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Vaccination Dynamic Briefing Generated 01 September 2020 for Marco Antonio Gonzalez


Vaccination Co-curated with London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Last review on Wed 19 August 2020

About This dynamic briefing draws on the collective intelligence of the Forum network to explore the key trends, interconnections and interdependencies between industry, regional and global issues. In the briefing, you will find a visual representation of this topic (Transformation Map – interactive version available online via intelligence.weforum.org ), an overview and the key trends affecting it, along with summaries and links to the latest research and analysis on each of the trends. Briefings for countries also include the relevant data from the Forum’s benchmarking indices. The content is continuously updated with the latest thinking of leaders and experts from across the Forum network, and with insights from Forum meetings, projects communities and activities.

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Executive summary Vaccines are the most effective means to prevent infectious diseases and their complications. Over the past few decades, morbidity and mortality attributable to vaccine-preventable diseases such as measles, mumps, and polio have dramatically declined as immunization coverage increased - especially in countries with routine vaccination programs. However, global vaccine uptake has stagnated, as misinformation and anti-vaccination propaganda have become widespread. While healthcare professionals remain the most trusted sources of related information, a growing number of people are being influenced by biased news sources and social media. Now, as the world looks ahead to a potential COVID-19 vaccine, technology giants are under pressure to remove harmful distortions and inaccuracies from their platforms. This Transformation Map is informed by the views of a wide range of experts from the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network and is curated in partnership with Heidi Larson, Founding Director of the Vaccine Confidence Project and Professor of Anthropology, Risk and Decision Science at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Special thanks to GAVI, IFPMA, and the Red Cross for their contributions.

1. Vaccine Hesitancy Anti-vaccine groups have gained influence around the world, potentially undermining the COVID-19 response.

2. Economic and Business Implications of Vaccination Employers have a duty to encourage responsible behaviour during pandemics.

3. Trust, Misinformation and Health False rumours and conspiracy theories have undermined many public health efforts.

4. Vaccinating for Security Anti-vaccination campaigns can be stirred by genuine concern or a cynical desire to manipulate.

5. Vaccinating Against Pandemics Building trust in a COVID-19 vaccine will be essential for the “great reset” to a new normal.

6. Vaccination and the Workplace Workers subjected to extensive social contact and mobility should be first in line for COVID-19 vaccinations.

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Vaccine Hesitancy Anti-vaccine groups have gained influence around the world, potentially undermining the COVID-19 response The past decade has seen increased hesitancy around the world to embrace vaccines. In 2019, the World Health Organization named vaccine hesitancy as one of the top 10 threats to global health, alongside issues like air pollution, climate change, non-communicable disease, influenza pandemics, antimicrobial resistance, and weak primary healthcare. There is a significant amount of evidence showing that decreases in vaccination uptake can lead to increases in vaccine-preventable diseases. For example, in 2018 - despite the existence of a safe and effective vaccine there were more than 140,000 deaths worldwide resulting from measles, most of which occurred among children. This was a direct result of a decrease in vaccination rates. While some of this decrease was due to access issues related to weak health systems, conflict and insecurity, or natural disasters, there was also an element of vaccine hesitancy and refusal at play. Declines in vaccine coverage like this threaten to reverse gains made in combatting vaccinepreventable diseases. Vaccine hesitancy may also be a challenge to overcome in relation to COVID-19; if enough people refuse to receive a vaccine shown to protect against the disease, it could undermine efforts to achieve herd immunity.

Related insight areas: The Great Reset, Future of Media, Entertainment and Culture, Leadership in the Fourth Industrial Revolution, Future of Health and Healthcare, Values, Pandemic Preparedness and Response, Global Health, Civic Participation, Mental Health, COVID-19, Global Risks

Anti-vaccine groups are highly organized and have broad reach and influence in many countries. One quarter of Americans are hesitant about getting a COVID-19 vaccination, and nearly a fifth say they will not get one. The preliminary results of a survey run by the Vaccine Confidence Project (which monitors public trust in vaccination programs worldwide) and ORB International showed that between mid-March and mid-April of 2020, one-fifth of Swiss respondents and 18% of those in France said they would refuse a coronavirus vaccine. Among Austrians, the number was 16%, while it was 9% in Germany. In another study in France, 26% of those surveyed said they would not take a COVID-19 vaccine if one became available. The Welcome Trust Global Monitor in 2018 showed that confidence levels in the safety of vaccines generally vary around the world. In Japan, only 32% of the public believes vaccines are safe, while in China the figure was 72% - which still demonstrates an underlying level of concern. Building confidence in vaccination more broadly will be a critical component of making any new COVID-19 vaccine effective.

