mitting to colleges earlier and earliwith Coach Cameron," Griffey er nowadays. Withrow football said. ''We had some knuckleheads players Kallen Wade (Notre on our team, andiwasoneofthem. Dame) and Brandon Miller (CinHe cared more about how we hancinnati), lakota East basketball dled omselves on and off the :field, player James Dews (Miami Hurriand he taught us a lot about life." canes) and Mount Notre ·Dame DREAM RIDE: Harrison -was girls' basketball player Lee SteNo. 7 in the final Enquirer Division phens (Furman) all were juniors I girls' softball area coaches' poll, this school year, but a1f recently but the "\V"Ildcats finished as state made oral commitments to Divi· tournament runners-up. Senior sian [colleges. · pitcher Sarah Beatly led the way HARMONY SWITCH: The Harmofor Hanison (25-9), whose tournany Community School, a chart~ ment trail included victories over school in Roselawn, announced New Richmond pitcher David Dun· · thisspringitwillmakea big change can was drafted by the Minneso- 2004 Final Four team Milford, state No. 2-ranked Greenville and defor 2005-06. The school has con- ta Twins in the 14th round of verted to a prep school format and the MLB draft, but he might opt fending state champion Toledo St Ursula. 'We'll be back," Hani.son will drop out of the Ohio High for Georgia Tech. coach Jesse Doman said. School Athletic Association after · KINGS "!ENNIS: The Knights, the 2005 football season. Basket· ball will be the premier sport, as Hannony will play ~ coached by Steve Cont:ardi, became the first Ohio team national schedule and by to get its athletes qualified to to win a state singles title, state doubles championship play college ball School director Deland McCullough, a and team championship in the same year. John Allare former Miami University star football running back, is won the singles title over teammate Doug Matthews, and the doubles championship team was Matt Allare overseeing the move. GCL PmDE: The Greater Catholic League celebrated and Ra'ees Ismail Kings capped it all by wiruJing the its 75th anniversazy this season. GCL stalwart Elder Division I team title, 3-0 over Toledo St John's. "lfs closed tl1e season in style, 'Yinning the school's 12th Di- something we've talked about since junior high," Matvision I state baseball title. The GCLalso won state team thews said of the team title. 'We've dreamed about it, titles in swimming (St Xavier) and boys' volleyball and we finally got it" SEE THEM RUN: :tvliddletown seniorJeffSee and Ma(Moeller) this school year. Roger Staubach, a former Purcell quarterback who gained fame as a Heisman Tro- son juniorAngelaBizzani each tlrree-peatedatthe state phy winner (Navy) and Super Bowl champion (Dallas track: meet See won his third straight Division I boys' Cowboys), said his GCL days were the building block 1,600 title and also won the 800. Bizzarri won her third for his career. ''We competed at probably the highest straight Division I girls' 3,200. They each have led their level in high school, really, across the country," Stau- team to a state track team title, Middletown whming in See's. freshman year (2002) and Mason sharing the bachsaid. DOMINANCE: Ifs a golden age for Cincinnati Division girls' title in 2004,

Boys' swimming

Jeff See, Middletown (Boys' Division 1), Angela Bizzarri, Mason (Girls' Division !)

Kyle Hodges, Hamilton (Boys' Division I)

Hank Browning, Turpin (200 freestyle, 500 freestyle), Kit French, St Xavier (100 freestyle, 100 backstroke), David Mosko, St Xavier (100 buttelfty) .

Wrestling

Boys' tennis

zach Marshall, Mason (DiviSIOn

John Allare, Kings (Division I singles), Matt Allan; and Ra'ees·!smail, Kings (Division I doubles), Steve Havens, CHCA (Division II singles)

I, 275 pounds), Patrick Lanham,

Madison (Division Ill, 140 pounds)

Girls' swimming

Abby Cooper, Ursuline (Division I 50 freestyle, 200 medley relay, 200 free relay), Sarah Tanner, Ursuline (Division I 200 medley relay, 200 free relay), Katie Brotherton, Ursuline (Division I 200 medley relay), Amanda Rom, Ursuline (Division 1200 medley relay), Sarah Radke, Ursuline (Division 1200 free relay), Sarah Krone, Ursuline (Division I 200 free relay)

Brittany Hill, Indian Hill (Division II diving, 200 free relay), Amanda Smith, Indian Hill (Divisir;n ll 200 free relay), Abby Roe, Indian Hill (Division II 200 free relay), Margaret Fish, Indian Hill {Division II 200 free relay), Anita Beck, Anderson (Division I 500 freestyle), Lindsay Graessle, Kings {Division I 100 breaststroke), Ashlee Edgell, Madeira (Division II 200 IM)

Boys' track

C

incinnati won 12 state team championships this year, compared to 16 the year before. Though the area won fewer titles, the teams that did win were among the most dominant the area has seen. This was most apparent in football, in which Colerain (15-0) thundered to the Division I championship with a runaway victory margin of 39.8 points a game. The Cardinals routed Canton McKinley 50-10 in the state title game, breaking Division I championship records for most points (50) and largest victory margin (40). F'tmiRESTAR:StXavierfootballquarterback Robby Schoenhoftcommitted to Ohio State last preseason, making his announcementinJulyattheEASports''Elitell" quarterback camp in California. Camp counselors, including 2003 Heisman Trophy winner Jason "White of Oklahoma, voted Schoenhoft most likely to win a national title in college football. "I told Robby, 'God threw a lightning bolt down on you when he gave you that arm,'" St. X coach Steve Specht said. Schoenhoft led St. Xto an 11-1 record, including three comeback wins in· Greater Catholic League South play. FlllllRE IS NOW: In surrnner 2004, Ursuline's 15-year-old Kelsey lindenschmidt became the yom1gest winner in 81 years of the Women's Ohio Amateur Golf Championship. Lindenschmidt could not -accept the tournamenfs prize, a gold neckRobby i quarterlace, per Ohio High School Athletic Associback and Ohio State signee, led the ation rules on eligibility. In the full, ahe finBofnbers to an 11.-1 record and was voted at a national quarterback camp ished third in the Ohio prep state" tournament as a sophomore and led the as most likely to win a national title Cincinnati area in scoring (36.2 per nine in college football. j

ST. XAVIER: CLOSE CALL The Bombers trailed by nearly 40 points entering the final day of the state meet yet beat Upper Arlington 259-248.5. It was St. Xavier's seventh straig~t state title and 27th overall. "To say I was a little worried was an understatement, but we left believing we could win this _meet,n coach Jim Brower said. Senior star Kit French (left) won two individual titles and anchored St. Xavier's second-place 400 freestyle relay team.

holes). As for•tbof gold necklace, they're holding it 1oi kindenschmidt until she leaves high .Scao0J. · 1V DME:·tCJ 1cirmati football fans saw a local first on-J.Ebdr1Day weekend, with live network 1'\lJ (G:h~Jmel19) of prep football games. Moe11E r Jilayed Louisville St. Xavier, Elder played '-:lighlands and Anderson played Colei"aio ~dth live (and some tapedelayed) TV'C·RCl"age. RWALRY <~9N',c AWRY: Elder blasted Western HillS:i&:_43 in the most lopsided football game ·[if c.heir storied -well, oncestotied - ser"i.-=sr"'!The West Side giants played to a 111-C(}(;l:lraw through their first 21 meetings~ 1:" 1tElder holds a 47-7-1 edge since 1950.-I'n 'ili<r2004 game, two-time defending state '"' ;,p Elder led 50-0 at halftime. Coach lnot gl Ramsey played all reserves afterrhaiftffie, and the Panthers did not throw a,pa:;s;•..g. the second hal£ BACKYAJID'J e·m~m: The hype was through the.rmfias Lakota East (8-0) visited lakotarW::sr:,-(7-1) late in the football season. The·B-uMr County schools dubbed 'it 'The BacJ0·dl"d: o!rawl," and East bloodied West's nose: Z-3-1 )";'A crowd estimated at 8,000 ja.mnKi, lcakota Wesfs 4,000-seat Firebird StaCbllliifor the event, which featured massive'!l"Dillc jams and a helicopter delivering the f.{ane ba11. West laughed last when it made 1ht':fllayoffs and East did not. but East clainNdTillkota supremacy. Backyard Brawl :!}5 1 <i.XYone? SURPRISE: chi £HCA boys' soccer team was 7~7-2 in:the mgular season but was the last Cincinnqtiilirl.v.s: squad standing in the postseasonA GHDA lost 1-0 to Cuyahoga

Valley Christian in the Divisidn ill state final. The Eagles played Division II powers Badin and Alter and were in a highly competitive Miami Valley Conference that included State-ranked Cincinnati Countrv Day and Summit Countzy Day. 'We beat the heck out of each other all season," CHCA coach George Stinson said. "I think it actually helped us." BACK AGAIN: The Indian 1-Dll girls' SOQcer team lost in the Division II state finalfo1· a second straight year despite losing seve~~ seniors from the year before. 'This team i'S completely different from last year: in evelJ' single way," all-state defender Sam SchoQ-ny said. "It's no better. It's no worse; it's just different. It was a great run." REMEMBER WHEN: Members of the illfated 1995 Colerain football team enjoyed the 2004 Cardinals' run to the state title. The '95 Cardinals reached the state final but were barred from playing after it was discovered the team used an ineligible player all season. ''Y"ou still wonder, 'What it?'" said David Murphy, quarterback of the '95 team. ''Wauld we have won?" AbOut 30 members of the '95 team went to Canton for the '04 Division I championship game. ''This is for the '95 team and all the Colerain teams that went before us," said Terrill Byrd, all-state defensive lineman on the '04 team. HIE SAID rT: Mister Simpson, Colerain's standoutfootballfullbackwho is headed to Michigan, drew big laughs at a reception honoring the state champs. Colerain £tunbled five times Oosing three) in the first six minutes of the title game but still won 5D-10. Said Simpson, "I want to thank God for be-ing with us ... especially when we were fumblin'."

Girls' tr-ack

Asher Matthew Peters, Chris Keefer, William Johnson, Jason Fisher, Lakota East (Division I 3,200 relay)

College Hill's Bili Walker (above) says he's Robin, while teammate O.J. Mayo is Batman. The two hope for two more state titles by the time they end their high school careers.

Good for a dozen The Cincinnati area won 12 team championships in the 2004-05 season: 1. Middletown boys' cross country ;2. TaYII:k.girls':_gtqss cfJtJptry ~ '~<_, 3. Roger Bacon girls' volleyball 4. Col,~[~in football · 5. St. Xavier swimming e:·i'Jolti\"Colle~e:Hill

Joe Hom, Cincinnati Chnstian (Division 111100 ~ash, 1,600 relay) Chris Lynch, Cincinnati Christian {Division Ill 1,600 relay) Ral'ldyTerrel!, Cincinnati Christian (Division 1111,600 relay) Kyle Thomas, Cincinnati Christian (Division 1111,600 relay)

Emily Thompson, Ashli JO>Jph, Kelly Sullivan, lange Gilby, Taylor (Division 113,200 relay)

1\:oys' basRetballi;:

7. Elder baseball

TEAM CHAMPIONS-·

12. Kings boys' tennis* *Team tennis Is not sanctioned, though int;lividual titles are.

NORTH COLLEGE HILL: SWEEPING THE NATION Sophomore stars OJ. Mayo, Bill Walker and Keenan Ellis led NCH (27-1) to a dominant season, with an average victory margin of 40-plus points a game. Mayo was named Ohio Mr. Basketball and a USA Today Ali~American. He averaged 27.4 points a game. "We set a goal to win three state titles in a row and make history," Mayo said, "We want to leave as a dynasty." Only two other Ohio boys' schools have won three straight state titles: Columbus Wehrle (1988-90) and Dayton Stivers (1928-30).

Angela Bizzarri, Mason (Division 13,200 run), Judy Bataille, Felicity (Division 111100 dash)

Eric Keyes, Princeton (Division I pole vault), Jeff See, Middletown (Division I 800 run, 1,600 run)

Stories by Tom Groeschen ELDER: DECADE AFTER DECADE The Panthers (28-1) won the program's Ohio-record 12th state baseball title. Elder also continued its "decades" streak, having won at least one s~te baseball title in every decade since the 1940s. Coach Mark Thompson, after playing a junior-laden lineup in 2004, saw his team come of age in 2005. "Nothing seemed to faze them,n Thompson said. Pitching ace Charlie Leesman (8-0, left) and Nd .. 2 starter Matt Klausing (7-0) both threw shutouts in the state tournament. leesman, signed with Xavier University, was taken by the Minnesota Twins in the 4oth round of the Major League Baseball amateur draft.

Coming in :Kentucky ... Coming next Wednesday, The Enquirer will present its Northern Kentucky Salute to Champions. The page will recap the area's top stories from the fall season through this week's state baseball tournament and give a nod to all of Northern Kentucky's state champions- tea..'n and individual.

At Cincinnati.Com II Alist of where athletes from the Class of 2005 are going for college IIIII Rosters of title teams lll!ll Past stories on teams, indi'!idual champs and more Keyword: Preps

I


GAMES II AUG. 13-29

Enquirer staff writer

G

o ahead and call Heather . Mitts a surptise. Say the firsttime Olympian is a newcomer in elite soccer and beat the odds by making this team. You'd be wrong. The 26-year-old St. Ursula grad won an NCMtitle for Florida in 1998, first played for the U.S. national team in February 1999, and starred for three seasons in the now-defunct WUSA She has had five different stints on the national team and has logged the fourth-mpst minutes for the team this year. Mitts was fueled by the dis.appointment of not malting the World Cup team last year, when she was slowed by a broken leg. "I came so close, had the injury, and fought to come back," she said. "She stepped into camp in January the sharpest, fittest, most motivated player," Olympic coach April Heinrichs told NBC.com. ''When you make a team, you let go of r .¡:rci)c;ot. . ,/\ie' You ¡ f't:>!l1"C>

heather


ANCHORS AWAY!

THE CINCINNATI ENQUIRER

OlYMPICS

H2 THURSDAY, AUGUST 12, 2004

On TV. I Coverage spans 7 channels

ow am

NBC prime time: Bob Costas hosts from 8 p.m. to midnight nightly. It's his fifth time in that spot; this time, he gets to talk about Greece, where his grandfather and grandmother were born. NBC late night: Pat O'Brien hosts during the first week from 12:35 a.m. to 2 a.m.; Dan Hicks, who ·covers swimming O'Brien during the first week, hosts late at night the second week. O'Brien started in sports,. before moving to the J-Lo and Mary-Kate world of anchoring "Access Hollywood." When the Olympics end, he starts preparing to anchor "The Insider," an "Entertainment Tonight" spin-off this fall. NBC daytime: Jim Lampley anchors from 12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. "It's his 12th Olympics. USA Network. Lilmpley anchors, 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. Mary Carillo takes over the ali-day coverage on the weekend of Aug. 21-22, when most of the tennis gold medals .are awarded. MSNBC: Lester Holt, working his first Olympics, anchors with O'Brien from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. CNBC: Fred Roggin hosts from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.; he's a longtime Los Angeles sportscaster, also known · for his comedy shows built around sports bloopers. Carillo anchors this weekend's coverage. Bravo: Carillo and lnga Hammond anchor from 5 a.m. to noon with Hammond also doing 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Telemundo: Jessi Losada anchors the Spanish-language coverage from 1p.m. to 8 p.m. Andres Cantor joins him when he's not calling soccer matches.

NBC has 1,210 hours of coverage By Mike Hughes Gannett News Service

Here's a primer on tlus year's Olympic telecasts: II When: The · opening ceremony will air at 8 p.m. Friday on NBC. The closing ceremony is Aug. 29; in between, the coverage will sprawl over NBC and six of its cable or broadcast channels. lli!l The channels: They are CNBC, MSNBC, USA Network, Bravo, Telemundo and the separate high-digital signal sent by many NBC stations. Iii What's missing: NBC also owns the Sci Fi Channel, which isn't scheduled to air Olympic coverage. That channel would be helpful if the games become intergalactic. Or if ancient Greeks return via time travel. Or if polevaulters begin to vanish in midair. lil!l Who gets these channels: Most cable homes. USA airs in 88 million homes, which is ahnost all the ones with cable. CNBC reaches 86 million homes, MSNBC 82 million, and Bravo 76 million. "Bravo picked up another four or five million homes when it was first announced that tl1ey were going to carry the Olympics," says ~~~;bersol, chairman of NBC

Associated Press file

Team USA celebrates its win over Germany Aug. 4 in Cologne. Though the best players aren't on

the team as in Dream Team days, the stars who are there still make for good TV.

ANALYZE.THIS

r1

Here are the analysts for sports best known to U.S. viewers: BASEBALL: Matt Vasgersian, voice of the San Diego Padres, with Joe Magrane. · BASKETBALL: Mike Breen with ' Doug Collins as men's analysts and Ann Meyers as women's analyst. Both haye i}e[Jn Olympians and Collins. went on to be a pro coach. Craig Sager is the reporter. BEACH VOLLEYBALL: Chris Marlowe with Karch Kiraly. Heather Cox is the reporter. BOXING: Bob Papa with Teddy Atlas. Kenny Rice is the reporter. DIVING: Ted Robinson and Cynthia Potter. Reporters will be former UC track star Lewis Johnson, Melissa Stark (a former football sideline reporter) and Andrea Joyce, a veteran sports reporter who worked the· CBS coverage when her husband, Harry Smith, was anchoring. GYMNASTICS: AI Trautwig with Tim Daggett and Elfi Schlegel. Joyce is the reporter. SOCCER: J.P. Dellacamera and Marcelo Balboa are the men's analysts and Lori Walker is the women's analyst. Viewers can switch to Spanish-language Telemundo for Andres Cantor, famous for rumbling "GOOOALI" SOFTBALL: Vasgersian, with exOiympian Dot Richardson. SWIMMING: Dan Hicks with Rowdy Gaines- who won three gold medals in 1984 - as analyst; Stark is the reporter. TRACK & FIELD: Tom Hammond will work with several analysts Dwight Stones, Carol Lewis, Marty Liquori and Lewis Johnson. In addition, Larry Rawson calls the women's marathon and Tom Feuer calls the walks. Bob Neumeier is the track reporter. TENNIS: Barry MacKay and Jim Courier, with Len Berman reporting. More expertise will come from Mary Carillo, who will anchor for USA Network Aug. 21-22, the big days for tennis gold. VOLLEYBALL: Jim Watson and Mike Todd. Other lV analyst news: llll Other general sports reporters include Billy Bush and Nancy Newman; assigned by NBC News are Bob Hager and Kelly O'Donneil. Iii The HDlV channel has a separate lineup of commentators, including Matt Devlin, Craig Hummer and Paul Sunderland. fJl\l Telemundo will have Edgar Lopez doing much of its play-byplay, with Andres Cantor, Jessi Losada and Alejandro Blanco doing soccer and Rene Giraldo doing boxing. Analysts include Adrian Garcia-Marquez (baseball and basketball) and Mara Montero (beach volleyball and walks). For boxing, Raul Marquez will be analyst, with Claudia Trejos as reporter. , - Mike Hughes, Gannett News Service

r

I By Mike Hughes Gannett News Service

During the Olympics, television altemates between action and aesthetics, between the whoosh of competition and the psychology of the athletes' lives. This year the action and the whoosh will prev.ail with the most comprehensive Olympic coverage ever via NBC Universal netc works. The 24-hour per day coverage will span seven networks under the: NBC umbrella, including NBC, MSNBC, CNBC, USA Network. Bravo, Telemundo and NBC's new HDTV network. "Our goal is to have · very event-driven programming," says David Neal, the executive vice president of NBC Olympics. He's gone into some previous Olympics with more than 100 features taped in advance. This year, with 1,210 TV and cable hours to fill, he has only 80 :fihns, . and none much longer than two minutes. Those films still serve a purpose, Neal says, introducing viewers to unfamiliar events. One of Neal's favorites looks at the 20th anniversary of the Olympics' first women's cross-country race. More than half of the :fihns will be about athletes from outside the United States, he says. Dick Ebersol, the chairman of NBC Sports, is trying to nudge past the "America against the world" days. "If you went anywhere else in the world, you'd find that we're the least nationalistic in our coverage," Ebersol says. That's one of many is-

Timing is everything Athens is seven hours ahead of New York, so when Bob Costas starts his primetime coverage at 8 p.m. EDT, it will be 3 a.m. in Greece. ''There's no way to do that live," said Dick Ebersol, chairman of NBC Sports. Primetime eventS are taped with live commentary. When they're shown, Costas will already know .

the winners. "You can't give the result away," Costas says, "but neither can you feign anticipation." The high-interest events will be saved for primetime. Others, however, will be live on cable. When Bravo starts its coverage at 5 a.m. weekdays, it will be noon in Athens. Some live events will even pop up late at night.

sues NBC.faces. They include: lil!l Key sports: A few events dominate, Ebersol says. "About 60 percent ofthe primetime coverage has been a mix of swimming, diving, gymnastics and track-and-field." ll Basketball: The Dream Team days of the best players on .the Olympic team have passed. Things are differentin most Olympic sports, Costas says. 'The place where they make their name and validate their reputations is always the Olympics,"

That's not true of basketball, so Ebersol is happy with the stars that are showing up. l!i! News: NBC News has two reporters, Bob Hager and· Kelly O'Donnell, assigned to Ebersol's unit. TI1 ere is much that they could . report on, from drug controversies to the potential for terrorism. "I think where our employees work and sleep will be incredibly safe," Ebersol says. "But I would not be encouraging our employees to wander off to a discotheque at 2 o'clock in the morning." II High definition: A separate signal will be sent on the HDTV channel openited by many NBC affiliates, Ebersol says. Fornow, that will stick to events happening in four neighbming stadiums. Things will be different in 2006, when the Winter Olympics are in Torino, Italy, he says. "We will do the Torino games completely in HD." · Bob Costas will be NBC's primetime anchor for the fifth time.

Handout photo,

HBO

B

H

H

How big is this year's Olympics coverage? NBC. says it includes: A helicopter, an airship, a tethered blimp, 26 semitrucks with equipment- and 300 other vehicles.

A 75,000. squarecfoot studio, plus compounds at ·~"''"''' ''~· tlie various venues, totaling another 154,418 square feet.

3,134 staffers in Athens, dwarfing the size (550) ofthe entire U.S. Olympic team. Those staffers have 70,026 nights of hotel reservations; they'll be served 185,400 meals and they'll down an estimated 260,000 cups of coffee.

3,756 pieces of furniture. Don't believe everything you see, though. At the Winter Olympics, the cozy fireplace fire was just a videotape loop.

485 camera positions. That's despite the fact that many events will be in the same few places; half of the· 28 sporting events will be in two venues .. 30,000 blank videotapes and another 10,000 with archived video on· them. There will be plenty of places to play them; NBC will have 400 VCRs and 2,500 color monitors. \•

~

For daily lV information and schedules from Athens: IJ Read The Cincinnati Enquirer daily. mil Visit Cincinnati.Com.

!lll Specific events: The exact details are still being worked out. They'll be listed on two Web sites, nbcolympics.com and tvguide.com- and on the TV Guide Channel, which airs on many cable systems. The general plans have been set, however. Here they are, for each network:

NBC 111ere are 28 Olympic sports, but Ebersol expects 60 percent of prirnetime coverage to stick to four of them - swimming, diving, gymnastics and track and field. By no coincidence, those are sports (along with basketball) in which Americans expect to do well. Other sports will pop in occa: sionally, he says, especially such telegenic ones as beach volleyball. 'They built a stadium right on the sea that's drop-dead great."

