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SEPTEMBER 2019

Suzie marty A longtime curator talks life and art!

Montreal? Mais, oui! Cool local college classes for seniors The real story of Minnesota and Jesse James

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senior LIVING IN Golden Valley


DEMENTIA DIAGNOSIS? WHEN IS KEEPING YOUR FAMILY MEMBER HOME NO LONGER AN OPTION

SOMETIMES IT TAKES A VILLAGE!

Minnesota Good Age / September 2019 / 3


Contents 22

EXPLORE MONTREAL, CANADA Discover the city’s undiscovered neighborhoods where locals live, work and play.

SEPTEMBER FROM THE EDITOR 8 How you define aging is entirely up to you. And that’s a good thing!

MY TURN 10 Aging has forced me to think about what it means to be a grown-up.

MEMORIES 12 I’ve lived in apartments, condos and homes — and I’ve loved them all.

28

REAL AGING If you’re 62 or older, you can audit classes at numerous colleges for almost no cost!

MINNESOTA HISTORY 14 Northfield residents and bankers didn’t give in to a robbery in 1876.

HOUSING 16 Global Pointe Senior Living in Golden Valley is changing the senior-living landscape.

NANA & MAMA 20 After 28 years living in the same house, we took on a big move.

32

ON THE COVER Suzie Marty shares her story of opening an art gallery in Minneapolis named after her two grandsons. Photos by Tracy Walsh 6 / September 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

18

HOUSING LISTINGS

CALENDAR 38 CAN’T-MISS BRAIN 40 TEASERS


Learn more by calling 877-343-3129 or visiting

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5/23/19 2019 12:49 PM Minnesota Good Age / September /7


FROM THE EDITOR Volume 38 / Issue 9

Positively ageless PUBLISHER

Janis Hall / jhall@mngoodage.com

CO-PUBLISHER AND SALES MANAGER

Terry Gahan / tgahan@mngoodage.com

GENERAL MANAGER

Zoe Gahan / zgahan@mngoodage.com

EDITOR

Sarah Jackson / editor@mngoodage.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Mye Brooks, Ed Dykhuizen, Carol Hall, Laura Groenjes Mitchell, Julie Kendrick, Dave Nimmer, Don Parker, Mary Rose Remington, Carla Waldemar, Olivia Volkman-Johnson, Tracy Walsh

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Valerie Moe

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Dani Cunningham

AD COORDINATOR

Hannah Dittberner / 612-436-4389 hdittberner@mngoodage.com

OFFICE MANAGER

Amy Rash / 612-436-5081 arash@mngoodage.com

CIRCULATION

Marlo Johnson / distribution@mngoodage.com

37,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2019 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. To receive Good Age by mail, send a check for $18 with “Good Age subscription” in the memo.

8 / September 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

O

BY SARAH JACKSON

ne of the greatest blessings in my life right now is a group of friends I get together with every other month. We all met working at a local magazine publisher. Our work — focused on cooking, gardening and home improvement — was a dream. But the camaraderie was really special, too. We all got along swimmingly. When the business tragically closed, we didn’t want to lose our friendships. Though our ages were all over the place — early 30s, early 40s, mid-50s and 60s — we wondered if our work chemistry could stand up outside the office. Much to our delight, it did! Shortly after our workplace fully dissolved, we got together and we’ve been staying close for five years now — and have seen each other through a lot. We call the group “our tribe.” During our last gathering, as we raised our glasses in celebration, it occurred to me that whenever I’m with them — and their uniquely vibrant spirits — our ages melt away. I feel, toward myself and them, positively ageless. It’s all about perspective — how we see ourselves and how we value all our stages of life — no kids, kids, grown kids and grandkids; single, engaged, married and divorced; working and retired. Our youth-worshiping society likes to say “age really is just a number.” When we say that, I think we’re supposed to be giving ourselves a confidence boost. But when you apply that mindset to everyone around you — including younger folks, those millennials and Zs — it can be even more powerful. Take for example, this month’s amazing cover star, Suzie Marty, the founder and owner of the Everett & Charlie art gallery in Minneapolis. Though she’s a grandmother — and named her gallery after her grandsons, ages 4 and 2 — she’s as young as ever. Her shine — her “sparkle,” as one of her featured artists put it — is vibrant and youthful, yet wise and practical. What pushed her to make the move to start her own gallery? In one year, she went through a divorce as well as cancer. “It was a wake-up call,” she said. “Live life the way you want. It’s not about money; it’s about experiencing life.” What’s more is that Marty doesn’t just say such things: You can see on her face how joyful, fearless and free she is, pursuing her later-in-life dream, despite challenges, including the realities of aging and the risks of running your own business. She’s found her passion and she’s following it! Maybe that’s her secret. We should all be so ageless.


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MY TURN

Adulting for the senior set BY DAVE NIMMER

N

ow that I’m rushing headlong toward my eighth decade, the reality of aging has forced me to think about what it means to be a grown-up — showing the maturity I’ve acquired over the years: I want to be more apt to cooperate than separate; be supportive, not punitive; show courage, rather than seek comfort; do the right thing, instead of the easy one; and be less self-centered and more self-aware. These seem like worthy goals for a senior citizen, at least for those of us who didn’t really think much about the complexities and necessities of becoming an adult in earlier years. Fortunately, I have some examples of how that’s done, from people much younger than me. Government: Gov. Tim Walz, Senate Majority Leader Paul Gazelka and House Speaker Melissa Hortman gave me a lesson in cooperation when they negotiated a budget compromise during the last legislative session. Walz and Hortman, DFLers,

10 / September 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

got together with Gazelka, a Republican, for several days behind closed doors and resolved their policy differences. They not only came away with an agreement, but they also seemed to have a genuine respect for each other — and they said so. In these days of political confrontation and combat, that struck me as a victory for grown-ups everywhere. Pro sports: Whatever happens to the Minnesota Twins in the final month, the season has to be judged a success. One of the primary reasons is the young manager, Rocco Baldelli. He’s anything but a crusty curmudgeon. He’s quick to publicly support his players and to resist a worst-case scenario. As Miguel Sano struggled with strikeouts, Baldelli came to his defense. “Has he had some swing-and-miss issues over the last week or so? Maybe,” Baldelli said. “He’s also the guy who gets on base, who impacts the ball.” I believe the young players respond to that kind of support.

