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Contents 30

ON THE COVER Liz Dodson’s very DNA could stand for ‘Destination: Next Adventure!’ Photos by Tracy Walsh

26

REAL AGING Why does getting older seem to bring on a sense of invisibility in these so-called golden years?

MARCH FROM THE EDITOR 8 These seniors stand tall, live large and inspire.

MY TURN 10 Take a look into the lives of two Burnsville caregivers.

MEMORIES 12 Did the feminism of the 1960s overshoot its objective for women?

MINNESOTA HISTORY 14 Meet Ohiyesa, a doctor, author and Native American treasure.

WELLNESS 16 Got a longtime bucket list? Here’s why you should promptly kick it to the curb.

IN THE KITCHEN 18 Tahini is the secret ingredient in these nutrient-dense cookies.

20

TRAVEL Traveling internationally? Then you need these five free apps, all tried, true and tested by a Minnetonka travel expert.

6 / March 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

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FROM THE EDITOR Volume 39 / Issue 3

Living the dream? BY SARAH JACKSON

PUBLISHER Janis Hall / jhall@mngoodage.com

CO-PUBLISHER AND SALES MANAGER Terry Gahan / tgahan@mngoodage.com

GENERAL MANAGER Zoe Gahan / zgahan@mngoodage.com

EDITOR Sarah Jackson / editor@mngoodage.com

CONTRIBUTORS Ed Dykhuizen, Carol Hall, Jody Lebel, Dave Nimmer, Lauren Peck, Christina Sandok, Susan Schaefer, Sheryl Stillman, Tracy Walsh, Jesse Watkins

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Valerie Moe

ART DIRECTOR Dani Cunningham

AD COORDINATOR AND OFFICE MANAGER Amy Rash / 612-436-5081 arash@mngoodage.com

CIRCULATION Marlo Johnson / distribution@mngoodage.com

37,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2020 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. To receive Good Age by mail, send a check for $18 with “Good Age subscription” in the memo.

8 / March 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

A

ge really is just a number, isn’t it? If you think I’m blowing smoke, guess what: I recently, at age 45, joined AARP. Why not? I enjoy the magazine, which is already relevant to my middle-age life and work. The benefits, such as hotel discounts, were attractive. And I believe we’re as young as our health and our mindset allow us to be! Let’s embrace every stage of life. And not deny that life is a precious journey made special by its limitations. Despite living in a youth-obsessed Photo by Tracy Walsh culture, we still get to define aging as we see fit. Take for example this month’s cover star, Liz Dodson, who we’ve dubbed The Dazzling Mrs. Dodson. Doesn’t she just sparkle? This world traveler and longtime artist has aged well, despite life’s challenges, and she’s right now trotting the globe, all at age 90. (I’m literally half her age and I’m pretty sure I can’t match her energy level.) And yet, aging is no picnic. Older adults are only occasionally honored and revered for going beyond the typical life expectancy. Longevity isn’t always rewarded. Another 90-year-old in this issue, Jesse Watkins of Minneapolis, writes about the unfortunate phenomenon of feeling invisible — because of his elder status — in our Real Aging department. But demographics in the U.S. could change things in the near future. Watkins notes: One out of every 5 U.S. residents will be retirement age by 2030. By 2034, there will be 77 million folks 65 years old or older. “That’s a lot of voices,” he writes. “Being ignored — not seen, invisible — will be more unlikely. We seniors are likely to be seen as more inside the mainstream. More admiring smiles may come our way from those younger than ourselves, followed more often by strangers voluntarily picking up a cane for us after it’s been dropped on the floor.” What do you think? Is it a foolish dream or an inevitable outcome? For the sake of all of us, I hope it’s the latter. Revering older adults — respecting our elders in all stages of the aging journey — benefits everyone.


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MY TURN

A little tenderness BY DAVE NIMMER

I

know we’ve all had the same fear — stuck in a nursing home or memory-care place, sitting alone, chin on our chest, with no one to help us, offer a kind word or a loving touch. Well, my fears have been somewhat allayed by my visits to Jim Klobuchar (yes, Amy Klobuchar’s father), an old newspaper friend and colleague now at Emerald Crest Memory Care in Burnsville. What I’ve seen is caregivers — half of whom, it appears, are immigrants — who are consistently careful, gentle and helpful, not only to Klobuchar, but to all the residents of his “cottage.” They all need a lot of help: to move, to eat, to dress, to get up and simply get through the day. Those attending to their needs are, in my opinion, worth $60 an hour. The national average is a little more than $12 for work of this kind. I’m not sure I could do what they do — for any amount of money. One of them is Hibaq Ismail, a 29-yearold mother of four who was born in Mogadishu, Somalia. She’s worked at Emerald Crest since September and now has the title of “life enrichment coach.” She leads the daily activities, which include exercising the body, talking about the news of the day and singing old songs that everyone knows. She’s learned the words to Auld Lang Syne, Home on the Range and George M. Cohan’s Over There. “I have lived all my life with elders,” Ismail said. “I treat them like I’d like to be treated. I always want them to feel they

10 / March 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

▲ Emerald Crest workers Jesus (Jesse) Alderete and Hibaq Ismail pose for a photo at the memory care community in Burnsville. Photo by Dave Nimmer

have their dignity. You know, Jim is still here. He’s still in there. He talks about climbing mountains, stories he’s written — and going to write — and growing up on the Iron Range. He’s helped me learn something about Minnesota.” What I learned about Klobuchar in the newsroom back in the day was he did not suffer fools and wouldn’t accept ultimatums. What I observed about Jim at his cottage is that he quickly takes a helping hand and follows gentle instructions. His trust and respect are obvious. “I build a relationship with these

elders,” said Jesus (Jesse) Alderete, 31, who’s worked as a resident coordinator at Emerald Crest since last March. Jesse, born in Robbinsdale, is the son of a native Mexican and considers himself "Hispanic/American." “I love what I do,” Alderete said. “I think I make a difference in people’s lives. I can get them a glass of water. I can get them up, get ‘em changed, talk to them and listen to their stories. You have to open your eyes and your heart to do this. After a while, you tend to appreciate life more.”


I have lived all my life with elders. I treat them like I’d like to be treated. I always want them to feel they have their dignity. — Hibaq Ismail, 29, at Emerald Crest Memory Care, Burnsville

Those at Augustana’s Emerald Crest appreciate Alderete enough to make him a mentor to other caregivers. Although precise figures are hard to come by, at least a third of all caregivers around the country are immigrants and, in states where populations are older, that percentage may exceed 40%. Some of us will spend our last days in a facility and the likelihood is we’ll be cared for by those for whom English is a second language, the same group of folks we choose to gut our turkeys, pick our strawberries and clean our toilets. Based on what I’ve seen, we’ll be all right. Perhaps the pain and anguish that’s sent people fleeing to America is now reflected in the empathy and sympathy they have for others who struggle. Listen to Jim Klobuchar: “They are good to me,” he said softly. Then he raised his voice. “And they are damned good for me.” Every morning they make sure he has a copy of the Star Tribune at his breakfast table. Dave Nimmer had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@mngoodage.com.

