Maryland Music Educator, Winter 2020-2021, Vol. 67, No. 2

Page 1

Vol. 67, No. 2

Winter 2020-2021

MARYLAND MUSIC EDUCATOR

Official Journal of the Maryland Music Educators Association

In This Issue: • MMEA 2021 All State Ensembles • Teaching Strings for the Non-String Playing Teacher • Clean AND Musical Playing • Differentiated Collaboration for Arts Integration •Reinvigorating the Remote Learning Choir • Using ESSA to Leverage Arts Education Policy • Preparing Future Music Educators for the Stress of the Job


2

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


L CO

E CONSEN LEG SU

S

25

top

Best Online Christian Colleges

IN TH U.S. E

Learn about our no-fee tuition and

Learn about ourdiscounts no-feeattuition and graduate tuition )(**+',-(.#/ 0$'.&"*1% graduate tuition discounts at )(**+',-(.#/0$'.&"*1%

Earn your

• Three specialized degree tracks to advance your education and career: wind, orchestral, choral • Post-master’s certificate in music conducting

With a program and faculty reflecting a national reputation for academic excellence, Messiah University’s master’s degree in music conducting will enhance your ability as an effective music educator and conductor.

• Emphasis on summer and online coursework, designed to fit the schedules of busy professionals • Our faculty are experienced music educators and conductors, and take time to mentor students • Coursework is instantly applicable to your everyday work setting

Experience the academic distinction of a nationally ranked Christian university. !"#$%&'$(($

APPLY TODAY 717-796-5061 messiah.edu/gradprograms Online | Flexible | Affordable


AUDITION for SUSQUEHANNA

right from home!

This year, our audition format will be a combination of recorded submissions and virtual meetings with faculty members.

SUSQU.EDU/MUSIC BACHELOR OF MUSIC Music Education • Performance • Composition BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA | SUSQU.EDU

Offering convenient opportunities to double major.

@susquehannau

We welcome in-person tours of our campus and music facilities by appointment. Call 570-372-4260 to schedule your visit. 4

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


!"!#$%!&'(!)*$ #!!+$%!&'(!)* !"#$%&'&"&$()*+&,-.$/*0,#$1%(/2$304#5$6-*$&++#55$,-$&$7#&8,"$-9$:.-9#550-;&8$)#4#8-:'#;,$$ -::-.,*;0,0#5$ &;)$ .#5-*.+#5<$ %(/$ =.0;35$ 6-*$ 0;,-$ &$ ;#,7-.>$ -9$ 80>#?'0;)#)$ +-88#&3*#5@$$ #A:#.,5$&;)$:.-9#550-;&85$7"-$7&;,$,-$5"&.#$,"#0.$.#&8?7-.8)$#A:#.0#;+#5<$%-*B88$&85-$.#+#04#$ 4&8*&=8#$,0:5$-;$&)4-+&+6$&5505,&;+#@$:.-3.&'$"#&8,"$5*::-.,$&;)$'*+"$'-.#<$C#,$*5$"#8:$6-*$ .&05#$,"#$=&.<$D-$,-$%&'&"&<0-E#)*+&,-.5FF(G


Take your musicianship to new levels through the continuous study of theory, practice, and performance.

Don’t Just Play. PERFORM AT YOUR HIGHEST LEVEL.

REMOTE AUDITIONS Saturday, December 12, 2020 Saturday, January 30, 2021 Saturday, February 6, 2021 Saturday, February 13, 2021 Application Deadline: December 1 Apply at ithaca.edu/music/admission.

VIRTUAL INFO SESSIONS Learn more about the School of Music from the comfort of your home! Live sessions offered multiple times each week. ithaca.edu/music | music@ithaca.edu

Summer Music Academy

A residential, supportive environment with other musicians from across the country.

HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION July 11–24, 2021

INTERMEDIATE DIVISION July 25–31, 2021

• Entering grades 10–12 • Orchestra, wind ensemble, voice,

• Entering grades 7–9 • Band, orchestra, and voice programs

and jazz programs Registration Opens: December 1

6

Learn more at ithaca.edu/sma.

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


Maryland Music Educator Official Journal of the Maryland Music Educators Association

Winter 2020-2021 Volume 67, Number 2

Features…

16 34 38 40 42 44

MMEA 2021 All State Ensembles: Member Lists by Ensemble by JJ Norman, MMEA Executive Director; Andie Sante, MMEA Operations Manager

Teaching Strings! Tips, Tricks, and Tools for the Non-String Playing Teacher by Kate McFadden, MODA Past President, Baltimore County Clean. Musical. Tom & Jerry or Ben & Jerry by Eric Lynch, Verona High School, New Jersey

Differentiated Collaboration for Arts Integration by Shawna Longo, Durban Avenue School, New Jersey

Reinvigorating the Remote Learning Choir: Ideas for Making Online Learning Meaningful and Efficient by Matthew C. Lee, John P. Stevens High School, New Jersey

Using ESSA to Leverage Arts Education Policy by Lynn M. Tuttle, Director of Public Policy, Research, & Professional Development,

NAfME

47

Letters from Retirement: Preparing Future Music Educators for the Stress of the Job:

Can They Learn from the Old Ways?

by Richard A. Disharoon, Baltimore County (retired); Past President of MMEA, MCEA, Eastern Division of NAfME; MMEA Hall of Fame Member

Contents… 2, 15 MMEA Annual Conference, Virtual Exhibit Hall, Job and College Fair 8 MMEA Executive Board Directory, Presidents, Article & Ad Information 9 MMEA Giving and Sponsorship, MMEA Hall of Fame, Award Recipients, Executive Directors, Editors 14 MMEA Student Leadership Summit, Fall 2020 Solo & Ensemble Festival 15 MMEA Annual Conference, Virtual Exhibit Hall, Job and College Fair

29 MMEA Young Composer Project Program Overview 30 In Memoriam, Mary Ellen Cohn, cont. 32 The Editor’s Page 33 Advocacy Link 33, 49 Volunteering for MMEA 46 Writing for Maryland Music Educator 49 MMEA/NAfME Membership NAfME Resources 49 MMEA/NAfME Membership 49 NAfME Divisions Elections

Advertisers Index Frostburg State Univ. Dept. of Music....12 Ithaca College School of Music ..............6 Menchey Music Service ........................11 Messiah College MM in Conducting.......3 Peripole Music, Inc...............................41 QuaverMusic.com ................50 (Cover 4) Salisbury University Music Program .....13 Susquehanna University Music Dept......4 Univ. of Maryland Baltimore Co. Department of Music ........................39 Wells School of Music, West Chester University ..................10 Wilkes Univ. Performing Arts Dept. .....33 Yamaha Corporation of America Educator Suite ....................................5

On the Cover: Sunset over a fence in a snow-covered farm field in rural Carroll County, Maryland. © Can Stock Photo. Artist: appalachianviews. Number 18242079. Used with licensed permission. Licensee: Felicia B. Johnston. The Maryland Music Educator is published for the members of the Maryland Music Educators Association, Inc., a federated state unit of the National Association for Music Education (NAfME), and music teachers in Maryland four times annually in the months of September/October, January/February, March/April, and May/June/July. Articles for publication must be submitted to the editor by August 2, October 1, January 4, and March 15, respectively. Publication dates, advertising rates, and closing dates may be found on the MMEA web page, www.mmea-maryland.org, under “Resources/Publications”. Maryland Music Educator will be emailed to all MMEA members, educators who participate in MMEA events, district arts supervisors, college music education students, libraries, MEA editors in other states, and advertisers. It will also be posted on the MMEA website, publicly available at no cost to readers, at www.mmea-maryland.org. Editor: Felicia Burger Johnston mmea.editor@gmail.com 304-613-2871 Maryland Music Educators Association (MMEA) is the professional association for the school music teachers of Maryland. MMEA is a 501 (c)(3) not-for-profit association incorporated in the State of Maryland. MMEA’s mission is to provide professional development for music teachers, opportunities for over 26,000 people to engage in state-wide music activities, events involving students, teachers, and volunteers, and to serve as an advocate for and to advance music education in Maryland schools.

Winter 2020-2021

Maryland Music Educator

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

7


MMEA Executive Board Directory 2020-2021 The MMEA Executive Board and staff listing is updated at https://www.mmea-maryland.org/executive-board-staff. Elected Officers President Brian Schneckenburger Baltimore County President-Elect Jennifer Kauffman Anne Arundel County Immediate Past President Angela Adams Anne Arundel County

Collegiate Representative Ebonie Pierce University of Maryland Baltimore County

Special Learners Chair Paul Tooker University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Initiatives Stephanie Prichard, Co-Chair University of Maryland Maurice Watkins, Co-Chair Prince George’s County

State Large Ensemble Festivals Chr. Scott Engel Washington County

Maryland State Dept. of Education Representative Alysia Lee Maryland State Department of Education

Member at Large Thomas Pierre Prince George’s County Recording Secretary Shefali Shah Anne Arundel County Component Association Presidents

Membership Chair Janet Gross Calvert County Membership Development Chair Stephanie Thompson Calvert County

Band Directors (MBDA) Matt Heist Anne Arundel County

Music Industry Representative Scott Schimpf Music & Arts

Choral Directors (MCEA) Katherine Meloro Howard County Orchestra Directors (MODA) Dan Sitomer Anne Arundel County General Music Teachers (MGMTA) Christie Cook Calvert County College Music Educators (MSMTE) Louise Anderson Salisbury University Appointed Officers Advocacy Chair Ronald P. Frezzo Montgomery County (retired) Collegiate Chapters Representative Brian Kaufman University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC)

Music Supervisors Representative Karl Stewart Carroll County Music Technology Chair Krystal Williams Baltimore City Private Schools Representative Joseph Shortall Private School Public Relations Chair Deborah Turner Anne Arundel County Research Chair Cathleen Russell Baltimore County

State Solo and Ensemble Festival Chair Jeffrey Baer Wicomico County Tri-M Chair Erick Von Sas Anne Arundel County Young Composers Project Michelle Roberts Montgomery County Staff Members * Board Member *Executive Director JJ Norman mmeamarylandinfo@gmail.com PMB#472 6710 F Ritchie Highway Glen Burnie, MD 21061 Communications Manager (Part-time) Kayde Deardorff mmeamarylandinfo@gmail.com Operations Manager (Part-time) Andie Sante mmeamarylandinfo@gmail.com

MMEA Presidents 1941-43 – Robert S. Bolles 1943-45 – C. James Velie 1945-47 – Frances Jackman Civis 1947-49 – Miriam Hoffman 1949-51 – Mary M. Hunter 1951-53 – Mary de Vermond 1953-55 – Thomas R. Lawrence 1955-57 – Blanche F. Bowlsbey 1957-59 – Mildred B. Trevvett 1959-61 – Emil H. Serposs 1961-63 – Chester J. Petranek 1963-64 – Ward K. Cole 1964-65 – Chester J. Petranek 1965-67 – Donald Regier 1967-69 – Nicholas Geriak 1969-71 – Alice S. Beer 1971-73 – Joseph Chalker 1973-75 – Bert L. Damron 1975-77 – Robert E. Kersey 1977-79 – David Marchand 1979-81 – Thomas E. Silliman 1981-83 – Thomas W. Fugate 1983-85 – Clarence T. Rogers 1985-87 – John E. Wakefield 1987-89 – R. Bruce Horner 1989-91 – Patricia W. Teske 1991-93 – Phyllis R. Kaplan 1993-95 – Roger J. Folstrom 1995-97 – Barbara F. King 1997-99 – Richard A. Disharoon 1999-01 – Michael L. Mark 2001-03 – Michael L. Mark 2003-05 – Ann Vaughn 2005-07 – Amy Cohn 2007-09 – Chrystie Adams 2009-11 – Carol Howell 2011-13 – Ginny Flynn 2013-15 – Stephen W. Miles 2015-17 – Katherine A. Murphy 2017-19 – Angela Adams June-Dec. 2019 – Paul Dembowski 2019-20 – Interim Pres. Angela Adams June 2020 – Brian Schneckenburger

*Journal Editor Felicia Burger Johnston Upshur County, WV (retired) mmea.editor@gmail.com

Updates, news, and more at: www.mmeamaryland.org Find MMEA on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter

Sight Reading Committee Chair Todd Burroughs St. Mary’s County

Maryland Music Educator Official Journal of the Maryland Music Educators Association Issue

Article Submission Deadline

Issue

March 20, 2021

Summer 2021

March 15, 2021

Fall 2021

August 2, 2021

Fall 2021

August 2, 2021

Winter 2021-2022

October 1, 2021

Winter 2021-2022

October 1, 2021

Spring 2022

January 3, 2022

Spring 2022

January 3, 2022

Please submit articles to: https://form.jotform.com/mmeamaryland/-mmea-contentsubmission-form. Please address questions to Felicia Burger Johnston, Editor, at mmea.editor@gmail.com. 8

Ad Contract Submission Deadline

Summer 2021

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

Advertising information & contract submission for Maryland Music Educator and the MMEA In-Service conference programs: https://www.mmea-maryland.org/publications.

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


MMEA is supported in part by a grant from the Maryland State Arts Council (https://www.msac.org/), an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts. MSAC on Facebook™: https://www.facebook.com/mdartscouncil/ MSAC on Twitter™: @mdartscouncil

MMEA Awards for Excellence Recipients Rosemary & James Walters Service Award 2002 – Thomas W. Fugate 2003 – Chrystie L. Adams 2004 – Richard A. Disharoon 2010 – Mabel Leonore Sawhill 2011 – Howard L. Miskimon 2011 – Sabra C. Steward 2012 – Deborah Turner 2013 – Jan Strevig 2014 – James L. Turk 2015 – Sally Wagner 2017 – Ginny Flynn 2020 – Janet Gross Corwin Taylor Music Education Leadership Award 1994 – Karen Douglas 1995 – Rosa Fletcher Crocker 1996 – Mary Ann Mears 1997 – James L. Tucker, Jr. 1998 – Roger J. Folstrom 1998 – Phyllis T. Kaplan 1999 – Barbara F. King 2002 – Mary Ellen Cohn 2004 – Chris Tuel 2005 – Linda Patton 2006 – Gary Beauchamp 2009 – Joan Orcutt 2010 – Katherine A. Rodeffer 2011 – Richard J. Deasy 2012 – C. Nelson Fritts 2013 – Nancy S. Grasmick 2017 – Anita Lambert 2018 – Michael L. Mark 2019 – Scott Herman 2020 – Todd J. Burroughs

Maryland Music Educators Association: Giving and Sponsorship MMEA provides in-service networking and professional learning for music teachers, opportunities for thousands of music students and teachers, and serves as an advocate for music education. MMEA provides student and teacher enrichment by sponsoring professional learning conferences, annual Awards for Excellence, and eight music groups for student All State music events. MMEA and five component associations, with over 300 volunteers, host district and state Solo and Ensemble events. During the spring, orchestras, bands, and choruses perform in festivals with nearly 10,000 students participating. Give Today! Become an MMEA Sponsor! https://www.mmea-maryland.org/give

Executive Directors Maryland Music Educators Association 1998-Dec. 2018 – Mary Ellen Cohn Editors, Maryland Music Educator 1954-57 – Homer Ulrich 1957-61 – Corwin H. Taylor 1961-65 – James L. Fisher 1965-67 – Robert E. Kersey 1967-73 – W. Warren Sprouse

Nov. 2018-Feb. 2020 – Mariama Boney May 2020– JJ Norman 1973-84 – James H. Avampato 1984-86 – W. Warren Sprouse 1987-96 – Thomas W. Fugate 1996-01 – Ray H. Zeigler 2001-08 – Thomas W. Fugate 2008-09 – Dawn Farmer 2008-09 – Felicia Burger Johnston

MMEA Hall of Fame 1988 – Margaret Black 1988 – Robert S. Bolles 1988 – David Burchuck 1988 – Frances Jackman Civis 1988 – John Cole 1988 – Mary G. Cross 1988 – John Denues 1988 – Nicholas Geriak 1988 – Thomas L. Gibson 1988 – Rose Marie Grentzer 1988 – S. Fenton Harris 1988 – Miriam Hoffman 1988 – Mary M. Hunter 1988 – John Itzel 1988 – Henrietta Baker Low 1988 – Otto Ortmann 1988 – Philip S. Royer 1988 – Osmar Steinwald 1988 – Charles C. T. Stull 1988 – Eugene W. Troth 1988 – Homer Ulrich 1988 – C. James Velie 1988 – Levi Wilder 1988 – Dorothy Willison

Winter 2020-2021

1988 – William Llewelyn Wilson 1989 – Alice S. Beer 1989 – Thomas R. Lawrence 1989 – Corwin H. Taylor 1990 – Robert E. Kersey 1990 – Dorothy S. Pickard 1991 – John Fignar, Jr. 1992 – Blanche F. Bowlsbey 1992 – Joseph F. Chalker 1992 – James L. Fisher 1993 – Thomas W. Fugate 1993 – C. William Johnson 1993 – Michael Pastelak 1994 – Mildred R. Reiner 1994 – Shirley J. Shelley 1994 – Donald Regier 1995 – David Marchand 1995 – W. Warren Sprouse 1996 – James H. Avampato 1996 – Carmelo J. Palazzo 1997 – Clarence T. Rogers 1998 – Maurice R. Feldman 1999 – Sr. Mary Theresine Staub S.S.N.D. 1999 – Nancy M. Cook

Maryland Music Educator

2000 – Mildred B. Trevvett 2003 – Leroy Battle 2003 – Glenn Patterson 2004 – Roger J. Folstrom 2004 – Phyllis R. Kaplan 2005 – Barbara F. King 2005 – Michael L. Mark 2006 – Mary Ellen Cohn 2006 – John Wakefield 2007 – Olivia W. Gutoff 2008 – Richard A. Disharoon 2008 – James L. Tucker, Jr. 2009 – Leone Y. Woodall 2010 – Bruce D. Wilson 2011 – Lee Stevens 2012 – C. Scott Sharnetzka 2012 – Cherie Stellaccio 2013 – Ray Danner 2014 – Dana Rothlisberger 2018 – Gilbert A. Brungardt (Posthumous) 2019 – Chris Vadala (Posthumous) 2020 – Charles Haslup (Posthumous)

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

9


WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

Wells School of Music

12 39 200+

DEGREE PROGRAMS PERFORMING ENSEMBLES CONCERTS ANNUALLY

PURSUE YOUR PASSION

at WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY musicinfo@wcupa.edu | wcupa.edu/music


SUPPORTING THE ARTS SINCE 1936

Instrument Rentals Music Lessons Instrument Repair Yamaha Pianos Printed Music Toll Free 1-888-menchey mencheymusic.com Hanover PA • Harrisburg PA • Lancaster PA Reading PA • York PA • Gambrills MD Timonium MD • Westminster MD


"#$%&'()*$+,#)-'./# PROGRAMS IN:!