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Latest knowledge World Health Organization

Imperial College London

WHO's Science in 5 - Herd Immunity

Podcast: COVID-19 vaccine trials latest and privacy in contact tracing

28 August 2020

19 August 2020 Watch WHO experts explain science related to COVID-19. Today, the concept is Herd Immunity. .

In this edition: Results of the COVID-19 vaccine animal trials and the latest news from the human trials, plus privacy in contact tracing apps.

Asian Development Bank

Rebooting the economy: The global race to develop and deliver a COVID19 vaccine

Harvard Kennedy School - Shorenstein Center

Will Americans Vaccinate Themselves and Their Children Against COVID-19?

27 August 2020

16 August 2020 Developing a vaccine for COVID-19 within one year is a herculean task. Getting the vaccine to the hundreds of millions if not billions of people who need it—especially in poorer countries—may be even harder.

If a COVID-19 vaccine becomes available, what is the likelihood Americans will vaccinate themselves? .

Kaiser Health News

Rather Than Give Away Its COVID Vaccine, Oxford Makes a Deal With Drugmaker 25 August 2020 In a business driven by profit, vaccines have a problem. They’re not very profitable — at least not without government subsidies. Pharma companies favor expensive medicines that must be taken repeatedly and generate revenue for years or decades. The Conversation

India is key for global access to a COVID-19 vaccine – here's why 24 August 2020 A richest-takes-all approach in the fight against the deadliest pandemic in living memory is bound to be counter productive, especially for the recovery of low and middle income countries. If governments cannot come together to agree on a global strategy, then the global south may need to pin its hopes on the manufacturing might of India. Harvard Business Review

Why Businesses Must Help Build Trust in a Covid-19 Vaccine 20 August 2020 Vaccine experts around the world are justifiably concerned by the lack of scientific data on the “Sputnik V” vaccine for Covid-19 that Russia recently approved after less than two months of human testing on a non-randomized group of 39 patients. They are also worried about the potentially chilling effect its possible failure could have on public acceptance of whichever of the dozens of other covid-19 vaccines in the pipeline eventually proves safe and effective.

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Economic and Business Implications of Vaccination Employers have a duty to encourage responsible behaviour during pandemics Vaccination will play a key role in responding to the COVID19 crisis. It can ultimately reduce transmission of the disease, prevent avoidable illness and death, and protect high-risk individuals. In addition, vaccination will be critical for businesses. Companies in the US have reported losing more than $500 billion per year due to illness-related productivity losses - and that was before the spread of COVID-19. The direct personal benefits of immunization include lowering healthcare costs and productivity loss, both for the infected and for anyone tasked with caring for the infected. Broader benefits that can positively affect the global economy include preventing the spread of illness, and immunization that improves children’s cognitive skills, and fosters their physical strength and performance at school in ways that, long term, lead to increased collective productivity. By improving financial security and reducing risk, vaccination may also help lead to increased investment levels, and bolster political and economic stability. And, by moving populations closer to something known as “herd immunity,” it also helps protect unvaccinated individuals in the community. Ultimately, achieving herd immunity will be necessary to to stop COVID-19, enable people to get back to work and school, and help businesses to return to normal. Based on early estimates of the infectiousness of the coronavirus, we will likely need between 50% and 70% of the global population to be vaccinated in order to achieve herd protection. There is a critical need for business leadership to help usher in a safer and healthier post-COVID-19 workplace; meeting COVID-19 vaccination needs cannot happen if employers do not help ensure a responsible roll out of the vaccine, and facilitate its acceptance in different communities. Employers can also play a key role in providing health information to employees, and encourage responsible behaviour to advance public health. Studies have shown that employees trust their employers more than government agencies or the media to provide them with credible, trustworthy information - including information specific to COVID-19. Many companies have already heeded the World Health Organization’s recommendation to advance health promotion in the workplace. Related insight areas: The Great Reset, Corporate Governance, Values, Workforce and Employment, Education and Skills, Future of Health and Healthcare, Pandemic Preparedness and Response, COVID-19, Agile Governance, Future of Economic Progress

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Latest knowledge Bocconi Knowledge

Center for Global Development

How Much Are Individual Choices Worth

Bringing a COVID-19 Vaccine to Market: Where Do We Go from Here?

