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Agenda Book

Social Science Research Council Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program

ANNUAL GRADUATE STUDENT SUMMER CONFERENCE

Columbia University

June 18-20, 2018


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TABLE OF CONTENTS Letter from the Director ..................................................................................................................................... 1 Summer Conference Schedule ........................................................................................................................... 2 Workshops ......................................................................................................................................................... 10 Speaker Biographies.......................................................................................................................................... 15 Planning and Advisory Committee ................................................................................................................... 16 Mellon Mays PhD Fellows ................................................................................................................................. 17 Invited Guests.................................................................................................................................................... 18 SSRC Staff........................................................................................................................................................... 18 Institutional Partners ........................................................................................................................................ 19 Graduate Student Fellows in Attendance (Organized by Last Name) ............................................................ 20 Graduate Student Fellows in Attendance (Organized by Institution) ............................................................ 25 Abstracts (Organized by Last Name) ................................................................................................................ 30 SSRC Reference Materials................................................................................................................................. 65 Logistics Memorandum .................................................................................................................................... 67 Columbia University Campus Map ................................................................................................................... 70 Summer Conference Evaluation....................................................................................................................... 71


LETTER FROM THE DIRECTOR Greetings SSRC-Mellon Mays fellows: Welcome to Columbia University in the City of New York, and the Annual Graduate Student Summer Conference! I look forward to meeting each of you over the next few days. The Summer Conference is the time when the SSRC-Mellon community comes together to exchange ideas and renew our commitment to each other and the objectives of the program. This is a time to forge new relationships with your colleagues that will last throughout your professional lives. We’re especially pleased to be back at Columbia University. We were last at Columbia for the 2008 Summer Conference, where we also celebrated 20 years of MMUF with the entire community. MMUF started in 1988 with eight member schools and selected its first cohort of students in 1989. There are now 51 member institutions and consortia, including our three South African universities and the United Negro College Fund (UNCF) consortium. More than 5,000 rising juniors have become Mellon fellows over the past 30 years. Our Mellon community includes more than 750 PhDs and over 700 graduate students who are enrolled in doctoral programs. This is a tremendous accomplishment as we mark the 30th anniversary of MMUF. This vast and supportive network of Mellon fellows is ever more important during this period of intellectual and economic transition in the academy. It is also a transformative period within our own organization. As of March 2018, Dr. Elizabeth Alexander is the new president of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Dr. Alexander is a poet, writer, and scholar; most recently, was the Wun Tsun Tam Mellon Professor in Humanities at Columbia University. We look forward to learning more about her vision for the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Our schedule, as always, is filled with opportunities to connect with other Mellon Fellows from universities around the country and our South African institutions. Our plenary speakers this year are both former attendees of the Summer Conference. The conference opens with Dr. John Mckiernan-González (MMUF, Oberlin College, 1989) delivering the Benjamin E. Mays Address. This year’s Keynote Speaker is Dr. Erica Armstrong Dunbar (MMUF, University of Pennsylvania, 1992), the Charles and Mary Beard Professor of History at Rutgers University. Dr. Armstrong’s latest book, Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, was a finalist for the 2017 National Book Award for Nonfiction. The Planning and Advisory Committee has taken special care in designing workshops that address issues that you have identified. This year our workshops are designed to allow conversation around the challenges and concerns that you may have at particular stages of your graduate school career. Senior Mellon fellows will be facilitating these workshops so please come with your questions and be ready for a lively conversation. At every Summer Conference there are dynamic paper presentations by your colleagues. These sessions, as well as the Recent PhD Panel, illustrate the breadth of scholarship of the Mellon Mays community. Finally, the most important element of the Summer Conference is you. Support your friends and colleagues by being actively engaged as they present their research. Take advantage of the opportunity to expand your network beyond your cohort year and engage with fellows across generations. Lifelong friendships and professional relationships have begun at Summer Conferences. There is much to be learned from our peers in the advanced years of graduate school as well as those who are just beginning their journey. I look forward to an inspirational and rejuvenating conference as we all share these few days of fellowship and community. Warm wishes,

Cally L. Waite, Director SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program

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SUMMER CONFERENCE SCHEDULE MONDAY, JUNE 18 2:00–4:30 pm

Arrivals & Conference Registration Garden Room #2, First Floor, Faculty House

5:30–6:15 pm

Opening Remarks Presidential Ballroom, Third Floor, Faculty House

Cally L. Waite Director, SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program, Social Science Research Council Alondra Nelson President, Social Science Research Council & Professor of Sociology, Columbia University 6:15–7:00 pm

Welcome Reception Skyline Dining Room, Fourth Floor, Faculty House

7:00–9:00 pm

Welcome Dinner & Benjamin E. Mays Address Seminar Rooms, Second Floor Faculty House

John Mckiernan-González* Jerome H. and Catherine E. Supple Professor of Southwestern Studies, Texas State University 9:00–10:00 pm

* MMUF PhD

Post-Dinner Mixer (optional) Ivy Lounge, First Floor, Faculty House

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T U ESD A Y , J U N E 19 8:00–9:00 am

Breakfast Students: Ferris Booth Commons, Third Floor, Lerner Hall Bring state ID/passport and SSRC-MMGIP lanyard Guests: Ivy Lounge, First Floor, Faculty House

9:15–10:30 am

Concurrent Sessions I Class Matters Seminar Room #1, Second Floor, Faculty House

Estela Diaz, Columbia University, Sociology The Baby Ivies: Elite Preschools in New York City Annaliese Grant, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Sociology Girls Work, Too: Structures of Work for Women and Girls in Financially Unstable White Families Ayanda Manqoyi, University of California, Davis, Anthropology Assembling the Reason to Understand the New Black Middle Class in South Africa Discussant: Hanna Garth*, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of California, San Diego Claiming Space Seminar Room #2, Second Floor, Faculty House

Maria (Angie) Diaz, Yale University, American Studies Imagining Tejano: Trail Ride Geographies at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Lucero Estrella, Yale University, American Studies Japanese Migration and Settlement in Northern Mexico During the Early 20th Century Kevin Zevallos, University of Connecticut, Sociology Beyond and Within the Dreamer Narrative: Undocumented Youth Organizing and the Contestation of Citizenship Discussant: Monica Martinez*, Stanley Bernstein Assistant Professor of American Studies, Brown University

* MMUF PhD

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In the Context of Oppression Seminar Room #3/4, Second Floor, Faculty House

Zipho Falakhe, University of Cape Town, Sociology & Social and Behavioral Studies Teenage Pregnancy, Media, and Representation: Contemporary Representations of Black Femininity Through Dominant Media Discourses on Teenage Pregnancy in South Africa Lydia Koku, Rice University, Sociology The Burdens They Carry: How Black College Students Resist and Internalize Received Messages About Race and Racism Sabelo Mpisi, University of Cape Town, Social Anthropology Shit Happens! An Ethnography of Shared-Communal Toilets and Conviviality in Bhurundi, Cape Town Discussant: Brandi Summers*, Assistant Professor of African American Studies, Virginia Commonwealth University Music Make You Gain Control Garden Room #1, First Floor, Faculty House

Dina Asfaha, University of Pennsylvania, Anthropology Song, Sound, Time—In Tandem Gratia Aimée Ilibagiza Mutabazi, University of Witwatersrand, Anthropology Kwitoza: Practice in Gihozo Traditional Dance Group as Reconstructing Rwandan Refugee Identity Benjamin Salinas, Cornell University, Anthropology and Sociology The Online Music Archives of Linaje Originarios and Their Political Implications Discussant: Jeffrey Treviño*, Assistant Professor of Music, California State University, Monterey Bay 10:45 am–11:45 am

Keynote Presidential Ballroom, Third Floor, Faculty House

Erica Armstrong Dunbar* Charles and Mary Beard Professor of History Rutgers University

* MMUF PhD

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11:45 am–12:15 pm

Group Photo Morningside Park Stairs

12:15–1:15 pm

Lunch Grab and go from Garden Room #2, First Floor, Faculty House (eat anywhere)

1:15–2:30 pm

Concurrent Sessions II The Art of Identity Seminar Room #1, Second Floor, Faculty House

Angela Acosta, Ohio State University, Iberian Studies Queering the Generation of 1927 Poets: Collaborative Residences in Madrid Paul Cato, University of Chicago, Social Thought Art Has to be a Kind of Confession: Tracing the Testimonial Poetics of James Baldwin's Theology of Love Discussant: McKinley Melton*, Associate Professor of English, Gettysburg College Mediating Science Seminar Room #2, Second Floor, Faculty House

Wanda Feng, Arizona State University, Astrophysics Modeling Type Ia Supernovae Progenitors Nomanesi Makhonco, University of the Western Cape, Environment and Water Sciences Hydrogeomorphic Controls on Reedbed Persistence in Non-Perennial River Systems Sofia Martinez, University of California, Berkeley, Sociology “It’s a Shame to Feel Like You’re in the Wrong Body”: An Exploration of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Within Discourses of Gender and Medicine on Internet Forums Discussant: John Mckiernan-González*, Associate Professor of History & Jerome H. and Catherine E. Supple Professor of Southwestern Studies, Texas State University

* MMUF PhD

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What You See is Not What You Get Seminar Room #3/4, Second Floor, Faculty House

Courtney Brown, Vanderbilt University, English Literature White Masks, Passing Myths: Ambiguity, Fluidity, and Multi-Directionality of Identity in the Neo-Passing Novel Jacquelynn Jones, Brown University, American Studies Faded: Photography on the Color-Line Mercedes Trigos, New York University, English From the Border(lands): The Window in Nella Larsen’s Passing Discussant: Julius Fleming, Jr.*, Assistant Professor of English, The University of Maryland, College Park 2:45–3:30 pm

Plenary Panel Presidential Ballroom, Third Floor, Faculty House

Debbie Cheng Program Officer, SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program, Social Science Research Council Rita Colon-Urban Distinguished Teaching Professor, SUNY Old Westbury & Regional Liaison, Ford Foundation Fellows Daniella Sarnoff Director, International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF) Program, Social Science Research Council 3:30–4:00 pm

Afternoon Snack Skyline, Fourth Floor, Faculty House

4:00–5:15 pm

Workshops Fellows Entering Graduate School A Seminar Room #1, Second Floor, Faculty House

Rayna Truelove Program Officer, Mellon Mays Gap Assistance Program, The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation Lisa Calvente, Kaysha Corinealdi

* MMUF PhD

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Fellows Entering Graduate School B Seminar Room #2, Second Floor, Faculty House

Anna Hidalgo, Kenton Rambsy Fellows Entering Graduate School C Seminar Room #3/4, Second Floor, Faculty House

Julius Fleming, Jr., Brandi Summers First-Year Fellows A Skyline Dining Room, Fourth Floor, Faculty House

Hanna Garth, Jeffrey Treviño First-Year Fellows B Skyline Dining Room, Fourth Floor, Faculty House

Jeffrey Coleman, Monica Martinez Second- and Third-Year Fellows A Garden Room #1, First Floor, Faculty House

Fareeda Griffith, Mckinley Melton Second- and Third-Year Fellows B Garden Room #2, First Floor, Faculty House

Michael Ralph, Elizabeth Todd-Breland South African Fellows Ivy Lounge, First Floor, Faculty House

Ayanda Manqoyi, Sindiso Mnisi Weeks 5:15–6:30 pm

Break

7:00–10:00 pm

Dinner Offsite Harlem Tavern, 2153 Frederick Douglass Blvd.

See map for walking directions from the Faculty House to the Harlem Tavern. After dinner, please do not walk back to Columbia through Morningside Park. You can use your Lyft credits to share a ride back to Wallach Hall.