Telemoodo

The other two channels are This will be the first time the harder to 'define. NBC's high-defi- Olympics have a Spanish-lannition ·channel must be launched gu~ge broadcast in the United by individual stations; NBC says States. There will be 169.5 hours, its high-definition sig11al is within emphasizing soccer and boxing, reach of 80 percent of TV homes. plns the final two rounds of ba<>eTelemundo, a Spanish-language ball. The soccer coverage will in, network, is on acombination of 47 cl11de Andres Cantor, noted for stations and almost 450 cable sys- his rumbling pronouncement of terns; combining them, it says it "Goooal!" reaches 91 percent of Hispanics in RJI)<fl Me-lh"ork the United States. U>l/'1 11 m II!l The anchor: That's Bob 'There \vill be only 49 hours of Costas, again. It will be his fourth 'coverage, starting at 8 a.m. Suntime hosting the Summer Olym- day. That's when the women's cypics, plus one stint with the winter cling road race will start winding games. through Athens. ll!l The time gap: The games The next weekend, Aug. 21-22, are in Athens, seven time zones USA will carry the tennis finals. away. At 8 p.m. EDT, it's 3 a.m. in The network also expects to have Greece. fu-e coverage of most U.S. basketThat means anything being ball games, for men ar1d women. shown in primetime is tape-delayed. However, some late night CNBC events will air live; 1 a.m, EDT is 8 On weekdays, this will be the a.m. in Athens. Most of the events home of boxing coverage. On · shown in the moming or after- weekends, boxing moves to noon will be live. MSNBC. CNBC - with l11 hours Things were much worse when total - will range from beach valthe games were in. Australia four leyball to soccer and taekwondo. years ago, with a 15-hour difference, Costas says. "We.were pre- MSNBC senting packaged presentations of This becomes the boxing. netwhat had happened literally the work on weekends. During the day before." week, MSNBC- with 133.5 hours !lll Broadcasttimes: If you on- total- ranges afar. It has basketly get NBC, you'll still have 226 ball, soccer, beach volleyhali, hours of Olympics over 17 days. "'resiling, canoeing, rowing, and By comparison, the 1992 games w·eightlifting, had 171.5 hours; the 1976 ones had 76.5 hours. . · BRAVO During weekdays, NBC will There will be 122 hours, in dudcover the Olympics from 12:30 ing tennis, equestrian, sailing, arp.m. to 4 p.m., from 8 p.m. to mid- chety, bacjminton, judo, handball, night and from 12:35 a.m. to 2 table tennis, synchronized swima.m.; it will rerun some of the cov- · ming and the track cycle races. erage from 2 a.m. to 5 a.m. and its uonl ''Today" show will have an Olym- n BII pic emphasis. The idea of doing high-definiII!l Cable times: During the tion coverage came late, Ebersol week, MSNBC will air Olympic says. Broadcasters from other events from 2 a.m. to 7 a.m.; USA countries were surveyed. will step in from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m., 'They (said), 'We want to have then MSNBC will return from 10 HD coverage of track and field, a.m. to 4 p.m. CNBC - which is swimming and diving, gymnasshowing financial m;ws during the tics, the opening and closing cerebusiness day - takes over from 5 monies, the basketball medal p.m. to 8 p.m. The others: Bravo rounds and the soccer stadium,' " from 5 a.m. to noon, 5 p.m. to 8 Ebersol says. 'That takes place in p.m. and midnight to 1 a.m. Tele- four stadiums that are contiguous mundo airs coverage from 1 p.m. to each other." to 8 p.m.; the high-definition chanThose sports will show up on nel will be 24 hours a day, some of the high-definition channel with it remns. the others being ignored for now. !lll Overall hours: TI1at adds ·The catch is that the same sports up to 71 hours of coverage on a are on NBC's primetime .. HDTV typical weekday, if you count the won't be showing them until afterrenins. Overall, NBC says it will ward. have 1,210 hours over seven chanThings will be easier in 2008, nels; in 2000, it had 441.5 hours Ebersol says, with every sport over three channels. shown in high-definition.

19210 hours of1V · and cable time. Compare that to the 19 76 Olympics, which totaled 76.5 hours. 100,000 feet of fiber optic and triax cable. That's almost (but not quite) the length of the original marathon run.

And finally.- $1 bmion. That's how much trade paper Variety says NBC could gross for its Olympic ad spots, which are going for as much as $700,000 per 30 seconds. The direct profits are mild; the network paid almost $800 million for rights, Variety says, and also has production expenses. Still, the Olympics could provide a boost for many of NBC's assets, from Today to the cable networks to the upcoming fall lineup.


H4

THURSDA~AUGUST12,2004

THE CINCINNATI ENQUIRER

OLYMPICS

After the athletes march and the flame is lit, after the ceremony is over and the doves fly free ... what then? In the end, the Olympic Games of Athens- ariy Olympics, for that matter~ n1ust be remembered for their moments and their feats. Looking for an alternative to spending time at the golf course or swimming pool this month? Here are ...

Michael Phelps is competingJ()r the United States- and for an important place in history.

Michael Phelps All he wants is history. Meaning eight victories in swimming to outdo the gold-medal binge of Mark Spitz in 1972. Spitz's remarkable accomplishment has gone unchallenged for three decades, but Phelps has made it his mission. The U.S. swimming trials, when Phelps lost to fellow world recordbreaking Yanks in two events, clearly suggested how difficult that mission will be in Athens. Phelps will need to find a way in the next month to get past his own countryrrien, but the showdown everyone is waiting for is in the 200 freestyle, when Phelps faces Australian manfish, Ian Thorpe.

Shot put

Rulon Gardner

He was the miracle man in Sydney. 'Tbe small-town giant who convinced millions of Americans that yes, there actually is something called Greco-Roman wrestling. Gardner's defeat of the unbeatable Russian mountain Aleksandr Karelin was the upset of the Olympics in 2000. He becmne an instant hero. Then bad things began to happen. A snowmobile mishap in 2002 leffhim stranded in the snow. Tiw frostbite he suffered led to the amputation of a toe. He was thrown from a motorcycle this year- not weruing a helmet on his famous head- and then injured his wrist playing pickup basketball. Ah, well. He'll be back to the safer world of wrestling soon, trying to defend one of the least likely g-old medals in histozy.

The 100-meter dash This is always a signature moment of track and :field, crowning the fastest man in the world. Only thing is, the current fastest man in the world won't be there. Tim Montgomery's world record has long since been tarnished by steroid allegations, and he dicin't even make it out of the U.S. Olympic trials. But there is always a stozy in this race, and defending champion Maurice Greene is a good place to start. The GOAT tattoo on his arm- Greatest of All Tnne -leaves him little margin for

This will not just be big guys and gals throwing ru·ound a heavy ball. Well, yes it will, but they will be doing it on the hallowed grounds of Olympia. It is the only competition scheduled for the site of the original ancient games. Even the ghosts will be watching. Besides that, the men's shot put is an American stronghold, and the United States has an outside chance to sweep the medals.

The

closest

thing to the Yan-

Men's basketball

The Dream Team was of another age and another generation. Now most of the top American stars stay home to get married, raise babies, heal bodies, face felonies, avoid terrorists and play golf. And any number of teams - lithuania, Serbia and Montenegro, Argentina·- have no fear of the USA Tim Duncan and Allen Iverson are still going, and Lany Brown is a coach who doesn't lose much. But if the Americans ru·e to a'l!'enge the humiliation of the sixth-place finish in the world championships and avoid their :first Olympic loss since the NBA began sending players, the new wave will have to produce. The stage is open for LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony and Emeka Okafor.

Softball

Associated Press file

Marion Jones

She remains to this day officially uncharged in the drug scandal that has engulfed American track and :field like a grass :fire. But clearly, she has been caught in the undertow, and unless things chru1ge at the last moment, the queen of2000 will only be in the long jump. A gold medal there · would be an emotionally charged ru1swer to the rigors of motherhood, the toll of time, ru1d the turmoil and allegations around her.

Will guard Allen Iverson be The Answer- or part of the problemfor the U.S. men's basketball team coached by his old friend Larry Brown?

kees-Red Sox in the Olympics? The U.S. vs. Australia in women's softball. TI1e Americans lost to the Aussies in the early rounds in Sydney, then stormed back to win the gold medal. Later, they edged Australia 4-3 in the world championships. The United States just :finishedasummertour54-0, butin the end, it will probably still have to beat Australia again. And the .Americans have another cause now, too. The wife of Coach Mike Candrea suddenly died of a brain aneurysm during the tour in July. Lisa Fernandez and her U.S. teammates are on a roll heading into the Games.

Marion Jones has faced hurdles on and off the track on her way to Athens.

Associated Press file

Women's soccer Her name is on the back ofjerseys worn by little girls everywhere. Mia Hrunm. Athens is her farewell to international competition, and probably the same for Brandi Chastain, Julie Foudy, Joy Fawcett and Kristine Lilly. TI1ey have been at the cen-· ter of the American emergence as a soccer powerhouse with the 1996 gold medal and 1999 World Cup (Chastain .. sports bra ... you remember). They settled for the silver in 2000 and third place in the 2003 World Cup, but this is the chance for one last gold medal bow.

Associated Press file

Mia Hamm & Company have been America's true Dream Tream.

Gymnastics Know how many medals the American women gymnasts won in Sydney? None. What in the name of Mary Lou Retton was going on? . The U.S. team aims for better days in Athens, with a mixed bag of kids and geezers. Teenager Courtney Kupets has already had to fight back from an Achilles tendon injury and could be one of the darlings. But there are also vaulters Mohini Bhardwaj, 25, and Annia Hatch, 26. Bhardwaj has received :financial support from actress Pamela Anderson. Hatch used to compete for Cuba.

Marathon

You know the legend. When the Greeks defeated the Persians in the battle of Marathon in 490 B.C., a runner nruned Phidippides was dispatched to cany the news to Athens. He ran 26 miles, delivered the news, then collapsed and died. Some fuddy-duddy historians now question details of the legend. But no matter. The competitors in these games- the women on one Sunday, the men on the next- will start near the battle site and end in Athens, following Phidippides' supposed route. . Two things are likely- none of them will die and the winner in the men's race will be from Africa.

i


OLYMPICS·

THE CINCINNATI ENQUIRER

THURSDAY, AUGUST 12, 2004 HS

Chart local athletes as they compete

Don't worry, athletes will prevail again tJ.ring the second week of the 1988 Olympics

in Seoul, South Korea, an Australian man sat at the bar of a nightclub in the Itaewon section of the city and nearly had his throat slit by the barmaid. It was no accident It was like something from an "Indiana]ones" movie. I saw it all. The guy was deep into his umpteenth barley malt. His tongue was connected to his brain, which was dialed into his beers, which weren't helping him think clearly. He started berating the woman behind the bar. He didn't stop for 45 minutes. He didn't stop, in fact, until the Korean barmaid calmly grabbed an r-~==--'"1 empty bottle of OB, the local brew, and slammed it on the bar. Pieces of glass orbited the room. By the time the shards settled, the barmaid Paul holding Daugherty. was the neck of what remained of the bottle. Specifically, she' was holding it underneath the Aussie's chin. There is fear. And there is the jagged edge of a broken beer bottle aimed at your carotidartery. Ifs always something at the Olympics, because we are always human, never more so than at the Summer Games, where a cross-section of the world gathers to compete in a cauldron of rivalry, nationalism, jingoism and pride. It brings out the best and worst in all of us. I don't know what to make of this Olympics. I'm going with a · . sense of wonder leavened by a trickle of dread. This is my sixth Olympics. I have learned not to preconceive. An open mind and a mother's patience are as important as a working cell phone. Because I have been advised not to look like an American, I'm foregoing the backpack bearing the logo of the FlYing Pig Marathon. I'm not wearing Gap-or· 8hampion 'OrEddie· Bauer. I have a hat, sent to me by a soldier-friend serving in Iraq, that bears the words "Operation Iraqi Freedom" across its bill. I · won't be taking that. I'm not sure what this advice means, 'don't dress like an American.' I only know I gave up my lederhosen long ago, and I surrendered the burqas when the guys on the playground started laughing at me. On the eve of the Athens Games, I also know this: TI1e athletes will save it. TI1ey always do. · It is :fitting that those with the winged feet, the hydraulic arms and backs, the iron :fists, and the ability to .fly, if only briefly, should save us from ourselves. They'll march into the Olympic Stadium Friday night bearing the hopes of relatives, friends, lovers and nations, and they will captivate our spirit for the next 17 days. Their burdens will be heayy. They'll bear them lightly. The great majority of them have given up something to get to tl1is point. That includes every Greater Cincinnatian that is competing. We long. for our jocks to be more like we are. We yearn for them to possess the same sense and sensibilities, to understand the way we do how the world works. Well, here they are. The rower Bryan Volpenhein works at Home Depot. The gymnast Mohini Bhardwaj waited tables. Greg Ruckman, another rower, is a 30-year-old Harvard graduate who has put off making his fortune for another chance at something priceless. This is his second Olympics. Why?

Hall Jr.

Go online throughout the Olympics for: II Blogs from three of our local Olympians: Nate Dusing, Kelly Sal chow and Jason Parker and from the Enquirers Paul Daugherty II Video and photo galleries II Live resuits, updates and medal counts ·11 Profiles of local athletes 'There is nothing I will ever do," he said simply, "that compares to the Olympics." They are 22 or 24 or 25 now. They have been planning for this monlent their whole lives. "Nine or 100:' says John Ketchum, father of Dan, 22, potential medalist in the 4x200 meter freestyle relay. Nine or 10 is when Dan first voiced the notion he'd like to, one day, give the Olympics a try. . How many of us have said . that?.A lot more than have done it. Ron Siler Jr. has made it. He has overcome the world to get to the Games, and now he will box the world for a chance to show the world what you can do when discipline breaks bread with talent and opportunity. Siler always had boxing, even when he had nothing else. His bookend buddy is Rau'Shee Warren, all of17 years old, the youngest American boxer. Warren's Olympic life is only beginning. . Every picture tells a story, which is why we should watch soccer defender Heather Mitts --and synchronized swimmer-- .' Becky Jasontek. · . Mitts is calendar-girl hand- ' some. If the U.S. women reach the medal round as expected, :figure her face to light up your TV. Jasontek's might not; synchronized swinlming is a fringe event, even at the Olympics. But courage never exists on the edges. J asontek ruptured an ovarian cyst :five years ago. She almost died. To her, competing is an expression of life. As it should be for all of us. Ruckman has spent some hours studying the prevailing winds off the Aegean Sea. They are expected to lash the rowing venue every afternoon. The competition is supposed to begin early each day and end before tile wind kicks up. But TV might have other ideas. "Just about every middle of the day is unrowable," Ruckman says. He has an idea to fix this: 'They should race every night at midnight, when the water is flat. Bring all the cars up to the · course and have them turn their lights on." Failing that, the rowers will just have to bail the water from fueir boats. Nobody said being an Olympian was a day at the beach. Unless he played beach volleyball. ' They will overcome. Overcoming is a permanent Olympic · condition. · · Watch the Games. Celebrate those who would show us the best of ourselves. And stay away from barmaids bearipg beer bottles. E-mail pdaugherty@enquirer-

.com

Jason McKittrick

Age:29

Local tie: Born in

{alternate) Age: 30

Cincinnati in 19 74

Local tie: Milan

Residence: Miami Beach Events: 50-meter freestyle; 4x100-

(Ind.) High grad Residence: Holton, Ind. Event: RecUive Competition dates: Aug. 16-21 •won't compete unless an athlete withdraws.

Competition dates:

. Sport: Shooting Age:30 -local tie: Xavier University graduate Residence: Fort Benning, Ga.

Event: 4xlOO-rneter freestyle relay Competition date: Aug.15: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

Event: 4x200-meter freestyle relay Competition date: Aug. 17: -'---------'-------~-

Event: 10-meter air rifle Competition date: Aug. 16: ----,------~--------~

Sport: Rowing Competition dates:_ Age: 30 Aug. 16 (heat):._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ local tie: Walnut HillsHigh and UC graduate Aug.17 (second-chance qualifier): _ _ _ _ _ _ __ Residencif:·Princeton,'NJ.=-- --- ~ --o·-· oAug;-2Q(final}:--'----'-~"-"--'--::...;.;;.~:.;;..;;:;_~.:::.::c.....:::c:;-'-'-' Event: Quadruple sculls

Sport: Rowing Age:24 local tie: St. Xavier High graduate Residence: Princeton, N.J. Event: Lightweight four

Competition dates: Aug. 15 (heat):------=-------~---Aug. 17 (second-chance qualifier): _ _;...__ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ Aug. 19 (semifinal):-----,------,------'----Aug. 22 (final):-------------~-

Sport: Boxing .Age: 17 local tie: Harmony Community School student Residence: Cincinnati Event: Light flyweight (106 pounds)

Competition dates: Aug.18 (fi(~t round):-::----------'---Aug. 21 (second r o u n d ) : - - - - - - - - - - Aug. 24 (quarterfinal): _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ AUg. 27 (semifinal):-------.,-----Aug. 29 (final):----------'----~

SCHEDULE FOR TRISTATE OLYMPIANS Aug.u

Aug.16

Heather Mitts, women's soccer vs. Greece (11 a.m.)

Jason Parker, 10-meter air rifle shooting (5 a.m. qualifications, 8 a.m. final)

a.m.) Bryan Volpenhein, men's eight rowing second-chance qualifier (3:20a.m.)

Aug.17

Aug.18

Mohini Bhardwaj, women's gym·nastics team final (2 p.m.) · Dan Ketchum, 4x200-meterfreestyle swimming relay (4:45 a.m. heat, 1:46 p.m. final) · Heather Mitts •. women's soccer vs. Australia (11 a.m.) Greg Ruckman, lightweight double sculls rowing second-chance qualifier (2 a.m.) Kelly Salchow, quadruple sculls rowing second-chance qualifier (2:50a.m.) Ron Siler, flyweight boxing first round (6:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m,) PatTodd, lightweight four rowing second-chance qualifier (2:40

Rau'Shee Warren, light flyweight boxing first round (6:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m.)

Heather Mitts, women's soccer vs. Brazil (11 a.m.)

Sport: Archery

Aug. 15 (relay) Aug. 19 (50 meters)

Sport: Swimming Age:22 Local tie: Sycamore High graduate Reside11ce: Ann Arbor, Mich.

Aug.14

Sport: Swimming

meter relay

Sport: Swimming Age:25 Local tie: Covington Catholic High grad Residence: Austin, Texas

Go online

OTHERS TO WATCH Gary

Nate Dusing

Aug.15

Mohini Bhardwaj, women's gymnastics team qualifications (3 a.m., 6:30a.m., 10 a.m:, 2 p:m.) Nate Dusing, 4x100-meter freestYle swimming relay (5:10a.m. heat, 1:55 p.m. final) Greg Ruckman, lightweight double sculls rowing heat (2 a.m.) Kelly Salchow, quadruple sculls rowing heat (3:10 a.m.) Pat Todd, lightweight four rowing heat (2:40 a.m.) Bryan Volpenhein, men's eight rowing heat (4:20a.m.)

. I

Aug.19

Greg Ruckman, lightweight dou- . bl~ sculls rowing semifinals (1:50 a.m., 2:50 a.m.) Pat Todd, lightweight four rowing semifinals (2:10a.m.) Aug. 20

.

Heather Mitts, women's soccer · quarterjinals (11 a.m.)

Aug.22

Mohini Bhardwaj, women's vault · final (1:35 p.m.) Greg Ruckman, lightweight double sculls rowing final (1:50 a.m.) Kelly Salchow, quadruple sculls rowing final (2:30 a.m.) Pat Todd, lightweight four rowing final (2:10 a.m.) Bryan Volpenhein, men's eight rowing final (3:30 a.m.) Aug.23

Heather Mitts, women's soccer semifinals (11 a.m., 2 p.m.)._ Aug.24

Rau'Shee Warren, light flyweight · boxing quarterfinals (12:30 p.m.)·

Aug.21

Aug.25

Ron Siler, flyweight boxing second round (6:30a.m.) Rau'Shee Warren, light flyweight boxing first round (12:30 p.m.)

Ron Siler, flyweight boxing quarterfinals (12:30 p.m.) Aug. 26.

Becky Jasontek, synchronized

swimming team technical routine (12:30 p.m.) · Heather Mitts, women's soccer medal matches (11 a.m., 2 p.m.) Aug.27

Becky Jasontek, synchronized swimming team free routine . (12:30 p.m.) Ron Siler, flyweight boxing semi. finals (6:30a.m.) Rau'Shee Warren, light flyweight boxing semifinals (12:30 p.m.) ·Aug: 28

Ron Siler, flyweight boxing final (12:30 p.m.) . ·Aug.29

Rau'Shee Warren, light flyweight boxing final (6:30a.m.) For ah updated Tristate Scorecard, go to Cincinnati. Com. Keyword: Olympics .

<· .\

.

.

.

_.:..._..~~_-;..._....._.~._.- ....,...-...,.-,_,."-.__.-·,---....~~...,~-_..._....._..,_~.-...--, . ......,__--..~-... ~~,_.-_..,__.,~....._....."""'".~~.....,""""'.......---...~·.... -~-~......_.,;:.;;~....:>,....._~·--.c... ..-~~r........r~-·-'~


H6 THURSDAY, AUGUST 12, 2004

MED

PICKS

By The Associated Press

BASKETBALL WOMEN Gold - United States; Silver- Russia Bronze - Australia MEN Gold - United States; Silver- lithuania Bronze - Argentina BOXING 106 pounds (48 kg)

Gold - Serguei Kazakov, Russia Sliver- Zou Shiming, China Bronze- Yan Bartelimi, Cuba 132 pounds (60 kg)

Gold - Mario Kindelan, Cuba Silver- Pichai Sayotha, Thailand Bronze- Vicente Escobedo, United States 152 pounds (69kg) .

Gold- Lorenzo Aragon, Cuba Silver- SherzodHusanov, Uzbekistan .Bronze- Ruslan.Khairov, Azerbaijan 165 pounds (75 kg)

Go.ld ~Andre Dirrell, United States Silver- Yordanis Despaigne, Cuba Bronze- Gennadi Golovkin, Kazakhstan 201 pounds (91 kg)

.

Gold - Alexandre Alexseev, Russia · Silver- Odlanier Solis, Cuba Bronze - Steffen Kretschmann, Germany CYCLING MEN

THE CINCINNATI ENQUIRER

OLYMPICS

ARCHERY

MEDAL PICKS

WHERE: Panathinaiko Stadium. WHEN: Aug.J5-21. MEDALS: Men's and women's individual and team competitions. OUTLOOK: Archery competition will be at stadium where llie first modem Olympic Games were held in 1896. Soulli Korea won men's and women's team competitions in 2000, and swept llie podiiun in women's individual. Italy bOasts . some top men's archers . Jennifer Nichols is llie top U.S. woman, while 2000 silver medalist Vic Wunderle is back for llie U.S. men. ·

cont. 100 Butterfly Gold~ ian Crocker, United States Silver- Michael Phelps, United States Bronze- Igor Marchenko, Russia

'

200 Individual Medley

Gold - Michael Phelps, United States Silver- Thiago Pereira, Brazil Bronze- Jani Sievinen, Finland 400 Individual Medley

Gold - Michael Phelps, United States Sliver- Alessio Bogglatto, Italy Bronze -laszio Cseh; Hungary

BADMINTON

400 Free Relay

WHERE: Goudi Olympic Hall. WHEN: Aug: 14-21. MEDALS: Men's singles, men's doubles, women's singles, women's doubles, mixed doubles. OUTLOOK: In a sport dominated by athletes from Asia, Denmark and llie Netherlands, olliers also have medal hopes. China has three of the world's top five men (as of late June), the top three women in the singles competition and llie two top-ranked women's doubles pairs. Denmark has the top men's doubles team. The United States will be represented by one men's doubles pair, Howard -·Bach and Kevin Han.

Gold - United States; Silver- Australia Bronze -Italy 400 Medley Relay

Gold - United States; Silver Australia Bronze - Ukraine 800 Free Relay

Gold -Australia; Silver- United States Bronze -Italy WOMEN 50 Freestyle

Gold -lnge de Bruijn, Netherlands Silver- Lisbeth Lenton, Australia Bronze- Michelle Engelsman, Australia 100 Freestyle

Sprint

Gold - Laurent Gane, France Silver- Thea Bos, Netherlands Bronze- Matthias John, Germany Gold -Jan Ullrich, Germany Silver -Tyler Hamilton, United/States BRONZE- Paolo Bettini, Italy., . Mountain biking

Gold - Filip Meirhaeghe, Belgium Silver.:. Miguel Martinez, France Bronze - Bart Bren~ens, Netherlands WOMEN sprint

Gold - Anna Meares, Australia · Silver- Svetlana Grankovskaya, Russia Bronze -Jennie Reed, United States Mountain biking

Springboard

Gold - Dmitry Sautin, Russia Silver- Peng Bo, China Bronze - Aleksandr Dobroskok, Russia Platform

Gold - Tian Liang, China Silver- Alexandre Despatie, Canada Bronze - Hu Jia, China Springboard Synchronized

Gold -Russia; Silver- China Bronze - United States Platform Synchronized

Gold -China; Silver- Australia Bronze -Russia WOMEN Springboard

Silver- Guo Jingjing, China Gold - Wu Minxia, China Bronze - Yuiia Pakhalina, Russia Platform

Gold - Emilie Heymans, Canada Silver- Li Na, China Bronze - Laura Wilkinson, United States Springboard Synchronized

Gold -China; Silver·· Russia Bronze -Australia Platform Synchronized

Gold -China; Silver- Canada Bronze -Australia GYMNASTICS MEN Team

Gold- 'china; Silver- United States Bronze - Romania All-Around

Gold -Paul Hamm, United States Silver -Yang Wei, China Bronze- Marian Dragt;lescu, Romania WOMEN Team ·

Gold - Romania; Silver- United States Bronze - China · .All-Around

Gold - Svetlana Khorkina, Russia Silver - Courtney Kupets, United States Bronze- Daniela Sofronie, Romania SOCCER MEN Gold- Italy; Silver- Argentina Bronze - Portugal WOMEN Gold- United States; Silver- Germany Bronze - Sweden SWIMMING MEN ,

Gold -Gary Hall Jr., United States Silver- Alexander Popov, Russia Bronze- Roland Schoeman, South Africa 100 Free

Gold- P. van den Hoogenband, Nthrlnds. Silver- Jason Lezak, United States Bronze- ian Thorpe, Australia .