Education: I witnessed the courage that University of St. Thomas President Julie Sullivan showed following a racial incident on her campus. She cancelled classes and held a campus-wide student discussion on the need for diversity and decency. She was available to reporters and critics. Meanwhile, her fellow MIAC presidents, after they decided to kick St. Thomas out of the athletic conference, sought comfort in anonymity. Not one of them had a public comment. They instead hid behind an innocuous news release. Police: St. Paul Police Chief Todd Axtell — a model for doing the right thing rather than the easy one — held a press conference a few months ago that was anything but innocuous. He announced he had fired five police officers for standing around while a former St. Paul cop beat a victim with a baton and pepper-sprayed him. The chief called it a breach of duty and the public’s trust. It takes guts to fire cops and the St. Paul


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down the fort while he lived his dream. “I hope when everyone here tonight sees that No. 7 hanging in the rafters — you all know that you played a role in getting it up there,” Mauer said. “I know when I see it, I’ll think of all of you and be forever grateful.” That’s a memorable lesson in humility for me, who always liked the attention. Hell, no one even suggested retiring my typewriter. Dave Nimmer had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@mngoodage.com. Landmark Tours GA 0919 H4.indd 1

8/13/192019 2:26 / PM Minnesota Good Age / September 11


MEMORIES

Home, sweet homes BY CAROL HALL

B

ack in the 1960s, during my young, single airline-stewardess days, I shared a funky, one-bedroom furnished apartment with two Fairview Hospital nurses. It was on the second floor of a 1930s Tudor house that had been converted into apartments. It was in southeast Minneapolis, near Dinkytown.

An apartment Roomie Geri’s upright piano was squeezed into the bedroom, and there was only one bathroom. Despite cramped quarters, we three got along famously with each other, and also with the collection of bohemian characters who inhabited the other apartments in the house. U of M students, their pets and one bona fide beatnik — interacting with them was like a scene from the hilarious 1942 movie, My Sister Eileen. I haven’t had that much fun since!

My condo In 1977, I was ready to abandon roommates and live alone. Following a new trend among unmarried career women, I purchased a condominium. 12 / September 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

Previously, home ownership was almost exclusively reserved for married couples — and during that era most women fully expected to get married. However, with their consciousness raised by the women’s liberation movement, a great many decided not to wait for “Mr. Right” to come along, and decided to strike out on their own.

The Equal Credit Opportunity Act opened the door for them/us. Passed into law in 1974, the ECOA was created to ensure women and other protected groups received equal lending opportunities. Although it seems incredible today, before the act was passed, U.S. banks required single women to bring a man along to co-sign any credit application, regardless of their income. Banks also routinely charged women higher interest rates than men with comparable incomes.

Our two-story home As for me, eventually I did get married. My husband and I built a small two-story house in Woodbury. Sharing my new home with my new husband should have been a wonderful experience. However, once we moved in, neither of us particularly liked it.


The rooms seemed too small. I came to dread all the stair-climbing involved with having the laundry in the basement. The neighborhood was filled with young families. The family right next door put in a swimming pool and proceeded to have noisy late-night pool parties. Then, on one warm June evening, an unimaginable and complicated tragedy occurred in that house. It seemed everything that could go wrong did go wrong — with the horrifying conclusion that the police shot and killed the young owner, a father. A pall was cast over the neighborhood. We moved away shortly thereafter, but the shock lingered for a long while. I often reminisce about these places. Each one marked a major turning point in my life — from frivolous single woman to independent single woman to married woman. Of the three, the apartment, not surprisingly, comes to mind often. It was the best of times. I was experiencing the joie de vivre of young womanhood. The world was just opening up for me. … Who knew what lie ahead?

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Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Write to her at chall@mngoodage.com.

Minnesota Good Age / September 2019 / 13


MINNESOTA HISTORY

Defeating the Jesse James gang BY MYE BROOKS

O

n Sept. 4, 1876, Northfield First National Bank bookkeeper Joseph Heywood discussed a recent area robbery with his employer. “Do you think,” he was asked, “that under like circumstances, you would open the safe?” It was a weighty question. The vault at the First National Bank contained some $15,000, approximately $360,000 today. Rumors circulated that the amount was much higher. Heywood was adamant: “I do not think I should.” Only three days later, his resolve would be tested when the infamous James-Younger Gang rode into town, sights set on the bank. They would not find success. The shootout between the gang and townspeople on the streets of Northfield, as well as the ensuing manhunt, would spell destruction for the gang and spark Wild West fame for Northfield and its brave defenders.

Outlaws on the loose! The James-Younger Gang had its roots in post-Civil War Missouri, where former Confederate guerrilla fighters like the infamous Jesse James felt no drive to settle down. By the late 1860s, the outlaws traveled the country robbing trains, banks and stagecoaches, leaving mayhem and empty coffers in their wake. Of the gang’s style, Jesse James said: “We always rob in the glare of the day and in the teeth of the multitude.” Riding into Northfield on Sept. 7 were 14 / September 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲A collage of Minnesota citizens and James-Younger Gang members from 1876. Top left to right: August Suborn, Joseph Lee Haywood, Sheriff Glispin, Bob Younger, Charlie Pitts, Jim Younger, Cole Younger and (center) Clell Miller and Bill Chadwell. Photo courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society


Frank and Jesse James; Jim, Bob and Cole Younger; Clell Miller; Bill Chadwell; and Charlie Pitts. All concealed their guns under dusters. Prior to the robbery, they cased the area, including the bank’s interior. At around 2 p.m., Frank James, Charlie Pitts and Bob Younger entered the bank while Clell Miller and Cole Younger stayed outside to guard the door. The rest covered their escape route. Cole Younger fired a shot outside, and it was then that Northfield resident J.S. Allen uttered the famous line: “Get your guns, boys, they’re robbing the bank!”

The resistance The townspeople took up arms, some using improvised weapons, such as stones. Medical student Henry Wheeler seized a rusty Civil War rifle off of its display rack, quickly shooting Miller dead and wounding Bob Younger. The Minneapolis Tribune described the chaos as “an exciting interchange of leaden courtesies.” Inside the bank, the robbers terrorized employees. There were three men working that day, Joseph Heywood among them. They were held at gunpoint, but insisted the lock was on a timer and could not be opened. (They lied; the lock was open during business hours, but the bolts remained in place so that it looked locked.) Frustrated, one outlaw wrestled Heywood to the ground, holding a knife to his throat: “Damn you, open that door or we’ll cut your throat from ear to ear!” Though the blade drew blood, Heywood remained calm and refused.

Lives lost There was no time to overcome Heywood’s iron will. The situation outside was escalating, and Cole Younger demanded that his fellow gang members come out to flee the scene. As the gang fled with only pocket change, a frustrated Frank James shot

Heywood in the head at point-blank range. Heywood, the bookkeeper, had defended the bank, but at the cost of his life. He left behind a wife and young child, with whom he had planned a vacation in a few days’ time. Another civilian, Nicolaus Gustavson, was mortally wounded. A Swedish immigrant who didn’t understand English, Gustavson didn’t get out of the way when told, so Cole Younger shot him in the head. Not all of the gang members escaped with their lives. The town left Clell Miller and Bill Chadwell dead in the dust.