* MMUF PhD

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W EDN ES DA Y, J U N E 2 0 8:00–9:00 am

Breakfast Students: Ferris Booth Commons, Third Floor, Lerner Hall Bring state ID/passport and SSRC-MMGIP lanyard Guests: Ivy Lounge, First Floor, Faculty House

9:15–10:30 am

Recent PhD Panel Presidential Ballroom, Third Floor, Faculty House

Robert Bland*, Assistant Professor of History, St. John’s University Lizeth Gutierrez*, Consortium for Faculty Diversity Postdoctoral Fellow in American Studies, Macalester College Sandy Placido*, Visiting Assistant Professor of History, Oberlin College Braxton Shelley*, Stanley A. Marks and William H. Marks Assistant Professor at the Radcliffe Institute & Assistant Professor of Music, Harvard University Moderator: Kenton Rambsy*, Assistant Professor of English and Digital Humanities, University of Texas at Arlington 10:40–11:55 am

Concurrent Sessions III Campus Contestations Seminar Room #1, Second Floor, Faculty House

Elizabeth Barahona, Northwestern University, History The History of Latinx Students at Duke University Christina Chica, University of California, Los Angeles, Sociology Articulating the Boundaries of Community: A Comparative Oral History Project with LGBTQ Princeton Alumni Noemi Linares-Ramirez, University of California, Irvine, Sociology Dropping the Indian: Social Movement Influence Over Mascot Change at Colleges and Universities Discussant: Kaysha Corinealdi*, Assistant Professor of History, Emerson College

* MMUF PhD

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States of Surveillance Seminar Room #2, Second Floor, Faculty House

Xavier Durham, University of California, Berkeley, Sociology Violence on the Market: Race and the Privatization of Police and Surveillance Technology in Urban Brazil Mbali Mazibuko, University of the Witwatersrand, Sociology Loss, Rage and Laughter: Texturing Protest Action against Sexual Violence on the South African Campus and its Existence Online Allegra Taylor, University of Delaware, English A Transatlantic Tapestry: Alexander Hamilton, the Marquis de Sade, and an Age of Revolution and Slavery Discussant: Fareeda Griffith*, Associate Professor and Chair of Anthropology & Sociology, Denison College Styling Images Seminar Room #3/4, Second Floor, Faculty House

Ruby Bafu, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Sociology The Impact of Mothers on the Racial Identity Making Process of Black Women with Natural Hair in the United States and the Dominican Republic Kelsey Desir, Duke University, English Deconstructing Controlling Images: Delusions of Control and Strength Mbalenhle Matandela, University of Oxford, Interdisciplinary Area Studies #PairofButtocks: Digital Feminist Contestations and Academic Freedom in Uganda Discussant: Lisa Calvente*, Assistant Professor of Intercultural Communication and Performance Studies, DePaul University 12:00–12:30pm

Closing Remarks and Evaluations Presidential Ballroom, Third Floor, Faculty House

Debbie Cheng Program Officer, SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program, Social Science Research Council 12:30–1:30 pm

Lunch Grab and go from Skyline Dining Room, Faculty House (eat anywhere)

1:30 pm

Checkout & Departures

* MMUF PhD

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WORKSHOPS W or k sh op s: N av i gat i n g t h e Gr ad u a t e Sc h ool Exp e r i e n c e One of our goals at the SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program is to support fellows throughout their graduate school career. There are issues central to where you are in your graduate school career, whether you are a recent graduate entering a PhD program, or in your first through third years of graduate school. These workshops provide the opportunity for you to ask questions about your individual experiences, as well as learn from seasoned Mellon fellows who have completed the PhD. We have divided you into groups according to your year in graduate school so that the conversation can focus solely on your questions and concerns. The unwritten title for these sessions is, “everything you wanted to know about graduate school but haven’t been able to ask.” The colors below correspond to the stickers on the back of your name tags. Fellows Entering Graduate School A BLACK Room: Seminar Room #1, Second Floor

First-Year Fellows B GREEN Room: Skyline Dining Room, Fourth Floor

Fellows Entering Graduate School B YELLOW Room: Seminar Room #2, Second Floor

Second- and Third-Year Fellows A PINK Room: Garden Room #1, First Floor

Fellows Entering Graduate School C BLUE Room: Seminar Room #3/4, Second Floor

Second- and Third-Year Fellows B PURPLE Room: Garden Room #2, First Floor

First-Year Fellows A RED Room: Skyline Dining Room, Fourth Floor

South African Fellows LIME GREEN Room: Ivy Lounge, First Floor

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Gr o u p A ssi g n m e n t s Fellows Entering Graduate School Group A (BLACK, Seminar Room #1, Second Floor)

Group B (YELLOW, Seminar Room #2, Second Floor)

Group C (BLUE, Seminar Room #3/4, Second Floor)

Facilitators: Lisa Calvente Kaysha Corinealdi

Facilitators: Anna Hidalgo and Kenton Rambsy

Facilitators: Julius Fleming, Jr. and Brandi Summers

Guests: Rayna Truelove, Ritu Mukherjee

Ruby Bafu Elizabeth Barahona Candace Borders Kevin Cruz Lucero Estrella Cassandra Flores-Montano Jekara Govan Lydia Koku Wendyliz Martinez Sophia Monegro Byron Nunez Sana Saboowala

Kimberly Broughton Kelsey Desir Xavier Durham Ann Ho Kimya Loder Amari Mitchell Marissa Ochoa Ifetayo Olutosin Cristian Padilla Romero Jeniffer Perales Garcia Maria Plascencia Natalie Solis Allegra Taylor

Alexa Aburto Roberto Ackerman Austin Alvarez Adriana Ceron Chayanne Marcano Sofia Martinez Jasmine Montoya Ayaan Natala William Oh Olivia Porte Brenda Quintana Sharee Rivera Paul Salamanca Benjamin Salinas Hassani Scott

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First-Year Fellows

Group A (RED, Skyline Dining Room, Fourth Floor)

Group B (GREEN, Skyline Dining Room, Fourth Floor)

Facilitators: Hanna Garth and Jeffrey TreviĂąo

Facilitators: Jeffrey Coleman and Monica Martinez

Aliyah Abu-Hazeem Angela Acosta Dina Asfaha Andie Berry Rene Cordero Alexandria Cunningham Annaliese Grant Jinna Kim Hector Peralta Maria Ramirez Blaque Robinson Amanda Rodriguez

Casidy Campbell Jessica Covil Patricia Ekpo Jazmine Exford Jacquelynn Jones Kerby Lynch Estefani Marin Alexandra Odom Golden Owens Jordan Victorian Yosef Washington Luna White Second- and Third-Year Fellows

Group A (PINK, Garden Room #1, First Floor)

Group B (PURPLE, Garden Room #2, First Floor)

Facilitators: Fareeda Griffith and McKinley Melton

Facilitators: Michael Ralph and Elizabeth Todd-Breland

Courtney Brown Tiesha Cassel Paul Cato Astride Charles Christina Chica Stephanie Davis Lavaisa Ezell Jeremy Gallion Ahmad Greene-Hayes Jovonna Jones Alvin Kim Noemi Linares-Ramirez Ali McTar Jamaal Muwwakkil Jomaira Salas Pujols Connie Wang

Hazim Abdullah-Smith Andrea Adomako Estela Diaz Maria (Angie) Diaz Wanda Feng Warren Harding Hadiya Jones Andrew Kim Katrina Miller Erica Sterling Amoni Thompson-Jones Shondrea Thornton Mercedes Trigos Nadeja Webb Domonique Young Kevin Zevallos 12


South African Fellows (LIME GREEN, Ivy Lounge, First Floor)

Facilitators: Ayanda Manqoyi and Sinidiso Mnisi Weeks Maphelo Batyi Paballo Abel Chauke Anell Daries Zipho Falakhe Boniswa Gelese Khadra Ghedi Alasow Kaylin Harrison Gratia AimĂŠe Ilibagiza Mutabazi Robert La Vita Ayanda Mahlaba Nomanesi Makhonco Rhulani Maluleke Sikelelwa Mashiyi Mbalenhle Matandela

Mbali Mazibuko Thando Mcunu Sithembiso Mdlalose Athenkosi Mndende Sabelo Mpisi Nondwe Mpuma Javier Perez Charlise Peteren Mogammad Yaaseen Samuels Given Sigauqwe Qiniso Van Damme Jan-Louise Victoria Lewin Zukolwenkosi Zikalala

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SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES J O H N M C KI ER N A N - GO N Z Á LEZ John Mckiernan-González is the Director of the Center for the Study of the Southwest, the Jerome and Catherine Supple Professor of Southwestern Studies, and an Associate Professor of History at Texas State University. He is a 1991 MMUF graduate from Oberlin College, and a 2002 graduate of the program in history at the University of Michigan. His first book, Fevered Measures: Public Health and Race at the Texas-Mexico Border, 1848-1942 (Duke: 2012), treats the multi-ethnic making of a U.S. medical border in the Mexico-Texas borderlands. He co-edited the volume, Precarious Prescriptions: Contested Histories of Race and Health in North America (University of Minnesota, 2013), which examines the contradictions and complexities tying medical history and communities of color together. His broad takes on Latina/os in U.S. medical history can be found in the OAH and National Park Service collaborative, American Latinos in the Making of the United States and in Keywords in Latina/o Studies (NYU: 2017). He has worked with the Smithsonian Institution, the Kellogg Foundation, the Nettie Lee Benson Library, and AMSA on a variety of collaborative public history projects. His next project, Working Conditions: Medical Authority and Latino Civil Rights tracks the changing place of medicine in Latina/o/x struggles for equality. Born in the U.S., he grew up in Colombia, Mexico, and the U.S. South and brings a migrant eye and experience to his projects in public history, medical history, and Latino studies.

ER I C A A R M ST R O N G D U N B A R Erica Armstrong Dunbar is the Charles and Mary Beard Professor of History at Rutgers University. Her publications, teaching, and documentary appearances have placed her among a small number of African American women scholars who study black life, culture, and gender up to the Civil War. Dunbar entered MMUF at the University of Pennsylvania, where she majored in History and African American Studies, and received her Ph.D. in History from Columbia University. Dunbar’s first book, A Fragile Freedom: African American Women and Emancipation in the Antebellum City was published by Yale University in 2008. Her newest book, Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge, is a startling and eye-opening look into America’s First Family. Never Caught was named as a 2017 non-fiction finalist for the National Book Award. In addition to her monographs, Dunbar has published peer-reviewed essays that have appeared in collections by Yale and NYU Press, has co-edited a special issue of Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography on the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, and has penned numerous book reviews and encyclopedia entries. She serves on the editorial board for the Race in the Atlantic World series (UGA Press) and was selected as a Distinguished Lecturer for the Organization of American Historians. In 2011, Dunbar made history by becoming the inaugural Director of the Program in African American History at the Library Company of Philadelphia, the nation’s first library and one of its oldest cultural institutions.

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PLANNING AND ADVISORY COMMITTEE The Planning and Advisory Committee (PAC) is the key link between Mellon fellows and program staff. Members provide indispensable intellectual and programmatic leadership for the SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program during their two-year terms. One of the primary responsibilities of the PAC is to contribute to the intellectual organization of the Annual Graduate Student Summer Conference. The PAC represents the diversity of the SSRC-Mellon Mays community, and it is an important mechanism for channeling the scholarly expertise and mentorship capabilities of the Mellon PhDs back into the program.