200 Free.

Gold - ian Thorpe, Australia Silver- Michael Phelps, United States Bronze - Grant Hackett, Australia 400 Free

Gold -ian Thorpe, Australia Silver- Grant Hackett, Australia · Bronze - Klete Keller, United States ·

WHERE: HOSC Indoor Arena, OAKA Olympic Indoor Halt WHEN: Aug. 15-28 . MEDALS: Gold, silver and bronze awarded to players, but not coaches; from top lliree . teams. · · OUTLOOK: The United States is a perennial favorite, but many ofllie best American players willidrew from llie team or turned down invitations. Defending world champion Serbia. and Montenegro and 20Q3 European champion Ulliuania are among llie favorites, and Spain .and Argentina will field strong, experienced teams. ·

200 Freestyle

Gold - Franziska van Almsick, Germany Silver- Melanie Marshall, Britain Silver- Petria Thomas, Australia Lisa Leslie wi II

400 Freestyle

lead a women's basketball team looking for a third straight gold medal.

Gold - Camelia Potec, Romania Silver- Hannah Stockbauer, Germany Bronze- Kaitlin Sandeno, United States

Associated Press file

800 Freestyle

Gold - Sanchiko Yamada, Japan Silver- Diana Munz, United States Bronze - Kalyn Keller, United States 100 Bacl<stroke

Gold - Natalie Coughlin, United States Silver- Reiko Nakamura, Japan Bronze- Anije Buschschulte, Germany

BASKETBAll-WOMEN'S.

Gold - Gunn-Rita Dahle, Norway Silver .-Alison Sydor, Canada Bronze - Sabine Spitz, Germany DIVING MEN

. 50-Meter Freestyle

Gold - Lisbeth Lenton, Australia Silver- lnge de·.Bruijn, Netherlands Bronze- Natalie Coughlin, United States

BASKETBAU.-MEN'S

Road time trial

1,500 Free

Gold - Grant Hackett, Australia Silver- Larsen Jensen, United States Bronze - David Davies, Britain · 100 Backstroke

Gold -Aaron Peirsol, United States Silver- Lenny Kray.zelburg, United States Bronze- Matt Welsh, Australia 200 Back

Gold- Aaron Peirsol, United States Silver- Gregor Tait, Britain Bronze- Bryce Hunt, United States 100 Breaststroke

Gold- Brendan Hansen, United States Silver - Kosuke Kitajima, Japan Bronze- Darren Mew, Britain 200 Breast

. Gold - Brendan Hansen, United States Silver- Kosuke Kltajima, Japan Bronze- Jim Piper, Australia

_WHERE: Preliminary games at Helliniko Indoor Arena; medal rounds at OAKA Olympic Indoor Hall. WHEN: Aug. 14, i6, 18, 20, 22, 2425, 27-28. MEDALS: Team competition. OUTLOOK: Twelve teams divided into two pools of siX compete in preliminary rounds, willi llie top four finishers in each round advancing to the medal round. The United States won llie last two gold medals and is favored again willi Olympic veterans Usa Leslie, Sheryl Swoopes and Dawn Staley and rising young star Diana Taurasi. Many of llie top foreign players in llie WNBA will compete for llieir home colintries, including Lauren Jackson and Penny Taylor for Australia, and Svetlana Abrosimova and Elena Baranova for Russia. The United States is 34-3 in Olympic competition willi. 17 straight victories. ·

200 Fly

Gold - Michael Phelps, United States Silver- Takeshi Matsuda, Japan Bronze- Justin Norris, Australia

teams, in two groups of six. There are 10 women's squads, in two five-team groups. TI1e Nellierlands, which won llie men's gold medal in Sydney, is one of llie top tean1s in Pool B, along willi eight-time gold medalist India and Australia, which won bronze in 2000. Germany is a power in men's Pool A, along willi three-time gold medalist Pakistan. On llie women's side, Australia won gold at last two Olympics. The United States did not qualify. ·

OUTLOOK: Mountain- Belgium's Filip Meirhaeghe and Norway's Gunn-Rita Dahle will be heavily favored to win individual medals. Canada has probably the best deplli top-tobottom in llie women's field. The United States is sending only one women's rider to Alliens. Road- American men's side will be williout Lance Armstrong, who declined an invitation. Track - France, Britain and Australia each won five medals at lliis year's world championships. And llie Russian women, led by Olga _Slyusareva and Svetlana Grankovskaya, figure to be strong; 2000 sprint gold winner Marty Nollistein is the lonereturningmedalistforllie United States.

GYMNASTICS

200 Bacl<stroke

Gold - Reiko Nakamura, Japan Silver- Stanislava Komarova, Russia Bronze - Katy Sexton, Britain 100 Breaststroke

Gold - Leisel Jones, Australia Silver- Amanda Beard, United States Bronze- Brooke Hanson, Australia 200 Breaststroke

Gold ~Amanda Beard, United States Silver- Leisel Jones, Australia Bronze - Hui Qi, China 100 Butterfly

Gold - Petria Thomas, Australia Silver- lnge de Bruijn, Netherlands Bronze- Martina Moravcova, Slovakia

WHERE: Olympic Indoor Hall. WHEN: AJ.lg. 14-19, 22-24. MEDALS: Men's and worn-· 200 Buftterfly en's team. Men's and women's all-around. DIVING Gold - Petria Thomas, Australia Men's .floor exercise, still rings, pommel Silver- Otylia Jedrejczak, Poland WHERE: Olympic Aquatic Center (Indoor horse, parallel bars, high bar, vault. WornBronze - Yuko Nakanishi, Japan . Pool). WHEN: Aug.14, 16, 20..28. MEDALS: · en's floor exerci~e, balance beam, uneven 200 Individual Medley Men compete in 3-meter springboard, 10m bars, vault. BEACH-VOll~BAll Gold -Amanda Beard, United States · platform, 3m synchronized and 10m synchro- · OUTLOOK: For the first time at Olympics, Silver- Alice Mills, Allstralia WHERE: Peace and Friendship Stadium. nized. Women compete in 3-meter spring- men's and women's teams must select three Bronze- Katie Hoff, United States WHEN: Women's pool play Aug. 14-19, round board, 10m platform,. 3m syn<;:]1ronized and ofllieirsix alliletes to compete on each event 400 IndividUal Medley · of 16 Aug. 20..21, quarterfirials Aug. 22, seini- 10m synchrornzed. · ·· in finals, and all lliree scores will count, leavGold - Katie Hoff, United States :finals Aug. 23, and medal matches Aug. 24. OUTLOOK: The Chinese are llie sport's ing no room for error. In the past, five or six . · Silver- Yana Klochkova; Ukraine Men's pool play Aug.14-19, round of 16 dominantcountry,winningarecord:fivegold athleteswouldgoandthelowestscorewould Bronze - Kaitlin Sandeno, United States Aug. 20..21, quarterfinals Aug. 22, semifinals medals in Sydney. The only non-Chinese be dropped. U.S. women won gold at world 400 Frees~le Relay Aug. 23 and medal matches Aug. 25. MED· winner was American Laura Wilkinson, who · championships last year, and men won silGold -United States; Silver- Australia ALS: Women's and men's team·competition. pulled off a stunning upset in platform and is ver. Bolli are expected to be in llie medal Bronze- Germany OUTLOOK: For each gender, the field con- back to defend her title. The top U.S. male is hunt again. China, Japan, Russia and 400 Medley Relay · sistsof12teamssplitintotwopools.Thetop Troy Dumais, who willcompete in spring- Romania have strongmen's and women's Gold -United States; Silver- China four from each pool advance to quarterfinals board and team willi brother Justin in syn- teams. Women's all-around should be the Bronze - Australia to begin llie medal round. The U.S. women, chronized. highlight ofllie individual competitions. Rus800 Frees~le Relay nowrankedsecondintheworld,haveagood sian Svetlana Khorkina will be one to Gold - United States; Silver- Australia chance to capture first gold but face tough watch, her final major intemational Bronze - China pool lliat includes top-ranked China, threecompetition. SYNCRONIZED SWIMMING time defending gold medalistCuba and 2000 Duet silver medalist Russia. On llie men's side, TEAM HANDBAll Gold -Russia; Silver- Japan Serbia and Montenegro is back to defend Bronze - United States gold from 2000. Brazil and Italy headline WHERE: Sports Pavilion at th€1 FaTeam Pool B, in which llie sixtlHanked Arllerilire Coastal Zone Olyrnpic Gold -Russia; SilverJapan cans are hoping to make up for a disapComplex; and Indoor Arena at Bronze - United States pointing showing in Sydney. llie Helliniko Olympic Complex. WHEN: TENNIS Aug. 14-24, 26-29. MEDALS: Men's and womMEN CANOE/KAYAK . en's team competition. Singles OUTLOOK: After sweeping all medals in . Gold -Andy Roddick, United States. WHERE: Schinias Olympic Rowing and Sydney, European teams should again Silver- Roger Federer, Switzerland dominate. Russia, llie reigning men's Canoeing Cenlre for flatwater sprints and Bronze - David Nalbandian, Argentina Olympic champion, is. grouped \villi llie Helliniko Olympic Complex for whiteWOMEN · Spain (2000 bronze medalist) and water slalom. WHEN: Aug.17-20 (slalom) Singles Croatia (2003 world champion). On and Aug. 23-28 (sprint). MEDALS: Men Gold- Serena Williams, United States the women's side, 2003 world compete in nine flatwater sprints- kayak Silver- Amelie Mauresmo, France champion France is grouped single and pair at 500 meters and 1,000 Bronze- Venus Williams, United States meters, canoe single and pair at 500 willi 2000 gold medalist DenSOFTBALL mark TI1e United States did and 1,000 meters, and kayak four Gold - United States; Silver- Australia ·not qualify. at 1,000 meters. Men's whiteBronze -Japan water slalom events are the TRACK ANID FI!OLD kayalc single, canoe sinJUDO MEN gle and canoe pair. 100 Meters Women compete in WHERE: Ano Uossia Olyn1pic Gold - Maurice Greene, United States three flatwater sprints Hall. WHEN: Aug. 14-20. MEDALS: SilverShawn Crawford, United States Brothers Justin Dumais (front) - kayalc single, kayak Men's weight classes- 60 kg, 66 kg, Bronze - Asafa Powell, Jamaica and Troy Dumais will team pair and kayak four, all 73 kg, 81 kg, 90 kg, 100 kg, lOOkg-plus. 200 Meters up insynchronized springat 500 meters. Women Women's weight classes- 48 kg, 52 kg, Gold- Stephane Buckland, Mauritania have one whitewater slalom event - kayak board diving for the U.S. 57 kg, 63 kg, 70 kg, 78 kg, 78 kg-plus. Silver- Justin Gatlin, I'Jnited States single. . OUTLOOK: Introduced as an Olympic Bronze- Kostas Kenteris, Greece OUTLOOK: Manmade Helliniko venue sport in 1964; M country has dominated but . 400 Meters pumps in water from the nearby Mediterra- · FENCING Gold -Alleyne Francique, Grenada llie Japanese are always strong. nean Sea, making it the first Olympic whiteTirisyear will be no exception with six,. Silver- Jeremy Wariner, United States water course to use saltwater. That makes WHERE: Helliniko Fencing Hall. WHEN: Bronze - Otis Harris, United States llie boats more buoyant and causes more eye . ·Aug. 14-22. MEDALS: Individual- men's and time world champion Ryoko Tani reti.tming · to defend her gold medal in llie 48 kg weight 800 Meters irritation from splashing; also creates more ·women's epee, foil and saber. Team- men's Gold- Wilfred Bungei, Kenya foam, making it more difficult for paddlers to epee, men's foil, men's saber, women's foil. class .. Jimmy Pedro, whose bronze in 1996 was Silver- Wilson Kipketer, Denmark judge water surlace. OUTLOOK: Italy's Valentina Vezzali has Bronze- Hezekiel Sepeng, South Africa lliree golds and one silver in individual and the last American medal, qualified in 73 kg; · · 1,500 Meters. he retired in 2000 but returned in 2003. team women's foil in llie past two Olympics; CYCliNG Gold- Rashid Ramzi, Bahrain . and should add to her total in Alliens. The Silver- Hachem El Guerrouj, Morocco Americans, who have not won a medal in MODERN PENTATHlON WHERE: Velodrome, Alliens Olympic fencing since 1984, have llieir best chance in B.ronze - Mehdi Baala, France Sports Complex (track); Parnitha Olympic women's saber, where sisters Sada and Emi5,000 Meters -wHERE: Olympic Modem .Pentathlon Mountain Bike Venue, in Mount Parnillia ly Jacobson, and Marie! Zagunis are all Gold - Kenenisa Bekele, Ethiopia (mountaill bike); Vouliag!neni Olympic ranked in llie top 10. TI1e single-elimination Centre at llie Goudi Olympic Complex. Silver- Eliud Kipchoge, Kenya Centre (road time trials); downtown Athens format can produce unforeseen medalists in WHEN: Aug. 26 (men), Aug. 27 (women). Bronze- Sileshi Sihine; Ethiopia MEDALS: Men's and women's competition. 10,000 Meters willi start-finish at Kotzia Square (road individual competition. · OUTLOOK: The five-sport discipline created ·races). WHEN: Aug.l4-15, 18 (road); Aug. 20.. Gold- Kenenisa Bekele, Ethiopia by modem Olympics founder Pierre de Cou25 (track);Aug. 27-28 (mountain bilce). MEDSilver- Haile Gebrselassie, Ethiopia bertin was introduced in 1912. fiElD HOCKEY , Bronze- John Korir, Kenya ALS: mountain- medals for men and women; Womellt competed for llie first time in · 3,000-Meter Steeplechase road - men's and women's road race and men's and women's time trials; track- time WHERE: OlympicHockeyCentreatHellini- 2000. Alliletes compete in shooting, fencing, Gold Ezekiel Kemboi, Kenya Silver- Wesley Kipruto, Kenya trial, sprint, individual pursuit and points ko Olympic Complex. WHEN: Aug. 14-27. swimming, horseback riding and finish \villi race are for men and women; team pursuit, · MEDALS: 'Men's and women's team competi· a cross-country run. Eastem European men Bronze - Paul Koech, Kenya have won all indi~dual medals past three Oc madison and keirin races are contested by tion. · 110-Meter Hurdles ·men only. OUTLOOK: The men's field consists of 12 lympics. Gold- A. Johnson. U.S.; Silver- L. Xiimg, China; Bronze- T. Trammell, U.S.

V'

. 'i


THE CINCINNATI ENQUIRER

TI-IURSDAY, AUGUST 12, 2004 H7

OLYMPICS

. MEDAL PICKS

MEDAL PICKS cont.

cont. TRACK AND FIELD MEN 400-Meter Hurdles Gold "Felix Sanchez, Dominican Republic Silver- James Carter, United States Bronze -Angelo Taylor, United States High Jump· Gold - Grzegorz Sposob, Poland Silver- Stefan Holm, Sweden Bronze -Jacques Freitag, South Africa Pole Vault · Gold -Toby Stevenson, United States Silver- Timothy Mack, United States Bronze -.Dmitri Markov, Australia Long Jump Gold -Dwight Phillips, United States Silver- Hussein TaherAI-Sabee, S. Arabia Bronze -Walter Davis, United States Triple Jump Gold -Christian Olsson, Sweden Silver- Jadel Gregorio, Brazil Bronze - Melvin Lister, United States Shot Put Gold -Adam Nelson, United States Silver- John Godina, United States Bronze - Reese Hoffa, United States ( Discus Gold- Vlrgilijus Alekna, Lithuania Silver- ·Robert Fazekas, Hungal}' Bronze - Gerd Kanter, Estonia Javelin Gold - Breaux Greer, United States Silver- Boris Hen I}', Germany Bronze- Alexandr Ivanov, Russia Hammer Gold ~ Koji Murofushi, Japan Silver- Adrian Ann us, Hungal}' Bronze- Olli-Pekka Karjalainen, Finland Decathlon Gold -Roman Sebrte, Czech Republic Silver- Tom Pappas, United States Bronze - Bl}'an Clay, United States Marathon · Gold -Sammy Korir, Kenya Silver- Jose Rios, Spain Bronze - Paul Tergat, Kenya 20-Kilometer Walk Gold -Jefferson Perez, Ecuador Silver- Robert Korzeniewski, Poland Bronze- Vladimir Stankin, Russia 50-kilometer Walk Gold -Denis Nizhegorodov, Russia Silver- Shucai Xing, China Bronze - Yuchen Han, China 400-Meter Relay Goid - United States Silver -Jamaica Bronze -Germany 1,600-Meter Relay Gold - United States Silver- Jamaica Bronze- Russia WOMEN 100 Meters Gold -Christine Arron, France Silver- LaTasha Colander, United States Bronze- !vet Lalova, Belarus 200 Meters Gold- Veronica Campbell, Jamaica Silver- Allyson Felix, United States Bronze - Yuliya Tabakova, Russia 400 Meters Gold -Ana Guevara, Mexico Silver- T. Williams-Darling, ·Bahamas Bronze- sanya Ridiaras, l.fnited states 800 Meters ' Gold -Maria Mutola, Mozambique· Silver- Tatyana Andria nova, Russi~ Bronze Jolanda Ceplak, Slovakia 1,500 Meters Gold -Olga Yegorova, Russia Silver- Yelena Zadorozhnaya, Russia Bronze - Tatyana Tomashova, Russia 5,000 Meters Gold - Elvan Abeylegesse, Turkey Silver- Ejegayehu Dibaba, Ethiopia Bronze -Jane Wanjiko, Kenya 10,000 Meters Gold - Lydiya Grigol}'eva, Russia Silver- Nataliya Berkut, Ukraine Bronze -Berhane Ad ere, Ethiopia 110-M.eter Hurdles Gold - Perdita Felicien, Canada Silver- Gail De~ers, United States Bronze -Joanna Hayes, United States 400-Meter Hurdles Gold- Sheena Johnson, United States. Silver- Brenda Taylor, United States Bronze - Jana Pittman, Australia High Jump Gold - Hestrie Cloete, South Africa Silver- Yelena Slesarenko, Russia Bronze - Tisha Waller, United States Pole Vault Go!{:. Svetlana Feofanova, Russia Silver- Stacy Dragila, United States Bronze - Yelena lsinbayeva, Russia Long Jump· Gold- Marion Jones, United States Silver- Irina Simagina, Russia Bronze- Tatyana Lebedeva, Russia Triple Jump Gold - Tatyana Lebedeva, Russia Silver- Kene Ndoye, Senegal Bronze - Yamile Aldama, Sudan · Shot Put Gold - Irina Korzhanenko, Russia Silver- Nadezhda Ostapchuk, Belarus Bronze - Nadine Kleinert, Germany Discus · Gold - Natyala SadOVi1, RUS?ia Silver- Ekaterini Voggcili, Greece Bronze - Anastasia Kelesidou, Greece Hammer Gold- Yipsi Moreno, Cuba Silver- ll}'na Sekachova, Russia Bronze - Wenxiu Zhang, China · · Javelin Gold - Osleidys Menendez, Cuba Silver- Nicola Brejchova, Czech Republic Bronze - Steffi Nerius, Germany Heptathlon Gold- Carolina Kluft, Sweden Silver- Kelly Sotherton, Britain Bronze - Svetlana Sokolova, Russia 20-KIIometer Walk Gold - Yelena Nikolayeva, Russia Silver- Elisa Rigaudo, Italy Bronze - Melanie Seeger, Germany ' Marathon Gold- Paula Radcliffe, Brita-in Silver- Margaret Okayo, Kenya Bronze- Catherine Ndereba, Kenya · 400-Meter Relay Gold -Jamaica 1

