Page 1

SEPTEMBER 2017

BEST BUY’S AGE-IN-PLACE HOME TECHNOLOGY PAGE 26

HOW TO BE A ROCKSTAR GRANDPARENT PAGE 38

THE MANY CHARMS OF LAS VEGAS PAGE 20

Music man Tony Mosley is back with a reunited New Power Generation, celebrating the life of Prince PAGE 44


Contents

20

VIVA LAS VEGAS! This desert gambling mecca offers fine dining, dazzling entertainment, fabulous shopping and a new observation wheel with stunning city views.

⊳⊳ The $785 million Paris Las Vegas hotel — which includes 2,916 guestrooms — was designed to bring the spirit of the European City of Lights to the Las Vegas Strip.

44

ON THE COVER Back on tour: Minneapolis native Tony Mosley left Prince’s New Power Generation in 1994 to settle down with a family and a steady job. Then his old bandmates came calling. Photos by Tracy Walsh

38 WHAT’S GRANDYCAMP? This online community — founded by a St. Paul grandmother — helps seniors master (and enjoy) modern grandparenting.

28

HOUSING RESOURCES

6 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

58

CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR

64

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MY TURN

10 A Minneapolis choir sings to end the plight of homelessness and share the joy of song.

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14 Minnesota women have been fighting for the right to vote since before MN was a state.

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WELLNESS

16 A study has shown that high-heart-rate aerobic exercise can fight memory loss.

CAREGIVING

18 Kinship caregiving presents special challenges in childrearing for seniors.

GOOD LIVING HOUSING

26 New technology from Best Buy could help seniors age in place for longer.

FINANCE

32 Many older adults are working after retirement for financial and social reasons.

IN THE KITCHEN

34 Nana, from our Nana & Mama column, shares her favorite mac-n-cheese recipe.

NANA & MAMA

36 How do you throw a party for a 1-year-old? You keep it simple — and go light on presents. Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 / 7

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FROM THE EDITOR Volume 36 / Issue 9 PUBLISHER

Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com

CO-PUBLISHER AND SALES MANAGER

Terry Gahan 612-436-4360 tgahan@mngoodage.com

EDITOR

Sarah Jackson 612-436-4385 editor@mngoodage.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Jamie Crowson, Matt Gulbransen, Carol Hall, Julie Kendrick, Laura Groenjes Mitchell, Dave Nimmer, Lauren Peck, Mary Rose Remington, Karen Ritz, Janet Salo, Carrie Luger Slayback, Carla Waldemar, Tracy Walsh

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Valerie Moe

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Dani Cunningham Kaitlin Ungs

CLIENT SERVICES

Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com

CIRCULATION

Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2017 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. Subscriptions are $12 per year.

8 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Simply grand! BY SARAH JACKSON

W

elcome to our latest issue of Good Age! This isn’t just our biggest issue of the year so far; it’s also, I hope you’ll find, one of our best yet! First, on our cover, we have one of the Twin Cities’ coolest cats — Tony Mosley, a Minneapolis native, husband, father of two, marketing project manager and former friend of Prince — who just returned from a European tour with a recently reunited New Power Generation. Also known as NPG, the band surrounded the Purple One during his glory days. Photo by Tracy Walsh In this issue, Mosley talks candidly about his tracywalshphoto.com time rapping and dancing on the road — then and now — and what it felt like to be part of the work and life of a Minnesota legend. This month is also our annual Grandparenting Issue. And what a time it is to be a grandmother or grandfather! On the coming pages, you’ll find some truly fresh insights in this arena, including another installment of our occasional Nana & Mama series as well as a special feature about GrandyCamp. This new online community for Twin Cities grandparents is the brainchild of Karen Ritz, a St. Paul-based children’s book illustrator and grandmother of two. Her goal is for modern grandparents to band together and have a blast, too. “Our career-driven children are leaving home later, marrying later and having children later still. And we ‘seniors’ are still in the thick of things, hitting our stride with experience, learning new platforms, retiring later and creating encore careers,” she said. “We’re still healthy, active and busy. Really busy! But then one day you find yourself at a hospital, holding a tiny, red-faced pause button.” Ritz, in this issue, writes about the unexpected joys and challenges of grandparenting in the modern age. And, bless her heart, she’s also put together a list of Good Age-friendly holiday events so you can start planning for the chaotic months ahead (with or without the grandkids). Finally, in addition to all our usual departments (freshly redesigned this month), be sure to check out the new face of Las Vegas, chronicled by our favorite travel writer, Carla Waldemar, who recently brought her brand of food savvy and Minnesota sensibility to Sin City, and loved it!


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MY TURN

Soulful singing BY DAVE NIMMER

A

s I sat and listened to the choir practice over a sunny, summer noon hour at Central Lutheran Church of Minneapolis, I was aware of how much music adds to my church experience. The joyful noise from the choir was of the stuff that nurtures my spirit and soothes my soul. And the souls in this choir could flat-out sing.

A new outlook What’s remarkable about the StreetSong MN choir is that some of them have been without a home, a few are still homeless and others simply care about the homeless and are members of their choirs at the Basilica of St. Mary, Hennepin Avenue Methodist Church and Central Lutheran. The choir’s polished sound is no accident. It’s been organized, trained and rehearsed for the past three years by the music directors at the Basilica (Teri Larson) 10 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

and Hennepin Avenue (Bill Mathis). They’ve neither lowered the bar, nor relaxed the standards. In the process, they’ve brought purpose and pride to members like 60-year-old Sherry Shannon. She’s a mother of four grown children who’s known homelessness first hand. “I had three kids when I found myself at Mary Jo’s place,” Shannon said of Mary Jo Copeland’s Sharing & Caring Hands in Minneapolis. “I’ve got a job now and a little apartment.” But life still isn’t easy. “My boys have been in trouble and I still worry about them. When I come to sing on Mondays, it helps me to stay focused,” she said. “This is my family. I’m happy. I’m relaxed. And I found out I can sing. I feel the power in my soul and being around music makes me feel like someone.” Feel like someone. That got my attention. How many times, I thought, have

I passed a panhandler on the street, a man on the exit ramp or a woman on a park bench with a cardboard sign and an endless, aching need: “Homeless. Hungry. Anything will help. Please.”

Expected excellence This choir, the brainchild of Larson, says to all who come: Welcome to the human race. Here’s a song book. Stretch your back. Up on your toes. Warm up your voice. Now, let’s sing. On the Monday I was there, Larson played the piano and Mathis directed the choir. They began with What a Wonderful World. I also learned that Mathis is a perfectionist. If the words are muffled, they sing the chorus again. If it’s too loud, or soft, they do it over. When it’s just right, he smiles and says, “Excellent. Excellent.” The choir was rehearsing for a benefit concert for the Downtown Congregations


⊳ The StreetSong MN choir focuses on creating community and the effort to end homelessness.

to End Homelessness, a collaboration of 16 downtown churches, synagogues and mosques. They’ve also given concerts at the Minneapolis Public Library and the Mall of America during the Christmas season.

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For Larson and Mathis, the choir is more than the music. “The homeless were a part of society I had no contact with,” Mathis said. “This has put new people in my life, has enriched my life. One guy came to my house for Thanksgiving dinner.” Mathis said he has a new view of people who find themselves without homes. “There are way too many ways to be homeless,” he said. “You don’t have to be a drug addict. Or an ex-con. One big medical bill can put you there.” In an article for The Chorister, Larson wrote: “We have members who used to be homeless. We have members who care deeply or have family members who are homeless. And now I see them as I walk down the street and I say, ‘Hello.’” Before I said goodbye to the choir, I listened to a soulful, stirring and sweet rendition of a gospel favorite of mine: “Lord, listen to your children praying. … Send us love. Send us power. Send us grace.” And all God’s children, including me, say Amen.

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Dave Nimmer has had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 / 11


MEMORIES

Forties fashions BY CAROL HALL

A

h, the knee-length skirts, the peeptoe pumps. The ever-present, ever-lovin’ hats. The clothing women wore in the 1940s was perfect for me. Alas, it had all but disappeared in the 1950s when I entered my 20s and became fashion conscious. I was cursed with the advent of the “New Look” (more about that later.) Being reasonably short, and lacking a long torso, I fit the picture of 1940s women for whom this clothing was designed. Best on me are the cute little suits with the abbreviated jackets, the ¾-length sleeve coats and wide-brim hats. Even the muchused shoulder pads worked. Glamorous stars in Turner Classic Movies' black-and-white ’40s flicks wear all of these items to their full potential — as well as others that make me drool. Capes top the list. What could have been more mysterious and dramatic than the long-hooded cape — actually a cloak — that Gene Tierney wore in Laura? It contributed to the mystery surrounding her (the crux of the picture). I also have a great love of furs. Fulllength mink coats, jackets, stoles — even muffs — were a staple for Barbara Stanwyck and Alexis Smith in their many dramatic roles portraying snooty rich women. And then there were the luscious chinchilla and white ermine wraps covering evening gowns. And, oh, those movie evening gowns. They were elaborate, fancy and “ooh la la” sexy on the backs of gorgeous 12 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

⊳⊳ Full-length mink coats, jackets and stoles were a staple for Barbara Stanwyck, who often played snooty rich women in 1940s films.

actresses rumbaing with actors attired in white evening jackets on the dance floors of elegantly appointed night clubs. (Think Rita Hayworth and Glen Ford in Gilda.) I often wish TV’s Dancing with the Stars would copy some of these sophisticated creations for their dancers instead of always putting them in something sequined and backless. As for hats, the movies went all out. Many were concoctions using feathers, veils or bows, specially designed to match the rest of the outfit — or the character. Dizzy, zany Billie Burke wore a perky

beret made of two appliqued doves, which only added to her ridiculous persona in Washington Melodrama. I won’t even get into movie wedding gowns — except to say that satin was the fabric of the day, as were long veils and trains, imaginative headdresses and puffed sleeves for bridesmaids — all total fantasia. Ditto for bathing suits. Esther Williams’ one-piercers were works of art that made strong fashion statements. There is, of course, a downside: Much ’40s clothing was tailored, with annoying long, side zippers and tiny buttons.


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▲▲A 1940s issue of Mademoiselle magazine featured women’s fashions, including lots of hats, perky little kneelength dresses, gorgeous satin gowns, open-toe pumps and even plaid hooded cloaks.

Full-length petticoats were necessary, dress shields and “foundation garments” as well. Gloves were de rigueur. But overall, women’s fashions of the 1940s oozed class. Men’s — a double-breasted suit and Fedora, a la Humphrey Bogart — not so much. But it all went together. I simply was born in the wrong era. Wispy waists, soft shoulders and dresses worn below mid-calf were the hallmark of the 1950s, thanks to Christian Dior, who incorporated them into his “New Look.” “Ballet” slippers (gasp!) completed the outfit. Audrey Hepburn was made for the New Look. Melania Trump wears a version of it today. I’ll say no more! Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Send comments and questions to chall@mngoodage.com.

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MINNESOTA HISTORY ⊳⊳ Organized groups, such as the University of Minnesota’s women’s suffrage club, were a force behind the movement for suffrage equity in 1913. Photo courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society.

Votes for women BY LAUREN PECK

I

n September 1919, the Minnesota legislature ratified the 19th Amendment, granting women the right to vote. The process took about 30 minutes. But the path to women’s suffrage locally and nationally wasn’t so simple. Women’s suffrage was on Minnesotans’ minds from the state’s beginnings in 1858. While writing the new state constitution, Democrats proposed allowing married women to vote in Minnesota, but the idea was quickly dismissed. That same year, in Champlin, early suffragist Dr. Mary Jackman Colburn made likely the first-ever public lecture on women’s rights in Minnesota.

On the ballot

tutional amendment allowing women the right to vote and run for office — on school issues — was included on the ballot. Suffrage activists were strategic in their work on the amendment: To avoid triggering opposition, they held off publicizing the amendment until right before the election. Advocate Sarah Burger Stearns also convinced the editor of the Pioneer Press, the leading newspaper in Minnesota, to announce his support for the amendment. Finally, activists ensured that the ballots were printed with very specific wording regarding the amendment: “For the amendment of Article VII relating to electors: Yes.” This required voters to scratch out “yes” and write “no” if they opposed it.