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MEMORIES

‘Only’ a housewife? BY CAROL HALL

A

recent History Theatre production in St. Paul — Gloria: A Life — focused on Gloria Steinem and other famous females leading the women’s liberation movement of the 1960s and ’70s. It also touched briefly on their predecessors, the women of the 1950s who were housewives and stay-at-home moms, a la June Cleaver of TV’s Leave It to Beaver. Juxtaposed with the feminists of the day and Gloria Steinem (who is still with us today at age 85), the June Cleavers of the world appeared naive and shallow, leading such bland and boring lives. This perception was strengthened as the feminist movement took hold. It made me wince. A very bright, well-educated young woman I knew then — who surely could have had a fulfilling career in business — believed her children should have their mother at home, so she chose instead to become a housewife. She almost apologized to me, as though this was something to be ashamed of. Because the feminist movement opened the door for women to make inroads in nearly every field, it has served — perhaps inadvertently — to devalue the role of housewife. Being a “homemaker” today is perceived by many women to be old-fashioned. In some circles, it’s no longer socially acceptable — even embarrassing. While watching Gloria: A Life, my 12 / March 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

dear and beloved late husband Earl also came to mind. A proven champion of social justice, Earl supported the women’s movement. Yet, ironically, Earl — who was considerably older than me — also was one of its perpetrators! Earl, and the other members of his “Greatest Generation,” were practitioners of the patriarchy that goaded women into seeking change. As Earl’s wife, I lived with this way of thinking. Earl was head of the household. He simply never took to sharing home chores, even after he’d retired from work. I eventually gave up trying to get him to do anything more than make the bed. Two of Earl’s daughters-in-law, who were committed feminists, could be very icy to him at times. The wife of his eldest son Jack actually became the family breadwinner, leaving Jack home to raise their two daughters. The wife of his second son Rick once wondered aloud to me if Earl had ever changed Rick’s diapers when he was a baby. (Earl’s first wife was his sons’ mother, so I don’t know.) And so I came away from Gloria: A Life wondering: Has feminism overshot its objective? Certainly not all women want to set the world on fire; many are simply not cut out to do so. Instead of being stigmatized for staying at home, they should be recognized for making the appropriate choice for them. How would Earl have reacted to the

Juxtaposed with the feminists of the day and Gloria Steinem, the June Cleavers of the world appeared naive and shallow, leading such bland and boring lives. play? He couldn’t very well look away from the criticism being heaped on men like himself that was portrayed on stage. Would he have argued with some of it? Certainly! Would his social conscience be reawakened, goading him to pitch in and further the feminist cause? I’ll never know! Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Send comments and questions to chall@mngoodage.com.


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MINNESOTA HISTORY

The soul of an Indian BY LAUREN PECK

O

ne of the most iconic and wellknown Native American writers of the early 20th century was from Minnesota. Ohiyesa, aka Charles Alexander Eastman, wrote 11 books over his career, sharing his personal stories as well as details about Dakota culture and life. “He’s not writing to impress anybody; it’s an effort to really get across the profound humanity of his people through telling his own story,” said Ojibwe author Heid E. Erdrich in the film Ohiyesa: The Soul of an Indian. Born in Redwood Falls in 1858, Ohiyesa was first called Hakadah, which means “the pitiful last,” because his mother died soon after his birth. He was raised by his paternal grandmother in a traditional Dakota community, but at age 4, his life was upended.

Fleeing the war The U.S.-Dakota War of 1862 broke out, and in the aftermath, the government imprisoned, executed and ultimately exiled Dakota people from Minnesota. Ohiyesa and his grandmother were among those who fled to Canada. There his uncle trained him as a Dakota warrior and hunter, and Hakadah was eventually given the name Ohiyesa, meaning “always the winner,” after he was part of a winning lacrosse game. Jacob wanted Ohiyesa to come back to the U.S. with him, learn English and go to school. Ohiyesa was hesitant, but moved to his father’s homestead in Flandreau, 14 / March 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

▲ Dakota Indian Charles Eastman, born in 1858 near Redwood Falls, Minnesota, went on to become a medical doctor, an internationally read author and a civil rights activist. Photo courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

Dakota Territory. After he was baptized, Ohiyesa took the name Charles Alexander Eastman.

He attended English-speaking schools in Flandreau and an Indian boarding school in Nebraska. Ohiyesa also went on to


Visitors to the Minnesota History Center in St. Paul can learn more about Ohiyesa and Dakota history in the new ongoing exhibit Our Home: Native Minnesota. On March 31 from 7-9 p.m., visitors can view a free screening of Ohiyesa: The Soul of an Indian, a personal film following Kate Beane and her family as they trace Ohiyesa’s life and impact on history.

Lauren Peck is a public relations specialist for the Minnesota Historical Society.

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The couple moved to St. Paul, where Ohiyesa opened a private medical practice. But he struggled to earn a living as few people were interested in going to a Dakota doctor. During his time in St. Paul, Ohiyesa started writing. His routine became writing during the day while Elaine typed his work at night and served as an editor. His first book Indian Boyhood, sharing stories of his childhood, was published in 1902. As the family moved to the East Coast, Ohiyesa kept writing and began touring widely as a lecturer, speaking to white audiences about Native American issues. He would often speak dressed in traditional Dakota clothing. “He was playing to that stereotypical view people had from the Westerns, from cowboys and Indians. And when he would go and speak to whites, they wanted to see that,” said Beane. “When he went up to the podium dressed that way, people were quiet. He actually was able to get them to listen to him.” In addition to his writing, Ohiyesa had jobs with the YMCA, establishing chapters in native communities, and the Boy Scouts of America, where he served as RMATIONAL HIG O F N H LI a Native American adviser and national PI G M councilman. He also was involved in civil rights, helping found the Society for American Indians, which successfully lobbied for Native Americans to receive U.S. citizenship in 1924. While Ohiyesa passed away at age 80 in 1939, his writing is still in print M A R C Hhave 2 0 trans2 0been today, and his books lated into languages such as French, German and Czech.