Music Education with Pathway to Master’s in 5 years

Performance Industry Music Studies CONTACT US: music@frostburg.edu | 301-687-4116

music.frostburg.edu facebook.com/fsumusicdepartment Frostburg Music Department

Saturday, Jan. 23, 2021 Thursday, Feb. 11, 2021

Friday - Saturday Jan. 22 - 23, 2021

Saturday, Feb. 6, 2021

Saturday, Feb. 20, 2021

Persons with disabilities may request accommodation through the ADA Compliance Office: 301-687-4102 (VRO 1-800-735-2258). Frostburg State University is a smoke-free campus.

12

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


Winter 2020-2021

Maryland Music Educator

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

13


MMEA is thrilled with the success of the inaugural MMEA Student Leadership Summit, held on January 9, 2021. This virtual summit was held for student leaders grades 7-12, undergraduates, and their teachers. 270 music students from across the United States, Canada, and China engaged in sessions with topics on advocacy, conflict resolution, communication, diversity, equity, inclusion, and access, self-care, time management. The Summit proved to be an educational and inspirational event for all in attendance. We are grateful for the 2021 Summit presenters: Dr. Myra Rhoden, Dr. James Weaver, Kyle Mills, Dr. Christa Kuebel, Jared L. Cassedy, Dr. Michael Raiber, Jazzmone Sutton, Dr. Shelby Chipman, Elizabeth Lasko, and MeLinda Ford. What students are saying about the summit: “Learning used to be a fun thing for me and then virtual learning took all the joy of learning away. Today I was able to find some of that happiness from learning through this summit as well as learn real everyday life skills that will help me service my band better.” The session recordings are on sale for $10. Please visit https://www.mmea-maryland.org/2021-student-leadership-summit for information and details.

In December, MMEA hosted a new festival opportunity, the Fall 2020 Solo & Ensemble Festival. This new Festival opportunity welcomed all students to submit recordings for adjudication with no approved repertoire list, no instrument/vocal styling restrictions, and students and educators were encouraged to select repertoire that was representative of the student’s personal experiences and culture. Over 125 students submitted recordings in music styles ranging from classical, world music, pop, and R&B. We applaud all of these young musicians for their creativity and musicality! Thanks to JJ Norman, MMEA Executive Director, and Andie Sante, MMEA Operations Manager, for information on pages 14-15. Thanks to Kayde Deardorff, MMEA Communications Manager, for graphics on pages 14-15.

14

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


Registration is open for the 2021 MMEA Annual Inservice Conference. We invite educators to reflect and evaluate which pre-COVID proven practices hold true after the shifts in education during 2020. How have collaborations, social unrest, and professional vulnerability shaped you as an educator? Presenters will share innovative strategies for reaching all students via face-to-face, hybrid, and virtual formats as we envision a future where synchronous and asynchronous instruction work hand-in-hand to augment individualized music instruction. Due to restrictions on large gatherings, this will be a virtual event. For full conference information and registration, visit https://www.mmea-maryland.org/annual-conference.

All of the benefits of an in-person exhibit hall in a virtual environment! We have set aside three hours (one hour each day) during the 2021 Annual Inservice Conference for our Virtual Exhibit Hall / Job & College Fair. Attendees will be able to virtually visit conference sponsors, vendors, and companies as well as colleges, universities, school districts, and arts-serving nonprofits. The Virtual Exhibit Hall / Job & College Fair will be free and open to the public.

Friday, March 5, 2021; 3pm-4pm Winter 2020-2021

Dates and Times: Saturday, March 6, 2021; 12:15pm-1:15pm. Maryland Music Educator

Sunday, March 7, 2021; 12pm-1pm https://www.mmea-maryland.org

15


Congratulations to all students who auditioned for the MMEA 2021 All State Ensembles! Your dedication to advancing your musicianship is to be commended. Please see the 2021 All State rosters below and on the following pages. MMEA is incredibly thankful to the 101 educators across the state who volunteered their time to judge auditions this year.

MMEA 2021 ALL STATE JUNIOR BAND FLUTE First Chair

Annika Seshadri

Harper’s Choice Middle School

Howard

Carma Ghorab

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Andrew Guo

River Hill High School

Howard

Ella Liu

Herbert Hoover Middle School

Montgomery

Isabel Mao

Richard Montgomery High School

Montgomery

Catherine Nan

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Michelle Pan

Robert Frost Middle School

Montgomery

Olivia Roh

Centennial High School

Howard

Jessica Yao

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

PICCOLO First Chair

Gianna Baker

Howard High School

Howard

OBOE First Chair

Annie Jung

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Kyle Cho

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Varsha Makkapati

Centennial High School

Howard

Bb CLARINET First Chair

Hamin Kim

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Joseph Ahn

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Joseph Chudnovsky

River Hill High School

Howard

Andy Deng

Herbert Hoover Middle School

Montgomery

Jerry Du

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Raffaella Galati

Mount View Middle School

Howard

Max Han

St. Paul's School for Boys

Baltimore

Donovan Holt-Harrington

Kingsview Middle School

Montgomery

Esther Kim

Mount View Middle School

Howard

Evan Kim

Centennial High School

Howard

Divya Kumar

River Hill High School

Howard

Viktor Lebhar

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Jaden Li

Walt Whitman High School

Montgomery

Charles Liddle

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Aidan Oh

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Elain Park

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Olivia Shim

Clarksville Middle School

Howard

Daniel Wang

River Hill High School

Howard

Edward (Zicheng) Wang

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Steven Wang

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Sean Xie

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

MMEA 2021 All State Junior Band, continued on next page 16

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


MMEA 2021 All State Junior Band, continued from previous page Bb CLARINET, continued

Samuel Yoon

Folly Quarter Middle School

Howard

Luke Zegowitz

Annapolis Middle School

Anne Arundel

BASS CLARINET First Chair

Sydney Pollard

Holy Trinity, An Episcopal School

Prince George's

Alayna Bucchioni

Mount Hebron High School

Howard

Michael Kaiser

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Sophie Zheng

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Samuel Lee

Murray Hill Middle School

Howard

Katie Bell

Centennial High School

Howard

Collin Blackman

River Hill High School

Howard

Adam Tang

Herbert Hoover Middle School

Montgomery

BASSOON First Chair

ALTO SAXOPHONE First Chair

Adam Dubelman

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Mahilan Guha

Herbert Hoover Middle School

Montgomery

Daniel Lee

Herbert Hoover Middle School

Montgomery

Joshua Soong

River Hill High School

Howard

TENOR SAXOPHONE First Chair

Luke Wu

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

James Chen

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

BARI SAXOPHONE First Chair

Nathan Farley

Patuxent High School

Calvert

Varsha Kantheti

Howard High School

Howard

Charles Norwood

River Hill High School

Howard

Jack Alpaugh

Centennial High School

Howard

Amber Evans

Barbara Ingram School for the Arts

Washington

Sophie Huang

Robert Frost Middle School

Montgomery

Jireh Kim

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Nathan Kim

Ellicott Mills Middle School

Howard

Noah Lee

Poolesville High School

Montgomery

Alyssa Ma

River Hill High School

Howard

Benjamin Tang

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Sophia Tevault

Broadneck High School

Anne Arundel

Libby Tunison

Dulaney High School

Baltimore

Ryan Wang

Walter Johnson High School

Montgomery

TRUMPET First Chair

FRENCH HORN First Chair

Natalie Min

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Austin Adaranijo

Atholton High School

Howard

Daniel Bi

River Hill High School

Howard

Taylor Bowen-Longino

Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart

Montgomery

Hannah Fox

Walt Whitman High School

Montgomery

Nora Hill

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Evan Klepper

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Neil Murphy

Centennial High School

Howard

Ebenezer Zeleke

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

TROMBONE First Chair

Gabriel Leon Guerrero

Winters Mill High School

Carroll

James Hawkins

Centennial High School

Howard

Martin Meister

Burleigh Manor Middle School

Howard

Noah Shimeall

Burleigh Manor Middle School

Howard

Kayden Tafrishi

River Hill High School

Howard

Andrew Zhang

Mount View Middle School

Howard

Evan Zhang

Herbert Hoover Middle School

Montgomery

Emily Zhu

Herbert Hoover Middle School

Montgomery

Raymond Zhu

Herbert Hoover Middle School

Montgomery

MMEA 2021 All State Junior Band, continued on next page Winter 2020-2021

Maryland Music Educator

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

17


MMEA 2021 All State Junior Band, continued from previous page EUPHONIUM First Chair

Daksh Badri

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Eli Krakower

Folly Quarter Middle School

Howard

Andrew Loiselle

Centennial High School

Howard

Katherine Pedulla

Oklahoma Road Middle School

Carroll

Alexander Wang

Richard Montgomery High School

Montgomery

TUBA First Chair

Louis-Felix Gauthier

Dunloggin Middle School

Howard

Ellie Fiedler

Mount Hebron High School

Howard

Meraal Hasan

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Max Tumey

Broadneck High School

Anne Arundel

PERCUSSION First Chair

Rishab Jain

Clarksville Middle School

Howard

Adam Azrieli

River Hill High School

Howard

Margaret Cipriano

Dunloggin Middle School

Howard

Joyce Kung

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Aditya Mishra

River Hill High School

Howard

Jason Oberly

Burleigh Manor Middle School

Howard

Noah Peng

Burleigh Manor Middle School

Howard

MMEA 2021 ALL STATE SENIOR BAND FLUTE First Chair

Holly Zhao

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Ellyse Davisson

Broadneck High School

Anne Arundel

Lucas Howarth

Atholton High School

Howard

Sharon Lee

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Sara Sadjadi

Parkside High School

Wicomico

Isabella Tang

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Emily Wang

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Kelly (Jiaxin) Yu

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Ivy Liang

Montgomery Blair High School

PICCOLO First Chair

Montgomery

OBOE First Chair

Jason Lee

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Lauren Riley

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Bb CLARINET First Chair

Sara Bock

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Adam Blayney

Bethesda Chevy-Chase High School

Montgomery

Maggie Chen

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Cadence Cheng

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Samuel Cheng

Centennial High School

Howard

Michael Chu

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Ethan Han

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Junwoo Kim

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Mylah Kittle

Walkersville High School

Frederick

Julia Lee

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Yiyun Li

Towson High School

Baltimore

Sofia Plastino

Centennial High School

Howard

Sophie Risley

Perry Hall High School

Baltimore

Erica Wang

Dulaney High School

Baltimore

Peter Winstel

Clarksburg High School

Montgomery

Kevin Wu

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Krystal Wu

Centennial High School

Howard

Steven Ying

Dulaney High School

Baltimore

MMEA 2021 All State Senior Band, continued on next page 18

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


MMEA 2021 All State Senior Band, continued from previous page BASS CLARINET First Chair

Jaida Butler

Suitland High School

Prince George's

Richard Hankerson

Washington Academy and High School

Somerset

BASSOON First Chair

Ryan Guo

Eleanor Roosevelt High School

Prince George's

Justin Ma

Glenelg High School

Howard

Tara Wasik

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Kathryn Wessells

Poolesville High School

Montgomery

ALTO SAXOPHONE First Chair

Claire Du

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Jackson Bernal

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Daniel Lee

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Andrew Yang

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

TENOR SAXOPHONE First Chair

Candis Lyle

Barbara Ingram School for the Arts

Washington

Konnor Lee

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

BARI SAXOPHONE First Chair

Emily Ellmore

Clear Spring High School

Washington

TRUMPET First Chair

Amber Bowen-Longino

Stone Ridge School Of The Sacred Heart

Montgomery

Billy Allen

Centennial High School

Howard

Roman Conway

Walt Whitman High School

Montgomery

Andy Guo

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Aiden Interrante

Mount Hebron High School

Howard

Amelia Jansen

Linganore High School

Frederick

Ryan Jefferies

Suitland High School

Prince George's

Kara Lewis

James M. Bennett High School

Wicomico

Adriane Skelton

Archbishop Spalding High School

Anne Arundel

Adam Solomon

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Alex Wu

River Hill High School

Howard

Joshua Young

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

Jocelyn Hao

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Bryan Bennett

Patapsco High School and Center for the Arts

Baltimore

Kyle Bickel

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

Matt Chabot

Broadneck Senior High School

Anne Arundel

Morgan MacLean

Liberty High School

Carroll

Russell Perdue

Aberdeen High School

Harford

Shisui Torii

Bethesda Chevy-Chase High School

Montgomery

Wanyun Wang

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

FRENCH HORN First Chair

TROMBONE First Chair

Andreas Naagaard

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Lante Evans

Suitland High School

Prince George's

Sean Mao

Bullis School

Montgomery

David Pang

Centennial High School

Howard

Aidan Rashid

Centennial High School

Howard

Avi Spector

Walter Johnson High School

Montgomery

Corey Wang

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Michael West

Calvert Hall College High School

Baltimore

Thomas Westendorf

Aberdeen High School

Harford

BASS TROMBONE First Chair

Daniel Ge

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

MMEA 2021 All State Senior Band, continued on next page

Winter 2020-2021

Maryland Music Educator

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

19


MMEA 2021 All State Senior Band, continued from previous page EUPHONIUM First Chair

Elizabeth Fischer

Glenelg High School

Howard

Margaret Frazier

Manchester Valley High School

Carroll

Page Judge

Severna Park High School

Anne Arundel

Maxwell Li

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Keaton Lovely

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

TUBA First Chair

Karim Najjar

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Petra Baggili

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Lowrider James

Baltimore School For The Arts

Baltimore City

Bernard Lojacono-Evans

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Evan Turner

Williamsport High School

Washington

PERCUSSION First Chair

Jillian Cupples

Clarksburg High School

Montgomery

Megan Ball

Glenelg High School

Howard

Caroline Clemes

Kent Island High School

Queen Anne's

Jasmine Gong

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Zachary Lupo

Hammond High School

Howard

Andrew Ngo

Aberdeen High School

Harford

Abigail Pak

Clarksburg High School

Montgomery

PIANO First Chair

Hannah Zhang

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

MMEA 2021 ALL STATE SENIOR JAZZ BAND ALTO SAXOPHONE Nathaniel Wu

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Connor Rose

Mount Hebron High School

Howard

TENOR SAXOPHONE Ronan Zwa

Bullis School

Montgomery

Chris Sylvester

Walt Whitman High School

Montgomery

BARITONE SAXOPHONE Cyrus Redjaee

Landon School

Montgomery

SECTION TRUMPET Adam Solomon

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Joshua Morris

Bethesda Chevy Chase High School

Montgomery

Aiden Interrante

Mount Hebron High School

Howard

Christine Ziadeh

Urbana High School

Frederick

SECTION TROMBONE Tej Mehta

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Corey Wang

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Sean Borsum

Richard Montgomery High School

Montgomery

BASS TROMBONE David Pang

Centennial High School

Howard

DRUMS Braeden Devnew

Westminster High School

Carroll

GUITAR Nathaniel Freda

Walter Johnson High School

Montgomery

PIANO Benjamin Roland

C. Milton Wright High School

Harford

MMEA 2021 All State Ensembles, continued on next page

20

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


MMEA 2021 All State Ensembles, continued from previous page

MMEA 2021 ALL STATE JUNIOR CHORUS SOPRANO Advika Agarwal

Richard Montgomery High School

Montgomery

Jayahthi Ankem

Northwest High School

Montgomery

Ava Baer

Mardela Middle and High School

Wicomico

Annie Campion

Severna Park Middle School

Anne Arundel

Gloria Choi

Mount View Middle School

Howard

Taylor Eversole

Huntingtown High School

Calvert

Camryn Flaherty

Northwest High School

Montgomery

Evelyn Goldin

Thomas W. Pyle Middle School

Montgomery

Isabella Guzman

Leonardtown Middle School

St. Mary's

Shirley Han

Richard Montgomery High School

Montgomery

Torben Heinbockel

St. Paul's School for Boys

Baltimore

Sofia Lazarus

Thomas W. Pyle Middle School

Montgomery

Carmen Mileo

Huntingtown High School

Calvert

Tarini Munnangi

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Naysa Mustafa

Robert Frost Middle School

Montgomery

Grace Myers

Perryville High School

Cecil

Liberty Pankhurst

Francis Scott Key High School

Carroll

Mitchell Parmelee

Barbara Ingram School for the Arts

Washington

Paisley Pentecost

Severna Park Middle School

Anne Arundel

Eliana Ranelli

Stevensville Middle School

Queen Anne's

Jadyn Riggs

Huntingtown High School

Calvert

Kayla Rogers

Huntingtown High School

Calvert

Jillian Shoultz

Mount Hebron High School

Howard

Yaela Teplinsky

Walt Whitman High School

Montgomery

Kendall Whittington

Barbara Ingram School for the Arts

Washington

ALTO Vinita Badugu

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Abby Bilenki

Notre Dame Preparatory School

Baltimore

Alexandra Blodnikar

Leonardtown Middle School

St. Mary's

Elizabeth Buppert

Damascus High School

Montgomery

Hannah Choi

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Margaret Cipriano

Dunloggin Middle School

Howard

Liam Darnell

Thomas W. Pyle Middle School

Montgomery

Camilla Fan

Thomas W. Pyle Middle School

Montgomery

Lily Fischer

Gaithersburg Middle School

Montgomery

MacKenzie Getz

Crofton Middle School

Anne Arundel

Nyema Gillespie

Barbara Ingram School for the Arts

Washington

Madeline Hall

Dunloggin Middle School

Howard

Jasmin Jabara

Thomas W. Pyle Middle School

Montgomery

Ria John

Mount Hebron High School

Howard

Daniella Kulp

Thomas W. Pyle Middle School

Montgomery

Lily Belle McDowell

Spring Ridge Middle School

St. Mary's

LeeAnn Pugh

Elkton High School

Cecil

Stacey Sam

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Aminata Toure

Northwest High School

Montgomery

Shruti Vadlakonda

River Hill High School

Howard

MMEA 2021 All State Junior Chorus, continued on next page

Winter 2020-2021

Maryland Music Educator

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

21


MMEA 2021 All State Junior Chorus, continued from previous page TENOR Daniel Field