Silver- United States Bronze - Bahamas 1,600-Meter Relay Gold - United States; Silver- Russia Bronze -Jamaica WEIGHTLIFTING ·American WOMEN weightlifter 106 pounds (48 kg) Tara Gold - Li Zhuo, China Cunningham Silver- Aree Wiratthaworn, Thailand goes for a Bronze - lsabela Dragneva, Bulgaria second 117 pounds (53 kg) straight gold Gold- Udomporn Polsak, Thailand medal Silver- Song Hui Ri, North Korea (105¥2 Bronze - Nurcan Taylan, Turkey 128 pounds (58 kg) pounds) afGold - Aleksandra Klejnowska, Poland ter her sur-· Silver- Aylin Dasdelen, Turkey prisingwin Bronze.- Alexandra Escobar, Ecuador in the 2000 · 139 pounds (63 kg) Olympics in Gold - Natalia Skakun, Ukraine Sydney. Silver- Hanna Batsiusllka, Belarus Bronze - Gergana Kirilova, Bulgaria 152 pounds (69 kg) Gold - Liu Ch unhong, China AssoCiated Silver - Pawina Thongsuk, Thailand Press file Bronze- Ester Krutzler, Hungary -165 pounds (75 kg) Gold- Nahla Ramadan, Egypt Silver- Tatyana Khromova, Kazakhstan Bronze - Slaveyka Ruzhinska, Bulgaria The Americans recovered to win gold. The used at the U.S. Open, which starts Aug. 30, . 165 pounds-plus (75 kg-plus) ·U.S. team's pitching staff of Fernandez, Jen- so that favors Roddick and his 140-150 mph Gold -Tang Gonghong, China WHERE: Schinias Olympic Rowing and Ca- rue Finch, Lori Harrigan and Cat Osterman is serves. TI1e heat might not be 'too much of a Silver- Agata Wrobel, Poland noeing Centre. WHEN: Aug. 14-22 MEDALS: unmatched. Australia, China and Canada will factor for the men, who'll play best-of-threeBronze- Chel}'l Haworth, United States Men compete in single sculls, double sculls, also be in medal hunt This competition is set matches until the singles :final. MEN lightweight double sculls, quadruple ~culls, crucial for the future of women's softball as 123 pounds (56 kg) pairs, fours, lightweight fours and eights an Olympic sport. The roc has only guaranGold - Wu Meijin, China with coxswain. Women's events are single 'teed it a spot through the 2008 Beijing Silver- Vitali Dzerbianiou, Belarus sculls, double sculls, lightweight double Games and will make another review later Bronze- Sedat Artuc, Turkey WHERE: Vouliagmeni Olympic Centre. sculls, quadruple sculls, pairs and eights this summer. · 137 pounds (62 kg) WHEN: Aug. 25 (women), Aug. 26 (men). with coxswain. All races are 2,000 meters. Gold- Halil Mutlu, Turkey . MEDALS: Men's and women's competition. OUTLOOK: U.S. women's eight comes in Silver - Shi Zhiyong, China OUTLOOK: After being shut out in Sydney, having won its last two World Cup events. Bronze - Diego Salazar, Colombia U.S. team appears poised to medal in 2004 Great Britain is defending Olympic champi' 152 pounds (69 kg) and· Sheila Taonnina were Barb Lindquist oninmen'sfourandeight.Inwomen'ssingle WHERE: Olympic Aquatic Center (M:ain Gold -Zhang Guozheng, China ranked No. 1 and No. 2 in the world. Austrasculls, Ekaterina Karsten of Belarus looks to Pool). WHEN: Aug. 14-21. MEDALS: Men com- lia's Silver- Bae-Young Lee, South Korea Loretta Harrop, second to Taormina at repeat gold~medal perfo_rmance fr?m Syd- , pete .in 50 meter, lOOm, 200m, 400m and the world championships in May, should alBronze .: Nikolai Peshalov, Croatia ney. Th~ U~ted States fruled to qu~ boats 1500m freestyle, lOOm and 200m backstroke, so contend. In men's race, New Zealand's 170 pounds (77 kg) for mens smgle sculls and women s double lOOm and 200m breaststroke lOOm and Gold -Sergei Rlimonov, Kazakhstan Bevan Docherty will look to repeat first-place sculls. '_The U.S. r_owing t~am has 15 me:n- 200m !JUtterfly, 200m and 400~ individual .finish at worlds. American Hunter Kemper Silver- Nejad Falahatl, Iran bers wtth Olympic expenence, none wtth medley, 4x100m and 4x200m freestyle relay has risen to No. 5 in world rankings. Bronze - Taner Sagir, Turkey 187 pounds (85 kg) ·medals. and 4x100m medley relay. Women compete Gold- Oleg Perepetchenov, Russia in 50 meter, lOOm, 200m, 400m and 800m Silver - Pyrros Dimas, Greece freestyle, lOOm and 200m backstroke, lOOm Bronze -Valeri Calancea,.Romania and 200m breaststroke, lOOm and 200m butWHERE: Agios Kosmas Olympic Sailing terfly, 200m and 400m individual medley, WHERE: Nikaia Olympic Weightlifting 207 pounds (94 kg) Center on the Saronic Gulf, southeast of 4x100m and 4x200m freestyle relay and Hall. WHEN: Aug. 14-16, 18-21, 23-25. MEDALS: Gold- Milen Dobrev, Bulgaria downtown Athens. WHI:N: Aug. 14-26, 28. 4x100m medley relay. Men compete at 123 pounds (56 kg), 137 Silver- Kakhi Kakiasvilis, Greece MEDALS:Elevensailingeventsinnineclass- · OUTLOOK:AIIeyeswillbeonAmericanMi- pounds (62 kg), 152 pounds (69 kg), 170 Bronze -Alexei Petrov, Russia es: the 49er double-handed skiff; Europe chael Phelps and Ian Thorpe of Australia. pounds (77 kg), 187 pounds (85 kg), 207 231 pounds (105 kg) (women)' .Finn (men) and laser (men) sin- Phelps may attempt to break Mark Spitz's re- pounds (94 kg), 231 pounds (105 kg) and 231 Gold- Alan Tsagaev, Bulgaria gle-handed dinghies; 470 men's and worn- cord of seven gold medals at 1972 Munich pounds-plus (105 kg-plus). Women compete Silver- Hossein Tavakoli, Iran en's double-handed dinghy; men's and worn- Games. Thorpe won three golds and two sil- at 105~ pounds (48 kg), 117 pounds (53 kg), Bronze- Saeed Saif Assad, Qatar en's windsurfing; Tornado double-handed vers in Sydney, but nearly missed 400m free- 128 pounds (58 kg}, 139 pounds (63 kg), 152 231 pounds-plus (105 kg-plus) catamaran; Star double-handed men's keel- style- his signature event- after an embar- potinds (69 kg), 165 pounds (75 kg), 165 Gold- Hossein Rezazadeh, Iran boat; and the Yngling triple-handed women's rassing DQ in Australian trials. A teammate pounds-plus (75 kg). Silver- Velichko Cholakov, Bulgaria gave up his spot so Thorpe could compete. OUTLOOK: Most of Greece will likely be keelboat that replaces the men's Soling. Bronze - Ronny Weller, Gemnany OUTLOOK: American Paul· Cayard, one of Natalie Coughlin of the United States is one watching when countrymen Pyrros Dimas WRESTLING the world's best sailors, will compete in his of the most versatile swimmers and could (187 pounds) and Kakhi Kakiasvilis (207 MEN firstOlympics at age 45 in the Star Class after challenge for five medals. Even with Phelps pounds) try to become four-time Olympic Greco-Homan beatin~ Mark Reyno~ds, the de~ending ~old and Coughlin, the Americans may have trou- champions. Only three Olympic athletes 121 pounds (55 kg) medal_ist and a four-time Ol~ptan, at trials .. ble matcliing their remru·kable performance havewonfour golds in same event. Neitheris Gold - Lazaro Rivas, Cuba ~e high-performance ~9er, WI~ retractable four years ago. The Americans won 14 golds a favorite; Dimas is 32, Kakiasvilis is 35; and Silver- Dae-Won lm, South Korea · ~· ·wmgs and the crew· hlk€d--out 1!'1 trapezes,. c .C:):heiii,ost'inahnn~boyrottedDlyinpics sinceo·both are •coming coff" medal-less--perform- -- .-Bronze~ Hasan Rangraz, lran:--c·---:nade a splashy debut at Sy?ney m ~000 and 1972- and 33 medals overall. ances in the European championships last 132 pounds (60 kg) IS sure.to be one oftl_le mostmteresting,~lassspring. The big story might again come from Gold- Amnen Nazarian, Bulgaria ~s ~?am. The _Yngling -: pronounced INGone of the smallest competitors - two-time Silver- Jim Gruenwald, United States ling -.makes ~ts Olympic debut 37_ years. afi» '-'lriinu u;.u gold medalist Halil Mutlu of Turkey is only Bronze- Roberto Monzon, Cuba ter bern!!' d~s1gned by a. Norwegian. FIIll1 4-llbutcanliftmorethan400pounds.Wom145% pounds (66 kg) Class will mclude an mtramural serum en's weightlifting returns after debuting in Gold - Manuchari Kvirkvelia, Georgia amo?g thre~ ~embers of Tea.n.: New ZeaWHERE: Olympic Aquatic Center (Syn- Sydney, and American Tara Cunningham Silver- Kim In-Sub, South Korea land s Amen~a s. ~u~. ere':' - skippe_r Dean chronized Swimming Pool). WHEN: Aug. 23- (105~ pounds,. 48 kg) goes for a second gold Bronze- Armen Vardanyan, Ukraine Barker,~ native KiWI, n~VJg~tor Kevm H~, 27. MEDALS: Women compete in 'duet and after surprise win in 2000. 163 pounds (74 kg) an Amencan; and Ben Ainslie of Great Bnt, · Gold- Alexei Gloushkov, Russia ain. Ainslie won the Laser Class gold in 2000 team. Silver- Jin Soo Kim, South Korea OUTLOOI(: Russia swept both events in Sydand silver in 1996. Bronze - Filberto Azcuy, Cuba ney while Americans didn't win any medals, 185 pounds (84 kg) the first time tl1at's happened since tins ofWHERE: Ano Liossia Olympic Hall. WHEN: Gold -Alexei Michin, Russia ten-maligned sport joined Olympics in 1984. Aug. 22-29. MEDALS: Men's freestyle wresSilver.- Ara Abrahamian, Sweden Sure to draw plenty of attention is Tammy tlers compete at 121 pounds (55 kg), 132 Bronze - Hamza Yerlikaya, Turkey WHERE: Markopoulo Olympic Shooting . Crow, allowed to compete by U.S. Olympic pounds (60 kg), 145~ pounds (66 kg), 163 211% pounds (96 kg) Centre. WHEN: Aug. 14-22. MEDALS:Tenmed- : Committee despite pleadingno-contesttove- pounds (74 kg), 185 pounds (84 kg), 2111~ Gold - Ramaz Nozadze, Georgia al event.s for men-prone rifle, three-position hicular manslaughter charges in a crash that pounds (96 kg) and 26412 pbunds (120 kg). Silver- Ernesto Pena, Cuba rifle, air rifle, free pistol, rapid fire pistol, air killed her boyfriend and a 12-year-old boy. Men's Greco-Roman wrestlers compete at Bronze- Karam Mohammed Gaber, Egypt pistol, running target, skeet, trap, double · 121 pounds (55 kg) ,132 pounds (60 kg), 145% 264% pounds (120 kg) trap.Sevenmedaleventsforwomen-airpispounds (66 kg), 163 pounds (74 kg), 185 0 Gold - Rulon Gardner, United States to!, sport pistol, air rifle, three-position rifle, l"Ail:ll n;, 0:. pounds (84 kg), 2ml pounds (96 kg) and Silver- Khassan Baroev, Russia skeet, trap, double trap. · 2641:\ pounds (120 kg). Women wrestlers Bronze -Mihaly Deak-Bardos, Hungal}' OUTLOOK: Nearly 400 men and women will WHERE: Galatsi Olympic Hall. WHEN: compete at 105~ pounds (48 kg), 121 pounds Freestyle compete; one of the few sports that has ap- Aug.14-23. MEDALS: Men's singles, men's (55 kg), 138)(, pounds (63 kg) and 158Y.: 121 pounds (55 kg) peared on the schedule of every modern doubles, women's singles, women's·doubles. pounds (72 kg). ' Gold - Dilshod Mansurov, Uzbekistan Summer Olympics. Women's shooting disciOUTLOOK: Chinese have dominated since OUTLOOK: Can Rulon Gardner do it again, Silver- Namik Abdullaev, Azerbaijan plines were introduced in 1984. Matt Em- sport was added to Olympics in 1988 - they without having to beat Russian super wresBronze- Roberto Montero, Cuba mons will compete in air rifle, prone rifle and won every available gold medal in 1996 and tler Aleksandr Karelin? Gardner has had a 132 pounds (60 kg) three-position rifle. He is the first American 2000. Top three men and top five women in· selies of mishaps and calamities since pullGold Mourad Oumachanov, Russia to qualify in three disciplines since 1960.. the world are all Chinese. American Gao J un, ing off his "miracle on the mat" upset ofKareSilver- Purevbaatar Oyunbuleg, Mongolia who won a women's doubles silver medal.in lin in Sydney, but now looks to be healthy Bronze ~ Yandro Quintana, Cuba 1992 while competing for China, represents and a gold medal contender again. Other145% pounds (66 kg) the United States' best hope for its first med- wise, U.S. freestyle and Greco-Roman teams Gold - Seraflm Barzakov, Bulgaria al. last year, she became the first American don't look especially strong, but Ameticans WHERE:· Various locations throughout Silver- lrbek Farniev, Russia Greece. Men's :final at Olympic Stadium; since 1959 to reach quarterfinals at world could get a medal count boost from a talented Bronze- Ali Reza Dabir, Iran four-member women's team. Annen Nazawomen's :final at Karaiskaki Stadium in Ath- championships. 163 pounds (7 4. kg) rien (132 pounds, 60 kg) of Bulgaria tries for ens. WHEN: Aug.ll-12, 14-15,17-18, 20-21, 23Gold - Bouvalsa Saitiev, Russia a third gold and Russiru1 star Buvaysa Saytiev 24, 26-28. MEDALS: Men's and women's team Silver- Mourad Galdarov, Belarus (163 pounds, 74 kg) looks to rebound from competition. Bronze- Gennadi Laliev, Kazakhstan· upset in Sydney to American gold medalist OUTLOOK: None of the top four men's WHERE: Faliro Coastal 185 pounds (84 kg) Slay; it was Saytiev's only loss in rnaBrandon teams from 2000, including· gold medalist Zone Olympic Com· Gold - Cael Sanderson, United States .jor international competition since 1995. Cameroon and the foUrth-place U.S. team, plex,' Sports Pavilion. Silver- Adam Saitlev, Russia qualified. Four-time world under-20 champi- WHEN: Aug. 26-29. Bronze -Yael Romero, Cuba Wrestler Rulon on Argentina is left as the favorite in the 16- MEDALS: 211% pounds (96 kg) Gardner is ready team field, although the Olympic tourna- Men's Gold - Alireza Heidari, Iran Associated to defend his ment is tough to gauge because rules restrict weight classes - 5::l Silver- Eldari Kurtanidze, Georgia Press file teams to players under 23, with three exemp- kg, 68 kg, 80 kg, 80 kgtitle. . Bronze - Krassimir Kotchev, Bulgaria tions. 2003 World Cup winner Germany and plus~ Women's .weight 264% pounds (120 kg) the United States are favorites in women's classes - 49 kg, 57 kg, 67 Gold - David Musulbes, Russia event; defending champion' Norway failed to kg, 67 kg-plus. Silver~ ArturTaymazov, Uzbekistan qualify. Women's tournament consists of 10 OUTLOOK: American Steven Bronze - Kerf}' McCoy, United States teams split unevenly ·into three groups. Lopez, who won gold in 68kg in . WOMEN Greece, as the host nation, earned an auto- Sydney, will try for another medal Freestyle matic bid to both :fields. in the 80kg weight class. Greece's Mi105% pounds ( 48 kg) chalis Mouroutsos will try to defend his Gold - Irina Melnik, Ukraine 2000 gold medal in 58kg on his home turf. Silver- Chiharu lcho, Japan Bronze- P. Miranda, United States 121 pounds (55 kg) WHERE: Olympic Softball Stadium atHelliGold - Saori Yoshida, Japan niko Olympic Complex. WHEN: Aug.l4-23. Silver" Na-La~ Lee, South Korea MEDALS: Women's team competition. WHERE: Olympic Tennis Center;Athens Bronze - Natalia Gaits, Russia OUTLOOK: U.S. team will again be prohibi- Olympic Sports Complex. WHEN: Aug. 15138% pounds (63 kg) tive favorite to win third straight gold. Led by 22. MEDALS: Men's singles and doubles, Gold - Sara McMann, United States three-time Olympian Lisa Fernandez, big- women's singles and doubles. Silver- Kaori lcho, Japan gest challenge for the Americans could come . OUTLOOK: Andy Roddick, Roger Federer Bronze- Lili Meng, China from themselves. U.S. team took a 110-game and the Williams sisters head a high-quality 158% pounds (72 kg) winning streak to Sydney before losing three field, with ATP and WTA ranking points at Gold- Kyoko Hamaguchi, Japan straight and nearly missing medal round. stake. The hard courts are the same as those Silver- T. Montgomel}', United States · Bronze -Xu Wang, China ·

(co

ROWING

TRIATHLON

SWOMMING

SAIUNG

WEIGHTUFTING

lf!>YN""IUlDftN zrli"'l I SWIMMING

WRESTLING

SHOOTING

f'AIOLI!f"·yrNNNS

SOCCER

TAEKWflNDO ·

1

SOfTBALl

TENNIS.

I

I


THE CINCINNATI ENQUIRER

OLYMPflCS

HS THURSDAY, AUGUST 12, 2004

'2004 su Friday, Aug.13 Opening Ceremony At Olympic Stadium, 1:15 p.m.

Saturday, Aug. 14 BADMINTON At Goudl Olympic Hall Round of 32 Women's Singles and Mixed Doubles, 2:30

a.m. 'Nomen's Singles and Mixed Doubles, 7 a.m.

BASKETBALL At Helliniko Indoor Arena

Women Australia vs. Nigeria, 2 a.m. Sotrth Korea vs. China, 4:15a.m. United States vs. New Zealand, 7:30a.m. Japan vs. BraZil, 9:45a.m.

Greece vs. Russia, 1 p.m. Spain vs. Czech Republic, 3:15p.m. BI'ACH VOllEYBAll , At Faliro Coastal Zone Olympic Complex Men Matches, 2 a.m., 3 a.m., 7:30 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 1 p.m., 2 p.m. Women Matches, 4 a.m., 5 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 3 p.m .. 4 p.m. BOXING At Peristerl Olympic Boxing Hall

Preliminaries Middleweight (75kg), 6:30 a.m. Ught Heavyweight (81kg), 8:01a.m. Middleweight (75kg), 12:30 p.m. Ught Healj'\\eight (81kg), 2:01 p,m, CYCUNG (ROAD) At Athens City Center Course Men's Road Race, 5:45a.m. DIVING At Athens Olympia Sports Complex, Maroussi Women's Synchronired 3-meter Soringboard Finals, 2 p.m. Men's Synchronized 10-meter Platform Rnals, 3:14 p.m. FENCING At Hei!Jmko Olympic Complex. Men's Individual Sabre Bimina~ons, 3 a.m. Quartertmals, 5:50a.m. Semiftnals, 11:30 ii.m. Bronze Medal, 1:20 p.m. Gold Medal, 1:40 p.m. GYMNASTICS (ARTISTIC) At Olympic Indoor Hall Men's Quilllflcatlon Session 1, 5:30a.m. Session 2, 9:30 a.m. Session 3, 1:30 p.m. FIELD HOCKEY At He!liniko Olympic Comp.!ex. Women Pool A, 1:30 a.m. Pool B, 3:30 a.m. Pool B, 11:30 a.m. Pool A. 1 p.m. ·JUDO At Ano Uossia Olympic Hall Men's 60kg Preliminaries;Repechages, 3:31a.m. , Fmal of Repechage A, 9:34a.m. Rnal of Repechage B, 9:35a.m. Final ofTable A, 9:36a.m. Final ofTable B, 9:37a.m. Bronze Medal A, 9:40a.m. Bronze Medal B, 9:41a.m. Gold M,edal, 9:43a.m. Women's 48kg Preliminaries/Repechages 3:30a.m. Final of Repechage A, 9:30a.m. Anal of Repecllage 8, 9:31 a.m. Final of Table A, 9:32a.m. Rna! ofTable G, 9:33a.m. Bronze Medal A, 9:38a.m. , Bronze Medal B, 9:39a.m. Gold Medal, 9:42a.m.

ROWJNG At Sahlnias Olympic Rowing and Canoeing Center Heats Women's Single Sculls, 1:30 a.m. Men's Single Sculls, 2:10 a.m Women's Pair, 3:10a.m. Men's Pair, 3:30a.m. Women's Double Sculls, 4 a.m. Men's Double Sculls, 4:20a.m. Men's Four, 4:50a.m.

SAILING At Aglos Kosmas Olympic Sailing Center Men's Double-handed Dinghy·470,·6 a.m. Men's Stngle-handed Dinghy-Ann, 6:01a.m. Women's Double-handed Dinghy-470,' 6:02 a.m. Women's Keelboat Yngling, 6:03 a.m. SHOOTING At Markopoulo Olympic Shooting Center -Men's Trap Qualiftcations, 2 a.m. Women's 10-meter Air Rifle Qualifications, 2 a.m. 1 Women's 10-meter Air Rlfte Final, 4 a.m. Men's 10-meter Air Pistol Qualifications, 5 a.m. Men's 10-meter Air P1stol Anal, 7:45a.m. SOCCER Men Game at Karaiskaki Stadium, Athens, 1:30 p.m. Game at Pankntio Stadtum, Heraklio, 1:30 p.m. Game at Pampeloponnisiako 'Stadium, Petras, 1:30 p.m. Game at Kaftanzoglio Stadium, TI1essaloniki, 1:30p.m. Women iapan vs. Nigerta atKaraiskakl Stadium, Athens, 11 a.m Greece vs. Australia at Pankritio Stadium, Heraklio, 11 a.m. China vs. Mexico at Pampeloponnislako Stadium, Patras, 11 a.m. United States vs. Brazil atKaftanzogllo Stadi-. um, Thessaloniki, 11 a.m. SOFfBAll At Olympic Softball Stadium Japan vs. Australia, 2:30a.m. United States vs. Italy, 5 a.m. Taiwan vs, Canada, 10 a.m, China ~<s. Greece, 12:30 p.m. SWIMMING At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Maroussi Heats Men's 400-meter lndivtdual Medley, 3 a.m Women's 100-meter Butterfly, 3:31a.m. Men's 400-meter Freestyle, 3:58a.m. Women's 400-meter Individual Medley, 3:41 a.m. Men's 100·meter Breaststroke, 5:15a.m. Women's 4x100-meterFreestyteRelay, 5:42 a.m. Finals Men's 400-meter Individual Medley Final, 12:30 p.m, Women's 100-meter Butterfly Semifinals, 12:39 p.m. Men's 40Q..meter Freestyle Rnal, 12:51 p.m. Women's 400-meter Individual Medley Final, 1:09 p.m. Men's 100-meter Breaststroke Semifinals, 1:28 p.m. ' Women's 4 x10Q..meter Freestyle Relay Final, 1:48 p.m. TABlE TENNIS At Galatsl Olympic Hall RrstRound · Men's Singles Sessions, 7 a.m., 7:45a.m., 1 p.m., 2 p.m. Men's Doubles , 4:45a.m. Women's Singles , 5:30a.m., 6:15a.m., 11 a.m., Noon Worn· en's Doubles ,4 a.m. TEAM HANDBAll At Sports Pavilion Men Pool A Spain vs. South Korea, 2:30a.m. Pool B Hungal)'vs. Egypt, 4:30a.m. Pool A Russia vs. Slovenia, 7:30 a.m. Pool 8 Gennany vs. Greece, 9:30 a.m. Pool A Croatia vs. Iceland, 12:30 p.m. Pool 8 France vs. Brazil, 2.30 p.m. VOLLEYBALL At Peac~ & Friendship Stadium Women Matches, 2 a.m., 4 a.m., 7 a.m., 9 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 2:30p.m. WEIGHIUFIING At Nikaia Olympic Weightlifting Hall Women's 48kg, 1 p.m.

Sunday,Aug.15

BASKETBAll At.Helliniko lndoQr Arena

BI'ACH VOllEYBAll

SHOOTING

Men

At Markopoulo Olympic Shooting Center Women's 25-met~r Pistol Qualifications, 2 a.m. ' Women's Double Trap Qu~lifrcations, 2 a.m. Men's 10-meter Running 'Target Qualifications, 3 a.m. Women's Double Trap Flnal, 6 am. Women's 25-meter Pistol Fmal, 8:15a.m.

Matches, 2 a.m .. 3 a.m., 7:30 a.m., 8:30 a.m.,_! p.m., 2 p.m. . Women

MatcheS, 4 a.m., 5 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 3 p.m., 4 p.m.

BOXING At Peristen Olympic Boxing Hall Preliminaries

light Welterweight (64kg), 6:30a.m. Woltcmeight (69kg), 8:01u,m. Ught Weltenveight (64kg), 12:30 p.m. Weltenveight (69kg), 2:01 p,m. CYCLING (ROAD) At Athens City Center Course Women's Road Race, 8 a nL EQUESTRIAN At Markapoulo Olympic Equestrian Center Individual Eventing Dressa~- Day 1, 3 a.m. Team Eventmg Dressage- Day 1, 3 a.m. FENCING At Helliniko Olympic Complex Wamen's lndividUill Epee Eliminations, 2 a.m .. Quarterfinals, 7:10a.m. Semifinals, 11:30 a.m. Bronze Medal, 1:30 p.m. Gold Medal, 1:55 p.m. FIElD HOCKEY At Helliniko Olympic Complex Men Pool A, 1:30 a.m. Pool B, 3:30a.m. Pool A, 11 a.m. Pool B, 11:30 a.m. Pool A, 1 p.m. Pool B, 1:30 p.m. GYMNASTICS ARTISTIC At Olympic Indoor Hall Women's QuallflcaHon Session 1, 3 a.m. Session 2, 6:30a.m. Session 3, 10 am. Session 4, 2 p.m. JUDO. At Ano liossia Olympic Hall Men's 66kg Preliminaries/Repechages, 3'31 a.m. Final of Repectlage A, 9:34a.m. FinE I of Repechage B, 9:35a.m. Final ofTable A, 9:36a.m. Final ofTabte 8, 9:37am. Bronre Medal A, 9:40a.m. Bronze Medal 8, 9:41a.m. Gold Medal, 9:43 a.m. Women's 521ig Pre!iminaries/Repechages 3:30a.m. Final ,of Repechage A, 9:30a.m. Final of Repechage 8, 9:31a.m. Final of Table A, 9:32a.m. Final ofTable B, 9:33a.m. Bronze Medal A, 9:38a.m. Bronze Medal B, 9:39a.m. Gold Medal, 9:42a.m. ROWING At Schinias Olympic Rol';hlg and Canoeing Center Heats Women's Uglltweight Double Scults, 1:30 a.m. Men's lightweight Double Sculls, 2 a.m. Men's Ughtweight Four, 2:~0 a.m. Women's Quadruple sculls, 3:10a.m. Men·s Quadruple Sculls, 3::)0 a.m. Women's Eight, 4 a.m. Men's E1ght, 4:20a.m. SAILING At·Agios Kosmas Olympic Sailing Center Men's Double-handed Dl11g~y-470, 6:01 a.m. Men's Single-handed Dinghy·Rnn, 6:02a.m. Men's Windsurfer- Mistral, 6.03 a.m. Open Single-handed Dtnghy·laser, 6:04 a.m. Women's Double-handed Dlnghy-470, 6:05 a.m. Women's Wmdsurfer- M1stwl, 6:06a.m. Women's Single-handed :'Dinghy-Europe, 6:07a.m. Women's 1\eelboai Yng!rng, 6:08a.m. SHOOTING At Markopoulo Olympic S~ooting Center Women's 10-meter Air Pistol Quallncations,2 a.m. Men's Trap Qualifications, 2 a.m. Women's 10-meter Air Pistol Final, 4:30a.m. Men's Trap fin.al, 6:30a.m. SOCCER Men Game at Karaiskaki Stadium, Athens,' 1:30 p.m. Game at Panl<ntio Stadtum. Heraklio, 1:30 p.m. Game at Kaftanzogtio Stadium, Thessalonikl, 1:30 p.m. Game iltPanthessaliko Stad•um, Volos, 1:30 p.m. SOFTBAlL At Olympic Softball ~tad.ium Japan vs. Taiwan, 2:30 a.n-h · Chma vs. Italy, 5 a.m. United States vs. Australia, JO a.m. Canada vs. Greece,12:30 pm. SWIMMINil At Athens Olympic Sports C(1rnplex, Maroussi Heats Women's 100·meter Bacl\stloke, 3 a.m. Men's 200-meter Freestyle, 3:20a.m. Women's 100-meter BreasL"itroke, 3:54a.m. Men's 100-meter Backstrolle, 4:15a.m. Women's 400-meter Freestyle, 4:42a.m. Men's 4 x 100-meter Freestyle Relay, 5:10 a.m. Rna is· Women's 100-meter Backsltoke Semifinals, 12:30 p.m. Men's 200-meter Freestyle Semifinals, 12:40 p.m. Women's 100-meter Butterfiy Final, 12:53 p.m. Men's 100-meter Breaststroke Final, 1:01 p.m. Women's 100-meter Breaststroke. Semifinals, 1:06pm. ' Men's 100-meter Backstroke Semifinals, 1:26 p.m. , Women's 400-meter Freestyle Frnal, 1:46 'p.m: Men's 4 x 100-meter Freestyle Relay Rna!, 1:55 p.m. '

TABlE TENNIS At Galatsi Olympic Hall Second Round Women's Doubles, 4 a.m. Women's Doubles, 4:45a.m. Men's Doubles, 5:30 a.m. Men's Doubles, 6:15a.m. Women's Singles, 7 'a.'m. Women's Srngles, 7:45a.m. Men's Singles, 11:30 a.m. Men's Singles, Noon Women's Smgles, lp.m. Women's Singles, 2 p.m.