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higher education, and in 1890, he received his medical degree from Boston Medical School, becoming the second Native American physician in the country. Wanting to help his people, Ohiyesa moved to the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota to work as a doctor. But barely a month after his arrival, tragedy struck the community. On Dec. 29, 1890, the Wounded Knee Massacre occurred with government troops killing several hundred Lakota people, including many women and children. Ohiyesa was the only doctor caring for the wounded. “It took all of my nerve to keep my composure in the face of this spectacle,” he wrote in his 1916 book From the Deep Woods to Civilization. Kate Beane, Flandreau Santee Dakota and Muskogee Creek and a descendant of Ohiyesa, noted that Wounded Knee must have echoed Ohiyesa’s childhood experiences of the U.S.-Dakota War. “To experience that again, to see that happen to people he considered relatives … must have been traumatic,” Beane said in Ohiyesa: The Soul of an Indian. After a few years at Pine Ridge, Ohiyesa and his wife Elaine — an educated woman from a Boston literary family whom he married in 1891 — left after clashing with the local Indian agent.

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WELLNESS

Kick that travel bucket list BY JODY LEBEL

I

’ve always loved making lists. My days and weeks and often my years are planned out on paper, and as such, I’m the quintessential bucket-list person. And, in theory, a bucket list — a list of things to do before you kick the bucket — is a great idea. Who doesn’t experience a little thrill of satisfaction when checking something off a to-do list? There are even related books like 1000 Places to See Before You Die by Patricia Schultz and 100 Things to Do in the Twin Cities Before You Die by Tom Weber. Just how much time do these authors think we have, anyway? 16 / March 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

Whether or not they’re written down, there are many things in this world we’d like to experience. But that doesn’t mean we necessarily have the time or the funds to make them all happen. It’s a no-brainer that writing out a bucket list is the first step in accomplishing our big-picture goals and dreams. Once it’s done, you can proudly tape it to your refrigerator for everyone to scrutinize. As the years pass, however, the list will become dog-eared and food-stained and your regular house guests will squint at it and say discouraging things like, “You’d better get going; your knees aren’t

going to last forever.” Indeed. Here are five good reasons why you should consider kicking that bucket list to the curb.

1

It narrows your focus.

If you arrive in Abu Dhabi fixated on booking that camel ride in the desert, you might miss the lady at the table next to you, covered from head to toe in a black burka, trying to eat a salad under her veil. Or if you’re so hyped up to jump out of that airplane, you might miss the local children holding the giant iguana on a leash by the side of the road. Stop


looking at the big event and start looking around. It’s the random side adventures and tidbits that make travel memories.

2

High expectations can disappoint.

I wanted to swim with the manta rays when we got into port in St. Martin. It was all I talked about. On the big day, the weather was bad, so the tours were cancelled. Major disappointment. Trip ruined. I’ve learned it’s better to travel carefree. Expect nothing — that’s when you find treasure.

3

Bucket lists make you feel obligated.

You don’t really have the money to spend on airfare to see Switzerland decorated at Christmastime. But you’re doing it anyway because it’s on your bucket list, gosh darn it. The truth is, we change as we age. What we once considered important and fun may not be so attractive in our later years.

4

You’ll miss out on smaller trips.

5

A bucket list turns you into a tourist.

Bucket lists aren’t cheap to complete. A serious bucket list person is likely to turn down little trips along the way, because he’s saving up for the big journey. Not getting to do everything on your list doesn’t make you a bad traveler.

Often our lists consist of things other people have told us about, things we’ve seen on TV or read in (ahem) magazines: “You simply MUST take the gondola ride in Venice,” for example. But remember: When you’re in Venice, making a beeline for the gondolas is something tourists do. It’s not the most fun or authentic

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SWOON WORTHY You may be familiar with tahini (sesame seed butter) as a hummus ingredient (and it is). But did you know tahini can also help you make great cookies? It adds a lovely nuttiness and creates a delightful texture, too. And the best part? Tahini is a great source of antioxidants, healthy fats, calcium and vitamin B6. BY CHRISTINA SANDOK

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Christina Sandok lives in Edina and is the owner of Prescribe Nutrition, which offers virtual health coaching and online nutrition programs. Learn more at prescribe-nutrition.com or @prescribe_nutrition on Instagram. Minnesota Good Age / March 2020 / 19


TRAVEL

20 / March 2020 / Minnesota Good Age


p o T l e v tra s p p a Before you fly away, be sure to download these five essential free mobile apps for international travel. BY SHERYL STILLMAN

A

s I was ready to embark on a recent trip to Thailand, my kids told me I needed to download WhatsApp. I immediately thought of WYSIWYG “What You See is What You Get,” a popular phrase back in the 1980s and ’90s. We were obviously speaking different languages. I quickly came up to speed not just on WhatsApp, but other traveler technology as well. Here’s a look at a few mobile-app finds that I would recommend for those who love to travel internationally as well as folks getting ready for their first adventure — especially women traveling solo (which can be a wonderful way to go)!


WHATSAPP This free app is almost identical to the typical text messaging apps that come standard with any mobile phone, except it’s designed to use a wi-fi connection, versus cell phone minutes, to help you avoid costly long-distance charges. It works on any smartphone model and desktop computers, too. And it’s free. (Charges may apply if you use cellular data.) Most foreign travelers use it to not only keep in touch with loved ones back at home, but also to text, call and share photos with new friends they meet along the way. With more than 1 billion users, WhatsApp (purchased by Facebook in 2014) is most popular with the younger generation. And yet I found it to be one of my most used and helpful apps during my vacation. Any time I met someone new, whether they were from France, Spain, Korea — regardless of age! — we were able to quickly share our contact data, create group chats and send photos to one another. With WhatsApp, you can also make voice and video calls and even leave voice messages. It also offers location tracking and sharing, a nice thing to have in an unfamiliar city when you’re trying to connect with members of your travel party or new friends. Before you head out, download this easy-to-use app that will keep you connected — even after the vacation is over. 22 / March 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

GOOGLE TRANSL ATE You can easily translate phrases on Google.com anytime, but there’s also a highly rated Google Translate app that’s free and ideal for international travel. Yes, you can learn a few key phrases in the language of the country or countries you’ll be visiting before you go. But on your trip, you may also encounter people who speak other languages from across the world. Google Translate (also available for desktop) includes 103 languages and is available offline (with 59 languages), which can be ideal if you’re backpacking or walking down narrow cobblestone streets and alleyways, where an internet connection is often hard to find. Thanks to “instant camera translation,” you can translate foreign street signs and other print texts such as those on menus — photographically in real time, using your phone’s camera — which is especially helpful if you’re skeptical of what food, bug or animal you might be ordering!

WHEN YOU’RE OFFLINE When your phone’s lost its juice or you decide to simply unplug to better experience your surroundings while traveling, it’s a good idea to keep on hand some personal business cards (or even small slips of paper) that include your name and WhatsApp number. As you meet new friends along the way, you can share your information (judiciously, of course) for them to connect with you another time. One of my best memories was meeting three Chinese men during an early morning beach walk. Of course, it was a rare occasion of having left my phone in the hotel room. Even though they didn’t speak a word of English and I don’t understand Chinese, we had an entire exchange of photo-taking, laughing, running in and out of the water, and then writing our names in the sand. I wish I had thought to give them my number as well so I could look back fondly on a photograph of our short yet meaningful time together. When traveling internationally, it’s easy to see that regardless of where we’re from, we all speak the same languages of joy and love.

