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October 11-17, 2018 Vol. 85 No. 10 www.spokesman-recorder.com

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THE VOICE OF THE AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY SINCE 1934

Black history unearthed in Mpls’ oldest cemetery By Jonika Stowes Contributing Writer In the heart of Minneapolis, a closed 20-acre cemetery serves as the resting place of many African American pioneers who helped shape the early beginnings of Minneapolis. Founded in 1853, Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery, located at 2945 Cedar Avenue South, is also the oldest existing cemetery in the city. While it only counts 1,800 tombstones, the cemetery holds the remains of more than 20,000 people. The cemetery is currently run by a committee of volunteers, known as Friends of the Cemetery (FOTC), who are working to uncover the history buried six feet underground. Susan Hunter Weir, a member of FOTC, said Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery has collected the remains of six wars, including the War of 1812, the Dakota Conflict, the Civil War, the Mexican American War, the Spanish-American War, and World War I.

First-ever BITCON conference bridges Black talent and technology are intertwined utilizing tech, the number of Black professionals that are employed by The Twin Cities is now tech companies or are foundhome to an inaugural confer- ers of tech companies are disence dedicated to “stomping proportionately low comthe divide” and increasing pared to other races,” said the number of Black women Elizabeth Cotton, BIT’s naand men in technology. tional director of strategic The Blacks In Technology partnerships. Conference, dubbed BITCON, Cotton, who guides develis organized by Blacks In opment, operations and marTechnology (BIT), a global net- keting strategy, is a tech vetworking think tank on tech eran with 10 years’ experience industry professionals with in project management and chapters across the country, program execution for govincluding Los Angeles, Cin- ernment and nonprofit agencinnati, Chicago, Houston cies. and Minneapolis. “[We want] to increase the “Although our daily lives ■ See BItCON on page 8 By Dwight Hobbes Contributing Writer

“Nine African American soldiers have been discovered who served in the United States Colored Troops (USCT),” said Hunter Weir. Those buried include Private Solomon Hare (Co F 25th USCT), Private Woodford Anderson (Co D 17th USCT), Ruben Burley (Co C 25th USCT), Archie Ramsey (Co K 17th USCT), and Amos

Watkins (Co G 17th USCT). In 1986, thenMinneapolis city council member Cheatham Goodridge Sharon Sayles Belton Courtesy of Friends of The Cemetery (who would go on to become the first Black mayor of Minneapolis in ceremony placing a headstone 1994) eulogized Private Oscar atop his grave. Private Vaughn Vaughn (Co H 16th USCT) in a ■ See Cemetery on page 8

‘Domestic violence is real’ — don’t ignore it ‘Sisterhood of Survival’ seeks to break cycle of abuse

By Paige Elliott Digital Editor The chilling story of LaShonda Childs, an African American Ohio teen allegedly shot and killed by her 28-yearold ex-boyfriend Trendell Goodwin, reverberated on social media last week. Prior to her death, Childs had posted on Facebook about the constant threat of danger she felt. “If you see the signs, don’t ignore it, y’all. Domestic violence is real,” she warned on Sept. 21. Childs was shot Oct. 2 and died early the next morning, two days shy of her 18th birthday. Her ex-boyfriend has since been charged in her murder. Her tragic death serves as a poignant start to Domestic Violence Awareness Month — a painful reminder of the need for open and honest dialogue about the issue. Sister Spokesman’s “Sisterhood of Survival” event on Oct. 6 provided a space for such a conversation. Community members packed a room at Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Center in Minneapolis to hear expert panelists Ethylon (E.B.) Brown, Saran Cryer, and Manu Lewis expound on the topic.

at NorthPoint Health & Wellness Center, opened his remarks on a conciliatory note. “I want to apologize for a lot of things that we [men] have done,” he said, his face wet with tears. “I consider learned behavior how we treat each other, and I do believe we can learn something different. “But, as a man, I realize how much we have broken our women down. And to start the healing process, we have to recognize what we have done,” he said. Bolin-Johnson furthered the theme of healing as she explained how, in learning to forgive her abusive ex-husband, she opened the door to self-love and acceptance. She also sought help from professionals and the church to aid in the healing process. “I had to be courageous; I had to fight for my peace,” she said. “I had to fight for my Sarae (l) and Jamieya Bolin-Johnson children and fight [generational trauPhotos by Steve Floyd ma]. Through forgiving him, I was free to love… I started to teach my children Domestic abuse survivor and author Marie Chanté, isis, and Alcina Washing- al trauma and how to break the cycle of about signs of abuse.” abuse to identifying abusive behaviors, Jamieya Bolin-Johnson, accompanied ton-Fowler. Panelists cited red flags to look for inThe one-hour discussion touched prevention tips, and the importance of cluding possessiveness and emotional by her young daughter, rounded out the panel. The afternoon was punctuat- on various aspects of domestic violence, self-love and care. ■ See ABuse on page 8 Lewis, a facilitator and case manager ed by spoken word performances from ranging from systemic and generation-

Twin Cities ‘Voices of the Civil Rights Movement’ honored By MSR Editors Twin Cities civil rights champions who helped to shape the state’s collective history are now part of a living multimedia library created to document the movement. Attendees gathered at the Minnesota History Center to honor St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter, Dr. Josie R. Johnson, former Minneapolis Mayor Sayles-Belton, Mahmoud ElKati and Harry “Spike” Moss for their contributions, ranging from fair housing to voter registration. The five are now part of the “Voices of the Civil Rights Movement” (VOCRM) platform, which is curated by Comcast NBCUniversal in collaboration with the Equal Justice Initiative. “The Twin Cities were not immune to the ire and intensity of racial discrimination,” said Ebonne Ruffins, vice pres-

ident of local media development for Comcast. s “Minneapolis and St. Paul civil rights leaders set a clear tone for effective lobbying and activism that was often replicated in states outside of the Midwest,” “The premiere of five ‘Voices of the Civil Rights Movement’ segments from the Twin Cities highlights the impact of this region — fair housing, voter registration campaigns, impassioned activism, overcoming discrimination, and choosing love during trying times,” she said. Ruffins first introduced the initiative in 2013 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, when Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech became a rallying cry for America’s Civil Rights Movement. It now stands “as a series of first-person interviews with participants from the march

(l-r) Phyllis Rawls Goff, Harry “Spike” Moss, Debbie Montgomery, Dr. Josie R. Johnson, former Minneapolis Mayor Sharon Sayles Belton, Toni Carter, Melvin Carter, Jr. and Mahmoud El-Kati Photo courtesy of Comcast NBCUniversal who could best describe their experiences before, during and after one of the most seminal civil rights events in American

history,” said Ruffins. With ing multimedia civil rights more than 16 hours of video platforms of its kind.” content, she said, “[It] is among the largest and furthest reach-

Visit MSRnewsonline.com for images from the event and to watch videos highlighting each of the honorees.


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October 11-17, 2018

The less rosy side of our ‘robust’ economy America in 2018 is enjoying faster growth, low unemployment, record numbers of job openings, and a stock market near an all-time high. Yet an alarming number of Americans are still struggling to get by. — Heather Long On more than one occasion this year, this column has made reference to America’s “robust” economic recovery and, in particular, how well Minnesota is faring. Among the counterpoints to Minnesota’s economic prosperity continue to be its rampant racial disparities that have plagued the state for well over a decade. Nonetheless, the dominant narrative, both here in Minnesota and across the nation, has championed record low unemployment, significant job growth, increased corporate profits, a strong GDP, and the second longest bull market in Wall Street’s history. But how many Americans are truly benefitting from this financial wave? This past May, the Federal Reserve published a report that twofifths of America’s adult population lack the savings to cover a $400 household emergency. And, according to the United Way, approximately 44 percent of U.S. households do not make enough to cover basic needs such as food, rent, transportation, health care and child care. A recent article in Forbes magazine has poked even a bigger hole in the frequent recital of a bountiful economy. In his piece “America’s Real Economy: It isn’t booming,” noted author and businessman Peter

Georgescu starts by writing, “Ostensibly, for the past 10 years, our economy has been recovering from the 2008 collapse,” adding that this rally has even intensified of late. He continues, however, by referencing an “alterative set of data that depicts a different America, where the overlooked majority struggles from month to month.” Georgescu goes on to cite a multitude of alarming statistics, which include: astronomical levels of credit card and student loan debt; the fact that two-thirds of American households have less than $1,000 in savings; and the projection that healthcare costs are expected to increase by as much as 20 percent in the coming year.

tainable, but they continue to put tens of millions of Americans on a collision course with financial disaster. Moreover, this nation’s economic disparities are a threat to its very future. Consider the world that we are leaving to our children, of whom four of 10 are already living in low-income households. But it not just our young people who will bear the burden of our mounting inequity; everyone is at risk. Among America’s most vulnerable and neglected populations are its seniors. For example, from suburban Cleveland comes the story of Robert and Jelaine Blocksom. First reported by the local ABC affiliate, Robert, 87, has come out of retirement to become a truck driver. The reason? So that the couple can afford to cover the medical bills associated with Jelaine’s illness.

Where is the respect, concern and support for both our youngest and oldest generations? What have we allowed ourselves to become? Perhaps the most telling data point centers on the purchasing power of American households in 2018. Although wages have been increasing by an average of nearly three percent per year, they have failed to keep up with the pace of inflation. As such, in 2018, a minimum wage employee in the United States must work more than 40 additional days each year just to earn “the equivalent of the 2009 minimum wage.” Not only are these trends not sus-

And the Blocksoms are far from alone. The number of Americans over the age of 85 who are currently working is approaching 300,000. This represents a steady rise over the past decade and is only projected to increase in the next five years. Additionally, the bankruptcy rate among seniors has more than tripled in the last quarter century. As long as the costs of food, housing, health care, prescription medications, and other basic needs skyrocket, our seniors (the majority of

whom live on fixed incomes) will continue to suffer gratuitously under the clutches of American greed. Where is the respect, concern and support for both our youngest and oldest generations? What have we allowed ourselves to become? And can we somehow muster the courage and compassion to change it?