The Park School of Baltimore

Baltimore

Nathan Hays

Huntingtown High School

Calvert

Rohan Krishnan

Neelsville Middle School

Montgomery

Joseph Matassa

Severna Park Middle School

Anne Arundel

Reilly Miller

Severna Park Middle School

Anne Arundel

Ryan Robbins

Thomas W. Pyle Middle School

Montgomery

Daniel Tofig

Richard Montgomery High School

Montgomery

BASS Izan Blanco Qureshy

Thomas W. Pyle Middle School

Montgomery

Brandon Chisholm

Severna Park Middle School

Anne Arundel

Patrick Gutierrez

James M. Bennett High School

Wicomico

Andrew Halverson

Barbara Ingram School for the Arts

Washington

William Hess

Wilde Lake High School

Howard

Matthew Keister

Great Mills High School

St. Mary's

Brandon Khouri

John T. Baker Middle School

Montgomery

Mitchell Kwoun

Thomas W. Pyle Middle School

Montgomery

Nikhil Naik

Clarksburg High School

Montgomery

Chris Ramos

Poolesville High School

Montgomery

Lincoln Reed

Richard Montgomery High School

Montgomery

Adam Roman

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

Radhati Srisukwattananan

Aberdeen High School Science and Mathematics Academy

Harford

Nate Swanson

Herbert Hoover Middle School

Montgomery

Arthur Yang

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

MMEA 2021 ALL STATE SENIOR CHORUS SOPRANO 1 Ariana Alvarez Morales

Northern High School

Calvert

Tiana Clemons

Henry E. Lackey High School

Charles

Emily DeSena

Centennial High School

Howard

Emma Dube

Damascus High School

Montgomery

Sarah Dudley

Huntingtown High School

Calvert

Elizabeth Fischer

Glenelg High School

Howard

Dalia Hassanein

Wilde Lake High School

Howard

Elizabeth Ipe

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Hayley Jones

Huntingtown High School

Calvert

Anna Kleist

Huntingtown High School

Calvert

Samantha Lambert

Archbishop Spalding High School

Anne Arundel

Julie Millward

North East High School

Cecil

Judith Oller

Huntingtown High School

Calvert

Danielle Ott

North Dorchester High School

Dorchester

Nicole Ouellette

Centennial High School

Howard

SOPRANO 2 Julie Camden

Huntingtown High School

Calvert

Sarah Chang

Northwest High School

Montgomery

Ceanna Cooney

Liberty High School

Carroll

Alexis Franklin

Barbara Ingram School for the Arts

Washington

Millie Fredes

Damascus High School

Montgomery

Charis Grant

Barbara Ingram School for the Arts

Washington

Jessica Kern

Glenelg High School

Howard

Amelia Lawlor

Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart

Montgomery

Paulette Mathis

Clarksburg High School

Montgomery

Eliana McFate

James Hubert Blake High School

Montgomery

MMEA 2021 All State Senior Chorus, continued on next page 22

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


MMEA 2021 All State Senior Chorus, continued from previous page SOPRANO 2, continued

Hannah Miller

Barbara Ingram School for the Arts

Washington

Danielle Romanowski

Liberty High School

Carroll

Sofia Romero

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Rachel Widmaier

North Dorchester High School

Dorchester

Robin Zillmer

James Hubert Blake High School

Montgomery

ALTO Catherine Blumhagen

James Hubert Blake High School

Montgomery

Emily Brosofsky

Huntingtown High School

Calvert

Cahleigha Brown

North Dorchester High School

Dorchester

Meredith Clark

C. Milton Wright High School

Harford

Allison Faith Comising

Reservoir High School

Howard

Amber Gieske

Huntingtown High School

Calvert

Elodie Greenwell

Mount Hebron High School

Howard

Angelina Guhl

Richard Montgomery High School

Montgomery

Maria Hoffen

Liberty High School

Carroll

Aletheia Hoffman

Westminster High School

Carroll

Elizabeth Hopper

Southern High School

Anne Arundel

Isabelle Ignatowski

Barbara Ingram School for the Arts

Washington

Madeleine Khouri

Damascus High School

Montgomery

Serena Lee

Liberty High School

Carroll

Molly McMaster

Huntingtown High School

Calvert

Layne Morsberger

Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart

Montgomery

Ishika Naik

Clarksburg High School

Montgomery

Ema Nakayama

Holton-Arms School

Montgomery

Madelyn Ortiz

Barbara Ingram School for the Arts

Washington

Anna Sadler

Liberty High School

Carroll

Eleanor Smedberg

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Miranda Smith

North Dorchester

Dorchester

Sarah Sparling

Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School

Montgomery

Dhriti Vadlakonda

River Hill High School

Howard

Alyssa Vasko

Huntingtown High School

Calvert

Caleb Auldridge

Barbara Ingram School for the Arts

Washington

Michael-Paul Awunor

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

Ian Brown

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

Ethan Coffin

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

George Currie

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

Mekhi Dashiell

Perry Hall High School

Baltimore

Ryan Dickson-Burke

Huntingtown High School

Calvert

Devin Etta

Paint Branch High School

Montgomery

Jack Heitner

Perry Hall High School

Baltimore

Samuel Jin

Gilman School

Baltimore

Evan Knott

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

Matthew Macapagal

Northwest High School

Montgomery

Joel Manzano

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

Conner Rock

Leonardtown High school

St. Mary's

Kenneth Stewart

Mount Hebron High School

Howard

James Teti

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

Raphael Trudeau

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

Guy Witt

Mountain Ridge High School

Allegany

TENOR

BASS Corbin Aquino

Northwest High School

Montgomery

Reginald Bailey

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

John Worthy Beilman

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

Benjamin Choe

River Hill High School

Howard

Efrain Enriquez

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

MMEA 2021 All State Senior Chorus, continued on next page Winter 2020-2021

Maryland Music Educator

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

23


MMEA 2021 All State Senior Chorus, continued from previous page BASS, continued

Raphael Esemoto

Paint Branch High School

Montgomery

Peyton Frazier

Clarksburg High School

Montgomery

Aiden Hayward

North Dorchester High School

Dorchester

Desmond Holt

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

Tristan Jacobs

North Point High School

Charles

John Kallaur

Dulaney High School

Baltimore

Rohan Koushik

Damascus High School

Montgomery

Peter Macyko

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

James McManus

Wilde Lake High School

Howard

Teja Nivarthi

Clarksburg High School

Montgomery

Andrew Opincar

Damascus High School

Montgomery

Dhruv Pai

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Daniel Patino

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

Corrigan Peters

Richard Montgomery High School

Montgomery

Carsten Portner

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Christian Taylor

Calvert High School

Calvert

Jason Wang

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Ryan Zwicharowski

Barbara Ingram School for the Arts

Washington

MMEA 2021 ALL STATE JUNIOR ORCHESTRA VIOLIN Co-First Chair

Olivia Cai

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Co-First Chair

Carolyn Fu

Thomas Wootton High School

Montgomery

Ethan Bai

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Evan Bian

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Karen Cao

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Andrew Chen

Clarksville Middle School

Howard

Shawn Chen

Urbana High School

Frederick

Kaitlyn (Meimei) Chien

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Cara Chow

The Bryn Mawr School

Baltimore City

Ace Chun

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Olivia Crane

Rockbridge Academy

Anne Arundel

Andy Cui

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Elena Doyle

Brunswick High School

Frederick

Myles Druck

Calvert Hall College High School

Baltimore

Sofia Grundy

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Brendan Hu

North Bethesda Middle School

Montgomery

Amy Huang

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Linda Huang

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Helia Hung

Ridgely Middle School

Baltimore

Eon Jeong

Rosa Parks Middle School

Montgomery

Hannah Jeong

Sherwood High School

Montgomery

Dahmin Lee

Rocky Hill Middle School

Montgomery

Elaine Lee

Dulaney High School

Baltimore

Lindsey Lee

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Vincent Lee

Robert Frost Middle School

Montgomery

Julia Li

Ridgely Middle School

Baltimore

Ryan Li

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Weiyang Li

Clarksville Middle School

Howard

Lindsey Lim

Poolesville High School

Montgomery

Allie Liu

Centennial High School

Howard

Xin-ye Liu

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

James Luo

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Daotian Ma

Centennial High School

Howard

Caroline Mah

Lake Elkhorn Middle School

Howard

MMEA 2021 All State Junior Orchestra, continued on next page 24

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


MMEA 2021 All State Junior Orchestra, continued from previous page VIOLIN, continued

Ananya Nair

Urbana High School

Frederick

Dia Nawathe

Centennial High School

Howard

Taehoon Noh

Salisbury Middle School

Wicomico

Sera Park

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Emily Shi

Folly Quarter Middle School

Howard

Jinwoo Shin

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Katherine Song

Herbert Hoover Middle School

Montgomery

Chloe Thompson

Poolesville High School

Montgomery

Abigail Tsai

Mount Hebron High School

Howard

Helynne Van Petten

Sherwood High School

Montgomery

Jennifer Wan

Robert Frost Middle School

Montgomery

David Wang

Bullis School

Montgomery

Paul Wang

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Daphne Wen

Takoma Park Middle School

Montgomery

Erica Wu

Robert Frost Middle School

Montgomery

Jingjing Wu

Robert Frost Middle School

Montgomery

Amy Ye

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Ian Yoon

Clarksville Middle School

Howard

Hannah You

Herbert Hoover Middle School

Montgomery

VIOLA First Chair

Claire Yu

Richard Montgomery High School

Montgomery

Maximilian Belyantsev

Richard Montgomery High School

Montgomery

Andrew Bian

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Daniel Cho

Murray Hill Middle School

Howard

Chloe Choi

Richard Montgomery High School

Montgomery

Idhant Gode

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Alvin Guo

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Matthew Guo

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Katie Hwang

Robert Frost Middle School

Montgomery

Rachel Kim

Reservoir High School

Howard

Andrew Liu

Centennial High School

Howard

Gregory Park

River Hill High School

Howard

Lily Peng

River Hill High School

Howard

Erica Qin

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Cathleen Shi

Robert Frost Middle School

Montgomery

Alice Song

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Aidan Suk

Mount Hebron High School

Howard

Katie Xiang

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Cindy Yu

Mount View Middle School

Howard

Ray Yuan

Robert Frost Middle School

Montgomery

Jenny Zheng

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

CELLO First Chair

Joseph Hsieh

Quince Orchard High School

Montgomery

Eleanor Aronin

Walt Whitman High School

Montgomery

Daisy Chen

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Julia Choi

Mount Hebron High School

Howard

Christopher Chung

Mount View Middle School

Howard

Ben Feng

Clarksville Middle School

Howard

Elena Kim

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Justin Kim

River Hill High School

Howard

Justin Kim

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Jaeyoung Kwon

Clarksville Middle School

Howard

Aydan Lee

Herbert Hoover Middle School

Montgomery

Claire Lee

Elkridge Landing Middle School

Howard

Jacob Lee

Roberto Clemente Middle School

Montgomery

Chloe Lim

Herbert Hoover Middle School

Montgomery

MMEA 2021 All State Junior Orchestra, continued on next page Winter 2020-2021

Maryland Music Educator

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

25


MMEA 2021 All State Junior Orchestra, continued from previous page CELLO, continued

Anlan Lin

Centennial High School

Howard

Yunyi Ling

Robert Frost Middle School

Montgomery

Luka Porter

South River High School

Anne Arundel

Ethan Shay

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Samuel Son

Lime Kiln Middle School

Howard

Jason Youm

Herbert Hoover Middle School

Montgomery

BASS First Chair

Annie Sun

Robert Frost Middle School

Montgomery

Jai Ahuja

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Kevin An

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Roger An

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Mark DeVale

Howard High School

Howard

Mason Lee

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

Evan LeFevre

Greenbelt Middle School

Prince George's

Katie Russo

Broadneck High School

Anne Arundel

Henry Syme

Ellicott Mills Middle School

Howard

Logan Tannenbaum

Cabin John Middle School

Montgomery

MMEA 2021 ALL STATE SENIOR ORCHESTRA VIOLIN First Chair

Andrew Gray

Landon School

Montgomery

Caroline Barn

River Hill High School

Howard

Emily Chen

Towson High School

Baltimore

Eunseo Cheon

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Rachel Choi

River Hill High School

Howard

Elinah Chung

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Anton Doan

River Hill High School

Howard

Charlotte Doughty

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Brandon Du

Centennial High School

Howard

Catherine Fang

Walter Johnson High School

Montgomery

Pieter Heesters

Gilman School

Baltimore City

Frank Horrigan

Poolesville High School

Montgomery

Alena Hu

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Vincent Jung

Mount Hebron High School

Howard

Darae Kang

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Irene Ki

Tuscarora High School

Frederick

Ellie Kim

Eleanor Roosevelt High School

Prince George's

Jeanne Kim

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Woo Bin Kim

Perry Hall High School

Baltimore

Mark Kuznik

Dulaney High School

Baltimore

Daeyong Kwon

Centennial High School

Howard

Erica Lee

Dulaney High School

Baltimore

Hawon Lee

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Ethan Li

Centennial High School

Howard

Jessica Liang

Centennial High School

Howard

Jason Lu

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Richard Luo

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Jaimie Lwin

Holton-Arms School

Montgomery

Anita Ma

Glenelg High School

Howard

Grace Ma

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Amelie Rose Marasigan

C. Milton Wright High School

Harford

Aaron Mei

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Jonathan Mei

Centennial High School

Howard

Kevin Mitchell

Barbara Ingram School for the Arts

Washington

Kenneth Mo

Glenelg High School

Howard

Melody Qian

Richard Montgomery High School

Montgomery

MMEA 2021 All State Senior Orchestra, continued on next page 26

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


MMEA 2021 All State Senior Orchestra, continued from previous page VIOLIN, continued

Kevin Rha

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Michelle Rhee

River Hill High School

Howard

Lauren Shieh

Elizabeth Seton High School

Prince George's

Wendy Song

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Angela Tan

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Lucy Wang

Atholton High School

Howard

Jingtang Yang

Atholton High School

Howard

Kathy Yao

Dulaney High School

Baltimore

Gracie Yoon

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Chad Yu

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Claire Zhang

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Faith Zhang

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Hannah Zhang

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Yifan Zhang

North Hagerstown High School

Washington

VIOLA First Chair

Claire Xu

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Sumin Choi

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Michael James Dee

Archbishop Spalding High School

Anne Arundel

Anthony Fei

River Hill High School

Howard

Anna Gu

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Amy He

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Ye Ji Kang

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Brian Kim

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

April Kwon

Aberdeen High School

Harford

Jessica Lian

Holton-Arms School

Montgomery

Kexin Liu

River Hill High School

Howard

Pierre Petitjean

Leonardtown High School

St. Mary's

Eddy Qiu

Centennial High School

Howard

Albert Russell

Old Mill Senior High School

Anne Arundel

Esther Shue

Governor Thomas Johnson High School

Frederick

Julia Song

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Madison Strempek

Crofton High School

Anne Arundel

Amy Tang

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Annika Wong

River Hill High School

Howard

Kara Woolcock

Crofton High School

Anne Arundel

CELLO First Chair

Sihyun Park

Glenelg High School

Howard

Samuel Chen

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Trinity Cheng

River Hill High School

Howard

Kaden Chien

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Hannah Choi

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Jihwan Kim

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Ryan Kim

Gilman School

Baltimore

Destany Kwon

River Hill High School

Howard

Daniel Lee

Marriotts Ridge High School

Howard

Benjamin Li

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Emma Lin

Walt Whitman High School

Montgomery

Alexandra Liu

River Hill High School

Howard

Jabez Luo

Reservoir High School

Howard

Justin Wang

Gilman School

Baltimore City

Julianne Yao

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Julia Ye

Centennial High School

Howard

Ethan Yen

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Allen Yoo

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Benjamin Yu

McDonogh School

Baltimore

Caleb Zhao

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

MMEA 2021 All State Senior Orchestra, continued on next page Winter 2020-2021

Maryland Music Educator

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

27


MMEA 2021 All State Senior Orchestra, continued from previous page BASS First Chair