201 7– 20 18 R O ST ER Anna Hidalgo Graduate Student, Sociology Columbia University

Dr. Sindiso Mnisi Weeks Assistant Professor, School for Global Inclusion and Social Development University of Massachusetts, Boston

Dr. Monica Martinez Assistant Professor, American Studies Brown University

Dr. Calandra Tate Moore Data Scientist U.S. Federal Government

Dr. John Mckiernan-González Jerome H. and Catherine E. Supple Professor of Southwestern Studies Texas State University

Jaime Sánchez, Jr. Graduate Student, History Princeton University

Dr. McKinley Melton Associate Professor, English Gettysburg College

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MELLON MAYS PHD FELLOWS Dr. Robert Bland Assistant Professor, History St. John’s University

Dr. Sandy Placido Visiting Assistant Professor, History Oberlin College

Dr. Lisa Calvente Assistant Professor, Intercultural Communication and Performance Studies DePaul University

Dr. Michael Ralph Associate Professor, Social and Cultural Analysis & Director, Metropolitan Studies Program New York University

Dr. Jeffrey Coleman Assistant Professor, Spanish Marquette University

Dr. Kenton Rambsy Assistant Professor, English and Digital Humanities University of Texas at Arlington

Dr. Kaysha Corinealdi Assistant Professor, History Emerson College

Dr. Braxton Shelley Stanley A. Marks and William H. Marks Assistant Professor, Radcliffe Institute & Assistant Professor, Music Harvard University

Dr. Erica Armstrong Dunbar Charles and Mary Beard Professor of History Rutgers University

Dr. Brandi Summers Assistant Professor, African American Studies Virginia Commonwealth University

Dr. Julius Fleming, Jr. Assistant Professor, English University of Maryland College Park

Dr. Elizabeth Todd-Breland Assistant Professor, History The University of Illinois at Chicago

Dr. Hanna Garth Assistant Professor, Anthropology University of California, San Diego

Dr. Jeffrey TreviĂąo Assistant Professor, Music California State University, Monterey Bay

Dr. Fareeda Griffith Associate Professor and Department Chair, Anthropology and Sociology Denison University Dr. Lizeth Gutierrez Consortium for Faculty Diversity Postdoctoral Fellow in American Studies Macalester College

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INVITED GUESTS

SSRC STAFF

M M U F C O O R DI N A T O R S

Dr. Alondra Nelson President

Kathy Erasmus University of Cape Town

Dr. Daniella Sarnoff Program Director, International Dissertation Research Fellowship

Dr. Genevieve Hundermark University of the Witwatersrand Dr. Ariella Lang Columbia University

SSR C - M ELLO N M A Y S GR A D U A T E I N I T I A T I V ES PR O GR A M

Dr. Tamara Mose Brown Brooklyn College

Dr. Cally L. Waite Program Director

Dr. Carmen Pérez-Marín University of Puerto Rico

Dr. Debbie Cheng Program Officer

Dr. Almeida Jacqueline Toribio The University of Texas at Austin

Julia Fernandez Program Assistant

F O R D F ELLO W SH I P

Lucio Rojas Program Assistant

Dr. Rita Colón-Urban SUNY Old Westbury

Brian Bahe Administrative Assistant Dr. Deidre Flowers Consultant Matt Coshal Consultant Adam Coshal Intern Nicole Robinson Evaluator

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INSTITUTIONAL PARTNERS T H E A N D R EW W . M ELLO N FOUNDATION

W O O DR O W W I LSO N N A T I O N A L F ELLO W SH I P F O U N D A T I O N

Dr. Armando Bengochea Program Officer and Director of MMUF The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Dr. Stephanie J. Hull Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

Lee Bynum Senior Program Associate and Associate Director of MMUF The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Dr. Rayna Truelove Program Officer, Mellon Mays Programs Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

Elizabeth Foley Program Associate The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Ina Noble Program Associate, Mellon Mays Programs Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

Emma Taati Program Associate The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Ritu Mukherjee Program Associate, Mellon Mays Fellows Professional Network Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

Chris Jo Program Assistant The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Zaidi Rivera Program Assistant The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

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GRADUATE STUDENT FELLOWS IN ATTENDANCE (ORGANIZED BY LAST NAME) Name

Field of Study

Graduate Institution

Hazim Abdullah-Smith

American Studies Sociology English Sociology Iberian Studies African American Studies History Anthropology Sociology History Area Studies English American Studies Rhetoric and Composition English American Culture

University of Maryland University of Notre Dame Undecided Undecided Ohio State University Northwestern University Undecided University of Pennsylvania University of Wisconsin-Madison Northwestern University University of the Western Cape Yale University Yale University Purdue University Vanderbilt University University of Michigan

African American Studies and Philosophy Social Thought Sociology Comparative Literature Environmental and Geographical Sciences Sociology History English

Pennsylvania State University University of Chicago Undecided University of Pennsylvania University of Cape Town University of California, Los Angeles Brown University Duke University

Aliyah Abu-Hazeem Alexa Aburto Roberto Ackerman Angela Acosta Andrea Adomako Austin Alvarez Dina Asfaha Ruby Bafu Elizabeth Barahona Maphelo Batyi Andie Berry Candace Borders Kimberly Broughton Courtney Brown Casidy Campbell Tiesha Cassel Paul Cato Adriana Ceron Astride Charles Paballo Abel Chauke Christina Chica Rene Cordero Jessica Covil

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Graduate Entry Year 2016

2017 ----2017 2015 --2017 2018 2018 2016 2017 2018 2018 2016 2017 2016 2015 --2016 2015 2016 2017 2017


Name

Field of Study

Graduate Institution

Kevin Cruz

Chicana/o Studies African and African Diaspora Studies History English English Sociology American Studies

University of California, Los Angeles University of Texas, Austin University of the Western Cape Vanderbilt University Duke University Columbia University Yale University

Sociology American Studies American Studies Linguistics English Sociology Astrophysics American Studies English and American Studies Area Studies Geography English Sociology African American Studies and Religion Africana Studies Urban Studies English Anthropology American Studies

University of California, Berkeley Yale University Yale University University of California, Santa Barbara University of California, Riverside University of Cape Town Arizona State University University of Southern California University of Pennsylvania University of the Western Cape University of Cape Town University of California, Riverside University of Wisconsin-Madison Princeton University Brown University University of Cape Town University of Pennsylvania University of the Witwatersrand Brown University

Alexandria Cunningham Anell Daries Stephanie Davis Kelsey Desir Estela Diaz Maria (Angie) Diaz Xavier Durham Patricia Ekpo Lucero Estrella Jazmine Exford Lavaisa Ezell Zipho Falakhe Wanda Feng Cassandra Flores-Montano Jeremy Gallion Boniswa Gelese Khadra Ghedi Alasow Jekara Govan Annaliese Grant Ahmad Greene-Hayes Warren Harding Kaylin Harrison Ann Ho Gratia AimĂŠe Ilibagiza Mutabazi Jacquelynn Jones

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Graduate Entry Year 2018

2017 2018 2016 2018 2016 2015 2018 2017 2018 2017 2016 2018 2015 2018 2016 2017 2018 2018 2017 2016 2015 2018 2018 2018 2017


Name

Field of Study

Graduate Institution

Jovonna Jones

African American Studies Sociology Anthropology English Sociology Sociology English

Harvard University Princeton University Northwestern University University of Pennsylvania University of California, Irvine Rice University University of the Western Cape

Gender Studies Sociology Sociology Geography History Environment and Water sciences Development Anthropology Anthropology Sociology Sociology English Anthropology Area Studies Sociology English Environmental Humanities Sociology Physics

University of Cape Town University of California, Irvine Stanford University University of California, Berkeley University of Cape Town University of the Western Cape Stellenbosch University University of California, Davis Undecided University of California, Irvine Undecided Pennsylvania State University University of the Western Cape University of Oxford University of the Witwatersrand Princeton University University of Cape Town University of the Witwatersrand University of Chicago

Hadiya Jones Andrew Kim Alvin Kim Jinna Kim Lydia Koku Robert La Vita Jan-Louise Victoria Lewin Noemi Linares-Ramirez Kimya Loder Kerby Lynch Ayanda Mahlaba Nomanesi Makhonco Rhulani Maluleke Ayanda Manqoyi Chayanne Marcano Estefani Marin Sofia Martinez Wendyliz Martinez Sikelelwa Mashiyi Mbalenhle Matandela Mbali Mazibuko Ali McTar Thando Mcunu Sithembiso Mdlalose Katrina Miller

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Graduate Entry Year 2016

2015 2016 2016 2017 2018 2016 2015 2015 2018 2017 2017 2017 2017 2017 --2017 --2018 2017 2017 2017 2015 2017 2018 2016


Name

Field of Study

Graduate Institution

Amari Mitchell

English Linguistics African and African Diaspora Studies Gender Studies Social Anthropology English Linguistics

Rutgers State University University of the Western Cape University of Texas, Austin Undecided University of Cape Town University of the Western Cape University of California, Santa Barbara

Africana Studies and Government Political Science Ecology and Evolutionary Biology History Anthropology Comparative Literature and Media Studies Media Studies Latin American History Latin American Studies American Studies Sociology Arts American Studies Art History American Studies Anthropology Rhetoric and Interdisciplinary Studies Sociology Sociology

Undecided University of Pennsylvania University of California, Los Angeles University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill Undecided University of Southern California Northwestern University Yale University University of Texas, Austin Yale University University of Cape Town University of the Western Cape Yale University Undecided Undecided University of California, Irvine Undecided University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill University of California, Santa Barbara

Athenkosi Mndende Sophia Monegro Jasmine Montoya Sabelo Mpisi Nondwe Mpuma Jamaal Muwwakkil Ayaan Natala Byron Nunez Marissa Ochoa Alexandra Odom William Oh Ifetayo Olutosin Golden Owens Cristian Padilla Romero Jeniffer Perales Garcia Hector Peralta Javier Perez Charlise Petersen Maria Plascencia Olivia Porte Brenda Quintana Maria Ramirez Sharee Rivera Blaque Robinson Amanda Rodriguez

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Graduate Entry Year 2018

2018 2018 --2017 2018 2016 --2018 2018 2017 --2018 2017 2018 2018 2017 2018 2016 2018 ----2017 --2017 2017


Name

Field of Study

Graduate Institution

Sana Saboowala

Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology Sociology Sociology Anthropology Environmental and Geographical Science Africana Studies Politics

Univeristy of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Undecided Rutgers State University Undecided University of Cape Town Undecided University of the Witwatersrand

Theological Studies History English Gender Studies Gender Studies English Social Anthropology Gender Studies Philosophy Philosophy English Sociology English Sociology African Literatures

Harvard University Harvard University University of Delaware University of California, Santa Barbara University of California, Los Angeles New York University University of Cape Town University of California, Santa Barbara Vanderbilt University University of Pennsylvania Vanderbilt University University of Illinois, Chicago University of Maryland University of Connecticut University of the Witwatersrand

Paul Salamanca Jomaira Salas Pujols Benjamin Salinas Mogammad Yaaseen Samuels Hassani Scott Given Sigauqwe Natalie Solis Erica Sterling Allegra Taylor Amoni Thompson-Jones Shondrea Thornton Mercedes Trigos Qiniso Van Damme Jordan Victorian Connie Wang Yosef Washington Nadejda Webb Luna White Dominique Young Kevin Zevallos Zukolwenkosi Zikalala

24

Graduate Entry Year 2018

--2015 --2018 --2017 2018 2016 2018 2016 2015 2015 2017 2017 2016 2017 2015 2017 2016 2016 2017


GRADUATE STUDENT FELLOWS IN ATTENDANCE (ORGANIZED BY INSTITUTION) Name

Field of Study

Graduate Institution

Wanda Feng

Astrophysics History Africana Studies American Studies Sociology English English African American Studies Theological Studies History English African American Studies History Anthropology Media Studies Iberian Studies

