Summer 2019 MME Journal

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Vol. 65, No. 4

Summer 2019

MARYLAND MUSIC EDUCATOR

Official Journal of the Maryland Music Educators Association

In this issue: • 2019 MMEA Awards for Excellence Recipients • Jazz Big Band Seating Placement • Strategies for Success: Making Yourself Marketable as a Music Educator


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Summer 2019

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Maryland Music Educator Official Journal of the Maryland Music Educators Association

Summer 2019 Volume 65, Number 4

Features…

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2019 MMEA Awards for Excellence Recipients by Ashley Ashman, MMEA Member at Large, Montgomery County Jazz Big Band Seating Placement by Earl MacDonald, Director of Jazz Studies, University of Connecticut Strategies for Success: Making Yourself Marketable as a Music Educator by Kathryn L. Evans, Associate Professor of Music Education, Towson University, and Danielle Woolery, Associate Professor of Music and Coordinator of Instrumental Studies, Texas Woman’s University

Contents…

Advertisers Index

06 MMEA Executive Board Directory, Presidents 06 MME Submission Deadlines 07 Hall of Fame,, Award Recipients, Executive Directors, Editors 07 MMEA 2019-2020 Conferences

08 In Memoriam: Olivia Warley Gutoff 12 The Editor’s Page 13 MMEA Giving and Sponsorship 13 NAfME National Conference 15 Calendar of Events, 2019-2020 26 Back Cover-MMEA/NAfME Membership

On the Cover: A summertime view of the Governor Thomas Johnson Memorial Bridge over the Patuxent River, as seen from a Solomons Island, Maryland, dock. The bridge connects Calvert County and St. Mary’s County in southern Maryland. Photo by Felicia Burger Johnston.

American College of Musicians ..............6 Frostburg State Univ. Dept. of Music....10 James Madison University......................4 Loyola University Maryland....................7 Menchey Bowed String Gallery.............13 Menchey Music Service ........................14 Univ. of MD Baltimore Co. .....................3 Univ. of Maryland School of Music ..............................................(Cover 2) 2 Yamaha Band & Orchestra ......................9

The Maryland Music Educator is published for the members of the Maryland Music Educators Association, Inc., a federated state unit of the National Association for Music Education (NAfME), and music teachers in Maryland four times annually in the months of September, January/February, late March, and May. Articles for publication must be submitted to the editor by August 1, October 1, January 2, and March 15, respectively. Publication dates, advertising rates, and closing dates may be found on the MMEA web page, www.mmea-maryland.org, under “Resources/Publications”. A PDF of Maryland Music Educator will be distributed digitally to all Maryland music teachers and all MMEA members. It will also be posted on the MMEA website at www.mmea-maryland.org (MMEA Executive Board decision, June 8, 2018). Send change of address promptly to the editor and to NAfME, 1806 Robert Fulton Drive, Reston, VA 22091, or use the web address: www.nafme.org. Editor: Felicia Burger Johnston, P. O. Box 3362, Cumberland, MD 21504-3362

304-613-2871

E-Mail: mmea.editor@gmail.com

Maryland Music Educators Association (MMEA) is the professional association for the school music teachers of Maryland. MMEA is a 501 (c)(3) not-for-profit association incorporated in the State of Maryland. MMEA's mission is to advance music education in Maryland schools. We do this by providing professional development for music teachers, involving students and teachers in opportunities for excellence through state-wide music activities and events, and serving as an advocate for music education.

The Maryland Music Educators Association is supported by a grant from the MD State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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MMEA Executive Board Directory 2019-2020 The MMEA Executive Board and staff listing is updated at https://www.mmea-maryland.org/executive-board. Elected Officers President Paul Dembowski Anne Arundel County President-Elect Brian Schneckenburger Baltimore County Immediate Past President Angela Adams Anne Arundel County Recording Secretary Emily Hill Frederick County Member At Large Ashley Ashman Montgomery County Component Association Presidents Band Directors (MBDA) John R. Stevenson Carroll County Choral Directors (MCEA) Katherine Meloro Howard County Orchestra Directors (MODA) Dan Sitomer Anne Arundel County General Music Teachers (MGMTA) Jennifer Kauffman Anne Arundel County College Music Educators (MSMTE) Stephanie Prichard University of Maryland

Appointed Officers Advocacy Chair Ronald P. Frezzo Montgomery County (retired) Collegiate Membership Advisor Melissa McCabe Towson University Conference Exhibits Chair Shefali Shah Anne Arundel County

Special Learners Chair Paul Tooker University of Maryland Eastern Shore State Dept. of Education Representative Alysia Lee Maryland State Department of Education State Large Ensemble Festivals Chair Scott Engel Baltimore County Tri-M Chair Erik Von Sas Anne Arundel County

Membership Chair Janet Gross Calvert County Membership Development Chair Judith Hawkins Prince George’s County Music Industry Representative Scott Schimpf Music & Arts Centers, Inc.

Publications Editor Felicia Burger Johnston Upshur County, WV (retired) E-Mail: mmea.editor@gmail.com Staff Members

Music Supervisors Representative Karl Stewart Carroll County Private Schools Representative Joseph Shortall Private School

Executive Director Mariama Boney, LMSW, CAE E-Mail: mmeaexec.mb@gmail.com mmeamarylandinfo@gmail.com PMB#472 6710 F Ritchie Highway 410-981-9662 Glen Burnie, MD 21061 Event and Membership Assistant (Part-time)

Public Relations Chair Deborah Turner Anne Arundel County Research Chair Cathleen Russell Baltimore County Sight Reading Committee Chair Todd Burroughs St. Mary’s County

MMEA Presidents 1941-43 – Robert S. Bolles 1943-45 – C. James Velie 1945-47 – Frances Jackman Civis 1947-49 – Miriam Hoffman 1949-51 – Mary M. Hunter 1951-53 – Mary de Vermond 1953-55 – Thomas R. Lawrence 1955-57 – Blanche F. Bowlsbey 1957-59 – Mildred B. Trevvett 1959-61 – Emil H. Serposs 1961-63 – Chester J. Petranek 1963-64 – Ward K. Cole 1964-65 – Chester J. Petranek 1965-67 – Donald Regier 1967-69 – Nicholas Geriak 1969-71 – Alice S. Beer 1971-73 – Joseph Chalker 1973-75 – Bert L. Damron 1975-77 – Robert E. Kersey 1977-79 – David Marchand 1979-81 – Thomas E. Silliman 1981-83 – Thomas W. Fugate 1983-85 – Clarence T. Rogers 1985-87 – John E. Wakefield 1987-89 – R. Bruce Horner 1989-91 – Patricia W. Teske 1991-93 – Phyllis R. Kaplan 1993-95 – Roger J. Folstrom 1995-97 – Barbara F. King 1997-99 – Richard A. Disharoon 1999-01 – Michael L. Mark 2001-03 – Michael L. Mark 2003-05 – Ann Vaughn 2005-07 – Amy Cohn 2007-09 – Chrystie Adams 2009-11 – Carol Howell 2011-13 – Ginny Flynn 2013-15 – Stephen W. Miles 2015-17 – Katherine A. Murphy 2017-19 – Angela Adams 2019- – Paul Dembowski

Maryland Music Educator Article Submission Deadline

Issue Fall 2019

August 1, 2019

Winter 2019-2020

October 1, 2019

Spring 2020

January 2, 2020

Summer 2020

March 15, 2020

Please send article submissions to: Felicia B. Johnston, Editor mmea.editor@gmail.com Issue