Minnesota moved a small step closer to women’s suffrage in 1875 when a consti-

The amendment ultimately passed — with 24,340 votes in favor and 19,468

14 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

against; the next year, Charlotte Ouisconsin Clark Van Cleve became the first woman elected to the Minneapolis school board.

Getting organized A statewide organization was formed in 1881 when the Minnesota Woman Suffrage Association (MWSA) was created by 14 women in Hastings. Stearns was elected its first president. Within a year, the group had 200 members, and MWSA eventually became a branch of the National American Women Suffrage Association (NAWSA). The fight continued steadily on from 1893 to 1907 with very little success. One small victory occurred in 1898 when voters approved an amendment giving women the right to vote and serve on library boards in Minnesota.


In 1914, Clara Ueland became president of the MWSA. She worked to make the MWSA even more organized, including hiring paid organizers to travel around Minnesota and finding key local women to be coordinators in their areas. In the state legislature, meanwhile, the divide was getting narrower and narrower; in 1915, suffrage was defeated by only one vote in the Senate.

Strategy conflict At the same time, the national suffrage movement was experiencing a split. Some leaders, like Alice Paul, felt more radical tactics were needed and subsequently left NAWSA. The National Woman’s Party (NWP) was formed in 1916 and relied on civil disobedience and protests, rather than other methods, such as lobbying political leaders, to fight for the vote. The NWP began picketing outside the White House in January 1917 and continued the protest for nearly two more years. Minnesota’s suffragists felt this national split. As a branch of NAWSA, the MWSA kept up its same tactics and distanced itself from the picketers. But some Minnesotans, like Sarah Tarleton Colvin and Bertha Moller, went to Washington, D.C. to protest. Moller was arrested 11 times and jailed twice, and Colvin, president of the Minnesota branch of the NWP, was jailed for five days after burning President Woodrow Wilson in effigy. By 1918, several more states, including New York and California, granted women full voting rights. Then a constitutional amendment passed the U.S. House of Representatives in January 1918, and Minnesota’s entire delegation voted in favor. In June 1919, the U.S. Senate passed the amendment, sending it to the states for rati-

fication, which required two-thirds of states to approve it before it could become law.

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In the midst of this, back in Minnesota, Remodeled and Spacious (chapel seating 200) legislation passed in March 1919 allowing 2593 E. 7th Ave., North St. Paul, MN 55109 women to vote in presidential elections. At that point, 30,000 Minnesota sandbergfuneralhome.com women were members of a local suffrage organization. Suffragists then lobbied Minnesota Gov. Joseph Burquist to call aSandberg Funeral GA 0513 12.indd 1 4/9/13 special legislative session to vote to ratify suffrage on the federal level. In a special session on Sept. 8, 1919, both houses ratified the 19th Amendment, which passed 120–6 in the House of Representatives and 60–5 in the Senate. One suffragist reported, “The moment the Senate vote was polled the corridors, floors and galleries of both houses were in an uproar; hundreds of women cheered and laughed and waved the suffrage colors, while in the rotunda a band swung into the strains of The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” The amendment was approved by a twothirds majority of states a year later, and the 19th Amendment became federal law in August 1920. However, Minnesota’s suffrage leaders didn’t consider their work done. The MWSA transformed into the Minnesota League of Women Voters, which is still an active organization devoted to civic engagement nearly 100 years later. Visitors to the Minnesota History Center can learn more about the U.S. suffrage movement and see related artifacts in the exhibit WW1 America, which examines this transformative and turbulent period in American history. The exhibit is open through Nov. 11.

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Lauren Peck is a media relations and social media associate for the Minnesota Historical Society. Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 / 15

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WELLNESS

Better than any pill BY CARRIE LUGER SLAYBACK

I

f you tell me you read my articles, I’ll do anything you say. As I left a meeting in 2016, a charming lady stopped me to say: “I never miss reading your fitness articles. There’s a free lecture you must hear: The Brain and Exercise.”        So I showed up at a University of California Irvine lecture series with Dr. Laura Baker of the Wake Forest School of Medicine, speaking on Exercise for the Brain: Is It Worth the Sweat? When Dr. Carl Cotman — founder of the university’s Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders (MIND) — introduced Dr. Baker, he almost gave away the answer, but not quite.

At risk for Alzheimer’s First, Cotman told us that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends 150 minutes of exercise weekly, but, unfortunately, people age 20 to 29 get less than 30 minutes, and those in their 80s get a paltry 15. “Sitting is the new smoking,” he said, describing a 50-year decline in Americans’ active lifestyle. “Exercise lowers risk for heart disease, cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, improves blood flow, mood and reduces stress,” Cotman said. But Baker’s study demonstrated even more than those oft-listed physiological benefits. To show the “brain benefit,” she assembled 71 sedentary adults, age 55 to 89, who had been diagnosed with mild 16 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

cognitive impairment (MCI.) MCI is described as memory problems greater than normal age-related failure to recall. Although not all people diagnosed with MCI progress to Alzheimer’s, the progress is tragic for those who do, including a loss of brain cells and severe shrinkage of the brain, marred by the characteristic plaques and tangles of Alzheimer’s. And, with those losses, comes a greatly diminished ability to care for oneself. “Not a single drug is effective in stopping or slowing the progressive nature of the disease,” Baker said.

Aerobic activity vs. stretching But guess what? Baker’s study found something that is effective. Her study divided a carefully matched group, all of whom had high likelihood of progressing to Alzheimer’s,

into two subgroups. Both exercised 45 to 60 minutes four times a week for six months. One group received classes in stretching. The other had aerobic training with a personal trainer at a gym. The aerobic group exercised at 70 to 80 percent of maximum heart rate while the stretching group exercised below 35 percent. Baker described the results at the end of six months. Participants had spinal taps analyzing their cerebrospinal fluid, indicating the presence of a protein marker for the tangles associated with Alzheimer’s. The protein decreased with aerobic exercise, showing a decline in the tangles. “No study with medication has been able to decrease the protein marker associated with Alzheimer’s,” Baker said. In the aerobic exercise group, scans


revealed brain volume increases rather than expected further brain shrinkage. The parietal lobe, frontal lobe and hippocampus increased in size, together with “key areas that connect these three.” Gains in brain weight affect “executive function,” which includes the ability to plan, initiate, multitask and focus. Participants in the stretching group probably benefited in flexibility and balance, but tangles in their brains increased, brain weight decreased and their dementia progressed. In the aerobic exercise group, the gains may have been caused by the increased blood flow — to the brain’s memory and processing centers — that accompanies high-intensity activity.

The best prescription The incidence of Alzheimer’s doubles every five years after 65, so that — after age 85 — about half of us will have Alzheimer’s. None of us wants to be counted in that number. What we want in our senior years is independence and the continued ability to care for ourselves, all while maintaining as much of the cognitive essence of our personalities as possible. If a pill would accomplish reversal of dementia’s progress, people would take it. But we do not have a pill. Baker prescribes a timed dose of vigorous activity. She has research to show it works. She has evidence that 45 to 60 minutes of aerobic exercise at 70 to 80 percent of maximum heart beat seems to reverse the progressive nature of dementia. I suspect you agree that in order to hold off the progress of Alzheimer’s, exercise is definitely worth the sweat.                                                            Carrie Luger Slayback is an awardwinning, retired teacher and current marathon runner who lives in California. Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 / 17


CAREGIVING

Taking care of kids BY JANET SALO

M

ore than 2.7 million children in the U.S. are living in a household without a parent present. We often hear from kinship caregivers about the twists and turns that are part of their journeys: A great-grandfather starts out watching his three great-grandchildren two days a week, and then that care evolves into seven days a week. An aunt has to pick up her nephews after a parent ends up incarcerated and finds she may be caring for the boys — until they’re adults. Then there's the grandchild who needed to be picked up by her grandmother at daycare because her mother entered a treatment program, and the grandmother’s caregiving becomes a year-long commitment. These are kinship caregiving families — caregivers who end up providing primary care for other people’s children.

Getting started The journey is often unplanned, and the road ahead is challenging. Often, it’s hard for caregivers to see the light at the end of the tunnel. First on the agenda might be figuring out the basics of obtaining medical insurance, accessing financial county resources and potentially obtaining legal custody to secure the immediate safety of the child. Next, children may need mental health resources or special support to address the loss and grief they feel. Often medical and dental needs may not have been adequately 18 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

addressed, so caregivers must make and attend many appointments to help kids catch up. Children may also need to be enrolled in a new school and adapt to new peers and unfamiliar environments.

Don’t go it alone Through this transition and over the long term, kinship caregivers need to take care of themselves to maintain the emotional stamina they may need to address strained family dynamics. Stress and burnout can deplete the kinship caregiver’s ability to cope. Reaching out for help and asking for assistance is hard, but often necessary. Kinship Family Support Services, a program of Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota, can help. Professional staff can connect caregivers to the resources that can best meet

their needs. Educational support groups and workshops are also available to offer emotional support and opportunities

ATTEND THE CONFERENCE WHAT: Lutheran Social Service

will present its fourth-annual Kinship Caregiver Conference and Resource Fair. All kinship caregivers are invited to rejuvenate, celebrate, learn and gain a wealth of community connections through educational presentations, information booths, resources and one-to-one assistance from professional staff. WHERE: Saturday, Nov. 4 WHERE: Center for Changing Lives, 2400 Park Ave. S., Minneapolis COST: FREE. Please register at kinshipcaregivers.org. INFO: kinshipcaregivers.org


for kinship caregivers to share ideas and resources with one another. In addition, caregivers can access information and assistance — including financial support options, legal services, online training for kinship caregivers and free webinars on kinship adoption — through a statewide Warmline by calling 877-917-4640 or emailing warmline@lssmn.org.

Success stories Many caregivers who have benefited from the support they’ve received report back to share their gratitude. One uncle and aunt couple, Randy and Gretchen, shared this note recently with Lutheran Social Service staff: Thank you for supporting our family. We, in late 2008, were given legal/physical custody of our nieces — then ages 9 and 11. Our nieces are special young women. We had never been parents, and thought the matter — caring for our nieces — would be temporary, maybe a year. The program was very timely and helped us, over the years, especially during the time we enjoyed support through a support group. The backpacks, the camp scholarship, the teaching on raising children — it all was invaluable to us. Our older niece graduated in 2015 and is in college. As of last weekend, our younger niece graduated from high school, and has now moved out to be on her own. Well, here we are: Thank you for everything. We are now back to Aunt and Uncle status, with both young adult girls deeply in our hearts. Janet Salo is a family support specialist at Kinship Family Support Services, a program of Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota. She is also a member of the Twin Cities’ Metropolitan Caregiver Service Collaborative (caregivercollaborative.org). Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 / 19


TRAVEL

V a v a V E xperie

f city ’s e h t f est o nce the b

The Linq Hotel & Casino on the Las Vegas Strip near Caesar’s Palace is home to the High Roller, the world’s largest observation wheel, towering 550 feet.

sights! e e s t s u and m g n i p , shop e r u t l u o od , c


! s a g e V BY C A

AL DE RL A W

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he Strip — the centerfold of Las Vegas — is a top contender for the most glittering, high-energy, escapefrom-reality stretch of real estate on the planet. From those fabled hotels lining the boulevard, you can spot the Eiffel Tower, the Empire State Building, an Egyptian pyramid and a medieval British castle, all inviting you to inhabit your personal fantasy — all within a rim of rocky mountains and platoons of palms. (You can also spot the airport, mere minutes away, too.) Affordable flights and rooms — even better bargains during midweek stays — conspire to entice folks to trade their upright Norwegian behavior for hedonistic pastimes played on a desert stage. (Delta, Sun Country and Spirit on a recent web search were all offering affordable direct shots to Sin City.) But remember, Minnesotans, this is a desert, and it’s hot. Plan outdoor activities for early morning or toward sunset, then schedule midday R&R at your hotel’s pool or its bling-laden shopping arcade. Walk nowhere. Trust me: Distances between hotel/casinos, each near the size of the Pentagon, are long and toasty. (The Strip is about 4 miles long, much too long to walk in the desert sun.) Hop the tram, engage a car service, grab a cab or summon Uber.

Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 / 21


Va-va-Vegas!