TI'AM HANDBAll At Sports Pavilion Women Pool A, China vs. HungafY, 7:30a.m. Pool A, Greec vs. Brazil, 9:30a.m. Pool B, Sp<Jin vs. Angola, 12:30 p.m. Pool B, Denmark vs. Fra~ce, 2:30p.m.

TENNIS At Olympic Tennis Center First Round Men's Singles, 3 a.m. Women's Singles, 3:01a.m. Men's Doubles, 3:02 a.m. Woffien's Doubles, 3:03 a.m. Men's Singles, 10 a.m. Women's Siilgles, 10:01 a.m. Men's Doubles, 10:02 a.m. Women's Doubles, 10:03 a.m.

VOllEYBALL Men Matches, 2 a.m., 4 a.m., 7 a.m., 9 a.m .. 12:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m. WATER POlO At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Maroussi Men Egypt vs. Australia, 2:30a.m. .Russia vs. Ka2akstan, 3:45a.m. Serbia and Montenegro vs. ~ungarj, 9:30 a.m. lta!yvs. Spam, 10:45 a.m. Germany vs. Greece, 2 p.m. Croatia vs. United States, 3:15p.m. WEIGHTLIFTING

Moed Doubles Round of 16, 2:30a.m. Women's Singles Round of 16, 2:34a.m. MiKed Doubles Round of 16, 7 a.m. Women's Singles Round of 16, 7:04a.m. Men's Singles Round of32, 11:30 a.m. Men's Doubles Round of 32, 11:36 a.m. BASEBALL At Helliniko Olympic Complex

AtAgios Kosmas Olymp\c Sailing Center Men's Single-handed Dingl1y-Rnn, 6:01a.m. Women's Double-handed Dinghy-470, 6:02 a.m. Open Oouble-handr:d D, nghy-49er, 6:03 a.m. Men's Double·handed Dmghy-470, 6;04 a.m. Women's KeelboatYngling. 6:05a.m.

At Faliro Coastal Zone Olympic Complex

At Panathinai~o Stadium

BADMINTON

SAILING

Men . Gtoup B Angola vs. lithuania, 2 a.m. Group A Italy vs. New Zealtll1d, 4:15a.m Group A China vs. Spain, 7:30a.m. Group A Argentma vs. Scrl11a and Montenegro, 9:45a.m. 1 Group B Puerto Rico vs. United States, 1 p.m. Group 8 Greece vs. Australia, 3:15p.m.

At Peace & Friendship StadiUm

At Goudt Olympic Halt

Men's Single Sculls, 1:50 ,~.m. Men's Pair, 2:20a.m. Men's Double Sculls, 2:4(1 a.m. Men's Four, 3 a.m. Women's Single Sculls, 3:JO a.m. Men's Single Sculls, 3:40 3.m.

Reid 2 Cuba vs. Austraha, 3:30a.m. Field !Italy vs. Japan, 4:30a.m. Field 2 Canada vs. Taiwan, 11:30 a.m. Field 1 Greece vs. Netherl;mds, 1:30 p.m.

ARCHERY Women lndividual1j32 Eliminations, 1:30 a.m. lndMdual1/32 Eliminations, 8:30 a.m.

CS SCHEDULE

SOCCER Men Gan;e at Karaiskaki Stad\um, Athens, 1:30 p.m. Game at PanKntio Stad1um, Heraklio, 1:30

p.m. Game at Pampeloponnisi:1ko Stadium, Patras, 1:30 p.m. ,Game atPanthessaliito Stadmm, Volos, 1:30 p.m.

SOFTBAll At Olympic Soft.ba\1 Stadium Taiwan vs.ltaly, 2:30a.m. · China vs. Australia, 5 a.m. Canada vs. United States. 10 a.m. Greece vs. Japan, 12:30 p.m.

SWIMMING At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Maroussi Heats Women's 100-meter Freestyle, 3 a.m. Men's 200-meter Backstroke, 3:39a.m. Women's 200-meter Breaststroke, 4:10a.m. Men's 200-meter lndl\'idual Medley, 4:47 a.m·. Women's 4 x 200-meter Freestyle Relay, 5:35a.m.

Finals Men's 200-meter Breasts:roke Final, 12:30 p.m. Women's 100-meter F!'e€'.style semifinals,

Associated Press file

M,auri~e G~een

(right) con;petes ~gainst John Capel in the men's 100 meter semifinal at the OlymPIC Tnals m July. Green 1s cons1dered a favorite to defend his 100-meter title. At Nikaia Olympic Weightlifting Hall Men's 56kg - Group B. 3:30 a.m. Women's 53kg- Group 8, 6 a.m.

Women's 53kg- Group A, 9:30a.m. Men's 56Kg- Group A, 1 p.m. .

Monday, Aug. 16 ARCHERY

At Panathinaiko Stadium Men lndividuall/32 Eliminations, 1:30 a.m. lndividuall/32 Eliminations, 8:30a.m.

BADMINTON At GoudJ Olympic Halt Women's Singles Quarterfinals, 2:30a.m. Women's Doubles Round of 32, 2·33 a.m. Mixed Doubles Quarterfinals, 2:36 a.m. Men's Doubles Round of 16, 2:38a.m. Women's Singles Quarterfinals, 7 a.m. Mixed Doubles Quarterfinals, 7:02 a.m. Men's Doubles Round of 16, 7:04a.m. Men's Singles Round of 32, 7:06a.m. Men's Doubles Round of 16, 11:30 a.m. Men's Singles Round of 32, 11:34 a.m.

BASEBAll At Helliniko Olympia Complex Field 2, Australia vs. Taiwan, 3:30a.m. Field 1, Canada vs. ftaly, 4:30a.m. Reid 2, Japan vs. Netherlands, 11:30 a.m. Field 1, Cuba vs. Greece, 12:30 p.m. · BASKETBALL At Hclliniko Indoor Arena Woman New Zealand vs. South Korea, 2 a.m. Nigeria vs. Japan, 4:15a.m. Czech Republic vs. United States;7:30 a.m. China vs Spain, 9:45a.m. · Brazil vs. Greece, 1 p.m. Russia vs. Austrn!ia, 3:15p.m. BEACH VOllEYBAll At Faliro Coastal Zone Olympic Complex Men : Matches. 2 a.m, 3 a.m., 7:30 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 1 p.m. , 2 p:m. Women Matches, 4 a.m., 5 a.m., 9·30 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 3 p.m., 4 p.m. BOXING At Peristen Olympic Boxing Hall

Preliminaries FeatheJWeight (57kg), 6:30a.m. Ughtwcight (60kg), 8:01a.m. FeatheJWeight (57kg), 12:30 p.m. Ughtweight (60kg), 2:01 p.m. DIVING At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Maroussi Women's Synchronized 10-meter Platform Fi· nals, 2 p.m. Men's'.Synchronized 3-meter Springboard R- · nals, 3:14p.m. EQUESTRIAN At Markopoulo Olympic Equestrian Center Individual Eventirig Dressage· Day 2, 3 am. Team Eventing Dressage - Day 2, 3 a.m. FENCING ·, At Hellinika Olympic Complex Men's lndlvldual Foil Eliminations, 3 a.m. Quarterfinals, 7:10 a.. m. Semifinals, 11:30 a.m. Bronze Medal, 12:30 p.m. Gold Medal, 12:55 p.m. FIELD HOCKEY At Het!iniko Olympic Complex ·women Pool G, 1:30 a.m. Pool A, 3:30a.m. Pool A, 11 a.m. Pool B, 1 p.m. GYMNASTICS ARTISTIC At Olymptc Indoor Hall Men Team Rna!, 1:30 p.m. JUDO At Ana Uossia Olympic Hall Men's 73kg PreHminaries/Repechages, 3:31a.m. Anal of Repechage A, 9:~4 a.m. Final of Repechage B, 9:35a.m. Rna! ofTable A, 9:36a.m. Rna! ofTable B, 9:37a.m. Bronze Medal A. 9:40 a.m. Bronze Medal B, 9:41a.m. Gold Medal, 9:43a.m. Women's 57kg PfeliminariesjRepechages, 3:30a.m. Rnal of Repechage A, 9:30a.m. Anal of Repechage a, 9:31a.m. final ofTab!e A, 9:32a.m. Final oflable B, 9·33 a.m Bronze Medal A, 9;38 a.m. Bronze Medal B, 9:39 a.m. Gold Medal, 9:42 a.m. ·ROWING At Schinias·Oiymplc Rowing and Canoeing Center Repechages Women's Single Sculls, 1:30 a.m. Men's Single Sculls, 2:10a.m. Women's Pair, 3:10a.m. Men's Pair, 3:30a.m. Wolflen's Double-sculls, 3:40a.m. Men's Double Sculls, 4 a.m. Men's Four, 4:10a.m. SAILING At Agios Kosmas Olympic Sailing Center Open Oouble-handed Dinghy-49er, 6:01

8.JJ1. Open Single-handed Dinghy-Laser, 6:02 a.m. Men's Double-handed Dinghy-470, 6:03 a.m. Men's Single-handed Dinghy-Ann, 6:04a.m. Women's Single-handed Dinghy-Europe, 6:05am. Women's Double-handed Dinghy-470, 6;{)6 a.m. Women's Keelboat Ynglmg, 6:07a.m.

SHOOTING At Markopoulo Olympic Shooting Center Women's Trap QUalifications, 2 a.m .. Men's 10-meter Air Rine Qualifications, 5 a.m. Women's Trap Final, 6 a.m. M(ln's 10-meter Air Rine A.nal, 8 a.m.

SOFTBALL At Olympic Softball Stadium Chma vs. Canada, 2:30a.m. United States vs. Japan, 5 a.m. Italy vs. Greece, 10 a.m. Australia vs. Taiwan, 12:30 p.m.

SWIMMING At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Marouss1 Heats Women's 200-meter Freestyle, 3 a.m. Men's 200-meter Butterfly, 3:38a.m. Women's 200-meter Individual Medley, 4:06 a.m. Finals Women's 200-meter Freestyle Semifinals,

12:30 p.m. Men's 200..meter Freestyle Final, 12:4~p m. Women's 100-meter Backstroke Final, 12:50 p.m. Men's 100-meter Backstroke Final, 12:58 p.m. Women's100-meter Breaststroke Final, 1:15 p.m. Men's 200·meter Butterfly Semifinals, 1:31 p.m. Women's 200-meter Individual Medley Semifioals, 1:53 p,m, TABLE TENNIS At Galatsi OlymPic Hall Men's Doubles Thi(d Round, 4 a.m. Men's Doubles Third Round, 5 a.m. Women's Doubles Third Round, 6 a.m. Women's Doubles ll'urd Round, 7 a.m. Men's Singles Second Round, 11 a.m. Men's Singles Second Round, Noon Women's Doubles Fourtll Round, 1 p.m. Women's Doubles Fowtll Round, 2 p.m. TFAM HANDBAll At SpOrts Pavilion Men Pool A South Korea vs. FlUssia, 2:30a.m. Pool A Slovenia vs. Croatia, 4:30a.m. .Pool A Iceland vs. Spain, 7:30a.m. Pool B Greece vs. France, 9:30a.m. Pool 8 Brazil vs, Hungary, 12:30 p.m. Pool B Egypt vs. Gennany, 2:30p.m. TENNIS At Olympic Tennis Center First Round Men's Singles, 3 a.m. Women's Singles, 3:01a.m. Men's Doubles, 3:02 a.m. Women's Doubles, 3:03 a.m. Men's Singles, 10 a.m. Women's S1ngles, 10:01 a.m. Men's Doubles, 10:02 a.m. Women's Doubles, 10:03 a.m. VOLlEYBAll At Peace & Friendship StJ.dium

Women Matches, 2 a.m., 4 a.m., 7 a.m., 9 a.m.,

12:30 p.m., 2:30p.m .. WATER POLO At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Maroussi Women United States vs. Hungal}', 2:30a.m. Australia vs. Italy, 3:45a.m. Russia vs. Canada, 9:30a.m. Greece vs. Kazakstan, 10:45 a.m. WEIGHIUFTING At Nikaia Olympic Weighttifting Hall Men's 62kg- Group B, 3:30a.m. Women's 58kg- Group B, 6 a.m. Women's 5Bkg ~Group A, 9:30a.m. Men's 62kg- Group A, 1 p.m.

Tuesday, Ailg. 17 ARCHERY At Panathinaiko Stadium Women's lndivtduat 1/16 El1mmations, 1:30 a.m. Men's Individual 1/16 Eliminatrons, 8:30 a.m.

BADMINTON At Goudi Olymp:c Hall Men's Singles Round of 16, 2:30a.m. Men's Doubles Quarterfinals, 2:34a.m. Women's Doubles Round of 16, 2:36a.m. Men's Singles Round of 16, 7 a.m. Men's Doubles Quarterfinals, 7:04a.m. Women's Doubles Round ~f 16, 7:06a.m.

BASEBALL At Hetliniko Olympic Complex Reid 2, Netherlands vs. Canada, 3:30a.m. Field 1, Tatwan vs. Greece, 4:30a.m. Field 2, Italy vs. Australia, 11:30 a.m. Field 1, Cuba vs. Japan, 12:30 p.m.

BASKETBAll At Helliniko Indoor Arena

Men Group A New Zealand vs. vs. China, 2 a.m. Group B Australia vs. Angola, 4:15a.m. Group B lithuania vs. Puerto Rico, 7:30a.m. Group A SertJia-Montenegro vs. Italy, 9:45 a.m. Group A Spain vs.irgentina, 1 p.m. Group B United States vs. Greece, 3:15 p.m.

BI'ACH VOllEYBALL At Fa tiro Coastal Zone Olympic Complex

Men Matches, 2 a.m., 3 a.m., 7:30 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 1 p.m., 2 p.m. · Women

Matches, 4 a.m., 5 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 3 p.m., 4 p.m. BOXING At Peristeri Olymptc Boxmg Hall Preliminaries Flyweight (5lkg), 6:3Q.a.m. Bantamweight (54 kg), 8:01a.m. Flyweight (51kg), 12:30 p.m. Bantamweigflt(54kg), 2:01p.m. CANOE-KAYAK (SLALOM RACING) At Olympic Canoe/Kayak Slalom Center Heats Men's Canoe Single~ 1st Run, 3 a.m. Women's Kayak Single -1st Run, 3:50a.m. Men's Canoe Single~ 2nd Run, 5 a.m. Women's Kayak Single- 2nd Run, 5:50a.m. EQUESTRIAN At Markopoulo Olympic Equestrian Center lndtviduat Eventing Cross Country, 1:30 a.m. Team Eventlng Cross Country..._1:30 a.m. FENCING At Helliniko Olympic Complex Men's IndiVIdual Epee

Men's Singles Second Round, 3 a in. Women's Smgles Second Round 3:01a.m. Men's Doubles Second Round 3.02 a.m. Women's Doubles First Round 3:03a.m. Men's Singles Second Round, 10 a.m. Women's Singles Second Round, 10:01 a.m, Men's Doub!es Second Round, 10:02 a.m. Women's Doubles First Round, 10:03 a.m.

Eliminations, 5 a.m. QuarterfinalS, 9:10 a.m. Semifinals, 12:25 p.m. Bronze Medal, 1:45 p.m.

Gold Medal, 2:35p.m. Women's Individual Sabre Eliminations, 3 a.m. Quarterfinals, 4:30a.m. Semifinals, 11:30 a.m. Bronze Medal, 1:25 p.m. Gold Medal, 2:15p.m.

VOllEYBALL' At Peace & Friendship Stadmm Men Matches, 2 a.m., 9 a.m., 7 a.m., 9 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 2:30p.m.

FIELD HOCKEY At Helliniko Olympic Complex 'Men

WATER POlO

Pool B, 1:30 a.m. Pool A, 3:30a.m. Pool B, 11 a m. Pool A, 11:30 a.m. Pool A, 1 p.m. Pool 8, 1:30 p.m. GYMNASTICS (ARTISTICi At Olympic Indoor Halt \A/omen's Team Rna!, 2 p.m. JUDO At Ana Uossia Olympic Hall Men's Blkg Prellmlnaries/Repechages, 3:31a.m. F1nat of Repechage A, 9:34 a.m. F1nal of F!epechage B, 9:35 <l.m. Final oflable A, 9:36a.m. Fmal ofTable B, 9:37a.m. Bronze Medal A, 9:40a.m. Bronze Medal B, 9:41a.m. Gold Medal, 9:43a.m. Women's 63kg Preliminaries/Repeallages 3:30a.m. Final of Repechage A, 9:30a.m. Fmat of RBpechcige ·a. 9:31a.m. Ftnal oflable A, 9:32a.m. Fmal ofTabte B, 9:33a.m. Bronze Medal A, 9:38 a.m. Bronze Medal B, 9:39a.m. Gold Medal, 9:42a.m. ROWING A: Schinias Olympic Rowing 1and Canoeing Center Repechages Women's Ught\<;eight Double Sculls, 1:30 am. Men's L1gt1tweight Double Sculls, 2 -a.m. Men's L1gfltweight Fours, 2:40a.m. women's Quadruple Sculls, 2:50a.m. Men's Quadruple Sculls, 3 a.m. Women's Eights, 3:10' a.m. Men's Eights, 3;20 a.m. SAILING At Agios Kosmas Olympic Sailing Center Men's Windsurfer- Mistral, 6:01a.m. Open Single-handed Dinghy-Laser, 6:02 am. Women's Windsurfer- Mistral, 6:03a.m. Women's Single-handed Dinghy-Euro'pe, 6 04 a.m. SHOOTING At Markopoulo Olympia Shooting Center Men's 50-meter Pistol Quatif1cattons, 2 a.m. Men's Double Trap Qualifications, 2 a.m. Men's 50-meter Pistol Rnal, 5:15a.m. Men's Double Trap Final, 7:30a.m SOCCER Stadium, Athens,

1~30

pm. Game at Pampeloponnisiak.o Stadium, Pa-

tras, 1:30 p.m. Game at Kaftanwglm Stadium, Ttlessaloniki,

1:30 p.m. Game atPanthe'ssaliko Stadium, Volos, 1·30

pm. Wt~men

Germany vs. Mexico at Karaiskaki Stadium, Athens, 11 a.m. Greece vs. Brazil at Pamoetoponnisiako Stadium, Patras, 11 a.m Ur.ited States vs. Australia at KaftanzogliO Stadium, Thessaloniki, 11 a.m. Sl'leden vs. Nigeria at Pantllessaliko Stadium, Volos, 11 a.m.

SOFTBAll At Olymprc Softball Stadium China vs. United States, 2:30a.m. Canada vs. Japan, 5 a.m. Greece vs. Taiwan, 10 a.m. ltnly vs. Australia, 12:30 p.m.

SWIMMING At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Maroussi Heats

Men's 100-meter Freestyle, 3 a.m. Women's 200-meter Butterfly, 3:44a.m. Men's 200-meter Breaststroke, 4:14a.m. Men's 4 x 200-meter Freestyle Relay, .4:45 am. Finats Men's 100-meter Freestyle Semifinals, 12:30

p.m Women's 200-meter Freestyle Final, 12:41 p.m. Men's :tOO-meter Butterfly Final, 12:48 p.m. Women's 200-meter Butterfly Semifinals, 12:55 ~.m. Men's 200-meter Breaststroke Semifinals, 1::1 p.m. Women's 200-meter Individual Medley Final, 1:39 p.m. Men's 4 x 200-meter Freestyle Relay Final, 1:46 p.m. TABLE TENNIS At Galats1 Olympic Hall Third Round Men's Singles, 4 a.m. Men's Singles, 5 a.m. Womens Singles, 6 a.m. Women s Singles, 7 a.m. Men's Singles, 11 a.m. Men's Singtes, Noon Women's Singles, 1 p.m. Women's Singles, 2 p.m. TFAM HANDBALL At Sports Pavilion

Women Pool A Ukraine vs. China, 7:30a.m. Pool A Hungary vs. Greece, 9:30a.m. Pool B South Korea vs. Denmark, 12:30 p.m. Pool B France vs. Spain, 2:30p.m.

TENNIS At Olympic Tennis Center

Men Australra vs. Italy, 2:30a.m. Germany vs. Egypt, 3:45a.m. Kazakstan vs United States, 9:30a.m. Russia vs. Serbia and Montenegro, 10:45 a.m. · Greece vs. Spain, 2 p m Hungary vs. Croatia, 3:15 p.m.

VVednesday,Aug.18 ARCHERY At Panathinaiko Stadium Women's IndiVIdual Eliminations, 1:30 a.m. Quarterfinals, 8:45a.m. Semifinals, 9:45a.m. Bronze Medal, 10:21 a.m. Gold Medal, 10:39 a.m.

ATHlETICS At Ancient Stadium, Olympia Men's Shot Put Qualifying Rounds, 1:30 a.m. Men's Shot Put Qual1fymg Rounds, 3 a.m. -Men's St1ot Put Final,·9 a.m. Men's Shot Put Final, 10:30 a.m.

BADMINTON At Goudi Olympic Hall Men's Singles Quarterfinals, 2 a.m. Women's Doubles Quarterfinals, 4 a.m. Men's Singles Quarterfinals, 7 a.m. Mixed Doubles Sem1fina!s, 9 a,m. Women's Singles Semifinals, 12:30 p.m. Women's Doubles Quarterfinals, 1:50 p.m.

'

BASEBAll

At Hellinilm Olympic Complex Reid 2, Netherlands vs. Italy, 3:30a.m. Field 1, Japan vs. Australia, 4:30a.m. Field 2, Greece vs. Canada, 11:30 a.m. Reid 1, Taiwan vs. Cuba, 12:30 p.m. -

BASKETBAll At Hellinlko Indoor Arena ~ Women China vs. Grech Republic, 2 a.m. Japan vs. Australia, 4:15a.m. South Korea vs. United States, 7:30a.m. Greece vs. Nigeria, 9:45a.m. Brazil vs. Russia, 1 p.m. Spain vs. New Zealand, 3:15 p.m.

BI'ACH VOllEYBAll At Fanro Coastal Zone Olympic Complex '- Men Matches. 2 ii.m., 3 am, .7:30 a.m., 8:30

a.m., 1 p.m .. 2 p.m. Women Matches, 4 a.m., 5 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 3 p.m., 4 p.m.

BOXING

Men Karalska~i

Game at

At AU1ens Olympic Sports Complex; Maroussi

At Peristeri Olymp:c Boxing Hall Pre:iminaries

light R~veight (48kg), 6:30a.m. lleavyo.veight (91kg), 8:16a.m. light R)welght (48kg), 12:30 p.m. Super Heavyweight (91kg-plus), ;2:01p.m. CYCLING (ROAD) At Voullagmeni Olympic Center ·Women's Individual Time Trial, 6 a.m. Men's Individual lime Trial, '8 a.m. CANOE-KAYAK (SLAlOM RACING) At Olympic Canoe/Kayak Slalom Center Men's Canoe Single sem1final, 3 a.m. Women's Kc:lyall Single Semifinal, 3:40a.m. Men's Canoe Sing:e Final, 4:50a.m. Women's Kayak Single Final, 5:20a.m. EQUESTRIAN At Markopoula Olympia Equestrian Center - lnd1v1dua! Eventing Jumping Qualifier, 8:30 a.m. Team Eventingjumping- Final, 8:30a.m. Individual EventingJumping -Rna!, 1:45 p.m. FENCING At Helliniko Olympic Complex Women's Individual Foil Eliminations, 3 a.m. Quarterfinals, 5:10a.m. Semifmals, 11:30 a.m. Bronze Medal, 12:30 p.m. Gold Medal, 12:55 .p.m. FIELD HOCKEY At Helllniko Olympic Complex Women Pool A, 1:30 a.m. Pool B, 3:30a.m. Pool A, 11 a.m. Pool, B, 1 p.m GYMNASTICS (ARTISTIC) · At Olympic Indoor Hall Men's Individual All-Around Final, 1:30 p.m. JUDO At Ano Uossia Olympic Hall Men's 90kg Pretiminal'lesjRepechages 3:31a.m. Rna! of Repechage A, 9:34a.m. Rna! of Repechage B, 9.35 a.m. Final ofTable A, 9:36a.m. Anal ofTab~ B, 9:37 a.m. Bronze Medal A, 9:40 q.m. Bronze Medal B, 9:41a.m. Gold Medal, 9:43a.m. Women's 70kg PreliminanesjRepechages 3:30a.m. Anal of Repechage A, 9:30a.m. Final oF Repechage B, 9.31 a.m. Anal ofTable A, 9:32a.m. Anal ofTable B, 9:33 a.m. Bronze Medal A, 9:38a.m. Bronze MedalS, 9:39a.m. Gold Medal, 9:42a.m.

ROWING At Schinias Olympic Rowing and Canoeing -Center Semifinals Women's Single Sculls,1:30 a.ffi.