Ad Contract Submission Deadline

Fall 2019

August 20, 2019

Winter 2019-2020

October 1, 2019

Spring 2020

January 2, 2020

Summer 2020

March 15, 2020

Advertising information at: https://www.mmea-maryland.org/publications

Updates, news, and more at: www.mmeamaryland.org 6

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MMEA Hall of Fame 1988 – Margaret Black 1988 – Robert S. Bolles 1988 – David Burchuck 1988 – Frances Jackman Civis 1988 – John Cole 1988 – Mary G. Cross 1988 – John Denues 1988 – Nicholas Geriak 1988 – Thomas L. Gibson 1988 – Rose Marie Grentzer 1988 – S. Fenton Harris 1988 – Miriam Hoffman 1988 – Mary M. Hunter 1988 – John Itzel 1988 – Henrietta Baker Low 1988 – Otto Ortmann 1988 – Philip S. Royer 1988 – Osmar Steinwald 1988 – Charles C. T. Stull 1988 – Eugene W. Troth 1988 – Homer Ulrich 1988 – C. James Velie 1988 – Levi Wilder 1988 – Dorothy Willison 1988 – William Llewelyn Wilson 1989 – Alice S. Beer 1989 – Thomas R. Lawrence 1989 – Corwin H. Taylor 1990 – Robert E. Kersey 1990 – Dorothy S. Pickard 1991 – John Fignar, Jr. 1992 – Blanche F. Bowlsbey 1992 – Joseph F. Chalker 1992 – James L. Fisher 1993 – Thomas W. Fugate 1993 – C. William Johnson 1993 – Michael Pastelak 1994 – Mildred R. Reiner 1994 – Shirley J. Shelley 1994 – Donald Regier 1995 – David Marchand 1995 – W. Warren Sprouse 1996 – James H. Avampato 1996 – Carmelo J. Palazzo 1997 – Clarence T. Rogers 1998 – Maurice R. Feldman 1999 – Sr. Mary Theresine Staub S.S.N.D. 1999 – Nancy M. Cook 2000 – Mildred B. Trevvett 2003 – Leroy Battle 2003 – Glenn Patterson 2004 – Roger J. Folstrom 2004 – Phyllis R. Kaplan 2005 – Barbara F. King 2005 – Michael L. Mark 2006 – Mary Ellen Cohn 2006 – John Wakefield 2007 – Olivia W. Gutoff 2008 – Richard A. Disharoon 2008 – James L. Tucker, Jr. 2009 – Leone Y. Woodall 2010 – Bruce D. Wilson 2011 – Lee Stevens 2012 – C. Scott Sharnetzka 2012 – Cherie Stellaccio 2013 – Ray Danner 2014 – Dana Rothlisberger 2018 – Gilbert A. Brungardt (Posthumous) 2019 – Chris Vadala (Posthumously) Rosemary & James Walters Service Award 2002 – Thomas W. Fugate 2003 – Chrystie L. Adams 2004 – Richard A. Disharoon 2010 – Mabel Leonore Sawhill 2011 – Howard L. Miskimon 2011 – Sabra C. Steward 2012 – Deborah Turner 2013 – Jan Strevig 2014 – James L. Turk 2015 – Sally Wagner 2017 – Ginny Flynn

Summer 2019

2019-2020 MMEA Professional Development Events Save the dates! October 18, 2019

Fall In-Service Day

March 13 & 14, 2020

Annual Conference

Corwin Taylor Music Education Leadership Award 1994 – Karen Douglas 1995 – Rosa Fletcher Crocker 1996 – Mary Ann Mears 1997 – James L. Tucker, Jr. 1998 – Roger J. Folstrom 1998 – Phyllis T. Kaplan 1999 – Barbara F. King 2002 – Mary Ellen Cohn 2004 – Chris Tuel 2005 – Linda Patton 2006 – Gary Beauchamp 2009 – Joan Orcutt 2010 – Katherine A. Rodeffer 2011 – Richard J. Deasy 2012 – C. Nelson Fritts 2013 – Nancy S. Grasmick 2017 – Anita Lambert 2018 – Michael L. Mark 2019 – Scott Herman

Maryland Music Educator

Executive Directors Maryland Music Educators Association 1998-2018 – Mary Ellen Cohn 2018– Mariama Boney Editors, Maryland Music Educator 1954-57 – Homer Ulrich 1957-61 – Corwin H. Taylor 1961-65 – James L. Fisher 1965-67 – Robert E. Kersey 1967-73 – W. Warren Sprouse 1973-84 – James H. Avampato 1984-86 – W. Warren Sprouse 1987-96 – Thomas W. Fugate 1996-01 – Ray H. Zeigler 2001-08 – Thomas W. Fugate 2008-09 – Dawn Farmer 2008-09 – Felicia Burger Johnston

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In Memoriam Olivia Warley Gutoff November 25, 1938-April 10, 2019 MMEA Hall of Fame Member Olivia Warley Gutoff, MMEA Hall of Fame member, MMEA Past Secretary, MODA Past President, and Artistic Director Emerita of the Maryland Classic Youth Orchestras and Philharmonic Conductor, died on April 10, 2019. After a career in Maryland, she resided in Williamsburg, VA. She is survived by her husband, Mort Gutoff, two sons, and grandchildren. She served Maryland Classic Youth Orchestras and Philharmonic for 25 years until she retired during the 2006-2007 season. She brought MCYO into its new home, The Music Center at Strathmore, where it remains as a program of Strathmore. She also served on the board of the Youth Orchestra Division of the League of American Orchestras. Mrs. Gutoff was an outstanding French horn player and teacher, and performed with the National Symphony Orchestra, the Washington Opera Society Orchestra, the Kennedy Center Ballet and Show Orchestras, the National Gallery of Art Orchestra, the

Wolf Trap Filene Center Orchestra, the New York City Opera Orchestra, the New York City Ballet Orchestra, the American Ballet Orchestra, and the National Philharmonic. Mrs. Gutoff’s son, Bob Marcellus, shared, “My mother has already left us a priceless legacy through her...family and her students with her love and inspiration. She positively impacted so many lives. We would like to leave a legacy for her with this scholarship, so that a young musician can afford to go to college and aspire to achieve the levels of success in teaching and performing that she did. This will impact future generations as she has impacted us.” To contribute to the Memorial Scholarship Fund, please see: https://www.gofundme.com/f/olivia-warley-gutoffmemorial-scholarship-fund Or checks can mailed to: Olivia Warley Gutoff Memorial Scholarship Fund c/o Chesapeake Bank 6619 Richmond Rd. Williamsburg VA 23188

Editor’s Note: The spring 2019 issue of Maryland Music Educator included a reprint of the late Olivia Gutoff’s article, “Music Educators Beware! Music Makes A Difference; Good Health Makes All the Difference in the World!” that first appeared in the Spring 2011 MME. In the article, Gutoff cited medical research proving that playing germ-laden instruments can lead to “...Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis, a general medical term that refers to inflammation of lung tissue”. She stated, “Students who have recurring colds, coughs, persistent sore throats and, breathing problems could be, unknowingly, inhaling mold and bacteria through their instruments,...a harbinger of a more serious problem leading to fibrosis or Interstitial Lung Disease, which is dangerous, progressive, and often irreversible” Mrs. Gutoff had requested in the winter that we reprint the article. Her family has granted permission to publish the following information about her struggle with lung disease, to help musicians.

Message to Musicians from Olivia Gutoff’s Family: She passed very peacefully on April 10, 2019 with family by her side throughout her brief hospital stay. This was a culmination of a determined 10-year battle with COPD, a lung disease for which there is no cure. COPD is now one of the five most prevalent causes of death in the country. Musicians are in best position, because of their experience with breathing techniques, to defend against effects of this disease, which can be acquired in multiple ways, including playing germ-laden instruments. Normal life expectancy at diagnosis is five years or less, with oxygen use during half that remaining lifespan time. Many of you had no idea of her serious condition as she was stoic and brave, and frankly way too busy with her hummingbirds, gar-

den, teaching, music, students, friends, and family to be inconvenienced by something as bothersome as a terminal illness. Because of her music, she actually maintained a very high quality of life throughout until just two weeks [before her death] despite difficult odds. The reason...was [that] her lung capacity from playing the French Horn over her lifetime, combined with her expertise in breathing techniques (she taught master classes on how to breathe into the instruments), was greatly expanded above and beyond that of a normal person. Playing music literally gave her lungs and heart an Olympic-class workout, making her so much stronger in terms of oxygenation and lung capacity. The doctors at the hospital were amazed when we told them that the first time she required supplemental oxygen was March of this year.