Arizona State University Brown University Brown University Brown University Columbia University Duke University Duke University Harvard University Harvard University Harvard University New York University Northwestern University Northwestern University Northwestern University Northwestern University Ohio State University

African American Studies and Philosophy English African American Studies and Religion Sociology English Rhetoric and Composition Sociology English

Pennsylvania State University Pennsylvania State University Princeton University Princeton University Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers State University

Rene Cordero Warren Harding Jacquelynn Jones Estela Diaz Jessica Covil Kelsey Desir Jovonna Jones Natalie Solis Erica Sterling Mercedes Trigos Andrea Adomako Elizabeth Barahona Andrew Kim Golden Owens Angela Acosta Tiesha Cassel Wendyliz Martinez Ahmad Greene-Hayes Hadiya Jones Ali McTar Kimberly Broughton Lydia Koku Amari Mitchell

25

Graduate Entry Year 2015

2017 2015 2017 2016 2017 2018 2016 2018 2016 2015 2015 2018 2016 2017 2017 2016 2018 2016 2015 2015 2018 2018 2018


Name

Field of Study

Graduate Institution

Jomaira Salas Pujols

Sociology Sociology Development English Sociology History Sociology

Rutgers State University Stanford University Stellenbosch University Undecided Undecided Undecided Undecided

Anthropology Sociology Gender Studies Africana Studies and Government Anthropology Art History American Studies Rhetoric and Interdisciplinary Studies Sociology Anthropology Africana Studies Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology Sociology Geography Anthropology Sociology Sociology Sociology Anthropology

Undecided Undecided Undecided Undecided Undecided Undecided Undecided Undecided Undecided Undecided Undecided University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign University of California, Berkeley University of California, Berkeley University of California, Davis University of California, Irvine University of California, Irvine University of California, Irvine University of California, Irvine

Kimya Loder Rhulani Maluleke Alexa Aburto Roberto Ackerman Austin Alvarez Adriana Ceron Chayanne Marcano Sofia Martinez Jasmine Montoya Ayaan Natala William Oh Olivia Porte Brenda Quintana Sharee Rivera Paul Salamanca Benjamin Salinas Hassani Scott Sana Saboowala Xavier Durham Kerby Lynch Ayanda Manqoyi Jinna Kim Noemi Linares-Ramirez Estefani Marin Maria Ramirez

26

Graduate Entry Year 2015

2018 2017 ------------------------------2018 2018 2017 2017 2017 2015 2017 2017


Name

Field of Study

Graduate Institution

Christina Chica

Sociology Chicana/o Studies Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Gender Studies English English Linguistics

University of California, Los Angeles University of California, Los Angeles University of California, Los Angeles University of California, Los Angeles University of California, Riverside University of California, Riverside University of California, Santa Barbara

Linguistics Sociology Gender Studies Gender Studies Environmental and Geographical Sciences Sociology Geography Urban Studies Gender Studies History Environmental Humanities Social Anthropology Sociology Environmental and Geographical Science Social Anthropology Social Thought Physics Sociology English

University of California, Santa Barbara University of California, Santa Barbara University of California, Santa Barbara University of California, Santa Barbara University of Cape Town University of Cape Town University of Cape Town University of Cape Town University of Cape Town University of Cape Town University of Cape Town University of Cape Town University of Cape Town University of Cape Town University of Cape Town University of Chicago University of Chicago University of Connecticut University of Delaware

Kevin Cruz Marissa Ochoa Shondrea Thornton Lavaisa Ezell Jekara Govan Jazmine Exford Jamaal Muwwakkil Amanda Rodriguez Amoni Thompson-Jones Jordan Victorian Paballo Abel Chauke Zipho Falakhe Khadra Ghedi Alasow Kaylin Harrison Jan-Louise Victoria Lewin Ayanda Mahlaba Thando Mcunu Sabelo Mpisi Javier Perez Mogammad Yaaseen Samuels Qiniso Van Damme Paul Cato Katrina Miller Kevin Zevallos Allegra Taylor

27

Graduate Entry Year 2016

2018 2018 2015 2016 2018 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2015 2018 2018 2018 2015 2017 2017 2017 2018 2018 2017 2015 2016 2016 2018


Name

Field of Study

Graduate Institution

Luna White

Sociology American Studies English American Culture History Sociology Sociology

University of Illinois, Chicago University of Maryland University of Maryland University of Michigan University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill University of Notre Dame

Area Studies Anthropology Comparative Literature English and American Studies English English Political Science Philosophy American Studies Comparative Literature and Media Studies African and African Diaspora Studies African and African Diaspora Studies Latin American Studies Area Studies History Area Studies English Environment and Water sciences Anthropology

University of Oxford University of Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania University of Southern California University of Southern California University of Texas, Austin University of Texas, Austin University of Texas, Austin University of the Western Cape University of the Western Cape University of the Western Cape University of the Western Cape University of the Western Cape University of the Western Cape

Hazim Abdullah-Smith Dominique Young Casidy Campbell Alexandra Odom Blaque Robinson Aliyah Abu-Hazeem Mbalenhle Matandela Dina Asfaha Astride Charles Jeremy Gallion Ann Ho Alvin Kim Byron Nunez Yosef Washington Cassandra Flores-Montano Ifetayo Olutosin Alexandria Cunningham Sophia Monegro Jeniffer Perales Garcia Maphelo Batyi Anell Daries Boniswa Gelese Robert La Vita Nomanesi Makhonco Sikelelwa Mashiyi

28

Graduate Entry Year 2017

2016 2016 2017 2017 2017 2017 2017 2017 2016 2016 2018 2016 2018 2017 2018 2018 2017 2018 2018 2016 2018 2017 2016 2017 2017


Name

Field of Study

Graduate Institution

Athenkosi Mndende

Linguistics English Arts Anthropology Sociology Sociology Politics

University of the Western Cape University of the Western Cape University of the Western Cape University of the Witwatersrand University of the Witwatersrand University of the Witwatersrand University of the Witwatersrand

African Literatures Sociology Sociology English English Philosophy English English American Studies American Studies American Studies American Studies Latin American History American Studies American Studies

University of the Witwatersrand University of Wisconsin-Madison University of Wisconsin-Madison Vanderbilt University Vanderbilt University Vanderbilt University Vanderbilt University Yale University Yale University Yale University Yale University Yale University Yale University Yale University Yale University

Nondwe Mpuma Charlise Petersen Gratia AimĂŠe Ilibagiza Mutabazi Mbali Mazibuko Sithembiso Mdlalose Given Sigauqwe Zukolwenkosi Zikalala Ruby Bafu Annaliese Grant Courtney Brown Stephanie Davis Connie Wang Nadejda Webb Andie Berry Candace Borders Maria (Angie) Diaz Patricia Ekpo Lucero Estrella Cristian Padilla Romero Hector Peralta Maria Plascencia

29

Graduate Entry Year 2018

2018 2016 2018 2017 2018 2017 2017 2018 2017 2016 2016 2016 2015 2017 2018 2015 2017 2018 2018 2017 2018


ABSTRACTS (ORGANIZED BY LAST NAME) Page

Name

Year

Field of Study

Institution

Paper Title

35

Angela Acosta

1st Year

Iberian Studies

Ohio State University

Queering the Generation of 1927 Poets: Collaborative Residences in Madrid

36

Dina Asfaha

1st Year

Anthropology

University of Pennsylvania

Song, Sound, Time—In Tandem

37

Ruby Bafu

Graduating Senior

Sociology

University of WisconsinMadison

The Impact of Mothers on the Racial Identity Making Process of Black Women with Natural Hair in the United States and the Dominican Republic

38

Elizabeth Barahona

Graduating Senior

History

Northwestern University

The History of Latinx Students at Duke University

39

Courtney Brown

2nd Year

Literature

Vanderbilt University

White Masks, Passing Myths: Ambiguity, Fluidity, and Multi-Directionality of Identity in the Neo-Passing Novel

40

Paul Cato

2nd Year

Social Thought

University of Chicago

Art Has to be a Kind of Confession: Tracing the Testimonial Poetics of James Baldwin's Theology of Love Articulating the Boundaries of Community: A Comparative Oral History Project with LGBTQ Princeton Alumni Deconstructing Controlling Images: Delusions of Control and Strength

41

Christina Chica

2nd Year

Sociology

University of California, Los Angeles

42

Kelsey Desir

Graduating Senior

English

Duke University

30


Page

Name

Year

Field of Study

Institution

Paper Title

43

Estela Diaz

2nd Year

Sociology

Columbia University

The Baby Ivies: Elite Preschools in New York City

44

Maria Diaz

3rd Year

American Studies

Yale University

Imagining Tejano: Trail Ride Geographies at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo

45

Xavier Durham

Graduating Senior

Sociology

University of California, Berkeley

Violence on the Market: Race and the Privatization of Police and Surveillance Technology in Urban Brazil

Lucero Estrella

Graduating Senior

American Studies

Yale University

Japanese Migration and Settlement in Northern Mexico During the early 20th Century

46

47

Zipho Falakhe

1st Year

Sociology

University of Witwatersrand

Teenage Pregnancy, Media and Representation: Contemporary Representations of Black Femininity Through Dominant Media Discourses on Teenage Pregnancy in South Africa

48

Wanda Feng

3rd Year

Astrophysics

Arizona State University

Modeling Type Ia Supernovae Progenitors

Sociology

University of WisconsinMadison

Girls Work, Too: Structures of Work for Women and Girls in Financially Unstable White Families

Anthropology

University of Witwatersrand

Kwitoza: Practice in Gihozo Traditional Dance Group as Reconstructing Rwandan Refugee Identity

49

Annaliese Grant

50

Gratia AimĂŠe Ilibagiza Mutabazi

1st Year

1st Year

31


Page

Name

Year

Field of Study

Institution

Paper Title

51

Jacquelynn Jones

1st Year

American Studies

Brown University

Faded: Photography on the Color-Line

52

Lydia Koku

Graduating Senior

Sociology

Rice University

The Burdens They Carry: How Black College Students Resist and Internalize Received Messages about Race and Racism

53

Noemi LinaresRamirez

3rd Year

Sociology

University of California, Irvine

Dropping the Indian: Social Movement Influence Over Mascot Change at Colleges and Universities

54

Nomanesi Makhonco

2nd Year

Environmental & Water Sciences

University of the Western Cape

Hydrogeomorphic Controls on Reedbed Persistence in Non-Perennial River Systems

55

Ayanda Manqoyi

Graduating Senior

Anthropology

University of California, Davis

Assembling the Reason to Understand the New Black Middle Class in South Africa

56

Sofia Martinez

Graduating Senior

Sociology

University of California, Berkeley

“It’s a Shame to Feel Like You’re in the Wrong Body”: An Exploration of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Within Discourse of Gender and Medicine on Internet Forums

57

Mbalenhle Matandela

Graduating Senior

Interdisciplinar y Area Studies

University of Oxford

#PairofButtocks: Digital Feminist Contestations and Academic Freedom in Uganda

58

Mbali Mazibuko

2nd Year

Sociology

University of Witwatersrand

c

32


Page

Name

Year

Field of Study

Institution

Paper Title

59

Sabelo Mpisi

2nd Year

Social Anthropology

University of Cape Town

Shit Happens! An Ethnography of SharedCommunal Toilets and Conviviality in Bhurundi, Cape Town

60

Benjamin Salinas

Graduating Senior

Anthropology

Cornell University

The Online Music Archives of Linaje Originarios and their Political Implications

61

Allegra Taylor

Graduating Senior

English

University of Delaware

A Transatlantic Tapestry: Alexander Hamilton, the Marquis de Sade, and an Age of Revolution and Slavery

62

Mercedes Trigos

3rd Year

English

New York University

From the Border(lands): The Window in Nella Larsen’s Passing

63

Kevin Zevallos

2nd Year

Sociology

University of Connecticut

Beyond and Within the Dreamer Narrative: Undocumented Youth Organizing and the Contestation of Citizenship

33


34


Angela Acosta Ohio State University Iberian Studies First Year Queering the Generation of 1927 Poets: Collaborative Residences in Madrid

Compilers of anthologies of twentieth century Spanish poetry consider ten male poets as core members of the Generation of 1927. These poets took inspiration from surrealism and they inhabited the same social spheres, such as meeting regularly at the Residencia de Estudiantes in Madrid. For decades, scholars maintained a canon that excluded women writers involved with the Residencia de Se oritas, an institution for women's education in Madrid. As a result, women writers' works were rendered invisible in Spain and abroad, disregarding the fact that women were involved in the same circles during this period. Clearly, the canonical dichotomization of inclusion vs. exclusion, male vs. female results in a problem for scholars attempting to get the full picture of literary activity in 1920s Madrid. A Queer approach does away with the binaries proliferated by literary anthologies, to approach the spectrum of artistic involvement that nuances the poetic careers of both men and women. In this paper, I expand the institutions associated with the Generation of 1927 by examining the interactions between the Residencia de Estudiantes and Residencia de Se oritas through socio-historical analysis. I argue that activities at the two residences demonstrate how male and female poets began to write and identify as poets under similar circumstances of community building and scholarly discussion. This paper thus applies Queer Theory to queer the canon of the Generation of 1927 as a simultaneous development of male and female poets' careers across diverse artistic spaces.