Anderson Bernal

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Christopher Ackerman

Broadneck High School

Anne Arundel

Samantha Chang

River Hill High School

Howard

Ana Clemmer

River Hill High School

Howard

Shannon Hu

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Cora Jackson

Eleanor Roosevelt High School

Prince George's

Eleanor Ohm

Walt Whitman High School

Montgomery

Rebecca Ruggles

Dulaney High School

Baltimore

Sudharsan Sundar

Mount Hebron High School

Howard

Bianca Wilson

Broadneck Senior High School

Anne Arundel

PIANO First Chair

Lucy Chen

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

FLUTE First Chair

Amy Hwang

Glenelg High School

Howard

Kamerin Hull

Parkside High School

Wicomico

Preston Waldrup

Atholton High School

Howard

OBOE First Chair

Ocarina Lin

Glenelg High School

Howard

Ayeesha Fadlaoui

Mount Hebron High School

Howard

ENGLISH HORN First Chair

Oscar Krug

Bethesda Chevy Chase High School

Montgomery

CLARINET First Chair

Keyvar Smith-Herold

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

Zachary Cheng

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

Sean Park

Hereford High School

Baltimore

BASS CLARINET First Chair

Stacy Sun

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

BASSOON First Chair

Jack Bernal

Thomas S. Wootton High School

Montgomery

Arthur Hu

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Emily Liu

Montgomery Blair High School

Montgomery

Kristin Dan

Our Lady of Good Counsel High School

Montgomery

Sarah Jacob

Centennial High School

Howard

Nathan Osheroff

River Hill High School

Howard

FRENCH HORN First Chair

TRUMPET First Chair

Tehya Shapiro

Towson High School

Baltimore

Michael Riddle

Howard High School

Howard

Joshua Kucharski

DeMatha Catholic High School

Prince George's

TROMBONE First Chair

Evan Beachy

Northern Garrett High School

Garrett

Hyun June Cho

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

Diem-Thu Nguyen

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

BASS TROMBONE First Chair

William Zhu

Winston Churchill High School

Montgomery

TUBA First Chair

Kurt Phillips

Clarksburg High School

Montgomery

PERCUSSION First Chair

28

Chance Caprarola

Winters Mill High School

Carroll

Daniel Hwang

River Hill High School

Howard

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


MMEA Yo ng Compo er Projec P g am O e ie

Â

Ab

e

eY

C

P

ec

The Yo ng Com o e P ojec (YCP) o Ma land m ic ed ca o in hei effo o inco o a e he Na ional S anda d fo M ic Ed ca ion and he Ma land S a e M ic S anda d in hei cla oom and ehea al . A ch, he P ojec i de igned o enco age and enhance he in c ional e e ience of Ma land chool den and m ic ed ca o h o gh o iding ofe ional c i i e , enhanced ecogni ion and elec ed e en a ion fo he ongoing c ea i e o k of den in Ma land chool .

Ca f

C

Each ea , MMEA o ide com o i ion a e men and feedback h o gh i Call fo Com o i ion . The Call fo Com o i ion i no a com e i ion, b a he an o o ni fo den o ecei e e onal feedback abo hei com o i ion . The com o i ion a e e ie ed b a anel of ofe ional m ician , and each den ecei e an enco aging i en e al a ion of hei iece. Adj dica o highligh ong oin and make o i i e gge ion fo f e g o h. O anding com o i ion ma be fea ed a he MMEA YCP Hono Conce in he S ing. Ca egorie : Aco Acoustic ic Electronic Elec onic M ic Music Song Songwriters ie

C

Click on https://www.mmea-maryland.org/youngcomposers-project for more information.

fe e ce Se

The YCP ill con in e o offe o ide f he e o ce o

Q e

? P ea e c

e ion a MMEA Confe ence o o eache and omo e c ea i i and com o i ion in he cla oom.

ac M c e e R be

, YCP C a

m .mmea@gmail.com

Deadline for 2020-2021 YCP submissions is April 1, 2021, at 11:59 PM. Winter 2020-2021

Maryland Music Educator

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

29


In Memoriam Mary Ellen Cohn First MMEA Executive Director and MMEA Hall of Fame Member September 30, 1944 ~ October 1, 2020 Additional Remembrances See https://www.mmea-maryland.org/mmea-journal for fall 2020 journal article with previous remembrances. Editor’s Note: The fall 2020 issue of Maryland Music Educator included an In Memoriam article honoring founding MMEA Executive Director Mary Ellen Cohn. Included were remembrances that arrived by publication time. Included here is a summary of that information and two additional remembrances. Mary Ellen Cohn, Founding Executive Director of Maryland Music Educators Association from 1998 - 2018, passed away on October 1, 2020. She was appointed MMEA Executive Director in 1998, after serving as MMEA Festival Coordinator. She helped advance music education in the state by working tirelessly to provide superior opportunities for Maryland music students through state performance events, including eight outstanding annual All State groups. She was dedicated to providing support and high-quality, content-specific professional development for Maryland’s music educators through annual in-services and conferences. In recognition of her leadership in music education for over twenty-five years, Mary Ellen was the recipient of the MMEA Corwin Taylor Music Education Leadership Award in 2002 and was inducted into the MMEA Hall of Fame in 2006. Prior to her work for MMEA, she had a long career as a choral music educator. The Maryland music education community is grateful for her half-century of dedicated service to the profession. Memorial contributions may be made to Maryland State Boychoir by visiting https://www.marylandstateboychoir.org/donate/ or Maryland Winds by visiting http://www.marylandwinds.com. Remembrance Roger A. Hall, Executive Director, Ohio Music Education Association, Ohio Foundation for Music Education I was one of the lucky ones. Early in my term as the state executive for Ohio, I was blessed to know and work with Mary Ellen Cohn. Mary Ellen was definitely “old school” but that suited me just fine - I am from that same era. She knew every facet of the operations of the Maryland Music Educators Association and no detail was too small that it would not get her full attention. She was a perfectionist, demanding only the highest standards from herself and inspiring those around her to reach for the same. She set standards for all of us because she understood that standards are good for everyone. But that wasn’t all there was to her management style. Mary Ellen understood people, and took great care to make sure the right people were in place to move the Maryland Association forward. She 30

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

was particularly skilled at qualifying those on her team and placing them where they would best succeed. She understood the role of volunteers and nurtured them better than anyone I know. We will all miss Mary Ellen. However, those on the NAfME Council of State Executives who never had an opportunity to work alongside her will miss her the most. She was the consummate executive and most importantly, she was a “class act”. Her influence would have shaped their careers in ways they can only imagine. I was one of the lucky ones.

Mary Ellen Cohn at MMEA Executive Board Meeting, October 3, 2014. Photo by Editor Felicia Burger Johnston

Remembrance Richard A. Disharoon, Past President of MMEA, MCEA, and Eastern Division of NAfME; MMEA Hall of Fame Member The Legacy of Mary Ellen Cohn June 1998. MMEA was at a crossroads. The Association was emerging from a difficult financial setback, discovered after we had already committed to returning the annual conference to Baltimore, and now, as MMEA President, I was confronted with the unexpected resignation of the association’s Executive Secretary/Treasurer and pressure from MENC (Music Educators National Conference, now NAfME) to join other state affiliates in creating an Executive Director position requiring a higher salary. At that time, approval of the Fiscal ’99 budget was pending; an overnight Executive Board retreat in late June was planned to complete MMEA’s first Strategic Plan, to comply with a directive to all state affiliates from MENC; and fall student and teacher event deadlines were fast approaching (communication was not as fast as now). It was imperative for me and my leadership team, Immediate Past President Barbara King and President-Elect Michael Mark, to have an administrator on board ASAP to work with us in moving the work of the association forward without delay. Because of the pending deadlines mentioned above and the association’s financial situation, we quickly agreed that the position should be offered to someone within the association. Mary Ellen Cohn, based on continued on next page

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


In Memoriam: Mary Ellen Cohn, continued from previous page

her leadership and significant contributions to MMEA during the previous eight years as Festival Director and prior experience organizing and managing conferences, was the most qualified person in the association to provide the administrative leadership required to ensure a smooth transition. The broad range of responsibilities we outlined for the position caused Mary Ellen to be reluctant at the outset to accept the position. After much discussion, and to our great relief, she finally agreed to become MMEA’s first Executive Director. To this day, I remain pleased that the Executive Board approved the recommendation of my leadership team. Here’s why. Mary Ellen always acted only at the direction of MMEA’s elected leaders, the Executive Council and the Executive Board. She never acted without permission. She fielded complaints, concerns, and questions in a business-like manner, asking questions that would help the leadership team develop appropriate responses. During my final year as President, when reporting to me, her answers included responses such as “Here’s the information. I await your decision on how or if I can help or what would you like me to do.” Mary Ellen’s strongest attribute was her ability to meld two management styles - personal diplomacy, from the political world, and personal relationship management from the business world. Most importantly, she had the wisdom to know when to use each style to further MMEA’s mission for the improvement of music education in Maryland. For thirty years, as an elected officer at the state and division levels and a member of the Executive Board, I witnessed her leadership style in action close-up. Mary Ellen used personal diplomacy with local, state and national politicians to advocate for music education. She was front and center in Annapolis representing MMEA in supporting legislative proposals for arts education. Mary Ellen’s personal diplomacy was frequently on display with the administrative staff at MENC. She defended the rights of state affiliates. Whenever Mary Ellen pushed back against what she believed were unreasonable demands from the national office, she offered an alternate proposal for consideration. Was she feisty? You bet. But always within the context of the bounds of personal diplomacy. But it was Mary Ellen’s personal relationship management style that paid the richest dividends for the MMEA. This management style manifested itself in two significant ways: negotiations with hotel, Convention Center representatives, and music merchants; and relationships with members.

Mary Ellen was a master negotiator. 1999 was the second year for the annual conference back in Baltimore after several years in Ocean City. She worked closely with the representatives from the Baltimore Convention and Visitors Bureau (BCBV), which wanted increased convention business for the city, to negotiate with hotels on the best room rates for members and room and board charges for All State students. As we made the move from holding the 1998 conference in two hotels to the Baltimore Convention Center (BCC) at increased cost, Mary Ellen expertly used the resources of the BCVB to negotiate reduced loading dock fees for exhibitors bringing smaller music industry exhibits to the conference, thus increasing revenue for the association, and studied sections of the BCC contract where she might be able to negotiate reduced charges. She negotiated lower exhibit fees for music dealers in exchange for transporting session equipment from schools to the Convention Center. The most remarkable aspect of Mary Ellen’s personal relationship management style was her ability to develop friendships with almost everyone: teachers - home-grown and new to the state, K-12 and higher ed; hotel, local music retail and music industry representatives; and even All State kids who asked for advice about careers in music education. Through those friendships she learned the size of your family, where you grew up and went to school, your birthday and on and on. She was invited to birthday parties and weddings. And she went! She sent cards. She paid her respects at funeral homes. Along with this ability to foster friendships came her uncanny ability to remember everything about everyone. This was an invaluable asset to an association with a changing elected leadership. Newly seated presidents looking for candidates to fill appointed Executive Board positions could rely on Mary Ellen’s knowledge of teachers across the state to recommend candidates whom she knew had the abilities for specific positions. Component presidents could rely on her for recommendations to nominate for elected office. She followed All State students who asked for advice about careers in music education through their college careers and early teaching years and knew when it was time to get them involved with chaperoning All State and eventually into running for elective office. Mary Ellen assisted me in the same way during my tenure as President of the MENC Eastern Division. She was well-known and respected throughout the division and advised me on the many issues being considered by the division as well as division leaders continued on next page

Republished with permission of NAfME, the National Association for Music Education Winter 2020-2021

Maryland Music Educator

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

31


In Memoriam: Mary Ellen Cohn, continued from previous page

upon whom I could rely for support and advice. Although the flame of Mary Ellen Cohn’s legacy may grow dim with time, the flame will never completely extinguish because it established the foundation upon which MMEA moved forward into the 21st Century. In the first decade of this century, Mary Ellen’s dedication to working with and through the elected leadership and her expertise at managing conferences, All State events, and the impossible task of scheduling solo and ensemble festivals that set new standards for those teacher and student events put MMEA back on solid ground and led to greater fulfillment and expansion of its mission. Through her leadership in the Eastern Division and nationally as Chairperson of the Council of State Executives, MMEA gained national respect as a leading affiliate of MENC.

Mary Ellen Cohn, second from right, at NAfME Hill Day 2016. L to R: Judith Hawkins, Brian Schneckenburger, Ronald P. Frezzo, Angela Adams, Rebecca Birnie, Shefali Shah, Alexa Bashaw, Mary Ellen Cohn, Todd Burroughs.

The Editor’s Page

Felicia Burger Johnston

=============================================================

MMEA is Busy!

M

MEA has been very busy with the Fall Solo & Ensemble Festival, the January 2021 Student Summit, virtual All State auditions and selections, and preparations for the virtual Annual Conference, March 5-7, 2021. Information about those events and MMEA 2021 All State ensemble member rosters are in this issue, contributed by MMEA Operations Manager Andie Sante and MMEA Executive Director JJ Norman. MMEA’s first Executive Director Mary Ellen Cohn’s dedication to music education was stellar and legendary. She was honored in the previous fall journal; several additional remembrances that arrived after fall issue publication time are in this issue. Feature articles in this issue include those of general interest as well as articles specific to band, chorus, orchestra, and general music. Kate McFadden, MODA Past President, offered her Midwest Clinic presentation outline for development into an article, “Teaching Strings! Tips, Tricks and Tools for the Non-String Playing String Teacher”. The article provides a wealth of information to non-string players and serves as a reference for string players. An article about the ongoing discussion of clean vs. musical playing, “Clean. Musical. Tom & Jerry or Ben & Jerry”, by Erik Lynch of Verona High School in New Jersey, provides insight into achieving both clean and musical performances. Shawna Longo, of Durban Avenue School, New Jersey, contributes “Differentiated Collaboration for Arts Integration” with links to helpful resources for collaborating with content area or classroom teachers. Matthew C. Lee, Choir Director at John P. Stevens High School in New Jersey, shares Follow MMEA on Twitter! @MMEA_Maryland

32

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

ideas for remote learning in “Reinvigorating the Remote Learning Choir: Ideas for Making Online Learning Meaningful and Efficient”. Lynn M. Tuttle, Director of Public Policy, Research, and Professional Development at NAfME, wrote “Using ESSA to Leverage Arts Education Policy” for The State Education Standard, published by the National Association of State Boards of Education in a special issue devoted to “Fostering Arts-Rich Schools” (https://www.nasbe.org/fostering-artsrich-schools/); we have been granted permission to republish for our readers. Hall of Fame member and Past MMEA President Richard A. Disharoon contributes his wisdom and experience in “Preparing Future Music Educators for the Stress of the Job: Can They Learn from the Old Ways?” in a continuation of his “Letters from Retirement” column. Writing for Maryland Music Educator The MMEA journal is posted online, freely available, at https://www.mmea-maryland.org/mmea-journal. Links to past issues are at the bottom of that webpage. Share the link with your musician colleagues and friends! Information about writing for this journal is on page 8 of this issue. Articles may be submitted at https://form.jotform.com/mmeamaryland/-mmea-content-submission-form. We welcome contributions about all aspects of music teaching, and articles of general interest to music teachers. Outlines from conference presentations can often be developed into articles. Contact Journal Editor Felicia B. Johnston at mmea.editor@gmail.com for more information.