“A teacher affects eternity: he can never tell where his influence stops.” ~The Education of Henry Adams(1907), Henry Brooks Adams, 1838-1918

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The Editor’s Page

Felicia Burger Johnston

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Thank you, Tom Fugate!

W

elcome to the Summer 2019 issue of Maryland Music Educator! We are finishing our first year of transition from print to digital-only journal issues and we also celebrate many ongoing organization-wide digital changes in submissions, invoicing, and more. Former Editor Tom Fugate Retires as Publications Business Manager Mr. Thomas W. Fugate, MMEA’s Publications Business Manager, has announced his retirement from MMEA work. Tom served as Editor of MMEA’s quarterly journal, Maryland Music Educator, from 1987-1996 and 2001-2008. During those times, he also arranged printing and mailing of journals; and edited and arranged printing of conference programs and certificates, All State programs and certificates, Awards for Excellence programs, and for printed and mailed election ballots (now done digitally) and conference Newsletters (discontinued about 2012). During the early years of MMEA’s website, he served as webmaster, posting conference information and other items of interest to members. Tom brought MMEA publications into the digital age, transitioning from the (literal) copy and paste process for articles, information, photos, and ads to digital desktop publishing program processes. He taught and mentored two new CoEditors in 2008, Dawn Farmer, who stepped down in 2009, and me. Tom has been a most patient teacher and mentor; I am grateful for his knowledge and guidance, and for sharing his experience and wisdom while encouraging me to try new things in publications. He and his lovely wife Esther have welcomed me in their home many times for editing lessons. Tom also served as MMEA’s President from 1981-1983. He has received two MMEA Awards for Excellence: he was a 2002 recipient of the Rosemary and James Walters Service Award and was named an MMEA Hall of Fame member in 1993. Prior to retirement from instrumental music teaching in Frederick County, Tom taught band at various grade levels. He is a graduate 12

L to R: Esther and Tom Fugate, at the MMEA Fall InService Day in October 2018. Mr. Fugate is retiring as MMEA Publications Business Manager. Photo by David F. Cohn.

of the University of Maryland, where he marched with the university band at an inauguration for President Eisenhower and later met his wife Esther in the band. Tom and Esther are the parents of three adult children and enjoy many grandchildren. I am sure our MMEA members join me in thanking Tom and wishing him a happy and healthy retirement after many years of service to MMEA! In This Issue In a feature article, “Jazz Big Band Seating Placement”, Earl MacDonald explains the “…reasoning behind the...‘traditional block’ formation, which helps to achieve maximized lines of vision, listening, blend, and balance” in jazz big bands. In “Strategies for Success: Making Yourself Marketable as a Music Educator”, Danielle Woolery and Kathryn L. Evans return to Maryland Music Educator as collaborating authors, offering tips for résumé-building. Also featured in this issue is an article about the 2019 MMEA Awards for Excellence by Ashley Ashman, MMEA Member at Large, who coordinated the 2019 MMEA Awards for Excellence nominations and selections and helped arrange the Awards Luncheon Ceremony. Attending the awards ceremony and hearing the stories of those whose work is so highly respected by colleagues, students, parents, and community members is an inspiring experience. Allow those stories and photos from the awards ceremony to inspire you, also! 2020 MMEA Awards for Excellence Nomination Forms MMEA Awards for Excellence 2020 nominaMaryland Music Educator

tion forms will be posted online this fall at http://www.mmea-maryland.org/. Consider nominating those who have done exemplary work to further music education for students. Past nominators have included colleagues, administrators, parents of students, booster groups, or former students. Recipients of MMEA Awards for Excellence are immensely grateful for the recognition. Let’s continue to give that recognition to deserving music educators and supporters of music education nominate worthy candidates for the 2020 MMEA Awards for Excellence! Writing for Maryland Music Educator Articles written about an aspect of your teaching are helpful to your peers. Article submissions are always welcome - completed articles or those providing content for which I provide writing assistance. Session outlines or handouts from In-Service sessions you have presented can often be developed into articles. I welcome your articles, article topic suggestions, and suggestions for improvement. I am here to serve you as you serve Maryland’s music students. Our publications email address is mmea.editor@gmail.com. I look forward to hearing from you!

Maryland Music Educator Issue

Article Submission Deadline

Fall 2019

August 1, 2019

Winter 2019-2020

October 1, 2019

Spring 2020

January 2, 2020

Summer 2020

March 15, 2020

Please send article submissions to: Felicia B. Johnston, Editor mmea.editor@gmail.com Issue

Ad Contract Submission Deadline

Fall 2019

August 20, 2019

Winter 2019-2020

October 1, 2019

Spring 2020

January 2, 2020

Summer 2020

March 15, 2020

Advertising information at: https://www.mmea-maryland.org/publications

Summer 2019


Join colleagues from around the country to learn the latest best practices for your music classroom. Early bird rate available through September 6. Register today.

Maryland Music Educators Association: Giving and Sponsorship ÂŽ

MMEA provides in-service networking and professional learning for music teachers, opportunities for thousands of music students and teachers, and serves as an advocate for music education. MMEA provides student and teacher enrichment by sponsoring professional learning conferences, annual Awards for Excellence, and eight music groups for student All State music events. MMEA and five component associations, with over 300 volunteers, host district and state Solo and Ensemble events. During the spring, orchestras, bands, and choruses perform in festivals with nearly 10,000 students participating.

Give Today! Become an MMEA Sponsor! https://www.mmea-maryland.org/give

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Maryland Music Educators Association Calendar for Students and Teachers - Subject to Change 2019 - 2020 HS: High School MS: Middle School The MMEA Executive Board and staff listing is updated at https://www.mmea-maryland.org/2019-20calendar. September 27 October 4 October 18 November 6-10

Deadline: All State Junior Application (Grades 7-9) Deadline: All State Senior Application (Grades 10-12) MMEA Fall In-Service Day, Long Reach High School (Tentative) NAfME National Conference and Honor Ensembles, Gaylord Palms Resort, Orlando, Florida November 16 All State Junior Auditions, Locations TBD November 23 All State Senior Auditions, Locations TBD December 4 Deadline: All State Jazz Submission December 9-20 All State Notifications January 10 Deadline: All State Commitment, Registration, and Payment January 18 Awards for Excellence Applications Due February 20-22 All State Jazz Band Rehearsals, UMBC Performing Arts & Humanities Building February 22 All State Jazz Concert, 3:00 p.m., UMBC Performing Arts & Humanities Building February 20-22 All State Junior Chorus and Orchestra Rehearsals, Location TBD February 22 All State Junior Chorus and Orchestra Concerts, Time and Location TBD March 13-14 Annual Conference, Baltimore Convention Center March 12-15 All State Junior Band, Senior Band, Senior Orchestra, Senior Mixed Choir and Senior Treble Choir Rehearsals Baltimore Convention Center (Schedule to be announced) March 14 All State Junior Band Concert, Morgan State University, Time to be announced March 15 All State Senior Band, Orchestra, Mixed Choir and Treble Choir, Morgan State University, Times to be announced March 27 Deadline: HS Band, Chorus and Orchestra Festival Registration/Application Apr. 3 Deadline: MS Band, Orchestra and Chorus Festival Registration/Application Apr. 3 Deadline: State Solo and Ensemble Applications Apr. 16 Deadline: State Solo and Ensemble Festival Eligibility Confirmation/Payment to be received Apr. 18 MMEA Awards for Excellence Ceremony and Luncheon, Location TBD Apr. 27-May 1 State HS Band, Chorus and Orchestra Festivals, Morgan State University May 4-8 State MS Band, Chorus and Orchestra Festivals, Location TBD May 9 State String and Vocal Solo and Ensemble Festival, Location TBD May 16 State Winds and Percussion Solo and Ensemble Festival, Towson University (Tentative)