The Temple Pool is one of seven Garden of the Gods pools at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. Day beds and cabanas start at $150.

PLAN YOUR TRIP

See VisitLasVegas.com.

Take in the view

An ideal intro to this city is the High Roller — the world’s largest observation wheel (new in 2014), making a half-hour loop that captures an overview of all that shines below. It’s space-agey observation pods sit like jewels on the wheel. Bar cabins offer 30-minute “happy half hour” rides. Yoga specials (one hour) allow you to engage in asanas at midday or at sunset on select days. Or you might sign on for a helicopter tour. Sundance offers a particularly appealing package with a 30-minute spin over the moonscape that is the Red Rock Mountains, landing at Pahrump Valley Winery, where Minneapolis native Bill Loken and winemaker wife, Gretchen, took over a failing property and restored it to medal-winning status. Tour and taste, settle in for a four-course dinner facing the vineyards, then depart with a gift bottle before zooming back over the bright lights of The Strip.

Shop it off ▲ The High Roller observation wheel includes 28 cabins that hold 40 people each for a total capacity of 1,120 passengers. Photo by James.Pintar / Shutterstock.com

22 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Gaming fans, you’re never more than a ca-ching away from the slots. And for those whose game of choice is shopping, same deal. Consider the options at Bellagio: Beyond its Gallery of


Va-va-Vegas! Fine Art — including an exhibit on the life of boxer Muhammad Ali and the opportunity to pick up your very own Van Gogh (“price upon request”) — you’ll find the storefronts of Gucci, Vuitton, Chanel, Prada, Dior, Tiffany, Armani and more. Then watch the resort’s iconic dancing fountain while your credit card cools off. Same goes for Caesars Palace, where you’ll spot Michelangelo’s David lookalike and the Trevi fountains you thought were in Rome, in company with Jimmy Choo, Fendi, Saint Laurent, Valentino and — what’s this? — H&M. Mandalay Bay’s arcade doesn’t lack for glitter, either, while its Shark Reef invites voyeurs to get up-close and personal with a deathly komodo dragon, piranhas, sting rays and sharks aplenty. Opening nearby in 2018 is Vegas’ new stadium, where you’ll be able to watch the relocated Oakland Raiders, the city’s first professional football team. (Hockey’s on the way, too.)

Iconic old Vegas

And now for something different, as they say. Head beyond The Strip to Downtown Las Vegas, where the city got its start in the early 1900s. Thanks to gambling and lax divorce laws, the nouveau town quickly captured attention. But, as times changed, it faded. Today, it’s ready for its close-up once again, attracting hipsters to iconic Fremont Street, which you can patrol on foot, under a blocks-long climate-controlled roof. Yes, get your name engraved on a grain of rice or line up for your 99-cent shrimp cocktail, then grab lunch at Freedom Beat in the Downtown Grand Hotel/Casino with its menu of all-American comfort food — pot roast; shrimp and grits; burgers; and Benedicts. Before that (or later, after dark) promise me you won’t miss the nearby Neon Museum for a guided tour of the historic 200-plus signs saved in its Boneyard — the golden nugget from the original Golden Nugget of 1946, the city’s first casino; the iconic Silver Slipper of 1955; and 1955’s Moulin Rouge, the first racially integrated hotel/casino. And so many others. Then carve out an afternoon at The Mob Museum, housed in the actual courthouse where Sen. Estes Kefauver cracked down on organized crime. Visitors are read the Miranda Act in the elevator leading them to the slums of New York, which tempted Irish, Jewish and Italian immigrants to turn to crime. Then there’s the arrival of Bugsy Siegel in Nevada to purchase The Flamingo, the mob’s first casino, among many other stories. 24 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲The Neon Museum, not far from downtown Las Vegas, features vintage signs from the city’s many former casinos. Photo by EQRoy / Shutterstock.com

See a show and chow down

So now you’re safe to make reservations for a show, such as BAZ, a sequin-studded song and dance mélange of filmmaker Baz Luhrman’s romantic hits. Or Frank Marino’s Divas Las Vegas, where female impersonators bring on stage everyone from Patti and Celine to Cher. Now for the hardest decisions — where to eat. Vegas is the dining capitol of the continent, if not the universe, where bold-name chefs from New York to New Orleans to L.A. — and even Paris — have opened outposts. Some of the newest arrivals include GIADA at the Cromwell Hotel/Casino, whose chef hails from Rome and knows a thing or two about a Caprese salad and fritto misto. Don’t miss the signature lobster ravioli. Or juicy, pine nut-crusted rack of lamb. Lago, in the Bellagio, celebrates Chef Julian Serrano’s mastery of the Mediterranean kitchen, from a gorgeous seafood salad to a showcase plate of Spanish pata negra (like prosciutto) and creamy homemade burrata cheese. Then it’s on to linguine studded with


iologist Licensed AudWelcoming Office KIM E. FISHMAN in a Warm & Licensed Audiologist Come see our new hearing boutique with some warehouse pricing

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tomatoes and the inspired union of pulled duck atop polenta. Chef Lorena Garcia rules at The Venetian’s CHICA with her creamy guac, flavor-rich tostadas and wild mushroom quesadillas — or try the meltaway short rib and porchetta. But don’t forget the corn — both on the cob (coated in white Mexican cheese) and in her take on mac and cheese. Come hungry to the Bacchanal Buffet in Caesars Palace, where the elegant food line segues from Asian (sushi, dim sum, seaweed salad, noodles) to Italian (pasta, pizza, meatballs), to Mexican (pork in mole verde, empanadas) to all-American (carved roasts of every sort, ribs, burgers, cold shellfish, hot biscuits and gravy) and more-more-more. Plus an endless dessert station. Chances are by now you’re already planning your return visit to the City That Never Sleeps (or disappoints). Keep that swimsuit handy. Carla Waldemar is an award-winning food/travel/arts writer. She edits the annual Zagat Survey of Twin Cities restaurants and writes food and travel articles for publications around the world. She lives in Uptown. Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 / 25


HOUSING ⊳ Woodbury resident Jane Helgesen and her daughter, Britt Stanton, currently use Best Buy’s Assured Living service and appreciate the convenience and peaceof-mind it provides.

Peace of mind BY SARAH JACKSON

M

ore and more people are balancing care for their aging parents while also juggling full-time jobs, child-rearing and other obligations. This balancing act is stressful for both older adults and their caregivers, and it’s projected to become increasingly common: By 2030, one in five Americans will be 65 or older. Affordable senior housing options are limited. Meanwhile, nearly 90 percent of adults 65 and older say they’d like to stay in their homes for as long as possible. In response, Best Buy has created a service called Assured Living to help caregivers and loved ones who practice this balancing act every day. Assured Living is a sensor-based notification service that connects caregivers and their loved ones with customizable

26 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

systems using home-security-type motion sensors and smart-home technology. Best Buy consults with caregivers and their loved ones to create systems that best meet their needs and home. Geek Squad Agents install the technology and provide training to both caregivers and their loved ones on how it works. Devices include bed and chair sensors — activated by pressure — as well as motion sensors that can be attached to

doors, windows, the refrigerator and even medicine cabinets. Other gadgets include wireless doorbell cameras (so older adults as well as their caregivers can see who’s there). Systems can also include smarthome thermostats, lights and deadbolts. Users can even add an Amazon Echo to control the smart features of the home with voice technology.

WHAT’S AN ECHO? Amazon Echo is smart speaker and voice-activated assistant, also known as Alexa, and is an optional part of Best Buy’s Assured Living program for older adults. An Echo is capable of voice interaction, turning lights on and off, music playback, making to-do lists, setting alarms, streaming podcasts, playing audiobooks and providing weather, traffic and other real-time information.


No cameras are required to make the service work, so older adults can still maintain their privacy. Caregivers gain access to basic information without having to be intrusive. Once the devices are in place, a digital system analyzes signals and provides custom notifications — through a mobile app and desktop dashboard — regarding a loved one’s activities and well-being. Over time, patterns in the data collected can help track what’s normal for the older adult’s home — and what is not. Older adults and their caregivers can set up automatic reminders for routine tasks such as taking medications. “Caregivers no longer need to worry about how Mom or Dad is doing because they’re getting updates in real time,” said

Booth Manor Residence For Seniors 62+

Devices include bed and chair sensors — activated by pressure — as well as motion sensors that can be attached to doors, windows, the refrigerator and even medicine cabinets.

• 1 Bedrooms • Based on Income • Utilities Included • Service Coordinator • Resident Activities & Programs • Community Room • Smoke-Free Building

1421 Yale Place, Mpls

612-338-6313

Transitions

Booth Manor GA 0114 12.indd 1

12/6/13 10:14 AM

can be difficult.

But selling a home shouldn’t be. We are here to help you & your family with your next move.

AJ McDougall, general manager of Best Buy’s strategic growth office, who has led the creation of Assured Living. “And parents enjoy the freedom of independent living along with the comfort that family members are there for them when they need them.” Best Buy piloted the Assured Living program with employee families in early 2017, and it’s now available to residents in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. Assured Living costs $1 per day with no contract. The price of the system depends on the custom design of each home, varying from several hundred dollars to $1,000 or more. Learn more and sign up for a free consultation at bestbuy.com/assuredliving or call 855-569-6538.

▲ The Assured Living mobile app from Best Buy displays activity and well-being information so caregivers and their loved ones can have informed conversations. Photo courtesy of Best Buy

Do you know of a new or interesting senior housing service or facility in the Twin Cities that might make a good Housing Spotlight? Write Minnesota Good Age editor Sarah Jackson at editor@mngoodage.com with the subject line HOUSING SPOTLIGHT.

Mary Frances Miller mfmiller@cbburnet.com

952-300-7874

Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 / 27

Miller M Frances GA 0717 V4.indd 1

6/20/17 2:49 PM


HOUSING RESOURCES

•MEMORY CARE •ASSISTED LIVING •INDEPENDENT HOUSING •LONG TERM CARE •NEW CONSTRUCTION

AUGUSTANA CARE OF MINNEAPOLIS ••••

Our full continuum of care offers everything from independent living to skilled nursing, all on one campus! We offer in-home care, restaurant-style dining, a bank, pharmacy, grocery store, coffee shop, beauty shop, medical clinic, fitness center, and more! 1007 E 14th St Minneapolis 1510 11th Ave S Minneapolis 612-238-5555 minneapoliscampus.org

CARVER COUNTY CDA •

Offers affordable independent living for adults 55 and better throughout Carver County including Chanhassen, Chaska, Waconia, and Norwood Young America. We offer Carver County CDA’s HUD subsidized Section 8 property for adults 62 and over, or those with a qualifying disability. All properties are smoke free. 705 N Walnut St Chaska 952-448-7715 carvercda.org

CITY OF SOUTH ST. PAUL, HOUSING DIVISION •

The City of South St. Paul operates 296 one bedroom public housing apartments

28 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

for residents aged 50+. Rent is based on 30% of tenant’s income. All utilities paid, on-site caretaker, security, after-hours answering service, community room, resident activities, laundry facilities. Call today for an appointment. 125 3rd Ave N South St. Paul 651-554-3270 mostrow@sspmn.org

COMMONBOND COMMUNITIES ••

CommonBond builds stable homes, strong futures, and vibrant communities. As the largest nonprofit provider of affordable homes in the Upper Midwest, CommonBond has been building and sustaining homes with services to families, seniors, and individuals with disabilities since 1971. 1080 Montreal Ave St. Paul 651-291-1750 commonbond.org/findhousing

THE GRAINWOOD SENIOR APARTMENTS ••

Affordable Grainwood Apartments bring the look and feel of a brand-new lake place to the heart of Prior Lake. The Grainwood offers contemporary maintenance-free living with amenities such as granite countertops and a washer/dryer in every home. Rents from $939. 5119 Gateway St Prior Lake

952-403-1280 grainwoodapartments.com

LEE SQUARE COOPERATIVE •

4x Readers Choice Award winner for best retirement independent living community for persons 55+. Lee Square is a vibrant active mix of members enjoying home ownership with virtually little maintenance. Established in 1985 and managed by EMS since inception! 4400 36th Ave N Robbinsdale 763-522-5095 or toll free 855-422-0022 leesquarecooperative.com

THE LEGENDS OF APPLE VALLEY ••

The Legends of Apple Valley brings brandnew independent senior living to the heart of the south metro. Opening in spring 2018, the Legends features 1-, 2-, and 3-BR apartment homes and amazing amenities with rents from the mid $900s. 14050 Granite Ave Apple Valley 763-225-4632 legendsofapplevalley.com

THE LEGENDS OF CHAMPLIN ••

The Legends of Champlin – opening in early 2018 – is a brand-new active senior community with rents from the low $900s.