28 August 2020

20 August 2020

Paolo Pin highlights social mechanisms that make containment policies effective or ineffective.

In this blog, we review the good and the bad about where the world now stands in efforts to bringing a vaccine to market, from the perspective of payers, national governments, and country coalitions, as well as development partners.

The Diplomat

South Korea’s Search for a COVD-19 Vaccine

Imperial College London

26 August 2020

Effective test and trace could reduce R by up to 26%

Despite the successes of South Korea’s testing-led efforts to contain the spread of COVID-19 to date, a recent spike in new cases emphasizes this approach is still only a short-term solution. The threat of a second wave seems to have renewed the sense of urgency for producing a vaccine.

18 August 2020 Test and trace could reduce the effective reproduction number, the R number, by up to 26% if carried out quickly and effectively, new research finds.

Christian Science Monitor

Australian Strategic Policy Institute

Trump’s big RNC challenge: Reframing pandemic politics

Vaccine ‘probably a 90% chance’ but huge challenges remain in tackling Covid-19

24 August 2020

14 August 2020 There is an elephant in the room at this week’s Republican National Convention, so to speak: the coronavirus pandemic. President Donald Trump may prefer to focus on law and order, standing up to China, and the “socialist” Democrats. Covid-19 remains by far the most important issue facing the nation in both impact and voter interest. It has reshaped almost everything about daily life in America – including the political conventions themselves. Many of the speakers at last week’s almost entirely virtual Democratic National Convention touched on the pandemic in one way or another.

Two of Australia’s leading experts on the Covid-19 pandemic say there’s a very good chance a vaccine will be developed for the disease but there will be huge challenges to overcome until then, and in ...

STAT

In the race for a Covid-19 vaccine, Pfizer turns to a scientist with a history of defying skeptics — and getting results 24 August 2020 Pfizer and that upstart rival, Moderna, were the first companies to launch large clinical trials to prove their vaccines’ efficacy, and on the same day: July 27. They have been in a neck-and-neck competition ever since.

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Trust, Misinformation and Health False rumours and conspiracy theories have undermined many public health efforts Misinformation about health is a common phenomenon, and vaccines were a target long before the COVID-19 pandemic sparked a related “infodemic.� There have been numerous documented instances of conspiracies undermining vaccines, such as rumours that polio vaccinations caused sterilization in Nigeria in 2003 and 2004, or claims that children born with microcephaly in Brazil in 2015 were not the result of Zika but instead were the result of bad vaccines. Among the more routinely recommended vaccines, the cervical-cancer-preventing HPV vaccine was criticized by some people for allegedly promoting promiscuity among teenage girls. Many people still believe that vaccines can cause autism, despite the fact that scientific research has disproven this supposed connection. New, as yet mysterious phenomena can fuel a flurry of speculation and rumours, as people try to make sense of complex information - driving a psychological phenomenon known as aversion to ambiguity. Strong believers in conspiracy theories tend to emerge in these ambiguous settings and cultivate audiences eager for some kind of explanation. This can take advantage of the genuine concerns and questions that people often have about vaccines, including parents being newly exposed to reams of online misinformation.

Related insight areas: Digital Identity, Healthcare Delivery, Agile Governance, Future of Media, Entertainment and Culture, Behavioural Sciences, Civic Participation, Arts and Culture, Cybersecurity, Digital Communications, Global Governance, Systemic Racism

In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, the World Health Organization has publicly acknowledged the harm caused by the spread of misinformation, rumours, and fake news about the virus by referring to the phenomenon as an infodemic (a term used by the World Economic Forum more than a decade ago, and suddenly regaining relevance). WHO officials have recognized that rumours ranging from the purported laboratory origins of COVID-19, to the idea that it can be cured by eating garlic, can be easily transmitted from person to person, carried by both the unwitting and the devious and spread almost invisibly through a vast virtual world - much like a virus. This infodemic points to a larger crisis rooted in the decline of public confidence in health systems, scientific expertise, and government authority sometimes undermining the willingness to comply with recommended or required public health measures meant to keep infectious diseases such as COVID-19 in check. In terms of vaccines in particular, the combination of distrust of authorities and an abundance of alternative misinformation can impact the ways in which people process information and make decisions, sometimes risking unnecessary disease outbreaks and fatalities.