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Maryland Music Educators Association 2019 Awards for Excellence Hall of Fame Chris Vadala (Posthumous) University of Maryland College Park

Corwin Taylor Music Education Leadership Award Scott Herman, Cabin John Middle School Montgomery County

School Administrator Award Matthew Record, Pocomoke Middle School Worcester County

Outstanding Music Teacher Awards Lisa Adams, Berlin Intermediate School, Worcester County Sarah Burton, North Salisbury Elementary School, Bennett Middle School, Parkside High School, James M. Bennett High School Wicomico County Emily James, South Shore Elementary School Anne Arundel County Randine Levy, Roberto Clemente Middle School Montgomery County David Matchim, Centennial High School Howard County The Executive Board of MMEA congratulates this year’s award recipients for their outstanding achievements as music educators, administrators, and music supporters. These extraordinary men and women devote(d) their professional lives to educating the whole child, ensuring that students whom they teach, supervise, or support have a strong and complete music education. They were honored for their accomplishments at an MMEA Awards for Excellence Luncheon at Turf Valley Resort in Ellicott City in April.

MMEA 2020 Awards for Excellence nomination information will be available at www.mmea-maryland.org in fall 2019. 16

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MMEA Member at Large

Ashley Ashman

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MMEA 2019 Awards for Excellence Recipients

Guests at the Awards luncheon

L to R: Mariama Boney, Executive Director; and Jim Turk, Pianist

MMEA Hall of Fame Chris Vadala (Posthumous), University of Maryland College Park For over 25 years, Chris Vadala was a driving force in jazz and music education in the state of Maryland. In 1993, after the unexpected death of George “Doc” Ross, Mr. Vadala was asked to step in as the interim Director of Jazz Studies at the University of Maryland. Within a year he was named the permanent director, and eventually named Professor of Saxophone and was recognized by the university as a Distinguished Scholar-Teacher. In addition to teaching at the University of Maryland, Mr. Vadala served on the faculties of Montgomery College and Prince George’s Community College.

the late Chris Vadala, MMEA Hall of Fame Award (posthumous)

L to R: Phil Barnes; Dr. Kathleen Vadala accepting the award on behalf of her late husband; and Dr. Peter Perry

Mr. Vadala mentored and inspired hundreds of Maryland’s music educators through his work at the university. He grew the jazz program from one to three big bands, allowing students to join his ensembles regardless of what instrument they played or their previous jazz experience. He understood the importance of students gaining experience with jazz as part of a comprehensive music education curriculum. He also established a Master of Music degree in Jazz Studies, and many of the recipients of that degree have remained in Maryland, furthering the cause of jazz education in our state. In addition to his work at the University, Mr. Vadala was a tireless proponent of music education in Maryland’s schools for over 30 years. He worked with DeMatha Catholic High School as a saxophone and jazz tutor. He worked with Montgomery County Public Schools as a festival clinician for middle school and developing high school jazz bands. He went into countless schools, usually at little to no charge, to work with their jazz bands and help them prepare for

L to R: Angela Adams, now MMEA Immediate Past President; and Paul Dembowski, now MMEA President

assessment festivals or just spark their interest in jazz. He served as a leader in the Maryland chapter of the International Association for Jazz Education throughout most of its existence, and worked closely over the years with Maryland Band Directors Association (MBDA) and MMEA on matters relating to jazz education. He served as the guest conductor for Maryland’s All State Jazz Band several times, in addition to conducting 49 of the 50 All State Jazz Bands, the All Eastern Jazz Band, and numerous local and regional jazz bands. Mr. Vadala’s unexpected and untimely death in January 2019 leaves an immense void in Maryland’s music education community. His passion, talent, dedication, and humility made him truly one of a kind, and the Maryland music education community should feel blessed that we could call him one of our own. Contributing to these remarks: Phil Barnes, James Hubert Blake High School, Montgomery County, Nominator Corwin Taylor Music Education Leadership Award Scott Herman, Cabin John Middle School, Montgomery County Scott Herman has served as the Instrumental Music Director at Cabin John Middle School for 29 years and has been on faculty with the Potomac Valley Youth Orchestra for five seasons. Prior to that assignment, he was conductor of the Maryland Classic Youth Orchestras for fourteen seasons. Mr. Hermon received the American String Teachers Association Outstanding Service to Strings award. and, in 2009, he was a recipient of the MMEA Awards for Excellence Outstanding Music Teacher Award. Mr. Herman was a member of the music staff of Cabin John Middle School when the CJMS music program received the 2012 MMEA Awards for Excellence Exemplary Music Program Award. The ensembles have had consistently superior performances at district and state levels. In addition, Cabin John Middle School has been highly represented in regional youth orchestras and in All County and All State ensembles. The Orchestra recently performed for the National PTA Reflections program at the U.S. Department of Education. They were a featured performing group at the Maryland Music Educators Association Annual In-Service Conferences in 2012 and 2002. In 2009, the band MMEA Awards for Excellence, continued on next page

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MMEA Awards for Excellence, continued from previous page

and orchestra were highlighted at the Montgomery County Public Schools Administrators Meeting. Mr. Herman directed the Montgomery County Junior Honors Orchestras for eighteen seasons, and the Junior Honors Band and Senior Honors Band for three seasons. In 2008, he directed the Southern Maryland Tri-County Orchestra. In 2006, he guest conducted the Thomas S. Wootton High School Orchestra in their debut at The Midwest Clinic. Mr. Herman has directed the 2002 Maryland All State Junior Orchestra, the 2003 Calvert County Senior Orchestra, L to R: Scott Herman, Corwin Taylor Music Education Leadership Award; Rick Penix, and the 2002 Baltimore County Coordinator of Fine Arts, Montgomery County Public Schools Middle School Public Schools Honors Band. Mr. Herman adjudicates music events throughout the region and is sought after by his colleagues as a resource. Mr. Herman’s private trumpet and string bass studio students are represented in All County, All State, and regional youth orchestras. He is currently a performer and clinician with the Capital Wind Symphony, as well as a freelance artist in several chamber ensembles throughout the Washington D.C. metro region. He is a past board member of the American String Teachers Association (ASTA). Scott Herman has led honors concerts, led innovations and advocated for music in our schools, and established himself as a master teacher of winds, strings, and percussion to the benefit of countless students in the state of Maryland. Contributing to these remarks: Scott Cameron, Cabin John Middle School, Montgomery County, Nominator School Administrator Award Matthew Record, Pocomoke Middle School, Worcester County Mr. Matthew Record has been the Principal at Pocomoke Middle School for only three years. However, in that short time, he has turned a struggling music program around and made it one of the stars of this small community. He has engaged the help of two dynamic music teachers, Ms. Leah Cole and Mr. Michael Devine; together, they have more than doubled enrollment in the programs, created excitement around performing, and involved the community, students, and parents in looking forward to events that Mr. Record has created. Mr. Record has dedicated increased school funding to the music programs, helped the teachers create physical environments that are more conducive to music instruction, and helped implement creative scheduling options to allow for L to R: Matthew Record, School Administrator Award; Tamara Mills, Coordinator of Instruction, higher music class enrollment. Worcester County Public Schools He has a knack for “thinking outside of the box” to help give expanded opportunities to students. Mr. Record is supportive of school-wide and community-wide events that support the arts. As an Arts Immersion school, Pocomoke Middle School has a large number of staff members who have been trained in arts integration. He is also very tech savvy, helping with social media outreach that educate the community about the arts and