South St. Paul HRA ADVERTISER LISTINGS

• 50+ Community • Income Based Rent • All Utilities Paid

62+ Independent Living 5015 35th Avenue South, Minneapolis www.NokomisSquare.com

We’re ideally located in a comfortable Minneapolis neighborhood.

• Newly Remodeled

Enjoy the convenience of maintenancefree living combined with amazing amenities such as a private patio and washer/dryer in every home. 11635 Theatre Dr N Champlin 763-354-5576 legendsofchamplin.com

THE LEGENDS OF COLUMBIA HEIGHTS ••

Opening in early 2018, The Legends of Columbia Heights is a brand-new, affordable community for active seniors that offers amazing amenities – such as granite countertops and a washer/dryer in every home – all at an unmatched value. Rents from $939. 3700 Huset Pkwy Columbia Heights 763-225-4633 legendsofcolumbiaheights.com

THE LEGENDS OF COTTAGE GROVE ••

Write your next chapter. Make it a Legend! The beautiful, BRAND-NEW Legends of Cottage Grove (opening in early 2018) is an affordable community for active seniors. It features granite countertops, a washer/ dryer in every home, and rents from $941. 6999 E Douglas Rd S Cottage Grove 763-452-3169 legendsofcottagegrove.com

• Elevators • Controlled Entries • On Site Caretaker Call for an appointment 651-554-3270

South St Paul HRA GA 0817 12.indd 3

Call to schedule your tour today!

612.721.5077 Equal Housing Opportunity

7/28/17 Nokomis 1:36 PM Square GA 0214 12.indd 1

Community + Connection + Independence = Vibrante

1/15/14 4:37 PM

Vibrante is a shared living community where women don’t have to age alone: staying vibrant, healthy, engaged... contributing to the greater good. If you’re age 55 or older and want to enjoy the company of like-minded women in a private, home environment, Vibrante is the place for you.

Suites available. Call for a n conversatio ! y toda Engaged Living. Thriving Women. | vibranteliving.com Vibrante Living GA 0617 H4.indd 1

Call Roxanne at 612.816.6940 to explore living in this luxurious, newly-remodeled four-bedroom home with Lake Nokomis views, complete with concierge services.

5/8/17 12:59 PM

Distinctive Senior Living!

Welcome to Our Community of Neighbors Summer, Fall, Winter and Spring, living at Gramercy is a wonderful thing!

• Great location in the heart of Richfield within walking distance to everything you need. • Conveniently located across the street from beautiful Wood Lake Nature Center.

(CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE)

• 1, 2 & 3 bedroom spacious homes with washer/dryer. Pet friendly. • Many social activities & amenities • Carefree lifestyle

Contact us

6711 Lake Shore Drive, Richfield, MN 55423 gramercylakeshore.com • 612.861.1378 Gramercy Park at Lake Shore Dr GA 0916 H4.indd 1

8/16/162017 10:26 Minnesota Good Age / September / AM 29


HOUSING RESOURCES

(CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE)

•MEMORY CARE •ASSISTED LIVING •INDEPENDENT HOUSING •LONG TERM CARE •NEW CONSTRUCTION

THE LEGENDS OF SPRING LAKE PARK ••

The Legends of SLP is a brand-new affordable community for active seniors. Opening in late 2018, the Legends offers 1-, 2-, and 3-BR apartments with amazing amenities. Join our Insider List and reserve a home before the general public. 1066 Cty Hwy 10 NE Spring Lake Park 763-392-9803 legendsofspringlakepark.com

LYNGBLOMSTEN •••

Lyngblomsten is a Christian nonprofit organization serving older adults and their families. A continuum of care offers: independent housing with assisted living services, full range of 24-hour skilled nursing options including short and longterm care, and community services and resources. 1415 Almond Ave St. Paul 651-646-2941 lyngblomsten.org

MINNESOTA MASONIC HOME ••••

Minnesota Masonic Home is located on an historic 80-acre estate overlooking the Minnesota River Valley in Bloomington. We offer Independent Living, Assisted Living,

30 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care, Skilled Nursing Care, and Transitional Care/ Rehab. Call to schedule a tour. 11501 Masonic Home Dr Bloomington 952-948-7000 mnmasonichome.org

NOKOMIS SQUARE COOPERATIVE •

Nokomis Square Cooperative is a member owned and operated housing and lifestyle choice for individuals 62 plus. We’re situated between Lake Nokomis and Minnehaha Park in South Minneapolis. Concrete and steel construction and experienced maintenance staff provide a carefree, well-kept environment. 5015 35th Ave S Minneapolis 612-721-5077 nokomissquare.com

OAK MEADOWS •••

Award winning Oak Meadows has an 18 year track record of providing excellent service and care to seniors and their families. We offer 48 assisted, 12 memory care and 62 independent apartments. Lifesprk provides 24/7 on-site homecare. 8131–8133 4th St N Oakdale 651-578-0676 oak-meadows.org

THE RESIDENCE AT NORTH RIDGE ••••

We offer the perfect mix of care, services and living options to ensure wellness and enrichment. Assisted Living, Independent Living, Adult Day Programs, Comprehensive Rehab Programs, Outpatient Rehab Therapy, On-site Child Care Program. Memory Care coming in early 2017. To learn more, please give us a call! 5500 Boone Ave N New Hope 763-592-3000 theresidenceatnorthridge.com

SALVATION ARMY BOOTH MANOR •

Conveniently located across from Loring Park, this 21-story high rise, with 154 one-bedroom apartments is designed for seniors 62 years of age or better, offering many services and amenities. It also combines the convenience of being near downtown with the serenity of the great outdoors. 1421 Yale Place Minneapolis 612-338-6313 salvationarmynorth. org/community/booth-manor


ADVERTISER LISTINGS

ST. BENEDICT’S SENIOR COMMUNITY •••

Convenience, independence and lifestyle are important aspects when choosing a senior community. Whether it's simplifying your life to make more time for activities, or needing assistance with everyday tasks, our campuses in St. Cloud, Monticello, and Sartell offer choices for vital aging. Sartell: Chateau Waters NOW OPEN 960 19th St S Sartell 320-654-2352 chateauwaters.com St. Cloud: 1810 Minnesota Blvd SE St. Cloud 320-203-2747 centracare.com/sbsc Monticello: 1301 E 7th St Monticello 763-295-4051 centracare.com/sbscmont

Affordable independent living for adults 55 and better carvercda.org • 952-448-7715

All CDA communities are smoke FREE!

Carver County CDA 55 and Better Rental Properties: Oak Grove Senior Residence in Norwood Young America 952-373-2200 • oakgrovesr.com The Crossings at Town Centre in Waconia 952-442-8232 • crossingsapt.com Centennial Hill in Chanhassen 952-474-4060 • centennialhillapts.com All 55 and Better Properties Offer: In-Unit Washers/Dryers • Underground Heated Parking Beauty Salon • Community Room • Heat included Guest Suite • Smoke-Free • Affordable Rents

Inquire about Waybury Apartments, Carver County CDA’s HUD subsidized Section 8 property for adults 62 and over, or those with a qualifying disability. Waybury Apartments in Chaska 952-448-5022 • waybury@carvercda.org Waybury Apartments Offers: One and Two-Bedroom Apartments • Heat Included Community Room with Full Kitchen and TV • Library Individual Garages & Decks • Controlled Access Entry Income limits apply. Residents pay 30% of their adjusted gross income for rent.

The Carver County Community Development Agency Provides Housing Opportunities and Fosters Economic Development in Carver County. Carver County CDA GA 0916 S3.indd 1

8/5/16 2:15/PM Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 31


FINANCE

Working while ‘retired’ BY MATT GULBRANSEN

R

etirement used to mean having leisure time to spend with family, play golf or bridge or perhaps travel the world. But these days, many Americans are spending their retirement working! About a third of Americans approaching retirement say they’ll continue to work full time or part time in retirement, according to a 2017 survey by the Employee Benefit Research Institute. And what’s even more startling? Eight percent say they’ll never retire. Some people enjoy working and they want a part-time job to stay busy and active. But most have an underlying financial reason to stay on the job. The lingering effects of the Great Recession have made it difficult to save for retirement. Some of the challenges include: ⊲⊲ Effects of housing crash: Housing wealth is determined by both the value of the home and the amount of debt. Housing wealth is a major asset for retirees, and it took a big hit in the 2008 housing crash as home values dropped and mortgage debt rose. ⊲⊲ Helping family members: It’s been said that young adults are ruining their parents’ retirement. According to the New York Times, 40 percent of millennials are getting significant financial help from their parents. Many families are also financially helping an aging parent. ⊲⊲ Lack of faith in Social Security: Millions of Americans rely on Social Security in retirement, but the fund is paying 32 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

out faster than it’s taking in money. The Social Security fund has enough money to pay recipients through the year 2034. Unless Congress acts, it will be able to pay only 77 percent of its promised benefits after that. ⊲⊲ Health care: This is one of the biggest expenses in retirement. HealthView Services’ 2017 retirement report estimates that a 65-year-old couple retiring in 2017 can expect to spend more than $400,000 on health care in retirement. ⊲⊲ Rising student debt: Student debt now tops $1.4 trillion, and it’s not just a young person’s problem. About 114,000 Americans over the age of 50 who defaulted on their student loans

are seeing part of their Social Security benefits garnished, according to the Government Accountability Office. Working in retirement doesn’t mean you have to stick with the 9-to-5 job you held throughout your career. Your current employer may have opportunities for you to transition into consulting, part-time or temporary work. Additionally, many retirees are shifting gears and trying something new. If you enjoy writing, you may be able to get a freelance gig where you can work from home. Animal lovers can earn income pet sitting or pet walking. Many retirees enjoy teaching or child care, driving for


Some people enjoy working and they want a part-time job to stay busy and active. But most have an underlying financial reason to stay on the job. a ride service such as Uber or Lyft or working in the retail or travel industries. Staying on the job into retirement isn’t a guarantee. Many Americans are forced to leave work earlier than expected because of a health problem, disability or changes at their company. Keep your job skills up to date and don’t underestimate the value of networking. Also, do your best to stay healthy. Try to eat a balanced diet and exercise so you’re not forced to leave your job for health reasons. I take this into account as I work with clients on their retirement planning. Ideally, income from a part-time job should be earmarked for fun things like travel and entertainment. In other words, you shouldn’t rely on income from a retirement job for necessities. You need a solid financial plan based on savings and investments so you can enjoy your retirement.

Enjoy Comfort – Enjoy Community – Enjoy Life! at

Lee Square Cooperative

Move into our 55+ Community & Enjoy:

• Virtually maintenance-free living • Many wonderful amenities • Walking path around building on 6+ acres • Hurry! Only two units currently available for sale ~ phone for a tour

763-522-5095 or 1-855-422-0022 4400 36th Ave North • ROBBINSDALE, MN www.leesquarecooperative.com Lee Square Coop GA 0917 H4.indd 1

8/11/17 1:50 PM

Matt Gulbransen is the president of Callahan Financial Planning in Woodbury. He holds an Accredited Wealth Management Advisor designation. Learn more at cfpcorp.net. Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 / 33


IN THE KITCHEN

y t Par e far

Throwing a gathering any time soon? This crowd-pleasing recipe — courtesy of our Nana & Mama writers — is easy to double, and it’s grandkid friendly, too. Turn the page to check out the latest from Nana & Mama on Page 36. 34 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


NANA’S HOMEMADE MAC AND CHEESE INGREDIENTS

½ pound elbow macaroni, cooked al dente and drained 6 tablespoons butter, divided 3 tablespoons flour 1 tablespoon dry mustard 3 cups milk ½ cup yellow onion, finely chopped 1 bay leaf ½ teaspoon paprika 1 egg 12 ounces shredded cheddar cheese 1 teaspoon salt Pepper to taste 1 cup bread crumbs

DIRECTIONS ⊲⊲Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. ⊲⊲Melt 3 tablespoons butter in a large pot. ⊲⊲Whisk in flour and mustard, and keep stirring, about five minutes, until free of lumps. ⊲⊲Stir in milk gradually, then add onion, bay leaf and paprika. ⊲⊲Simmer 10 minutes; remove bay leaf. ⊲⊲Slowly whisk in the egg, and stir in all but a few ounces of cheese. ⊲⊲Fold in the macaroni and pour the mixture into a greased 2-quart baking dish or a 9-by-11-inch pan sprayed with vegetable oil. ⊲⊲Top with remaining cheddar cheese. ⊲⊲Melt 3 tablespoons butter and toss in bread crumbs to coat. ⊲⊲Top macaroni with bread crumb mixture. ⊲⊲Bake for 30–35 minutes or until golden brown on top. ⊲⊲Remove from oven and rest 5–10 minutes before serving.