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Latest knowledge Kaiser Health News

World Health Organization

COVID + Influenza: This Is a Good Year to Get a Flu Shot, Experts Advise

We need to prevent COVID-19 vaccine nationalism.

28 August 2020

19 August 2020

Flu season will look different this year, as the country grapples with a coronavirus pandemic that has killed more than 172,000 people. Many Americans are reluctant to visit a doctor’s office and public health officials worry people will shy away from being immunized.

We need to prevent #COVID19 vaccine nationalism. For this reason, the World Health Organization is working with governments and the private sector through the ACTAccelerator to ensure that new innovations are available to everyone, everywhere starting with those at highest risk.

Kaiser Health News

LA Hospital Seeks Vaccine Trial Participants Among Its Own High-Risk Patients

The Economist

26 August 2020

14 August 2020

Covid-19: When will a vaccine be ready? Around $10bn is being spent on finding a vaccine for coronavirus—it’s not nearly enough. And even when a COVID-19 vaccine is found how should it be distributed fairly? Our experts answer your questions. .

The patients at Dr. Eric Daar’s hospital are at high risk for serious illness from COVID-19, and he’s determined to make sure they’re part of the effort to fight the disease. He also hopes they can protect themselves in the process.

Kaiser Health News

What Seniors Can Expect as Their New Normal in a Post-Vaccine World

Nature

The unequal scramble for coronavirus vaccines — by the numbers

03 August 2020

24 August 2020 Imagine this scenario, perhaps a year or two in the future: An effective COVID-19 vaccine is routinely available and the world is moving forward. Life, however, will likely never be the same — particularly for people over 60. That is the conclusion of geriatric medical doctors, aging experts, futurists and industry specialists.

Wealthy countries have already pre-ordered more than two billion doses. Wealthy countries have already preordered more than two billion doses. Australian Strategic Policy Institute

Covid-19 disinformation campaigns shift focus to vaccines 23 August 2020 In ASPI’s latest report on Covid-19 disinformation , Albert Zhang, Emilia Currey and I investigated how the narrative of an American vaccine trial killing soldiers in Ukraine (which did not actually happen) was laundered from the propaganda site of a pro-Russian militia into the international information ecosystem. What this case study highlights is the way in which the battle for control of the coronavirus narrative is shifting from the origins of the virus to the hopes for a vaccine. .

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Vaccinating for Security Anti-vaccination campaigns can be stirred by genuine concern or a cynical desire to manipulate In 2019, the World Health Organization included “vaccine hesitancy” among its top 10 threats to global health security. This is particularly true in relation to COVID-19. A vaccine is now required that protects public health and enables people to comfortably go back to work and school. However, a vaccine will only succeed at that if it is widely accepted. Hesitancy and concerns about vaccines generally are connected to political movements like the rise of populism and nationalism, anti-abortion sentiment, and gun rights advocacy - which sometimes share financial, political, and social resources, and also have the potential to stir disruption in a number of places. In this context, it can be difficult to mobilize an entire population to accept health interventions like vaccines or other COVID-19 control measures, as the motives of the government are often not trusted. Securing access to communities in order to offer medical services is often a negotiation point amid broader political struggles. In Latin America during the turbulent 1980s, and in the Democratic Republic of Congo in the 1990s, for example, representatives from the WHO, UNICEF, and other organizations successfully negotiated cease-fires to allow for polio vaccinations.