12:37 p.m. Men's 200-meter Backstroke Semifinals, 12:48 p.m. Women's 200-meter Sutter."'y Final, 1:11 p.m. Men's 100~meter Freestyle Final, 1:17 p.m. Women's 200-meter Bre;:;ststrok.e Semifinals, 1,23 p.m. Men's 200-meterlndivldual Semifinals, 1:35 p.m. Women's 4 x 20D-meter Freestyle Relay Final, 1:56 p.m. TABlE TENNIS At Ga!atsi Oiym_t:ic Hall Women's Doubles Quartenlnals, 4 a.m. Men's Doubles Fourth Rou11d, 6 a.m. Men's Doubles Fourth RoLmd, 7 a.m. Women's Singles Fourth R0tmd, 11 a.m. Women's Singles Fourth R~und, Noon Men's Singles Fourth Round, 1 p.m. Men's Singles Fourth Round, 2 p.m. TI'AM HAND !\All At Sports Pax; !ion Men Pool A, Croatia vs. South K.crea, 2:30 a.m. Pool A, Iceland vs. Sloven13, 4:30a.m. Pool B, France vs. Hungary\ 7:30a.m. PoolS, Greece vs. Egypt, ~;30 a.m. Pool A, Spain vs. RUSSia, 1'2:30 p.m. Pool B, Germany vs. Braztl, 2:30p.m. TENNIS At Olympic Tenni::;; Center Men's Singles Third Rounci, 10 a.m. Women's Singles Thitd Round, 10:01 a.m. Men's Doubles Qua~rfln~\s. 10:02 a.m. Women's Doubles Second Round, 10:03 a.m. VOllEYBAll At Peace & Fiiendsh.lo Stadium Women ' Games, 2 a.m., 4 a.m., 7 C\Xn., 9 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 2:30p.m. WATER POlO At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Maroussi Women Australia vs. Kazakstan, 2:30a.m. United States vs. Canada, 3:45 a.m. · Russia. vs. Hungal)', 9:30a.m. Greece vs. Italy, 10:45 a.m. WEIGHTLIFTING . At Nlkala Olympic Weif,11tlifting Hall Men's 69kg ·Group B, 3:30a.m. Women's 63kg ~Group B, G a.m. Women's 63kg- Group A, 9:30a.m. Men'S 69kg- GrOup A, 1 p.m.

Thursday, Aug. 19 ARCHERY At Panathina!ko Stadium Men's Individual Eliminations, 1:30 a.m.

1:50 a.m. Men's Ughtweigflt Four semifinals, 2:10a.m. Men's Quadruple Sculls Sem1fina!s, 2:30 a.m. Men's lightweight Double Sculls Semifinals, 2:50a.m. Women's Single Sculls Final B, 3:10a.m. Men's Single Sculls Final B, 3:20a.m. · Women's Pair Final B, 3:30a.m. Men's Pair Final B, 3:40 a.m. Women's Double Sculls Final B, 3:50a.m... Men's Double Sculls Final B, 4 a.m. Men's Four Final 8, 4:10a.m. Women's Single Sculls Final C, 4:20a.m. Men's Single Sculls Final C, 4:30a.m. Women's Single Sculls Final D, 4:40a.m. Men's Single Sculls Final D, 4:50a.m. Men's Single Sculls FinalE, 5 a.m. SAILING At Agios Kosmas Olympic Sailing Center Men'S Single-handed Oinghy-Fmn, 6:01a.m Men's Windsurfer- Mistral, 6:02a.m. Open Single-handed Dinghy-laser, 6:03 a.m. Men's Double-handed Omghy-470, 6:04 a.m. Women's J(eelboatYngling, 6:05a.m. Women's Wmdsurfer- Mistral, 6:06a.m. Women's Double-handed Dinghy-470, 6:07 a.m Women's Single-handed Dinghy-Europe, 6:08a.m. SHOOTING At Marlmpoulo Olympia Shooting Center Men's 10-meter Running Target Qualifications, 2 a.m. Women's Skeet Qualifications, 3 a.m. Men's 10-meter Running Target Final, 5:30 a.m. Women's Skeet Final, 7:30a.m. SOFTBAlL At Olympic Softball Stadium Taiwan vs. Chtna, 2:30a.m. · United States vs. Greece, 5 a.m. Japan vs.ltaly, 10 a.m. Canada vs. Australia, 12:30 p.m. SWIMMING At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Marou~si Heats · Men's 50-meter Freestyle, 3 a.m. Women's 800-meter Freestyle, 3:33a.m. Men's 100-meter Butterny, 4:10a.m. Women's 200-meter Backstroke, 4:49 a.m. Rnals Men•s·5o-meter Freestyle Sem!ftnals, 12:30 p.m. Women's 200-meter Breaststroke Final, 12:39 p.m. Men's 200·meter Backstroke final, 12:461 p.m. Women's 200·meter Backstroke Semifinals, 12:53 p.m. Men's 200-meter lndtvldual Medley Final, 1:14 p.m. Women's 100-meter Freestyle Final, 1:30 p.m. Men's 100-meter Butterfly Semifinals, 1:45 p.m. TABlE TENNIS At Galatsl Olympic Hall Women's Doubles Semifinals, 4 a.m. Men's Doubles Quarterfinals, 6 a.m Women's Singles Quarterfinals, 11 a.m. TEAM HANDBAll At Sports Pavilion Women Pool B Angola vs. South Korea, 7:30 a.m. Pool A Greece vs, China, 9:30a.m. Pool A Brazil vs. Ukraine, 12:30 p.m. Pool B Spain vs. Denmar'l{, 2:30 p.m. TENNIS At Olympic Tennis Center Men's Singles Quarterfinals, 10 a.m. Women's Singles Quarterfinals, 10:01 a.m. Men's Doubles Semifinals, 10:02 a.m. Women's Doubles QuaJterfinals, 10:03 a.m. VOLLEYBAll At Peace & Friendship Stadium Men Matches, 2 a.m., 4 a.m., 7 a.m., 9 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 2:30p.m. WATER POlO At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Marnussi Men Serbia and Montenegro vs. Kazakstan, 2:30 a.m. United States vs. Hungary, 3:45 a.m Spain vs. Australia, 9·30 a.m Italy vs. Germany, 10:45 a.m. Egypt vs. Greece, 2 p.m. Croatia vs. Russia, 3'15 p.m. WEIGHTUFTING At Nikaia Olympic WeigfltJifting Hall Men's 77kg ~Group B, 3:30a.m Women's 691~- Group B, 6 a.m. Womeri's 69kg ~ Group A, 9:30 a.m. Mel'l'S 77kg ·Group A, 1 p.rri. :

Friday, Aug. 20 ARCHERY At Panathinaika Stadium women's Team "Eliminations, 1:30 a.m. Quarterlinals, 3:30a.m. Semifinals, 8:45a.m. Bronze Medal, 9:44 a.m. Gold Medal, 10:14 a.m.

· Quarterfinals, 8:45a.m. seffiifinals, 9:45a.m. ATHlETICS Bronze Medal, 10:21 a.m. Gold Medal, 10:39 a.m. . At Ancient Stadium, Olympia Men's 20km Walk, 2 a.m. BADMINTON ·Men's Hammer Throw Qualifying Rounds, At Goudi Olymp;c Hat! ·2:15a.m Women's Singles Bronze Medal, 2 a.m. Women's Heptathton 100-meter Hurdles, Men's Doubles Semifinal 1. 3 a.m. 2:30a.m. · Mh:ed Doubles Bronze Medal, 4:20am. Men's Tnple Jump Qualifying Rounds, 2:55 Women's Singles Gold Me\lal, 7 a.m. a.m. Men's Doubles Semifinal Z, 8:30a.m: Women's Heptathlon H1gh Jump, 3:40a.m. Mixed Doubles Gold Medal, 9:50a.m. Women's 100-meter, Round 1, 3:45a.m. BAsKETBA\_l . Men's Hammer Throw Qualifying Rounds, At Hellimko lndoQ,r Arena 5:05a.m. Men ' Women's Heptathlon Shot Put, 12:30 p.m. Group ASerbia·MontenegrQ vs. New Zealand, Men's1500-meter, Round 1, 12:35 p.m. 2 a.m. Women's 100-meter, Round 2, 1'05 p.m. Group A ltalyvs. Spain, 4:f5 a.m. Men's High Jomp Qualifying Rounds, 1:20 Group B United States v::. Australia, 7:30 p.m. a.m. WOmen's Heptathlon 200-meter, 1:50 p.m. Group B Puerto Rico vs. Angola, 9:45a.m. Men's 400-mt:mlr, Round 1, 2:20p.m. Group A Argentina vs. Chrn~. 1 p.m. Women's Discus Throw Qualifying Rounds, Group B Greece vs.lithuat-;ia, 3:15p.m. 2:30p.m. BI'ACH VOllEYBAll Women's BOO·meter Round 1, 3 p.m. At Faliro Coastal Zone O:ympic Complex Men's 10000-meter, Final, 3:35p.m. Men Women's·SOOD-.meter, Round 1, 4:35p.m. Matches, 2 a.m., 3 am., 7:30 a.m., 8:3C BADMINTON a.m., 1 p.m., 2 p.m. At Goucii Olympic Halt wOmen Men's Srngles Semifinals, 2 a.m. Matches, 4 a.m., 5 a.m., 9:30 ·ctm., 10:3< Men's Doubles Bronze Medal; 4:40a.m. a.m., 3 p.m., 4 p.m. Women's Doubles Semifma!s, 7 a.m. BOXING Men's Doubles Gold Medal, 10 a.m. At Peristeri Olymp1c Sexing Hall BASEBAll Preliminaries At Helliniko Olympic Complex Welterweight(69kg), 6:30a.m. Reid 2, Taiwan vs. Italy, 3:30a.m. Ught Heavyweight (81kg). 7:31a.m. Field 1; Japan vs. canada, 4:30a.m. Ught Welterweight (64kg). 12:30 p.m. Reid 2, Austral1a vs. Greece, ·11:30 a.m. Welterweight (69kg), 2:31p.m. Field 1, Cuba vs. Netherlands, 1?:30 p.m. CANOE·KAYAK (SLAlOM RACING) BASKETBALL At-Olympia CanoejKayat.. Slalom Center At Hetliniko Indoor Arena Heats Women Men's Cano? Double 1st Rt";n, 3 a.m. Russia vs.Japan, 2 a.m, Men:s Kayak Single 1st Run, 3:40a.m. New Zealand vs. China, 4:15a.m. Men's Canoe Double 2nd Run, 5 a.m. Ufi!ted States vs. Spain, 7:30 a:m. Men's l<ayak Single 2nd Run, 5:40a.m. Czech Republic vs. South Korea, 9:45 a:m. FENCING Australia vs. Greece, 1 p.m. At Helliniko Olymp\~ Complex Nigeria vs. Braztl, 3:15p.m. Men's Team S~bre BEACH VOllEYBAll Preliminaries, 3 a.m. At Faliro Coastal Zone Olympfc Complex· Quarterfinals, 4:15a.m. Men Classifications, 5:30a.m. Round of 16. 7:30 a.m. . Semifinals, 7:30a.m. Round of 16. 8:30 a.m. Bronze Medal, 11:30 a.m. Round of 16, ·1 p.m. Gold Medal, 12:40 p.m. Round of 16. 2 p.m. Women FIELD HOC~U Round of 16, 9:30 a.m. At Heiliniko Olymp,..: Complex Round of 16, 10:30 p.m. Men Round of 16, 3 p.m. Pool A, 1:30 a.m. Round af 16, 4 p.m. Pool 8, 3:30 a.m. BOXING Pool A, 11 a.m. At Pensten blympic Boxing Hall Pool B, 11:30 a.m. Preliminaries ~ool A, 1 p.m. Featherweight (57kg), 6:30a.m. Pool B, 1'30 p.m. Ughtweight(SOkg), 7:31a.m. GYMNASTICS (ARTISTIC) ,. Bantamweight (54kg}, 12:30 p.m. At Olympia Indoor Hall Featherweight(57kg), 2:31p.m. Women's Individual AII·AI'(Iund Rnal, 2 p.m. CANOE-KAYAK (SLALOM RACING) JUDO At Olympic Canoe/Kayak Slalom Center At Ano liossia Olympic Hall Men's C2 Canoe Double Semifinal, 3 a.m. Men's 100~ Men's K1 Kayak Single Semifinal, 3:35a.m. Preliminaries/Repechages, 3·31 a.m. Men's C2 Canoe Double Final, 4:45a.m. Final of Repechage A, 9:34a.m. Men's K1 Kayak.Single final, 5:10a.m. Final of Repechage B, 9:35a.m. CYCLING (TRACK) Frnal ofTable A, 9:36a.m. At Olympic Velodrome Final ofTable B, 9:37a.m, ·Men's 4000·meterlndividtia! Pursuit Qualify· Bronze Medal A, 9:40a.m, ing Round, 9:30a.m. Bronze Medal B, 9:41a.m. Women's 500-meter'Time Tnal Final, 10:15 Gold Medal, 9:43a.m. a.m. Women's 78kg Men's 1km lime Tnal Flnal, 10:55 a.m. Pre!lminanes;Repechages, 3·30 a.m. Men's 4000-meter Individual Pursuit F1rst Final of Repechage A, 9:30a.m. Round, 11:55 a~m. Final of Repechage B, 9:31a.m. DIVING F1nal ofTable A, 9:32 a.m. At Athens Olympic Spans Complex, Maroussi Anal ofTable B, 9:33 a.m, Women's 10-meter Platform Preliminaries, Bronze Medal A, 9:38a.m. 5:30a.m. Bronze Medal 8, 9:39a.m. GoW Medal, 9:42a.m. EQUESTRIAN At Markopoulo Olympic Equestrian Center ROWING Individual Dressage Grand Prix- Day 1, 1:30 'At Schinias Olympic Rowir..g and Canoeing a.m. Center Women's Ughtweight Double Sculls Semifinals, 1:30 a.m. Men's lightweight Double Sclllls Semifinals, See 2004, Page H,9


THE CINCINNATI ENQUIRER

OLYMPICS

20 From Page HS Team Dressage Grand Pnx ·Day 1, 1:30 a.m. FENCING At Helj1mko Olympic Complex

Women's Team Epee Prelimmaries, 3 a.m. Quartertinals, 4:15a.m.

ClassWcatlons, 5:30 a.m. Semifinals, 5 30 am. Bron~e Medal, 11:30 a.m. Gold Medal, 12:40 p.m. FIELD HOCKEY At Hellm1ko Olympic Complex

Women

·

Pool A, 1"30 a.m Pool B, 3:30 a.m. Pool A, 11 a.m. Pool B, 1 p.m. GYMNASflCS (TRAMPOUNE) At Olympic Indoor Hall Women

Qualification -1st Routine, 9:30a.m. Qualification ·2nd Roulrne, 10:06 am. Ftnal, 10:48 a.m.

JUDO

At Ana l1ossia Olympic Hall Men's lOOkg-plus

Prelimmaries/Repechages 3.31 a.m. Final of Repechage A, 9 34 a m Rnol of Repechage B, 9:35a.m. Final of Tab'e A, 9:36 a.m. Final of lable B, 9:37a.m.

Bronze Medal A. 9:40a.m. Bronze Medal B, 9 41 a.m. Gold Medal, 9:43a.m , Women's 78kg-plus PrefimrnanesjRepechages 3 30 am Final of.Repechage A, 9:30a.m Anal of Repechage B, 9.31 a.m. Anal ofTable A, 9:32 a.m. Anal ofTable B. 9:33a.m. Bronze Medal A, 9:38 a m Bronze Medal B, 9'39 a m Gold Medal, 9:42a.m. SAILING At Agtos Kosmas Olymptc Sailmg Center Open S•ngle-handed Dmghy-Laser, 6:01a.m. Open Double-handed Dinghy-49er, 6·02 a.m. Women's Smgle--handed Dinghy-Europe, 6:03a.m. SHOOflNG AtMarkopoulo Olympic Shooting Center Women's 50-meter Rtfle 3-Position Qualifications, 2 a.m. Men's 50-meter Rtfle Prone Qual!f1cat1ons, 5 a.m. Women's 50-meter Rifle 3-Position Final, 7:30a.m. Men's 50-meter Rifle Prone Fmal, 7.30 a.m. SOCCER Women Quarterfinals F1 vs. E2 atPampeloponnisiakoStadium, Petras, 1l a.m. G1 vs E3 or F3 at Kaftanzoglio Stadtum, Tllessalontkl,ll am. F2 vs. G2 at Pankritio Stadium Heraktio, 11 a.m. E1 vs. G3 atPanthessaltko Stadtum, Volos, 11 a.m. SOFTBALL At Dl>·mptc Softball StadiUm Italy vs. vs. Canada, 2'30 a.m United States vs. Taiwan, 5 am Greece vs Australia, 10 am. Japan vs. China, 12.30 p.m. , SWIMMING At Attlens Olympic Sports Complex, Maroussi Heats Women's 50-meter Freestyle, 3 a.m. Men's 1500-rneter Freestyle, 3:27a.m. Women's 4 x 100-meter Medley Relay, 5 06 a.m. Men's 4 x100-meter Medley Relay, 5:28a.m. Fmals Women's200-meterBackstroke Final, 12.30 p.m. Men's 100-meter Butterfly Fmal, 12:37 p.m. Women's 800-meter Freestyle Final, 12.43 p.m. Men's 50-meter Freestyle Final, 1:05 p.m. Women's 50-meter Freestyle Semifinals, 1:20 p.m. TABLE TENNIS At Galatsi Olympic Hall Men's Doubles Semifinals, 4 a.m. Women's Doubles Bronze Medal, 6 a.m. Women's Doubles Gold Medal, 7 a.m: Men's Smgtes Quarterfinals, 11 a.m. __ TEAM HANDBAll At Sports Pavilion Men Pool A South Korea vs. Iceland, 2:30am. Pool A Spain vs. Slovenia, 4:30a.m. Pool B Braztl vs Greece, 7:30a.m. Pool BHungaryvs. Germany, 9:30 a,m Pool ARussia vs. Cmatia, 12:30 p.m. Pool 8 France vs. Egypt, 2:30p.m. TENNIS At Olymp1c iennis Center Men's Smgles Semtfinals, 10 a.m. Women's Singles Sem1finals, 10.01 a.m. Men's Doubles Bronze Medal, 10:02 a.m Womert's Doubles Semlllnals, 10.03 a.m. VOLLEYBALL At Peace & Fnendsh1p Stadium Women Matches, 2 a.m., 4 a.m., 7 a.m., 9 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 2:30p.m. WATER POLO At Athens Olymptc Spor..s Complex, Marouss1 Women Italy vs. Kazakstan, 2 am Umted States vs. Russia, 3:15a.m. Hungary vs. canada, 9:45a.m. Australia vs Greece, 11·30 a.m. WEIGHTUFTING At Nika1a Olympic Weightflfting Hall Women's 75kg Group A, 1 p m.

Saturday, Aug. 21 ARCHERY At Panathinaiko Stadium Men'sTeam EIJmtnatlons, 1:30 a.m. Quarterfinals, 3:30 a.m. Semlfillals, 8:45a.m. Bronze Medal, 9:44a.m. Gold Medal, 10:14 am. ATHLETICS At Anc1ent Stadium, Olympia Men's Discus Throw Quall~·lng Rounds, a.m. Warnell'S 400-meter Hurdles, Roulld 1, 2.05 a.m. Warnell's 400-meter, Round 1, 2·45 a.m. Warnell'S Heptathlon Long Jump, 3 a.m. Men's Discus Throw Qualifying Rounds, 3:30 a.m. Men's 100-met~r. Round 1, 3'35 am Women's Heptathlon Javeltn Throw, 11:30 a.m. Women's Pole Vault QualtFymg Rounds, Noon Men's 100-meter, Round 2, 12:40 p.m. Wernert's Heptathlan Javelin Throw, 12:45 p.m. Women's 100-meter Semifinals, 1.20 p.m Women's Trtple Jump Quallfymg Rounds, 1:30 p.m. Women's 800-meter Semifinals, 1:40 p.m. Warnell'S DISCUS Throw Rna I, 2:10p.m. • Men's t'iQO-meter Semifinals, 215 p.m. Warnell'S Heptathlon 800-meter Anal, 2:40 p.m. Men's 3000-meter Steeplechase, Round 1, 3:05p.m. Warnell'S 100-meter Final, 3:55p.m. BADMINTON At Goudt OlympiC Hall Warnell's Doubles Bronze Medal, 2 a.m. Men's Singles Brorue Medal, 3:45a.m. Warnell's Doubles Gold Medal, 7 a.m Men's Singles Gold Medal, 8:10a.m. BASEBALL At Helllmko Olympic CompleK Reid 2, Japan vs. Taiwan, 3:30a.m. Reid 1, Canada vs. Cuba, 4 30 am Reid 2, Netherlands vs. Australia, 11:30 a.m. Reld 1, Italy vs. Greece, 12:30 p.m. BASKETBALL At Helllnlko Indoor Arena Men Australta vs Puerto R1co, 2 a.m. Spain vs. Serbia-Montenegra, -1:15 a.m. New Zealand vs. Argentina, 7.30 a m. Chma vs. Italy, 9:45a.m Uthua~Ja vs. Umted States, 1 p.m. Angora vs. Greece, 315 p m. BALL ympic Complex

tara 1 llt--?- ,,M:es s e. atetf Oml, t4.8k3.0 WATER>.>, 0· I 300k2 rrM I, e ,. w

PICS SCHEDULE

Preliminaries Flyweight(51kg), 6:30a.m. Middlevleight (75kg), 7.31 a.m. Light Rywe~ght (4Bkg), 12:30 p m. Middleweight (75kg), 2'31 p.m.

9th place, 4:30a.m. Quanerilnall, 7:30a.m. Quarterfinal 2, 9:30 a.m. Quarterfinal 3, 12:30 p.m. Quanertlnal4, 2:30 p.m.

CYCUNG (TRACK) At 01ymp1c Velodromo Men's Team Spnnt Qualifying Round, 9:30 am. Women's 3000-meter lndtv!dual PursUit Qualifying Round, 9'50 am Men's Team Spnnt Arst Round, 10:25 a.m_ Men's 4000-meter lndt~tdual Pursuit Anal 3-4, 10.40 a.m. Men's 4000·meter Individual Pursuit Fmal 1-2, 10:47 a.m. Men's Team Sprrnt Final 3-4, 11:05 a.m. Men's Team Sprint Fina11-2, 11:10 am. women's 3000-meter Individual Pursuit Rrst Round, 11.25 a.m.

VOLLEYBAll At Peace & Fnendsh1p Stadmm Women · Quarterfinal1, 7 a m Quarterfinal2, 9 a.m. Quartertlnal3, 12:30 p.m. Quarterfinal4, 2:30 p.m. WATER POLO At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Marousst Women 5th place, 3:45 a.m. Semifinal!, 10 a.m. Sem1fina12, 11:15 a.m. WEIGHTliFTING At Nika1a O!ymp1c Weightlifting Hall Men's 105kg- Group B, 9·30 am Men's 105kg ·Group A, 1 p.m. WRESTLING (GRECO·ROMAN) At Ana l.iOSSia Olymp c Halt Men Pool Eliminations 66kg, B4kg, 120k~ 2:30 a.m. 55kg, 66kg, 120k~ 4 a.m. 55kg, B4kg, 5'30 a m. 66kg, B4kg, 120kg, 10:30 a.m. 55kg, Noon Qualifications 66kg, 12Dkg 12:50 p.m 55kg, 84kg, 1:25 p.m.