Adapted from Alton Brown’s Baked Macaroni and Cheese at foodnetwork.com


NANA & MAMA

An easy-peasy first party BY MARY ROSE AND LAURA

MAMA: One day, when I was dropping Kellan off at daycare, his teacher asked me how I felt about him turning 1 in a few weeks and the upcoming switch to the nextstage daycare room. I looked around the infant classroom that had been his home for the past nine months and it hit me that he was no longer one of the youngest babies in the room: He was among the oldest! After some reflection with my spouse about how quickly the last year had gone, we began to plan Kellan’s first birthday party. A quick Google search for ideas had us completely overwhelmed. We found Pinterest boards showcasing extravagantly themed — and expensive — parties. It was inspiring, but it seemed like way too much for a child who wouldn’t understand or remember much, if anything. So my spouse and I opted for a more low-key, low-budget approach. We were lucky enough to have the help of both of Kellan’s grandmas in planning and hosting the party. Since our house is far too small to comfortably fit more than four adults, we had the party at my in-laws’ home. We used Evite.com to send invitations and told our family and friends we’d have an open-house style party from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. They were welcome to come whenever they could — and leave whenever they wanted. This worked especially well for all of our friends who have young kids and needed to work around nap schedules, soccer games and other obligations. 36 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Because we’re trying to take a more minimalistic approach to Kellan’s toy collection — and to ensure the party wasn’t focused on present-opening — we asked for no gifts. As Nana explains below, the party went off without a hitch! Laura’s lessons learned: Beware the pressure of Pinterest; plan a party that matches your (and your partner’s) style. And don’t be afraid to ask friends and family for help.

NANA: One of the ways I soften the blow of saying goodbye to my daughter and her family at the end of our visits is to quickly plan the next trip. So as the little family prepared to leave Minnesota for Colorado after the holidays, I asked my husband to book us flights to Denver for our grandson’s first birthday in April: I just couldn’t miss it! As I reminisced about all the birthday parties I planned for my three kids over the years, I remembered how much work they could be, so I asked my daughter, “Is there something I can do to help? And what kind of theme are you considering?” Laura, somewhat flippantly, responded: “How about a ‘My son is turning 1, so come over for some cake,’ theme?”

I knew I’d need to be strategic with my theme pitch: Since she's an educator, I suggested a Dr. Seuss / Cat in the Hat theme. She bit, and we were on our partyplanning way! Laura and her mother-in-law, Jisele, and I each did some research and then shared our ideas in group emails. Next we listed the duties and food options: ⊲ Send Evites four weeks prior. ⊲ Purchase Dr. Seuss-themed paper products, including wraps for cupcakes. ⊲ Gather multi-colored goldfish (One

GET THE RECIPES! Learn how to make Cat in the Hat Cookies at madetobeamomma.com/cat-hat-cookies; check out our In the Kitchen department on Page 34 for Nana’s Homemade Mac and Cheese recipe; go to mngoodage.com to see the recipe for Uncle Tyler’s Addictive Guacamole.


Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish) and make Cat in the Hat treats —Oreo cookies layered with strawberries and bananas. (They were easy to make and a big hit with guests!) ⊲⊲ Prepare guacamole and chips; homemade macaroni and cheese; beverages including root beer, fruit-infused water and a few adult drinks; and cupcakes. ⊲⊲ Buy Dr. Seuss books to serve as party favors for each child. The day before the party, we met Laura’s in-laws for lunch and finalized plans. The two grandmas did the grocery shopping, others ran to the liquor store and we all arrived the next morning a couple hours before the party to prepare the food. Even my son’s girlfriend’s parents visiting from California helped out! With all the busy hands, everything was ready by the time the doorbell rang. As expected, baby Kellan — the guest of honor — was oblivious to the prepara-

Kellan instinctively knew he was supposed to make a mess with his cupcake, and he did, smashing it all over his smiling face. He looked happy, his parents looked proud, and since many of the guests lingered two hours past the open-house end time, the two grandmas high fived, and proclaimed it a successful party. Nana’s takeaways? Go easy-peasy on first birthday parties: Keep it simple, have a theme, consider an open-house format, accept all help and, of course, take lots of photos!

tions as he napped in the bedroom. When he awoke, the house was filling with wellwishers, and he good naturedly obliged everyone who wanted to hold him.

Mary Rose Remington, a baby boomer and new grandmother, lives in Minneapolis. Her daughter, Laura Groenjes Mitchell — a millennial firsttime mom — lives in Denver. They’ll be documenting their generational differences with this occasional series in both Minnesota Good Age and its sister publication, Minnesota Parent.

Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 / 37


Karen Ritz of St. Paul recently founded a GrandyCamp blog and online community to share her experiences in grandparenting and to help others find ideas and inspiration. Photo by Tracy Walsh


Grandy u r u How to master — and, above all, enjoy — the art of modern-day grandparenting with help from a fellow ‘gramma’ from St. Paul By Karen Ritz

H

ave you played a board game with your grandchild lately? The new ones don’t have winners or losers, they have “cooperative” goals, designed to help kids learn colors and numbers, and the art of taking turns. Jack (2.75) and I played Hoot Owl Hoot! today in the magic minutes between his getting up from a nap and Grace (1) awakening. Players use color matching to get around the board with a goal of getting all your owls into a nest before the sun comes up. At one point during the third round, Jack put his head on my hand and said, “I love you, Gramma.” Gramma for the win! Four days a week with a wild 1-year-old and a 2.75-year-old is often exhausting when you’re 60. But I wouldn’t trade this morning for anything.

Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 / 39


Grandy Guru

We’re still healthy, active and busy. Really busy! But then one day you find yourself at a hospital, holding a tiny, red-faced pause button.

We called a duck across a pond with a Mallard recording on my iPhone. How the kids giggled to have a real live bird quacking answers just a few feet away! Grace was falling asleep in her stroller on the way home, so I pulled her out and alternated between her toddling and my carrying, not to throw off the all-important nap schedule. I tried a new recipe for an after-nap treat, but lunch was regular boxed mac and cheese. What do we do all day? Luckily, Jack will work on projects, but Grace, not so much. They love going to the library and we read a lot of books. One day we counted six turkeys in the back yard. Potty training is as difficult as it was in Motherhood round one. Jack is at the age when he says “Gramma, gram, gramma” a hundred times a day. My other three days of the week are jammed with writing, illustrating, graphic design and everything that comes with launching a new blog — tackling (you guessed it) the art of modern-day grandparenting! Yes, despite being still quite active in my career as an author illustrator as well as concierge blogger (saintpaulconcierge.info), I’m going all in on this grandparenting thing — and I’m taking you along with me: I’m taking you to GrandyCamp.

LEARN MORE

40 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

GrandyCamp.info

GrandyCampMSP

GrandyCamp

GrandyCamp


▲ The new GrandyCamp blog features kid-friendly recipes, local outings and home activity ideas for Twin Cities grandparents and their grandchildren, including crafts such as adding googly eyes to everything, dinosaur-themed projects, cute potty-training squares and pipe-cleaner/colander art.

GrandyCamp.info is my newly created online community featuring ideas, activities, crafts, recipes, plus destinations and fun events curated just for Twin Cities grandparents. You’ll find short, personal stories and tons of engaging visuals on the blog as well as on Pinterest, Instagram and Facebook. Yes! Social media. It’s not just for the kids anymore. (More on that below.)

Why do we need this? Our career-driven children are leaving home later, marrying later and having children later still. And we “seniors” are still in the thick of things, hitting our stride with experience, learning new platforms, retiring later and creating encore careers.

Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 / 41


Grandy Guru We’re still healthy, active and busy. Really busy! But then one day you find yourself at a hospital, holding a tiny, red-faced pause button. We become instantly passionate about becoming really good at this: What books teach a toddler to love reading? How would I make a video reading of a bedtime story for a distant grandbaby? What app would entertain kids in a restaurant? Where can I take a child to a $2 movie with real buttered popcorn? How do you impress a dino fan? (A dinosaur garden!) When was the last time you made banana bread or M&M cookies? You need a new, fab recipe! What gift should you give your college-age grandson? Is there a creative way to give gift cards?

A new era for grandmothers Busy grandparents need help. Despite prestigious degrees and impressive careers, nearly threequarters of grandparents say that being a grandparent is the single most important and satisfying thing in their life. Less than half of today’s grandparents are senior citizens, and those that are might be working until age 70. Lesley Stahl, in her new book Becoming Grandma, list our ranks (women between 50 and 70) at some 40 million. She points out ways that the girls raised with Title IX and women’s rights are developing and defining a new way of grandmothering. Seventy-five percent are online, and make up the single fastest growing demographic on Facebook and other forms of social media. We don’t all have white hair (at least that we admit to), and we know grandchildren aren’t always sweet. We might see these kids for a few hours, a day, a week, once a year. The time is important, challenging and has the potential to provide lasting memories.

Be a rock star With GrandyCamp, I hope we can all learn the art of grandparenting together! Our catchphrase is: The grandkids are coming! We can help! Already, we’ve found some no-fail tricks. But if we do fail at something, we’ll share that, too! Finally, I know you’re going to like our curated Twin Cities Event Calendar and destinations with details about discounts, parking, stroller logistics and where to feed the kids on the go. No, we won’t have every blessed thing listed. Instead we’ll include

42 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲Grace and Jack, grandchildren of GrandyCamp founder Karen Ritz of St. Paul, love to play, read and (sometimes) nap.

events and destinations that appeal to you — trains, firehouses, festivals, museums, drive-in restaurants, even Minnesota’s largest candy store. We want you to be a Rockstar Grandparent, and enjoy the time too! The stuff we share works for Grandpas, Steps, Aunties and Uncles, practice grandmas, and loving caregivers as well: Please share. We’re scouring the web for the best ideas and deals, so you don’t have to, and, of course, we have some great ideas and deals of our own. (I was just contacted by a guy who designed a course to teach magic tricks to grandpas: How fun is that?!) We want to hear about your experiences on Facebook and see those grandkids on Instagram. A big part of our mission is listening to what you need help with and finding answers. We’ll even help with the online and tech aspects of grandparenting, like reading bedtime stories over Skype, upping your digital photography game or managing your frustrating Facebook newsfeed so it works for you. Let’s do this! Karen Ritz has illustrated more than 46 books, including Ellis Island, a 1995 Minnesota Book Award winner and Sadie Braves the Wilderness, a new children’s book about the wonders of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. She lives and paints — and grandparents — in St. Paul.


Make some Memories

Get planning for yourself as well as your extended family, including grandkids, with this list of holiday events By Karen Ritz

GrandyCamp.info headquarters put this early list together this past summer, knowing that families are hard to wrangle during the holidays, and attending a show together can make for great memories and traditions! There are sure to be more performances yet to be scheduled, but this gives you, dear grandparent, a great start on a Grand Plan. It’s A Wonderful Life Live Radio Play, Saint Paul Hotel, December. Always a sellout!