Related insight areas: Global Health, Digital Communications, Digital Economy and New Value Creation, Values, Civic Participation, Global Governance, Human Rights, Agile Governance, COVID-19, International Security, Role of Religion, The Great Reset, Future of Media, Entertainment and Culture, Humanitarian Action

However, these types of negotiations have been breaking down in recent years, as some groups refuse health officials any kind of access to people living in areas they control whether it is the Taliban in Afghanistan, or Boko Haram in Nigeria. Meanwhile security threats caused by “digital wildfires,” as described by the World Economic Forum in its Global Risks Report, can lead to sudden spikes in panic and fear among populations that already lack confidence in the public sector. In Pakistan, for example, rumours spread online in 2019 that a polio vaccine contained poison and children in Peshawar had negative reactions to it - bringing vaccinations to a near standstill. Community mobilization against immunization campaigns in Madagascar, Nigeria, and the Philippines has been difficult to assess, particularly when participants use the encrypted service WhatsApp. Some digital wildfires may be sparked by genuine questions about vaccine safety, though research suggests others are initiated to exacerbate social divisions and spread mistrust. While the impacts of vaccine hesitancy are felt primarily in terms of public health, the solutions needed to address it require expertise from fields including political science, anthropology, psychology, artificial intelligence, cyber security, and digital media analytics.

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Latest knowledge Big Think

Center for China and Globalization

Why flu vaccines only last a year

Global Health Governance: Is Great Powers' Cooperation Possible?

28 August 2020

19 August 2020 Vaccine science is tricky. While hope grows for a COVID-19 vaccine given the sheer number of researchers working toward one, flu vaccines present their own challenges, as a recent report from Emory Vaccine Center details.

The global public health system faces an unprecedented challenge. How can different countries come together and cooperate despite various forms of opposition and stigmatization? How can we strengthen mechanisms and coordinate responses to fight the pandemic now and build up long-term public health capabilities for the future? How can we encourage cooperation to develop and distribute a coronavirus vaccine around the world?.

FiveThirtyEight

Even With A Vaccine, The Economy Could Take Many Months To Return To Normal

Science Daily

25 August 2020

School flu vaccine program reduces community-wide influenza hospitalizations

Once we find a COVID-19 vaccine, our lives can return to normal, right? Economists don’t think so.

18 August 2020

United Nations

COVAX Global Vaccines Facility

Seasonal influenza contributes substantially to hospitalization and mortality, especially among infants and the elderly. Because school-aged children are responsible for the greatest proportion of community-wide influenza transmission, efforts to increase vaccination among children are thought to have the greatest potential to prevent influenza epidemics.

24 August 2020 Director-General, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus announced that as of today, “172 countries are now engaging with the COVAX Global Vaccines Facility, which has both the largest and most diverse COVID-19 vaccine portfolio in the world.” .

UNICEF

Chemistry World

Vaccines work

Facing the challenge of vaccine trials

10 August 2020

24 August 2020

COVID-19 is a global health crisis, and if we let it prevent us from delivering life-saving immunization services to children, another global health crisis won’t be far behind. We have to make vaccinations a priority for every child. .

This month has seen stark differences in the ways different authorities are approaching the challenge of developing vaccines to Covid-19. On one hand are those piling resources and support behind companies recruiting thousands of volunteers to large scale trials. On the other is Russia’s extraordinary gamble, pressing ahead with approval and mass vaccination without that clinical safety net. Source: © Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images Most vaccine candidates are undergoing large scale trials to determine their safety and whether they actually offer protection.

