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•• Martin ••• •• Luther •• •• College •• •• •• Undergraduate •• Catalog •• 2007--2008 •• •• •• •• • 1995 Luther Court •• New VIm, Minnesota 56073-3300 (507) 354-8221 •• FAX (507) 354-8225 •• MLC Website: www.mlc-wels.edu •• •• ••


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TABLE OF CONTENTS Quick Facts

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Message from the President Mission Statement Student Life Admissions Finances Financial Aid Academic Po licies Academic Programs Course Descriptions Faculty Administration Academic Calendar College Seal

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Information in this catalog is current as of January 15, 2007. Martin Luther College reserves the right to change courses, requirements, regulations, and policies listed in this catalog without advance notice.

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MLC

QUICK FACTS

THE WELS COLLEGE OF MINISTRY Martin Luther College is owned and operated by the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Formed from an amalgamation of Dr. Martin Luther College (founded 1884) of New Ulm, Minnesota, and Northwestern College (founded 1865) of Watertown, Wisconsin, Martin Luther College opened its doors in 1995. The college prepares men and women for various areas of the Christian ministry.

ACADEMIC

PROGRAM - Graduate

Martin Luther College offers the Master of Science in Education (M.5.Ed.). For admission requirements, program description, and inquires contact the Director of Graduate Studies at (507) 354-8221, ext. 241 or at Martin Luther College, 1995 Luther Court, New Ulm, MN 56073 or access the graduate studies information through the academics heading of the Martin Luther College website.

CAMPUS AND LOCATION The beautiful fifty-acre campus is situated on top of a wooded range of hills overlooking the city of New Ulm, Minnesota. New Ulm, a Minnesota Star City with a population of 13,750, is located on U. S. Highway 14, 100 miles southwest of Minneapolis. For more information visit the Martin Luther College website at www.mlc-wels.edu.

FINANCIAL AID Approximately 90% of the students receive some form of financial assistance through the college's comprehensive financial aid program. TUITION AND FEES The Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod provides a small subsidy for the operating costs of Martin Luther College. This subsidy reduces the cost of education for each student by about 5%. The annual cost of tuition, room and board is $13,670. Textbook costs average $800 per year.

FACULTY A faculty of about 80 Christian educators serves the student body.

ACCREDITATION Martin Luther College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org; 312-2630456). The elementary education program of Martin Luther College is approved by the Minnesota Board of Teaching. Graduates of this program may be recommended for a Minnesota teaching license.

ENTRY DATES The application deadline for Fall semester enrollment is April 15. The Winter semester application deadline is October 15. ACADEMIC PROGRAMS - Undergraduate Studies in Educational Ministry Students in the Educational Ministry program are trained as early childhood teachers, elementary teachers, secondary teachers, or staff ministers. Graduates receive a bachelor of science in education degree; staff ministry graduates receive the bachelor of science degree. Upon recommendation of the faculty, qualified graduates receive their initial assignments into the ministry through the WELS Assignment Committee. Graduates who meet Minnesota Board of Teaching standards also qualify for Minnesota licensure.

STUDENT POPULATION Approximately 800 undergraduate students come from some thirty states and several foreign countries. There are 35 graduate students and approximately 625 continuing education students. ATHLETICS, SCHOOL COLORS AND VARSITY MASCOT MLC offers fourteen varsity sports and is a member of the NCAA Division III and the Upper Midwest Athletic Conference (UMAC). The school colors of Martin Luther College are black, red, and white; the varsity mascot is the Knights.

Studies in Pastoral Ministry Students in the Pastoral Ministry program receive a Bachelor of Arts degree. Qualified graduates are recommended for admission to Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary. The college also offers seminary certification programs for older, second-career students, both for those who already hold a bachelor's degree and for those who do not.

SUMMER SESSION Martin Luther College operates two three-week summer session terms for its undergraduate program, its graduate program and for professional development. For more information on summer sessions, check the MLC website under Academics, then Office of Continuing Education.