Caught, eventually Wheeler quickly rode after the escapees without even donning his boots, and the following manhunt, made up of hundreds of volunteers, was the largest in American history at the time. It took 13 days for the Watonwan County sheriff and five volunteers to corner the three Younger brothers and Charlie Pitts near Madelia, Minnesota. Pitts was killed in the skirmish, and the Youngers were arrested and sentenced to life in Stillwater State Prison, though Cole and Jim were eventually paroled. They refused to implicate the James brothers. Frank and Jesse James, meanwhile, maintained all their lives that they’d never visited Minnesota. Northfield remains proud of its slice of Wild West derring-do fame. The raid is reenacted during the annual Defeat of Jesse James Days festival every fall, Sept. 4–8 this year, featuring games, live music and other activities. The spirit of the Northfield people past and present was best summarized by the Minneapolis Tribune in 1876: “No attempt of this kind can be made in the hamlets and towns of Minnesota with impunity.” Mye Brooks is a public relations intern for the strategic communications department of the Minnesota Historical Society. Minnesota Good Age / September 2019 / 15

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HOUSING SPOTLIGHT

A new look for senior living BY SARAH JACKSON

GLOBAL POINTE SENIOR LIVING WHERE: 5200 Wayzata Blvd., Golden Valley OPENING DATE: November 2019 There’s a waiting list for reservations for independent living, assisted living and memory care apartments. AGES: 55 and older

A

lmost every day, I drive into downtown on 394. Whether I’m stuck in traffic or flying by, it’s hard not to notice all the interesting multi-story developments along the way. When Talo — a massive, modern apartment complex with the city’s “only lazy river” — rose up, I was intrigued. I looked up at it daily, imagining what it would be like to be in my 20s or 30s and sitting riverside or carousing on the rooftop deck! Well, now I have a new source of intrigue — Global Pointe Senior Living — right next door. I’ve been watching this five-story, 99-unit senior community rise for months now and it’s like nothing I’ve ever seen in housing, especially senior housing. Its architecture, for one thing, stands out: On the top story, European-style dormers — the kind you might see in a Parisian mansard roof — peek out from all sides. It also boasts an enormous five-story brick chimney with a dramatically fluted top. What is this place? It turns out, Global Pointe is a passion

16 / September 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

project for the owner/developer, hometown boy Mark Globus. While searching for senior housing for his mother — and not finding anything that quite lived up to his expectations — the idea to build a place for her was born. Globus wanted to create “a refined and luxurious environment that was big enough to deliver excellent care and amenities, but still small enough for neighbors to become friends,” said marketing director Mary Bunnell. Globus — as the managing director at Minneapolis-based Global One Commercial, the project’s developer — knew how to make it happen. St. Louis Park-based SilverCrest will manage and operate Global Pointe with a resident-focused, health-forward philosophy while offering a continuum of care that allows residents to transition from independent-living apartments to assistedliving and memory-care wings as needed. Global Pointe, despite the old-world architecture of its exterior, will be as contemporary and sophisticated as its neighbor,

NUMBER OF UNITS: 99 units, including studios, 1 bedrooms, 2 bedrooms and 1- and 2-bedroom/den units. COST RANGE FOR A SINGLE RESIDENT: $1,900–$7,800

a month, depending on apartment size and care needs. All units include utilities, phone, Internet, wifi, cable, wellness center access, scheduled transportation, programs, activities and events.

PROPERTY OPERATOR: SilverCrest Properties of St. Louis Park. SilverCrest also manages Parkshore in St. Louis Park, Village Shores in Richfield, Summit Place in Eden Prairie, Kingsley Shores in Lakeville, SilverCreek on Main in Maple Grove, Brightondale in New Brighton and Shorewood Senior Campus in Rochester.

INFO: 763-235-3468,

globalpointeseniorliving. com. To learn more, visit the community’s showroom at The Shops at West End, 1668 West End Blvd., St. Louis Park, featuring floor plans for each apartment style (all named for famous cities around the globe), fabric swatches, paint colors, fixture samples and more.


Amenities and activities ⊲ High-end lobby area and common spaces ⊲ Highly skilled on-site care team including physical therapists ⊲ Stainless appliances, granite countertops and private laundry ⊲ Chef-prepared meals made from fresh ingredients, served in a formal dining room and a more casual bistro ⊲ Wellness center with specialized cardio and strength equipment, personalized fitness programs, exercise classes and personal trainers ⊲ Full-service salon and spa ⊲ Four-season porch ⊲ Rooftop veranda with an outdoor fireplace ⊲ Dedicated spaces for entertaining guests ⊲ Art studio ⊲ Life enrichment and activities room ⊲ Billiards ⊲ Library ⊲ Movie theater ⊲ Gardens ⊲ Business center ⊲ Heated, indoor parking and storage. Rebuilding Together GA 0919 H4.indd 1

Talo, with luxury modern finishes and high-end common spaces, including a lobby with a living moss wall and a four-season porch that leads to the rooftop veranda with outdoor fireplace, to name a few. Construction is expected to be completed in late October with residents moving in as early as mid-November. And now I have another place in Golden Valley in which I can imagine myself living — eventually. Do you know of a new or interesting senior housing facility in the Twin Cities that might make a good Housing Spotlight? Write Minnesota Good Age editor Sarah Jackson at editor@mngoodage.com with the subject line Housing Spotlight.

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HOUSING RESOURCES

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CITY OF SOUTH ST. PAUL, HOUSING DIVISION The City of South St. Paul operates 296 one bedroom public housing apartments for residents aged 50+. Rent is based on 30% of tenant’s income. All utilities paid, on-site caretaker, security, after-hours answering service, community room, resident activities, laundry facilities. Call today for an appointment. South St. Paul • 651-554-3270 mostrow@sspmn.org COMMONBOND COMMUNITIES CommonBond builds stable homes, strong futures, and vibrant communities. As the largest nonprofit provider of affordable homes in the Upper Midwest, CommonBond has been building and sustaining homes with services to families, seniors, and individuals with disabilities since 1971. St. Paul • 651-291-1750 commonbond.org/findhousing

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Minnesota Good Age / September 2019 / 19


NANA & MAMA

Mother-daughter tips for making a big move NANA: Twenty-eight years: That’s how long we lived in our beloved family home on five acres southeast of the Twin Cities. There we raised three kids, two dogs, one cat and two guinea pigs. We tended a huge garden and apple orchard, and I had a private work space above our garage. Even our neighbors were wonderful! Our roots were deep and we thought we’d live there forever, but in 2012 my husband accepted a job that required us to move north of the Twin Cities. Knowing how much I loved our home, he bribed me: “If you move, I’ll buy you all new furniture.” And so began our adventure of middle-aged moving.