Clarence Hightower is the executive director of Community Action Partnership of Ramsey & Washington Counties. Dr. Hightower holds a Ph.D. in urban higher education from Jackson State University. He welcomes reader responses to 450 Syndicate Street North, St. Paul, MN 55104. Photo courtesy of Ian Espino via Unsplash.com

In search of absent narratives New coalition aims to change whose stories the media tell and how they tell them By Charles Hallman Contributing Writer A local coalition is now in place that aims to change problematic racial narratives and their representation in local news media. The Saint Paul & Minnesota Community Foundations in July awarded a $250,000 grant to Truth and Transformation: Changing Racial Narratives in Media, a partnership of six community, media and academic organizations to create program materials, training sessions and an outreach plan. The coalition hopes to help news professionals “uncover their own biases and assumptions, and amplifying community solutions to narrative change,” a press release said. It also plans to reach out beyond the Twin Cities in an effort to improve statewide reporting on communities of color. “Narrative change and racial healing are critical components of creating racial equity,” Foundations President and CEO Dr. Eric Jolly said in the release. “We know this work is only possible through effective community partnerships, and this collaborative effort is an excellent example of the creativity and fresh thinking that is possible

truth, racial healing and transformation. The St. Paul-based community foundation received a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation in 2017 to support and sustain this process around the country. “We have to address the absent narratives… that are happening all around us,” Jolly said in an MSR phone interview. He said he believes that members of the media play an important role in dispelling false narratives within our communities. “Our goal is we will find a way” to improve media reporting of Blacks and other people of color, and the grant award will help the coalition to help news professionals “uncover their own biases and assumptions,” he said. The idea of a statewide focus to address narrative change in the news media was a convincing point for the Foundations to fund the coalition, added Jolly. “We had some other [proposals], but they weren’t as diverse. What impressed the Foundations was the quality of the coalition representing many facets of our community.” Although the partnership is Twin Cities-based, “I think it is essential that the outreach goes be-

The program will help news professionals “uncover their own biases and assumptions.” when we invite others to the table.” The partners and their primary roles include: • KMOJ Radio will help in content creation and community outreach. • Pillsbury United Communities will help in content creation and community outreach efforts as well through its Community Media Initiative, composed of North News community newspaper and KRSM-FM radio. • Minnesota Public Radio will serve as project and fiscal manager, partnership development, marketing and communications, and digital/ social media support. • The Minnesota Humanities Center will provide statewide conference design, develop education materials, and program evaluation. • Hamline University will serve as host site for a proposed statewide media conference in 2019 as well as help design and develop program content, facilitation, and educational resources. In 2017, the school was selected as one of the nation’s first 10 Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation Campus Centers by the Association of American Colleges and Universities. • The University of St. Thomas’ ThreeSixty Journalism, a nonprofit program that trains and supports diverse students, will lead in the collaboration of education and youth outreach and conference reporting. The grant is part of the Foundations’ work in

yond the Twin Cities into the small towns and small newspapers” around the state, he pointed out. “We want to go beyond the traditional media… I think the conversations by this coalition in the next several months will bring broader sources and fuller context” in stories about communities of color, marginalized communities, and disadvantaged communities both locally and statewide. “Our goal is to reduce the exaggeration in the representation [of communities of color] in traditional media.” Jolly called the coalition’s proposed two-day, statewide media conference for 2019 “an opportunity” to constructively critique the news media and help produce better coverage. “We will be talking in the community to our youth group and other organizations,” Jolly said. He also pointed out that the Foundations’ role in this effort largely will be what the coalition wants from them in terms of further assistance. “We will be involved if we are invited, but we want the community to have the power to do it.” The grant will also help, in part, to create a curriculum for future journalists in how stories should be reported, Jolly said. “We are not backing down from this.” Charles Hallman welcomes reader responses to challman@spokesman-recorder.com.

JOIN US!

open house at Saint Paul College Tuesday, October 23 • 5pm start here. go anywhere. Learn about more than 100 Associate Degree, Certificate and Diploma programs.

Let us know you’re coming! saintpaul.edu/OpenHouse Saint Paul College, A member of Minnesota State

If you need disability related accommodations to make this event accessible, please contact the Director of Access & Disability Resources at 651.846.1547 or AccessResources@saintpaul.edu. Saint Paul College is an Equal Opportunity employer and educator.


October 11-17, 2018

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Five principles for closing the learning gap in babies

By Charles E. Crutchfield III, MD

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hen it comes to improving learning and increasing brain development in children, the earlier we involve infants, the better. Sociologists are talking a lot about something called «the learning gap.» This is a gap in knowledge and ability seen between different groups of children. These groups can vary based on race or socioeconomic status. The key is identifying ways to close or even eliminate this learning gap in children. Closing the learning gap is a passion for Harvard Professor Ron Ferguson. He was stunned to be able to identify a learning gap in children as early as age two. As he has stated, “Kids aren’t halfway to kindergarten, and they’re already well behind their peers.” Brain development techniques can be implemented by caregivers well before any formal learning programs, like pre-school, begin. Even more encouraging is that these techniques are mainly low cost or

free. In a recent interview with NPR, Dr. Ferguson said: “Things that we need to do with infants and toddlers are not things that cost a lot of money. It’s really about interacting with them, being responsive to them.” So he developed a plan to help eliminate the learning gap in kids. It is a series of five principles that all caregivers can implement to increase early childhood development significantly. He calls these principles “The Boston Five.” His goal is to introduce “the Five” to the Boston area and then across the country. According to a recent report on NPR.com, the “Boston Five” principles are: 1. Maximize love, manage stress. Babies pick up on stress, which means moms and dads have to take care of themselves, too. It’s also not possible to over-love or be too affectionate with young children. Research shows feeling safe can have a lasting influence on development. 2. Talk, sing and point. “When you point at something, that helps the baby start to associate words with objects,” Ferguson explains. Some babies will point before they can even talk. 3. Count, group and compare. This one is about numeracy. Babies love numbers and counting, and there’s research to show they’re actually born with math ability. Ferguson says caregivers can introduce their children to math vocab-

ulary by using sentences that compare things: “Oh, look! Grandpa is tall, but grandma is short,” or “There are two oranges, but only three apples.” 4. Explore through movement and play. “The idea is to have parents be aware that their children are learning when they play,” Ferguson says. 5. Read and discuss stories. It’s never too early to start reading aloud — even with babies. Hearing words increases vocabulary, and relating objects to sounds starts to create connections in the brain. The Basics also put a big emphasis on discussing stories: If there’s a cat in the story and a cat in your home, point that out. That’s a piece lots of parents miss when just reading aloud. Maximize love and man-

age stress, principle #1, is related to a previous article I wrote on minimizing insecurities and maximizing success (“A good childhood can prepare us for a good life,” March 21, 2018 Spokesman-Recorder). Evident and crucial situations involving food, housing, and family insecurities can have devastatingly adverse predictive effects on children. For many people, this new understanding can open doorways to addressing and overcoming obstacles that can be life-changing. In a recent CBS news segment related to the issue of adverse traumatic childhood events and the way they affect subsequent human behavior, the correspondent, Oprah Winfrey, commented that this new way of looking at and understanding human

behavior was “absolutely lifechanging and will influence all of her future relationships.” Principle #4 must include music and art. These are essential for the developing brains of infants, too. Studies have evaluated the social, intellectual and emotional outcomes of young children who participated in art forms such as music, art, dance, theatre/acting, drawing and painting. Emerging research supports the intimate involvement in these activities and a positive influence on brain and intellectual development in children. Dr. Ferguson has decided that the best way to spread the word on these early learning techniques is to teach them where the babies and parents are. This teaching includes hospitals, community centers, so-

cial service organizations, pediatric clinics, barbershops and hair salons, and churches. When it comes to closing the learning gap in babies, they need love and attention. The more interactions we have with little ones, the better. Their brains are like super-sponges. They soak up everything that comes their way. Learn and use Dr. Ferguson’s Boston Five principles. Use them as soon as your baby is born. By doing so, you will put your child in the best position to enjoy a happy, successful life. For additional information on enhancing early childhood development and closing the learning gap, visit http:// boston.thebasics.org/. Charles E. Crutchfield III, MD is a board-certified dermatologist and Clinical Professor of Dermatology at the University of Minnesota Medical School. He also has a private practice in Eagan, MN. He received his M.D. and Master’s Degree in Molecular Biology and Genomics from the Mayo Clinic. He has been selected as one of the top 10 dermatologists in the United States by Black Enterprise magazine. Dr. Crutchfield was recognized by Minnesota Medicine as one of the 100 Most Influential Healthcare Leaders in Minnesota. He is the team dermatologist for the Minnesota Twins, Vikings, Timberwolves, Wild and Lynx. Dr. Crutchfield is an active member of both the American and National Medical Associations, and president of the Minnesota Association of Black Physicians.