♫♫♫♫♫♫

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


Pursue your passion at Wilkes University! Wilkes University’s music program offers a wide variety of study and performance opportunities. All University students are welcome to take private lessons, pursue a minor in music or audition for any of our ensembles: Chamber Orchestra Chamber Singers Civic Band Flute Ensemble Jazz Ensemble Marching Band Pep Band Percussion Ensemble University Chorus CONTACT US TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION: Maryellen Sloat, Division of Performing Arts maryellen.sloat@wilkes.edu | 570-408-4420

Advocacy Chair Shares Link About Music and Dementia Ronald P. Frezzo, MMEA Advocacy Chair, contributed the following link about a music teacher with dementia who improvised a composition, on the spot, based on four notes randomly selected by. his son. The skill of improvising a piece based on four notes had been a frequent “party trick” of the music teacher, according to family members. Click on the link for more information about the development of the improvised composition into an orchestral piece: https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/18822820.watch-former-music-teacherdementia-stuns-improvised-composition-using-four-notes/

Find us on the web at: www.mmeamaryland.org. Winter 2020-2021

MMEA Opportunities to Volunteer Interested in volunteering with MMEA? See https://www.mmeamaryland.org/volunteer

Maryland Music Educator

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

33


Teaching Strings! Tips, Tricks and Tools for the Non-String Playing String Teacher by Kate McFadden, MODA Past President, Baltimore County Based on a presentation at The Midwest Clinic, December 19, 2014

M

any music educators find themselves assigned to a position teaching in an area that is not their area of strength or experience. Some begin teaching in a position using their area of strength and are then assigned, in subsequent years, to teach a class or two in their less strong areas. Despite common state certifications that certify the holder competent to teach in all areas of music, PreK-12, it is still possible to major in one strong area of music education (choral, band, orchestra) in college and have little or no experience in one or two of the other areas. Basic techniques classes in areas other than the college major area often last one semester and vary in effectiveness in helping practicing teachers actually teach in those less strong areas. This article contains tips and basic information to assist non-string playing music educators who find themselves assigned to a position teaching strings or wish to prepare themselves for that possibility. I. Getting started a. Know some brands of instruments • Knilling, Lewis, Sherl and Roth, Eastman, Glaesel • Online stores o Shar Music (http://www.sharmusic.com/ o Southwest Strings (http://www.swstrings.com/ b. Remind parents to look for instruments with brand names and serial numbers. Also remind them that price does matter with strings and bows. II. Instrument set-up a. What size instrument? If possible, have students move to a full size instrument before their rental contract expires. The hardest thing is to get a student who has purchased a smaller instrument to move to a full size one. Stress that their tone will improve, and that they can physically injure themselves playing on an instrument that is too small. Violins - With arm and hand extended to the left, the left hand should wrap around the scroll comfortably. Measure from the neck to the center of the palm of hand. 23” and up: 4/4 (full) size 22” - 23”: ¾ size 20 ¼”: ½ size 18 ½”: ¼ size Violas - Viola sizes refer to the actual length of the instrument's body, in inches. It is important that the student is comfortable holding and playing the viola, or physical problems may develop. With 34

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

arm and hand extended to the left, measure from the neck to the center of the palm of hand. 27” and up: 16.5” viola 26” - 27”: 16” viola 25” - 26”: 15.5” viola 24” - 25”: 15” viola 23” - 24”: 14” viola (also called intermediate viola) 21” - 23”: 12” to 13” viola (also called junior viola) 19” - 20”: 11” viola Cellos - Measure from shoulder socket to tip of middle finger (left arm) or size by height. 24” and up is 4/4 size; Height - 5 ft and up 22” - 23” is 3/4 size; Height - 4 ½ ft to 5 ft. 20” - 21” is 1/2 size; Height - 4 ft to 4 ½ ft. Even smaller sizes are available. You can also measure the distance between the tip of the index finger;to the tip of the little finger (left hand): 6” and up 4/4; 5”-6” - ¾. Bass - Generally elementary students and 6th graders play 1/2 size basses, middle school students can handle a 3/4 bass, and high school students play a larger bass. (In reality, it is often simply what your school has!) b. Is the instrument in good working order? Pegs - Make sure the pegs can move freely and stay in place. Use peg compound (not chalk) to keep pegs from slipping. Bridge - Check that the bridge isn’t bent, and is lined up with the notches of the sound holes. Many times the bridge might not be fitted to the instrument properly and then the strings sit too high above the fingerboard. Bridges are not attached to the body. Don’t glue them on, no matter how much you want to. Body - Watch where the neck goes into the body for cello and bass. It can come apart. Also watch for cracks. Sound Posts - There is a sound post inside the instruments, and they do fall. If you are not trained and comfortable resetting it, get it repaired. Strings - Even if the string isn’t broken, it may need to be replaced. Look for wear or unraveling. E strings need to be replaced the most. It’s a good idea to replace E strings a few weeks before a concert. c. Things string players should have or do. Shoulder Rests!! - Violin and viola players must have a shoulder rest! No exceptions; do not accept any continued on next page

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


Teaching Strings!!...continued from previous page

excuses. There are so many choices: look in any catalog - Kun, Zaret, Everest, etc. Rock Stops - Cellos and basses need rock stops. Xeros strap stops are the best; Super Sensitive Stoppin’ or Slip Stop Endpin Rockstop are good for basses. Rosin - All rosin is not the same. Get appropriate rosin for the different instruments. Wipe off extra. Rosin breaks easily when dropped. Consider cutting holders for rosin from small “pool noodles”, which provide grip and can help cushion rosin if it is dropped. III. Tuning a. Use electronic chromatic tuners and pick-ups: Korg, Intelli, Snark, etc. Any age student can learn to use them and tune with fine tuners. (Teacher should tune with pegs until students are older.) b. Make sure violin, viola, and cellos all have fine tuners or built-in fine tuners. They are cheap and easy to put on. Watch them and unscrew them when they are all the way down. Then tune with the pegs. c. When students say they hear a rattling sound, check the fine tuners first. They rattle when they are loose. d. When tuning with pegs, “Little bitty turns - always pushing in when making small turns”. IV. Holding the instrument Always stress posture. Sit up straight, both feet on the floor, shoulders relaxed, and head up. Violin/Viola: Must have a shoulder rest! • Left hand on left shoulder of instrument as you face the back of instrument, turn over, put a right finger on the button, bring button into neck putting your finger between your neck and the instrument. Lift jaw; pull finger away; put jaw on chin rest (left of the center of your chin). Imagine a line from the center of the eye down the cheek to the place the button shoulder touches the neck. • Hold instrument over your head with the scroll in your left hand, lower the instrument onto your left shoulder, place the chin rest under your jaw (left of the center of your chin), and keep instrument level with the floor. Cello • Adjust the endpin 2 ways: 1. Gently stand cello on scroll and bring endpin out to your eyes. Gently turn over. 2. Hold the cello in your lap; pull endpin out the width of your fully stretched hand span plus one inch. The scroll should be about chin height when standing. • Sit on edge of chair, place left hand on the left shoulder of the cello, an arm’s length away. Lean cello back so it rests against the body, mid chest high. The inside of the knees should touch the side of the cello. Fit the cello to the body not the other way around. • The right foot should be slightly in front of the left foot. Bass • Endpin height: The bridge should be even with knuckles when arm is at your side. The nut should be at the middle of the forehead. • Holding the bass: Feet shoulder width apart; using the left hand, hold the bass an arm’s length away; bring the bass toward you and turn it to a 45-degree angle to your body. The corner of the bass should rest on the left thigh.

Winter 2020-2021

V. Bow Hold Bow holds should be natural, and relaxed. Always begin bow hold on a pencil before using the bow. Every method book has great pictures of bow holds. There are also many aids you can buy or make to help form bow holds. Violin/viola/cello/bass French bow hold tips Elephant Bow story: “Three elephants came to a river with a log across it. They put their trunks into the river to drink. They put their trunks in just enough to get to the water and not under the log. There was a little bird that perched on the log next to the elephants (for cellos this is a baby elephant too small to reach the water). Swimming below the log in the river was an alligator. He wants to eat the bird (or baby elephant), but knows if he touches the elephants, they will stomp on him. So he bends himself and hides under the log. Then the elephants lean to the left to relax. Remember elephants are large and wouldn’t be touching each other.” ~ source unknown • Bunny ears: Hold your right hand’s first finger and little finger up and drop the middle fingers over the bent thumb, like an image of bunny ears and bunny teeth. Then open the bunny mouth and put the stick of the bow on top of the thumb and drop the middle fingers over and let the first finger (ear) lay on the stick and the little finger ear tip is on the stick (cello little finger rests over the stick, similar to the middle fingers). See three photos below.

Bunny Ears, three photos above • Llama bad, bunny good. (llamas spit): Variation on bunny. Llamas have a straight thumb. See photo below left. • Connect the dots. Mark a dot on the hand for the five contact points with the bow, and put the bow on the dots. See photo below right.

Llama bad

Connect the dots

• Dead hand: Relax your hand (like it’s dead); then bring up and place the bow in the opening. Very relaxed. Bass German bow hold tips • Make an “eyeglass” with your right hand thumb and first finger with your palm facing up. Place the screw of the bow through the eyeglass, place tip of 2nd and 4th fingers under the bow and let the 3rd finger float in air. VI. Producing sound/Problems and solutions All of the following should be done on open strings first. a. Begin with Pizzicato! (Pizzicato: plucking, abbreviated pizz.) This is so important; bad pizzicato is really bad. i. Violin/viola - Right thumb on the corner of the fingerboard, index finger up, other fingers closed continued on next page

Maryland Music Educator

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

35


Teaching Strings!!...continued from previous page

(like they’re holding the bow). Pluck with the fleshy part of index finger, not the nail. ii. Cello/bass - Right thumb on side of fingerboard, point index finger toward bridge, close other fingers, pluck with side of index finger. b. Getting started with the bow: i. Place left hand fingers at inside of right elbow (without the instrument; violins and violas bow over right shoulder). Pull bow to tip, feeling the joint move, and pull until arm is straight. Open and close elbow joint like a gate. Make sure shoulder is not moving. Elbow and wrist should be bending. Cellos/basses can practice bowing over wrist of left arm extended in front like strings, or place left hand fingers at inside of right elbow and “air bow” the imagined strings in front. ii. Imagine pulling the bow in both directions. Paint with hand before using bow. iii. Say PULL, PUSH instead of UP, DOWN in the beginning. iv. Shadow bow, using paper tubes or egg cartons, or turn the bow to place stick of bow on shoulder or on top of hand. Or, if holding instrument, put the bow, turned over, in crook of left arm underneath the instrument. c. First time on the string: Place bow on string and push down on string. When ready, pull, and there should be an explosion of sound. Go until arm is straight, without moving the shoulder. Push back to frog. d. Beginning Bow hold: For younger (elementary students) Find the balance point on the bow and form bow hold there. Do all the other steps above. Gradually move to the frog, but go back if bow starts to “skate or curve”. e. Bowing lanes: Bow should be in the middle between the fingerboard and bridge. Think of highway lanes that are perpendicular to the strings. f. Problems: Bow flopping over fingerboard, bow curving around head, bow not staying straight. i. Stand with bow arm against a wall making sure the shoulder is touching the wall. Then bow. Only the elbow and the wrist can be moved (not the shoulder). ii. Make sure wrist is bending. For violins and violas, the wrist should point to the nose when at the frog and bend the other direction when at the tip. With cello and bass, the wrist should point to the fingerboard when at the frog. Think “mountains and valleys”. iii. Imagine painting with fingers or running fingers through the water to get wrists to move. iv. Straws in the F sound holes: Use straws that bend at the top so they can be joined together; for cello and basses, use the thick type pixy sticks (empty), bubble tea straws, a thin circular plastic tubing, or wooden dowel that will fit in the F hole of the instrument. Place the straws in the round ends of the sound holes nearest the fingerboard, and put the bow on the string between the straws and the bridge. Analyze how it feels. What do they have to do to keep the bow straight? v. Double stop hooked bows: Play two strings at one time (flattening the hair of bow and pressing down to hit two strings). Pull and stop the bow in small increments until you get to the tip. Have a contest to see who can get the most stops. Do this exercise with both down and up bows. Then get to the tip in a set number of stops; eventually, use the whole bow.

VII. Left Hand Violin/viola: The most important thing is that the wrist stays flat and does not bend backward. • The left hand touches the instrument with the pad of the left thumb and at the base of the first finger. The thumb should be relaxed. The knuckles of the left hand are parallel with the fingerboard and the fingers form boxes over the strings • Place left hand on left shoulder of instrument and imagine the instrument pushing hand and arm to the scroll. • Draw eyes on the tip of the left thumb and a mouth on the pad of the thumb. Make sure the thumb is “looking” at the ceiling, not the pegs, and the “mouth” is closed against the instrument. • Stress natural position (no one walks around with the hand bent backwards). • Spoon technique: Place a spoon on the inside of the left wrist so the large part of the spoon is resting in the bottom of the palm, Secure around the wrist with a rubber band or hair tie. • “Worm Hole” When the left hand is placed correctly and all fingers are curved and making contact with the string, a small opening should be seen at the webbed fleshy part of the hand between the thumb and first finger. The opening should be large enough to place a pencil (or worm) through it - perhaps use a gummy worm. • Don’t squash an imagined bird egg in the palm of the left hand. Cello: Arm and wrist are flat and straight. • Place hand 3-4” from the nut, thumb on the back of the neck opposite the 2nd finger (hidden from view). The left arm should be at a 45-degree angle to the fingerboard. Hand is natural, like holding a soda can. • Pat the belly with open hand, bounce up to fingerboard. • Thumb is opposite second finger. Put a sticker, reinforcement circle, or even a band-aid where the thumb should go. Bass: Elbow out, not resting on instrument. • Place hand 4-5” from nut, thumb hidden from view opposite the 2nd finger. • Fingers never touch. • Bass face: Thumb in ear, 1st finger on eyebrow, 2nd on nose, 4th on mouth. • Come from above: Hand on head, hand on top of scroll, hand into position (helps keep the elbow up). VIII. Intonation: a. Tapes or not: I say yes! • For beginners and on cellos, use Don’t Frets™. • Use auto pinstripes (auto stores). o Violins and Violas: I only put first finger, 3rd finger and 4th finger. They need learn early that the 2nd finger moves. o Cellos: I use Don’t Frets or put on 1st, 3rd and 4th tapes. o Basses: put 1st and 4th, and then, shifting down on the G string, C natural and D (C# is 2nd finger). If you can use different colors for the bass, use one color for 1st position and another for the shift. b. Terms you should learn • High and low fingers: violins and violas. High means further away from the scroll and low is closer to the scroll. High is sometimes marked with an arrow pointing up, and low the opposite. High 2 means 2nd finger touching the 3rd finger, and low 2 means 2nd finger next to the first finger. High 3 and low 4 are the same note. continued on next page

36

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


Teaching Strings!!...continued from previous page

• Have violins and violas practice moving finger back and forth. • Learn the different finger patterns. c. If you can get a band in tune, you can get an orchestra in tune. • You can’t play in tune if you are not holding the instrument correctly and pulling the bow straight. Fix those problems and your intonation issue will be easier to fix. • Use electronic tuners. • Watch their fingers, and move them if they are not in the correct place. They are not glued down. • Have them play with a drone in the key of the piece of music. • Listen for “crunching” sounds. Teach them to listen for crunching sounds. • SING! • Listen to recordings. • Get inside each other’s tone. Teach them to listen. Play in and out of tune. Hands together means in tune: pull hands apart and students should go further out of tune. As hands move closer, then they get closer in tune, until hands are together and everyone is back in tune. IX. Method Books There are SO many out there; look at many of them to find the one you can play that has a good teacher edition. My favorites: • Sound Innovations (customizable!, DVD lessons, SmartMusic™) • Strictly Strings (nice pacing, not too fast or slow) • New Directions for Strings (Stays in D for a long time) • Essential Elements 2000 (nice pacing) • String Basics (great interactive practice software - free) • A Rhythm A Week • Sight-Read It for Strings X. Literature selection and rehearsal techniques a. Keys are learned in this order: D, G, C, (then 2nd octave G for violins and 2nd octave C for viola and cello), F, A, Bb, etc. b. Selecting music • Younger orchestras do best in the keys of D and G. Tackle the key of C once they have mastered the idea of low 2 (2nd fingers). The key of F involves low 1 and low 2’s, so be careful. Older orchestras can handle other keys as long as they have learned the scale and arpeggio and have played unison tunes in that key. • Know your orchestra; make sure you have the players to cover the different parts. If you don’t have violas or strong violas, don’t pick a piece the highlights violas. • Go through each part, mark bowings and specific fingerings. c. Seating • Don’t put all your strongest players on first violin. Second violin is a very important part and needs strong players. Use the 3rd violin music, but it also needs strong players, because it is the viola part and jumps around to accommodate the missing C string. Don’t be afraid to create a simpler violin part for the weaker players; however, insist they play it in tune with a good tone. • Violinists should experience all the violin parts. Mix them up, either song by song or by concert. d. Rehearsing • Always begin with scales and arpeggios in half notes using large, full bows, or play each note twice. Use scales to practice different bowings, and rhythms. • Use some book of unison tunes or rhythms. Winter 2020-2021

• Match warm-up scales with keys in the music for the rehearsal. It is important for them to get the key in their ear and the finger patterns under their fingers. • Play pizzicato while fingering and singing (or saying) note names. One group can bow while others play pizzicato. • Air bowing while fingering and singing - air bowing styles: i. Violins/violas - turn bow over and put stick in the crook of left elbow. Hold instrument normally and bow normally in the left elbow. Cello/bass - turn bow over and place against body of instrument above bridge and under strings. Bow with gentle pressure against the instrument. ii. Hold bow above strings and bow normally. iii. Hold bow vertically - great for getting fingers and wrist to move. XI. Your professional development: a. Get an instrument of your own and take it home. • Use one of your school’s instruments or buy one for yourself. It is so important that you begin to play a string instrument. • Get book one of a method book series, and play through the entire book, reading everything in the teacher edition. • Learn some fiddle tunes. b. Take classes, workshops, webinars, etc. There are so many summer classes available, such as: • Villanova Summer Music Program • Ohio State String Teacher Workshop in summer • NAfME conferences and webinars, state conferences • The Midwest Clinic website resources • Don’t forget lessons through community colleges, a music store, or private teachers. c. Check out the web: • Mark Hopkins String Pedagogy - http://stringtechnique.com • The Cello Professor - http://www.celloprofessor.com • Music Showcase - https://www.musicshowcaseonline.com/ • Many other resources, including YouTube™ tutorials and teacher sections on music company websites. d. Join your state music educators organization and American String Teachers Association (ASTA), and read the journals. e. Network with other string teachers in your county or around the state. About the Author: Kate McFadden has been teaching music for over 30 years. She has taught at all levels, public and private. She is currently teaching at Deer Park Middle Magnet School in Baltimore County. Her ensembles have consistently received excellent and superior ratings at county and state adjudications and out-of-state competitions. She has presented sessions on teaching strings and Celtic music at several MMEA conferences, VMEA conference, NAfME conferences and webinars, county in-service sessions, and The Midwest Clinic. She is an adjudicator and mentors new teachers throughout her county. She is a Past President of the Maryland Orchestra Directors Association and continues to be involved by managing the state orchestra assessments. She also continues to teach and perform on bassoon. Comments are welcome and may be directed to the author at cmcfadden@bcps.org.