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Message From the President Reverend Theodore B. Olsen

The Martin Luther College Challenge MLC challenges its students to be competent in academics, social and communication skills to be used in service to the Lord's Word MLC challenges its students to be confident in the Lord's grace so as his servants they will share his Word. MLC challenges its students to stay connected to the word so they may be nurtured, strengthened and emboldened to proclaim the Word MLC challenges its students to build character which is based on the morals and values of the Word - essential for a servant of the Word MLC challenges its students to be caring for the lost souls of the world - to evidence a passion for souls, a passion engendered by the Word. Martin Luther College, the WELS College of Ministry, exists to prepare the next generation of Gospel heralds and offers five ways to proclaim that life saving Gospel; studies in pastoral ministry and studies in educational ministry which includes early childhood ministry, elementary school ministry, high school ministry, and staff ministry. There are some 800 students at MLC preparing to proclaim the eternal gospel to every nation, tribe, language and people. Martin Luther College is an exciting place to be, a place at which you will be challenged, a place to grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ, a place from which you can move forward to proclaim Christ. Are you looking for the excitement of working with the most powerful thing in the world - the Word of the Lord? Then, MLC may be the place for you!

January 15, 2007

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MARTIN LUTHER COLLEGE M,SS,ON STATEMENT Martin Luther College exists to serve the ministerial needs of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS) • by preparing men for pastoral training at Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary and • by preparing men and women for service as teachers and staff ministers in the Synod's churches and schools so that the WELS may be served by candidates both qualified and competent to proclaim the Word of God faithfully and in accord with the Lutheran Confessions in the Book of Concord. Objectives To fulfill this mission, Martin Luther College carries out all instruction and programs of student life according to the gospel as revealed in the inspired Word of God. Through its programs the college desires • to strengthen the student in a consecrated spirit of love for God and his Word; • to educate the whole person for faithful, capable, intelligent citizenship in today's world; • to assist the student in acquiring the knowledge, attitudes, and skills needed for service in the church and for lifelong learning; and • to encourage the student in developing and demonstrating a heart for service in the church, community, and world. Function Consistent with its mission and objectives, Martin Luther College • encourages, recruits, and admits men and women qualified to undertake appropriate programs of study at Martin Luther College; • offers courses of study which qualify men for entrance into Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary, where they will continue their preparation for the pastoral ministry of the WELS; • offers courses of study for the preparation of qualified educators for the teaching ministry in the preschools and elementary and secondary schools of the WELS; • offers courses of study for the preparation of qualified staff ministers for the congregations of the WELS; • awards appropriate degrees, certificates, and diplomas to those who successfully complete the prescribed courses of study; • serves students and synodical constituency with educational leadership in the instruction of Martin Luther College students, through the professional development of Martin Luther College faculty, and with programs in continuing education for teachers and staff ministers. 4

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STUDENT LIFE A Christian Community Academic Counseling Athletics Campus Living Class Attendance Employment, Shopping, Service, Events, etc Extra-Curricular Life Financial Services Handicapped Accessibility Health Services Housing Marriage Meals Motor Vehicles Orientation And Registration Personal and Spiritual Counseling Student Government Vacations Worship

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A Christian Community God created us to live together with him and with each other. In this world where sin separates and divides, we thank God for gathering us together as his people in Christ. God enables us to live together with each other in a Christian community and enjoy the blessings of worshiping, working, laughing, and even crying together. It is God who makes it possible for us as a campus family to encourage and admonish, forgive and befriend, help and assist.

Vacations Dormitories and the cafeteria open the weekend before the first class in fall and close on graduation day in spring. Facilities are closed during the longer Christmas and spring breaks and the shorter Thanksgiving and Easter recesses. Students are encouraged to travel home during these holiday recesses. Those who live farther from home are encouraged to spend the break at the home of a friend.