Gluten sensitivity ‘epidemic’ has many causes

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Think you’re following a gluten-free diet? Not so fast. A physician who is a pioneer in discovering and diagnosing the problems with gluten says many products touted as gluten-free today are not. Dr. Kenneth Davin Fine, a gastroenterologist, brought gluten sensitivity to the public consciousness more than 20 years ago. He says during those early years, gluten-sensitive patients usually experienced significant improvement in their health on a “glutenfree diet,” but his patients have told him in recent years they have seen fewer improvements. “Products can now be labeled ‘gluten-free’ even if that food contains up to 20 parts per million of gluten,” said Dr. Fine. “While that doesn’t sound like a lot, a little gluten can go a long way in the reactions of the most active immune systems.” Gluten is a mixture of proteins found in the cereal grains wheat, barley, rye and oats. It causes illness in people with celiac disease, when the immune reactions to gluten damage the intestinal tissues — which is visible on a biopsy. More common is non-celiac gluten sensitivity. This happens when symptoms and intestinal dysfunction are present in the absence of such changes on a biopsy. Recent studies found that most (but not all) celiacs could eat gluten without resulting in damage to their small intestine. In his research, Dr. Fine has found that only about half of celiacs or non-celiac gluten sensitive patients can tolerate oats. He says “glutenfree oats” is a misnomer and may be responsible for symptoms experienced by people who think they are eating a gluten-free diet. Dr. Fine believes the gluten sensitivity epidemic is caused by: • A combination of greater immunoreactivity in most people stimulated by mainly environmental factors (stress, exposure to hormones in food, medicines, pollution, and possibly EMS from electronic devices). • The way many foods have been altered by producers so they can be manufactured in mass quantities more efficiently. • Widespread use of stomach acid-inhibiting medicines. • A general lack of breastfeeding in this country from 1955-1985 (when synthetic

infant formula was falsely touted to be more healthy than breast milk). Public health directives recommending that the public should eat mostly grains as part of the USDA food pyramid. An evolution of agricultural practices leading to hybridization of grains to increase their gluten content, and more widespread use of herbicides and pesticides. Recently, there also has been a significant increase in the mass marketing of products said to assist the gut microbiome in digesting food. The microbiome is the genetic material of all the microbes — bacteria, viruses, and fungi — in the body. Dr. Fine says the best way to keep a healthy gut and microbiome is to eat the right foods. “Researchers have sometimes detected a different microbiome in obese individuals compared to non-obese individuals. “Although this has attempted to be the blame for the obesity, it cannot be ruled out that their microbiome is different because they make different, and perhaps less healthful food choices,” said Dr. Fine. Other reasons for a poor microbiome are frequent exposure to antibiotics, the bactericidal chlorine added to public water, improper sleep, stress, and diets heavy in meat, cooked food (as opposed to raw vegetables, salads and fruit), and “junk food” and other sugar-laden foods. This is all typical of the modern lifestyle, which Fine says is a primary contributor to poor overall health. “If you really want to achieve a healthy body, you must have a healthy intestine and intestinal flora,” Dr. Fine said. “And when it comes to immunologic food sensitivities, one must really be more restrictive of antigenic foods than was necessary years ago because of the progression of this immunologic epidemic.” — Information provided by News and Experts. Dr. Kenneth Davin Fine has held staff positions at both Baylor University Medical Center and the University of Texas-Southwestern Medical School. His medical research has appeared in prestigious medical journals including The New England Journal of Medicine, Gastroenterology, The Journal of Clinical Investigation, and The American Journal of Gastroenterology.


February 16-22, 2017

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October 11-17, 2018

How to save energy (and coin) like a pro this winter By MSR Editors The colder months are fast approaching - many of us already have our heat thermostats up and running! While the Farmer’s Almanac reports a slightly milder and less snowy season than usual, but braving a Minnesota winter still requires a bit of preparation. What better time than now to winterize your house or apartment to not only save some coin, but also reduce your carbon footprint? Read on for 10 quick tips to manage your home’s heat without breaking the bank. Manage your temperature. Lowering your thermostat not only saves energy, but reduces your heating bill. Every degree you turn down saves about two to three percent. If you’re still not sold on lowering while at home, try turning it down when you leave for the day or before you go to bed. Don’t put your heat on blast Just know, though, that your house isn’t built like a car — so blasting the highest amount of heat when you get home won’t warm your house up any faster. In fact, your house will warm up at the same rate whether you have it on 70 or 80. The only thing that will be rising faster is your bill. Rotate your ceiling fan If you’ve got a ceiling fan, you can actually use it help redistribute heat. Simply run the blades clockwise position and you’ll now be able to push warm air down to the floor. Ditch your space heater This one may sound like blasphemy, but central heating systems actually work better and more efficiently than space heaters. In fact, space heaters only convert about 30 percent of the energy into electricity. So, unless you’re at the office in a cubicle icebox, we suggest turning this one off. But, if you simply must have a space heater, use it in a smaller area and make sure to turn it toward people and not open space. Get a humidifier A humidifier will add moisture to the air, which can help retain heat. That means those of us who like warmer temps can actually turn it down a few degrees and still be comfy and cozy.

Photo courtesy of Getty Let the light in Our days are getting shorter, so get the most out of them by leaving your drapes and blinds open. This will allow the sun’s natural energy to help warm your home (and give you some much needed vitamin D) — just make sure to close them once the sun goes down to avoid heat leaks. Check for window leaks Now is the perfect time to check and seal drafty windows. This can include resealing caulk along the window edges or getting a double-sided draft guard at your local hardware store (or on Amazon). Check your air filters Replace (or ask your landlord to) your filters every three months to not only give you fresher air, but also minimize your energy use. Not able to replace — try vacuuming them out, along with vent coves.

Unplug appliances and electronics Did you know that appliances and electronics use energy when you’re not using them? So unplug those unused toasters and lamps to add some more coins to your pockets. This may sound like a bit much, but the Department of Energy estimates that unused appliances account for an average of five to eight percent of your annual usage. Don’t block vents This may seem like a no-brainer, but it doesn’t hurt to make sure that couches or other furniture

aren’t blocking vents that let the warm air in. If they are, this might be a good time to start redecorating. Maintain your fireplace If you’ve got this heating goldmine, make sure to maintain it! That includes checking the seals and caulking and keeping it clear of debris. Keep the damper closed when no fires are burning — otherwise warm is air going right up the chimney. And, if you never use your fireplace, plug and seal the chimney flue altogether.

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October 11-17, 2018

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The Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder (MSR) welcomes and values commentary and feedback from the community. The articles found here are edited for clarity and/or space, but the opinions are the author’s own and do not reflect the views of the MSR.

Kavanaugh confirmation a disservice to America By Senator Kamala D. Harris Guest Commentator U.S. Senator Kamala D. Harris, a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, released the following statement on her vote on the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to be Associate Justice of the Supreme Court: When Judge Brett Kavanaugh was first nominated, I said that he represents a direct and fundamental threat to that promise inscribed above the Supreme Court, “Equal Justice Under Law.” In the weeks since then, the basis for my concern has been confirmed. Senate Republicans used raw power to rush an unfit nominee onto the Supreme Court when the American people have more questions than answers about Judge Kavanaugh’s suitability to serve. When Dr. Christine Blasey Ford came forward with serious and credible allegations of sexual assault, not only was she attacked by Senate Republicans, she was mocked by the President of the United States. The White House then prevented the FBI from investigating critical aspects of the allegations or interviewing key witnesses — not even permitting the FBI to interview Judge Kavanaugh or Dr. Ford. As a former prosecutor, I have led investigations and I have tried cases in a courtroom.

I have spent countless hours with assault survivors. So, when I look at what has occurred over these few days, we have fallen short in fulfilling our constitutional duty to fully evaluate Judge Kavanaugh’s nomination. This process has been a disservice to Dr. Ford. This process was a disservice to survivors everywhere. And this process has been a disservice to the American people. The Judge Kavanaugh the American people saw before the Judiciary Committee last week does not have the character, the temperament, or the judgment to sit on the highest court in our land. His own partisan, evasive, dishonest, and aggressive testimony demonstrates that we cannot trust him to be a fair and unbiased jurist. He is simply unfit. The Senate should have put partisanship aside and demanded better. Millions of Americans are rightly outraged at this hasty and unjust process, which threatens to cloud the legitimacy of the Supreme Court of the United States. And they are rightly fearful that Justice Kavanaugh will undermine Roe v. Wade, roll back access to affordable healthcare, and side with powerful and partisan interests over the most vulnerable. It is now up to each of us to continue to fight for justice and equality and hold our government accountable.

Elections have consequences By Rev. Stephen Tillett Guest Commentator I am compelled to express my disgust at the determination of the Senate Judiciary Committee and the White House to ramrod through a Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) nomination no matter what. While Brett Kavanaugh might meet some standards for a Justice, as far as his legal training and experience, there are other factors which weigh heavily with this nomination. I am well aware that ”elections have consequences,” so whoever is president when a SCOTUS vacancy occurs has earned the right, by virtue of the votes of his/her fellow citizens, to nominate a person to fill the vacancy (unless you are President Barack Obama in the winter of 2016). There are so many things that are being done out of order now that undermine any façade of comity or cooperation, that we find ourselves in a constant state of toxic politics. I am concerned that our democracy is being sacrificed on the altar of political expediency and ideological purity. I am especially troubled that some women would dismiss, out-of-hand, a complaint about sexual assault or harassment from other women just because it is ideologically inconvenient. While I expect, but don’t excuse, that cognitive dissonance from men in positions of power, I expect better from women.

For some senators to earnestly assert their ”sympathy” that Dr. Ford was assaulted, but to also claim that she has misremembered who assaulted her is insulting and laughable. This is not about ideology nor the usual bloviating about ”right” and ”left.” This is fundamentally about human decency and respecting the claims of women about the abuses they have faced, whether there were eyewitnesses to it or not (such as with the accusers of now-jailed comedian Bill Cosby. I’m just saying...) One has to wonder what the daughters and granddaughters of some U.S. Senators think about their father/grandfather’s politically dismissive attitudes toward sexual assault. I know and believe that all life is precious, but not just preborn life! Some of the same people who are obsessed to end abortion are also the people who oppose programs that would enhance the standard of living for the children once they have been born. How can one insist a child be born, but then oppose family assistance programs like AFDC and SNAP benefits, Head Start programs, health care for said children and free or affordable college or vocational education? If we made the world more child- (and parent-) friendly, there would likely be fewer abortions. This obsession over abortion also overlooks a few realities. First, less than two percent of all the cases the SCOTUS hears

will involve abortion. Second, even with the White House, both houses of Congress and a conservative majority on the SCOTUS, they will probably never end all access to legal abortion, because that would deprive some candidates of their go-to campaign issue every election season. Third, most of the political leadership, while manipulating the abortion issue to their own advantage, are really more concerned with the other 98 to 99 percent of rulings the SCOTUS makes. And many of those rulings from a ”conservative” (i.e., corporate and pro-business) court will lead to negative outcomes for most Americans, such as asserting that corporations deserve the same rights as people. The court makes many more rulings that damage our nation concerning the burgeoning security and police state in America, the environment, worker’s rights, voter suppression and gerrymandering and any number of other matters that affect the daily lives of many Americans. This is about a lifetime appointment to our highest court. Rev. Stephen A. Tillett is pastor of Asbury Broadneck UMC, Annapolis, MD, president of the Anne Arundel County, Maryland Branch NAACP and author of Stop Falling for the Okeydoke: How the Lie of Race Continues to Undermine Our Country.