PACKPOINT

You also can take or import photos for higher quality translations; translate bilingual conversations on the fly; draw text characters instead of typing; and create your own phrasebook by starring and saving translated words and phrases for future reference. Don’t let a language barrier prevent you from chatting it up with strangers on your next adventure.

Does the mere idea of packing stress you out? What to take, how much can you really get in that suitcase or backpack — it can all be very confusing. Travel experts agree: Pack as little as possible! If you want help organizing a list of items to include, the PackPoint app has you


covered. Rated Fodor’s Best Travel App in 2019, PackPoint generates recommendations based on type of travel (business or leisure), destinations, number of nights and planned activities. This smart, free app even looks at the upcoming weather forecast to customize clothing and/or accessory options to make sure you’re prepared and not left out in the rain. For a small fee, you can upgrade to a premium option that allows users to connect to TripIt and Evernote apps.

XE CURRENCY With 70 million downloads worldwide, XE Currency is the international traveler’s app of choice with its easy-to-use interface and features that allow you to: • Monitor up to 10 currencies at once; • Set rate alerts and notifications; • Compare your cost with the midmarket rate and transaction rate; • Transfer currency in 65 currencies to more than 170 countries (fees apply); • Work offline. One big question among newer travelers is whether to get foreign currency before traveling or upon arriving at their destination. Research shows that it’s best to exchange currency right here at home with your local bank or credit union and to sell it back upon return. These establishments often offer the highest exchange rates with the lowest fees. Don’t be short-changed: Download this efficient, free app to ensure you have up-to-date pricing so you can literally get the most for your dollar. Minnesota Good Age / March 2020 / 23


MEETUP Meetup.com is an online community that connects people with shared interests to help facilitate in-person meetings. Its resulting app is a must for solo travelers or for anyone interested in meeting locals, ex-pats or fellow tourists. Started in 2002 and purchased by privately held WeWork in 2017, Meetup caters to more than 35 million members with 300,000-plus groups, according to Business Insider. That translates to approximately 4,000 meetups per day across the world, including travelers. As a solo traveler myself, I found it comforting to know that there was a group of people I could meet in an unfamiliar country where we had an immediate connection and at least one thing in common. In my case, the commonality was that we were traveling throughout Thailand at the same time. Getting together — in person — is an ideal way to share stories, get suggestions on places to visit, provide restaurant recommendations and make new friends, all in safe and public places. Search your travel dates and destinations on meetup.com (and download the free app) before you leave so you don’t miss an opportunity to connect with other likeminded travelers or locals during your stay.

Sheryl Stillman of Minnetonka has spent the last two decades traveling alone, both professionally and personally, capturing tips and tricks along the way. Learn more at GuidetoSoloTravel.com. 24 / March 2020 / Minnesota Good Age


⊳ Sheryl Stillman of Minnetonka poses while visiting a farm outside Chiang Mai as part of a two-week vacation that took her throughout Thailand, also including Phuket (above), a rainforested, mountainous island off the Southeast Asian country’s west coast. Photos by Sheryl Stillman

Minnesota Good Age / March 2020 / 25


REAL AGING

Going


unnoticed Why does getting older seem to bring on invisibility? And how can we fix this? BY JESSE WATKINS

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ecoming invisible? Not seen? It feels real, and yet you know it’s not. A teacher, a pastor, maybe a passerby makes eye contact with others, but not with you. Ignored, denied, avoided, not chosen. Elders aren’t spared. Many years ago, I was bicycle-touring on the California coast, hugging the ocean on the closest land trail, road or highway. Day 3 south of San Francisco was rainy and cold — a mess. And I was a mess — muddy and wet. At lunchtime, I rolled up to the entrance of a roadside semi-fancy restaurant, locked my bicycle to a post and walked into the café’s small front entry, stopping there to remove my muddy poncho. A couple entered behind me, walked by — no nod, no eye contact. I might as well have not been there. A group of three entered, did not look at me, made no comment about the weather, no look of disapproval, just hurried on inside. A group of four? The same. I was unpleasant to look at, therefore invisible.

Does getting older automatically bring on invisibility? How common is the problem? Whose job is it to solve — a spouse’s, the nurse on duty where you live, your own?

Finding — and losing — status Geni Hart, now 76, moved at age 65 from Fargo, North Dakota to the Phoenix, Arizona area and became invisible. “Here, at first, I didn’t get the recognition and respect that I did in Fargo. There, I was known as a long-distance cyclist and runner and a helpful citizen,” she said. “Early on in Arizona, where I wasn’t known, my feeling of being invisible was at its greatest. I had no voice. I’d offer an opinion and not be heard at all, it seemed.” Living in Arizona 11 years now, the insecurity — the invisibility — has lifted. “I’m seen more clearly now, and I’m known in the community. It’s much better. I don’t feel angry about the way things happened,” she said. “Of course, being a woman adds to the problem. You have to work hard to overcome not being seen. And you have to speak up more,

sometimes when you’d rather not.” Hart noted that in an extreme situation, virtual invisibility can be an asset. In World War II, for example, women whose most notable quality was their ordinariness were selected to fight in the French Resistance. It was an advantage to become invisible.

Different experiences Rev. Jan Brosen, a Lutheran pastor and a resident of Cornerstone Elim Community in Plymouth, Minnesota, said she felt some invisibility during her early onset of dementia. Her memory loss began with a fall in her bathroom, followed by a 12-hour wait for rescue. “After that, I began to take notes to aid my memory,” she said, adding about invisibility: “It’s easy to think we are forgotten. We may believe when we’re younger that the church will be there for us when we get old — or before — and usually it is. But the response may take longer than we think it should.” Going unnoticed isn’t a universal tale, however. Minnesota Good Age / March 2020 / 27


A longtime journalist, Jesse Watkins, age 90, lives at Augustana Apartments of Minneapolis, where he blogs about the joys and challenges of aging. Photo courtesy of Cassia

Nellie Searles, as she got older, moved from Augustana Apartments in Minneapolis, an assisted living community, to the adjoining Augustana Health Care Center, then to an Ebenezer assisted living community on Park Avenue. Searles said emphatically that she’s not subject to invisibility. “I have plenty to do, people to connect and visit with, a table of four for meals, TV, movies and games to play,” she said, adding that she enjoys her community’s seasonal celebrations, too.

The depression factor Sarah Karber, an Augustana Apartments chaplain, said there’s a loneliness problem among seniors, and that it includes people with depression and folks living with a major loss, such as the passing of a spouse. Depression tells people lies — about 28 / March 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

Senior numbers have grown and ages have climbed. According to U.S. Census Bureau projections, 1 out of every 5 U.S. residents will be of retirement age by 2030. themselves. One is that they’re not connecte; another is that they’re not worthy. It’s hard not to believe. Fortunately, systems of care that focus on the physical and emotional needs of individuals is increasing in use. For myself, plain old vigorous workouts in the fitness room push back feelings of uselessness.