35


Dina Asfaha University of Pennsylvania Anthropology First Year Song, Sound, Time—In Tandem

The Eritrean Armed Struggle for Independence is unorthodox not only in its duration of thirty years, but in its struggle against another African country and imperial force in the Horn region Ethiopia. At a time in the world where blatant Western imperialism was still occurring and the major players in the international arena consisted of countries such as the U.S., the Soviet Union, and Cuba, the Eritrean cause was unpopular and to some, a baseless cause. In addition to garnering the warfare technology necessary to defeat the small nation of Eritrea from the Soviet Union, Ethiopia became the recipient of guerrilla military training from Cuba and as many as 16,000 Cuban soldiers. I want to amplify the three decades of struggle and dissect how exactly this time was experienced by those entrenched in the quotidian nature of violence, catastrophe, and a seemingly un-concluding war up until May 1991. What type of labors were Eritreans engaging in order to actualize the national project against a power such as Ethiopia? While my broader research questions are concerned with the weaponization of sound to unite Eritreans near and far, for this paper, I turn specifically to the genre of revolutionary music that emerged during this period as one major instrument in the Eritrean toolkit against Western and Ethiopian imperialism, among other tools of war. I argue that this body of musical literature, sung and recorded in Eritrean languages, was a platform to foster intimacy, recalibrate time, and conceptualize post-colonial Eritrean society.

36


Ruby Bafu University of Wisconsin-Madison Sociology Graduating Senior The Impact of Mothers on the Racial Identity Making Process of Black Women with Natural Hair in the United States and the Dominican Republic

This paper will discuss the sociology of motherhood and examine the impact of mothers on the hair practices of Black women with natural hair in the United States and the Dominican Republic. Specifically, it focuses on the impact that Black mothers have on their daughter’s racial identity making process and racial understandings of “good” versus “bad” hair. I argue that the way Black mothers raise their daughters to think about their hair impacts how their daughters view themselves and the world around them. Drawing on 20 in-depth interviews approved by the Institutional Review Board and consisting of college students and professors who work or study at Cornell University as well as college students and women in the workforce from Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, this study has two main goals: first, to describe the power that Black mothers have in teaching their daughters about the political, gendered and racial aspects of Black natural hair in the Dominican Republic and the United States. Second, to analyze how Black women shape their racial identity based on what their mothers teach them about the social acceptability of Black hair.

37


Elizabeth Barahona Northwestern University History Graduating Senior The History of Latinx Students at Duke University

This thesis uncovers the history of Latinx students at Duke University since the arrival of the first Latinx student Class of 1926 Andres Rodriguez Diago Y Gomez --to the protests and demands that led to the creation of La Casa, a space dedicated to Latinx students in 2017. This thesis investigates how Latinx students racially identified themselves since their arrival, and how the Duke University administration identified them, at a time when Duke felt encapsulated in a Black/White racial paradigm. Since their arrival to Duke in 1926, Latinx students were racially identified as other. This distinction that is was neither Black nor White, allowed for Latinx students to attend the racially segregated university. From 1926 to the late 1950s, Latinx students did not consistently unite as a community, organization, or under a common identity. Instead, some Latinx students organized nonconsecutively as part of the Cosmopolitan, Alien, International and Pan-American club. In the 1950s, students began to consolidate themselves as a Spanish-speaking community but not as a community based on a common ancestry, ethnicity or race. This thesis traces how a disconnected group of students became the Latinx community that protested eighty-nine years later.

38


Courtney Brown Vanderbilt University English Literature Second Year White Masks, Passing Myths: Ambiguity, Fluidity, and Multi-Directionality of Identity in the Neo-Passing Novel

At the end of the 20th century, Danzy Senna’s Caucasia and other “millennial passing,” or ‘neopassing,’ novels take up the issue of passing anew in order to examine uncharted realms of identity formation—to talk about identity outside, around, and beyond the strictly delineated racial categories and other community boundaries demanded by earlier decades, as evidenced in such canonical novels as Nella Larsen’s Passing. By the turn of the 20th century, a shift in identity politics has opened up new space for novels like Caucasia to explore characters and communities with more fluidity, expansiveness, and multi-directionality of identity formation. Through Caucasia, Senna makes the case for a much more expansive conceptualization of identity and community than Larsen’s Passing could allow, blurring the borders of identification and allegiance in order to explore the fluid grey space between what we may think of as fixed race/class identities or community groups. Senna’s neo-passing novel takes on the passing trope not to retell a tired and damaging ‘tragic mulatta’ tale, but rather to insist that there can be mulattas without tragedy; that the undefined space between whatever we might mean when we say ‘authentic’ blackness and ‘authentic’ whiteness is also a viable space from which to derive a sense of identity; that individuals need not be a static reflection or provide a ‘sincere’ performance of some monolithic community; and that identity formation can be a fluid, multifaceted, and multidirectional process.

39


Paul Cato University of Chicago Social Thought Second Year Art Has to be a Kind of Confession: Tracing the Testimonial Poetics of James Baldwin's Theology of Love

In a 1961 interview with Studs Terkel, James Baldwin described art as a means of self-reflection and storytelling, arguing that all “art has to be a kind of confession” and insisting that “if you can examine and face your life, you can discover the terms with which you are connected to other lives, and they can discover them, too.” Baldwin’s writing is filled with anecdotes and personal stories that convey broad religious and philosophical truths – a form of discourse that theologian Rebecca Chopp terms a “poetics of testimony.” Employing literary, sociohistorical, and philosophical analyses, I argue that Baldwin’s numerous testimonies lay the groundwork for a love-based spirituality, wherein moments of intimacy, vulnerability, and selflessness foster connections with the divine and provide salvation here on earth. By telling powerful stories of love’s capacity to save, inspire, and heal, Baldwin presents his moral message in a highly persuasive and accessible manner, a fact evidenced by the public’s continuous engagement with his work. Drawing on the writings of Paul Ricoeur and Shoshana Felman, I outline three registers of testimony within Baldwin’s oeuvre – that of “confession,” that of “witnessing,” and that of “prophecy” – and I consider the role each register plays in promoting Baldwin’s philosophy of love. Finally, I close by reading Baldwin alongside the testimonial works of contemporary black creatives such as Kerry James Marshall, Edwidge Danticat, and Barry Jenkins, and I consider whether their uses of testimony might bear insights similar to Baldwin’s.

40


Christina Chica University of California, Los Angeles Sociology Second Year Articulating the Boundaries of Community: A Comparative Oral History Project with LGBTQ Princeton Alumni

Elite private universities have historically excluded students based on gender, race, ethnicity, and religion among other qualities. The expansion of admission has developed alongside efforts to frame university communities with diversity language and to create resources for students from these groups. Some institutions that have historically excluded marginalized students are now actively incorporating them into institutional history. The Princeton LGBTQIA Oral History Project is an example of one such effort at Princeton University to archive alumni experience. As part of this project, I conducted thirtyfour oral histories with alumni that graduated between 1970 and 2010 currently living in California. As part of a more recently established category of identity with varying levels of visibility, LGBTQ students provide a unique lens into how marginalized students historically understand their place in and are shaped by experiences in institutions of higher education. My work follows a tradition of historical and narrative grounding in Sociology to answer questions about meaning making, identity, and the boundaries of community. Using these interviews as data, I ask: How have university resources influenced LGBTQ student experience over time and how does membership in different university communities shape the life course after college? My findings demonstrate the influence of LGBTQ visibility, personal networks, larger historical events such as the onset of HIV, and other group affiliations on identity formation, career trajectory, and social ties. These personal narratives illuminate both how institutions affect individuals and how individuals affect the construction of institutional history.

41


Kelsey Desir Duke University English Graduating Senior Deconstructing Controlling Images: Empathizing with the Strong Black Woman

The 1970s and early 80s are an appropriate moment to look at works published by Black women authors, most notably those that explore and center their struggle against racism and sexism. Black women's systematic power is quite limited in the United States. Therefore, assessing expressive culture is particularly important because it allows them to exercise significant agency. During the 70s and 80s, Black women used literature as a medium to portray themselves on their own terms and divorce their identity from externally-defined controlling images. This paper builds on the work of Patricia Hill Collins and considers controlling images to be negative and harmful representations that are continuously perpetuated by hegemonic culture, the subject, and projected onto the Black woman, the object. In particular, the Strong Black Woman trope is one of the main distorted images of Black womanhood that these texts grapple with. This paper will assess two major approaches Black women authors adopt in an effort to realize self-definition. For instance, Maya Angelou's poem "Still I Rise," in valorizing resistance, also opens the possibility for the reader to overlook the underlying issues that Black women face. Toni Cade Bambara takes another approach with The Salt Eaters. In this novel, she restores the Black woman to her human form by materializing Black female pain and labor. This paper ultimately asserts that the second approach is necessary in order for Black women to reclaim the Black female body and image.

42


Estela Diaz Columbia University Sociology Second Year The Baby Ivies: Elite Preschools in New York City

How are elites reproducing at the earliest stage of schooling? There are decades of independent, interdisciplinary research that overwhelmingly agrees: early schooling plays an significant role in improving a child's chance of academic, social, and financial success in their adult lives (Ă–zar 2012; Heckman 2006). Within sociology, there has been a rapid expansion of studies seeking to illuminate the mechanisms and reproduction of elite culture, particularly within schooling institutions (Lareau 2011). These studies highlight what elite reproduction looks like at the high school (Khan 2011), college (Karabel 2005), and post-college levels (Rivera 2015). To better understand how preschool faculty, staff, and parents reproduce elite status in the preschool admissions process, I will conduct a three-phase, longitudinal ethnography using: a comparative case study of two different elite preschools in NYC, a set of at least ten (10) parents applying to those schools, educational consultants, and the Parents League of New York, a coalition of parents and schools that provide advising on the admissions process. This research will use a multi-method approach that includes ethnographic fieldwork, in-depth interviews, informal interviews, and substantial participant observation. In this presentation, I will highlight findings from phase one of my research with interviews of parents who have gone or are currently going through the application process. Given the simultaneous expansion of free preschool and the highly concentrated wealth of elite preschools in New York City, there is no better place or time to conduct this research.