Vote as if your life depends on it (because it does) By Derrick Johnson Guest Commentator In the 2016 U.S. presidential election, we were wrong. Political forecasters, pollsters, elected officials, and even media, told us that the 45th President of our nation would be a woman named Hillary Clinton, but they were wrong. In many cases, the margin between who became president and who lost the race was a slim few thousand votes. For example, in the 2016 Presiden-

polls in November. When we take our welldeserved seat at the table, we know our impact is always powerful. We’ve seen the collective power of Black women impact key races for office in special elections and primaries. Black women, according to a recent NAACP poll which analyzed the 61 most competitive midterm races, are tired of feeling disrespected by the Trump Administration and have made it a much higher

we must vote as if our lives and our children’s lives depend on it. Because it does. The NAACP has decided to fight back and we ask you to join us by using your ballot as the weapon of choice. Help those you know to get registered and mobilized to vote. Reach out to five people in your personal or social networks and bring them with you to the polls. If you understand the importance of this year’s elections, we know that you will sound the alarm, con-

If you understand the importance of this year’s elections, you will sound the alarm, connect with others, and express your power by casting your vote. tial election, the winning margin was less than two percent in Michigan, Florida, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and two other states. Though the popular vote was won by Clinton (in excess of three million votes) and the margin between victory and loss was small in many states, the “near victory” serves as cold comfort to those communities whose civil rights are slowly being rolled back under the ominous weight and rise of racism and White nationalism. Today, like in 2016, we hear the predictions of a powerful political shift in the House of Representatives and possibly the Senate. While these predictions are promising, they alone will not ensure that the interests of the Black community will be affirmed by the winners of the midterm elections. The only way we will get the respect we deserve is to show up and show out at the

priority to voice their displeasure at the polls. Black men are not far behind them. They too, along with other communities of color, are tired of the relentless racism permeating our nation and fueled by politicians. As we approach November, we hear the faint yet consistent refrain — elections have consequences — ringing in our ears. Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation is now a harsh reality — his presence could remake the Supreme Court of the United States into a bastion of conservatism reminiscent of yesteryears when access to our democracy was parceled off according to skin color. For the Black community, November is a watershed moment. If we fail to vote in numbers respective to our actual political power, future generations will suffer for our apathy. We don’t have to tell our people how to vote, only that

nect with others, and express your power by casting your vote. Voting is not just about politics, it’s about fighting police brutality, preserving civil rights, providing public education, protecting the right of workers to organize, and giving those who need health care access to it. But most importantly, voting is about our ability to live as equals in a society that doesn’t always view us as such. Stand strong and vote — our lives depend on it! See you at the polls. For resources on getting out the vote in your neighborhood and community, visit naacp.org/campaigns/fighting-for-democracy Derrick Johnson is the president and CEO of the NAACP.

What happened to ‘innocent until proven guilty’? Through My Eyes

The Minneapolis Story Continues By Ron Edwards Contributing Commentator America’s identity and historical reputation was on the line this past week as the world watched us tear our country apart as the battle raged to keep Judge Brett Kavanaugh off the United States Supreme Court at any cost and by any means necessary. If “accusation equals guilty” prevails as the new due process, the toppling of America’s institutions of democracy will accelerate — institutions that are necessary for America’s survival, in general, and Black America’s, in particular. The key question is whether anyone can be safe if the U.S. Constitution’s 14th Amendment guaranteeing “due process” and “equal protection of the law” is not followed? That has been the Black experience in slavery, Jim Crow, post Brown vs Education, and still too often now. We remember the 1991 Clarence Thomas — Anita Hill hearings, and the recent trial of Bill Cosby. When Cosby was called “Amer-

ica’s Dad,” Black America understood that was like putting a rope around his neck, because Americans never really accepted the identification of a Black man as America’s father. The same for Clarence Thomas, who was called an Uncle Tom for being a Republican. Who will be safe as the presumption of innocence until proven guilty is cast aside, accusations treated as self-proving with no corroboration. Women must ask themselves if tossing out “presumption of innocence until proven guilty” in the attempt to keep Kavanaugh off the bench is worth the cost of exposing their men (sons, brothers, husbands, fathers, friends) to the same kind of “proof,” leaving no one safe from accusations, especially young Black men? This will continue to destroy the future of America’s institutions. Kavanaugh stepped on banana peels that were extremely dangerous to the perception of his personal character, leaving anti-Kavanaugh and anti-Trump senators questioning having Kavanaugh on the Supreme Court bench for the next 30-plus years. But, even if he had not been confirmed this weekend, would the next candidate, probably a strong female, White or Black, have

been willing to endure uncorroborated accusations and the digging into their past going back to high school, especially when Democrats will say no to any Trump nominee? Even the four witnesses that Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, one of Kavanaugh’s accusers, claimed corroborates her accusation have all signed letters under oath to the contrary — letters the Democrats did not acknowledge. America is tearing itself apart, risking separating even more from each other and from the roots of our democracy that led to the creation of the Republic in 1776. Black America is still trying to obtain a place at the table, as I wrote in my second book, A Seat For Everyone. America has not only turned its back on Lincoln’s “United We Stand,” and his “malice toward none,” but also Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “nonviolent” demonstrations. Those who claim to offer us fairness and respect are instead purposefully causing us to miss the boat again. How many more chances do we have? What’s next? Stay tuned. Ron Edwards is an author and hosts radio and TV show.

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October 11-17, 2018

The Hate U Give lacks grit, but has its moments the defining incident involving Khalil is way too predictable. Director George Tillman has his hands full. He takes a very complicated script with disparate storylines and pulls together all those elements into a comprehensible film that does have powerful moments. The film has a tone, texture and style that can be traced back to his overall guidance: the cinematography (Mihai Malaimare Jr., Nina), production design (William Arnold, The Edge of Seventeen) and music (Dustin O’Halloran, Lion) are perfect — maybe too per-

touch as an understanding cop. K.J. Apa as Chris, Starr’s White boyfriend, is a pleasant surprise as a loving partner willing to see her through her difficulties. This is a well-produced movie about a very worthy subject. The dramatic elements range from weak (scenes with Starr at her prep school), to questionable (would a drug lord really threaten Starr for the reasons he states?), to right on target (the portrait of the Carter family and its concerned parents is affecting). If you want a close-up view of the Black Lives Matter Move-

(l-r) Algee Smith and Amandla Stenberg star in The Hate U Give By Dwight Brown Contributing Writer

T

he phrase “The Hate U Give Little Infants F—s Everybody” gave the hip hop group T-H-U-G-L-I-FE its name. The sentiment from the late Tupac Shakur (and other group members, Big Syke, Stretch, Mopreme Shakur, The Rated R and Macadoshis) meant that the kids you ignore or deride turn into young people who will be a stone in your shoe. Writer Angie Thomas used that mantra as a title for her bestselling book The Hate U Give, which is inspired by the tragic shooting of Oscar Grant

by a transit police officer in 2009 in Oakland, Calif. The main character of the movie The Hate U Give, Starr Carter (Amandla Stenberg, Hunger Games), has a lot on her shoulders for a 16-yearold. She lives in a Black working class-neighborhood and is the daughter of Maverick, an ex-convict (Russell Hornsby, Fences) who has turned his life around and owns a local grocery store. Her dad’s past colors his family’s existence every day. He instills in his children basic survival skills for dealing with the police: “Keep your hands where they can see them.” He gives them self-esteem lessons,

as well: “Know your rights. Know your worth.” To give his kids better opportunities, Maverick and his wife Lisa (Regina Hall) send Starr and her brothers Seven (Lamar Johnson) and Sekani (TJ Wright) to a mostly White prep school far from their inner-city home. Living her life in two places is an adjustment; Starr acclimates well. Then one night her worlds are both torn apart and shoved together. After a late party in the hood, she’s riding in a car with childhood friend Khalil (Algee Smith). A White cop pulls them over and questions them. Starr immediately puts her hands on the dashboard. Khalil is reluc-

SMALL BUSINESS SHOWCASE & SHOPPING EXTRAVAGANZA NOV. 3, 2018 • 12-4

tant. When asked to step outside the vehicle, Khalil seems blasé. There is a deadly incident. Is it a mistake? Standard police procedure? Manslaughter? Khalil’s sudden death changes Starr’s life and destiny. Will she remain silent? Become a witness? Go public? Screenwriter Audrey Wells reportedly passed away Oct. 4 after a long battle with cancer. Her gripping screenplay lines up the characters’ histories, rivalries and relationships. Each are distinct people dealing with teen angst, social issues, racial pride, family dynamics, civil rights concerns, interracial dating, drug dealing and gang violence. Sometimes, the magnitude of the drama overwhelms what should or could have been a film based in stark realism. Add in a subplot about a

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fect for a film that should have had more authentic grit. There are scenes that look like location shots from a music video, and they don’t fit in. But, the wealth of talent on view is almost staggering. Sten-

ment, take a look at the very compelling grassroots documentary Whose Streets? That doc will bring you into the heart of a timely and vital civil rights movement. The Hate U Give is well-intentioned, but not

"This is a well-produced movie about a very worthy subject." teen befriended by flaky gal pals and you’re caught between a story with issues that matter and a shallow adolescent tale. Mix in gang violence that is more reminiscent of West Side Story than The Bloods vs. The Crips and it takes away from the seriousness of low-income neighborhood crime. The odd juxtapositions may be unsettling for some audiences as they are being pulled into a main storyline that strongly mirrors incidents of police malfeasance and the post-traumatic stress that follows. Also,

ONLY

Photo and poster courtesy 20th Century Fox

berg carries the weight of the film, giving Starr just enough juice to grow from a humble, vulnerable teen to a courageous protester. Hornsby displays a grace and strength as the father who tries to protect his children. His character is wise, adaptive, paternal and loving. Hall, as the watchful mom, never leaves a doubt that she who would risk everything for her kids. Anthony Mackie plays a local crime lord and is less successful at making heads or tails of his dubious character. Rap artist Common adds a nice

as genuine. Still, it’s well worth a trip to the movie theater. The Hate U Give opened in select theaters on Oct. 5 and is slated to open nationwide Oct. 19. For more movie info, go to www.foxmovies.com/movies/the-hate-ugive. Check local listings for show times. For more from NNPA News Wire film critic Dwight Brown, go to DwightBrownInk.com or BlackPressUSA.com.