Common to all Christians is the struggle between the new man of faith and the old sinful nature. The new man wants to love God and people perfectly. The old Adam hates what is good and is completely selfish. God's Law uncovers and exposes sinful selfishness, and the Gospel of Jesus Christ covers, heals, and comforts with the message of forgiveness won by Christ. Moreover, God's gracious forgiveness

Students and parents are often concerned about winter travel back to Martin Luther College after major vacation breaks. When winter weather causes travel concerns, students and parents are asked to check the MLC Portal (www.portal.mlc-wels.edu) for information concerning school closing, or phone the college information desk at 507-354-8221.

provides the power for godly living, striving, and maturing. When hundreds of people share close

Housing In general, college policy is that students live in the dormitories provided by our synod. Unmarried students live with a roommate in one of five residence halls operated by the college. If enrollment numbers are greater than dormitory capacities, then single students who are four or more years out of high school and have reached the age of 21, may request an exemption from dormitory living, but the Vice-President for Student Life will make decisions regarding such requests. Married students arrange their own housing.

quarters on our campus, opportunity abounds for selfishness to hurt and wound. But God the Holy Spirit uses his Word on our campus to turn us away from sin, turn us back to Christ in repentance and faith, and turn our hearts and hands toward others in love. Worship Martin Luther College plans its day around the worship of our Lord. Morning and evening chapel services provide our campus family with opportunity to gather together around the Word, to sing, to pray, and to praise God. Students are also expected to attend worship services at one of the area WELS congregations. The faculty provides organized opportunities for small group Bible study.

The college provides a bed, mattress, desk, chair, dresser space, and wardrobe/ closet for each dormitory resident. Rooms are equipped with connections for phone, cable TV and the campus computer network. Students provide towels, bed linens and blankets, phone, and study lamps. Appliances and extra furniture may be brought into the dormitories with the approval of the dormitory supervisor. Some items require a fee or deposit. Before bringing items to campus, please contact the Vice-President for Student Life.

Class Attendance Martin Luther College expects students to attend their classes. The public ministry calls for faithfulness, and regular class attendance is one training ground for that important requirement. Illness and emergency, of course, may necessitate absence from class.

Meals Dormitory students are required to participate in the meal plan offered by the college. Our cafeteria offers continuous "7 AM to 7 PM" service. Students with an ID can enter the cafeteria as often as their schedules permit. The cafeteria provides a variety of menu items and a number of specialty bars each day. Off-campus students may also purchase meals in the cafeteria.

The academic calendar specifies when classes are in session. Students and their parents and families are expected to follow the academic calendar, particularly when making travel arrangements and vacation plans. Travel arrangements should be made after the last exam date of the semester. Those who need to make use of the Minneapolis airport should also become familiar with shuttle service times while making their flight reservations.

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the Word to make each believer more like Christ. When growth in Christian life is not apparent or when behavior calls into question a person's fitness or readiness for service in the public ministry, a student may be asked to leave school.

Financial Services Martin Luther College operates an automatic teller machine on campus. The ATM permits withdrawals, but no deposits. The school's receptionist cashes personal checks (up to $50 per day). Some local banks will cash personal checks for students who present proper identification and have an account with them.

Campus regulations reflect the concerns of our civil government. The Martin Luther College Governing Board has declared our campus to be drug- and alcohol-free. Martin Luther College has also established procedures to deal with sexual harassment. Racial prejudice is a form of lovelessness that the college family works with God's Word to eliminate.

Health Services New students submit a physician's health evaluation and a profile of medical history on forms provided them by the college. Proof of immunization (Diphtheriaj Tetanus within the past 10 years, MMR, and Polio) is a legal requirement for campus residency.

Student Government Each class selects its own officers and elects delegates to the Student Senate. Each of the five residence halls has a dormitory council elected by its own residents. The Student Senate is the student body's voice in matters affecting student life at MLC. Class officers attend to the specific concerns of each class. Dormitory councils address concerns of residential living.

It is Martin Luther College policy that necessary medical and immunization forms be returned to the Admissions Office prior to a student's arrival on campus. An on-staff registered nurse meets the routine health needs of student. She holds regular hours oncampus each school day. New Ulm has a regional hospital and competent physicians in most fields. A student is responsible for the costs of off-campus care, which means carrying major medical insurance or being prepared to meet emergency medical costs should they occur. Martin Luther College carries accidental injury insurance to supplement a student's own primary coverage for injuries that occur on college property or in conjunction with school sanctioned activities. Intercollegiate athletes at Martin Luther College fall under the protection of NCAA coverage for catastrophic injury. Intercollegiate athletes must carry their own major medical insurance and must update their health records with a physical exam prior to their junior year.