Feelings of depression, loneliness or isolation should be dealt with by a professional therapist. Psychiatrist/counselor Leah Streitman at Behavioral Health Services (BHSI) in the Twin Cities sees the plight of elder invisibility in a broader context. “I encourage patients, senior or not, to talk through their feelings, not just on the surface, but below the surface as well,” she said. “What are the feelings that cause a person to feel invisible?”

A better, elder United States Our current culture, reports say, is beginning to shift its values along with the growing senior demographic. Senior numbers have grown and ages have climbed. According to U.S. Census Bureau projections, 1 out of every 5 U.S. residents will be of retirement age by 2030.


CALL FOR HELP If you or an older adult in your life are experiencing isolation or depression, please call the Institute on Aging’s 24-hour Friendship Line at 800-971-0016 or call the Senior LinkAge line at 800-333-2433 and ask about mental health resources.

By 2034, there will be 77 million folks 65 years old or older. That’s a lot of voices. Being ignored — not seen, invisible — will be more unlikely. Those of us with white hair, or none, will be seen more by younger folks out and about every day. We’ll have proportionally more dollars to spend, causing a shift in the marketplace toward products seniors prefer. Voting also will reflect senior impact. Seniors have always shown up to vote in higher percentages. Discourse and open conversation is also likely to shift toward senior preferences. Run for office! We seniors are likely to soon be seen as more inside the mainstream. More admiring smiles may come our way from those younger than ourselves, followed more often by strangers voluntarily picking up a cane for us after it’s been dropped on the floor. What will it be like, how will we be seen when there are more 80-, 90- and 100-year-olds everywhere, all the time?

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A former features editor and longtime reporter, Jesse Watkins now blogs regularly about older adults for Cassia, an affiliation of Augustana Care and Elim Care. Learn more at augustanacare.org/get-know-us/blog.

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Artist Liz Dodson poses in her Minneapolis condo with views of downtown Minneapolis and the Mississippi River. Photo by Tracy Walsh


On top of the world Liz Dodson, at age 90, is a one-woman franchise with a thriving art career, a rich family life and a zest for world travel. By Susan Schaefer

M

any mornings you’ll find Liz Dodson in the gym of her Riverview Tower condo in Minneapolis, poring over The New York Times, pedaling a stationary bike for a half-hour spin. “I walk regularly and try to ward off knee surgery with my 30-minute physical fitness routines,” she confesses, a twinkle in her corn silk blue eyes. At age 90, Dodson isn’t just regal, stunning and fit. She’s a one-woman franchise — known equally for her interdisciplinary body of artwork and arts leadership, her extensive global travels and residencies, and her attentiveness to her four sons and large extended family. Her elevated condo’s view over the city and the Mississippi River’s St. Anthony Falls parallels her exceptionally urban, urbane and high-flying life. A globetrotter currently on her second around-the-world tour, she also teaches a wildly popular weekly artsappreciation course. With a sterling reputation for arts leadership, she was just appointed VP of an international arts organization. Currently planning her next major exhibition in China in 2021, she’s staged more than 20 major exhibits since 1999 (the year she turned 69). And, oh yes, she’s enjoying a budding romance. This must be a highly motivated millennial, right?

World wanderer And to celebrate her strong health, good fortune and 90th year on earth, Dodson isn’t putting up her feet in reflection. No, in fact, during the first third of 2020, she’ll commemorate the milestone with a 119-day Viking World Wonders cruise. (She departed from Los Angeles on Jan. 4 and will arrive in London on May 2.) She had originally planned to host her sons, Mark, Scott, Bob and Jim, for a month each onboard the voyage, which includes 80 shore excursions. Scott, however, had to back out for his own upcoming wedding. No worries, though: Three are still going and Dodson’s current male companion decided to accompany her for the entire journey, booking the stateroom next to hers. The ever-youthful Dodson gleefully explains that her beau, Rob, whom she recently met online, has planned a fantastic evening at the Sydney Opera Minnesota Good Age / March 2020 / 31


House for her actual birthday in February with two of her sons joining for a special birthday dinner. Surely, a trip like this seems hard to top, but Dodson’s actually done that. Yes, she’s already traveled around the world (more on that later). Attributing her joy of the journey to the migrations of her family of origin, Dodson’s very DNA could stand for “Destination: Next Adventure!” While her maternal grandfather, James Higgins, emigrated from County Cork Ireland during the time of the Irish famine, it seems that the tale of her father, Arthur Wolfram Isca, is the real spark for Dodson’s own wanderlust. “My father left Germany when he was 14 years old to avoid going into the German army, taking a train to France, then on to England,” she explains. His father had owned a Berlin theater newspaper and his mother had been a theater dressmaker, so he was able to get a job traveling to various cities as a theater prop boy. After he arrived at Liverpool,

Liz Dodson displays some of her work as part of the Art Day in Alice during her time in South Africa. Dodson co-directed the event, which brought together deeply segregated black and white communities in the early 1980s.

her father boarded a tall ship where he was hired as a cook’s assistant, sailing back and forth from Liverpool to the Amazon rainforest. Next, he worked on a ship going up the Amazon River, marking mahogany and ebony trees for cutting in the Brazilian rainforests. (Maybe not environmentally friendly by today’s standards, but it was acceptable back then.) When Dodson and her brother, James, were young children, their father told exciting stories of the enormous anaconda snakes and headhunters he had encountered in the jungle. “These stories — and the fact that my mother also loved to travel — have had a great bearing on my love to travel,” Dodson says.

Wife and mother

When Liz Dodson and her brother, James, were young children, their father told exciting stories of his travels in the Amazon rainforest, which later inspired Liz’s love of globetrotting. 32 / March 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

Dodson has been no less a pioneer in her personal and professional life. She grew up in South Minneapolis near Lake Harriet and, like many of her peers, she married young, at age 20, and had four children, “an average number during the ’50s.” However, unlike most young women

of her era, Dodson had recently graduated from Minneapolis College of Art and Design (MCAD), in a time when women weren’t that much of a fixture in universities, let alone at art schools. By then she had already attended evening classes at the University of Minnesota and had worked as a freelance fashion illustrator. After the birth of her first child, however, she adopted a more traditional role. “I became a stay-at-home mom until my four sons all started kindergarten,” she explains. Still, during Christmastimes she was able to get babysitters and continue with her fashion illustration in downtown Minneapolis at Powers Department Store. As was typical in the 1950s, her husband didn’t help very much with taking care of the children. “In fact, he didn’t hold the babies until they were 1 year old, and he didn’t do any of the housework,” she adds. So, when she wanted to attend university classes, Dodson had to fit it in strategically “so that I didn’t neglect my traditional role.” Yet, she managed to graduate with a master’s degree in art education and began teaching art at Lincoln High


Artist Liz Dodson’s elevated condo view over the city of Minneapolis and the Mississippi River parallels her urban, urbane and high-flying life. Photo by Tracy Walsh

School in Bloomington, where her children attended. When her husband’s job as vice president of World Toy Company took him to Hong Kong — for half the year, six weeks at a time — “I was an art teacher and also Supermom, doing it all.” They divorced when she was 49, once the boys were all out of high school.