BY MARY ROSE AND LAURA

home changed: We let go. Decluttering: We gave away much of our furniture to needy college students (remember the bribe?) and made countless

bubble wrap and boxes. It’s best to ask for and accept help from friends, family, neighbors and co-workers. Moving is an emotional rollercoaster.

trips to Goodwill. This move provided the

With help, however, even middle-age

perfect deadline to have our grown kids

people can pull off an exciting move —

retrieve their left-behind items like drums,

and with any luck, get new furniture!

bikes and golf clubs. Listing during the holidays: Contrary to

MAMA: Two young kids (3 years old and

some opinions, our realtor said listing over

8 months old), two big dogs, one 16-foot

the holidays was a solid plan: Inventory

moving pod, two cars, one U-Haul trailer

would be low and only serious buyers

and 946 miles to go.

would be looking. He was right and we

The math was stacked against us, but

received five offers, accepting the highest

my wife and I decided to take the leap

bid, which was well over asking price.

and sell our home in Denver and upgrade

Our new home: Meanwhile, after touring

to a larger home — closer to family and friends — in Minneapolis.

Preparing to sell: We asked around, and

a dozen homes, we found a home (above)

found a good realtor who recommended we

that magically checked all our boxes. We

We haven’t finished the move yet; my

work with his colleague who was a consul-

loved both the house and property on a

parents in the Twin Cities have generously

tant in feng shui, the ancient Chinese art

beautiful lake, so we made an offer, which

let us live in their basement for a month

of creating harmonious surroundings. She

was immediately accepted.

until we close on our new house. But we’ve

made recommendations about decluttering,

Moving day: As middle-age movers, we

already learned many lessons about how

painting, decorating and curb appeal (bye-

knew our backs would be better off if we

to pull off a cross-country move with kids.

bye basketball hoop).

hired a couple young guys with muscles and

Here are my top tips to maintain your

Her most intriguing advice was to write

a large truck. They hauled everything out of

sanity along the way:

a letter to our current home. She suggested

the old house and our sons were strategically

we thank the house for all it had done for

placed at the new house, ready to unload.

our family, bless it and release it. As hokey

Lessons learned: Packing takes longer

Pack early and often: However long you think it’ll take to get everything packed, double it and get started ASAP. All of

as it may sound, my husband and I did this

than expected. One tends to run out

those little projects add up and working

and immediately our relationship to the

of packing supplies, especially tape,

around kids makes everything take

20 / September 2019 / Minnesota Good Age


longer. Break big projects into smaller tasks and chip away whenever you can. Ask for help with the kids: When people ask to help, with the move don't ask them to pack boxes. It takes way too much effort to get the packing process organized enough to be able to hand it off to someone else to pack boxes. Instead, ask them to come watch the kids so you can work on packing. Bonus points for folks who will take the kids outside the home for play time. Get the kids involved: To help your kids feel like they’re part of the move — instead of like it's something happening to them — try to find ways to get them involved. Our 3-year-old went through all of his toys, with our help, to decide what would come with us and what could be sold or donated. Older kids can help pack boxes, fold linens, label boxes, clean and more. Talk with your kids: Before the move, share what you’re excited about, what you’re going to miss and what challenges you might face along the way. Change is hard for everyone, but knowing what to expect can lessen the stress. During the move, narrate what’s happening and why, check in with your kids regularly to see how they’re feeling and try to carve out pockets of quality time to reconnect. After the move, continue to provide a listening ear and extra hugs as your kids adjust to your new home. Support them as they navigate the changes, including making new friends, learning the new neighborhood and more. Stick to a routine: There are times when the usual schedule is absolutely impossible, but young kids in particular need structure. Find ways to incorporate or build a new routine to make their day-today as predictable as possible. Mary Rose Remington, a baby boomer grandmother, and her daughter, Laura Groenjes Mitchell, a millennial mother of two, are documenting their parenting/grandparenting — and life experiences — together. Minnesota Good Age / September 2019 / 21


TRAVEL

TAKE A FOODIE TOUR OF FRENCH CANADA, INCLUDING MONTREAL Collage photos by Kiev.Victor / Shutterstock.com

Foodie finds (inset) and green spaces abound in Montreal, including Olympic Park and its Biodome, which is home to a science museum with ecosystem exhibits.

Main photo by R.M. Nunes / Shutterstock.com


AND — THREE HOURS AWAY — QUEBEC CITY, TOO! BY CARLA WALDEMAR

waitress greets me. As 'Hello-bonjour,' my does everyone I meet here in Montreal. The “hello” part welcomes English-speaking visitors, while “bonjour” employs the language of the locals. And that harmony is part of the secret sauce that seasons the magic of a visit to this city, the second-largest French-speaking town in the world (after Paris, natch). You realize, with a delicious shiver, that you’re not in Minnesota, Dorothy, but you’re spared the long and costly overseas flight, plus the attitude, traffic snarls and crowds of France’s capital. You’ll still have to change money, of course, but who doesn’t love a country in which the dollar boasts the image of a loon?

Minnesota Good Age / September 2019 / 23


⊳ ALT Hotel Montreal features modern decor in the lobby and throughout its 154 rooms in the hipster neighborhood of Griffintown. Photo courtesy of ALT Hotel Montréal Griffintown

I was paying a return visit, so this time I chose to stray beyond the historic Old Port, along the banks of the St. Lawrence River, where French voyageur Jacques Cartier first beached his boat in 1535. His home still anchors the waterfront, aside a tiny 17th-century sailors’ church. For centuries, the port he founded — and the antique limestone mansions that followed — served as the hub of the city. Only later came the souvenir shops, galleries and wine bars as the area morphed into a tourist magnet. That mecca is as vivacious as ever, but today’s experiential visitors want more. We were drawn to the city’s lively, “undiscovered” neighborhoods, where locals live, work and play, with nary a tour bus in sight. Our home was the hip, new Alt Hotel, just a 20-minute stroll from the famed harbor, 24 / September 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

hemmed in by the muscular Lachine Canal. In the Griffintown neighborhood it anchors, condos are rising on once-gritty streets as, inevitably, it starts to gentrify. So now’s the perfect time to catch the vibe in the area’s vintage shops, salons, bars and hole-in-the-wall eateries of many persuasions, overseen by splashy murals along an artery called Notre Dame West. First, check out the bustling Atwater Market of 1938, built to serve the working class in nearby tenements. Today its rainbow of pristine products includes sweet shellfish, juicy apples, savory charcuterie and fancy chocolates, to name a few. And yes, that Quebec food fave, poutine, is there, too: Think fries slathered in gravy, then topped with squeaky cheese curds. (I dare you not to become an addict.) Don’t miss the bakery with its attached café, either. Take a moment to admire (or rent)