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Vaccinating Against Pandemics Building trust in a COVID-19 vaccine will be essential for the “great reset” to a new normal We will always have to live with disease outbreaks, of both old and new varieties, ranging from local flare-ups to global pandemics. COVID-19 has shaken the world not only with its impacts on health and lives lost, but also by halting “normal” social life and breaking economies. This tumult is all because of a virus for which we had no vaccine or treatment to stop its unchecked spread - facilitated by weak leadership, unprepared systems, and strong antiglobalization sentiment at a time when global cooperation has never been more necessary. Pandemics are often triggered by a new virus - or a new virus strain - against which humans have no natural protection because they have never been exposed to it before. And, because the virus is new, at the beginning there are no available vaccines. Not all pandemics lead to the development of a vaccine. A vaccine was developed relatively quickly after the 2009 H1N1 outbreak, as it was adapted from an existing influenza vaccine. However, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, first identified in 1981, still has no approved vaccine despite extensive investment and research. Nearly 33 million people have died from AIDS-related illness, and every year more people are infected. One of the challenges for any vaccine that can effectively stop the spread of COVID-19 is the question of whether people will actually take it once it is developed. Surveys and reports in multiple countries show many people are hesitant to accept a new vaccine, and some are already determined not to take it. The reasons for this include broad vaccine scepticism, and the heightened uncertainty during COVID-19 (or any pandemic) as the media reports on the accelerated pace of vaccine research and development in ways that are not comforting for a public anxious about related risks. Some people will be persuaded of the value of the vaccine once they have clear evidence of its effectiveness and safety, but others have lost too much trust in authorities amid a generally inadequate COVID-19 response. Public trust and cooperation are fundamental to any pandemic response and pandemics offer a global opportunity for new modes of trust-building and cooperation. The promise of a COVID-19 vaccine, and the opportunity to improve public perception of the value of vaccination for getting healthy people back to work and school, is an essential part of the “great reset” to a new normal. Related insight areas: Agile Governance, Future of Health and Healthcare, Pandemic Preparedness and Response, Global Governance, COVID-19, Healthcare Delivery, Civic Participation, Innovation, Future of Media, Entertainment and Culture, The Great Reset, Values

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Latest knowledge Frontiers

Harvard Kennedy School – Journalist’s Resource

Social Stigma: The Hidden Threat of COVID-19

Coronavirus vaccines: We address 3 big questions about safety, distribution and adoption

28 August 2020 COVID-19 infection has been recognized as a pandemic by the World Health Organization. Efforts to prevent the spread of the disease are threatened by the appearance of disease-associated social stigma in society. In Egypt, a small wave of stigma directed at different groups started to appear. Here we report the features of COVID-19associated stigma in Egypt and suggest recommendations to overcome this stigma before it grows and have physical and psychological impacts on society.

23 August 2020 As journalists work to keep communities informed about COVID-19 vaccines, they need to consider questions about safety, distribution and adoption. We address three specific questions, focusing on policies and processes in the U.S. The post Coronavirus vaccines: We address 3 big questions about safety, distribution and adoption appeared first on Journalist's Resource .

Frontiers

Center for Global Development

What Would Jenner and Pasteur Have Done About COVID-19 Coronavirus? The Urges of a Vaccinologist

Modelling the Manufacturing Process for COVID-19 Vaccines: Our Approach 19 August 2020

26 August 2020

We are developing a system of interconnected models which represent global manufacturing capability from the start of clinical trials to secondary vaccine manufacture; that is, time from first human trials to finished product ready to be shipped.

Vaccines are the best cost-benefit tools to control and eradicate infectious diseases. The live smallpox vaccination, called variolation, was the injection of the homologous virus and this promoted self-healing local lesions that guaranteed strong and long-lasting protection. However, since 3 % of these variolations caused cases of smallpox in the vaccinated individuals, it was considered unsafe and was discontinued.

Brookings

Want herd immunity? Pay people to take the vaccine 18 August 2020

MIT Technology Review By Robert E. Litan When I was a child, doctors giving vaccine shots used to hand out candy or a little toy to take the sting and fear out of the shot. A similar idea could rescue the U.S. economy when one or more COVID vaccines are approved by the FDA and widely available for mass uptake. .

The US just approved the use of plasma from covid-19 survivors as a treatment 24 August 2020 The US has approved wide emergency use of blood plasma from covid-19 survivors as a treatment for coronavirus infection, despite limited evidence it helps. The therapy, which the White House touted as a “breakthrough,” involves giving plasma from survivors to those battling the infection.

Der Spiegel

The "'Sputnik Moment": Cutting Corners in the Race for a Vaccine 07 August 2020 With more than 865,000 coronavirus infections, Russia is currently the fourth-most affected country in this pandemic and President Vladimir Putin is pushing for a breakthrough in vaccine development. The government says that more than 20 countries from Asia, Latin America, Africa and the Middle East have expressed interest in the vaccine. In Moscow, there is talk of a "Sputnik Moment," a reference to the Soviet Union's launch of the first ever satellite in 1957, ahead of the Americans. .