SPCO-Holiday Concert: Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos, Dec. 7–10

Sister Act, Chanhassen, Nov. 3–Feb. 24

Dot, Park Square, Dec. 8–Jan. 7

The Velveteen Rabbit, Northrup, Nov. 4

The Blenders Holiday Soul Tour, Pantages, Dec. 8–10

How the Grinch Stole Christmas, Children’s Theatre, Nov. 7–Jan. 7

Celtic Thunder, State, Dec. 9

Cirque du Soleil Crystal, Target Center, Nov. 9–12

VocalEssence: Star of Wonder, Orchestra Hall, Dec. 9

Of Mice and Men, Park Square, Nov. 9–Dec. 16

A Christmas Oratorio, Orchestra Hall, Dec. 9–10

Brian Setzer Christmas Rocks, State, Nov. 10

Lorie Line: King of Kings, Fitzgerald, Dec. 10

A Christmas Carol, Guthrie, Nov. 14–Dec. 30

At Christmas (Mick Sterling), Chanhassen, Dec. 12–13

Disney’s Beauty and the Beast Jr., Stages, Nov. 17–Dec. 28

The Phantom of the Opera, Orpheum, Dec. 13–31

Miss Bennet; Christmas at Pemberley, Jungle Theatre, Nov. 18–Dec. 30

Home for the Holidays: Kat Perkins, Chanhassen, Dec. 14–16

The Hip Hop Nutcracker, Ordway, Nov. 21–22

SPCO: Handel’s Messiah, Basilica, Dec. 14–15, Ordway, Dec. 16–17

The Hip Hop Nutcracker, State, Nov. 21–22

Rose Ensemble: Christmas in Baroque Malta, Dec. 14–17

The Illusionists, Ordway, Nov. 21–26

A Christmas Celebration with The Steeles, Fitzgerald, Dec. 15–16

Blithe Spirit, Guthrie, Nov. 25–Jan. 14

Loyce Holton’s Nutcracker Fantasy, State, Dec. 15–23

Coco’s Diary: A Christmas Gift to Remember, History Theatre, Nov. 25–Dec. 23 Keri Noble: A Very Special Christmas, Chanhassen, Nov. 24–25

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Movie / Live MN Orchestra, Minneapolis Convention Center, Dec. 15–17

Disney’s The Little Mermaid in Concert Live to Film (Minnesota Orchestra), Orchestra Hall, Nov. 25–26

Nutcracker (Not So) Suite: Ballet of the Dolls, Cowles, Dec. 15–30 Christmas Together with Steven C & Friends, Chanhassen, Dec. 17

A Christmas Carole Peterson, Ritz, Nov. 29–Dec. 30

Two Girls & A Boyd Got New Shoes for Christmas, Chanhassen, Dec. 19–20

Black Nativity, Penumbra, Nov. 30–Dec. 24

A Three Tenors Christmas, Chanhassen, Dec. 20–21

Rock & Roll Christmas Show, Chanhassen, Nov. 30–Dec. 3, Dec 6–10

Home for the Holidays, MN Orchestra and Kevin Kling, Orchestra Hall, Dec. 21

Merry and Bright (Charles Lazarus), Orchestra Hall, Dec. 1

Christmas with Cantus, Ordway, Dec. 22

Disney’s Beauty and the Beast Jr., Steppingstone Theatre, Dec. 1–22

An Evening with George Winston, Orchestra Hall, Dec. 22

VocalEssence: Welcome Christmas / Star of Wonder, Orchestra Hall, Dec. 2, 8–10

Katie McMahon’s Celtic Christmas, O’Shaughnessy, Dec. 22

The Great Russian Nutcracker, Orpheum, Dec. 2

Celtic Holiday Hooley, Chanhassen, Dec. 22–23

Will Downing: Soulful Sounds of Christmas, Ordway, Dec. 5

An Andy & Bing Christmas (Mick Sterling & Ben Utecht), Chanhassen, Dec. 26–31

Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins, MN Jewish Theatre, Dec. 7–19

Noon Year’s Eve, Como Conservatory, Dec. 31–Jan. 1

Annie, Ordway, Dec. 7–31

New Year’s Celebration Concert, Orchestra Hall, Dec. 31

Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 / 43


Tony Mosley of Minneapolis performs at Bird in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, with a reunited New Power Generation on a recent European tour, honoring the work and life of Prince. Photo by Peter Lodder Photography


Coming full circle After years on the road, Tony Mosley left Prince’s New Power Generation to settle down with a family and a steady job in Minneapolis. Then his old bandmates came calling. BY JULIE KENDRICK

S

ome people’s lives follow a straight trajectory — they move from milestone to milestone as if they’re ticking boxes off a checklist: College. Marriage. Kids. Grandkids. Tony Mosley hasn’t lived one of those lives. Beginning with the strange alchemy of luck, circumstance and talent that led to his first meeting Prince Rogers Nelson, Mosley has followed an original life path that’s been sometimes funky and sometimes buttoned-down. Now, at age 55, he’s landed right back where he started so many years ago — performing music that’s dear to his heart, in front of audiences clamoring for the opportunity celebrate the work and life of The Purple One. After spending the years between 1987 to 1994 experiencing the rarified world of professional music-making, first-class travel and sold-out concerts around the world as part of Prince’s New Power Generation band, Mosley zigged when everyone else was zagging.

Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 / 45


Coming full circle

Instead of seeing the rock-and-roll life through to the bitter end, he opted out for marriage, fatherhood and a business career. But once rock and roll’s been your life, is it ever really out of your system? In the wake of Prince’s death and an enormous revival of interest in his expansive catalog of music, Mosley was presented with a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for a reunion of the New Power Generation, known as NPG. So he picked up a mic — he’s a rapper, vocalist, hip-hop dancer and guitarist, too — and set out this past July with other original members of NPG to perform across Europe to tens of thousands at a time.

Discovered at First Ave How did this all come to be? To learn that, we need to travel back 33 years, to the iconic rock venue at 701 N. First Ave., Minneapolis. The scene: First Ave, men’s bathroom. Tony and his friends are killing time between takes of a new movie that’s going to be titled Purple Rain. They’re dancing and singing along to the boom box they’ve brought along. 46 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲The New Power Generation’s recent reunion tour included Lynn Grissett (trumpet), Keith Anderson (sax), Sonny T (bass), Andre Cymone (guitar, vocals), Tommy Barbarella (keyboards), Tony Mosley (guitar, vocals, dance), Damon Dickson (percussion, vocals, dance), Kip Blackshire (vocals), Kirk Johnson (drums), Mike Scott (guitar), Morris Hayes (musical director, keyboards, vocals) and other guest artists. Photo by Peter Lodder Photography

They don’t realize it, but their lives are about to change. The backstory: Tony, a 1980 North High School graduate, had already finished a stint of active duty in the Marine Corps. He was still in the Reserves when he and his crew began participating in First Avenue’s weekly amateur dance contests. After winning for four weeks in a row, they were promised roles as extras in the movie. Once they got on set, they were told they’d be wrangling the extras instead. The big break: To fend off boredom during long down-times on set, they started staging impromptu performances in the bathroom (which had decent acoustics). During one of these sessions, Prince happens to walk in. He watches them for a few


moments, smiles, then leaves. The next thing they know, Prince’s manager is pulling them aside and asking them to choreograph seven dance numbers for the next day’s shoot. Mosley picks up the story from here: “We raced back to my Mom’s apartment in North Minneapolis. We moved all the furniture out of the way and got to work. We never went to sleep that night, but we were on set at 5:30 a.m. the next day, ready to perform those dances on camera.” Don’t cue up your DVD of Purple Rain to look for them — most of the performances were cut from the final version of the film. “But I think Prince saw that we could turn around good-quality work very quickly,” Mosley said. A few months later, Prince asked them to perform at the after party for the Purple Rain premiere in Los Angeles. “We were just some local cats from Minneapolis performing in front of our idols — stars like Arsenio Hall and Eddie Murphy,” Mosley said.

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He feels good Performing always came naturally to Mosley, who remembers his mother taking him to a James Brown concert when he was 7. “He brought kids up on stage to dance, and I did the James Brown impersonation that was always a hit during family reunions,” Mosley said. “I remember really liking the applause.” His next performance came in third grade, at Harrison Elementary School’s talent show. “My buddy and I were doing a tumbling act, but we fell at the very first pass. I jumped up and started dancing,

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Coming full circle and then I launched into a Bill Cosby impersonation. Everyone loved it.” The important lesson Mosley learned from that experience: “Never act like you’ve made a mistake and the audience won’t realize it either.” Whether performing at an elementary school or a sold-out arena, Mosley is a cool cat at showtime. “To this day, I’ve never had stage fright. I get nervous energy before a show. I walk around, away from everybody, to get into my head and get myself ready to hit the stage,” he said. “When I hear the downbeat, I’m gone.”

On the road Prince formed the New Power Generation in 1990, inviting Mosley, Kirk Johnson and Damon Dickson to join the backing band on tour. Mosley, who went by the stage name Tony M., was hired as a choreographer and dancer. His role in the show eventually expanded, thanks to another incident in which Prince turned up unexpectedly and observed Mosley-the-soloist in action. It happened in Paris, during a sound check before a show. “Prince had been working on the final edits of the film Graffiti Bridge, so he was in and out of town quite a bit, and we didn’t realize he was there,” Mosley said. “I was playing guitar and singing The Humpty Dance during the check. Then I heard Prince’s voice from the sound tower: ‘That was kind of funky.’” Prince sent for Mosley after the show and asked if he could rehearse the song and perform it when he went off stage for a wardrobe change, starting the next night. “I said ‘absolutely,’ but I was shaking in my boots,” Mosley said. “He told me ‘the stage is yours.’ It was a great opportunity, and luckily I didn’t mess up the lyrics on my first chance to rap before a live audience.” His performance of The Humpty Dance remained in the show for the rest of the tour.

▲▲Prince formed the New Power Generation in 1990, inviting Damon Dickson, Kirk Johnson and Tony Mosley to join him. All three recently toured Europe as part of a reunited NPG.

Time to get serious As the years passed, Mosley began to feel it was time for a change. He and Kirk Johnson had tried to establish a record label — MPLS Records — but quickly began “hemorrhaging money” in the process, Mosley said. 48 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲During sound checks for Prince, Tony Mosley would rap while testing the microphone. Prince noticed him and invited him to add his raps into live performances and studio albums such as the Grammy-nominated Diamonds and Pearls.


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Coming full circle

I’ve always known Tony as an office professional, so seeing him performing at the Xcel Center was so exciting. He had so much energy, so much swagger and so many dance moves. The entire office couldn’t stop talking about it the next day. — Tony Mosley’s friend and co-worker, Caroline Kornowicz

50 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

In 1994, after NPG has release a solo album, Goldnigga, just a year earlier, Mosley left his post with NPG. “I still loved performing, but I was getting burned out on the business side of the industry,” he said. “I took a serious self-assessment and told myself: ‘You’re a 30-year-old African-American male without a college degree. It’s time to get serious.’” Mosley says he “swallowed his pride” and took a temporary job with Pro Staff, which placed him at Carlson Marketing. He moved up through the ranks and gained experience in loyalty marketing, incentives, interactive marketing and claims. Three years ago, Mosley took a job as senior project manager at the promotional marketing firm YA in downtown Minneapolis. Chris Behrens, the firm’s president and CEO, said Mosley never mentioned his music background when interviewing for the position. Details about his former career emerged slowly. The more Behrens heard, the more impressed he was — both at Mosley’s show-business talent and his decision to make a change. “It’s impressive to me that he knew the rock and roll life would not last forever, and that he had the foresight to pursue a career in business,” Behrens said. “Tony is a focused, genuine and down-to-earth person. Our clients think the world of him and the work he does here. And, at our holiday party last year, he led us in a YA-version of Soul Train that got us all warmed up.” It’s an attitude shared throughout the ranks at YA.


⊳ Tony Mosley (in white) raps with a reunited NPG at the North Sea Jazz festival 2017 in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Photo by Eric Van Nieuwland

“He handles his fame with grace and honor,” said senior digital project manager Lee Reed. “He owns it and is so natural about it. He is proud, but so humble, and he’s been very kind to the co-workers who are also fans. He seems amazed at what he experienced and thankful for the gift he was blessed with and all it has brought him, including his family, who he cares most about in this world.” YA account manager Caroline Kornowicz said Mosley’s shared some of his stories with her in the past two years. “He told me how Prince was his friend and mentor during a critical time of his life where he could’ve taken a different — and worse — path,” she said.