its importance. He posts many photos, performances, and messages about the arts in his school, helping to get information about the arts from the school out into the community. Mr. Record has worked in tandem with the Worcester County Public Schools Fine Arts Supervisor to coordinate multiple arts residencies and performers to visit the school. He has financially supported these visits with 50% 100% of the costs. School Improvement Planning is an important part of school leadership. Typically, Principals place emphasis on improvements in the state-tested areas (Reading, Math, Science). However, because he values the arts and wants to constantly improve all of his programs, he implemented a Fine Arts Improvement Planning committee. He used professional development time and money to bring arts teachers together with central office arts staff to create a plan for arts improvement. He knows that when you devote the proper resources to an area, you will see success. We are very fortunate to have a Principal who understands that students are not well-rounded and do not develop as successful citizens without an education in the arts. Mr. Record makes the arts a priority at his school and in his community. Contributing to these remarks: Tamara Mills, Coordinator of Instruction, Worcester County Public Schools, Nominator Outstanding Music Teacher Award Lisa Adams, Berlin Intermediate School, Worcester County Ms. Adams has been with our school system for many years. She has been a staple on the specials team at Berlin Intermediate School, acting as team leader on several occasions. She is a passionate, professional music instrumental instructor. An MMEA member, she takes her profession seriously. She performs in her community, outside of school, and models for her students what it means to be a true musician. Ms. Adams has helped Berlin Intermediate School become a school at which parents, students, and the community know that they will get highquality, rigorous music instruction. Her school is a feeder school to the wildly popular L to R: Lisa Adams, Outstanding Music Teacher Tamara Mills, Coordinator of Instruction, music programs at Stephen Award; Worcester County Public Schools Decatur Middle School. She understands that for these elective programs at the middle school and high school to continue, she had to build the foundations. Her classroom is full of collaborative student work, while she facilitates learning. You will often find excited students in small groups or ensembles and learning from one another. She gives them just the right balance of direct instruction, independent learning, and accountability. She builds confidence within them by taking them to various community events and having them participate in district festivals and adjudications, where they consistently score very well. Several times, Ms. Adams has helped the fine arts supervisor with professional learning opportunities, provided feedback when necessary, and has offered to lead the school's arts integration/immersion efforts. In 2015, Ms. Adams won the Yale School of Music Yale Distinguished Music Educator Award for her outreach with the Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra (MSO), and she attended the Yale Music MMEA Awards for Excellence, continued on next page

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Symposium. She is active with our local MSO, providing masterclasses to students, field trips to symphonies, and instruments (through our Noteworthy Instruments Program) to those who cannot afford to rent or purchase an instrument. Recent observations of Ms. Adams' class have proven stellar. Her students came in and followed what are obviously consistent routines, worked in small ensembles, were formatively assessed, and were provided with ample opportunity to perform for one another in class. She is also dedicated to helping continue a legacy of high-quality music instruction. A former student who is now a music education major at Towson University is currently volunteering in her class. She has welcomed this student as an intern, to help to mentor her and provide valuable experience in the classroom. After helping to secure the necessary permissions, Ms. Adams is now working with this music student to make sure that she sees what high-quality, rigorous music instruction looks like. It is without hesitation that we recommend Ms. Adams for the Outstanding Music Teacher Award. Contributing to these remarks: Tamara Mills, Coordinator of Instruction, Worcester County Public Schools, Nominator Outstanding Music Teacher Award Sarah Burton, North Salisbury Elementary School, Wicomico County Mrs. Sarah Burton has been teaching in Wicomico County since September of 1991. She currently teaches elementary strings at North Salisbury Elementary School, middle school orchestra at Bennett Middle School, and high school string orchestra at Parkside High School and James M. Bennett High School. Mrs. Burton inspires her students to continue pursuing excellence on their instruments and has impressed her colleagues with her talent and dedication to the music programs of four distinctly different schools. Mrs. Burton has presented professional development sessions for Wicomico County’s novice instrumental teachers on the use of method books, repertoire, and instructional strategies. She served on the Wicomico County team that wrote the current Orchestra Curriculum and Summative Assessments. Mrs. Burton creates lesson plans and designs instruction that incorporate the state and national artistic process standards of creating, presenting, responding, and connecting, using traditional musical techL to R: Sarah Burton, Outstanding Music Teacher niques. She is able to connect Award; Jeffrey Baer, Supervisor of Fine Arts, with students of all ability levWicomico County Public Schools els through her positive relationships, musicality, and sense of humor. Mrs. Burton has established and maintains an excellent performance tradition for her string orchestras. She initiated the orchestra program at Pittsville Elementary and Middle School. Her schools’ groups have consistently earned excellent ratings at District V Orchestra Festival. She encourages her middle and high school students to participate in District and State Solo and Ensemble Festival, where they consistently score at the highest levels. She plays piano accompaniments for her students and for wind and percussion students from many schools at the District and State Solo and Ensemble Festivals. She also has accompanied AllShore Chorus, played piano for the annual Classics for a Cause

Concert (sponsored by the Salisbury Wicomico Arts Council), and accompanies student recitals for the Presto performing arts education outreach program at Salisbury University. In the community, Mrs. Burton demonstrates leadership by serving her church as music director, by playing in pit orchestras for the Community Players of Salisbury, and by playing cello in the Salisbury String Quartet. She was selected as a Teacher of the Year Quarter Finalist through a student/teacher/colleague nomination process at two of her schools. Mrs. Burton has planned and hosted the District V Orchestra Festival at Wicomico High School since 2011, and was instrumental in instituting the District V All-Shore Honors Orchestra ensemble. She has organized student ensembles to play for Chamber of Commerce events, awards assemblies, and the Teacher of the Year banquet. The high school orchestras that Mrs. Burton directs present annual Children’s Concerts. She has prepared individuals and ensembles to perform for The Honorable Governor Larry Hogan and the First Lady of Maryland, Yumi Hogan. Mrs. Burton is a very humble teacher, but I believe that she should be most proud of the fact that the high school orchestra program has grown from a combined group of 29 students, when she began, to four separate groups with over 100 students involved. Because of her guidance, the elementary and middle school orchestra program enrollment has tripled within the past ten years. As a testament to the value she places on school improvement and professional development, Mrs. Burton stated, “I am continuously encouraged that we are raising the bar and improving the quality of the orchestra program.” Contributing to these remarks: Jeffrey Baer, Supervisor of Fine Arts, Wicomico County Public Schools, Nominator Outstanding Music Teacher Award Emily James, South Shore Elementary School, Anne Arundel County Emily James has been a General Music, Choral, and Instrumental teacher at South Shore Elementary for the last thirteen years. During her time at South Shore Elementary, she has dedicated herself to building a strong, well-respected music program where students feel loved and seek to excel. She works hard to make meaningful connections between her school and the greater Crownsville community, and frequently finds performance opportunities for students. Mrs. James is a well-respected member of the South Shore faculty and her peers look forward to collaborating with her on special projects. She earned National Board for Professional Teaching Standards certification in Early Childhood Music in 2017, in an effort to deepen her knowledge and become a more reflective educator. She is currently pursuing her School Improvement Leadership L to R: Emily James, Outstanding Music Teacher Walker, Central Middle School, Certificate in hopes that she will Award; Lauren Anne Arundel County be able to bring about a positive influence for teachers and students in Anne Arundel County Public Schools. Mrs. James shares her passion for music education outside of her school building by using her time and talent to help fellow educators and students across the state. As a member of the Maryland Choral Educators Association (MCEA) board, she has worked diligently to revive the Elementary Demonstration Chorus at the winter conference. MMEA Awards for Excellence, continued on next page