paddleboats beached along the canal it borders, or pop into the Canal Lounge for coffee or a glass of vin. On the market’s far corner, Foiegwa (pronounce it and you’ll recognize its signature dish) is doing a brisk brunch business in Benedicts, chicken with waffles and adult milkshakes. Another day, head across town to the equally blue-collar (and venerable) Jean Talon Market, a standby of Little Italy, where a good share of its 150 stands offers All Things Maple — syrup, sugar, candy. We took the Spade & Palacio food tour, which features a hearty lunch of samples at half a dozen neighborhood stops, including — within the market itself — cured meats (sausages and ham); cheeses both sharp and aged and young and creamy; and homemade ice cream (think pear-maple-whiskey). Next, we followed our guide to a Salvadoran neighborhood to gorge


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The walled city of Quebec Quebec City, three hours’ distant from Montreal by bus or train, seems plucked from across the sea. French is the native language of nearly all its inhabitants, since the days when that land’s explorers erected a fort-like trading post on what’s now Lower Town’s prime gathering spot, Place Royale. Galleries vivid with modern art and elegant pieces sculpted by the First Nations’ Inuits vie for shoppers with dusty antiques stores and a vast food market. The city grew up along the mighty river galloping below a rising cliff you can descend by the accurately named Breakneck Stairs or a less lethal funicular beside the breathtaking fairytale that is Chateau Frontenac. Its venerable hotel rooms — and a popular café where we sated ourselves on a regal buffet brunch — have hosted the globe’s political leaders and boldname celebs (as the photos in its public spaces can attest).

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Today, this quaint town remains the only walled city in our continent. But these days, newly hot neighborhoods outside those formidable walls are capturing visitors’ attention, too. Our trendy hotel, the 3C Art de Vivre faced the Grande Allee, the ChampsElysees of the city with the Musee de Quebec across the street — a treasure house of art. Behind the 3C, Avenue Cartier, hung with lanterns that resemble oversize lampshades, intersects with Boulevard Rene Levesque, sporting a quirky mix of indie boutiques, wine bars and cafes. To plan your outside-the-box vacation, visit quebec-cite.com/en.

Photo by Paul Shio

Minnesota Good Age / September 2019 / 25


▲ Foxy, located in Montreal’s emerging Griffintown neighborhood, serves wood-fired dishes in an intimate setting (middle), including flavorful shellfish dishes (left) and other seafood (right). Photo courtesy of Foxy, Dominique Lafond, Mickael Bandassaky.

on pupas (cornmeal pancakes stuffed with beans and cheese and topped with cabbage salad). At Brasserie Harricana, we sipped Belgian-style beers, followed by sobering cold-press coffee at Dispatch Roastery. (Next door was Manitoba, a bistro celebrating the fare of Canada’s First Nations: Seal, anyone?) The tour’s finale was a picnic in Petite Italie Park, where a checkered tablecloth disappeared under platters of specialties gleaned from the American South — fried chicken, hush puppies, mac and cheese and more, courtesy of nearby Dinette Triple Crown, which gladly fills picnic baskets for visitors. Finally, we took a taxi back downtown to explore the new, block-long festival

▲ Spade & Palacio’s self-proclaimed “non-touristy tours” take small groups of visitors into lesser-known neighborhoods, often on bikes. Photo courtesy of Michael Reeder and Spade & Palacio Tours.

park called Jardins Gamelin, which arose from a dicey urban stretch to be reborn as a vibrant hangout for afterwork happy hours, Sunday brunches and everything in between. We found food and drink stands, a stage hosting free performances and green gardens where tots escaped from strollers to romp. Close by was the Village (aka Boys Town), where on summer evenings, its 26 / September 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

bustling St. Catherine Street is reserved for pedestrians to promenade under a canopy of tennis-ball-size colored lights that form the Pride flag. By dinnertime, we were somehow hungry again, so we tramped back to Griffintown to Foxy, where everything’s wood-roasted, including apps like lobster with smoked jalapeno butter and shrimp in green mole. Heavier fare included

charcoal-grilled trout, honey-mustard sausages, baby chicken and hanger steak. To plan your own off-the-grid immersion, visit Tourisme Montreal at mtl.org/en. Carla Waldemar is an award-winning food/ travel/arts writer. She edits the annual Zagat Survey of Twin Cities restaurants and writes food and travel articles for publications around the world. She lives in Uptown.


REAL AGING

George Quast of Hutchinson has taken a variety of classes at Ridgewater College, including anatomy, sociology and accounting.

Learning W for life

By Don Parker

How can you fight isolation or boredom? Go back to school (on your terms) for free!

28 / September 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

hen Doug Hanneman and I founded Good Age in 1981, one of the first subjects we wrote about was the many benefits older adults receive from taking college courses. And with all Minnesota state universities, community colleges and technical colleges offering nearly free tuition for people age 62 or older (by law), it wasn’t a hard sell. Doug and I were students on the newspaper staff at Inver Hills Community College in Inver Grove Heights in the mid-1970s. The college had an excellent journalism program at the time that spawned a top correspondent for the Star Tribune and the St. Paul Pioneer Press as well as our own budding journalism careers.


Starting out After his student days, Doug didn’t have to go far for employment. He edited a newsletter for DARTS, an agency providing services to older adults in Dakota County, which happened to be located just upstairs from where our student newspaper offices had been. But as time went on, he wanted to bring needed information to older Twin Citians beyond Dakota County. He hatched the idea of Good Age as a free-distribution newspaper in the St. Paul area, and asked me to help him get it started. As editor, Doug often included articles about the many opportunities to take classes at colleges in the area. Studies show such classes engage elders’ interests in new subjects, and keep them socially connected, too. As the newspaper found its financial footing with support from the Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, Doug continued as editor and I returned to Inver Hills to teach speech and journalism.

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Where we’ve been Doug’s success as editor of Good Age later earned him offers to edit the South Washington County Bulletin and Hutchinson Leader newspapers, from which he retired a year ago. I spent two decades fundraising for nonprofits in Washington, D.C., and returned last year to teach part time again at Inver Hills. When I returned to campus last summer, I was pleased to see Good Age — still going after 38 years — was being distributed outside the college bookstore. I let Doug know the publication we had founded was right there where our journalism studies had all started. That got us talking about how more people age 62 and older would benefit if they knew they could take classes at public colleges for almost no tuition!