Reunited After Prince’s death, a sold-out Prince tribute concert was held at the Xcel Energy Center in October 2016, with performances by Stevie Wonder, Chaka Khan, Tori Kelly and Jessie J. The New Power Generation reunited and performed at the show in front of 17,000 fans. “We wanted to make sure it was right and we wanted to make Prince proud,” Mosley said. They achieved their goal and then some. A City Pages review described Mosley’s performance: “Prince hypeman pajama-clad Tony M. came out for a seriously funky Sexy MF.” “It felt like home to be back together with the band,” Mosley said. Mosley’s office mates from YA were there in full force.

Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 / 51


Coming full circle

“I’ve always known Tony as an office professional, so seeing him performing at the Xcel Center was so exciting,” Kornowicz said. “He had so much energy, so much swagger and so many dance moves. The entire office couldn’t stop talking about it the next day.” And it wasn’t just Mosley’s office mates talking in the days that followed. “The fans who lived and breathed Prince’s music were overwhelmingly appreciative and told us, ‘You need to get back out there,’” Mosley said.

The European tour While the NPG reunion had been arranged as a one-time event, the group was approached about doing additional shows. They went for it — and found themselves this past July on a 12-gig European tour in eight cities, including London, Zurich, Paris, St. Petersburg and Rotterdam. It was such a success that another European tour is in the works for fall, along with a U.S. tour in spring. The physical pace of the tour was different for Mosley at age

52 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

▲ Tony Mosley and Shelby J perform in Rotterdam, The Netherlands on a recent European tour with the New Power Generation. Photo by Eric Van Nieuwland

55 than when he was touring Europe in his 20s. “It’s a young man’s game,” he said. While the tour was sometimes a physical challenge, it included many highlights, including the band’s first performance in London’s Hyde Park. “Phil Collins was performing on the main stage. And when I saw the size and location of our stage, I thought ‘No one is going to show up for this.’ We went backstage to get ready, and when we came out, there were more than 60,000 people waiting for us. I was stunned.” Damon Dickson, 56, is enjoying being back on tour as well, a big change from his day job as security manager for Allied Universal, managing a security team for Golden Valley-based Mortenson Construction. “It’s crazy to see all of us in the same room at the same time after all these years,” Damon said. “We laugh a lot when we’re


▲ During his European tour, Tony Mosley did frequent video chats with his wife, Deanna, daughter, Kira, 17, and son, Shane, 15.

together, and we have so much fun. But when we’re talking about the music, it’s serious. That’s when you see how special it is.”

Cool dad For Mosley, standing ovations from adoring crowds pale in comparison to the joys of being a husband and father. He and his wife, Deanna, have been married for 19 years, and the family lives in Eden Prairie. Daughter Kira, 17, is a basketball phenom who has been generating interest from Division I schools. “Her first concert was a Prince concert, when she was still small enough to perch on my shoulders,” Mosley said. “I remember it went on until after 11 p.m., but she was still rocking out.” Son Shane, 15, is a competitive swimmer who has just begun expressing some interest in the music business. “I would prefer for him to stick to swimming, studies and college prep, but I have to appreciate that my own mom let me pursue the life I wanted, and so I have to be open to what he wants,” Mosley said. When his children were little, Mosley

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Coming full circle

never showed them his platinum albums or awards. (He co-wrote several songs with Prince, and he has two Grammy nominations for Diamonds and Pearls and Love Symbol Album.) The first time his kids ever saw him perform was at the Prince tribute performance at the Xcel last fall. “The place was filled to the rafters, so that was pretty exciting,” Mosley said. “I knew where my kids were sitting, and I was able to see the looks on their faces when they saw old Dad make his entrance. Later, I brought them both up on stage to dance along to one of the numbers.”

Remembering Prince Mosley has decades of positive memories about his collaborative work with Prince. “He lived and breathed music, and his creativity was off the charts,” he said. “For so much of the time, the band was really his family, because we were with him 24/7. We’d start rehearsing between 10 a.m. and noon, and work until 5 or 6 p.m. Then maybe we’d shoot a video, or go into the studio to record. And then there might be a party at Paisley Park that night. The next day, it would start all over again. That was the pace all the years 54 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

▲ Huge crowds greeted NPG in Europe. Photo by Peter Lodder Photography

I worked with him.” Mosley and Prince didn’t always see eye to eye. In 1998, he and fellow musician Levi Seacer filed a lawsuit against Prince — which was resolved — for shared royalties on compositions such as Sexy MF and My Name Is Prince, which Mosley and Seacer had co-written. Mosley still kept in contact with Prince over the years, however, sometimes being invited to parties at Paisley Park, sometimes through the serendipity that seemed to mark their relationship. “I was at a Beyoncé concert and he spotted me in the crowed. He had one of his security detail shine a flashlight on me,

STAY IN TOUCH Follow the New Power Generation at facebook.com/ originalnpg for information about future shows, including another European tour this fall and U.S. tour dates in spring 2018.


Coming full circle and I looked over and saw him waving me down. We talked and laughed together for a while. It was good to see him.” Mosley remembers being at work when he heard the news of Prince’s death. Along with so many others, he felt disbelief. “I just slumped in my chair for a minute, staring into space. Our lead sales executive heard about it and very kindly told me to head home. It was a tough time, and it hit me hard,” Mosley said. “All the band members who had performed with him had a private get-together, just to tell stories and be with one another.” Mosley, along with his wife and children, attended the private memorial service for Prince in August 2016. “I think that was the first time it really hit me,” Mosley said. “I broke down, because I realized my man was gone. I had to walk away so my kids wouldn’t see me crying.”

The past year has been a whirlwind for Mosley. He lost a creative mentor. He reunited with old bandmates — and experienced the rebirth of a long-dormant music career. And he’s toured in many of the cities he performed in more than 25 years ago. What can possibly be ahead for him? Mosley is adamant that his revived music career is temporary — definitely still a side hustle. “This is not a midlife crisis, and I’m not giving up my day job,” he said. “But doing this is one way to keep Prince’s memory alive.” He’s also feeling quite content in his job with YA, having logged a collective 17 years of project management. “I love the people I work with and I’m comfortable with what I’m doing. This change happened under unfortunate circumstances,” he said. “But since it presented itself, I’m going to enjoy it while it’s here.” With two high schoolers at home, he knows an empty nest is in his future, but he’s sanguine at the prospect. “We’re talking about downsizing, maybe moving downtown,” he said. “Maybe Deanna and I will just look at each other and say, ‘What now?’ But I think we’ll be OK. “And maybe I’ll even have the chance to get in some golf once in a while, once I’m not driving to practices, games and meets all the time. Whatever happens, I’m looking forward to the ride.” Julie Kendrick is a contributing writer for many local and national publications. She lives in Minneapolis. Follow her on Twitter @KendrickWorks. 56 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Photo by Tracy Walsh

What’s ahead

I love the people I work with and I’m comfortable with what I’m doing. This change happened under unfortunate circumstances. But since it presented itself, I’m going to enjoy it while it’s here. — Tony Mosley, an original member of the New Power Generation, on his professional life now and NPG’s recent reunion


With more than 3,600 courses and new ones being added every week, you could learn something new every day for the next several years from the comfort of your own living room! These courses and video tutorials are FREE. Have your library card barcode handy and visit melsa.org/Lynda to link to a metro public library website. Start learning something new today!

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CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR SEPTEMBER

Photo by Deen van Meer

ALADDIN

→ This Disney Theatrical production, adapted from the Oscar-winning animated film, makes its Minnesota premiere, including many of the cherished songs from the original movie soundtrack. More than 100 moving lights and 300 costumes animate the show, along with pyrotechnics and a magic carpet that actually flies. When: Sept. 15–Oct. 8 Where: Orpheum Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets start at $39. Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

ONGOING

MINNESOTA STATE FAIR → Experience Minnesota’s finest agriculture, horticulture, art and industry, plus carnival rides, games, live music and food vendors aplenty. This year’s newest feature is a Great Big Wheel — a 156-foot-tall Ferris wheel with 36 enclosed gondolas each carrying six people. When: Through Sept. 4 Where: Minnesota State Fairgrounds, St. Paul Cost: Advanced tickets start at $11. Gate admission is reduced from $12 to 58 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

$9 on Aug. 31 for ages 65 and older (Senior Day) and for military on Aug. 29 (Military Appreciation Day). Info: mnstatefair.org

SUMMER FLOWER SHOW → Hosted by the Marjorie McNeely Conservatory, this year’s display is a showcase of blue and orange hues, complimented by yellow and chartreuse accents, designed with petunias, geraniums and lilies. When: Through Oct. 1 Where: Como Park & Zoo and Conservatory, St. Paul

Cost: FREE Info: comozooconservatory.org

LIVIN’ LA VIDA LUTHERAN → The Looney Lutherans — three wacky gals, promoting their new (fictional) cookbook — present a family-friendly variety show, featuring music, comedy and audience interaction. Where: Plymouth Playhouse, Minneapolis When: Through October 21 Cost: Tickets start at $39. Info: looneylutherans.com


CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR

HOT LUNCH

→→Internationally recognized installation artist and New Ulm native Eric Rieger, also known as HOTTEA, has completed his largest and most challenging installation to date — 13,000 strands of yarn, each 60 feet long, totaling 721 pounds and featuring 103 colors — all hanging from a 55-by-45-foot skylight. When: Through October Where: Atrium at the north entrance of the Mall of America, Bloomington Cost: FREE Info: moa.net

AUG. 27–30

AFRICAN CHILDREN’S CHOIR →→Enjoy lively African songs and dances, including children’s songs, traditional spirituals and Gospel favorites from this group organized by Music for Life, which operates education programs and relief efforts in seven African countries. When: 7 p.m. Aug. 30 at The Basilica of Saint Mary, Minneapolis; other shows are set for Marshall (Aug. 19), Willmar (Aug. 20), Hopkins (Aug. 27) and Woodbury (Aug. 27) Where: Various Cost: FREE; donations will be accepted. Info: africanchildrenschoir.com

SEPT. 7–OCT. 6

STORYCORPS →→This renowned nonprofit organization will record interviews in the Twin Cities as part of its cross-country MobileBooth tour. Having collected more than 65,000 interviews from Americans in all 50 states, StoryCorps has gathered one of the 60 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

largest single collections of human voices ever recorded. Minnesota Public Radio is hosting StoryCorps as part of its 50th anniversary celebration. The MobileBooth is an Airstream trailer outfitted with a recording studio. When: Sept. 7–Oct. 6 Where: George Latimer Central Library, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: Call 800-850-4406 or visit storycorps.org to make a reservation.

SEPT. 8–10

TASTE OF GREECE →→Enjoy live music, dancing, cultural events, church tours, au­thentic food, desserts and a Greek boutique at this annual festival. When: Sept. 8–10 Where: St. Mary’s Greek Orthodox Church, Minneapolis Cost: Admission is free. Food tickets are $1 each. Bring three non-perishable food items to receive two free food tickets. Info: mplsgreekfest.org

SEPT. 8–OCT. 1

TAKING STEPS →→The Theatre in the Round Players open their 66th season as the longest-running theater company in Minneapolis with the story of a hard-drinking tycoon and the crumbling old mansion he wants to buy. He’s joined by his unhappy wife, his brother-in-law and others, who find themselves confused by a series of misunderstandings that escalate into an evening of hilarious theater. When: Weekends Sept. 8–Oct. 1 Where: Theatre in the Round, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets are $22 ($18 for ages 62 and older on Friday and Sundays) Info: theatreintheround.org

SEPT. 8–OCT. 29

SEVER’S FALL FESTIVAL →→Take the grandkids out to experience Minnesota’s favorite fall traditions, including corn and hay-bale mazes, an exotic petting zoo, a giant slide, pumpkin blasters, pig races, zip lines, a gourd walk and


many other activities. When: Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays Sept. 8–Oct. 29, plus Oct. 19–20 Where: Shakopee Cost: $15 for ages 4 and older at the door. Info: See seversfallfestival.com for discounted tickets and coupons.