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She frequently goes out of her way to contact colleagues around the state to encourage participation in this honor choir. In addition to managing the Elementary Demonstration Chorus, she was also invited to guest direct the group in 2018, and has presented at three other MMEA conferences. From 2015-2016, she served on the Anne Arundel County Public Schools curriculum writing team for General Music at the Kindergarten and Second Grade levels. Her thoughtful collaboration and diligent work laid the foundation for a successful curriculum that is used for all students in Anne Arundel County Public Schools. Mrs. James joined the All Children’s Chorus of Annapolis artistic team as Assistant Director in the fall of 2014. Since her arrival, the Training Chorus has grown in size and strength. She plans rigorous and engaging choral rehearsals while maintaining a positive learning environment. She has a knack for authentically connecting with singers. Her artistry and attention to detail allow for meaningful music making with singers. Her connections have increased the amount of financial and community support for ACCA, allowing more singers from the greater Annapolis area to become involved in the organization. She has had the honor of guest conducting honor choirs in St. Mary’s County, Maryland, and in Upshur County, West Virginia. Her enthusiasm and professionalism created memorable performances for both ensembles. Mrs. James’ reach goes beyond students. She frequently takes the time to mentor new teachers and is always willing to help a colleague. She frequently shares resources and ideas and has even volunteered in other schools during her time off to help prepare middle school ensembles for festival. Her dedication to music education is truly something to be admired. Contributing to these remarks: Lauren Walker, Central Middle School, Anne Arundel County, Nominator Outstanding Music Teacher Award Randine Levy, Roberto Clemente Middle School, Montgomery County Ms. Levy inspires students to learn music. Sixty percent of the school population is now enrolled in a music class: band, orchestra, chorus, rock band - all of which Ms. Levy has taught or is teaching. Students are so inspired that they often continue playing music in high school and beyond. Many of her former students are now young adults playing professionally in the music industry and majoring in music education in college. Ms. Levy encourages creativity and demonstrates quality instruction. Ms. Levy created a rock band program after seeing the results of adding rock music to the traditional band and orchestra classes. She now teaches Beginning, L to R: Randine Levy, Outstanding Music Teacher Intermediate, and Advanced Rock Award; Melissa Regan, Parent, Roberto Clemente Band. The students rehearse with Middle School, Montgomery County their bands every day and can use their own creative ideas for arrangements, riffs, and solos. Ms. Levy helps to build students’ self-esteem and confidence. Students are “front and center” when performing with a band of about six or seven members. Students perform for peers at lunch concerts and seasonal concerts, and at many community-based events such as Germantown Day, NEA Gala, and Board of Education visits.

She demonstrates leadership qualities with students and others. She encourages her students to take leadership roles within their bands. The students are accountable to each other for their bands to be successful. They must collaborate daily and negotiate personalities. She also takes a leadership role in her field. She is an adjunct professor at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), teaching An Innovative Classroom Clinic to current music education majors, and she includes the college students in her own middle school classroom for the ultimate experiential learning experience. She is expanding her leadership knowledge with her enrollment in the Equity and Excellence in Education graduate certification program at McDaniel College. Ms. Levy also encourages her colleagues to join her in impactful, school-wide events. She developed a “Live Aid” benefit-style concert to help those in need (in Nairobi, Kenya) and has extended the concert to include a science fair and world history presentations so that many more students and teachers can participate. Ms. Levy is warm and caring toward students and staff. She is academically responsible for teaching music, but she spends much of her time and energy helping her students transition through the challenges of middle school. She often meets with students to listen to what may be upsetting to them in their lives. She describes music as a way to express emotion and connect with others. There is a line of students every morning to see her and talk with her about music or other areas of interest. Ms. Levy has won two awards from her school colleagues: Most Hopeful Teacher and Most Spirited Teacher. Her school concerts are standing room only, with many alumni attending to support the current student bands. Most of the school staff and hundreds of students from across the country attended the recent 10th Anniversary Concert of Rock Band classes. She has been honored with many awards, including nomination for a Grammy in Education Award and Montgomery County Executive’s Award for Excellence in the Arts and Humanities in Education. She has authored articles about rock music education. She has been invited by VH1 Save The Music to present at the National Association of Music Merchants SupportMusic.com Coalition Webinar on the topic of “Expanding Music Education Through Access to Contemporary Music”. Ms. Levy and her students have been honored with news media articles and shows and have earned Superior ratings at county music festivals. Contributing to these remarks: Melissa Regan, Parent, Roberto Clemente Middle School, Montgomery County, Nominator Outstanding Music Teacher Award David Matchim, Centennial High School, Howard County I have to admit that I wanted to cry the first time I heard the Centennial High School Jazz Band. This was in 2009, the year before David Matchim entered the scene. Having at the time a middle school student in the excellent Burleigh Manor Middle School program, I was looking forward to the same level of excellence continued into the high school. I expected to hear improvement in the students’ performance, but this was not the case. I wondered how such talented musicians could sound worse than they had the year before and I worried about how I would continue to encourage my son’s engagement in music throughout high school if the program did not improve by the time of his arrival. But David Matchim did not cry over how the students sounded. He did not cry over being appointed to the program just days before the start of 2010 Band Camp. He did not cry at the overwhelming task of knowing MMEA Awards for Excellence, continued on next page

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nothing about the staff or students while being expected to lead them through the two weeks’ time they had to put a show together. He did not cry in that first week of band camp when students unexpectedly left early, came late, and dropped out altogether. He did not cry when 2011 Band Camp began with a 5.8 magnitude earthquake and ended with hurricane Irene which left our area without power for 5 days. Instead, David Matchim rolled up his sleeves and worked tirelessly to solve problems and to create a haven where students wanted to participate. He passionately believed in the potential of every student who walked into the band room and L to R: Terry Eberhardt, Music Coordinator, Howard County Public Schools; David Matchim, who marched onto the field. He Outstanding Music Teacher Award took pride in seeing them mature both musically and as human beings. He was so happy about the relationships, teamwork, and leadership skills that developed on and off the field in the students of the bands he conducted. He watched over them and intervened when he felt they needed help getting through difficult situations. He does cry as he has sent each class of his prodigies on to life after high school. He cries because he will truly miss them and because he knows they are better people for having been in the music arts program. This dedication, passion, and genuine caring are what have fueled the excellence of the CHS band program since David Matchim took the helm. Since that first year, band has transitioned from “just a class to take to complete the fine arts credit requirement” to a vibrant, fulfilling musical and social experience for students. Enrollment has increased so much that Matchim now offers 3 bands (from 2), continuing to offer Jazz Band and Marching Band with the addition of a pit band which pro-

vides live music for the CHS spring musical, a percussion ensemble, and a Steel Drum Band. He also supports theater arts and dance arts at Centennial High by providing live pit music for the musicals and through encouraging dance students to participate in the marching band shows. He has even chaperoned the spring dance trips to Orlando the past few years. The Centennial music program now boasts the highest music program participation rate of all Howard County schools. They have won nearly every accolade possible in the last few years, including having been invited to perform at The Midwest Clinic. Recognition of the CHS bands comes from his peers as well. In 2014, the CHS Wind Ensemble was selected to perform as a demonstration group at the Maryland Music Educators Association Fall In-Service Day Conference. After the performance, the ensemble received a standing ovation from the music directors from schools across the state. Additionally, Mr. Matchim’s bands regularly receive superior ratings at Howard County Public School System adjudications. At the 2016 adjudication, it was said that the Wind Ensemble had one of the finest performances in the history of the festival and once again received a standing ovation. As a parent of a student who takes music very seriously, it has been fascinating to witness the 9 years as David Matchim has transformed what was into the incredible program it is today. CHS students can continue to be challenged to grow, to be engaged in music, and to participate in a social network of like-minded young adults who enjoy coming together to improve themselves while having fun. Outside of regular academic classrooms, the band room is where many students spend the majority of their time. They find refuge there while, under the patient yet very demanding baton of Mr. Matchim, they continue to hone their craft. Contributing to these remarks: Jill Updike, Past President, CHS Friends of Music, Howard County Parent of Band Students, Nominator

R: Ashley Ashman, MMEA Member at Large, who served as Ceremony Host at the Awards Luncheon. In her position as Member at Large, she coordinated the 2019 MMEA Awards for Excellence nominations and selections and helped arrange the Awards Luncheon Ceremony.