The journey continues In 1980, Dodson met her second husband, Ray Monroe Dodson, in — of all places — the hot tub in her condo’s gym. Their relationship became a storybook tale for other longstanding Riverview Tower residents. “Liz captivated Ray and vice versa,” quips a close friend. “They were a perfect fit.” As Dodson tells it: “Our first date was lunch at The Lexington restaurant, and then we toured the Minneapolis Institute of Art where — in front of Springtime of Life, the 1871 painting by Jean-BaptisteCamille Corot — Ray held my hand.”

Mr. Dodson, a scholar who taught organic chemistry at the University of Minnesota, was a scientist with many patents to his name. The two married in 1982 at the Unitarian Unity Church in St. Paul and traveled to San Francisco for their honeymoon. More travel was already in the cards. A year later came their first global adventure. She and Ray went to live in a little town named Alice, part of the black homeland in South Africa, for two years. Always plying her artistic soul, Dodson brought her creative sensibilities to her time there. One of the most memorable days in her life was as co-director for the Art Day in Alice. It was the time of deep segregation, and the white Africans who lived there typically prohibited black Africans from eating in the clubhouse. But on this special day, they were invited to join in the food and festival activities. Elementary and high school children opened an art exhibition.

College students wrote and put on a play. The city’s mayor cut a ribbon before the parade and planted a tree. “There were performances of traditional Zulu and break dancers, and many performances by African bands, choirs and popular music,” she remembers. “It was a beautiful coming-together festival that drew both whites and blacks together. I felt so delighted — after all the planning — that it went so well and was so rewarding, meaningful, fun and amazing. It still ranks as one of the best days of my life.”  And that’s saying something. Her time in South Africa included visiting several game parks, including the famous Kruger National Park, culminating with a spectacular trip around the world, with visits to 26 countries in 14 months. “After 33 event-filled years,” she says, “Ray died at age 95.” Dodson remains close with her stepchildren and their families. 

Minnesota Good Age / March 2020 / 33


Dodson recounts a moment at the show’s opening that is the embodiment of her motherly fulfilment: “Some of my artist colleges were gathered around our installation. One of them asked my son, ‘Well, Jim, tell us: How does it feel to be collaborating in an exhibition with your mother?’ Jim answered, ‘It is my honor.’ I was so moved by his reply, I’ve never forgotten that proud-mother moment.”

Even Liz Dodson’s condo bedroom includes captivating works of art, such as this woodblock headboard by her son, Jim Brenner. Photo by Tracy Walsh

Staying with it

Creator, curator, collaborator Dodson’s age hasn’t slowed her down. She continues to enjoy an active career and solid international reputation as a professional artist. “I seek to explore the passageways we travel in life,” reads her artist statement. “I see the world through the blend of art, politics, nature and science, and strive to emphasize the theme of water, climate change and art for social change.” Breathing life into that claim, Dodson is most proud of her collaborative creative sculpture/video installations with her youngest son, Jim Brenner. The themes of their work typically center on water, sustainability and climate change. Since 1999, they’ve done more than 20 installations, starting in Chicago, then moving on to many other cities, including 34 / March 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

Liz Dodson’s age hasn’t slowed her down. She continues to enjoy an active career and solid international reputation as a professional artist. three recently in China. In 2000, Dodson staged a second major collaboration with her son titled 2000 Elements, a prestigious juried show in New York that involved stiff competition to get a spot. “We had long phone discussions about the type and details of this installation, which finally focused on the primal elements of earth, air, fire and water,” she explains.

More recently, Dodson has enjoyed working as art director with Jim’s son, her grandson James Jr. “I have directed some of his drone video work,” she boasts. James Jr. also has composed music for her videos and updated her art-centered website LizDodson.com. Dodson’s service to the art community is also legendary. She’s belonged to and served in leadership roles for several art organizations over the years. In her early days, Dodson was a member of WARM, Women Artists Resources of Minnesota, showing her work in many exhibitions. Starting in the 1980s, she joined the Women’s Caucus for Art (WCA), attending and taking her first video camera to the World Conference of Women in Beijing, China. She served on WCA’s national board for a decade, developing friendships with women artists from all over the country. She curated WCA new media video shorts exhibitions in Atlanta, Seattle, New York and L.A. In 2004, Dodson and her colleague, Jeanne Philipp, co-presented a College Art Association conference session Negotiation Collaboration in Aesthetics and Social Change in Seattle. Dodson received Puffin Grants for her video artwork in 2004 and 2009. Outcomes from those grants included more curated exhibitions — A Place at


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Liz Dodson poses with her son, Jim Brenner, at Edison High School in Northeast Minneapolis in front of RiverFirst, one of his many publically commissioned sculptures.

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the Table shows in Chicago in 2007 and with the Michigan WCA Chapter in Ann Arbor in 2008. Later Dodson joined the regional art committee board of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, co-coordinating two large art exhibitions, Women and Water Rights in 2010, and The Women and Money Project in 2016. The latter exhibit — featured at U of M’s Katherine E. Nash Gallery — garnered national attention. Dodson joined the International Association of Female Artists as a vice president and was featured on their website in November 2019. She’s planning an IAFA exhibition in China in 2021, if government negotiations permit. During a recent Osher Lifelong Learning Meet the Art Director class

that Dodson co-teaches with her friend and neighbor, Kay Joseph, Dodson was able to show off her son Jim’s Northeast Minneapolis studio and work. She’s listed first on his website’s collaborators page in front of the Chicago Public Art Group and others. “Being able to work with my mother is an incredible privilege,” Brenner says. “She’s taught me not only how to be a more creative artist, but how to be a better person.” This obvious mother-son affinity and affection for each other encapsulate the life of this incredible woman — family, art, service. Susan Schaefer is a Minneapolis-based freelance communications consultant, writer and photographer who can be reached at insights@lifeintrans.com.