Marriage Students notify the Vice-President for Student Life when they are making plans for a marriage that will take place before graduation from Martin Luther College or prior to emollment at Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary, or that may impact future assignment. The Vice-President for Student Life and the Campus Pastor counsel with these students. Academic Counseling Each student is assigned a faculty member as an academic advisor. The advisor helps chart the path to graduation by tracking academic progress and assisting the student to choose appropriate courses. The advisor may also offer personal counseling or direct the student to someone who can also help with non-academic concerns.

Campus Living Martin Luther College publishes a handbook that contains campus regulations and guidelines. Christian principles and courtesy form the necessary framework for day-to-day living on campus. By emolling, each student declares a willingness to abide by both the letter and the spirit of these common-sense regulations. The college administration and elected student representatives work together to keep guidelines up-to-date and relevant. Fines may be levied and other penalties imposed when regulations are broken. In all cases the goal is to promote peace, harmony, and loving concern for others. The Holy Spirit works through

Personal and Spiritual Counseling Students who serve as resident assistants provide peer counseling. There is one resident assistant on each floor or wing of a dormitory. Each dormitory has an adult resident supervisor to whom a student may also tum. The Vice-President for Student Life is available for other concerns. The Martin Luther College Campus Pastor offers confidential spiritual counseling. A Christian counseling office in New Ulm, staffed by WELSjELS counselors, supplements the work of the Vice-President for Student Life and

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the Campus Pastor at their recommendation and referral.

Handicapped Accessibility Although most campus buildings were built prior to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American Disabilities Act of 1990, attempts are made to assist students and other personnel who have disabilities. There are ground-level wheel chair accessible entrances to the Wittenberg Collegiate Center (WCC), the Library building, and the Gymnasium. The Library, Wittenberg Collegiate Center (WCC), Old Main, Luther Student Center (LSC), Concord and Summit dormitories are served by elevators. Concord and Augustana Halls have private handicap-accessible toilet, shower and laundry facilities. Every attempt is made to eliminate any disadvantages and create a sensitive learning environment for students with disabilities.

Motor Vehicles A student may bring a motor vehicle to campus under the following conditions: • • • • •

the vehicle must carry liability insurance; it needs to be safe; it must be kept in operating condition throughout the year; it must be registered with the Student Life office (fees range from $40 to $80 per year) it must be parked on campus in the lot assigned by the Student Life Office

Parking on streets adjacent to campus is prohibited as a courtesy to our residential neighbors. Students who bring a vehicle agree to abide by motor vehicle regulations set by the college and the government.

Extra-Curricular Life Government: Students can participate in campus leadership opportunities such as Student Senate, dormitory councils, class offices, an intramural athletic board, ad hoc college committees and task forces, etc.

Parking space on campus is limited. It may not be possible to accommodate all those wishing to bring vehicles to campus. Students must register for parking prior to bringing their vehicles to campus.

Music and Dramatics: student-led drama club,

Forum, produces a fall musical, a winter play,

Orientation And Registration Current students register for classes prior to the end of each school year. New students and incoming freshmen will be pre-registered before the beginning of the school year. The college welcomes new students and their parents to a few days of orientation at the beginning of the first semester. Matters such as room and roommate assignment, vehicle registration, parking, financial aid, and the initial payment of fees are handled by mail prior to arrival on campus. It is important that students supply the college with a correct summer address.

reader's theater, outdoor classical theater in the park, and a children's theater play. The MLC Music Division sponsors multiple performance choirs, bands, ensembles, jazz band, and hand bells. Publications: Students write, edit, and layout the school literary magazine, The Knight's Page, a magazine featuring the translation of confessional Lutheran Latin and German material called Studium Excitare, and have been asked to utilize their writing gifts by the Public Relations Office Social Events: Students participate in homecoming activities, snow carnival events, class events and outings, lyceums and cultural events, special interest clubs, and faculty-student gatherings.