DIVING At Athens Olymp1cSports Complt!l, Maroussi Women's 10-meter Platform Serl!lfinals, 6:30 EQUESTRIAN At Markopoulo Olympic Equestrian Center IndiVidual Dressage Grand Pnx ~ Day 2, 1:30 am. Team Dressage Grand Pnx- Day 2, 130 am. FENCING At Hel!iniko Olympic Complex Men's ieam Foil Preliminaries, 3 a.m. Quarterfinals, 4.15 a.m. Class1ficauons, 5:30am. Semifinals, 5:30 a.m. Bronze Medal, 1130 a m Gold Medal, 12:40 p m

VVednesday,Aug.25

FIELD HOCKEY At Hellini;m Olympic Complex Men Pool B, 1:30 a.m. Poor A, 3'30 a m Pool B, 11 a.m. Pool A, 11:30 a.m. PooiB,1pm Pool A, 1:30 p.m. GYMNASTICS {TRAMPOLINE) At Olympic Indoor HnH Men Quahf1cat1on -1st Routine, 9:30a.m. Qualification - 2nd Routine, 10:06 a.m. Final, 10:~8 a.m. ROWING At Schinias Olympic Rowing am! Canoemg Center women's Smgle Sculls Flnal A. 1:30 a.m. Men's Single Sculls Final A, 1:50 a.m. women's Patr Final A, 2:10a.m Men's Pa1r Rna! A. 2:30a.m. Women's Double Sculls Final A, 2:50a.m. Men's Double Sculls Fmal A, 3:10a.m. Men's Four Final A, 3:30 a.m. Women's lightweight Double Sctllls Fmar B, 4:10a.m. Men's Ugl1twe!ght Double Sculls Final B, 4·20 am Men's Ughtwelght Four Anal B. ll 30 a.m. Women's Quadruple Sculls Finalll 1 4·40 a m. Men's Quadruple Sculls Anal B1 n:50 a.m. Men's Eight Final B, 5 a.m. Women's Ughtweight Double Sc~J!ts Final C, 5:10a.m. Men's Ughtweight Double Scull:; Rna! C, 5·20 a.m SAIUNG At Ag1os Kosmas Olympic Samrg Center Men's Double-handed Dmghy-~"0 • Final, 6:01am. Men's Single-handed Dinghy-Fifln • Final, 6·02 a.m Men's Wmdsurfer ·Mistral, 6.03 rt m Women's Keelboat Yngling- Fmal, 6:04a.m. Women's Double-handed Dmgl\~·470- Final, 6.05 am Women's Wmdsurter ~Mistral, 6:06a.m. Open Multihull- Tornado, 6:07a.m. Men's Keelboat· Star, 6 08 a.m SHOOTING At Markopoulo Olympic Shooting Center Men's 25-meter Rapid Fire Pistol Qua!Jfica~ tions, 2 a.m. Men's Skeet Qualifications, 3 a.m., Men's 25-meter Rapid Fire Pistol Final, 7:30 SOCCER Men Quarterfinals Game at Karatskakl Stadium, Athans, 11 a.m. Game atPankritio Stadium, Hera Kilo, 11 a.m. Game at Pampeloponnisiako Stcdlum, Pa~ trns, 2 p.m. Game atKaftanzoglio Stadium, Thessalonikt, 2 p.m. -SWJMMINr' At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Maroussi · Rnals Women's 50-meter Freestyle Anal, 12:30 pm. Men's 1500-meter Freestyle Fmal, 12:36 pm Women's 4 x100-meter Medley Relay Fmal, 1:06 p.m. Men's4 x100-meterMedley Relay Final, 1:25 p.m. TABLE TENNIS At Galatst Olymptc Hall Women's Smgles Semifinals, 4 a.m. Men's Doubles Bronze Medal, 6 Cl m. Men's Doubles Gold Medal, 7 a.m. TEAM HANDBALL At Sports Pav111on Women Pool B, Angola vs France, 7:30a.m. Pool A, Ukraine vs. Greece, 9:30a.m. Pool B, South Korea vs. Spain, 12 30 p.m. Pool A, Braz1l vs. llungal)', 2:30p.m. TENNIS At Olympic Tennis Center Men's Smgles Bronze Medal, 10 ll m. Women's Smgles Bronze Medal, 10.01 a.m. Women's Smgles Gold Medal, 10:02 a.m. Men's Doubles Gold Medal, 10:01! a.m. Women's Doubles Brorue Medal, 10:06 a.m. VOLLEYBALl At Peace & Fnendshlp Stadmm Men Matches-, 2 a.m., 4 a.m, 7 am, 9 a.m, 12:30 p.m., 2:30p.m. WATER POLO AtAthensO\ymptc Sports Complex. Maroussi Men Kazakstan vs. Hungary, 2:30a.m. Egypt vs.ltaly, 3:45a.m Germany vs. Spain, 9:30a.m. Greece vs. Austraila, 10 45 a.m Serbia and Montenegro vs Croallil, 2 p.m. Russia vs United States, 3:15p.m. WEIGHRIFTING At Nikaia Olympic Weightliftirl(( Hall ,Men's 85kg- Group 8, 3:30a.m. women's 75kg-plus- Group B, 6 f .m. Women's 75kg-plus- Group A, 9:30a.m. Men's 85kg- Group A, 1 p.m

Sunday, Aug. 22 ATHLETICS Women's Marathon 11 a.m.AtAnclentStadium, Olympta Men's High Jump final, 12'30 p.m Women's 100-meterHurdles Round 1,12:35 p.m. Men's Triple Jump Final, 1:10 p.m. Men's Wheelchair 1500-meter, 1:35 p.m. Women's Wheelchair 800-meter,1:45 p.m. Men'slOO·meter Semifinals, 1.55 p m. Men's Hammer Throw Fmal, 2:15p.m. Women's 400-meter Hurdles Semifinals, 2.20 p.m. Men's 1500-meter Semifinals, 2:50pm Womert's 400-meter Semifinals, 315 p.m. Women's 100-meterHurdles, Round 2, 3:40 p.m. Men's 100-meter Final, 4:10p.m. BASEBAll At Helltmko OlympiC Complex Field 2, Netllerlands vs. Taiwan, 3.30 a.m. Field 1, Greece vs. Japan, 4'30 a.m. Field 2, lt?lyvs. Cuba, 11:30 a.m. Field 1, Australia vs. Canada, 12:30 p m. BASKETBAll At Helliniko Indoor Arena Women New Zealand vs .czech Republic,~ a.m. N1gena vs. Russ1a, 4:15am. Brazil vs. Australia, 730 am Greece vs. Japan, 9:45a.m. China vs. United States, 1 p.m. Spain vs South Korea, 3:15 p.m. BEACH VOLLEYBALL At Fallro Coastal Zone Olympic Complex Quarterfinals Men, 7:30 a.m. Men, 8:30a.m. Women, 9·30 am.

Misty May (right), from the U.S., works against Brazil's Adriana Behar in the World Tour beach volleyball final, which the U.S. won in June. CYCLING (TRACK) Women's 100-meter Hurdles Semifinals, At Olymptc Velodrome Noon Women's Sprint Qualifying Round (2"cl0-me· Men's 400-meter Hurdles, Round 1, 12:30 ter), 2 a.m. p.m Men's Sprint Quallfymg Round (200-meter). Men's Discus Throw Final, 1:20 p.m. 2:15a.m. Women's 200-meter, Round 2,1:25 p m. Men's 4000-meter Team Purswt Qualifying Women's BOO-meter Fmal, 1:55pm Round, 2:35a.m. Men's 400-meter Final, 2:05p.m. Women's Spnnt 1/8 Rnals, 9:30 a.m. Men's Decathlon 400-meter, 2:20p.m. 1 Men's Sprint 1/16 Finals, 9:50a.m. Women's 5000-meter Final, 3 p m. Warnell's Sprint 1/8 Finals Repechages, BASKETBALL 10·25 am At Hellmrko Indoor Arena Men's Sprint 1/16 Repechages, 10:30 a.m. Men Women's 3000-meter Individual Pursuit final Spam vs. New Zealand, 2 a.m. 34, 10:40 a.m. • Uthuama vs. Australia, 4:15a.m. Women's 3000-meter lndMd ual Pursuit Fmal Unlted.States vs. Angola, 7:30 a.m. 1-2, 10:45 a.m. Serbia-Montenegro vs. China, 9:45a.m. Men's Spnnt ljB Fmals, 11:30 a.m. Italy vs. Argentina, 1 p.m. Men's 4000-meterTeam Pursuit F1rst Round, Greece vs. Puerto Rico, 3:15p.m. 11:20 a.m. BEACH VOLlEYBALL Men's Spnnt 1/8 finals Repechages, 11:50 At Fahro Coastal Zone Olympic Complex a.m. Semifinals DIVING Men, Noon At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Marouss! Men, 1 p.m. Women's10-meter Platform Finals, 2 p.m. Women, 2 p.m. EQUESTRIAN Women, 3 p.m. At Markopoulo Olympic Equestrlart Center BOXING Individual Jumping Qualification ~ 1st QualifiAt Peristeri Olymp1c Boxing Hall er, 2 a.m. Quarterfinals FENCING Bantamweight (54kg), 12:30 p.m. At Hell1mko O!ymptc Complex Feathe1We1ght (57kg), 1:31 p.m. Men's Team Epee Super Hea~101ght (91kg-plus), 2'31 p.m. Prelimmaries, 3 a.m. CANOE·KAYAK (FlAlWATER) Quarterfinals, 4:15a.m. At Schmias orymptc Rowmg and Canoeing Classifications, 5:30 a.m. Center • Semifinals, 5·30 a m Heats Bronze Medal, 11:30 a.m. Men's Kayak Single 1000-mcter,1:30 a.m. Gold Medal, 12:40 p.m. Men's Calloe Single 1000-meler, 2 a.m. FIELD HOCKEY Women's Kayak Fours 500-meter, 2·20 am At Helllmko Olympic Complex Men's Kayak Doubles 1000-meter, 2:40a.m. Women Men's Canoe Doubles 1000-meter, 3:10a.m Men's Kayak Fours 1000-meter, 3'40 a.m _Jo_q1_~1:EQ.?·!!k__ __. __ ~ Pool A, 3:30a.m. ~ - - CvCLING(lAAcK) Pool B, 11 a.m. At Olympic Ve!odrome Pool A, I p.m. Women's Splint Quarterfinals, 9:30a.m. GYMNASTICS (ARTISTIC) Men's Spnnt Classification 9-12, 9:45a.m. At Olympic Indoor Hall Women's Spnnt Quarterfinals, 9:50a.m. finals Men's Spnnt Quarterfinals, 10:05 a.m. Men's Floor Exercise 1 p m, Women's Sprint Quarterfinals, 10 20 a.m Women's Vault Flnal, 1:35 p.m. Men's 4000-meter Team Puerto Rmosutt FIMen's Pommel Horse, 2.08 p.m. nal 34, 10:30 a.m. Women's Uneven Bars, 2:43 p.m. Men's 4000·meter Team Puerto RicosiJit FiMen's Rmgs, 3:14p.m. nal1-2, 10:37 am. Men's Sprint Quarterfinals, 10:45 a.m. ROWING At Schmias Olympic Rowing and Canoeing Men's Spnnt Quarterfinals, 11:10 a.m. Center DIVING A Finals At Athens Olymptc Sports Complex. Marouss1 Women's Ughtweight Double Sculls, 1:30 Men's 3-meter Springboard Preliminaries, a.m. 6:30a.m. Men's lightweight Double Sculls, 1:50 a.m. EQUESTRIAN Men's Ughlv.e1gl1t Fours, 2.10 a.m. At Markopoulo Olympic Equestrian Centre Women's Quadruple Sculls, 2:30a.m. lndiVJdual Dressage Grand Prix Special, 1 Men's Quadruple Sculls, 2:50a.m. a.m. Women's Eights, 3.10 a.m FIELD HOCKEY Men's Eights, 3:30a.m. At Helhmko Olympic Complex SAILING Men At Agtos Kosmas Olympic Sailing Center Pool B, 1:30 a.m. Open Smgle-handed Dinghy-Laser ~ Anal, Pool A. 3:30 a.m. 6:01a.m. Pool B, 11 a.m. Open Mult1hutr- Tornado, 6 02 a.m Pool A, 11'30 am. Men's Keelboat- StEr, 6:03a.m. Pool B, 1p m, Open Double-handed Dinghy-49er, 6.04 Pool A, 1:30 p.m. a.m. · GYMNASTICS (ARTISflC) Women's Single-handed Dmghy-EumPe - FiAt Olympic Indoor Hall nal, 6:05a.m. flnals SHOOTING Men's Vault, 1 p.m. At Markopoulo Olympic Shooting Center Women's Beam, 135 p.m. Men's 5Q-meter Rifie 3-Posltton Qualifica- Men's Parallel Bars, 2:10 p m tions, 2 a.m. Women's Floor Exercise, 2:45p.m. Men's Skeet Qualifications, 4 a.m. MerJ's Honzontal Bar, 3.20 p.m. Men's 50-meter Rifle 3·Posttl0n Ftnal, 6·30 SAILING a.m. At Aglos Kosmas Olympic Sailing Centro Men's Skeet Fmal, 8·30 a.m Men's Windsurfer· Mistral, 6.01 a.m. SOFTBALL Men's Keelboat- Star, 6'02 a.m At Olympic Softball Stadium Open MultihuU- Tornado, 6:03 a,m. Semifinals, 2"30 am. Women's Windsurfer- M1stral, 6:04a.m. Semtfinals, 5 a m. SOCCER Bronze Medal, 10 am. Women TABlETENNIS Semifinal at Pankntto StadiUm, Herakllo, 11 At Garatsi Olympic Hall a.m . Men's S1ng!es Semifinals; 4 a.m. Semifinal at Pampeloponnis1ako Stadium, Women's Singles Bronze Medal, 6 a.m. Patras, 2 p m ' Women's Singles Gold Medal, 7 a.m. SOFTBAll TEAM HANDBAll At Olympic Softball Stadium At Sports Pavilion Grand Rnal (Gold Medal), 9 a.m. Men SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMING Pool A, Slovenia vs. South l<orea, 2·30 am At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Maroussi Pool A. Croatia vs. Spain, 4·30 a.m. Duet Technical Routine Prellminpry, 12:30 Pool B, Germany vs Frartce, 7 30 a.m p.m. Pool 8, Hungaryvs. Greece, 9:30a.m. TABLE TENNIS Pool A, Russ1a vs. Iceland, 12:30 p.m. At Galatsi Olympic Hall Pool B, Egyptvs Brazrl, 2:30pm. • Men's Singles Bronze, 6 a.m. TENNIS Men's Singles Gold, 7 a.m. At Olympic Tenms Center TEAM HANDBALL Men's Smgles Gold Medal, 10 am. At Sports Pavilion Women's Doubles Gold Medal, 10:02 a.m. Women VOLLEYBAll Pool B France vs. South Korea, 7:30a.m. At Peace & Friendship Stadium Pool A China vs Brazil, 9:30am. Women Matches, 2 a.m., 9 a.m., 7 am., 9 a.m., . Pool A Hungary vs. Ukraine, 12:30 p.m. Pool B Denmatk vs. Angola, 2.30 p.m. 12:30 p.m., 2:30p.m. VOLLEYBALL WATER POLO At Peace & Friendship Stadium At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Maroussl Men Women Matches, 2 a.m. Seventh Place, 3.45 a.m. Match, 4 a.m. Quarterfinal1, 10 a.m. Match, 7 a.m. Quarterfinal2,11:15 a.m. Match, 9 a.m. WRESTLING (FREESTYLE) Match, 12:30 p m. At Ano Uossia Olympic Halt Match, 2:30pm. Women WATER POLO Pool Elimination Matches At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Maroussl 48kg, 63kg, 2·30 am. Men 55kg, 72kg, 3 10 a.m. Germany vs. Australia, 2.30 a.m. 48kg, 3:50 a m. Croatia vs. Kazakstan, 3:45a.m. 63kg, 4:30a.m. Spam vs Egypt, 10 a.m. 72kg, 55kg, 10:30 a.m. Russia vs. Hungary, 11:15 a.m. 63kg, 4Bkg, 1110 a.m. United States vs Serbia and Montenegro, 2 721<g, 11:50 a.m. p.m. 551<g, 12.30 p.m. Italy vs. Greece, 3:15p.m. WEfGHTliFTING At Nikaia Olympic Welghtiifting Hall Men's B, 9:30 a.m.

3MV5m

•a ,J l'i • '''' ,; j ,/~t ~r

31 lhfeJil! .,,TJ' d.iv, ~-· L(]Un6n1l e/h -..'%"" 14t"'2t J . ;1. 1d:d 1111• f,

..,Pnil>,a.-.¢,

~~'1

=--,;;"f '"'' ".:

.e.

Serrufinafs, 5 a.m. Anals, 2 p.m.

~ . , AH; l:n 1 k.

55kg Qualifications, 2:50a.m. Semifinals, 4.10 a.m. 5th place, 10:40 a.m. Bronze Medal,l1:50 a.m. Gold Medal, 12:05 PJll. 63kg Qualifications, 3:10a.m. SemifiPals, 4 30 a m 5th place, 10:50 a.m. Bronze Medal, 12.30 p.m Gold Medal, 12:45 p.m. 72kg Qualifications, 3:30a.m. Semifirals, 4 50 am 5th place, 11:30 a.m. Bronze Medal, 1:10 p.m. Gold Medal, 1'25 p.m.

Tuesday, Aug. 24 ATHLETICS At Anc1ent Stadium, Olympia Men's Decathlon 110-meter Hurdles, 2 a.m. Men's liD-meter Hurdles, Round 1, 2:35 a.m. Men's Decathlon Dtscus Throw, 3 a.m. Men's 200-meter, Round 1, 3:20p.m. Men's Decathlon Discus Throw, 3:30a.m. Men's Decathlon Pole Vault, 6 a.m. Men's Decathlon Javelin Throw, 12.30 p.m. Men's Long Jump Qualifying Rounds, 12·45 p.m. Men's 200-meter, Round 2, 1 p.m. Women's 1500-meter, Round 1, 1:30 p.m. Women's Pole Vault Rna!,1:55 p.m. Men's Decathlon Javerm Throw, 2 p.m. Men's 400·meter Hurdles Semifinals, 2:05 p.m. Men's :woo-meter Steeplechase Fmal, 2:40 p.m. Wome11's 200-meter Semifinals, 3·05 p.m Women's 100-meterHurdlcs Rna1,3:30 p.m. Womer,'s 400-meter Final, 3:50p.m. eas... Decatblnn..J.50rbmeter__fmal, 4:05 p.m. Men's :500-meter Rna!, 4:25p.m. BASEBALL At Helliniko Olympic Complex Semifinal, 4:30a.m. Semifiral, 12:30 p.m. BASKETBAll At Hellln!ko Indoor Arena Womer.·s 11th place (A6 vs. B6), 2 a.m. Womer's 9th place (A5 vs B5), 8:15a.m. Men's 1tth place, 7:30 a.m. Men's 9th place, 9:45a.m. BEACH VOLLEYBAll At Fatlro Coastal Zone Olympic Complex Women s Bronze Medal, 12 30 p m Women s Gold Medal, 2 p.m. BOXING At Pensten Olympic Boxmg Hall

Quarterfinals Ught Flyweight (48kg), 12:30 p.m. LlghlWetght (60kg), 1:31 p.m. Ught Hea~'ll!lght (B1kg), 2:31 p.m. CANOE·KAYAK (FIAlWATER) At Schm1as Olympia Rowing and Canoeing Center Heats Men's Kayak Single 500-meter, 1:30 a.ffi. Men's Canoe Smgle 500-meter, 2 am. Women·s Kayak Single 500-meter, 2:20a.m. Men's Kayak Doubles 500-meter, 2:50a.m. Men's Canoe Doubles 500-meter, 3:20a.m. Women s Kayak Doubles 500-meter, 3:40 a.m .. CYCLING (TRACI\) At Olympic Velodrome Women's Spnnt Semifinals, 9:30a.m. Men's SpnntSem1finals, 9:40a.m. Women's SprintCiass1fiaation 5-8, 9:50a.m. Women's Sprmt Semifinals, 9:55a.m. Men's Spnnt Semifinals, 10:05 a.m. Women s Spnnt Classification 9-12, 10:15 am. Women s Sprint Semifinals, 10:20 a.m. Men's Sprint Sem,finals,10 25 a.m Men's PrJmts Race Fmal, 10:30 a.m. Women's Sprtnt Anal3-4- Heat1,11:20 a.m. Women's Sprtnt Anal1·2 ·Heatl, 11'25 a.m. Men's Spnnt Final3-4- Heat 1, 11:30 a.m Men's Sprint Final1~2- Heat 1,11:35 a.m. Men's Spnnt ClassJftcatmn 5·8, 11:40 a.m. Women's Sprint Anal 3-4 - Heat 2, 11.45 a.m. Women':l Spnnt Ftna\1-2- Heat 2, 11:50 a.m. Men's SortntAnal3-4- Heal2, 11.55 a.m. Men's Sprint Anal 1-2 ~Heat 2, Noon If nee· essary Women's Sprint Final 3-4 - Heat 3, 12:15 p.m. Women's Sprtnt Final 1-2-Heat3, 12:17 p.m. Men's Sprint Ana13-4- Heat 3, 12:20 p.m . Men's SpnntRnal1-2- Heat 3,12:22 p.m. DIVING At Athens Olympic Spor.s Complex, Maroussi Men's 3-meter Spnngboard Semifinals, 5 a.m Finals, 2"45 p.m. EQUESTRfAN At Markopoulo Olympic Equestrian Centre lndtviduaiJummng Quahf1cat1on- 2nd Qualifier, 2 a.m. Team Jumping Final- Round 1, 2 a.m. Individual Jumpmg Qualification- 3rd Qualtfi· er, 1:30 p.m Team Jumping Final· Round 2, 3 p.m. FIELD HOCKEY At Hel!iniko Olympic Complex Women Classtfic1ltian 5-8. 1:30 a.m. Class1ficotion 5-8, 4 a.m. Semtfinal1, 11 a.m. Semifinal2, !:30.p.m. GYMNASTICS (ARflSTIC) At Olympic Indoor Hall GymnastiCS Gala (Exhibition), 5 a.m. SJIIUNG At Agios Kosmas OlympiC Sailmg Centre Open Double-handed Omghy-49er· Races, 6 a.m.

T

>.,.

<

'*'I.

A.LiUJ30~.£M~

;

> !.,../

',, .,;_., ~

;,rG~. J.:~,<

0

<">

CYCLING (TRACK) Olympic Velodrome Men's Ketrln Arst Round, 9:30a.m. Women's Points Race Final, 9:45a.m. Men's Kemn First Raund Repechages, 10:25 a.m. Men's Ke1rin Second Round, 10:50 a.m Men's Madison Final, 11 a.m. Men's Keirin Fina17·12, Noon Men's Kemn Rnal1·6, 12:05 p.m.