Maryland Music Educator

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

37


Clean. Musical. Tom & Jerry or Ben & Jerry by Erik Lynch, Verona High School, New Jersey Republished with permission from Tempo, The Official Magazine of the New Jersey Music Educators Association, October 2019, Vol. 74, No. 1

P

ost-concert discussion among my colleagues in the band world tends to follow an either-or framework. Have you ever heard something like this? “Boy, they were super clean, but really boring! It felt more clinical than it did musical.” “Wow, that slow movement was really, really musical, but the percussion section was sloppy and ruined it for me!” Visual imagery takes me back to a classic Tom and Jerry cartoon, with each iconic character battling for some form of moral superiority. However, my heart really yearns for Ben and Jerry, in particular “Coffee Heath Bar Crunch”, where those luscious ingredients work in decadent harmony. Have we been conditioned in the band world to think about performances in a somewhat dualistic way? Are technical considerations and those decisions that gravitate more towards the musical end (phrasing, climax points, tempi, etc.) separate or integrated entities? One would hope that professional musicians/practitioners would lean towards the latter. Additionally, I hope that we see technical precision as a means leading to great music making. But, sadly, this would be a clear case where there is a disconnect between ideal theory and practice.

Festival or crafting the ideal program for the Concert Band Festival in hopes of making the Gala Concert, competition can breed a mindset that is not musical. Sadly, we educators can succumb to pedantic and myopic rubrics (aka score sheets) crafted by those people and companies who simply want to make money from us. It makes me sad that the hyper-competitive nature of the band world is so close to the pervasive testing culture in academia that we often criticize, especially when we consider how liberating music making can be. It is time that we all reflect upon these tensions. If we agree, or partially agree, that competition can lead us to prioritizing the “clean and together” over the more abstract elements of the art form, then what does that mean for our students? Some salient points: • We might avoid playing great literature or play a finite amount of music for the sake of competition. • We might cultivate a learning environment that is more hierarchical than it is egalitarian. • We might reduce our discourse on the podium to a set of tricks (the 3rd is always sharp, etc.) as opposed to teaching in more organic and contextual ways. • Through over-repetition, we might breed a student mindset that is more passive than it is active, while suppressing rather than cultivating autonomy.

Two Vantage Points With that said, the purpose of this article is to attempt to balance these tensions from two vantage points: 1. Why does the band world put such emphasis on technical precision, and what are the implications for our students? 2. How can we refine our conceptual paradigm of this delicate, yet pivotal balance point of technical and music issues? Furthermore, how will this evolved philosophy translate to our students having heightened musical experiences? Competition in the band world can often push us toward safe and clean performances that prioritize technical precision over the intrinsic beauty of the art form. This is especially apparent in the marching band world, as the idiom has been intensified with props, electronics, voice overs, etc. This can leave the actual music making as a small portion of the curriculum. Furthermore, the remainder of time, often minimal, that goes into music centers around repetition and clean playing, avoiding so many great parts of the literature: interpretation, theoretical/compositional techniques, and contextual elements, to name a few. Many music educators would agree that the competitive nature of the marching band world bleeds over to other parts of our program. Whether it is perfecting three selections for the State Jazz Band

Moving Forward How do we move toward a more well-rounded mindset that perpetuates the interdependent nature of the concrete and the abstract elements of music making? More emphasis on developing stronger philosophical mindsets in pre-service teachers would address issues and be beneficial in a number of areas. Some students who come from purely competitive programs will simply replicate that framework in their future programs, unless pushed to challenge their previous experiences. One of the areas that would flourish exponentially from this stronger philosophical mindset would be our discourse on the podium. When we are able to balance technical and abstract thoughts (which can happen in the same thought) from the podium, we are imparting more meaningful musical ideas to our students while asking them to think critically. Let’s look at some scenarios for trying this: • Option 1: Clarinets, that is G# in measure 61 - please make sure your left pinky is down. Option 2: Clarinets, that is G# in measure 61 - please make sure your left pinky is down. Listen to this chord that uses your G#. Now listen to this chord with a G natural. What are you hearing? What colors come to mind when I switch notes?

38

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

Maryland Music Educator

continued on next page Winter 2020-2021


!"#$%&''(')#*&$(+#,"--#.(%,#$&*/%&0&$#"+0&$%(+$1#2#!"#$%&'($)*+",

---./011"23*234$*22&506*5"$7'&3'0+,!"#$"!%&'()*+!,)-&,&./!'./)%$0!+1.%$")&*!

8920+*.$028$8*5"',"!

222#&'+!"&!"#+!*22&506*5"$028$ *26"'8*,.*71*20'9!3)*+#$*!4,")/"! 5%#&0$,/!6,&-,$'

3&4(%(0'$

5###6"%&74"89#:0;<*=<7#>9#?@?@# A6+,0-"7$,(/#"'4#B<)&-"7#3&4(%(0'C 5###D7(4"8#"'4#6"%&74"89#E"'&"78#??## "'4#?F9#?@?G#A6+,0-"7$,(/#"'4## B<)&-"7#3&4(%(0'C 5###6"%&74"89#3/7(-#F9#?@?G## A6+,0-"7$,(/#"'4#B<)&-"7#3&4(%(0'C 5###H,&7$4"89#E&'<#F9#?@?G#AB<)&-"7# 3&4(%(0'#2#H7"'$I<7#6%&4<'%$#J'-8C

*&$(+K&*=+K<4&

Clean. Musical....continued from previous page

• Option 1: Trumpets, be sure to pull out your tuning slide a bit when you put in your straight mute; you are going sharp. Option 2: Trumpets, be sure to pull out your tuning slide a bit when you put in your straight mute; you are going sharp. Remember what a great color and shade you give to the sound here - imagine that you are adding really great olive oil to your pasta. Do me a favor: take out the mutes and play the passage again. How does the timbre change? I do understand that some might critique the second options because they lack efficiency. I would contend that teaching music

should supersede error detection: are we in the animal training business or striving to teach our students to think critically? The answer is obvious, but the reality is not. In the end, technical prowess and musical maturity are much more like Ben and Jerry than they are Tom and Jerry. Regardless of the nature of our program (competitive, non-competitive, etc.), we all should strive to make the deepest and most significant connections we can with our students, while leaving indelible marks that are truly artistic during their transformative years.

About the Author: Erik Lynch is in his 19th year as Director of Bands at Verona High School, where he leads the Marching Band, Concert Band, Chamber Ensembles, and a three track Music Theory program. Before coming to Verona, he served as Assistant Director of Bands at Immaculata High School in Somerville, NJ. A graduate of Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University, Mr. Lynch completed his undergraduate studies in Music Education with a percussion emphasis, studying with William Moersch and She-e Wu, and was a four-year member of the Rutgers Wind Ensemble as a Naumburg Scholarship Recipient. During these years, he attended the Eastern Music Festival twice, studying timpani with John Feddersen, and in his senior year was one of six timpanists selected to participate in the Vic Firth Timpani Seminar at the Tanglewood Music Center under Maestro Seiji Ozawa. Mr. Lynch has also played timpani on the Gramercy Brass Orchestra of New York’s recording of Brubeck in Brass. Additionally, Mr. Lynch completed his Master of Music Education degree and Supervisor's Certificate, also at Rutgers. Mr. Lynch was a finalist for the College of New Jersey’s Outstanding Educators Program in 2006, and a finalist for Yale University’s Distinguished Music Educators Program in 2011. Additionally, he was nominated for the Grammy Outstanding Music Educator Award in 2013, 2014, 2017, and advanced to the quarterfinal round in 2014 and 2017. Consequently, Mr. Lynch is a Legacy Candidate for the Grammy award. He formerly served as the chair of the Essex County Honor Band and NJSMA Marching Band, and currently serves as co-president of the New Jersey Marching Band Director's Association. Winter 2020-2021

Maryland Music Educator

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

39


Differentiated Collaboration for Arts Integration by Shawna Longo, General Music & Music Technology teacher, Durban Avenue School, New Jersey Republished with permission from Tempo, Official Magazine of the New Jersey Music Educators Association, January 2019, Vol. 73, No. 2

W

e’ve all been there…looking for something to increase student engagement or deepen student learning. Many teachers have heard about and are interested in the idea of arts integrated lessons and projects for the classroom. I have found that many teachers don’t know where to begin in terms of collaborating with their colleagues regarding arts integration. What does this collaboration look like? As an arts teacher, you might be nervous or uncomfortable approaching the non-arts colleagues because you haven’t established a relationship with them. This can also go the other way - the non-arts teacher might not be confident in “arts skills” and might be uncertain where to begin. In my experience, there is no right or wrong way…as long as you both are open to new ideas and collaborating! Just as no two people are alike, collaboration amongst teachers doesn’t always look the same. I like to call this differentiated collaboration. The term differentiation is readily used in classrooms around the world, but is typically only associated with students and their needs. Teachers are no different! Every time I work with a teacher to develop and/or co-teach an arts integration lesson, it “looks” different for a number of reasons. 1. Relationships - My relationship with each teacher is different. Honestly speaking, some relationships are better than others; but regardless, we are two people with different personalities trying to work together for a common goal, and this never “looks” the same! 2. Connecting - Each non-arts teacher brings a different level of comfort in working with the arts. Do they connect more with visual art, music, dance, or theater? Or they may not think that they are comfortable with any art form because they don’t view themselves as creative. 3. Comfort level - Each teacher is in a different place concerning how comfortable they are with arts integration. Are they more on the arts enhancement side or arts integration side of the continuum? For more information on this concept, check out this article discussing the Arts Integration Continuum at https://artsintegration.com/artsintegration-continuum/. 4. Location and time - Are we located in the same building? Do we have any common “free” time in our schedules? If the answer is “no” to both of these, then digital is the way to go! Google Docs™, text, email, phone, or virtual call will solve that problem very easily!

Just as no two people are alike, collaboration amongst teachers doesn’t always look the same. I like to call this differentiated collaboration. 40

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

Keeping in mind that no two collaborative efforts for an arts integration lesson will “look” the same, I’ve created a sample step-by-step guide that is a great place to start. Step 1 - Quick conversation in passing, in the hall between classes, at the mailboxes, by the copy machine, or via text/email. Nonarts content teacher may say, “Hey, I have a unit coming up on ‘Human Rights’ and thought it would work well for an arts integrated lesson. Do you have any ideas?” Arts teacher responds, “Yes! That sounds great! Let me think about it and get back to you. Do you know what discipline you want to integrate? Visual arts, music, theatre, or dance?” Step 2 - Arts teacher completes some research on the topic and brainstorms potential lesson ideas. Step 3 - Arts teacher emails/texts the non-arts teacher to set a time for a quick conversation. Arts teacher sends the non-arts content teacher the Pre-Planning Guide* to complete before their meeting. Step 4 - The two teachers bring their completed Pre-Planning Guides* and meet to finalize the lesson idea. The arts teacher also brings the Collaborative Planning Guide* to help guide their conversation. They also make sure to discuss the non-arts and arts standards that will be integrated throughout the lesson. The arts teacher sends the non-arts teacher a Google Doc of the Arts Integration Lesson Plan Template* that they can start working on together. Step 5 - Teachers collaboratively create the lesson plan via Google Docs. Teachers also have brief conversation via email, text, and/or face-to-face as needed. This step can take as much time as needed as both teachers listen and communicate how to best align the selected standards. Step 6 - Once the lesson plan is well underway, the teachers meet briefly to discuss the assessments that will be used (diagnostic, formative, and summative). Step 7 - One of the teachers shares a Google Doc to collaboratively draft the needed assessment pieces. Both teachers discuss the assessment pieces (rubrics, checklists, continuum, etc.) that will be used. Reminder: include the standards that are being assessed on each assessment piece! Step 8 - Co-teach the arts integrated lesson as time permits. If the teachers cannot be together for all classes, think about having the teachers together for one period to roll out the lesson. Remember that it is the selected standards that are being taught, so focus on those aligned arts and non-arts standards. Step 9 - Complete the Lesson Reflection* questions as soon as the lesson has been delivered, as this will help you think about how the arts integrated lesson went and plan for future iterations of this

Maryland Music Educator

continued on next page Winter 2020-2021


Contact us for a complete catalog

• Special Educator Discounts

800.443.3592

• Free Shipping on Qualifying Online Orders • Triple Guaranteed for Quality, Musical Function, and Price

PERIPOLE.COM

PARTNERS IN MUSIC EDUCATION® Exclusive Direct Distributors: Orff Instruments

Halo Recorder ®

®

Classic Ukuleles TM

by Enya

PERCUSSION

Differentiated Collaboration..., continued from previous page

lesson. Ideally, both teachers should complete this together. If you are interested in learning more about arts integration, contact me and/or search The Institute for Arts Integrations and STEAM’s website at https://artsintegration.com/. The *Pre-Planning Guide, *Collaborative Planning Guide, *Lesson Plan Template, and *Lesson Reflection documents discussed in the steps above are located pp. 90-95 in the 2018 New Jersey Arts Integration Think and Do Workbook found at http://artsednj.org/new-jersey-arts-integration-think-and-do-workbook/.

Remember - think differentiated collaboration. You may jump from Step 1 to Step 3 to Step 5 and that’s okay. What matters most is how you begin the journey and what your students gain at the end of it. Don’t forget to celebrate your success in collaborating, as it will lead to your next collaboration for arts integration! * See column 1, this page. This article was originally written for Education Closet.

About the Author: Shawna E. Longo is the General Music and Music Technology teacher at Durban Avenue School, Hopatcong, New Jersey. She also serves as the Arts Integration & STEAM Specialist for TMI Education; Coach for The Institute for Arts Integration and STEAM; and Ambassador for Music First, Hal Leonard and Jamstik. With 19+ years of teaching experience, Mrs. Longo holds a Bachelor of Music in Music Education degree from The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC; a Master of Public Administration in Arts Administration degree from Seton Hall University in South Orange, NJ; Supervisor/Curriculum Director’s certification from Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ; and certification as an Arts Integration Specialist (Level 1) as well as certification as an Arts Integration Leader (Level 2) from The Institute for Arts Integration and STEAM. She is a clinician and consultant for music education, music technology, social/emotional learning, arts integration, and STEAM. She is a recipient of the 2019 Mike Kovins Ti:ME Music Technology Teacher of the Year award, 2019 New Jersey Governor’s Award in Arts Education, 2019 TeachRock Star Teacher Award from the Rock and Roll Forever Foundation, 2018 NJMEA Master Music Teacher Award and the 2016 Governor’s Educator of the Year for Hopatcong Middle School. Comments and questions are welcome and may be directed to Shawna Longo at shawnalongo@gmail.com. Winter 2020-2021

Maryland Music Educator

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

41


Reinvigorating the Remote Learning Choir: Ideas for Making Online Learning Meaningful and Efficient by Matthew C. Lee, Choir Director, John P. Stevens High School, New Jersey Republished with permission from Tempo, Official Magazine of the New Jersey Music Educators Association, October 2020, Vol. 75, No. 1

E

very music teacher has had to figure out how to make music classes meaningful while staying connected. I have brainstormed a few things I will be trying this fall, provided that school is either a hybrid model or entirely online. When students are made responsible for their own learning, real growth can be achieved. This is by no means meant to apply to everyone in every situation; you may choose to modify or completely change the ideas listed below. Idea A: Learning Repertoire in Chunks and Layers Have you or someone you know attempted to put together a virtual choir video, only to find that students are breathing where they’re not supposed to, singing the incorrect notes and/or rhythms, and not singing very musically? Didn’t you ever wish you could address the musicianship of their music making in a meaningful, thorough, yet efficient way? In this approach to learning repertoire online, students are given the chance to take responsibility for their own proficiency and understanding of the music. The suggested steps that follow can take place over a period of a few weeks. “Rinse and repeat” for different segments and pieces. Step 1: Sing a short excerpt of the piece with accurate notes and rhythms (neutral syllable, solfège, or count singing) along with the practice track. Step 2: Sing the same excerpt with accurate notes and rhythms AND correct diction, modeled after teacher instruction video. Step 3: PERFORM with accurate notes, rhythms, diction, AND phrasing; including word stress, dynamics, and cut offs as indicated on the prepared score and as discussed in Zoom™ rehearsal and/or a conducting/modeling video. Step 4: After a discussion about the expression and message of the piece that you have chosen, students are now assigned to make a video in which they prepare their virtual choir submission, using all of the guidelines they have worked on in the previous steps. Sometimes asking for videos from students can be like pulling teeth: you can complete these steps in small group Zoom meetings. If this is not possible due to technology, students can send in recordings using their phones. Assessment: Pass/Fail; Randomly spot-check student work and give feedback when possible. After three-four cycles: Have students peerreview their small segments or ask section leaders or responsible choir members to review the work of students in their voice part. This approach can also be applied to a solo line of repertoire. Let’s say that in September you aren’t ready to have them learn a four-part 42