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Vaccination and the Workplace Workers subjected to extensive social contact and mobility should be first in line for COVID-19 vaccinations Workplace settings can determine the spread of infectious disease. Some of the most affected workplaces during the COVID-19 pandemic have been hospitals and nursing homes, and meatpacking plants where employees are in close quarters for long shifts. As of June 2020, according to estimates, nearly 1,000 COVID-19 deaths had been reported among healthcare workers in the US alone, and nursing and long-term care facilities have registered COVID-19 fatalities among residents and staff that account for a third of that country’s total death toll. In July 2020, as Africa was anticipating an uptick in reported cases, more than 11,000 healthcare workers had already been reported as infected across multiple countries there. Protecting frontline workers is essential, and when a COVID-19 vaccine becomes available healthcare workers are likely to be the first in line. Those working in the meatpacking industry and in similar sectors should also be given priority. While the US has seen thousands of confirmed cases of COVID-19 among workers at meat and poultry processing facilities, the disease has also had a heavy impact on plants in countries including Spain, Brazil, and Australia. Any workplace that involves large gatherings of people or high levels of mobility, such as in the military or travel industry, are at higher risk of disease spread. Bus drivers, railway workers, airline staff, truck drivers and everyone they come into contact with during work hours are key populations for vaccinating against not just COVID-19 but also influenza and measles. Vaccination in these settings is a crucial and invaluable investment. Theme parks provide a perfect opportunity for infectious disease outbreaks; a measles outbreak at Disneyland in California in 2015, for example, ultimately spread to three other US states, Mexico, and Canada. Schools are also a workplace where students and staff can be vulnerable. In Israel, after they started to reopen schools following a long closure in July 2020 with social distancing and mask measures in place, officials nonetheless reported that despite the protections more than 150 students and dozens of staff members were found to be infected. Teachers suffered the most, and some were hospitalized, in an instance where COVID-19 vaccination in the workplace could not only have protected people but also enabled education to continue. Related insight areas: Human Rights, Inclusive Design, The Great Reset, Public Finance and Social Protection, Aviation, Travel and Tourism, Education and Skills, COVID-19, Advanced Manufacturing and Production, Workforce and Employment, Pandemic Preparedness and Response, Healthcare Delivery

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Latest knowledge The Conversation

London School of Economics and Political Science

Inside the Chinese companies vying to produce the world's first coronavirus vaccine

COVID-19 in Latin America: were we doomed from the start? 19 August 2020

27 August 2020

Even though different countries responded very differently to the emergence of coronavirus, its impact has been devastating virtually everywhere in Latin America. Underlying factors like labour informality, compounding health issues, low healthcare spending, multi-generational households, and economic openness have made the region’s experience of the crisis especially grave, writes Rodrigo Aguilera. Along with the US, … Continued.

For all its innovative prowess, China has generally lagged other countries in developing vaccines. That appears to be changing with the race for a coronavirus vaccine, with chinese companies potentially even at the forefront. As often with China, the question is: who are we dealing with? Who are the main vaccine developers? How far are they in developing a vaccine?. In Depth News

Nature

In a Historic Move, Africa Eradicates Devastating Polio

What the immune response to the coronavirus says about the prospects for a vaccine

25 August 2020 While COVID-19 pandemic is playing havoc with the global economy and a frantic search continues for a vaccine, thanks to a concerted campaign of immunization, Africa is free of a highly infectious disease which mainly affects children under 5 years of age. It is a significant development marking the eradication of the second virus from the face of the continent since smallpox 40 years ago.

17 August 2020 Viral immunologists say that results so far have been predictable — here’s why that’s good news. Viral immunologists say that results so far have been predictable — here’s why that’s good news. Kaiser Health News

America’s Obesity Epidemic Threatens Effectiveness of Any COVID Vaccine

Quanta Magazine

Can Vaccines for Wildlife Prevent Human Pandemics?

06 August 2020 For a world crippled by the coronavirus, salvation hinges on a vaccine. In the US, where at least 4.6 million people have been infected and nearly 155,000 have died, the promise of that vaccine is hampered by a vexing epidemic that long preceded COVID-19: obesity. .