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As young educators, we all set out to change the world. For music teachers, our tool for changing the world is music. For administrators, our greatest tool is an outstanding music teacher. ~ Terry Eberhardt, Music Coordinator, Howard County Public Schools, from his introduction of David Matchim, recipient of a 2019 MMEA Outstanding Music Teacher Award. Summer 2019

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Jazz Big Band Seating Placement by Earl MacDonald, Director of Jazz Studies, University of Connecticut Reprinted with permission from New Hampshire Quarter Notes, Fall 2018, Vol. 51, No. 1.

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nstrumentation, aesthetics, ensemble size, stage dimensions, and musical considerations have contributed to a variety of stage setups since the big band’s inception in the 1920s. Rather than cataloging and weighing the favorable and unfavorable characteristics of unconventional configurations (like Stan Kenton’s inverted “V” or Thad Jones’ separating the baritone sax and bass trombone), this article will explain the reasoning behind the widely-accepted “traditional block” formation, which helps to achieve maximized lines of vision, listening, blend, and balance.

Guiding Principles Lead players (alto sax 1, trombone 1 and trumpet 1) should be in the middle of their sections, in a direct line with one another. Unlike the concert band, the lead players should never be seated on the end of the section. For the trumpet and trombone players, the most common configuration is 2-1-3-4, from the director’s vantage point. Seating for the saxophone section is slightly different than the brass sections, and the optimal saxophone section sound and balance is achieved with the following arrangement: Tenor 1•Alto 2•Alto 1•Tenor 2•Baritone The rhythm section sets up as a unit, to the left of the wind instruments, from the perspective of the director. In the diagram above, a short riser is used, on which the trumpet players stand and the trombone players are seated. One player per stand is compulsory for all players in the jazz band. Insist on a low, flat stand directly in front of each player. Student trombonists might argue the benefit of having a slanted stand at the side, but this isolates the player from blending with the section. With the setup in this diagram, a narrow pathway between the winds and rhythm section allows soloists to walk out front when the music permits. Two guiding principles have been achieved with this seating arrangement: the lead play22

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

ers are in the middle, and the primary soloist chairs (tenor 1, trombone 2 and trumpet 2) are closest to the rhythm section, thereby creating a combo-like setting during solo passages that will help them hear the chord changes as they improvise their solos. When an arranger has assigned trumpet solos to the 4th trumpet chair, one might use a trumpet section configuration of 4-31-2, which keeps the lead trumpet in the middle, while bringing the soloist closer to the rhythm section. However, many directors prefer keeping all the lowest parts to their far right when facing the band. Correspondingly, the baritone sax and bass trombone are on the right side of the big band, opposite from the string bass. Cases have been made for grouping these three low register instruments together on the left, but ultimately more sonic depth is achieved with the aforementioned configuration. The Rhythm Section When setting up the rhythm section, aim to facilitate unobstructed visual communication between each player. In addition to being Maryland Music Educator

in close proximity to one another, the bassist and drummer should have clear sight of each other’s hands and faces. This will assist them in synchronizing their beat. Whether the bassist is situated beside the hi-hat or ride cymbal is a matter of personal preference. Some argue that being in close proximity of the hi-hat helps lock in the groove. Others might cite a pairing such as Ron Carter (bass) and Tony Williams (drums), as an example of the bassist standing with the ride cymbal directly in his left ear, for time alignment. In the latter example (not represented in the above diagram), the bassist is positioned in the crook of the piano, between the piano and drum set. In this way he/she functions as the rhythm section’s “glue,” in terms of both the harmonic foundation and the time. The guitarist is most often seated next to tenor sax 1 in the row of saxophones. The guitarist and pianist need a clear line of vision with each other, to facilitate non-verbal cues. A small stage or rehearsal space might necessitate putting the rhythm section on the right side of the band. This is fine; however, NEVER divide the rhythm section with Summer 2019

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some of the players to the right and some to the left of the band. They are reliant on each other for listening and seeing each other as they strive to play a solid groove. Common Questions Asked by Directors With the conventional big band setup now addressed, some variations do occur from time to time with setup and with instrumentation, due to the number of players in the big jazz big band. In this next section, let’s consider some practical questions and variations I often encounter by music educators: Q: I’d like to carry five trumpets. Where should the fifth trumpet sit and what part should they double on charts written for 4 trumpets? A: For five trumpets, I like the 3-2-1-4-5 configuration, and suggest doubling the 4th part. NEVER double the lead part in any section. Q: I have a ‘REALLY big band,’ with 2 players on each chair in most sections. How do you suggest we set up? A: In contrast to marching bands, bigger is not always better. If possible, start a second feeder band. The students will feel better because their individual roles become more important, and you will be able to teach and have the students experience correct sectional balance and blending. Under no circumstances should you double rhythm section parts. Two pianists should not share one bench. If you have two bassists or guitarists, have one unplug while the other plays. As in sports, everyone has a specific role, and sometimes even the best players must take a turn sitting on the bench; otherwise, the playing field becomes a cluttered mess. Q: Where should amplifiers be placed? A: It’s crucial that the guitar and bass players put their amps behind them so they can hear their sound and adjust their playing. Q: I realize this is out of the scope of the traditional setup, however, I have students who play non-standard jazz instruments in my jazz band (flute/clarinet/bassoon for example), because the students are either highly motivated, or help to fill out a section that is lacking in players, or both. Where should these players be situated and how can they best be utilized? A: Be guided by your musical intuition and the above-outlined principles when making Summer 2019

...this article will explain the reasoning behind the widely-accepted “traditional block” formation, which helps to achieve maximized lines of vision, listening, blend, and balance. such decisions. I can imagine seating a highlymotivated bassoonist, French hornist, or euphonium player within the trombone section, to compensate for fewer trombone players. But if the instrument is a different transposition, provide the player with a transposed part. Don’t leave this responsibility to the student. Should you opt to add a flute, give some careful thought as to what lines will be doubled. Use the flute selectively, as an added unison/octave color. Simply handing them a lead trumpet part and telling them to play down a major 2nd isn’t a good option, as it will negatively impact overall intonation. When the guitar is assigned written melodic lines, I might consider doubling these on flute, and having the flutist sit next to the guitar. Within the same part, I might occasionally have the flute double a muted trumpet part, as well. Although I have seen supplementary woodwind sections seated to the side of a big band, I wouldn’t suggest going this route unless the music calls for it and/or you are willing to rewrite and reorchestrate the music. If the students are truly exceptionally motivated, and there are holes in your big band’s core instrumentation, consider encouraging those players to pick up a secondary instrument. It’s certainly easier to achieve acceptable balance between four trombones than two trombones, a bassoon and a bass clarinet. Conclusion Further equipping instrumental music educators with the skills and knowledge to become increasingly comfortable in directing big bands was the motivating force behind writing this article. Setting up in a manner which achieves overall musical unity through maximized lines of vision, listening, blend, and balance will provide a solid foundation for your group. Feel free to send me additional questions on this topic, or anything else jazz-related, at earl.macdonald@uconn.edu. Maryland Music Educator

About the Author: Earl MacDonald’s commitment to the jazz art form is apparent in his performing, composing and teaching. The former musical director and pianist for Maynard Ferguson serves as the Director of Jazz Studies at the University of Connecticut and teaches annually at UMass Amherst’s Jazz in July program. The Winnipeg native earned a Bachelor of Music degree in Jazz Performance at McGill University and a master’s degree at Rutgers University, where he apprenticed with Kenny Barron. A recipient of the Sammy Nestico Award for outstanding big band arranging, MacDonald has released five albums as a bandleader, two of which earned JUNO nominations for Jazz Album of the Year. For his chamber jazz explorations on “Mirror of the Mind”, MacDonald was described as “a magical, musical alchemist of hip hybrids” (Owen McNally, Hartford Courant). Similarly, his large ensemble project, “Re:Visions” was touted as having “gone beyond where most big bands go, establishing Earl MacDonald as a major force in the world of jazz composition” (Dan Bilawsky, www.allaboutjazz.com). Visit MacDonald’s web site, www.earlmacdonald.com, where you can take a free online lesson, read articles and reviews, hear his music, peruse his blog, and learn more about Earl MacDonald’s performances, teaching, and latest projects. Comments are welcome and may be directed to Earl MacDonald at earl.macdonald@uconn.edu.