TRIATHLON At Vouliagmem Olymprc Centre Men's Flnal, 3 a.m. VOLlEYBALl At Peace & Fnendshtp StMmm Women's Semlflnall, 12:30 p.r.t Women's Semifinal2, 2:30p.m. WRESIUNG (GRECO· ROMAN) At Ano Uossia Olympic Hall Men 60kg, 74kg Qualifications, 2:30a.m. 96kg Qualifications, 3.06 a.m. 60kg Semtfinals, 3:42 a.m. 74kg Semifinals, 4:06 a.m. . 96kg Semifinals, 4:30a.m. 60kg 5tll place, 10:30 a.m. 74kg 5th place, 10:42 a.m. 96kg 5th plaee, 10'54 am. 60kg Bronze Medal, 11:10 a.m. 60kg Gold Medal, 11:21 a.m. 74kg Bronze Medal, 11:46 a.m 74kg Gold Medal, 12:01 p.m. 96kg Bronze Medal, 12:26 p.m 961<g Gold Medal, 12'41 p.m. WATER POLO At Athens Olympic Sports Compl<Jx, Marouss! Women Bronze Medal, 10 a.m. Gold Medal, 11:15 am

Friday, Aug. 27

ATHlEnCS AtAnc1ent Stadium, Olympia Men's 50km Walk, Noon Men's Pole Vault Final. 1 p.m. Women'slong Jump Final, 1.05 p.m. Men's 4 x 100-meter Relay Round 1, 1:10 DIVING p.m. At Athens Olymp•c Sports Complex, Maroussi Women's 4 x400-meterRelay R0und 1, 1:20 Women's 3-meter Springboard Preliminaries, p.m. 6:30a.m Men's 4 x 400-meter Relay Round 1, 1:35 EQUESTRIAN p.m. At Markopoulo Olympic Equestrian Centre Women's Javelin Throw Anal. 1:55 p.m. lndiv1dual Dressage Fmal Grand Prix Free- Men's 110-meter Hurdles Final, :2.30 p.m. style, 8:30 a m. Women's 10000-meter Fmal, 2:50pm. -~ --- - --FIEtD-HOCKEY- - - - .Women's3_x 10Q:..m~er,_Belay Fi_D_91, 3:45 p.m. At Helhmko Olympic Complex Men BASKETBALL Classification 9-12, 1:30 a.m. At Helliniko Indoor Arena ClassifiCation 9-12,4 am. Women Classification 5-8,11 a.m. 5th place, 4:15a.m. Semifinal1, 11:30 a.m. Semifinal, 7:30a.m Classification 5-8, 1:30 p.m. Semifinal, 9:45a.m. Semifinal2, 2 p.m. Men Semifinal, 1 p.m. SAILING Semifinal, 3:15p.m. At Ag1os Kosmas Olympic Sailing Centre Men's Windsurfer- Mistral- Final, 6 am BOXfNG Men's Keelboat- Star, 6:01a.m. At Pensten Olympic Boxm~ Hall Open MultihuU- Tornado, 6:02a.m. Semifinals . Women's Wmdsurfer - Mtstral • Fmal, 6:03 Fl~verght (51kg), 6:30a.m. Feathe!Weight (57kll), 7:01a.m. a.m Ught WelteJWeight (64kg), 7:31>.m. SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMING Mtddlewerght (75kg), 8:01 a.m. At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Marousst Heavywe~ght (91kg), B:3! a.m. Duet Free Routine Final, 12:30 p.m. Ught Fl~'lelght (48kg), 12:30 p r;, TRIATHLON Bantam.e1ght (54kg), 1:01 p.m. At Voullagmeni Olympic Centre Ughtwelght (60kg), 131 p.m. Women's Final, 3 a.m. Welte!Welght (69kg), 2 01 p.m. VOlLEYBAll Ught Heavyweight (B1kg), 2:31 P.m. At Peace & Friendship Stadtum Super Heavyweight (91kg·plus), 3:01p.m. Men ' CANOE·KAYAK (FIAlW!\TER) Quarterfinal1, 7 a.m. At Schmtas Olympic Rowing anl:l canoemg Quarterfinal 2, 9 a.m. Center Quarterfinal3, 12:30 p.m Final Qua~erfinal 4. 2:30p.m. Meq's Kayak Single lOOO·meter, 1:30 a.m. WATER POLO Men's Canoe Smgle 1000-meter, 1:45am. AtAthensOiymp:cSports Complex, Maroussi Women's Kayak Fours 50()-.metel, 2·20 a.m. Men Men's Kayak Doubles 1000-metr.\, 2·35 a.m. Classification 7th-12th, 2:30a.m Men'sCanoe Doubles 1000-metrr, 3:10a.m ClassificatiOn 7th-12th, 3:45a.m Men's Kayak Fours 1000-meter, 3:25am. Quarterfinal1, 10 a.m. CYCUNG (MOUNTAfN BIKE) Quartertinal2, 1115 a.m. At PamJtlla Olymptc Mountam Blke Venue WEIGHTLIFTI~G Women's Cross CountJy, 4 a.m DiVING At Nikaia Olympic We~ghWfting Hall At Athens Olymp11:: Sports Complex, Maroussi Men's 105kg-plus- Group B, 9:30a.m Men's 10-meter Platform Prellminanes, 6:30 Men's !05kg-plus ·Group A, 1 p.m. a.m. WRESTLING (GRECO-ROMAN) EQUESTRIAN At Ana l.ioss1a Olympic Hall At Markopaulo Olymp1c Equestrian Centre Men lnd1vidual Jumping Final 60kg, 74kg, 96kg Pool Eliminauon Matches, Round 1, 9 a.m. 2:30a.m. Round 2, 1:30 p.m. 55kg, 66kg, 120kg Semifinals, 4:05a.m. FIELD HOCKEY 60kg, 96kg Pool Elimmation Matches, 4:30 At Helllmko Olympic Complex a.m. Men 84kg Semifinals, 4 30 a.m. 7th place, 1:30 a.m. 74kg Pool Ehmmation Matches, 4:55a.m. 11th place, 2 am. 55kg, 120kg Final Classification 5-6, 6 a.m. 5th place, 4 a m 66kg, 84kg Final Classification 5-6, 6:12 9th plaoo, 4:30a.m. a.m. Bronze medal, 11 a.m. 60kg, 74kg, 961:g Pool B1mination Matches, Gold medal, 1:30 p m 10:30 a.m. GYMNASTICS (RHYTHMIC) 55 kg Bronze Medal, 10:10 a.m. At Galatsi Olymptc Hall 55kg Gold Medal, 10:20 a.m. lndwtdual All-Around Quaflficattan, 12:30 66kg Bronze Medal, 10:45 am. p.m. 66kg Gold Medal, 1 p.m. B4kg Bron?e Medal, 1:25 p.m MODERN PENTATHLON 84kg Gold Medal, 1:40 p.m. Women 120kg Bronze Medal, 2;05 p.m. At Goudi Olympic Hall 120kg Gold Medal, 2·20 p.m. Shooting, 3 a.m. Fenmng, 4 a.m. At Goud1 Olymprc Modem Pentatlllon Centre ATHLETICS Swimmmg, 7:20am. At Ancient Stadium, Olympia Riding. 9:10a.m. Women's High Jump Qualifying Rounds, 1 Running, 11:20 a.m. pm. SOCCER Men's long Jump Final, 1·20 p.m. Men's Javelm Throw Qualifymg Rounds, 1:25 Men's Bronze Medal atKaftanzogllo Stadmm, Thessalomkl, 1"30 p.m. p.m. SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMING Women's 1500-meter Semifinals,130 p.m. At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Maroussi Men's 110-meter Hurdles Semifinals, 2 p.m. Team Free Routine, final, 12:30 p,m, Men's 800-meter Semifinals, 2:25p.m. Men's Javelin Throw Qualifymg Rounds, 2:50 TAEKWONDO pm. At Sports Pavilion Women's 4 x 10Q..meter Relay Round 1, 3 Men's Under 68kg pm. Prellmlnanes, 4:12 a.m. Men's 400-meter Hurdles Flnal, 3:30p.m. Preliminanes, 8:54a.m. Men's 200-meter final, 3.50 p.m. r~epechage, 10:80 a m. Repechage, 11:12 a.m. BASKETBALL Bronze Medal, 12:05 p m. At Helllnlko Indoor Arena Gold Medal, 12:35 p.m. Men Women's Under 57kg Prellmmanes, 2 a.m. Prel!mmanes, 8:30a.m. RePechage, 9:54 a.m. 10:48 am.

Thursday, Aug. 26

ddlwe'~~r:P •. J"Jr$;Jll ""'' t-, ,(.,,, -·

e.

ltsCan let-.'l!,messaro u """'t:, ' : ..<.;:'!-. "

BOXING At Peristeri Olympic Boxtng Hall Quarterfinals Ayweight (51kg), 12:30 p.m. Middleweight (75kg), 1:31 p.m. CANOE·KAYAK (FLAlWATER) At Schinias Olymp1c Rowmg and Canoemg Center Semifinals Men's Kayak Smgle lOOD-meter, 1:30 a.m. Men's Canoe Single 1000-meter, 1:50 a.m. Women's Kayak Fours 500-meter, 2 a.m. Men's Kayak Doubles woo-meter, 2:20a.m. Men's Canoe Doubles 1000-meter, 2:40 am Men's Kayak Fours 1000-meter, 3 a.m.

GYMNASTICS (RHYT~MIC) Individual All-Around Qualificatl\)n, 8:30a.m. Group AU-Around Qualification. 12:30 p.m. MODERN PENTATH~ON Men At Goud1 Olympic H>ll Shooting, 3 a.m. Fencing, 4 am At Goudt 01y,11pic Modem Pentathlon Centre S\~imming, 7.20 a.m. Rtdmg, 9:10 a m Runmng, 11:20 a.m. SAILING AtAgtas 1\osmas OlympiC Smlmg Centre Men's Keelboat- Star, 6 a.m. Open Multihull- Tornado, 6:01 3.m. Open Double-handed Dmghy49er - Final, 6:02am. SOCCER At Karais!18kt Stad1um. Athens Women Bronze Medal, 11 a.m. Goid Medal, 2 p.m. SYNCHRONIZED SWm1MING At Athens OlympiC Sports Comp'ex, Maroussi Team Technical Routine, 12:30 p.m. TAEKWONDO Men's Under 58kg Preliminaries, 4:12a.m. Prel!mmanes, 8:54a.m. Repechage, IO.!B am. Repechage, 11:12 a.m. Bronze Medal, 12·05 p.m Gold Medal, 12:35 p.m. Women's Under 49kg Pre11mmanes, 2 am Preliminaries, 8:30a.m. Repechage, 9:54 a m. Repechagc, 10:48 a.m. Bronze Medal, 11:53 a.m. Gold Medal, 12:20 p.m. TEAM HANDBAll At Sports Pavilion ' Women 9th place, 5.30 a.m. Quarterf1na11, 7:30 a.m Quartelfinal2, 9:30a.m. QuarterfinalS, 12 30 p.m . Quarterfinal4, 2:30p.m.

Saturday, Aug. 28 ATHLEnCS -. • At Anctent Stadium, O!ymp1a Fmals Women's High Jump, 1 p.m. Women's 1500-meter, 1"30 p.m. Men's Javelm Throw. 1:40 p.m. Men's 800-meter, 1:50 p.m. Men's 5000-meter, 2:05p.m. Men's 4 x100-meter Relay, 2:45p.m. Women's 4 x 400-meter Relay, 3 p.m. Men's 4 x 400-meter Relay, 3:25p.m. BASKETBALl At Helllniko Indoor Arena Women Bronze Medal, 7 a.m. Gold Medal, 9:15a.m. Men 7th place, 2 am 5th place, 4:15a.m. 8ronze Medal, 1 p.m. Gold Medal, 3:30p.m BOXING At Pensteri Olympic 8oXJng Hall Finals AyNelght (51kg), 12:30 p.m. Feathetweight(57kg), 1:06 p.m. Ught Welte!Weight (64kg), 1:41 p.m. Middleweight(75kg), 2:16p.m. Heavyweight (91kg), 2:51 p m CANOE-KAYAK (FIAlWATER) At Schinias Olympic Rowing and Canoslng Center Final~-

Men's Kayak Single 500:0,eter, 1:30 a.m. Men's Canoe Smgle 500 meter, 1'45 a.m WOmen's Kayak Single 500·meter, 2:20a.m. Men's Kayak Doubles 500-meter, 2:35a.m. Men's Canoe Doubles 500 meter, 3:10a.m. Women's Kayak Doubles 500-meter, 3.25 a.m. CYCLfNG (MOUNTAIN BlltE) At Pamitha Olympic Mountam Bike Venue Men's Cross Country, 4 a.m. DIVING At Athens Olympic SpOrts Complex, Maroussi Men 10-meter Platform Semtfinals, 5 a.m. 10-meter Platform Fmals, 1 p.m. GYMNASTICS (RHYTHMfC) At Galatsi Olympic Hall Group All-Around Fmal, 9:30a.m. SJIILfNG At Agios Kosmas OlYmpic Sailmg Centre Open Multihull ·Tornado Fmal, 6.01 a.m. Men's Keelboat~ Star Final, 6:02a.m. SOCCER At Olympic StadiUm Men's Gold Medal, 3 a.m. TAEKWONDO At Sports PaVIliOn Men's Under 80kg Prellmmanes, 4:12a.m. Prelimmaries, 8:30 a.m. Repechage, 9:54a.m. ~ . Repechage, 10.48 a.m. Bmnze Medal, 11:53 a.m. Gold Medal, 12:20 p.m. Womert's.Under 67kg Prellmmaries, 2 a.m. Preliminaries, 8:54a.m. Repechage, 10.18 a.m. Repechage, 11:12 a.m. Bronze Medal, 12:05 p.m; • Gold Medal, 12:35 p.m. TEAM HANDBAll At Sports Pavilion Women's Classification 5-8, 2'30 am. Women's ClasstfJCation 5-8, 4:30 am. Men's 7th place, 7:30a.m. Women's Bronze Medal, 9:30a.m. Men's 5th place, 12:30 p.m. - Meri'SBronze-Medal;' 2·3-0""P"!i •· - -VOLLEYBAll At Peace & Friendship Stadium Women Bronze Medal, 11 am. Gold Medal, 1 p.m WRESTUNG (FREESTYl£) AtAno Uossia Olympic Hall Men 60kg, 74kg, 96kg Pool Elimination Matches, 2:30a.m. 55kg, 66kg 120kg Semtfinals, 4·05 am 60kg, 96kg Pool Elimination Matchss, 4:30 a.m. B4kg Semifinals, 4:30 a.m. 74kg Pool Elimmation Matches, 4:55a.m. 55kg, 120kg Final Classification 5·6, 6 a.m 66kg, B4kg Final Clesslflcation 5·6, 6:12 a.m. 60kg, 74kg, 96kg Pool Elimination Matches, 10:30 am. 5Skg Bronze Medal, 10:10 am 55kg Goid Medal, 10:20 a.m. 66kg Bronze Medal, 10:45 a.m. 66kg Gold Medal, I p.m. 84kg Bronze Medal, 1:25 p.m. 84kg Gold Medal, 1:40 p.m. 120kg Bronze Medal, 2:05 p.m. 120kg Gold Medal, 2:20p.m.

Sunday,Aug.29 ATHLEnCS Rnish at Panathina1ko Stadium Men's Marathon, 11 a.m. BOXING At Pensten Olymptc Boxmg Hall finals Ught Flywetght (48kg), 6:30a.m. Bantamweight(54kg), 7:06a.m. Ughtweight(60kg), 7.41 a.m. WelteiWelght (69kg), B:16 am. light Hea~'"ight (81kg), 8:51a.m. Super Heavyweight (91kg-plus), 9.26 a.m GYMNASTICS (RHYTHMIC) At Galatsi Olympic Hall lndlllldual All·Around Anal, 8:30a.m. TAEKWONDO At Sports Pav11ion Men's Under 80kg Prelimmaries, 3:12 a.m. Prelimmanes, 7:54 a.m. Repechagc, 9:18 a.m. Repechage,10:12 a.m. Bronze Medal, 11:05 a.m. Gold Medal, 11'35 a.m. Women's Over67kg Preltmmanes, 1 a.m. Preliminaries, 7:30 a.m. Repechage, 8:54 a.m. Repechage, 9:48a.m. Bronze Medal, 10:53 a.m. Gold Medal, 11·20 a m. TEAM HANDBALL At Sp'orts Pavilion Women's 7th place, 2 a m. women's Gold Medal, 4" aim. Women's 5th place, 7:30a.m. Men's Gold Medal, 9 a.m .• VOLLEYBALL

At Peace & Friendship Stad1um Men Bronze Medal, 5:30a.m. Gold Medal, 7 30 a.m. WATER POLO At Athens Olympic Sports Complex, Maroussi Men 9th place, 2:30 a:m. 7th place, 3:45a.m. 5th place, 5 a.m. Bronze Medal, 9 a.m. Gold Medal;10.30 a.m~ WRESTLING (FREESTYLE) AtAno lioss1a Olympic Hall Men 60kg, 74kg QualificatiOns, 2:30am. 96kg Qualifications, 3:06a.m. · 60kg Semtfinals, 3·42 am 74kg Semifinals, 4:06am. 96kg Semifinals, 4.30 am. 60kg 5th place, 7 a.!Jl

nWUf~::fii ~·~·

,

u;j., " " " ' " ~

ATHLETICS At Ancient Stadmm, Olympta Women'sJavelin Throw Qualifying Rounds, 12 p.m. Men's Pale Vault Qua11fymg Rounds, 12·15 p.m. .Men's 5000-mete·, Round 1, 12 55 p m Women's Javelin Throw Qualifying Rounds, 125 p.m Men's BOO-meter, Round 1, 2: p.m Women's long Jump Qualifying Rounds, 2:20 p.m. Women's 400-roeter Hurdles Fmal, 2:55 p.m Women's Hammer Throw Final, 3:10p.m. Men's 110-meter Hurdles, Round 2, 3·15 p.m. Men's 200-meter Sem1fina 1s, 3 55 p m Women's 200-meter final, 4:20p.m. BASEBALL At Helhmko O!ymprc Complex Men's Bmnze Medal Game, 4.30 a.m. Men's Gold Medal Game, 1 p.m. BASKETBALL At Helltmko Indoor Arena Women Quarterfinal, 7:30a.m. Quarterfinal, 9'45 am. Quarterfinal, 1 p.m. Quarterfinal, 3:15p.m. BEACH VOLLEYBAll At FaHro Coastal Zone Olympic Complex Men ~ Bronze Medal, 12:30 p.m. Gold Medal, 2 p.m

FIELD HOCKEY At Hell!mko Olympic Comp~ex Women 7th place, 1:30 a.m. 9th place, 2 a.m. 5th place, 4 a.m. Bronze Medal, 11 a m. Gold Medal, 1:30 p.m.

At Peace & Friendship Stadium Men's Semifinal1, 12:30 p.m. Men's Semifinal2, 2:30p.m. WATER POLO At Athens Olympia Sports Comp!e>(, Maroussi Men 11th plaCB, 2:30a.m. Classification 7th-10th, 3:45a.m. Classification 7th·10th, 10 am. Semtfinal1, 11:15 a.m. Semlfinal2, 2 p.m. WRESTLING (GRECO·ROMAN) At Ano LJossia Olympic Hall Men Pool Eliminations 66kg, 84kg, 120kg, 2:30a.m. 55kg, 66kg, 120kg, 4 a.m. 55kg, 84kg, 5:30a.m. 66kg, 84kg, 120kg, 5:30a.m. 55kg, Noon Qualifications 66kg, 120kg, 12:50 p.m. 55kg, 84kg, 1:25 p m.

-w

!.

lex~"

•''

pp.

•• i

_,;, ,__.,.

. ,:...,

JIC ' ~:

....

-~­

,.

'*·

• .J'> ... ,, ;

_\()

osotneQ\ bAthe a" n.

"" $1.

)f'),,,';::W,,"''

)

3 0 _am.

->~ ~ • > ! '1:0: ( ~ ""'-< ,.,a_ca mar.a

tes

stP 1 Stad1_ urn , ,,

M . ,m

-

"U

·OK,<,,.

aterfi.b e:n

.!fl...

&Y, :AE.L. Q,I)Wg 0 P, o!li . . 'ou,an af e1""" .na ffle,c,5sG&lnd


HlO

OLYMPICS

THURSDA~AUGUST12,2004

THE CINCINNATI ENQUIRER

COLLECT All !FOUR OlYMPICS COVERS Today's Olympics special section is published with four different covers each with a different local Olympian in the spotlight (from left): Heather Mitts, Ron Siler Jr., Nate Dusing, Mohini Bhardwaj. To collect all four or get your favorite: II Call The Enquirer at 651-4500 or 1-800-876-4500. II Go to Cincinnati.Com, KeYWord: Olympics, to order.. II Visit The Enquirer at 312 Elm Street and go to the Customer Service Center in the main lobby.

Olympics through the years

_j

About the section

-Games never at a loss for memories ·•- Hitler, terrorists, boycotts just a few Enquirer news services

We can't help but feel a little nos. talgic. The Olympic Games have re. · -· turned to Athens, Greece, for· the - · first time since 1896. 1bere have been so many unforgettable moments since. Join us as we travel down memory lane. 11m As Adolph Hitler was trying to create a master race, the star of the 1936 Games in Berlin was jesse Owens, an African-American. Owens, an Ohio State product, won gold medals in four events: the 100 meters, the long jump, the 200 meters and the 4x100 relay. Iii The 1972 Olympics in Munich provided what may be the evenfs Associated Press file darkest moments. Masked Pales- Jesse Owens showed up Adolph !· tinian terrorists broke into the Hitler at the 1936 Games in : '1 Olympic Village, killed two Israeli Berlin as the African-American athletes and took nine hdstages. won four gold medals. Five terrorists and all hostages were killed during a shootout with 1912 Games in Stockholm. Years German police at a military airport later, his name was take out of the as the terrorists tried to escape. · record books because it became lllll The terrorists' actions didn't known he had played in some prostop swimmer Mark Spitz from ere- fessional baseball games before the ating a positive memory for those Olympics. h1 1953 - 30 years after '72 Olympics. The_American won a he died- the International Olympic record seven gold medals. Committee restored his name to 11!1 Yes, we're still in '72, when the the record books, and his children u.s. men's basketball team suf- were given duplicate medals. fered its first loss in Olympic histo- ·· 3. Mildred Dldrikson- Nicknamed ry and earned silverinstead of gold. "Babe'~ because of her home-run Doug Collins' two free throws with hitting ability, she was the first three seconds left gave the Amer- dominant female athlete. She set icans a 50-49lead. Russia inbound· three world records at the 1932 ed the ball, and it was deflected. Olympics in Los Angeles (80-meter U.S. players celebrated. Olympic hurdles, javelin, high jump). officials put a second back on the 4. Wilma Rudolph- She had polio, clock and gave Russia another scarletfev!'r and double pneumochance. Again, it failed to score. nia (twice) as a child and was the Then a FIBA official came out of the 20th child in a family of 22 children. stands and made officials put three At 11, a brace came off Rudolph's seconds back on the clock-for un· withered left leg,. and she started lrnown reasons.1bis time, the Rus- competing in sports. In 1960, she · siansscored.TheU.S.didnotshow won three gold medals.in Rome up for the medal ceremony and re- (100 meters, 200 meters, 4x100-mefused to accept its medals, which ter relay). remain in a-bank vault in Sweden. 5. [lob Beamon -The high elevaIll! There was nothing small tion ol' Mexico City in 1968 created about 86-pound Nadia Comaneci's the kind of air that_ would aid a long performance at the 1976 Games in jumper. But even Beamon's worldMontreal. Comaneci, 14, achieved reconl' leap - 29 feet, 2'h inches the first perfect score in the history could aot have been expected. Noof Olympic gymnastics, scoring a body had ever jumped past 28 feet. 10.0 on her uneven parallel bars His record stood for 23 years. routine. And that was just the be- rl·ve s, fac's ginning. She earned seven' perfect r n111 L scores, won thi-ee individual gold lllll George Eyse, an American medals and helped Romania to a gymnast with a wooden leg, won team silver medal. six medals in 1904. . IIIli It was a tense moment when Ill! The middleweight Greco-Ro· U.S. sprinters Tommie Smith and man wrestling semifinal in 1912 beJohn Carlos raised their fists in the tween Russia's Martin Klein and Black Power salute while the na- Finland'sAlfredAsikainenlastedll tional anthem played during a med- hours. al ceremony in Mexico City in 1968. Iii Swedish shooter . Oscar · The controversial move earned the Swahn, 72, won a silver medal in the two suspensions from the roc. team doublt1'shot running deer II!IThe United States led a boy- eventin1920andbecametheoldest cott of the 1980 Olympics in Mos· medalist ever. cow that produced the lowest turn· lllll American Marjorie Gestring, out in 24 years Qust 80 countries). 13, won the gold medal in springSixty-five countries refused to par- board diving in 1936, She remains ticipate because of the Soviet inva- the youngest female gold medalist. sion of Afghanistan. lllll Ethiopian Abebe Bikila in 1964 became the first person to Name game win the marathon twice - six 1. Spiridon Louis - The Greek weeks after having his appen· · postal worker was the first to run dix removed. through the pillars of PanantheInformation collected [rom naic Stadium April 10, 1896, in Athens. More than 100,000 peovarious Web sites and news reports. ple were on hand to watch the Greek win the first marathon of Michael Phelps (right) · the modem-day Olympics. will try to break Mark 2. Jim Thorpe -The NFL Hall Spitz's record of seven · of Farner won the decathlon golds in one Olympics . . and pentathlon - nobody else has ever done that - at the

Cover design: Mike Nyerges Cover photos: Associated Press photographers Jayme Clifton Halbritter (Heather Mitts), Tom Kimmel (Ron Slier Jr.), John Todd (Nate Dusing), Rene Macura (Mohini Bhardwaj). Section editor: Michael Perry. Inside design: Jim Pleshinger. Copy editors: Lyndsay Sutton, Bill Thompson. Special thanks to: Enquirer photo editor Eileen Joyce, for setting up all the out-of-town photos; and Enquirer reporter Neil Schmidt, for keeping track of all our local Olympians throughout the year.

::;::<

'

Coming up this month Don't miss these Enquirer special sections: l!lliil Aug. 18: High school football II Aug. 27: College football

I

1ffi¥e Spiill~Jg ~ IRlltmiill)y

513-681.-PIAN

In September BengalsjPro football preview.

I

I

1 , I

EXPERIENCE THE OlYMPIC GAMES LIKE NEVER BEFORE ON APANASONIC HDTV WITH DIGITAL .CABLE~ .

I~------------------------, I

LEARN HOW YOU CAN GET I•

. Panasonic makes it easy to enjoy high-definition TV any way you like it. Choose frorri Plasma, LCD, or Projection HDTVs in many sizes. Select models are .CableCARD-ready and offer an ATSC Digital Tuner and HDMI input that make HD easy. The convenient and affordable way to bring great HD programming home. • A digital cable with HD box is all you need • No long-term contracts • No expensive equipment to buy • Get the most out of your HDTV

The Digital Cable advantage: . High-def programming you just can't get with satellite TV. , • More local broadcast channels in HD .. Your favorite sports in HD • Events like the 2004 Olympic Games

l~ I.

ALLOWANCE TOWARD DIGITAL CABLE WITH HIGH-DEFINITION*",~, For specific offer terms, visit 1 : www.panasonic.com/cableoffer : : or ca!I1-877-0NLYCABLE. · I

I

I

I

: Nowo\ll'thingspossible,~TIMEWARNER:' I

~CABLE

I

I

I

I

I

~------------------------·

MAGNOLIA A4DI01VIDI:O

S.IEAR~ Good tue. Groat prica

Sounahck" ~fnole~I"'J'ir'9"""-

36USC220506 "Where availi!ble. ""Other limitations and restrictions apply. Offer good for purchase and subscription 7/1/04 through 8.'3 t/04. Picture simulated.

-..~_......,.._:....___,...,.

_____. . _. _. _. . . . ....__~

.

~--.-·----- ·~'"--~~=~~~~-====~-------··-_. ~~-~~-~~-~~~~~-~~-·~~=-:-:~==~'::::-::~::.:::::::::--.:::--:--~~-=-~~.-=:::::--=·:·~~~---~·~:::_--~~_:::~~~=-~-- ·---~~-.,_. .,z:-~:.--.--Jw<-~---~

---~--....-~--------------....--.'~ -··~---···~- -----~-----

~---

--·------ -~---·-

~

Moeller High School 2004-05 Football Articles  
Moeller High School 2004-05 Football Articles