24 August 2020 Studies suggest that self-disseminating vaccines could prevent the 'spillover' of animal viruses into humans as pandemic diseases. Harvard Kennedy School – Journalist’s Resource

Reporting on coronavirus vaccines: 5 tips to help journalists inject audiences with the facts 23 August 2020 To help reporters make sense of what’s known and yet to be learned about COVID-19 vaccines, we asked for insights from the experts.

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4. Vaccinating for Security

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5. Vaccinating Against Pandemics

2. Economic and Business Implications of Vaccination

Social Stigma: The Hidden Threat of COVID-19, Frontiers, www.frontiersin.org What Would Jenner and Pasteur Have Done About COVID-19 Coronavirus? The Urges of a Vaccinologist, Frontiers, www.frontiersin.org The US just approved the use of plasma from covid-19 survivors as a treatment, MIT Technology Review, www.technologyreview.com Coronavirus vaccines: We address 3 big questions about safety, distribution and adoption, Harvard Kennedy School – Journalist’s Resource, journalistsresource.org Modelling the Manufacturing Process for COVID-19 Vaccines: Our Approach, Center for Global Development, www.cgdev.org Want herd immunity? Pay people to take the vaccine, Brookings, www.brookings.edu The "'Sputnik Moment": Cutting Corners in the Race for a Vaccine, Der Spiegel, www.spiegel.de

How Much Are Individual Choices Worth, Bocconi Knowledge, www.knowledge.unibocconi.eu South Korea’s Search for a COVD-19 Vaccine, The Diplomat, thediplomat.com Trump’s big RNC challenge: Reframing pandemic politics, Christian Science Monitor, www.csmonitor.com In the race for a Covid-19 vaccine, Pfizer turns to a scientist with a history of defying skeptics — and getting results, STAT, www.statnews.com Bringing a COVID-19 Vaccine to Market: Where Do We Go from Here?, Center for Global Development, www.cgdev.org Effective test and trace could reduce R by up to 26%, Imperial College London, www.imperial.ac.uk Vaccine ‘probably a 90% chance’ but huge challenges remain in tackling Covid-19, Australian Strategic Policy Institute, www.aspistrategist.org.au

6. Vaccination and the Workplace

3. Trust, Misinformation and Health

Inside the Chinese companies vying to produce the world's first coronavirus vaccine, The Conversation, theconversation.com In a Historic Move, Africa Eradicates Devastating Polio, In Depth News, www.indepthnews.net Can Vaccines for Wildlife Prevent Human Pandemics?, Quanta Magazine, www.quantamagazine.org Reporting on coronavirus vaccines: 5 tips to help journalists inject audiences with the facts, Harvard Kennedy School – Journalist’s Resource, journalistsresource.org COVID-19 in Latin America: were we doomed from the start?, London School of Economics and Political Science, blogs.lse.ac.uk What the immune response to the coronavirus says about the prospects for a vaccine, Nature, www.nature.com America’s Obesity Epidemic Threatens Effectiveness of Any COVID Vaccine, Kaiser Health News, khn.org

COVID + Influenza: This Is a Good Year to Get a Flu Shot, Experts Advise, Kaiser Health News, khn.org LA Hospital Seeks Vaccine Trial Participants Among Its Own High-Risk Patients, Kaiser Health News, khn.org The unequal scramble for coronavirus vaccines — by the numbers, Nature, www.nature.com Covid-19 disinformation campaigns shift focus to vaccines, Australian Strategic Policy Institute, www.aspistrategist.org.au We need to prevent COVID-19 vaccine nationalism., World Health Organization, www.youtube.com Covid-19: When will a vaccine be ready?, The Economist, www.youtube.com What Seniors Can Expect as Their New Normal in a Post-Vaccine World, Kaiser Health News, khn.org

Acknowledgements Cover and selected images throughout supplied by Reuters. Some URLs have been shortened for readability. Please follow the URL given to visit the source of the article. A full URL can be provided on request.

16 Vaccination Briefing, September 2020


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17 Vaccination Briefing, September 2020


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Profile for Marco A. Gonzalez

Vaccination in Strategic Intelligence of WEF  

Co-curated with London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Vaccines are the most effective means to prevent infectious diseases and th...

Vaccination in Strategic Intelligence of WEF  

Co-curated with London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Vaccines are the most effective means to prevent infectious diseases and th...

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