43


Maria (Angie) Diaz Yale University American Studies Third Year Imagining Tejano: Trail Ride Geographies at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo

In February 1974, after traveling to Reynosa, Mexico from Houston, Texas, Los Vaqueros Rio Grande trail riders waited to cross the US-Mexico border. En route to the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo opening parade, their trip signaled a broader inclusion of Tejanos within the three-week event. By focusing on Los Vaqueros Rio Grande Valley from 1974-1989, this presentation will illustrate how the group reoriented the Rodeo to be a celebration of Texas-Mexican history beyond land disposition and labor exploitation. This participation occurred in the context of Rodeo’s echos of frontier development and in era of increasing security at the border and nativist resurgence that marked the period’s bounds of exclusion. Using archival sources, this presentation looks to the role of cultural memory as articulated via Tejano imaginaries of space, history, and heritage. It follows Deborah Vargas’s notion that Tejano collectively hails a call to remember. Los Vaquero’s journey coordinated a regional claim of belonging by retracing early cattle drives, and their engagement with Tejano borderland communities created spaces to reconcile the racialization projects represented by the Rodeo. By re-historicizing Tejano relationships to rodeo, the group created enduring sites for Mexican Americans to participate in Houston’s civic life, navigate racialized landscapes, and envision being Texan alongside the tokenism bestowed by Rodeo stewards. Their annual wind through canyons of downtown Houston represents a prism into the ways that Mexican Americans in Houston navigated the affective geographies of Tejano amidst evolving discursive spaces of latinidad.

44


Xavier Durham University of California, Berkeley Sociology Graduating Senior Violence on the Market: Race and the Privatization of Police and Surveillance Technology in Urban Brazil

White populations anxiety over urban criminality in Brazil has spurred surveillance technology consumption and hiring of private security since the 1980s. Today, this technology, namely ClosedCircuit Television (CCTV) cameras, and private policing are necessary urban elements in cities such as Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo. Through this fear, privatized surveillance markets pose a growing problem for Afro-Brazilian populations in terms of urban violence and exclusion. With private and technology-based coercion compromising the state’s violence monopoly, what is the state’s role in violence today? To answer this question, this project places surveillance theory in conversation with Brazilian racial discourse through a self-surveillance case study in the Jacarezinho favela. Following the analysis, it concludes that we should label surveillance privatization as a process of market-fueled structural violence. Such a shift broadens our understanding of surveillance from observation to physical manifestations of racialized documentation and control.

45


Lucero Estrella Yale University American Studies Graduating Senior Japanese Migration and Settlement in Northern Mexico During the Early 20th Century

This paper presents an overview of Japanese migration to Mexico during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, with attention to the settlement of Japanese migrants in the northern Mexican states. Specifically, it examines Japanese migration that resulted from the start of diplomatic relations between Mexico and Japan and the internal migration of Japanese migrants from their original ports of entry throughout Mexico to northern Mexico. In 1888, Mexico and Japan signed the Treaty of Friendship, Commerce and Navigation that gave Japan an opportunity to grow its presence abroad and opened Mexico to Japanese investments. Later during the early twentieth century, the United States' restrictive immigration policies, such as the Gentlemen's Agreement of 1907, changed the course of Japanese immigration to North and South America. While some of these migrants viewed settlement in the northern states of Mexico as an opportunity to get closer to the United States, others sought job opportunities in railroad construction, mines, agriculture, and fishing, and hoped to remain in northern Mexico. By examining Japanese agricultural records, Japanese immigration documents, and Mexico's census data, I seek to asses why Japanese migrants began settling in northern Mexico, particularly in the states of Baja California, Sonora, Sinaloa, and Coahuila, and how this led to the creation of communities of Japanese migrants and Japanese Mexicans.

46


Zipho Falakhe University of Cape Town Sociology & Social and Behavioral Studies First Year Teenage Pregnancy, Media and Representation: Contemporary Representations of Black Femininity Through Dominant Media Discourses on Teenage Pregnancy in South Africa

Teenage pregnancy rates in South Africa have steadily been decreasing over the past two decades, as evident in national statistics. However, the popular discourse in the media invokes moral panic, framing teenage pregnancy as an increasing societal crisis (Mkhwananzi, 2012: 73; Macleod, 1999: 1). The central research question asks; how do dominant discourses in the South African media on teenage pregnancy construct representations of black femininity? Using Critical discourse analysis to analyse the dominant discourses that emerge from two local and two national newspaper articles on teenage pregnancy in the year 2017. I argue that teenage pregnancy is framed as emanating from particular bodies rather than structural forms of governance and representations. My findings were that the dominant discourses represented black femininity as hypersexual, deviant and over fertile (Magubane, 2001: 817; Vaughan, 1991). Such a discourse has great potential in misguiding health intervention strategies and framing health phenomena’s such as HIV/AIDS for young black women. Particularly when young black women are already the most vulnerable to HIV infection in Southern Africa. Viewing teenage pregnancy within the context of racism, social discrimination, inequality and sexism illustrates how discourses hidden in text (Macleod, 2002: 648) are structured by dominance, and that dominance structures are legitimated by ideologies of powerful groups, and become naturalized, which is the effects of power (Wodak & Meyer, 2001).

47


Wanda Feng Arizona State University Astrophysics Third Year Modeling Type Ia Supernovae Progenitors

Type Ia supernovae are known as standardizable candles because their magnitudes may be used as distance indicators. Studies of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have yielded evidence for the expansion of the universe - a Nobel-prize worthy discovery (Perlmutter et al., 1999; Riess et al., 1998). Yet, the nature of SNe Ia progenitor systems and their underlying mechanism are not well understood. There are two competing hypothetical progenitor scenarios: the single-degenerate scenario wherein a white dwarf star accretes material from a companion star; and, the double-degenerate scenario where two white dwarf stars merge. Several lines of observational evidence support the former scenario. In this study, we investigate the single degenerate scenario by varying white dwarf properties, the composition of the accreting material, and the treatment of convection in the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA). We find that the accretion of solar composition material onto carbon-oxygen white dwarf stars yield white dwarfs that grow toward the Chandrasekhar mass limit. This suggests that these systems result in SNe Ia explosions.

48


Annaliese Grant University of Wisconsin-Madison Sociology First Year Girls Work, Too: Structures of Work for Women and Girls in Financially Unstable White Families

A wide range of scholarly work investigates the crucial roles women’s emotional and physical labor has in the family, with women often doing more physical tasks in the home and more emotional and unpaid labor in general. Most of this literature looks exclusively at the labor adult women engage in, assuming the traditional generationally-specific structure in which adults work and children are simply the targets and/or beneficiaries of that work. Parents work and children get cared for. However, research on low-income family structures suggests that a slightly different model may also exist, in which children, too, engage in family labor of some kind starting from much younger than the middle class norm. This research looks at how work in financially unstable white families is distributed between women and girls of all ages in a family structure, and when and how girls begin performing labor in the family. To answer these questions, this research focuses on 35 total interviews from mothers and their adult daughters, recounting the full history of work women and girls performed inside and outside the family. With girls who begin “working” in some capacity for the family as young as 6 years old, this work hopes to make visible the kinds of labor in which girls from low-income and financially unstable families may engage and perhaps point us toward a re-conception of the scope of women’s work from a more age- and class-specific perspective.

49


Gratia AimĂŠe Ilibagiza Mutabazi University of Witwatersrand Anthropology First Year Kwitoza: Practice in Gihozo Traditional Dance Group as Reconstructing Rwandan Refugee Identity

The figure of the refugee is one of the most familiar yet misunderstood in the contemporary global imagination. Popular representations of refugees tend to present them as helpless victims of circumstances beyond their control, while even radical scholars such as Agamben (1998) write of the refugee as the embodiment of bare life. The voices, narratives and experiences of refugees is often drowned out among intervention and integration programs, political policies, and the stamp of humanitarianism which further marginalizes and undermine their agency in creating and determining their identity. Refugee identity and its space in society and discourse is thus often explored so that it may inform how refugees can be pragmatically dealt with, in the places they reside in. Drawing inspiration from critical theorists such as Weheliye (2008) and Nietzsche (1967), in this paper I show how one community of refugees my own makes life, time and value beyond the immediate present. I present an auto-ethnographic account of Gihozo, a Rwandan traditional dance group in Johannesburg. Using the framework of kwitoza (to practise; to exercise), I trace how the participants of Gihozo creatively make the world anew through improvisations with space, the movements of their bodies through dance, and how they engage dialogically with different kinds of audiences that position them in relation to different scales of context. These audiences range from Non-Government Organisations (NGOs) and civil society structures on the one hand; and intra-community functions such as marriage parties and political memorials on the other.

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Jacquelynn Jones Brown University American Studies First Year Faded: Photography on the Color-Line

In 1932, Caroline Bond Day published an anthropological study titled “A Study of Some NegroWhite Families in the United States.” Day’s study, divided into three sections, includes family histories, anthropometric data, personal photographs, and sociological observations for approximately 350 ‘Negro-White’ families. Framed around a single photograph from Day’s collection, this project asks the following questions: How might this photograph disrupt the 20th Century racial binary? And, how does this photograph continue to speak to the mixed-race experience?

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Lydia Koku Rice University Sociology Graduating Senior The Burdens They Carry: How Black College Students Resist and Internalize Received Messages about Race and Racism

At predominantly white institutions, Black students often engage in various forms of on-campus activism in order to affect change. This presentation highlights one key finding from the last chapter of my thesis, which examines how 10 Black students at Bryn Mawr and Haverford make meaning of the work they do in response to racism. Seven of ten students have internalized a definition of activism that solely refers to engagement in protests, boycotts and demonstrations. Students who avoid this work comment on the ways in which a lack of emotional support from their institutions (while organizing) harms their mental health and sense of agency.

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Noemi Linares-Ramirez University of California, Irvine Sociology Third Year Dropping the Indian: Social Movement Influence Over Mascot Change at Colleges and Universities

This article analyzes how and why almost every U.S. college and university with a Native American mascot dropped its stereotypical Indigenous representations in sports team names and images between 1968 to 2015. This study uses the Qualitative Comparative Analyses (QCA) method to examine which conditions led to schools dropping their Native American mascot. This study shows the different patterns of social movement characteristics, movement target characteristics, and concession costs for schools that changed their Indian mascot over time. The schools in the first period had lowsports popularity and faced little resistance against the change, which resulted in few or no perceivable costs for conceding. The schools in the second period had higher sports popularity and internal pressure against the change. During this period, however, the NCAI (National Coalition of American Indians) acquired additional support from diverse social justice organizations, which underscored that Indian mascots were perceived as racist and exclusive by a broader constituency. This broad-based support made it more likely that schools with Indigenous mascots would incur reputation costs for keeping them. The schools in the third period resisted change notwithstanding the broad-based coalition for change. These schools had higher sports popularity, and, as a result, they had powerful pressure against dropping the mascot from students and alumni, which resulted in economic threats. These schools only changed their mascots when the NCAI collaborated with the NCAA, which shifted the balance of costs and benefits of change.

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Nomanesi Makhonco University of the Western Cape Environment and Water Sciences Second Year Hydrogeomorphic Controls on Reedbed Persistence in Non-Perennial River Systems

SA is a water scarce country and has been ranked amongst the driest countries in the world. SA is classified as a semi-arid country and has an annual rainfall of 450mm per year, which is very low when compared to the world’s average of 860mm per year. It is predicted that due to variability in rainfall, the interior of SA may become more arid and that flow in rivers may become more variable. The country is prone to extreme events such as droughts and floods. With the country’s rainfall variability said to rise and with the demand for water, there also rises a need to understand the functioning and management of these river systems not only for human consumption but also for environmental water allocations. This study will be investigating some of the factors that allow for reedbeds {which are very important for the ecology of the river} to persist in the “harsh” conditions that characterise Non-Perennial River Systems (NPRS). The water act provides that water be set out for both humans and the environment. River systems can be broadly classified into two types; perennial rivers which flow all year round and NPRS which are rivers that do not flow all year round. NPRS remain poorly understood because a large amount of research has been focused on perennial rivers. NPRS constitute 70% of South African rivers.Globally NPRS constitute more than 50% of the global network.