October 11-17, 2018

7

this week community calendar

conversation about the lifecycle of redlining, disinvestment, predatory lending, and gentrification and displacement. Info: bit.ly/2C5askA

Here are the MSR editors’ top picks of free (and low-cost) events, arts and activities to enjoy throughout the Twin Cities and greater metro area.

October 17 Candidate Forum: Hennepin County District 2 8-9:30am @ Jax Cafe, 1928 University Ave. NE, Mpls. Free Candidates Irene Fernando and Blong Yang will talk workforce, economic development regulations, policies and more with Minneapolis Regional Chamber. Info: bit.ly/2Ea1V2t

OCTOBER 12 – 20 Now through October 14 Twin Cities Black Film Festival SPNN, 550 Vandalia St., St. Paul. $10+ Four days of films, panels, fashion and mixers showcasing independent filmmakers of color. Info: tcbff.org

Northside Legal Law Clinic 11 am-1 pm @ New Rules, 2015 N. Lowry, Mpls. Free Every third Wednesday of the month, Northside Legal Clinic provides small business owners free legal consultation. Attendees can meet with an attorney for up to 30 minutes individually, on a first-come-first-served basis. Info: bit.ly/2A0HEbD

October 13 National Black MBA Development Day 9 am-1 pm @ U of M Carlson School of Management, 321 19th Ave. S., Mpls. Free National Black MBA - Twin Cities hosts this annual event featuring professional development sessions and a meet and greet with the corporate sponsors and networking. Info: bit.ly/2pL9Glc

Ladies Night Of Comedy 7:30-9:30 pm @ House of Comedy, Mall of America, 408 E. Broadway, Bloomington. $15+ Shed G presents a night of comedy featuring B Phlat, one of St. Louis’ hottest comedians. Info: bit.ly/2y8HVaL

18th Annual Twin Cities Book Festival 10 am-5 pm @ Minnesota State Fairgrounds, 1265 Snelling Ave. N., St. Paul. Free Largest literary event in the Upper Midwest featuring hundreds of exhibitors, dozens of presenting authors and special children’s programming. Info: raintaxi.com/twin-cities-book-festival

October 18 Voices of Our Community Input Session 5:30-7:30 pm @ Hamline University Klass Center, 1537 West Taylor, St. Paul. Free Part of a listening sessions series hosted by City of St. Paul to share info about the city’s equity work and gather community feedback. This week’s topic: Real Employment Opportunity Info: facebook.com/pg/MayorMelvinCarter/ events

FrogTown Comedy Hour 8-10 pm @ Heritage Tea House, 360 W. University Ave., St. Paul. $10 Baddie’s Comedy Co. presents a night of laughter, food and music every second Saturday of the month. Info: baddiescomedy.com October 16

THINK PINK Breast Cancer Awareness, October 20 causes. Info: facebook.com/ElevateYourNetwork October 19 Cool Like That Hip Hop Fashion Show 7-11 pm @ Public Functionary, 1400 12th Ave. NE, Mpls. $10+ Black Fashion Week MN presents a fashion show honoring hip hop. Featured designers include Nsod Guy, Creed Hostetter and STUDIIYO23. Performance by Chadwick “Niles” Phillips. Info: bit.ly/2pH6xD3 FAM Fridays 8 pm-Midnight @ Radisson RED, 609 S. 3rd St., Mpls. Free Sound Vérité Records curates an evening of fashion, art and music every Friday night with pop-up shops from local fashion designers, craft makers, artists, and live entertainment. Info: soundveriterecords.com

Elevate Your Network 5-10 pm @ The Pourhouse, 10 5th St. S., Mpls. Free Weekly networking and happy hour event highlighting various business sectors and

From Redlining to Predatory Lending- The Racial Wealth Gap 5:30-8 pm @ Minneapolis Urban League, 2100 Plymouth Ave. N., Mpls. Free Panel discussion and community

THINK PINK Breast Cancer Awareness 2-7 pm @ El Nuevo Rodeo, 2709 E. Lake St., Mpls. $15 Love Promotions hosts an evening celebrating those impacted by breast cancer. Hosted by KMOJ’s Glamlife Kim and honoring Sharlene Young, Sandra Hales, Susan Brown, Debbie Gatlin and Tamiko Edwards. The event includes live entertainment, swag bags and more. Info: bit.ly/2ycRaqu The Wenso Ashby Experience 6-8:30 pm @ Capri Theater, 2027 W. Broadway Ave., Mpls. $17+ Pianist Wenso Ashby brings his full band for a musical experience incorporating smooth jazz, culture and history. Info: brownpapertickets.com/event/3607588 Have an event you’d like to submit for consideration? Add it for free to our calendar at spokesman-recorder.com/calendar.

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October 11-17, 2018

er Weir. The oldest cemetery member is Morgan Jones, a former slave of a Virginia tobacco field who Continued from page 1 moved to Minnesota after gaining his freedom. Jones lived in Minnesota for 44 years as a free man. He died in 1906 at the age of 101. Perhaps the most nationally known individual lived on his farm in Fergus Falls, Minnesota, but due to failing health moved to Minneapolis to live buried at Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery is William C. Goodridge. Born a slave in 1806 in Marywith his daughter three years before he died. Hunter Weir said the FOTC hopes to hon- land, he was freed by age 16 and started his first or three more African American soldiers’ graves business — a barbershop — at 18 years old.

CemeTery

“Nine African American soldiers have been discovered who served in the United States Colored Troops.”

with headstone placements, including Thomas Jefferson, Glenis Lee and Amos Yancy, next summer. “The way we’re finding these people is [through] a database of over 22,000 names,” said Hunter Weir. “We have information starting with where they were born, and in picking people from the South — Missouri in particular — [we’re going] back to censuses and try to identify people who are African American. So far, we have several hundred.” Among those identified is John W. Cheatham, “the first African American firefighter in Minneapolis, retired as a captain 1884,” according to Hunt-

Goodridge invested heavily in real estate and went on to own 13 railroad cars operating the Reliance Line, a freight shipping business. As its owner, he became involved in the historic Underground Railroad as early as 1851 during the Christiana Riots in Christiana, Pennsylvania. Goodridge’s railroad cars helped smuggle fugitive slaves across Pennsylvania during their first leg of escape to Canada. “He ran the Underground Railroad between York, Pennsylvania and Philadelphia, PA in the years right before the Civil War,” said Hunter Weir. “Goodridge got to the point where he owned the only five-story office building in York, PA.” In 1865, with his home under constant surveillance and threats by pro-slavery militants to kidnap him into the South, Goodridge moved to Minnesota to live with his daughter and son-in-law. By the time he left York for Minnesota he was one of the city’s wealthiest citizens. Today, his former family home is now the site of the William C. Goodridge Freedom Center and Underground Railroad Museum. Goodridge’s grandson, Toussaint L’Ouverture Grey, named after the liberator of Haiti, was the first African American child born in St. Anthony, Minnesota in 1859. Hunter Weir said the FOTC is now working to start an African American tour of the graves in Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery.

BITCON Continued from page 1

representation and visibility of Black professionals in tech. Our objective is to provide a space where the BIT audience — which includes students, entrepreneurs, job seekers, early career and mid-career professionals, and executives — the opportunity to connect to share resources, knowledge, and career opportunities.” The conference was the brainchild of Sharon Kennedy Vickers, City of St. Paul’s Chief Information Officer and co-founder of the BIT Twin Cities chapter along with BIT organizer Antoinette Smith. She proposed the event to BIT founder Greg Greenlee in November 2017. It presented itself as a can’t-miss opportunity to expand BIT. “BIT has a very active and established chapter in the Twin Cities headed by Sharon...and Antoinette Smith,” said Cotton. “Sharon mentioned how the Twin Cities was an up-andcoming tech hub and that diversity and inclusion was a really high priority for the [Twin]

any other major U.S. cities. Why wouldn’t we have it here?” said Cotton. “Through my recent visits, I have been able to gain insight on the business and political ecosystem while assessing the demographics that drive this great American city.” She added, “We wanted to illustrate that you can be involved and contribute to the tech community all across America. Our goal is to showcase that there are great tech career options outside of coastal regions. Tech-friendly communities that embrace family values and reasonable cost of living are high commodities these days. As BIT is growing as an organization, we also seek to develop and stimulate the local workforce.” The three-day conference will host a series of activities, including workshops, keynotes, and a career fair, at several locations throughout Minneapolis and St. Paul. “We wanted to focus on having a tech conference and not just a diversity conference,” explained Cotton. “We felt it was important that we provide the type of programming that is applicable to the success of the BIT audience. “That means having speakers providing information and knowledge that our audience can immediately apply to their companies,

“We wanted to add visibility. There is not a strong awareness of people of color within this space.”

Cities. They had already organized great events, and together the two of them cultivated great relationships with some of the local companies and organizations — Best Buy and Target being among those local companies.” “A lot of us have been working really hard within the space and we needed [somewhere] to come together, network, support each other and continue to advance and grow in the field,” said Vickers about BIT’s presence in the Twin Cities. “We also wanted to add visibility,” she explained. “There is not a strong awareness of people of color within this space.” Minnesota also has a history of being a Midwest tech hub since the 1950s, with corFor more information, visit friendsofthecemetery.org. porations such as IBM establishing a presence Cemetery photos courtesy of Facebook/ in Rochester and both Control Data Corporation and Cray Supercomputer launching out of PioneersAndSoldiersCemetery Jonika Stowes welcomes reader responses at Minnesota in the ‘60s and ‘70s. “The Twin Cities houses more Fortune 100 jstowes@spokesman-recorder.com. companies’ headquarters and footprints than

their careers, their education journey, and to their everyday lives,” Cotton continued. “We developed key sessions [to] benefit our audience and began to curate subject matter experts and influencers to lead these discussions.” Cotton also noted that BITCON hopes to pique the interests of future tech leaders. “We have selected speakers that we believe would draw out potential tech workforce and entrepreneurs from nontraditional backgrounds and hopefully inspire a generation to pursue careers in tech.” BITCON takes places October 11-13 at various venues throughout the Twin Cities. For tickets or more information, visit blacksintechnology.net. Dwight Hobbes welcomes reader responses at dhobbes@spokesman-recorder.com.