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CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR MARCH

THE MUSIC MAN

Photo by Rich Ryan

→ Meredith Willson’s five-time Tony Award-winning musical features the songs Seventy-Six Trombones, Ya Got Trouble, Wells Fargo Wagon and Till There Was You. When: Feb. 29-Sept. 5 Where: Chanhassen Dinner Theatres Cost: Tickets start at $50. Info: chanhassendt.com

MARCH 1

EXTRA/ORDINARY → Celebrate the opening weekend of a new exhibit with Family Day activities, including games, crafts, Tyke Invite play structures and interactive storytelling. Curators will pair artifacts from the museum’s permanent collection with the original art they inspired for a new picture book, A to Zaao: Playing with History at the American Swedish Institute. When: March 1 Where: American Swedish Institute, Minneapolis Cost: Included with museum admission of $6-$12 for ages 6 and older Info: asimn.org 36 / March 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

SPHINX VIRTUOSI: FOR JUSTICE AND PEACE → An orchestra of the nation’s top black and Latinx classical string soloists will perform music by composers who wove themes of justice and peace into their works without regard to time or place. The performance, also featuring soprano Elaine Alvarez, will be broadcast live on Minnesota Public Radio. When: 3 p.m. March 1 Where: Ordway Center for the Performing Arts, St. Paul Cost: $16-$26 for adults, free for children and college students Info: ordway.org

LARGEST POTLUCK → In celebration of National Minnesota Day, 11 local chefs will each create one dish from their heritage to highlight the diverse culinary scene in the Twin Cities. When: March 1 Where: Rosedale Center, Roseville Cost: $50 includes a buffet of the chefs’ creations with a cash bar. Info: tpt.org/event/largest-potluck

MARCH 3-8

MY FAIR LADY → Lerner & Loewe’s beloved musical boasts such classic songs as I Could Have Danced All Night, The Rain in Spain and Wouldn’t It Be Loverly.


When: March 3-8 Where: Orpheum Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: $40-$145 Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

MARCH 6-22

SUEÑO (DREAM) → See Obie Award-winning playwright José Rivera’s translation and adaptation of Pedro Calderón de la Barca’s classic, Life Is a Dream. When: March 6-22 Where: The Lab Theater, Minneapolis Cost: $18 in advance, $22 at the door Info: bit.ly/sueno2020

MARCH 8

RICK STEVES’ TRAVEL SKILLS CLASS → Join the affable travel expert for a special seminar featuring all the latest in smart European travel. When: March 8 Where: Ordway Center for the Performing Arts, St. Paul Cost: $32-$62 Info: ordway.org

Center, Bloomington Cost: $27-$32 Info: masonicheritagecenter.org

South St. Paul HRA • 50+ Community

MARCH 14-15

• Income Based Rent

IRISH HERITAGE WEEKEND

• All Utilities Paid

→ Explore the Irish heritage of one of the most influential families of the Gilded Age on a themed tour.

• Newly Remodeled • Elevators

When: March 14-15 Where: James J. Hill House, St. Paul Cost: Included with site admission of $6-10 Info: mnhs.org/event/7786

• On Site Caretaker Call for an appointment 651-288-8159

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IRISH CELEBRATIONS → Landmark Center’s two-day celebration of all things Irish is produced in partnership with the Irish Music and Dance Association and includes A Day of Irish Dance (March 15) and a St. Patrick’s Day Irish Celebration (March 17). When: March 15, 17 Where: Landmark Center, St. Paul Cost: $5-$7 Info: landmarkcenter.org

MARCH 16

→ Experience cultures from around the world through music, dance, food, pets, crafts and more at this annual international event series.

→ This documentary play by seven female writers is based on personal interviews with seven women who faced lifethreatening obstacles before bringing heroic changes to their home countries of Pakistan, Nigeria, Ireland, Afghanistan, Guatemala, Russia and Cambodia.

When: March 8: Indonesia; March 22: Poland & Hungary; April 5: Senegal & Sierra Leone Where: Landmark Center, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: landmarkcenter.org

MARCH 11-12

FROM THE KING, FOR THE KING → Mick Sterling headlines this new tribute — The Gospel According to Elvis — featuring the beloved gospel songs of Elvis Presley. When: March 11-12 Where: Minnesota Masonic Heritage

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MARCH 15, 17

MARCH 8, 22; APRIL 5

URBAN EXPEDITION

• Controlled Entries

SEVEN

When: March 16 Where: The O’Shaughnessy, St. Paul Cost: $25-$29 Info: theoshaughnessy.com

MARCH 18-26

MAN IN BLACK: THE MUSIC OF JOHNNY CASH → Brian Pekol and his band will play such hits as I Walk the Line, Ring of Fire, Get Rhythm and Folsom Prison Blues.

Did you know our Twin Cities stretch of the river is a national park? Or that it provides drinking water for over 1 million metro residents? Learn more, advocate, volunteer, or donate at

When: March 18-26 Minnesota Good Age / March 2020 / 37


Where: Minnesota Masonic Heritage Center, Bloomington Cost: $27-$32 Info: masonicheritagecenter.org

MARCH 20-APRIL 4

THERE LIES THE HOME → The acclaimed vocal ensemble Cantus honors the experiences of those who have braved the high seas — whether forced, seeking opportunity or by necessity. When: March 20-April 4 Where: Minneapolis, Stillwater, Edina, Wayzata and St. Paul Cost: $23-$43 Info: cantussings.org

MARCH 24-APRIL 5

ANASTASIA

→ From the Tony Award-winning creators of the Broadway classic Ragtime, this show transports viewers from the twilight of the Russian Empire to Paris in the 1920s, as a brave young woman sets out to discover the mystery of her past. When: March 24-April 5 Where: Orpheum Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: $40-$146 Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

MARCH 27-29

PEACE 4 THE AGES → This 90-minute intergenerational collaboration involving teens and older adults features the writings, songs, video and dance performances that arose from letters the participants wrote to each other about what peace means to them. When: March 27-29 Where: Stages Theatre Company, Hopkins Cost: $14-$20 Info: stagestheatre.org

MARCH 28-29

ENCOUNTERING KINDNESS A CHORAL POEM → CorVoce Chamber Choir premieres local composer Catherine Dalton’s latest, along with works by Pau Casals, Rene Clausen, 38 / March 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

MapleFest

→ Celebrate syrup season with a stack of pancakes and a stroll through the arboretum’s syrup-production facilities. Breakfast seatings (registration required) are available every half hour from 8:30 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. When: March 28 Where: University of Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Chaska Cost: $15 for ages 16 and up, free for ages 15 and younger Info: arb.umn.edu/content/ maplefest-2020

Norman Dinerstein, Morten Lauridsen, Stephen Paulus, Jake Runestad, Kevin Siegfried and more. When and where: March 28: St. Michael’s Lutheran Church, Roseville; March 29: Mindekirken, The Norwegian Lutheran Memorial Church, Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: corvoce.org

MARCH 28

WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE TEA → Enjoy a three-course tea while learning about Minnesota’s own suffragists. Participants are invited to come dressed to support women’s suffrage in 1920. When: March 28 Where: Sibley Historic Site, Mendota Cost: $40; reservations are required. Info: mnhs.org/event/8148