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Ayanda Manqoyi University of California, Davis Anthropology First Year Assembling the Reason to Understand the New Black Middle Class in South Africa

The presentation is a close engagement with scholarship on the black middle class in postapartheid South Africa. Focusing on the individual as the unit of analysis, research on class in the South African context has solely been based on income/occupation as the main determinant of middle-class location and the consumption patterns of Black professionals. Relating affluence that is determined by income and conspicuous consumption to race and consumption, some studies have suggested that an over-the-top use and display of material goods should be understood as an expression of individual identity and agency since liberation. Yet none of these arguments rest on micro-level analysis. By drawing on a few ethnographic examples, this paper argues that the black middle class as individuals are constituted through complex and negotiated relationships. By focusing on these contemporary studies formation of class among black people in South Africa, I draw on Weber and Bourdieu’s theorization of class and distinction. Anthropological perspective and methodologies contributing to the study of black urban residents with the aim to provide emic perspectives describing class stratification contribute to contemporary studies on the black middle class as free autonomous beings. The presentation concludes by suggesting an analysis of class to reflect lived experiences needs to locate the individual within the relations that constitute certain kinds of obligations.

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Sofia Martinez University of California, Berkeley Sociology Graduating Senior “It’s a Shame to Feel Like You’re in the Wrong Body”: An Exploration of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Within Discourse of Gender and Medicine on Internet Forums

This project examines how people with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) understand gender identity and interpret medical knowledge on social networks such as Reddit.com and Soulcysters.net. After PCOS was first identified in 1935, the criteria for diagnostics and the etiology of the syndrome has been widely contested amongst practitioners of endocrinology. Although PCOS is a heavily researched condition within a biomedical framework, there is a lack of social investigation concerned with how people describe and embody the condition. However, within the little social scientific literature one thing is made clear: PCOS is a syndrome that disrupts conventional notions of womanhood and femininity. Amongst affected women, the condition is notoriously known for manifestations of thick facial hair growth, cystic ovaries, balding, infertility and absent or irregular menstrual cycles. Drawing upon discourse analysis and open coding, I argue that recounted experiences on social media (re)define the term PCOS in ways that interrupt the two-sex model. Research concerning narratives of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome complicates modern understandings of human variation, as well as scientific and social configurations of being. PCOS is embedded in rhetoric that begs to question where it is that pathology begins and standards of beauty, ability and health end.

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Mbalenhle Matandela University of Oxford Interdisciplinary Area Studies First Year #PairofButtocks: Digital Feminist Contestations and Academic Freedom in Uganda

The age of digital power and development has given political, social and economic contestations a space for belonging and greater political participation. Feminist activism in the African context is understood as "the political praxis that emanates from a very cogent analysis of the political, economic and social conditions which shape African women's lives" (Salo, 2001: 60). African women's activism online is intertwined with offline activism, which provides possibilities for development in feminist praxis and for the challenge of gendered norms and parameters of academic freedom. With the increasing internet penetration on the African continent due to the mobile phone, social media has become a space for solidarity-building, mobilisation and advocacy for greater freedom and gender justice. Social media is not neutral nor monolithic in its culture and mandate; there are competing cultures, surveillance and the curtailing of the freedom of expression by the state, which is needed in order to realise academic freedom. This study looks at the possibilities and the limitations of social media as a feminist tool for expressing academic freedom in Uganda. This study draws on the PairofButtocks protest started by feminist public intellectual Dr. Stella Nyanzi who uses social media as part of her feminist praxis (bwa Mwesigire, 2017) and feminist contestation. The effect of Dr. Stella Nyanzi's deliberate use of vulgarity, rage and humour on her Facebook account in response to the inefficiencies of the Ugandan state for not providing sanitary pads to school girls will be analysed through contentanalysis and in-depth interviews of feminist activists.

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Mbali Mazibuko University of the Witwatersrand Sociology Second Year Loss, Rage and Laughter: Texturing Protest Action Against Sexual Violence on the South African Campus and Its Existence Online

I explore the emotional geographies of protest action in the context of womxn's activism against sexual violence in the post-apartheid South African university (POSTASA). I argue that the extension of offline protest action to online worlds, such as Facebook and Twitter, create a global pool of activism to confront the plight of womxn. In the contexts of the university currently known as Rhodes (UCKAR) and Wits Univeristy, I assert that the #RememberKwezi is the consistently emerging wound that Black feminist students within the academy continue to learn from and use as praxis for a larger feminist movement that moves beyond the campus. I foreground the emotional lives of Black womxn who have survived sexual violence, live in fear of it and contest the crisis in various ways. Therefore, I suggest that the performance of emotion also arises as a protest repertoire which textures POSTASA womxn's activism in a distinct way in comparison to the womxn's movement during apartheid.

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Sabelo Mpisi University of Cape Town Social Anthropology Second Year Shit Happens! An Ethnography of Shared-Communal Toilets and Conviviality in Bhurundi, Cape Town

In South Africa, the deleterious aftermaths of the Apartheid legacy are such that black South Africans residing in informal settlements and townships do not have access to basic amenities. In the post-apartheid or democratic landscape of South Africa, inequality remains inseparable from intersectional issues of race, class, and citizenship. For Cape Town building from its reality as the most segregated city in South Africa, with black South Africans still awaiting the manifestation of the promises that were made to them in 1994, and their consequential graduation out of poverty such a backdrop has seen the city being termed as an apartheid city in the post-apartheid. This study examines the reconfiguration of social relationships around shared-communal-toilets across and within three sites, Zone 2, Zone 16, and Shukushukuma, located in an impoverished informal settlement in Bhurundi, Mfuleni, Cape Town, South Africa. Building on ethnographic fieldwork, spread across the three sites, it examines how, through sharing toilets, and other underpinning forms of organizing life, residents create and recreate social relationships on a daily basis, and on different times of the day. The paper shows that despite their centrality in the wellbeing of people, toilets are equally pivotal to the creation of social life, social relationships, and a sense of community. In particular, through exploring the relationship between the material and the immaterial, building on bricolage, conviviality, reciprocity, and total social fact, as theoretical frameworks, it illustrates that shared-communal-toilets and the key to the toilets are both fabrics and gatekeepers of sociality.

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Benjamin Salinas Cornell University Anthropology and Sociology Graduating Senior The Online Music Archives of Linaje Originarios and their Political Implications

The Hip Hop duo Linaje Originarios--comprised of cousins Bryan and Dario Tascon-- is challenging Colombian state notions of indigeneity and cultural memory by mobilizing Hip Hop music online. Over the past 7 years, the Colombian president Juan Manuel Santos has promoted policies that seek to incorporate the native peoples of Colombia into the political discourse. Spearheaded by the Ministry of Culture, the administration has redesigned their policies and public image around the notion of preserving indigenous groups, in an attempt to include them as a part of a collective Colombian identity. The western state apparatus, however, by its very nature seeks to homogenize the populations it controls, therefore by including indigenous people within the political construct of Colombia’s current political discourse, the administration is reducing indigeneity to the past. Groups such as Linaje Originarios present contemporary notions of indigeneity through hip hop both live and online. The Tascon Brothers rap in their native language and dress, and create videos that mediate their experience; in this way they are able to present their culture to a local audience while re-presenting performances to a global one. My project argues that internet hyperlink culture in tandem with the global appeal of Hip Hop creates spaces where indigenous identities might be represented outside of the western state apparatus; further it seeks to demonstrate the ways that Linaje Originarios mobilizes their identity online through the combination of music, language, and visual media.

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Allegra Taylor University of Delaware English Graduating Senior A Transatlantic Tapestry: Alexander Hamilton, the Marquis de Sade, and an Age of Revolution and Slavery

My project centers on the depiction and submerged discourse of the Haitian Revolution and slavery in the works of the Marquis de Sade. This work is vitally important because during Sade's lifetime and writing career, the 1780s and 1790s, his contemporaries, historians and philosophers alike, failed to engender an open dialogue, barely even constructing a discourse surrounding the presence of the French colony, Haiti. Many remained silent to the violence brought on by Haiti. A new people were created, the slave planter. I will argue that Sade was proficient at actively portraying the shift in French power dynamics away from the French aristocracy and toward slave planters' excessively violent culture. I will refer to this intervening intellectual and corporal technology as "the colonizer's and colonist's consciousness." Sade was adept at discursively witnessing this new paradigm by developing fiction that underscored slavery's affinity to sexual violence. Indeed, he fetishizes the system of slavery--its preoccupation with hierarchy and difference, its occupation of the spaces of the slave's body and the space of the plantation as the site of brutalization and horror unparalleled. I assert that at the core of French revolutionary politics and Enlightenment values was the suspension of the woman of color presenting the absolute physical submission of her body and the overwhelming annihilation of her psyche for the pleasure and rumination of the slave planter and a quietly, cruel French society. The writing by the Marquis de Sade I will engage includes The 120 Days of Sodom.

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Mercedes Trigos New York University English Third Year From the Border(lands): The Window in Nella Larsen’s Passing

This paper emphasizes that one discipline’s methods of comparative racialization can be valuable for another in its efforts to disrupt national narratives that homogenize categories and impose hierarchies. Parting from Mary Pat Brady’s theorization of space and the reconceptualization of the border as analytic—two major interventions in Chicana Studies—this essay close reads moments in Nella Larsen’s Passing in order to argue that the window functions analogously to the passing subject, who is constituted by, from, and through the space that surrounds her. If, as Brady suggests, “the processes of producing space, however quotidian or grand, hidden or visible, have an enormous effect on subject formation,” Passing underscores how the delimitation of spaces, although seemingly natural, effects and affects how national narratives are constructed. In the same way that a window is naturalized as an aspect of a wall but is in fact generative for the main character’s identity development, the passing subject, although excluded from the U.S. national narrative, is a crucial component of the national structure. The conceptualization of passing depends on the articulation of two (or more) spaces one can traverse, yet Larsen’s passing subject operates not by crossing a border but from the border, which is—as Anzaldúa argues—a space of its own, neither in nor out and both at once. Thus, Passing unsettles the Black/White binary.

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Kevin Zevallos University of Connecticut Sociology Second Year Beyond and Within the Dreamer Narrative: Undocumented Youth Organizing and the Contestation of Citizenship

Based on semi-structured interviews, participant observation of undocumented youth-led rallies, lobbying campaigns, and debriefing meetings, content analysis of the immigrant youth organization's social media profiles and testimonies of the undocumented activists during public hearings in the state capitol, I examine how undocumented immigrants contest dominant notions of citizenship while simultaneously offering alternative and locally actualized forms of citizenship that are more inclusive. Citizenship for them is more than just a legal status, it is a matter of belonging; a fluid status that is produced through everyday practices and social relations. Undocumented youth of color organizers negotiate the relationship between illegality and racism through public and private (within the organization) performances of their undocumented status. Undocumented youth organizers undergo a double-sided process of disidentification and of becoming a political subject through gendered and racialized public and private performances of coming out as undocumented. I argue how performances of coming out as undocumented not only challenge conventional ideas and images of who undocumented immigrants are, but also redefine and reinvent notions of belonging and community, which I term insurgent citizenship. In so doing, I show what the sociology of race and ethnicity can contribute to a sociology of citizenship that acknowledges the relationship between citizenship, race and racism.