ABuse Continued from page 1

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manipulation. Brown, program director of Oasis of Love Crisis Intervention Center, encouraged people to assess their relationships and take stock to see if their basic needs — praise, approval and acceptance — are being met. Brown implored attendees to ask themselves, “Am I getting [those things] out of this relationship? I don’t have to ask for them? I don’t have to perform for them?” Cryer, a mental health therapist at Tubman, added that both women and men need to be diligent when looking for a mate. “You want to find out more information and not get into the emotional piece, but stay in your head. If they’re talking about a young lady that they have children by and they’re calling her out of her name, well, they’re going to call you out of your name, too.” “It’s an interview,” she continued. “You’re interviewing them into your home, into your body, and when that happens, you become part of their trauma.” Cryer advised attendees to be mindful and discerning at the onset of a potential relationship to avoid becoming entangled in a painful web because, “It’s not easy to leave. It just isn’t. It’s so emotional.” Tamara Webb, a longtime Sister Spokesman attendee, said she was glad she came out to the event. “I got a lot out of it,” said Webb. “[Domestic violence] really plagues our community. We definitely need to see those signs and deal with it honestly with ourselves individually and in a group as a whole.” Webb said although she had never been in an abusive relationship, she was glad to see the show of support and resources available for survivors of abuse. Many support services for women victims of domestic violence, as provided through the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), actually hang in the balance. The measure was set to ex-

(l-r) Sarae and Jamieya Bolin-Johnson, Manu Lewis, Tracey Williams-Dillard, Saran Cryer and Ethylon (E.B.) Brown pire Sept. 30, but as part of a stopgap spending bill, Pres. Trump extended it to avoid a government shutdown. That extension only lasts through Dec. 7. The continuation of the VAWA is all the more critical when considering the Violence Policy Center’s annual report that shows Black women are disproportionately killed across the country, being murdered by men at a rate of more than double White females. The report, based on 2016 findings, the most recent year for which information is available, notes that most often, Black females were killed by males in the course of an argument. Attendee Ella Chapman, a survivor of abuse and now a motivational speaker, also stressed the importance of support for domestic violence victims. “During the time period when I was going through my situation, 20-something years ago, there wasn’t a lot of resources, and so now there’s more awareness, but we need even more,” she said. Chapman revealed that she decided to break free from her abusive marriage after she stumbled upon a startling revelation: “It was the discovery that my [children] were plotting to kill their father if he had jumped on me again — that was my breaking point,” confided Chapman, her eyes brimming with tears. “That was my wake-up moment,” she continued. “I saw that they hadn’t made their bed and I removed their pillow and saw all these weapons…

“That was the first time that I went and got a restraining order. It started the process… So that gave me the opportunity to escape and leave town, and that’s how I ended up in Minnesota [from Des Moines, Iowa].” Chapman encouraged therapy for survivors. She also advised women currently in abusive relationships to make a plan. “Be smart, plan it out. Make sure you’re connecting with the right people to help you and gather all the important things you want to take with you. Be very intentional about what your next step is going to be. “My suggestion for anyone who is experiencing a violent lifestyle is to plan to leave and know that you deserve better. You really do deserve better.” National Domestic Hotline: 1-800-799-7233 Other resources: Oasis: agapeoasis.com/tag/oasiscrisis-intervention Tubman: https://tubman.org NorthPoint Health & Wellness Center: www.northpointhealth.org For more domestic violence resources, visit MSRNewsOnline. com. For more photos and video highlights from “Sisterhood of Survival, visit Facebook/SisterSpokesman or MSRNewsOnline.com. Paige Elliott welcomes reader responses to pelliott@spokesmanrecorder.com.


October 11-17, 2018

Legals

Employment

State of Minnesota County of Hennepin Without Real Estate In Re the Marriage of: Kimberly Marie White-Collins, Petitioner and Kanya Collins Sr, Respondent

Case Type: Dissolution Without Children District Court FourthJudicial Court Court File No. 27FA-18-4703 SUMMONS WITHOUT REAL ESTATE ORDER FOR SERVICE BY ALTERNATIVE MEANS

THE STATE OF MINNESOTA TO THE ABOVE-NAMED RESPONDENT: WARNING: YOUR SPOUSE (HUSBAND OR WIFE) HAS FILED A LAWSUIT AGAINST YOU FOR DISSOLUTION OF YOUR MARRIAGE. A COPY OF THE PAPERWORK REGARDING THE LAWSUIT IS SERVED ON YOU WITH THIS SUMMONS. THIS SUMMONS IS AN OFFICIAL DOCUMENT FROM THE COURT THAT AFFECTS YOUR RIGHTS. READ THIS SUMMONS CAREFULLY. IF YOU DO NOT UNDERSTAND IT, CONTACT AN ATTORNEY FOR LEGAL ADVICE. 1. The Petitioner, (your spouse) has filed a lawsuit against you asking for dissolution of your marriage (divorce). A copy of the Petition for Dissolution of Marriage is attached to this Summons. 2. You must serve upon Petitioner and file with the Court a written Answer to the Petition for Dissolution of Marriage, and you must pay the required filing fee. Answer forms are available from the Family Law Facilitator Program, Family Court Self Help Center located in the Family Justice Center, 110 South Fourth Street, Minneapolis, MN 55401. You must serve your Answer upon Petitioner within thirty (30) days of the date you were served with this Summons, not counting the day of service. If you do not serve and file your Answer, the Court may give your spouse everything he or she is asking for in the Petition for Dissolution of Marriage. 3. This proceeding does not involve real property. NOTICE OF TEMPORARY RESTRAINING PROVISIONS: Under Minnesota law, service of this summons makes the following requirements apply to both parties to the action, unless they are modified by the Court or the proceeding is dismissed: (1) Neither party may dispose of any assets except (A) for the necessities of life or for the necessary generation of income or preservation of assets, (B) by an agreement of the parties in writing, or (C) for retaining counsel to carry on or to contest this proceeding. (2) Neither party may harass the other party. (3) All currently available insurance coverage must be maintained and continued without change in coverage or beneficiary designation. (4) Parties to a marriage dissolution proceeding are encouraged to attempt alternative dispute resolution pursuant to Minnesota law. Alternative dispute resolution includes mediation, arbitration and other processes as set forth in the district court rules. You may contact the Court Administrator about resources in your area. If you cannot pay for mediation or alternative dispute resolution, in some counties, assistance may be available to you through a nonprofit provider of a court program. If you are a victim of domestic abuse or threats as defined in Minnesota statutes, Chapter 518B, you are not required to try mediation and you will not be penalized by the Court in later proceedings. IF YOU VIOLATE ANY OF THESE PROVISIONS, YOU WILL BE SUBJECT TO SANCTIONS BY THE COURT. Date: 7/13/2018

9

Signed: Kimberly Marie White-Collins Minnesota Spokesman Recorder October 11,18 & 25, 2018

NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE THE RIGHT TO VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT AND IDENTITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECTED BY THIS ACTION. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that default has occurred in the conditions of the following described mortgage: DATE OF MORTGAGE: February 11, 2014 ORIGINAL PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF MORTGAGE: $10,000.00 MORTGAGOR(S): Katie J. Dupay MORTGAGEE: US Federal Credit Union DATE AND PLACE OF RECORDING: Recorded with the County Recorder in and for the County of Hennepin, State of Minnesota, on April 1, 2014, as Document No. 10066167 ASSIGNMENTS OF MORTGAGE: Assigned to Glenwood Financial, LLC, recorded May 21, 2018, as Document No. 10555516; subsequently assigned to Minneapolis Property, LLC, recorded May 21, 2018, as Document No. 10555517 LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Lot 18, Block 14, Lincoln Street Supplement to East Side Addition to Minneapolis PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1823 Pierce St. NE, Minneapolis, MN 55418 COUNTY IN WHICH PROPERTY IS LOCATED: Hennepin AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE: $10,685.49 THAT there has been compliance with all pre-foreclosure requirements; that no action or proceeding has been instituted at law or otherwise to recover the debt secured by said mortgage, or any part thereof; THAT pursuant to the power of sale contained in said mortgage, the above-described property will be sold by the Sheriff of Hennepin County as follows: DATE AND TIME OF SALE: November 12, 2018, at 11:00 a.m. PLACE OF SALE: Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office, Room 30, 350 South Fifth Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota to pay the debt secured by said mortgage and taxes, if any, on said premises and the costs and disbursements, including attorneys’ fees allowed by law subject to redemption within six (6) months from the date of said sale by the mortgagor(s), their personal representatives or assigns. The date on or before which the mortgagor must vacate the property if the mortgage is not reinstated under section 580.30 or the property redeemed under section 580.23: May 13, 2019, at 11:59 p.m. THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW FOR REDEMPTION BY THE MORTGAGOR, THE MORTGAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS, MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS ENTERED UNDER MINNESOTA STATUTES, SECTION 582.032, DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE MORTGAGED PREMISES ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, AND ARE ABANDONED. Dated: September 17, 2018 Minneapolis Property, LLC Assignee of Mortgagee HOELSCHER LAW FIRM, PLLC By: Brian G. Hoelscher #0238752 Attorneys for Assignee of Mortgagee 13100 Wayzata Boulevard, Suite 100 Minnetonka, MN 55305 (952) 224-9551 THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. FORECLOSURE DATA Minn. Stat. Sec. 580.025 (1) the physical street address, city, and zip code of the mortgaged premises is 1823 Pierce St. NE, Minneapolis, MN 55418; (2) the name of the transaction agent, residential mortgage servicer, and the lender or broker, as defined in section 58.02, if the person holding the mortgage is a transaction agent as defined in section 58.02, subdivision 30 are as follows: – not applicable; or the name of the residential mortgage servicer and the lender or broker, as defined in section 58.02, if the person holding the mortgage is not a transaction agent as defined in section 58.02, subdivision 30 are as follows: residential mortgage servicer – Superior Financing, Inc., lender or broker – Minneapolis Property, LLC; (3) the tax parcel identification number of the mortgaged premises is: 12-029-24-34-0152; (4) if stated on the mortgage, the transaction agent's mortgage identification number is: - not applicable;(5) if stated on the mortgage, the name of the residential mortgage originator as defined in section 58.02 is: US Federal Credit Union Minnesota Spokesman Recorder, September 20,27 & October 4,11,18 & 25, 2018

SOE Continued from page 10

become coaches], we are on board with that.” The 2019 NCHC Frozen Faceoff is March 22-23, 2019 in St. Paul. “We can’t wait to come back in March,” Fenton said.