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Doug serves on an advisory committee at Ridgewater College in Hutchinson, so he talked with leaders there about how to tell more people age 62 or older about the opportunity, and I started informing senior centers and others in the communities surrounding Inver Hills. Why do colleges do this? It’s the law. The Senior Citizen Education Program is part of a decades-old Minnesota statute that requires all state-supported institutions of higher education to offer free classes for seniors. (Many other status have similar laws.)

Lifelong learning A friend of Doug’s in Hutchinson, 69-year-old George Quast, has taken several classes at Ridgewater, and he’s a firm believer in their value. “I’ve learned so much from the teachers

and the other students,” Quast said. “Some of the kids are so focused and they come from all backgrounds.” Quast said his greatest satisfaction has come from his interaction with fellow students and teachers. “I’ve listened to these young people and the direction they are taking and it’s been a wonderful experience,” he said. “I like the challenge of learning from them.” Later-in-life college classes even have the potential to bring married, older-adult couples closer together: After retiring, then-70-year-old Petra Vasquez wanted to learn Spanish. Her grandparents were from Mexico, but she hadn’t learned the language growing up in South St. Paul. Her daughter, Michele Zywiec, explained: “One day, she decided to sign up for a four-credit course at Inver Hills. My dad (Mike) wanted no part of going

to school, but he ended up going to class with my mom. They had so much fun they accepted an invitation from their instructor to go on a class trip to Spain. They loved it!”

Intergenerational Even decades ago, when Good Age was still in its original newspaper format, we wrote about studies that showed attending college classes prevents social isolation among older adults, expands their horizons and interests, and that interacting with younger students was very good for both generations. “I remember when I was a sophomore at Inver Hills, I took a history class about World War II,” Doug recalled. “We had the usual younger students like me, but we also had many World War II veterans who took the class, people who were

LEARN MORE Are you 62 or older? You can take college classes at the University of Minnesota, Minnesota state universities, state community colleges and state technical colleges for almost no cost: Though most colleges charge nominal fees, tuition is free for seniors who audit classes (versus taking them for college credits). Some private colleges may also offer discounts. Here are a few public options to check out in the Twin Cities: • Anoka Ramsey Community College | tinyurl.com/ar-seniors | 763-433-1300 • Anoka Technical College | tinyurl.com/anoka-tech-seniors | 763-576-7720 • Century College | tinyurl.com/century-seniors | 651-773-1700 • Dakota County Technical College | tinyurl.com/dakota-seniors | 651-423-8000 • Hennepin Technical College​ | tinyurl.com/hennepin-seniors | 952-995-1300 • Inver Hills Community College | tinyurl.com/inver-hills-seniors | enrollment@inverhills.edu | 651-450-3503 • Metro State University | tinyurl.com/metro-state-seniors | 651-793-1300 • Minneapolis Community and Technical College | minneapolis.edu/cost-aid | 612-659-6000 • Normandale Community College | tinyurl.com/normandale-seniors | 952-358-8200 • North Hennepin Community College | tinyurl.com/north-seniors | 763-488-0391 • Ridgewater College | tinyurl.com/ridgewater-seniors | 320-234-8500 • St. Paul College | saintpaul.edu/admissions/tuition | 651-846-1600 • University of Minnesota | tinyurl.com/u-of-m-seniors | 800-400-8636 • A Senior Citizen Guide for College | tinyurl.com/college-seniors-mn 30 / September 2019 / Minnesota Good Age


I’ve learned so much from the teachers and the other students. — George Quast, 69, who has taken several classes at Ridgewater College in Hutchinson

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Don Parker and Doug Hanneman founded Good Age in 1981. Minnesota Good Age / September 2019 / 31


Live life the way you want. It’s not about money; it’s about experiencing life. It’s a dream — and you can hope all you want, but you need to take action. — Suzie Marty, owner of the Everett & Charlie gallery in Minneapolis

Photos by Tracy Walsh


The sparkle that is

Suzie Marty Longtime curator and creator Suzie Marty opened a unique Minneapolis gallery after a profound midlife wake-up call.

By Olivia Volkman-Johnson

O

V

n Mother’s Day in 2018, Suzie Marty gave birth to Everett & Charlie, figuratively speaking. And since then the Linden Hills art gallery — named for her grandsons, ages 4 and 2, respectively — has been her labor of love to create a new kind of space for local artwork as well as one-of-a-kind experiences. It all began quite serendipitously. Marty was on her way out to dinner with a friend, chatting about the possibility of opening her own gallery, when they walked past a prime storefront on 43rd Street and wondered why no one had leased it yet. “It was right next to Wild Rumpus, where I had brought my sons and then my grandsons,” Marty said. “I said, ‘This is my gallery.’” Over the next three months, Marty called in connections from artists across the Twin Cities, hoping to get at least 12 artists to showcase their work in the new gallery on consignment. Quickly, she ended up with more than 25 local artists who were seriously interested. And that was just the start.

Minnesota Good Age / September 2019 / 33


Always creating For Marty, life as an artist began the day she was born. She grew up crafting and creating — as soon as she could keep her head upright — and hasn’t stopped since. “There’s no becoming an artist — you can’t get it out of you. It’s who you were meant to be,” she said. “There’s an undercurrent of not being satisfied when you’re not giving it attention.” Though Marty didn’t grow up in a family where art was a core value, she’s chosen art every step of the way in her life — from winning a grade-school poster contest run by the Montevideo Fire Department, to practically living and

In 2012, however, she had an eye-

blowing at Anoka Ramsey and print-

opening experience: She went through a

making and watercolors at St. Cloud State

divorce and cancer in the same year.

(taught by the Coen Brothers’ mother).

“It was a wake-up call,” Marty said.

Though her gallery started out void

“Live life the way you want. It’s not about

of her own works — she’s been too busy

money; it’s about experiencing life. It’s a

cheering on the local artists she’s so fond

dream — and you can hope all you want,

of — she’s currently working on a wide

but you need to take action.”

range of pieces that will eventually have

Exploring her own art

their time in the space. That includes a collection of abstract

It was at that point when Marty made a shift

paintings, inspired by photos of prairie

to creating art informed by her experiences.

lands taken by her oldest son, paired with

“Life events are the core of where a lot of art comes from,” she said. “It can be personal.” She also stopped feeling shy about

poems written by her youngest son.