SEPT. 9

MINNEAPOLIS MONARCH FESTIVAL →→Honor the Monarch butterfly’s amazing 2,300-mile migration from Minnesota to the mountains of Mexico with live music, a parade, dance performances, art activities and games conducted in Spanish and English, plus Minnesotan and Latin food. When: 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Sept. 9 Where: 49th Street and Woodlawn Boulevard, Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: monarchfestival.org

WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S →→The Minnesota-North Dakota Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association is holding its annual walk in more than 600 communities nationwide, including many in Minnesota. When: 9 a.m. Sept. 9 Where: Target Field, Minneapolis Cost: Though there’s no fee to register, participants are encouraged to fund raise for the cause. Info: alz.org/mnnd

SEPT. 12–APRIL 8

MUSICAL THEATER SERIES →→The Ordway Center for the Performing Arts’ 2017-2018 musical series continues with a variety of Ordway-produced shows and a Broadway tour (Kinky Boots) to illuminate a variety of diverse musical styles and universal themes. When: In the Heights (Sept. 12–17), Annie (Dec. 7­–31) and Kinky Boots (April 3–8, 2018) Where: The Ordway, St. Paul Cost: Subscription packages start at $130. Info: ordway.org

SEPT. 15–16

ST. PAUL OKTOBERFEST →→Enjoy beer, bratwurst and authentic cuisine at this annual event, showcasing the centuries-old German traditions of bed races, dachshund races, live music, polka dancing, games and family fun.

Small classes, up to 6 students New session begins Sept. 5 All levels, ages 40+

When: Sept. 15–16 Where: Historic Schmidt Brewery, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: saintpauloktoberfest.org

SEPT. 15–OCT. 15

THE ABOMINABLES

Spanish Class MN GA 0917 12.indd 1

→→Minnesota’s unique youth hockey culture is the star of this one-of-a-kind world-premiere musical, created by and for Minnesotans. Geared toward ages 8 and older, the story follows Mitch, who’s always played on the A team, but is worried he might get sent down to the B team. When a young hockey-playing yeti appears at Bantam tryouts, things go from bad to worse. When: Sept. 12–Oct. 15 Where: Children’s Theatre Company, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets start at $15; $5 lap passes are available for ages newborn to 3 years. Info: childrenstheatre.org

LANTERN LIGHTING CELEBRATION

MACKINAC ISLAND

September 19-23, 2017 Shepler’s Ferry, 2 night stay on Mackinac Island, Dinner at the Pink Pony, Horse-drawn Carriage Tour, Grand Hotel Lunch, Madeline Island Tour & More! $1050 per person (dbl. occ.)

MORE UPCOMING TOURS Branson Christmas November 7-11, 2017

$725 per person (dbl. occ.) $875 per person (dbl. occ.)

→→Families are invited to honor deceased loved ones by decorating and releasing a floating lantern in their memory. Celebratory activities include live music, food trucks and a nondenominational remembrance ceremony. When: 5–8 p.m. Sept. 16 Where: Lakewood Cemetery, in Uptown Minneapolis Cost: A $5 donation is requested for each lantern. Info: Reserve a lantern at lakewoodcemetery.org.

1-800-288-8246 | www.rileytours.com

Norsk Hostfest Sept. 26-29, 2017

SEPT. 16

8/15/17 12:43 PM

New England States San Antonio Christmas October 4-16, ist Only2017 Wait-L $2350 per person (dbl. occ.) Nov. 28-Dec. 6, 2017 $1475 per person (dbl. occ.)

Albuquerque Balloon Texas & Rio GrandeValley Fiesta October 5-12, 2017 February 4-18, 2018

$1500 per person (dbl. occ.)

$2300 per person (dbl. occ.)

Arizona’s Deserts & Smoky Mountains Canyons October 18-26, 2017 Feb. 15-Mar. 2, 2018

$1650 per person (dbl. occ.) $2700 per person (dbl. occ.)

More 2018 tours coming soon! Call us today for more information or a brochure on one of these tours! 1-800-288-8246 | www.rileytours.com Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 / 61

Rileys Travel Easy Tours GA 0917 V4.indd 1

8/10/17 7:14 PM


CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR

WILLS, ESTATE PLANNING

JAMES G. ROBAN Attorney at Law

261 Ruth Street North St. Paul (651) 738-2102 Will: $40 PoWer of Attorney: $30 HeAltH CAre DireCtive: $70

Roban, James GA 1116 12.indd 1

10/20/16 1:41 PM

MOVEMENTWISE

→ Dance, explore your creativity, engage your mind and socialize with like-minded people in this community-oriented dance class for ages 50 and older who want to explore a wide variety of dance forms, including social, modern, ballet and percussive styles. No experience is required. When: 6:30–8 p.m. Wednesdays Sept. 13–Dec. 6 Where: The Cowles Center for Dance and the Performing Arts, Minneapolis Cost: Fees are $10 per class or $80 for a MovementWise membership, which includes 12 classes, a free ticket to a select Cowles Center performance, discounted show tickets and invites to membership events. Info: thecowlescenter.org or 612-206-3640

Located in Oakdale, MN

OPENINGS IN ASSISTED

CONTACT 651-578-0676 KIM www.oak-meadows.org Sletten Oak Meadows GA Law 0517Office 12.indd 2

Estate Planning, Probate, & Trust Law

SEPT. 16

WILD RICE FESTIVAL → Celebrate wild rice and Native American culture at this annual gathering, featuring activities, educational presentations, engaging exhibits and food trucks.

4/20/17 4:27 PM

Karen Sletten, Attorney at Law

EXCELSIOR APPLE DAY

Working together, we can make sure that your values, as well as your assets, are passed on after you’re gone.

→ This Lake Minnetonka street festival features live music and local art, crafts, food vendors and a kids’ corner, plus a pie-eating contest, a wine and beer garden and an old fashioned street dance in the evening.

612.206.3709 slettenlaw.com

310 4th Avenue South Suite 5010, Minneapolis, 55415

62 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age Sletten Law Office GA 0917 12.indd 1

When: 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Sept. 16 Where: Harriet Alexander Nature Center, Roseville Cost: FREE Info: wildricefestival.org

8/18/17 10:24 AM

When: Sept. 16

Where: Downtown Excelsior Cost: FREE Info: excelsior-lakeminnetonkachamber.com

SEPT. 16–17

HOMES BY ARCHITECTS TOUR → Explore 17 new and remodeled homes, all designed by registered members of the American Institute of Architects-Minnesota. This 10th-annual self-guided tour features a range of project sizes, styles, techniques, budgets and neighborhoods throughout the Twin Cities. Visitors can meet the designing architects and project teams at all the homes on the tour. When: 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Sept. 16–17 Where: Twin Cities Cost: Advance tickets, required for ages 5 and older, may be purchased at homesbyarchitects.org or at AIA-


Minnesota for $15 (until noon on Friday, Sept. 15). They will also be available at each home during the tour for $20. Info: homesbyarchitects.org

SEPT. 21

CANTUS WITH SWEET HONEY IN THE ROCK → Minnesota’s acclaimed men’s vocal ensemble and the famed, all-female AfricanAmerican performance group join forces for an evening of song, starting with separate sets, followed by a combined dynamic finale.

The wide range of services and care options at The Residence at North Ridge is one of the reasons we’re considered one of the best senior housing facilities in the community. Assisted Living Independent Living • Adult Day Program • Comprehensive Rehab Program

Outpatient Therapy Rehab On-site Child Care Program • Assisted Living Memory Care available in 2017

To learn more about how The Residence at North Ridge’s commitment to best practices and quality care can benefit you or your loved one, give us a call at 763-592-3000. 5500 Boone Ave N New Hope, MN 55428 Licensed by the state of Minnesota as a Housing with Services establishment and a Comprehensive Home Care agency. Residence at North Ridge GA 0516 H6.indd 1

4/21/16 2:38 PM

When: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 21 Where: Orchestra Hall, Minneapolis Cost: $30–$100 Info: minnesotaorchestra.org  and cantussings.org

SEPT. 23

MUSEUM DAY LIVE! → Smithsonian magazine’s annual event includes free admission to many museums nationwide, including more than a dozen Minnesota destinations.

952.443.6113

When: Sept. 23 Where: Minnesota Cost: FREE. Downloadable tickets, good for two people each, are required. Info: smithsonianmag.com/museumday

SEPT. 24

CZECH AND SLOVAK FESTIVAL

Caring for mind, body & spirit.

Gianna Homes GA 0517 H4.indd 1

4/10/17 9:47 AM

→ Savor the sights, sounds and flavors of Czech, Slovak, Bohemian and Moravian cultures at this annual festival with live music, ethnic food and beer, folk dance performances, children’s games, craft booths and more. When: 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Sept. 24 Where: CSPS Hall, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: sokolmn.org

MORE ONLINE! Find more events on the new Minnesota Good Age website at mngoodage.com/cant-misscalendar. Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 / 63


Brain teasers SUDOKU

WORD SEARCH Hugs and kisses

ADVISE BOUND CELEBRATE CUDDLE HEIRLOOM INHERIT JOYOUS

CRYPTOGRAM Break the code to reveal a quote from a famous person. Each letter represents another letter.

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64 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

ANSWERS

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3. More than 200 miles.

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2. Sept. 10, 2017

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Clue: B = E

REMEMBER SPOIL SUPPORT TEACH TRAVEL UNCONDITIONAL

TRIVIA 1. 77 percent

Source: Anonymous

KINDNESS LAUGH LOVE MEMORIES MENTOR NOSTALGIC PLAYFUL


TRIVIA Grandparenting 1. A recent survey found what percentage of grandparents prefer a phone call over a text? 2. When is National Grandparents Day 2017? 3. As of 2011, 43 percent of grandparents live how far from their grandchildren? Sources: grandparents.com, wikipedia.com, statistica.com

SUDOKU WORD SCRAMBLE Marble, Lizard, Zipper CROSSWORD

ANSWERS Minnesota Good Age / September 2017 / 65

CRYTPOGRAM A grandmother is a little bit parent, a little bit teacher, and a little bit best friend.


Crossword

68 Holy female fig. in a Renaissance painting 69 Lumberjack’s tool

DOWN

ACROSS

1 Jam holder 4 Nike logo 10 H.S. junior’s exam 14 “__ Beso (That Kiss!)”: Paul Anka song 15 Stephen King’s telekinetic high schooler 16 Short car trip 17 “Chill! It’s Labor Day!” 20 Open, as a Chablis 21 Toy block brand 22 NYC airport on Flushing Bay 23 Gas for signs 25 “Actually, you’re right” 27 Oared 30 More than zero 32 Trail behind 33 Señora Perón 34 River, in Mexico 66 / September 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

35 Kick out of office, as a dictator 38 “Chill! It’s Labor Day!” 42 Early ball game score 43 “... at the __ ball game!”: song lyric 44 Speak 45 Coax (out), as a genie 46 Letters in a certain bachelor’s ad 47 “Bye!” 49 Unanalyzed info 52 Came home in a cloud of dust 54 Inventor Whitney 55 Hawkeyes’ home 57 Historic cold period 61 “Chill! It’s Labor Day!” 64 “Young Frankenstein” seductress 65 Big name in little trains 66 Prefix with verse 67 Yappy dog, e.g.

1 Son of God, in a Bach cantata title 2 B __ bravo 3 Campus mil. unit 4 Chicken or cowed 5 Ridiculously silly 6 Mork’s planet 7 Like a dental exam 8 Stringy, as meat 9 Row of foundation bushes 10 Antonym of post11 Foolish one 12 “Better a witty fool, than a foolish wit,” e.g. 13 Lone Star State 18 Leftover for Fido 19 Painting gadget 24 Former Neet rival 26 SoCal cop force 27 Move, in realty ads 28 Roast roaster 29 Student swimmer’s aid 31 “Ain’t happenin’!” 34 Feel regret over 35 “The butler __ it” 36 Persuade 37 Irish New Age songwriter 39 “__ be surprised” 40 One way for a jailed suspect to get out 41 Aid to the poor 46 Considered appropriate 47 Italy’s largest island 48 Biblical garden 49 Immerse in salsa again, as a chip (only do this if you’re 50-Down!) 50 By oneself 51 Works hard 53 One devoted to a single profession 56 Itty-bitty bit 58 34-Across filler 59 Group after boomers 60 Spooky-sounding lake 62 Tit for __ 63 Santa __, California


September 2017  
September 2017  
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