State of Minnesota Certificate of Assumed Name Minnesota Statutes Chapter 333 ASSUMED NAME: PRINCIPAL PLACE OF BUSINESS:

NAMEHOLDERS:

Hub Bike Coop Mechanic Apprenticeship Vivek Narula Creative 5244 Zenith Avenue South Minneapolis, MN 55410 USA Vivek Narula 5244 Zenith Avenue South Minneapolis, MN 55410 USA

I, the undersigned, certify that I am signing this document as the person whose signature is required, or as agent of the person(s) whose signature would be required who has authorized me to sign this document on his/her behalf, or in both capacities. I further certify that I have completed all required fields, and that the information in this document is true and correct and in compliance with the applicable chapter of Minnesota Statutes. I understand that by signing this document I am subject to the penalties of perjury as set forth in Section 609.48 as if I had signed this document under oath. SIGNED BY: Vivek Narula EMAIL FOR OFFICIAL NOTICES: creative@viveknarula.com DATED: 9/19/2018 11:59 PM

The program provides time & guidance for an individual to learn bicycle mechanics, bicycle assembly, and service area standards in quality and efficiency. Deadline for application (resume/letter of interest) is Monday 10/15/18. Apprenticeship is paid and will begin in November. Apprenticeship is 24 hours a week Apply online at https://www.thehubbikecoop.org/jobs

Financial Specialist The U.S. District Court, District of MN is accepting applications for a full-time Financial Specialist in Minneapolis, MN. Salary range is $47,652 - $77,483. For more information visit the court’s website, www.mnd.uscourts.gov, Employment. An Equal Opportunity Employer

Minnesota Spokesman Recorder October 4 & 11, 2018 State of Minnesota Certificate of Assumed Name Minnesota Statutes Chapter 333 ASSUMED NAME: Minority Media Inclusion Partnership PRINCIPAL PLACE OF BUSINESS: 2214 Blaisell Avenue Minneapolis, MN 55404 USA NAMEHOLDERS:

Pete Rhodes 2214 Blaisell Avenue Minneapolis, MN 55404 USA

I, the undersigned, certify that I am signing this document as the person whose signature is required, or as agent of the person(s) whose signature would be required who has authorized me to sign this document on his/her behalf, or in both capacities. I further certify that I have completed all required fields, and that the information in this document is true and correct and in compliance with the applicable chapter of Minnesota Statutes. I understand that by signing this document I am subject to the penalties of perjury as set forth in Section 609.48 as if I had signed this document under oath. SIGNED BY: Pete Rhodes EMAIL FOR OFFICIAL NOTICES: prhodesjr@comcast.net DATED: 5/30/2017 11:59 PM Minnesota Spokesman Recorder October 4 & 11, 2018

NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE THE RIGHT TO VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT AND IDENTITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECTED BY THIS ACTION. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that default has occurred in the conditions of the following described mortgage: DATE OF MORTGAGE: November 6, 2004 ORIGINAL PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF MORTGAGE: $20,000.00 MORTGAGOR(S): Aaron B. Henne and A. Catherin Henne MORTGAGEE: US Federal Credit Union DATE AND PLACE OF RECORDING: Recorded with the County Recorder in and for the County of Hennepin, State of Minnesota, on December 8, 2004, as Document No. 8486572 ASSIGNMENTS OF MORTGAGE: Assigned to Glenwood Financial, LLC, recorded May 21, 2018, as Document No. 10555518; subsequently assigned to Minneapolis Property, LLC, recorded May 21, 2018, as Document No. 10555519 LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Lot 8, Block 11, Thorpe Bros.’ William Penn Addition to Minneapolis PROPERTY ADDRESS: 3931 Russell Ave. N., Minneapolis, MN 55412 COUNTY IN WHICH PROPERTY IS LOCATED: Hennepin AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE: $14,143.81 THAT there has been compliance with all pre-foreclosure requirements; that no action or proceeding has been instituted at law or otherwise to recover the debt secured by said mortgage, or any part thereof; THAT pursuant to the power of sale contained in said mortgage, the above-described property will be sold by the Sheriff of Hennepin County as follows: DATE AND TIME OF SALE: November 12, 2018, at 11:00 a.m. PLACE OF SALE: Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office, Room 30, 350 South Fifth Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota to pay the debt secured by said mortgage and taxes, if any, on said premises and the costs and disbursements, including attorneys’ fees allowed by law subject to redemption within six (6) months from the date of said sale by the mortgagor(s), their personal representatives or assigns. The date on or before which the mortgagor must vacate the property if the mortgage is not reinstated under section 580.30 or the property redeemed under section 580.23: May 13, 2019, at 11:59 p.m. THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW FOR REDEMPTION BY THE MORTGAGOR, THE MORTGAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS, MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS ENTERED UNDER MINNESOTA STATUTES, SECTION 582.032, DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE MORTGAGED PREMISES ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, AND ARE ABANDONED. Dated: September 17, 2018 Minneapolis Property, LLC Assignee of Mortgagee HOELSCHER LAW FIRM, PLLC By: Brian G. Hoelscher #0238752 Attorneys for Assignee of Mortgagee 13100 Wayzata Boulevard, Suite 100 Minnetonka, MN 55305 (952) 224-9551 THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. FORECLOSURE DATA Minn. Stat. Sec. 580.025 (1) the physical street address, city, and zip code of the mortgaged premises is 3931 Russell Ave. N., Minneapolis, MN 55412; (2) the name of the transaction agent, residential mortgage servicer, and the lender or broker, as defined in section 58.02, if the person holding the mortgage is a transaction agent as defined in section 58.02, subdivision 30 are as follows: – not applicable; or the name of the residential mortgage servicer and the lender or broker, as defined in section 58.02, if the person holding the mortgage is not a transaction agent as defined in section 58.02, subdivision 30 are as follows: residential mortgage servicer – Superior Financing, Inc., lender or broker – Minneapolis Property, LLC; (3) the tax parcel identification number of the mortgaged premises is: 05-029-24-41-0078; (4) if stated on the mortgage, the transaction agent’s mortgage identification number is: not applicable; (5) if stated on the mortgage, the name of the residential mortgage originator as defined in section 58.02 is: US Federal Credit Union Minnesota Spokesman Recorder, September 20,27 & October 4,11,18 & 25, 2018

The passing parade John Gagliardi, former St. John’s football coach and college football’s winningest coach, died Sunday at 91. Don Hudson, Macalester’s first Black football coach and first Black coach at a predominately White college, died September 30 at age 88. I had the honor to speak to both men over the years. Finally… The NCAA last week introduced four proposals that, if approved, will help loosen up current restrictions on transfers. This includes: Players are im-

mediately eligible if they are enrolled in summer school; graduate transfers are given two-year scholarships; walkons can play immediately after transferring; and players can’t play for two different schools in the same academic year after transferring. Charles Hallman welcomes reader responses to challman@spokesmanrecorder.com.

Case Manager & Neighborhood Program Coordinator Interfaith Outreach & Community Partners is a human services organization in the Northwest metro working with suburban families living in poverty, many of whom are African American. We are hiring for in-office case manager as well as community-based staff position. Understanding the impact of systemic racism is a must. Our organization is client centered, values driven, team orientated, fast paced, diverse and focused on learning and professional development. Apply here: http://iocp.org/about/open-positions.

State of MinneSota – DepartMent of HuMan ServiceS

Clinical Services Director

Anoka $38.45 - $55.20/hourly; $80,284 - $115,258/annually Relocation expense reimbursement available! The Minnesota Department of Human Services is seeking a driven and passionate candidate for the role of Clinical Services Director. This position will oversee the non-medical Clinical Services Department at Anoka Metro Regional Treatment Center (AMRTC), which includes the psychological services, behavior analysis services, rehabilitation services, and social services across the hospital. The Clinical Services Director will direct and oversee the delivery of all clinical services across AMRTC, including compliance with all applicable practice standards, plus increase the effectiveness and efficiency of services. The person in this position will also represent non-medical clinical services at policy and planning meetings, as well as ensure the recruitment and retention of high quality clinical staff across AMRTC. GREAT BENEFITS PACKAGE! The State of Minnesota offers a comprehensive benefits package including low cost medical and dental insurance, employer paid life insurance, short and long-term disability, pre-tax flexible spending accounts, retirement plan, tax-deferred compensation, generous vacation and sick leave, and 11 paid holidays each year. Apply online by 11/01/2018 at www.mn.gov/careers search for Job ID # 27159. Equal Opportunity and Veteran Friendly Employer

GET NOTICED!