Sharing her passion Before Everett and Charlie were born,

breathing in the art wing of Anoka High

letting people see her home art studio —

Marty was already encouraging personal

School, to studying art history and educa-

and the works therein.

expression through art with her sons.

tion at St. Cloud State University. In the years following, Marty worked as an art buyer, a residential mural painter,

“I was very, ‘Nobody come in!’” Marty said. “Now? I could care less.” Marty’s most-used materials include

“When my oldest son was little, I came out of the house to see he had drawn all over the car,” Marty laughed. “But I thought, ‘Pictures first, clean later.’”

the proprietor of a gift gallery in Waconia

watercolor and acrylic painting and

and a docent at the Minneapolis Institute

mixed media, although she’s explored

of Art — mulling over, but not taking the

other avenues, too — ceramics at Minne-

rapher, while her youngest is a writer

steps to open her own gallery.

sota State University-Mankato, glass

and poet who came up with Everett &

Today, Marty’s oldest son is a photog-

There’s no becoming an artist — you can’t get it out of you. It’s who you were meant to be. There’s an undercurrent of not being satisfied when you’re not giving it attention. ▲▲Suzie Marty’s Everett & Charlie gallery features an eclectic mix of art that often serves as a lively backdrop for public and private events. 34 / September 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

— Suzie Marty, owner of the Everett & Charlie gallery in Minneapolis


▲▲Curator Suzie Marty poses with artwork from her gallery by local painter David Cook. Photos by Tracy Walsh Photography

Charlie’s tagline — “A gallery where art

edges the shifting view of how

meets experience.”

grandmothers play a role in their grand-

Though Marty can’t imagine life without her grandchildren — or “little

children’s lives. “I’m not the grandma to have them on

cubs,” as she calls them — she said it can

a weekly basis. I’m going be the one that’s

still be very surreal being a grandmother,

going to take them to art museums and

or “Oma” as she’s referred to by Everett

concerts and festivals,” Marty said. “I’m

and Charlie.

going to be the one to get them member-

“They shifted my way of living when

ships for the Duluth aquarium or zoo

Variety and quality Each month, Marty’s gallery showcases a featured artist, kicked off by an opening reception. Throughout the gallery, visitors will find numerous other art pieces for sale in a variety of media, including paintings, sculpture, jewelry, photography and even home goods and clothing. “Once people get in here, they’re

they were born — in terms of living

and then go home and talk about the

surprised about the variety, quality, depth

the life that I want to live in a way that

monkeys and draw pictures of them.”

and energy of the pieces,” Marty said.

they will be proud of me,” Marty said.

Marty said it’s especially fulfilling to be

Some notable local artists with

“There’s such a love around it, that’s hard

a female role model for her grandsons.

international acclaim include jewelry

to explain in words. But I can express it

“Since I’m a single grandma, there’s

designer Robyn Robinson and collage

As a business owner and a single mother/grandmother, Marty acknowl-

importance in that, too,” Marty said. “I’m a strong, independent woman and a grandma, doing it all on my own.”

artist Kristi Abbott. The main goal of Everett & Charlie, Marty said, is to bring in people

V

through art.”


from all walks of life, with varying

ings and other smaller celebrations.

knowledge of art, and help them find

Of course, the artists’ openings have a

pieces that speak to their experiences.

festive feel, such as Prosecco, Paintings,

“I always say, ‘The gallery is you.’

& Ed, a midday Sunday soiree this past

I’ve gotten bolder about telling people

July that featured mixed-media artist

to buy pieces that speak to them,”

and photographer Edward Bock. Bock said he appreciated how Marty

Marty said. The gallery also provides opportunities for customers to meet the artists in person.

was supportive and friendly, but also organized, business-knowledgeable and sales-motivated. “Everything an artist needs,” Bock said. “Suzie is an art lover and curator who loves organizing and arranging

They think it’s brave — it’s not brave. It’s everything I love. — Suzie Marty

artworks in her gallery to give her customers the best experience possible. Her welcoming presence is the sparkle on the art.”

Freedom to be fearless Marty’s fearlessness — and her belief

“The work will stand on its own,” she said. “But sharing stories with customers leads to that personal emotional connection.”

The ‘experience’ But it’s not just about connecting with art and artists that speaks to the gallery’s experiential niche. Everett & Charlie already has hosted live music performances, art demonstrations and author events, including a recent discussion and signing by author Annette Rugolo — all in the gallery space, amongst the art and the energy it creates. In June, the gallery created an outdoor experience with next-door neighbor The Harriet Brasserie, celebrating its sevenyear anniversary alongside the gallery’s first anniversary. In the side alley, attendees celebrated with food, drinks, art and music. ▲▲Suzie Marty named her Linden Hills gallery after her grandsons, Everett and Charlie, who are ages 4 and 2 and live in Duluth. 36 / September 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

And now Marty is teaming up with The Harriet Brasserie to host private catered events in the gallery, such as dinner parties, wine tastings, corporate gather-

that art truly has no boundaries — might be part of that magic. “There’s no judgment in art, no favorites,” she said. “It changes depending on what mood you’re in.” That freedom is expressed in her home and in the gallery. “I had a woman from out of state tell me she loved how everything is hung in here, which is how my home looks — with modern pieces next to more traditional pieces,” Marty said. Others have had similar reactions. “They think it’s brave — it’s not brave,” she said. “It’s everything I love.” As the gallery has come into its own, Marty has started to see the parallels between the gallery’s growth and that of her young grandsons. “It’s fun to see progression with both,” Marty said. “As they grow up, I want them to be able to pour the wine here and show their work here.” Olivia Volkman-Johnson is a local freelance writer, studying to become a pastry chef.


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PLATES FOR GOOD → Premier eateries, including Nolo’s Kitchen & Bar, Pagoda, Butter Bakery Cafe, Honey & Rye Bakehouse and Lucy’s Burgers, will donate a minimum of 20 percent of sales to end hunger. When: Sept. 12 Where: Twin Cities Cost: Various Info: platesforgood.org

SEPT. 12–22

THE ONE-MAN CIRCUS

THE LOONEY LUTHERANS IN YOUNG(ISH) AT HEART

→ The wacky trio is back with age-defying wisdom, music, comedy and help from the audience to create an interactive and family-friendly show. When: Sept. 11–Oct. 27 Where: Ames Center, Burnsville

SEPT. 6–8

TASTE OF GREECE → This three-day festival features authentic Greek food, live music and cultural events, all in support of three local charities. When: Sept. 6–8 Where: St. Mary’s Greek Orthodox Church, Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: mplsgreekfest.org

SEPT. 7

MINNEAPOLIS MONARCH FESTIVAL → Honor the monarch butterfly’s amazing migration from Minnesota to Mexico. Using 38 / September 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

Cost: $30–$38 Info: ames-center.com

art, music, dancing, games, native plants, prairie tours and more, the festival raises awareness of the need to provide and protect monarch habitat. When: Sept. 7 Where: Lake Nokomis Park, Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: monarchfestival.org

SEPT. 10–22

SMOKEY JOE’S CAFE → This Grammy-winning and Tony-nominated smash made history as Broadway’s longestrunning musical revue, featuring classics such as On Broadway, Stand by Me, Jailhouse Rock, Hound Dog, Love Potion No. 9, Spanish Harlem, Yakety Yak and Charlie Brown.