ART FOR NATURE: NATIVE BEE HOUSE → Build a native bee house to take home using basic materials such as wood, twine and paper. This event is sponsored by Minneapolis/St. Paul Elder Care Cooperative, which aims to ease caregiver burden/ fatigue while continuing to keep loved ones engaged and safe through a volunteer network. When: March 28

Where: Carver Park Reserve, Victoria Cost: FREE Info: facebook.com/pg/eldercarecoopmn

MARCH 31-APRIL 4

THE COLOR PURPLE → The 2016 Tony Award winner for Best Musical Revival features a Grammywinning score of jazz, gospel, ragtime and blues and a Pulitzer Prize-winning story. When: March 31-April 4 Where: Ordway Center for the Performing Arts, St. Paul Cost: $48-$111 Info: ordway.org

APRIL 5

BOWLING TO END BRAIN TUMORS → Bowling for Brains hosts its 9th-annual bowling and fundraising event, with all proceeds benefiting the American Brain Tumor Association and the Givens Brain Tumor Center at Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis. When: April 5 Where: Bowlero, Lakeville Cost: $22-$30 for adults; $220-$260 for a team of eight; ages 10 and younger can bowl for $15-$25; ages 3 and younger can attend for free. Info: bowlingforbrainsmn.org


SENIOR SERVICES DIRECTORY ACTIVITIES

WANT TO PLACE A SENIOR SERVICES AD? CALL 612-825-9205

FUN WITH THE GRANDKIDS Join us select Tuesdays from 9AM–10AM or 4PM–5:30PM

The 14th annual

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MEDICARE

Como Zoo GA 0220 2cx1.indd 1

1/10/20 4:00 PM

Medicare Questions? Call Me!

Harvey S. Perle

Licensed Agent for Senior Marketing Strategies (SMS) North Central Insurance Agency

(651) 303-8889 • harvey@perleandcompany.com www.perlesofwisdom.com

HEALTH

Horseback riding sleep-a-way camp sports & fitness academics performing arts foreign Languages outdoor adventures day camp arts & crafts . . .

Presented by

Saturday, March 7 10am –2pm @ como zoo in St. Paul

not sure what to do with the Grandkids this summer?

We can help!

SPONSORED BY

FREE parking & admission

mnparent.com/campfair

FAMILY HISTORY

CREMATION

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Swedish Motors

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ACCESSIBILITY

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Our Motto: Do it right or not at all!

Stop by and meet our newest team member, Willow!

Receive $100 OFF your purchase — mention “Good Age”

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Simple Cremation $750

Serving the Greater Twin Cities Metro Area

TECHNOLOGY

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Keen Attention to Detail

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Crescent 11/19/19 1 3:04 PM 1/21/20 11:10 AM Tide GA 1219 1cx2.2.indd

Elevators · Dumbwaiters Vertical Lifts · Stair Lifts Wheelchair Lifts Wheelchair Ramps

Exceptional Customer Service

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BUY/INSTALL / USED/NEW / LICENSED/SERVICE

The Twin Cities’ premier independent Volvo Sales & Repair Shop

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• No Hidden Costs • No Pressure to Buy

PERSONALIZED TECH HELP Private in-home assistance at your own pace for tech questions or frustrations, big or small.

952-232-9172 TechHelpByZoe @gmail.com

12/30/19 Tech 5:46 Help PM by Zoe GA 1cx2.indd11/20/19 1 2:47 PM


Brain teasers SUDOKU

WORD SEARCH Sights to See

ACROPOLIS ALCATRAZ ALHAMBRA BRANDENBURG BUCKINGHAM COLOSSEUM DISNEYLAND

REDWOOD RUSHMORE SANTORINI STONEHENGE VERSAILLES VESUVIO YELLOWSTONE

EVERGLADES GIBRALTAR GUGGENHEIM KILIMANJARO NIAGARA PETRONAS PYRAMID

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40 / March 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

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3. Machu Picchu

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TRIVIA

2. What country’s tourist attractions include the Terracotta Army and the Forbidden City?

CRYTPOGRAM The trouble with traveling back later on is that you can never repeat the same experience.

1. What’s the current name of Chicago’s tallest building, once known as the Sears Tower?

WORD SCRAMBLE Louvre, Sphinx, Eiffel

North Stars

3. What UNESCO World Heritage Site is a 15th-century Inca citadel located 8,000 feet above sea level in Peru? Sources: choosechicago.com, wikipedia.com, traveler.sharemap.org CROSSWORD

ANSWERS

Minnesota Good Age / March 2020 / 41

SUDOKU


Crossword

ACROSS

1 __-been: washed-up celeb 4 Shared again, as a story 10 Samantha Bee’s network 13 Frequently found in poetry? 14 One with a hunger 15 Go bad 16 Citrus drink in a sea breeze cocktail 19 Philosopher Kierkegaard 20 Dawn goddess 21 Bridal veil trim 22 Packed in a slatted box 25 Like bath mats 27 Frivolous legal entanglement 29 Prez on a fiver 30 “Cream of” concoction 31 Lonely place, so they say 35 Former 37 Part of rpm 42 / March 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

39 Actress Russo 40 Bury 43 Frontier lawman Wyatt 46 HBO rival, briefly 47 French luxury retailer since 1854 50 Gives a hand 53 Celebrity socialite 54 One who stirs the pot 55 Former flier 57 “Live” sign 59 2011 Dolly Parton single, and what homophonically happens twice in 16-, 27- and 47-Across 63 Night before 64 Most authentic 65 Generation __ 66 “Lust for Life” singer Lana __ Rey 67 How theater seating is arranged 68 Hurricane center

DOWN 1 Keeps to oneself 2 Early form of Latin jazz 3 Like the most twinkly sky 4 Boxing official 5 Musician’s asset 6 “Can’t deny that” 7 They might bring you to tears 8 Releases from a cage 9 Basketball’s Erving, familiarly 10 Dry run 11 Italian lawn bowling game 12 Pricey 14 Gossipy sorts 17 Podded plants 18 Coat named for an Irish province 23 “Music for Airports” producer Brian 24 Bra spec 26 Med. research agency 27 Tough spot to self-trim hair 28 Olympic swords 32 Simulated launch site 33 Taking a vacation, Brit-style 34 Lowly worker 36 English “L’chaim!” 38 Sitar master Shankar 41 Jan. and Feb. 42 Words introducing a plot twist 44 Road groove 45 Hit the buffet in a major way, say 48 “Scout’s honor!” 49 Singer Turner 50 Played a part 51 Push roughly 52 Jason of “How I Met Your Mother” 56 Guthrie of folk 58 Like avocados ready for guacamole 60 Bi- plus one 61 Tree with elastic wood 62 WWII spy gp.


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Profile for Minnesota Good Age

March 2020  

March 2020  

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