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Strategies for Success: Making Yourself Marketable as a Music Educator

Evans

Woolery

by Kathryn L. Evans, Associate Professor of Music Education, Towson University, and Danielle Woolery, Associate Professor of Music and Coordinator of Instrumental Studies, Texas Woman’s University

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s music education professors, we regularly encounter students who believe different myths about the job search process. Examples include 1) your college or professors will find you a job; 2) school districts will find you; and 3) only the best music students will get jobs. If you believe any of these statements, your future may seem bleak! In reality, however, there are several steps you can take to make yourself more marketable and even better prepared as you finish your pre-service education and begin to look for a job.

Be Proactive and Seek Guidance Your job hunt has already started. The music world is small, and you only have one chance to make a first impression. Therefore, it is important to be professional from the start of your college career. One of the first ways to do this is to introduce yourself to the music education faculty at your school, even if you will not actually have them for class until your junior or senior year. They will enjoy meeting you and knowing that you are invested in your future career path. Another person you should get to know is your music advisor: schedule a meeting to sit down together and map out a long-term plan, and be sure to follow up every semester. Do you think you already know where you would like to student teach or what grade levels interest you? Or are you passionate about the subject matter, but not sure if you would like to teach elementary or high school? Your advisor is there to help you through the process. Don’t be afraid to ask for insight and listen to recommendations concerning course rotations, volunteer opportunities, credit hours, graduation deadlines, transfer credits, etc. Chances are, music advisors have advised 24

Finding ways to gain experience is a vital part of making yourself stand out from the crowd. many music education graduates in the past who are now gainfully employed, so let them help you be successful!

chamber ensembles is another way to diversify your background. Jazz ensemble, mariachi ensemble, a homogeneous instrument choir, or a quartet are just a few of the options that can show your initiative and dedication. Campus music organizations are an avenue in which you can gain valuable experience and networking opportunities. Does your school have a collegiate chapter of the National Association for Music Educators (NAfME)? Or a student chapter of the American Choral Directors Association, or the Organization of American Kodály Educators? Have you considered joining a

Become Involved While your academic and musical studies are of utmost importance, we also suggest that you become involved in a variety of activities. Be as active in ensembles as possible, especially if you want to be a band, orchestra, or choir director. You not only learn musicianship and team-working skills as an ensemble member, but you can start to think as a director does and gain rehearsal techniques and strategies. If you are an instrumentalist, consider joining the university choir; if you are a vocalist, consider joining the university band or orchestra after your instrumental techniques courses. This will make you even more marketable, aid in preparation for your music content exam, and help you to make connections Gain experience and networking through your collegiate chapter of NAfME. Here, Theresa Iacarino (Music Teacher, Baltimore between the different County) provides a ukulele workshop for the Towson University areas. Performing in collegiate chapter of NAfME.

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music fraternity, such as Delta Omicron, Kappa Kappa Psi, Mu Phi Epsilon, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, or Sigma Alpha Iota? All of these organizations can provide students with professional development, leadership, and service opportunities focused on their main area(s) of interest. Gain Experience Finding ways to gain experience is a vital part of making yourself stand out from the crowd. Take advantage of student rates at professional development events, such as state music education conferences, meetings of professional music organizations, discipline-specific conferences, or pre-service and early career conferences. You can also attend conducting workshops, pedagogy master classes, or music reading sessions to enhance your skill set. Volunteering shows that you are willing to work hard without substantial financial reward‌sounds like the life of a music teacher, right? There are several avenues to explore for volunteer opportunities in college that can be both fun and beneficial. Some options include assisting your music department with recruitment events/audition days, assisting at local music contests or festivals, volunteering at a professional music organization conference, performing at local senior living facilities, or mentoring/tutoring younger students. You can also seek opportunities to teach/conduct through volunteering in a variety of capacities. These could include teaching private lessons, working as a marching drill tech, leading sectionals, coaching students before solo and ensemble contests, directing a church choir, or serving as an assistant or intern at a summer camp or for a community choir.

Advocate for Yourself: Listen and Observe As you prepare for student teaching, you should also dedicate time to listen and observe. This is a time when you will want to advocate for yourself, without overstepping. Attend local school concerts, music assessments, and summer camps. Observe music teachers over spring break or between semesters to learn from their instructional strategies and rehearsal techniques. Visit multiple classrooms and programs so you can begin to network with potential mentor teachers while observing in a variety of settings. Start compiling a list of master teachers with whom you would like to work, based on field experiences, conference presentations, performances, and word of mouth. Speak with senior music education students and recent graduates about their experience with their student teaching and mentor teachers. Also, be sure to communicate with your music education advisor and faculty. They may know of the perfect program/mentor teacher for you that you have not even considered. Conclusion In contrast to the myths presented at the beginning of this article, your future is bright and filled with many possibilities! Remember to seek the advice and guidance of trusted individuals, advocate for yourself, and be confident in your training and abilities. Find what makes you unique and build on your

About the Authors: Danielle Woolery is Associate Professor of Music and Coordinator of Instrumental Studies at Texas Woman’s University in Denton, Texas, where she teaches clarinet and courses in music education and pedagogy. She holds degrees from the University of Miami, where she was a Henry Mancini Institute Fellow; Webster University; and the University of North Texas. Dr. Woolery is an active chamber music performer and clinician and has given performances and presentations both nationally and internationally. She was awarded first prize in the 2013 International Clarinet Association Research Competition in Assisi, Italy and serves on the editorial board of the NACWPI Journal, the official publication of the National Association of College Wind and Percussion Instructors. Summer 2019

strengths. As you worry about applied lesson juries, ear training tests, and writing lesson plans, make sure you can still see the forest for the trees. Avoid getting lost in the day-to-day activities by keeping sight of your end goal: becoming the best music educator you can be. By being proactive and intentional about building your resumĂŠ throughout your journey, you can help yourself reach the ultimate goal of getting your first job as a music teacher!

Events such as that presented by Theresa Iacarino (Music Teacher, Baltimore County) to Towson University music education students can enrich your professional development.

Kathryn L. Evans is Associate Professor of Music Education at Towson University. She earned a Ph.D. in music education at the University of Miami, where she was the recipient of the prestigious University of Miami Fellowship. She received Master of Music degrees in both music education and choral conducting, as well as the Bachelor of Music Education degree, from Central Michigan University. An active clinician, adjudicator, and honor choir conductor, she presents at conferences and teacher in-services nationally and internationally. Prior to joining the faculty of Towson University, Dr. Evans taught K-12 general music and choir in Michigan.

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MARYLAND MUSIC EDUCATOR Vol. 65, No. 4 Summer 2019 Official Journal of the Maryland Music Educators Association Maryland Music Educators Association, PMB#472, 6710 Ritchie Highway, Glen Burnie, MD 21061 This issue of Maryland Music Educator will be posted at www.mmea-maryland.org