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

harmony piece just yet because you would rather focus on getting them to sing accurate notes, rhythms, using good singing diction and demonstrating a sense of line. Have them do the same activity, with more or less steps, using “America” (“My Country, ‘Tis of Thee”) or a similar melody which they know or can learn easily. Idea B: Sight Reading in Context of Repertoire It’s easy to assign a daily or weekly Sight Reading Factory assignment (https://www.sightreadingfactory.com/), to build basic skills. However, for sight reading assignments that relate to the music your students are performing, take selected segments from their music and identify sections each part could feasibly sight read, given the starting note. You might choose a piece of music that is “sight readable” to give students a chance to succeed on their own. 1. Teach part of a song by rote through video or Zoom rehearsal. 2. Assignment: have them sing the part they learned using a practice track or video, and then make them responsible for learning the next few measures on their own. They can use solfège or any other method, including playing the part on a piano or trying their best to pick it up from YouTube™ to learn the next segment. 3. Students record along with the backing track, which will have a metronome and their part highlighted. Optional: During the assigned independent study segment, have the highlighted part drop out. This step will require knowledge and proficiency in a notation software. 4. Alternatively, assign them four measure or less of the song that you have chosen and ask them to figure out how to sing it. Ask them to include a description about how they learned it in their submission. Of course, this step may depend on the level of your learners. Idea C: Part of Your Musical World If you want to take a break from working on repertoire, it may be helpful to take a glance into the musical worlds of students’ lives. For many students, music exists in two categories - the music from school, and the music they listen to outside of school. Why not bring the two together? This lesson can take place asynchronously or over group discussions. You could even host a “listening party” to screen-share the song that students submitted prior to the meeting (having prescreened, as always, all videos submitted by students). Depending on the size of the class, this process may take several class meetings to finish. In the best scenario, students will be encouraged to open a discussion with one another continued on next page

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


Remote Learning Choir..., continued from previous page

based on the songs that they submit for this sharing project. Ask students to choose a song that is significant to them and school-appropriate. Have them submit a YouTube link through a Google Form™. With the link, they should include a written portion, answering these questions with three-four sentences: 1. What is it that you like about this song? 2. What does the message of the song talk about? 3. What does this song mean to YOU? 4. If someone were listening to this song for the first time, what might you tell them to listen for? The following week, you can return to this song and apply the following extensions: 1. Find another artist’s rendition of this song (a cover). What key elements does this second artist change? How is the overall effect of the song changed? 2. Which rendition do you prefer? Why? Further extension: Create your own cover, either of the song you submitted in the original prompt, or of another song. Think about the elements that you can change, such as tempo, melody, key, instrumentation, texture, harmonies, overall mood, mode (turn a major sing into minor? minor into major?). These thoughts may be enriched with examples of how songs can change in feeling based on the manipulation of these elements (for example, Married Life from Pixar’s “Up”, or well-known nursery rhymes in minor modes). While you talk about this assignment you can also discuss what each of these elements mean. What is texture? How does a key signature work? Idea D: A Cappella Mini-Projects With the rise of shows and movies like The Sing-Off and Pitch Perfect, contemporary a cappella may be a crucial part of your choir program. So much of what we do in choir can be applied to contemporary pop a cappella singing and arranging. This project will allow your students to create original arrangements while still using listening skills and requiring collaborative teamwork. Results may vary based on the skill level of the individual students. Using Soundtrap™ (subscription required); the Acapella™ app from PicPlayPost (phone-friendly, free version allows creation of oneminute videos); or GarageBand™ (access to iOS/Macbooks required), students can either: 1. Create entirely new a cappella arrangements by harmonizing pop songs. OR 2. Find an a cappella rendition of a song and perform it without referring to written sheet music. The emphasis on “without sheet music” is important since you may have that one student who can write symphonies with no problem. There are also TONS of user-submitted transcriptions and arrangements available on websites such as MuseScore™. Asking students to make their own arrangements or mimic pre-existing arrangements requires planning, teamwork, and critical thinking. For students who don’t know where to begin, ask them the following questions to “jog” their brains: 1. In the recording, how many instruments are playing? How many singers are there? 2. Listen to the original recording and count again: can you focus on a different layer this time than you did last time? Winter 2020-2021

3. Can you hear the bass line? 4. Is there percussion involved? 5. Are there higher harmonies involved? Is there another singer or instrument that complements the melody, but higher? 6. Are there lower harmonies involved? Is there another singer or instrument that supports the lower end? 7. Can you sing along with the melody? 8. Can you sing along with another instrument or singer that is NOT singing the melody? 9. How many sections are there in this song? What is the form of this piece? 10. How can you recreate what you hear on the original recording, using only voices? 11. Next Step: Can you add your own spin to your arrangement? How might you make it unique? This idea could be good for the awkward post-winter break lull or used as a feature for your concerts. You could offer an incentive to students by planning to feature exemplary projects in a group rehearsal OR in a virtual concert. In this age of remote learning, I would encourage meeting with the students in small groups - perhaps after they have decided their groups, and help them get started without offering too much help. The projects they develop may range from full a cappella productions to melody with body percussion, but that is okay! The point isn’t to discover the next ICHSA group (International Championship of High School A Cappella), but to encourage students to use their ears, brains, and each other to create something new. I would also encourage becoming familiar with the software mentioned above so you can help walk students through it. Student access to technology will determine the scope of some of your assignments. About the Author: Matthew Lee is the Choir Director at John P. Stevens High School in Edison, New Jersey, where he conducts five vocal ensembles that have consistently received superior or Gold ratings at local, state, national, and international festivals. In 2017, the J.P. Stevens High School Chamber Choir was recipient of the Grand Prize and the Morten Lauridsen Award at the Interkultur Sing ‘N’ Joy Princeton International. The J.P. Stevens A cappella Ensemble was invited to perform at the NAfME Eastern Division Music Educators Conference in Atlantic City in April 2017. In 2019, The JP Stevens A cappella and Chamber Ensembles returned to the Sing N Joy Festival, earning gold rankings and being selected into the Grand Prix round, and Mr. Lee was the recipient of the Conductor’s Award. Many of his students are selected each year to perform with various regional and state honor choirs. Mr. Lee is the NJ ACDA High School Youth Chair, and has prepared numerous honor choirs throughout New Jersey. He has presented interest sessions at the NJACDA Summer Workshop and the NJMEA All-State Conference. He is involved throughout New Jersey as a manager of honor choirs and serves on the NJ All-State Choral Procedures Board. He was recently named the recipient of the ACDA Lannom Study Award. Mr. Lee is the assistant conductor at Christ Church in Summit, NJ and a member of Harmonium Choral Society. He has performed with the Westminster Choir College Summer Festival Choir and in the South of France with the University of Delaware Choral Symposium as a conducting scholar. He holds a degree in Music Education from Northwestern University.

Maryland Music Educator

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

43


Using ESSA to Leverage Arts Education Policy

to and improving student engagement and achievement in … (II) activities and programs in music and the arts.”

academically at-risk students in their school based on academic achievement indicators, usually the tested subject areas. Traditionally, Title I funds in targeted assistance schools have funded supplemental interventions in the tested subject areas. Under ESSA, opportunities for a well-rounded education may also be funded for these students.

At least 20 percent of the funds an LEA gets under Title IV-A must be spent on a wellrounded education. As the arts and music are part of the definition of a well-rounded education, these federal dollars can support arts and music-related funding requestsM. so Tuttle, by Lynn Director of Public *"#+ # ,,-./&01%'%&2"# During ESSA’s first Policy, two years, Research, & Professional Development, NAfME long as those requests a) increase access and each state created an ESSA plan, including Republished with permission from an issue of The State Education Standard dedicated to “Fostering Arts-Rich Schools”, published opportunity for students to participate in the a revised accountability system to meet the by themusic National Association Boards of Education (NASBE), January 2020, under a Creative Commons license, CC BY-ND arts and as identified through a local of State law’s new requirements. Increased flexibilneeds assessment and b) do not supplant local 4.0.in(https://www.nasbe.org/fostering-arts-rich-schools/) ity for states defining their accountability and state funds already received by the school systems was a defining tenet of ESSA. In fact, Special thanks to Valerie Norville, Editorial Director, NASBE; Lynn M. Tuttle, Director of Public Policy, Research, & Professional district for such activities. To date, Congress states were required to select at least one has authorized annual funding levelsDevelopment, of over NAfME; and Ella Wilcox, new measure for their accountability systems Editorial Communications Manager, NAfME $1 billion for Title IV, Part A. that met their needs. Music and arts educa-

By contrast, a well-rounded education is referenced 14 times throughout Titles I, II, and IV of the law. Box 1. ESSA’s Definition of Well-Rounded Education ‘‘(52) WELL-ROUNDED EDUCATION.—The term ‘well-rounded education’ means courses, activities, and programming in subjects such as English, reading or language arts, writing, science, technology, engineering, mathematics, foreign languages, civics and government, economics, arts, history, geography, computer science, music, career and technical education, health, physical education, and any other subject, as determined by the State or local educational agency, with the purpose of providing all students access to an enriched curriculum and educational experience.’’

2. Title IV-A. Also known as the Student Support and Academic Enrichment Grant, Title IV, Part A of ESSA provides new block funding to local education agencies (LEAs) to support three broad areas of education: educational technology, safe and healthy students/ schools, and a well-rounded education. As Title IV underscores, the U.S. Congress sees access to a well-rounded education as a civil right. Section 4104 states that the funds are meant to help states (and LEAs) “offer well-rounded educational experiences to all students, as described in section 4107, including female students, minority students, English learners, children with disabilities, and low-income students who are often underrepresented in critical and enriching subjects, which may include—(i) increasing student access to and improving student engagement and achievement in…(II) activities and programs in music and the arts.” At least 20 percent of the funds an LEA gets under Title IV-A must be spent on a well-rounded education. As the arts and music are part of the definition of a well-rounded education, these federal dollars can support arts and music-related funding requests so long as those requests a) increase access and opportunity for students to participate

www.nasbe.org

44

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

in the arts and music as identified through a local needs assessment and b) do not supplant local and state funds already received by the school district for such activities. To date, Congress has authorized The clearest evidence annual of state funding and local levels of over $1 billion for Title IV, Part A. innovation is revealed in 3. Title I. ESSA changed language in Title I to reflect the importance around Title IV-Aeducation. Title I schools come in two varieties: ofactivity a well-rounded and state accountability schoolwide Title I schools and targeted assistance Title I schools. systems. Under ESSA, schoolwide Title I schools are for the first time encouraged to include information in their schoolwide plans on how they provide well-rounded educational opportunities, including music and arts education, to their students. While this does not necessarily mean Title I funds will support those opportunities, it marks the first time that schools have been encouraged to include a wider range of curricular offerings beyond the tested subject areas within their schoolwide plans. Also for the first time, targeted assistance Title I schools may use their supplemental federal Title I dollars to support well-rounded educational opportunities, including music and the arts, for students identified as the most academically at-risk students in their school based on academic achievement indicators, usually the tested subject areas. Traditionally, Title I funds in targeted assistance schools have funded supplemental interventions in the tested subject areas. Under ESSA, opportunities for a well-rounded education may also be funded for these students. 4. Accountability. During ESSA’s first two years, each state created !" a revised accountability system to meet the an ESSA plan, including law’s new requirements. Increased flexibility for states in defining their accountability systems was a defining tenet of ESSA. In fact, states were required to select at least one new measure for their accountability systems that met their needs. Music and arts education advocates and supporters worked with states across the nation to make the case for including an arts-related measure in the revised accountability systems. Several took up the challenge, including Connecticut, Massachusetts, Illinois, Michigan, and Louisiana. These states have been developing measures of student access to arts and music instruction. Georgia went further and included measures of student achievement in the arts as part of its revised accountability system. Additional states included music and arts education in unique ways throughout their ESSA plans, from how migrant students (Title I, Part C) should have access to the arts to how the arts can play an active role in 21st Century Community Learning Center after-school programs (Title IV, Part B).1

Maryland Music Educator

January 2020 • National Association of State Boards of Education

I

tion advocates and supporters worked with Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) has states across the nation to make the case to reflect the importance of a well-rounded for including an arts-related in the blazed new pathways for policy and funding in K-12measure arts educaeducation. Title I schools come in two varietrevised accountability systems. Several took ies:tion. schoolwide Title I schools and targeted Many states acted early to take advantage of these federal up the challenge, including Connecticut, assistance Title I schools. Under ESSA, opportunities to expand students’ access to theIllinois, arts.Michigan, and Massachusetts, schoolwide Title I schools are for the first time Louisiana. Theseactions, states have been Throughtoits definitional suggested anddevelopfunding encouraged include information inlanguage, their ing measures of student access to arts and schoolwide plans on how they provide wellmechanisms, ESSA provides states five levers: music instruction. Georgia went further and rounded educational opportunities, including included measures ofESSA student replaces achievementthe in 1. The definition a students. well-rounded education. music and arts education, tooftheir the arts as part of its revised accountability While does not necessarily subjects” mean Title found idea ofthis “core academic in No Child Left Behind with a system. Additional states included music and I funds will support those opportunities, it more broadly defined “well-rounded education.” arts education in unique ways throughout marks the first time that schools have been plans, fromin howSection migrant students The artstoand music intheir theESSA definition 8002, encouraged include a widerare rangeincluded of (Title I, Part C) should have access to the arts curricular offerings beyond the tested subject with music being listed for the very first time in can federal law to how the arts play aneducation active role in 21st areas within their schoolwide plans. after(box 1). As the language makes clear, Century statesCommunity may addLearning to theCenter definition Also for the first time, targeted assistance Title school programs (Title IV, Part B).1 asI schools they see fit their to meet theirfederal curricular needs and the needs of the stumay use supplemental Title I dollars to support well-rounded educa3"# 4 # 5-&(,&%-/#65-7#89.''-.&:"; Congress was dents they serve. Its predecessor term “core academic subjects” tional opportunities, including music and maintained Title I language that discourreferenced only identified in relation to the Highly Qualified Teacher provision. the arts, for students as the most ages schools from pulling students out of the

!"#$# %&'(#)" changed in Title n itsESSA four yearslanguage of life, theI Every

continued on next page Winter 2020-2021


Using ESSA..., continued from previous page

5. Protection from “pullouts.” Congress maintained Title I language that discourages schools from pulling students out of the regular classroom to receive the supplemental interventions that Title I funds. This language has been in place since No Child Left Behind. However, with music and the arts now part of the “well-rounded education” definition, it is easier for arts educators to make the case that students should not be pulled from their arts “specials” because the arts are part of what should be the “regular classroom” experience for all students.

How Did States and Districts Respond? ESSA clearly affected arts education across the nation. How far have these impacts extended to date? The clearest evidence of state and local regular innovation isreceive revealed in activityMore around Title ofIV-A and classroom to the supplemental than $30 million the $1.17 billionstate in interventions that Title I funds. This language Title IV-A funding from the 2018–19 school accountability systems. suburban, and has been in place since No Child Left Behind. year supported music and arts programs. hool districts ThisHowever, past with spring, the National music and the arts now part of Association of Music Merchants Rural, suburban, and urban school districts eported using the “well-rounded education” definition, it is alike reported IV-A funds to (NAMM Foundation) partnered withusing myTitle organization, the easier for arts educators to make the case that IV-A funds to Foundation support music and arts education. students should not be pulled their arts Association forfrom Music Education (NAfME), to survey music usic and arts. National The top seven uses of Title IV-A funding are “specials” because the arts are part of what educators, their advocates, and their music merchant partners (stores, for professional development, purchase of should be the “regular classroom” experience instruments and equipment, stafffor allabout students. Title IV-A funds. Weremusical dealers) schools using these funds to ing augmentation, curriculum development, support music and arts programs? If so, what did the funds support? purchase of instructional materials, arts partHow Did States and Districts Respond? nerships with local artsand agencies (e.g., teaching And what were the outcomes for schools, teachers, students? ESSA clearly affected arts education across the artists, field trips), and facility improvements Working informally through the two organizations’ advocacy netnation. How far have these impacts extended (e.g., acoustic treatment, sound system, theatrito date? The clearest evidence of state and local cal lighting). Most respondents reported using works, we collected stories from participants in 26 states over a periinnovation is revealed in activity around Title the funds for multiple purposes (figure 1). od ofIV-A nearly weeks. systems. Here are some highlights: and statesix accountability District-level respondents to our nonscienThis past spring, the National Association • More than $30 million of the $1.17 billion inadditional Title IV-A tific survey provided insightsfunding on the of Music Merchants Foundation (NAMM impact of Title IV-A funds. One programs. said, “Students partnered with my organization, fromFoundation) the 2018–19 school year supported music and arts are able to participate in types of art-making the National Association for Music Education • Rural, suburban, and urban school districts reported using they might not havealike had access to previously. (NAfME), to survey music educators, their access to a wider variety of curricand theirto music merchant partners Titleadvocates, IV-A funds support music andStudents arts have education. ular materials than in previous years, includ(stores, dealers) about Title IV-A funds. Were • The top uses of Title are forandprofessional develing pieces of music theatre resources that schools usingseven these funds to support musicIV-A funding are priced out of theequipment, range of many individual and arts purchase programs? If so,of whatmusical did the fundsinstruments opment, and staffing school budgets.” Another: “Students that would support? And what were the outcomes for augmentation, curriculum development, have beenpurchase denied access toof our instructional programs were schools, teachers, and students? givenarts the opportunity to participate. Workingarts informally through the two organimaterials, partnerships with local agencies (e.g.,” teaching At the state level, there are two areas where zations’ advocacy networks, we collected stories artists, field trips), and acoustic treatESSA has had the (e.g., most impact to date: funding from participants in 26 states overfacility a period of improvements nearly six weeks. Here are some highlights: lighting). activitiesMost using state set-asides and state ment, sound system, theatrical respondents reported using the funds for multiple purposes (figure 1). Figure 1. Uses for Title IV-A (percent of respondents reporting)