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612-827-4021 Fitz Continued from page 10

Zimmers’ reputation as a fixer was restored after allowing 38 points and 564 yards to Los Angeles. The 2018 2-2-1 Vikings may be back on target to being a playoff-caliber contender. Pro Bowl receiver Adam Thielen is doing his part. He’s on fire as the first receiver in the NFL Super Bowl era to have five straight 100-yard receiving games to start the season. Quarterback Kirk Cousins, the $84 million guaranteed man, has been a passing marvel. Cousins is the first NFL player to have four straight games of 30 completions or more. In other NFL news Graham Gano of Carolina kicked a 63-yard game-winning field goal to help Carolina beat New York and tie an NFL record. For the first time in NFL history, four rookie quarterbacks, all drafted in the first round of the 2018 Draft, all won on the same weekend: Cleveland’s Baker Mayfield, New York’s Sam Darnold, Buffalo’s

Josh Allen, and Arizona’s Josh Rosen. Everybody, it seems, is complaining about roughing the passer penalties. There were 11 just last weekend. Pittsburgh Head Coach Mike Tomlin says, “Penalties are becoming a joke.” The 5-0 Los Angeles Rams and Kansas City Chiefs are the only unbeaten teams. If they stay on course, they meet in Mexico City on Monday Night Football November 19. Six NFL teams are 1-4. Which one surprises you? New York, San Francisco, Arizona, Indianapolis, Atlanta or Oakland? The Cardinals are here Sunday at U.S. Bank Stadium. Larry Fitzgerald can be heard weekday mornings on KMOJ Radio 89.9 FM at 8:25 am, on WDGY-AM 740 Monday and Friday at 9:10 am, and at www. Gamedaygold.com. He also commentates on sports 7-8 pm on Almanac (TPT channel 2). Follow him on Twitter at FitzBeatSr. Larry welcomes reader responses to info@larry-fitzgerald.com, or visit www.Larry-Fitzgerald.com.


10

October 11-17, 2018

RECORDS ARE MADE Mpls wins another sports bid: TO BE BROKEN the NCAA Women’s Final Four

I

New NFL passing yards record-holder Drew Brees Photo by Steve Floyd

T

day, fueled by the memohe NFL has a new ry of the humiliating 38-7 passing king — NFC title loss. DefensiveNew Orleans quarly, the Vikings forced two terback Drew Brees is now critical turnovers. number-one all-time. MonSteven Weatherly, reday night the New Orplacing defensive star leans Saints dominated Everson Griffen out with Washington 43-19. It was mental illness issues, a record-setting 363-yard forced a fumble. That was three-touchdown performance by Brees. He passed Brett Fa- returned 64 yards for a touchdown vre (71,838) and Peyton Manning by Linval Joseph. Head Coach Mike (71,940). The Saints, 4-1, have won four in ■ See Fitz on page 9 a row and lead the NFC South. The new mark for King Brees is 72,079 for now. Brees has thrown 499 career touchdown passes and with his next TD pass can join Manning, Favre and Tom Brady in the exclusive 500 touchdown passing club. Unlike a Major League Baseball’s season, which is called a marathon, an NFL season is like a 400-meter relay race. As we enter the second quarter of the NFL season, records continue to fall. The NFL ratings are up, and scoring is up by 80 yards per game. The Vikings upset the Super Bowl Passing King Drew Brees visits Champion Philadelphia Eagles 23- with Larry Fitzgerald Jr. Photo courtesy of Larry Fitzgerald 21 in the city of brotherly love Sun-

t’s back. Women’s college basketball’s crowning event, the NCAA Women’s Final Four, will return to downtown Minneapolis in 2022. I was there the last time the weekend event was here in 1995, a homecoming for two local former prep stars (Tracy Henderson, Brandi Decker) who grew up just blocks north from the arena and the kickstart of Connecticut’s dynasty as they won their first national title. God willing, I plan to be there again in four years. Minneapolis was one of four U.S. cities the NCAA selected as Final Four hosts last month in the latest round of successful bids. “This never gets old winning a major event,” Sports Minneapolis Executive Director Melvin Tennant proudly declared to an invited gathering of officials, including the Minneapolis mayor, inside the downtown Lynx-Timberwolves arena.

Melvin Tennant Photo courtesy of Meet Minneapolis

community that has 36,000 individuals that make their living in this [hospitality] industry,” he explained. “It’s important for us to be able to show that we can extend that radical hospitality [to visitors and others]. We

“We have great history of hosting NCAA events.” Tennant, as Meet Minneapolis president and CEO, has been actively involved in this city securing and hosting this year’s Super Bowl and WNBA All-Star Game. The City will also host this December the Women’s Volleyball Championship, among many major sporting events. The 1995 Final Four brought in about $22 million to the area, Tennant reported. “We are not going to speculate what the economic impact is going to be here, but that is the range we are looking at,” he forecasted. Later, Tennant pointed out to the MSR the perhaps overlooked economic importance of hosting large sporting events in Minneapolis, especially to those who don’t give a lick about sports. “We did highlight the fact that we are a

can only do that if we have people that are engaged and want to be involved in this industry and feel that they can make a living in it.” He was confident that Minneapolis would get the 2022 Final Four, the same confidence he previously displayed when predicting that the city would get the Super Bowl, the W’s annual game, next year’s Men’s Final Four, and other big-ticket platforms. His role includes recruiting, enhancing and producing not only sporting events in Minneapolis, but also such conventions as the National Baptist Convention that brought thousands of Blacks to the city last month. “We have great history of hosting NCAA events,” Tennant stated matterof-factly. “The NCAA trusts us more and

Josh Fenton

By Charles Hallman Contributing Writer The Big Ten this season will use a three-on-three format after a five-minute sudden death overtime period if the score still is tied in men’s hockey games. The National Collegiate Hockey Conference (NCHC) has used this format for several years now. “The NCHC was the first hockey conference to adopt three-on-three overtime three seasons ago,” Commissioner Josh Fenton told reporters at the league’s annual media day in St. Paul last month.

Photo by Charles Hallman At least one league team has made the final quartet for five seasons running, including the first all-NCHC national championship game between Minnesota Duluth and Denver in 2017. Furthermore, the last three national champions (North Dakota, 2016; Denver, 2017; and Minnesota Duluth, 2018) have come from the eight-team NCHC. “We believe we are the best conference in college hockey,” Fenton said. “We are very proud of what this conference has built since day one.” But when the NCAA earlier this year proposed a new mandate regarding overtime, Fen-

their own overtime rule after the first sudden death session. “College hockey is strong,” Fenton pointed out. But that doesn’t mean it isn’t without need of improvement: He noted three “significant areas” during his pre-season address to reporters, including the MSR. One, a better definition of “commitment…defined as when a prospect signs a national letter of intent,” and any oral commitments aren’t binding, the commish explained. Second, “delayed enrollment” is allowing players who go to junior hockey after high school to later accept a hockey scholarship up to age 21; and third, the need to devise an early recruiting model “different from other sports. I expect new legislation to be proposed this fall,” Fenton added. After his address, we asked Fenton about diversity. Two NCHC schools this season now have Black assistant hockey coaches (Paul Jerrard of Omaha, and Colorado College’s Leon Haywood). “I know all of our campuses have a commitment to diversity, particularly racial diversity,” Fenton noted.

Charles Hallman welcomes reader responses to challman@spokesman-recorder. com.

‘FANTASTIC FOUR’ PREP PHOTOS OF THE WEEK

Sports odds and ends

College hockey commitment to racial diversity reaffirmed

more. I don’t know if there has been any other city that has had a run of NCAA events [such as] we’ve had in recent years.” Julie Manning of the University of Minnesota, the host institution, was in the “closer” group of four who made the final presentation to the NCAA selection committee in Tampa in August, a final step in the bid process. She noted that her group held at least three dress rehearsals prior to showtime in Tampa. “We did a great job,” Manning recalled. She later described for us a room full of crossed fingers as the NCAA’s live PowerPoint showed on the screen, a flashy build-up to the announcement. “We felt pretty good, but you just don’t ever know.” Manning assured this paper’s principal women’s sports reporter that diversity will be front and foremost in the Women’s Final Four planning. “Absolutely,” she promised. “It is also a platform for us to get better [and] an opportunity here for us to reach out to the Somalian community.”

PreP Scene Dr. Mitchell PalMer McDonalD

This week’s “Fantastic Four” flashback photos feature four former prep stars — Tyus Jones, Tre Jones, Amani Hooker and Tyler Johnson — excelling while they were in high school with an update of what each is up to currently. Check out the pics and captions! Dr. Mitchell Palmer McDonald welcomes reader responses to mcdeezy05@gmail. com. All photos by Dr. Mitchell Palmer McDonald Tyus Jones (left), shown here representing Apple Valley in the 2013 boys’ basketball state tournament, recently started his fourth NBA season as a 6’2” point guard for the Timberwolves. After leading the Eagles to the 2013 Class 4A title as a junior, he was named Mr. Basketball and selected as a McDonald All-American the following season. He led Duke University to the 2015 NCAA championship as a freshman before being drafted by the T-Wolves. Tre Jones (right), shown here representing Apple Valley in the 2017 boys’ basketball state tournament, is a freshman at Duke University. The 6’3” guard helped the Eagles win Class 4A state titles in 2013, 2015 and 2017. He was named Mr. Basketball in 2018 and was a McDonald All-American.

Amani Hooker (bottom right), shown here in 2015 playing football for Park Center, recently started at safety helping the University of Iowa defeat Minnesota 48-31 last week. The 6’1” junior, who played quarterback, running back, wide receiver and safety in high school, is one of the top players at his position in the Big Ten.

“If a player of color aspires to be a coach, and they see our conference or other schools that have hired African American assistant coaches as a route for them, we are on board with that.” The NCHC has led the way in its overall vision since its founding in 2011 “to be the best singlesport conference in the NCAA.” Eight NCHC teams have made the NCAA Frozen Four since the league began play in 2013-14, the most of any conference.

ton led the charge against any changes. “Our conference has been outspoken in the belief that three-on-three is good for the growth of the overall [college hockey] game,” he stressed. The NCAA later backed off to allow each conference to come up with

“If a player [of color] growing up aspires to be a coach, and they see our conference or other schools that have hired African American assistant coaches as a path and a route for them [to ■ See SOE on page 9

Tyler Johnson (above), shown here running from two Minnesota defenders in the 2014 Class A state title game while playing for Minneapolis North, continues to shine as wide receiver for the University of Minnesota. The 6’2” junior, who led North to the Class A basketball title his senior year, caught six passes for 107 yards and one touchdown in the Gophers’ 48-31 Homecoming loss to Iowa.

October 11, 2018 - MN Spokesman-Recorder  

INSIDE: Black history unearthed in Mpls' oldest cemetery; First-ever BITCON conference marries Black talent and technology; Sister Spokesman...

October 11, 2018 - MN Spokesman-Recorder  

INSIDE: Black history unearthed in Mpls' oldest cemetery; First-ever BITCON conference marries Black talent and technology; Sister Spokesman...

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