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SSRC REFERENCE MATERIALS T H E SSR C M I SSI O N : SO C I A L SC I EN C E F O R T H E PU B LI C G O O D The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) is an independent, international, nonprofit organization founded in 1923. It fosters innovative research, nurtures new generations of social scientists, deepens how inquiry is practiced within and across disciplines, and mobilizes necessary knowledge on important public issues. The SSRC is guided by the belief that justice, prosperity, and democracy all require better understanding of complex social, cultural, economic, and political processes. We work with practitioners, policymakers, and academic researchers in the social sciences, related professions, and the humanities and natural sciences. We build interdisciplinary and international networks, working with partners around the world to link research to practice and policy, strengthen individual and institutional capacities for learning, and enhance public access to information. The SSRC approaches its work guided by five basic commitments: 1. Fostering innovation. We work on problems that need new approaches; we act as a catalyst for new thinking. We seek to mobilize the most creative and knowledgeable researchers and to help research institutions be more dynamic. Renewing existing expertise, putting knowledge to work on new problems, and generating novel data and theories are all crucial to advancing social science for the public good. 2. Investing in the future. We ensure the future of knowledge production through nurturing new generations of researchers, enabling practitioners to act on scientific knowledge, enhancing cross-fertilization among intellectual fields, developing capacity where it is most lacking, and facilitating the internationalization of social science. 3. Working internationally and democratically. Better understanding of basic social processes is a resource for improving the lives of all. It should be available to all. Participation in the production of scientific knowledge should also be as broad as possible. We support the internationalization of social science and opportunities for under-represented groups both as matters of equity and as requirements for ensuring that the production of knowledge is informed by different contexts and perspectives. 4. Combining urgency and patience. We bring researchers, practitioners, policymakers, and broader publics together to focus on topics of pressing public importance from health to human rights. But since even the most urgent problems are seldom solved overnight, we must learn even as we act, and we must continually renew existing knowledge. 5. Keeping standards high. Practical action, policy, and debate on major public issues all need to be informed by the best possible knowledge. This is produced by emphasizing scientific quality, engaging important public questions, and ensuring openness to critical analysis. Theory and research can then command the attention of those who approach practical issues with different values or agendas.

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SSR C F U N DI N G O P PO R T U N I T I ES: I N T ER N A T I O N A L DI SSER T A T I O N R E S EA R C H F ELLO W SH I P (I DR F ) http://www.ssrc.org/programs/idrf/ The Mellon International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF) offers nine to twelve months of support to graduate students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences who are enrolled in PhD programs in the United States and conducting dissertation research on non-US topics. Sixty-eight fellowships are awarded annually. Fellowship amounts vary depending on the research plan, with a perfellowship average of $21,000. The fellowship includes participation in an SSRC-funded interdisciplinary workshop upon the completion of IDRF-funded research. The program is open to graduate students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences—regardless of citizenship—enrolled in PhD programs in the United States. Applicants to the 2018 IDRF competition must complete all PhD requirements except on-site research by the time the fellowship begins or by December 2018, whichever comes first. The program invites proposals for dissertation research conducted, in whole or in part, outside the United States, on non-US topics. It will consider applications for dissertation research grounded in a single site, informed by broader cross-regional and interdisciplinary perspectives, as well as applications for multi-sited, comparative, and transregional research. Proposals that identify the United States as a case for comparative inquiry are welcome; however, proposals that focus predominantly or exclusively on the United States are not eligible. Applicants from select disciplines within the humanities (Art History, Architectural History, Classics, Drama/Theater, Film Studies, Literature, Musicology, Performance Studies, Philosophy, Political Theory, and Religion) may request three or more months of funding for international on-site dissertation research in combination with site-specific research in the United States, for a total of nine to twelve months of funding. All other applicants (for instance, those in Anthropology, Geography, History, Political Science, and Sociology, among others) must request nine to twelve months of on-site, sitespecific dissertation research with a minimum of six months of research outside of the United States. Research within the United States must be site-specific (e.g., at a particular archive) and cannot be at the applicant’s home institution unless that institution has necessary site-specific research holdings. Please note that the IDRF program supports research only and may not be used for dissertation writeup. Applicants who have completed significant funded dissertation research in one country by the start of their proposed IDRF research may be ineligible to apply to the IDRF to extend research time in the same country. Eligibility will be at the discretion of the IDRF program, depending on completed research time and funding. The IDRF program expects fellows to remain at their research site(s) for the full nine- to twelve-month funding period. The IDRF program will not support study at foreign universities, conference participation, or dissertation write-up. The program does not accept applications from PhD programs in law, business, medicine, nursing, or journalism, nor does it accept applications in doctoral programs that do not lead to a PhD.

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LOGISTICS MEMORANDUM L O G I S T I C S M E M O R AN D U M TO: FROM: SUBJECT: DATE:

SUMMER CONFERENCE GUESTS SSRC-MELLON MAYS PROGRAM STAFF CONFERENCE ARRIVAL AND LOGISTICS JUNE 4, 2018

READ, PRINT AND BRING THIS DOCUMENT WITH YOU TO NEW YORK. Please read it carefully, as it contains many important details.

Welcome to the 2018 SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Student Summer Conference at Columbia University! We recommend that you print a copy of the campus map, which is available here. GETTING TO COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Columbia University is located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan between 110th and 120th Streets on Broadway. We strongly recommend the use of New York’s extensive and comparatively inexpensive public transportation system. The fare for public transportation is $2.75, and instructions are provided below. Of course, feel free to also consult Google Maps to guide yourself. Taxis and rideshare services, such as Uber and Lyft, are also available; fare from airports will range from approximately $40-$80 excluding tip and tolls. Please note that we will not be reimbursing the cost of transit in New York. FROM JFK AIRPORT: Take the AirTrain service to Jamaica Station to access either MTA New York City Transit or the Long Island Railroad (LIRR). For the former option (MTA NYC Transit), from Jamaica Station, take the E train to 42 Street (Port Authority) and then transfer to the 1 train to 116 Street (Columbia University). Alternatively, from Jamaica Station, take the LIRR service to Pennsylvania Station. From Pennsylvania Station, transfer to the 1 train to 116 Street Station (Columbia University). FROM LAGUARDIA AIRPORT: Take the M60 Bus from LaGuardia Airport and disembark from the bus at the Broadway/W 116 St stop. For more information, visit the MTA website. FROM NEWARK AIRPORT: Take the AirTrain service to “Airport Station.” From “Airport Station,” you can use Amtrak or New Jersey Transit to get to Pennsylvania Station. Then, take the 1 train to 116 Street (Columbia University). FROM PENNSYLVANIA STATION OR PORT AUTHORITY STATION: Take 1 train to 116 Street (Columbia University). For more information, visit the MTA website. FROM GRAND CENTRAL STATION: Take the Shuttle (“S” train) to Times Square/42nd Street Station and transfer to the 1 train. Take the 1 train to 116 Street (Columbia University). For more information, visit the MTA website. 67


HOUSING CHECK-IN AND CONFERENCE REGISTRATION Once you arrive on Columbia’s campus, please proceed to Hartley Hall to pick up your room key. You will be staying next door at Wallach Hall (1116 Amsterdam Avenue). If you arrive at Hartley between 8 am and 9 pm, go to the registration desk, immediately to your left; if you arrive outside of these hours, go to the hospitality desk, immediately to your right. A room card will be issued to you. Once you settle your belongings in your dorm room, visit the lobby in Faculty House (64 Morningside Drive) to register for the conference and receive conference materials. Registration will take place from 2:00 to 4:30 pm. If you are delayed in transit and unable to register by 4:30 pm, please call or text Program Staff at (914) 440-3739. ACCOMMODATIONS Conference attendees will be housed in Wallach Hall. Your room will be equipped with a twin xl bed, pillow, linen sheets, bureau, desk, and chair. Bathroom facilities in Wallach Hall are communal, so please be prepared to share; we recommend bringing any personal items that will make you comfortable (i.e. shower flip flops, bath robe, toiletries). You must check-out of Wallach Hall by 11:00 am on June 20. To check-out, give your key to the registration desk. If you would like to leave your bag at the registration desk, please ask for a luggage tag. Please note that you will be charged $35.00 to replace a broken key. All broken keys must be turned in to the Conference Housing Office at 114 Hartley Hall. Columbia University security policy requires a lock change when keys are lost or missing. A $65.00 lock change charge will be collected for a lost key, or for each key not returned at check-out. This is your responsibility. MEALS Breakfast on Tuesday and Wednesday will be served at Ferris Booth Commons, which is located on the third floor of Lerner Hall, from 7 to 9:30 am. You must bring your SSRC-Mellon Mays nametag/lanyard, as well as a state-issued ID or passport in order to enter the dining hall. CONFERENCE INFORMATION The 2018 Annual Graduate Student Summer Conference begins with opening remarks at the Faculty House’s Presidential Ballroom at 5:30 pm. Please note that New York is a walking city; as such, you should bring comfortable shoes.

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REIMBURSABLE EXPENSES Reimbursable expenses include transportation costs to and from your home airport or train station and any meals during transit. We will only reimburse the cost of public transit to/from NYC airports and train stations (i.e. not the cost of taxis or ride shares). Reimbursement requests must be made using the SSRC Travel & Expense form, which can be downloaded from the Fellows Portal. Following the event, please mail a completed Travel & Expense form and all receipts, postmarked by July 13, to: Brian Bahe, SSRC-Mellon Mays, One Pierrepont Plaza, 15th Floor, Brooklyn, NY 11201 Please keep a copy of all documents for your records. HEALTH INSURANCE INFORMATION Any costs incurred due to health emergencies are the responsibility of the fellow. The SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program will not be responsible for any medical expenses incurred during the Summer Conference. For health emergencies, proceed to: • CityMD Urgent Care – 2710 Broadway at W 104th Street. (212) 658-0676. M-F 8 am to 8 pm, SaSu 9 am to 5 pm. • Mount Sinai St. Luke’s – 1111 Amsterdam Avenue at W 114th Street. (212) 523-4000. 24/7 service. STAFF CONTACT Beginning Monday, June 18, you may reach a staff member by calling or texting (914) 440-3739 between 8 am and 9 pm. You may also email us at mellonmays@ssrc.org. TRAVEL CONTACT If you experience any issues regarding travel, please contact our travel agent Jolanta Badura by email at travel3@ssrc.org or by phone at (929) 328-4463.

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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY CAMPUS MAP

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SUMMER CONFERENCE EVALUATION The SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program recognizes the importance of providing fellows the opportunity to give feedback on their experience at the Summer Conference. We will distribute a short evaluation form at the end of the conference, allowing for insightful comments and thoughtful feedback. You must fill out the evaluation form in order to receive your travel reimbursement. If you do not submit an evaluation form at the conference, you can download the form from the Fellows Portal and email it to mellonmays@ssrc.org. We will use your feedback to help us evaluate the program and plan for future conferences and we appreciate the time that you are taking to help develop future SSRC-Mellon Mays programming.

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The SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program One Pierrepont Plaza, 15th FL Brooklyn, NY 11201 Phone: (212) 377-2700 Email: mellonmays@ssrc.org Web: mellonmays.ssrc.org SSRC Mellon-Mays

@ssrcmellonmays

Staff: Cally L. Waite Director

Deborah Cheng Program Officer

Julia Fernandez Program Assistant

Lucio Rojas Program Assistant

Brian Bahe Administrative Assistant

2018 SSRC-Mellon Mays Summer Conference Agenda Book  
2018 SSRC-Mellon Mays Summer Conference Agenda Book  
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