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS/EQUIPMENT STAFFING CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS ARTS PARTNERSHIPS W/LOCAL ARTS AGENCIES FACILITY IMPROVEMENTS 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

Source: National Association of Music Merchants Foundation and the National Association for Music Education

District-level respondents to our nonscientific survey provided additional insights on the impact of Title IV-A funds. One said, “Students are able to participate in types of art-making they might not have had access to previously. Students have access to a wider variety of curricular materials than in previous years, including pieces of music and theatre resources that are priced out of the range of many individual school budgets.” Another: “Students that would have been denied access to our programs were given the opportunity to participate.” Winter 2020-2021

At the state level, there are two areas where ESSA has had the most impact to date: funding activities using state set-asides and state accountability and reporting systems. California and Georgia, for example, used their set- asides - that is, state percentages of the federal allocations under Title IV-A - to promote and support music and arts education as part of a well-rounded education. In California, the legislature encouraged this usage, led by Senator Ben Allen during the spring of 2018. The legislature established priorities for the use of Title IV-A state-level set-asides of $44 million, including the use of the LEA funds to expand visual and performing arts education. LEAs could apply through a competitive process to receive additional Title IV-A funds from the state. Of the $44 million set-aside, $30 million went to visual and performing arts projects across the state. The California Alliance for Arts Education has established a working group of participating school districts in order to help them learn from each other as well as document the outcomes of the funded programs. Georgia’s Department of Education decided to dedicate a portion of its state-level set-aside funds to create a competitive Title IV-A stART Grant. According to the department, “The purpose of the stART grants is to assist rural schools and districts in creating and developing arts initiatives that support quality arts education programs that signficantly improve student access to the arts.” Designated LEAs can apply, and the program continues in the 2019–20 school year.2 On the accountability and reporting front, the Illinois State Board of Education has continued to work with stakeholders to determine the weighting of an arts indicator to be included in preK-8 schools and high schools. For now, the indicator will be reported but not part of the rating system for schools until at least 2022. The state board will report on how many students participate in the arts via the state’s longitudinal data system. The board received more comments on including the arts as part of its accountability system than for any other topic area.3 The Michigan School Index includes access to the arts as one of its indicators of school quality. The index weighted access to the arts and physical education at four percent in the school quality rankings for K-8 schools during its first year. School quality overall represents 14 percent of a school’s rating. Ratings are now available per school on the Michigan Department of Education website and include staffing ratios to help determine a school’s ranking for access to arts and physical education. Implications for State Boards New federal dollars are increasing access to music and arts education in states throughout the country, often with an emphasis on under-served populations, such as rural counties in Georgia. States are looking at ways to leverage ESSA to support arts education, from highlighting places in the law where the arts can play a positive role in a student’s academic outcomes to making transparent how and when students can access the arts during the school day. There are two broad implications for the work of state boards in ensuring transparency and equitable access to an arts education. The work of Michigan and Illinois are two examples of states making more transparent where and how students have access to arts education and where they do not. There are others. Many states are building arts education dashboards.4 New Jersey, continued on next page

Maryland Music Educator

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

45


Using ESSA..., continued from previous page

which has been collecting arts access data for more than a decade, just announced that its efforts to increase transparency on arts access has paid off: in September, the governor announced that 100 percent of the state’s public schools now offer students access to arts education.5 In addition to advocating for greater data transparency, a state board can consider other ways to increase equitable access to the arts. Does your state require an arts credit for graduation from high school? Doing so will increase access to the arts in all high schools in the state. Does your state recognize honors for arts classes as it does other academic classes? New Jersey enacted a law in 2016 to make certain that all honors classes, including the arts, are treated equally for grade weighting. Does your state offer an arts seal for high school graduates? Arizona just passed a law creating a State Seal for Arts Proficiency, and the state board will work with stakeholders to determine what requirements students will need to complete to obtain the seal, including focused study in at least one arts form. If your state board has excellent examples of policies, practices, or funding streams to support the arts, please share those with the arts education community. Sharing your stories and ideas will help create

a vibrant educational environment that includes the arts for all students, not just those with privileged access. Endnotes 1 Lynn Tuttle, “How Does Arts Education Fare in the Final Round of State ESSA Plan Submissions?” EdNote blog (Denver, CO: Education Commission of the States, January 18, 2018). 2 Georgia Department of Education, “Title IV, Part A stART Grant,” web page, https://www.gadoe.org/School-Improvement/FederalPrograms/Pages/SSAE.aspx. 3 Arts Indicator Work Group, “Arts Indicator Recommendation,” presentation to the Illinois State Board of Education on January 16, 2019, h t t p s : / / w w w . i s b e . n e t / https://www.isbe.net/Documents_Board_Meetings/Illinois-ArtsIndicator-Work-Group-Presentation.pdf 4 Valerie Norville, “Focusing on Gaps in Access to Arts Education,” Policy Update 23, no. 1 (Alexandria, VA: NASBE, July 2018). 5 Brent Johnson, “N.J. Just Reached This Education Milestone, Murphy Says,” https://www.nj.com/politics/2019/09/nj-just-reachedthis-education-milestone-murphy-says.html (September 9, 2019).

About the Author: Lynn Tuttle is director of public policy, research, and professional development at NAfME. Lynn Tuttle was Director of Arts Education at the Arizona Department of Education. Her duties included acting as a liaison to the state’s arts educators; providing professional development in Arizona’s Academic Arts Standards, arts assessment and arts integration; and promoting quality arts education programs in Arizona’s schools. She co-chaired the Arizona Arts Education Census Committee, which published the 2010 Arizona Arts Education Census, documenting access and availability of arts education in Arizona’s district and charter schools. She has keynoted for The Kennedy Center’s 2013 Partners in Education conference and the 2013 Biannual Maine Arts Education Conference, and has presented for Americans for the Arts, Arts Education Partnership, the Educational Theatre Association, the Kennedy Center Alliances for Arts Education Network, the National Art Education Association, the National Dance Education Organization, the National Association for Music Education, and the State Arts Advocacy Network. Lynn serves as Past-President for the State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education and is one of the leaders of the revision of the National Voluntary Arts Education Standards. Lynn holds degrees from the Peabody Conservatory of Music (valedictorian), the Johns Hopkins University (Phi Beta Kappa) and the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University.

Have you ever wanted to • be a published writer? • help other music teachers? • share your music teaching expertise? If you would like to write for Maryland Music Educator, please submit articles to be considered for publication to:

https://form.jotform.com/mmeamaryland/-mmea-content-submission-form or submit queries to Felicia Burger Johnston, Editor, at mmea.editor@gmail.com

Deadlines for journal issues: Fall, Aug. 3; Winter, Oct. 20; Spring, Jan. 20; Summer, March 20

Virtual Learning Resources for Music Educators https://nafme.org/my-classroom/virtual-learning-resources-for-music-educators/ 46

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


Letters from Retirement Preparing Future Music Educators for the Stress of the Job: Can They Learn from the Old Ways? by Richard A. Disharoon, Baltimore County (retired); Past President of MMEA, MCEA, and Eastern Division of NAfME; MMEA Hall of Fame Member

H

ow do you teach Personal Magnetism to pre-service music education students? How can students develop a “unique level of Emotional Presence”? These are questions gleaned from reading professional journals that I’ve been pondering from the comfort of my retirement chair. Maybe I shouldn’t bother to seek answers, but when you’ve been immersed in the profession for almost 60, it’s hard to pull away from wondering how you incorporate seemingly “you either have it or you don’t” characteristics into pre-service music education curricula. Personal Magnetism According to the authors of one article, Personal Magnetism has been identified through research as a recurring concept that helps teachers deal with the stresses and challenges of the profession. One of the experts on personal magnetism identifies two primary components: perseverance and passion. Having guided student interns in discovering ways to struggle through roadblocks to solving lesson goals, administrative issues, and the stresses and challenges of everyday teaching, I know that perseverance can be taught. Passion, in my view, is another story. I have no idea how to teach something that is unique to each individual. Don’t we all know teachers we would describe as enjoying teaching - but we would not say they are passionate about teaching? Students know if you are passionate about teaching or just enjoy it, the same as they know if you love them. Students who experience music with a person who is passionate about teaching and music walk away from that teacher’s classroom knowing that to be passionate about something means that you believe in it from the depths of your soul. Isn’t it also a matter of personality? We’ve all known teachers with “outsized” personalities and teachers at the other end of the spectrum with quiet personalities. Both draw students to them like magnets. But they entered the pre-service curriculum with these personalities, (they didn’t take Personality 101!) and the curriculum provided them with the skill-sets to provide an outstanding music education for the students they would teach. Emotional Presence I’ve concluded that emotional presence is the ability to remain calm (peaceful) and composed (unperturbed, unruffled), both externally AND internally, in the exciting classrooms populated with students who bring a multitude of attitudes, modes of learning, and learning abilities for teachers to command every day. Interactions that occur during lessons, but most often occur during transitions between activities, or as students enter and exit rooms, are the times when emotional presence is tested. But there was a qualifying phrase attached to this demand required Winter 2020-2021

for teaching that opened the vignette on Workload and Self Care referenced in the last letter: “unique level” of Emotional Presence. (“Class Action: The Case for Empowering Our Teachers”, TC Today: The Magazine of Teachers College, Columbia University.) Then, I read about and hear parents struggling to help their children learn at home during the pandemic. Many have declared their appreciation for the work of teachers - but I believe it’s not only for the teaching of content. I think it’s also because they have discovered the need for emotional presence when their child rebels against online learning by refusing to turn on the camera or turn in assignments, or their child simply finds it impossible to succeed through this mode of learning. Where, then, does the demand for a “unique level” of emotional presence enter the picture? This quote in the Teachers College Magazine provides the answer: “I used to tell parents, ‘Think about how draining it is to run a twohour birthday party with 20 seven-year-olds. Now think of those same kids in one room, six hours a day - and you’re teaching them to read!” ~Joseph Young, former Cambridge, MA Superintendent of Schools~ The demand for a unique level of Emotional Presence is required to remain externally and internally calm and composed as we manage, supervise, and interact with large groups of children throughout the long school day. Elementary vocal/general teachers and secondary teachers see large groups of children as many as four to six times per day. Each group presents a new “personality” that tests anew a teacher’s unique level of Emotional Presence. I’ve told the following story many times. It can now be cited as an example of a unique level of Emotional Presence exhibited by a teacher who had a long career: Responding to a request from one of my graduate Choral Music Education students, I stopped by an after school middle school rehearsal to listen and provide comments before the winter concert. I entered the open space school that I knew well, expecting to hear choral sounds resonating through the halls as I approached the rehearsal area. Silence. As I entered the rehearsal/performance area I saw a sea of singers on risers listening carefully to the teacher speaking in a very low conversational voice, a voice so soft that I had to move in close to hear her comments. No child was moving or speaking. All listened intently to the teacher’s directions. When the rehearsal was over, this very large group of students was dismissed in an orderly, controlled fashion. In later years I had the opportunity to observe this teacher work with younger and older students in the same effective way. She had a unique sense of humor. Students would chuckle at her jokes, etc., but always knew to return to work. Students of all ages loved her. I marveled at this teacher’s ability to manage a group of any size.

Maryland Music Educator

Preparing Future Music Educators..., continued on next page https://www.mmea-maryland.org

47


Preparing Future Music Educators...Letters from Retirement, continued from previous page

I realized that the sequential, logical thinking ingrained by these simple techniques, when expanded, formed the foundation for carrying me through the many changes in teaching assignments, class personalities, and administrative challenges of a forty-two year career. The Old Ways Pondering the inclusion of teaching Personal Magnetism and Emotional Presence to pre-service students finally led me to sorting through the experiences of my own undergraduate training for possible answers. I have often been thankful for my training as a self-contained elementary classroom teacher, training that had been proven over and over again in the Maryland State Normal Schools for Teachers to result in effective classroom management techniques. Reviewing those techniques, I realized that they formed the foundation of developing the perseverance identified as essential to developing Personal Magnetism and for meeting the base level demand for developing an Emotional Presence to sustain a long career. I realized that the sequential, logical thinking ingrained by these simple techniques, when expanded, formed the foundation for carrying me through the many changes in teaching assignments, class personalities, and administrative challenges of a forty-two year career. They included step-by-step directions for transitioning from one content area to another and exiting and entering the classroom for bathroom breaks, lunch and physical education classes, as well as bus dismissal. We didn’t just take notes and talk through these procedures, we experienced them as our professor modeled the directions and we followed: put your speller in your desk, take out your arithmetic book, turn to page 10, now stand, stretch, and sit. College

juniors walked through how to leave the classroom. Yes, we actually lined up silently and in single file in the hall with the first person stopping at the clock! I practiced those directions as an intern and employed them during my first year of employment as a fourth-grade classroom teacher, instructing my students in transitioning from reading lessons to science lessons and lining up for bathroom breaks. As I traversed the next forty-one years in secondary music classrooms, I was forever grateful that, while not employing the procedures as I had in my elementary classroom, the underlying principles provided clear thinking to the directions I gave my choir students for moving on and off risers and among the transitions within my classroom. I believe the interns that I supervised benefitted from my sharing those procedures I learned during my pre-service training. From the ease of my retirement chair I wonder if pre-service music education methods classes, including performance methods, include taking students step-by-step through class management procedures. I wonder if these classes include discussions of ways to solve lesson goals, administrative issues, and other problems to develop the perseverance characteristic of Personal Magnetism. I wonder if there are discussions about the importance of the essential elements of Emotional Presence: taking time to breathe and the need to find time for privacy during the school day. I didn’t see evidence that the first-year instrumental teacher assigned to my school many years ago had these experiences. Although we ate lunch together every day in an effort to reassure him, to talk through his problems, he didn’t make it. He left teaching after one year. The Normal School ways may be “old school”, but many teachers of my generation and previous generations had long careers in education. I think the old “normal school ways” would give today’s pre-service students a better chance of long careers.

About the Author: Richard A. Disharoon, MMEA Hall of Fame member and Past President of MMEA, MCEA, and the Eastern Division of NAfME, has been a choral music educator and voice teacher for over fifty years. He earned his B.S. degree in Elementary Education from State Teachers College at Towson (now Towson University); his M.A. degree in Music Education from Teachers College, Columbia University; and his Ph.D. in Secondary Music Education at the University of Maryland, College Park. For forty years he was the Chair of Visual and Performing Arts and Choral Director at Pikesville High School, Baltimore County Public Schools; and he was Director of Music at Arnolia United Methodist church for twenty years. From 1985-1990, he was Director of Choral Activities at the Essex Campus of the Community College of Baltimore County where he founded the Greater Baltimore Youth Chorale. He was Director of the Parkville Summer Choral Workshop from1988-1999. In 2004, he was honored with the MMEA Rosemary and James Walters Service Award. Dr. Disharoon has guest conducted several Maryland high school and middle school honors choruses. He is active as an adjudicator for Solo and Ensemble and large ensemble festivals. Dr. Disharoon was an Adjunct Professor of Choral Music Education at Loyola University of Maryland, the Peabody Conservatory of Music, and Towson University. His many articles on Choral Music Education based on teaching these graduate courses were published in Maryland Music Educator. Dr. Disharoon maintained a private voice studio for several years and at the Maryland Conservatory of Music from 2005-2009. He specialized in working with male developing voices.

Visit us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/Maryland-Music-Educators-Association-MMEA151424924953983/ 48

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

Maryland Music Educator

Winter 2020-2021


Join MMEA/NAfME Today! You automatically become a member of Maryland Music Educators Association when you join the National Association for Music Education. From local activities to national issues, MMEA and NAfME offer the combination of networking, professional development and resources you need as a music educator. • To join MMEA/NAfME online visit https://nafme.org/join-renew/. • To join by phone or to receive a membership application in the mail, please call NAfME Member Services at 1-800-828-0229. • Email: memberservices@nafme.org for any membership questions. • Already a member? Update your contact information with NAfME at www.nafme.org/membership. July 2020 - June 2021 Dues By Membership Type Active Membership: $145 ($100 NAfME/$45 MMEA) Retired: $70 ($50 NAfME/$20 MMEA) Collegiate: $45 ($30 NAfME/$15 MMEA) Introductory: $75 ($50 NAfME/$25 MMEA)

MMEA Interested in volunteering with MMEA? See https://www.mmea -maryland.org/ volunteer

https://bit.ly/2021NAfMEDivisionElections Elections close February 11, 2021, at 5:00 PM EST.

Winter 2020-2021

Maryland Music Educator

https://www.mmea-maryland.org

49


MARYLAND MUSIC EDUCATOR Vol. 67, No. 2

Winter 2020-2021

Official Journal of the Maryland Music Educators Association Maryland Music Educators Association, PMB#472, 6710 Ritchie Highway, Glen Burnie, MD 21061 This issue of Maryland Music Educator will be posted at www.mmea-maryland.org