→ David Dimitri, a world-famous high-wire dancer and veteran of Cirque du Soleil and the Big Apple Circus, balances dramatic feats such as high-wire flips and a humancannon launch with humor, poetry and serenades on the accordion. When: Sept. 12–22 Where: L’homme Cirque will set up a big top adjacent to the Circus Juventas big top in St. Paul. Cost: $30 Info: circusjuventas.org

SEPT. 13–14

ST. PAUL OKTOBERFEST → This annual festival features a horsedrawn beer wagon parade, a stone-lifting competition, dachshund races, a kid-friendly carnival, bed races, live music and more. When: Sept. 13–14 Where: Schmidt Brewery, St. Paul Cost: FREE; a $5 wristband is required for alcohol purchases. Kinder Carnival admission is $8. Info: stpauloktoberfest.org

SEPT. 20–OCT. 20

AUBERGINE

→ A son cooks a meal for his dying father to say everything that his words can’t in this


story of an intergenerational Korean family struggling to relate across emotional, linguistic and cultural divides. When: Sept. 20–Oct. 20 Where: Park Square Theatre, St. Paul Cost: $20–$55 Info: parksquaretheatre.org

SEPT. 21–22

LAKEVILLE ART FESTIVAL → Experience the work of more than 90 juried artists, plus demonstrations, community art projects, a youth art tent, live music, food, craft beer and wine. When: Sept. 21–22 Where: Lakeville Art Center Cost: FREE Info: LakevilleArtFestival.org

SEPT. 25–28

POP-UP USED BOOK SALE → Thousands of books, movies and CDs from all seven branches of Ramsey County Library, as well as private donations, will

be sold. Most items sell for $1 or less; only cash or checks will be accepted. When: Sept. 25–28 Where: Shoreview Library Cost: FREE Info: rclfriends.org

SEPT. 25–NOV. 21

RIPCORD

→ A sunny room on an upper floor is prime real estate in the Bristol Place Senior Living Facility, so when the cantankerous Abby is forced to share her quarters with new-arrival Marilyn, she has no choice but to get rid of the infuriatingly chipper woman by any means necessary. When: Sept. 25–Nov. 21 Where: Minnesota Masonic Heritage Center, Bloomington Cost: $25–$36 Info: sidekicktheatre.com

MORE ONLINE!

Find more events at mngoodage.com/ cant-miss-calendar.

Senior Companion & Foster Grandparent GA 0619 V6.indd5/21/19 1 10:57 AM

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For more information, please call (612) 626-9490 Sponsored by the National Institute On Aging

Minnesota Good Age / September 2019 / 39

Dr Fang Yu GA 0419 V6.indd 1

8/15/19 5:14 PM


Brain teasers SUDOKU

WORD SEARCH MIArtists

BECKMANN CLOSE DELACROIX GAUGUIN LEIGHTON LORRAIN MATISSE

MODIGLIANI OKEEFFE OKUMA PARKS PIRANESI POUSSIN REMBRANDT

REYNOLDS SARGENT STELLA STUART THORVALDSEN ZORACH

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Break the code to reveal a quote from a famous person. Each letter represents another letter.

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40 / September 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

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ANSWERS

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TRIVIA 1. Frank Gehry 2. Spoonbridge and Cherry 3. Franconia Sculpture Park

Source: Maya Lin


TRIVIA

WORD SCRAMBLE Warhol, Hopper, Rubens

Land of 10,000 Artists CRYTPOGRAM I try to give people a different way of looking at their surroundings. That’s art to me.

1. The Weisman Art Museum, on the U of M campus, was designed by what famous architect? 2. Claes Oldenburg designed what gigantic fixture of the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden? 3. Speaking of sculpture, what is the name of the 43-acre park in Shafer, Minnesota, near Taylors Falls?

CROSSWORD

ANSWERS

SUDOKU

Sources: wam.umn.edu, walkerart.org,  exploreminnesota.com

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Minnesota Good Age / September 2019 / 41


Crossword

66 Johns, to Brits 67 “__ can play!”: “It’s easy!” 68 Caustic chemical 69 Bowler’s target 70 Emails

DOWN

ACROSS

1 More certain 6 Gp. with moms, dads and educators 9 “Thereabouts” suffix 12 “Men” or “teeth,” grammatically 14 One of Ringo’s set 15 __ kwon do 16 Absurd, as a scheme 17 Autodialed annoyance, often at dinnertime 19 Prof’s aides 20 System of rules 22 Protection for political refugees 23 German I 25 Philosophies: Suff. 27 Picky details 28 Computer event with a “blue screen of death” 30 Penultimate Greek letter 31 Big Pharma watchdog: Abbr. 42 / September 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

32 Suggest 34 Encroach (on) 38 Musical knack 39 Naughty 41 Black or Red waters 42 Downpour concern 44 Bills with Franklin on them 46 Good times 47 Japanese vegetable 49 Infatuated with, with “about” 50 “__ Land”: 2016 Best Picture? Not! 52 Elite English boarding school 53 Deadly “2001” computer 54 “Brideshead Revisited” novelist Waugh 56 Laundry 58 Wall St. takeover 61 Exacts revenge 63 Punctuation that Brits call a full stop 65 Guggenheim display

1 Barbecue rod 2 Arm bone 3 *Deadly “game” in “The Deer Hunter” 4 Big Band __ 5 *Ones helping with the horses 6 Expert 7 Low-pitched brass instruments 8 Cookiedom’s Famous __ 9 *Stallone nickname, with “the” 10 Henri’s “Hi” 11 Pilothouse wheels 13 Lion constellation 14 Severe reprimands, and a hint to the starts of the answers to starred clues 18 Singer Lauper 21 Slight market slide 24 St. Louis hrs. 26 Short skirt 28 Kitchen master 29 Iranian currency 31 *Trio after turtle doves 33 Paris pronoun 35 TV watchdog 36 “Wow!” 37 “No sweat” 40 Letter-shaped fastener 43 October gemstones 45 Italian hour 48 “We’re __ schedule here!” 50 Permitted by law 51 Bugs Bunny animator Tex 52 Ballade’s last stanza 55 Website with business reviews 57 Rejuvenation site 59 “__, James __” 60 Poems of praise 62 Many millennia 64 Deli bread


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September 2019  

September 2019  

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