Employment, Shopping, Service, Events, etc. The community of New VIm offers part-time jobs to as many students as need them. Employment opportunities are posted regularly in the Luther Student Center in cooperation with Minnesota Job Service. Job opportunities are also listed on the Martin Luther College Campus Intranet.

Service Clubs: Students can assist with campus life by joining audio-visual services, becoming recruitment hosts, serving as campus ambassadors, and participating in other college sponsored service activities. In addition, students are warmly encouraged to volunteer their time and energy in the community.

Students may shop for personal needs in New VIm, nearby Mankato, or the Twin Cities. All three areas sponsor cultural and recreational activities.

Athletics Martin Luther College offers a comprehensive intercollegiate athletic program for men and women. The college is associated with the National

The Martin Luther College Campus Intranet lists volunteer opportunities within the community as a way of encouraging students to use their God-given time and abilities in the service of others.

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Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA Division III) and the Upper Midwest Athletic Conference. Cross country, soccer, basketball, tennis, golf, and track and field are offered to both men and women. In addition, women may compete in volleyball and softball, while men can compete in football and baseball. Intramural competition is offered for both men and women in tennis, indoor soccer, basketball, volleyball, bowling, badminton, basketball, softball, and flag football. All students not participating in intercollegiate sports during the respective sport season are eligible to be a part of the intramural program. The program is operated through a student board under the guidance of the Athletic Director. The athletic program is under control of the faculty athletic committee with recommendations provided by a student athletic board. The Athletic Director supervises the activities and schedules all intercollegiate athletics and intramural events. The Athletic Director also supervises the dance team and cheerleading squads. Athletics at Martin Luther College help to contribute to a positive overall college experience for students. Christian sportsmanship is just as important as participation and winning is never placed at odds with learning. Gender equity in sports is observed.

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ADMISSIONS Admissions Procedures Deadlines Entrance Requirements International Students Languages Nondiscriminatory Policy Specific Entrance Requirements: Studies in Educational Ministry

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Entrance Requirements In keeping with its mission to prepare men and women for service in the churches and schools of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod, Martin Luther College admits into its programs students who • are prayerfully considering the public ministry of the gospel as their life's work; • desire to serve in the public ministry of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod; • have God-given talents that are valuable for service in the church; • possess an upright character and honorable reputation; and • have demonstrated the ability to succeed in college-level coursework.

• Academic Electives - 2 credits (English, Foreign Language, Mathematics, Science, Music Fundamentals, Social Studies)

Note: A high-school credit is defined as one year of study. Students with an ACT mathematics score of 17 or lower are required to complete MTH0002 Developmental Mathematics before enrolling in any other mathematics course(s). Developmental Mathematics does not fulfill any of the mathematics requirements for graduation. Languages MLC assumes that many students will enter with more than two credits in a foreign language. Students may receive college credit for additional high school semesters if: (a) they achieve an acceptable score on an entrance examination, and (b) they continue with that language on the college level.

The following requirements apply to all who are seeking admission to Martin Luther College for the 2007-2008 academic year. 1. Written recommendation from applicant's pastor on a form provided by the Martin Luther College Office of Admissions. 2.

There are advantages to the study of Latin as the first foreign language in high school. Latin serves as a good introduction to the study of other foreign languages.

Written recommendation from applicant's high school counselor or principal on a form provided by the Martin Luther College Office of Admissions.

If a student desires to take the Confessional Languages option, he will find it advantageous take Latin and German in high school.

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An ACT composite score of 20 or higher on a single enhanced test. Applicants must request that ACT scores be sent to Martin Luther College directly from ACT. This can be requested on the ACT registration form. The code number for Martin Luther College is 2127.

Students who have not taken the previously-noted foreign language credits in high school are able to pursue a program that meets MLC s language requirement. Most students in this situation will be able to complete their program in four years.

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A high school diploma awarded on the basis of a minimum cumulative GP A of 2.50 figured on a minimum of 14 academic credits earned according to the following schedule: • English-4 credits

Specific Program Requirements: Studies in Educational Ministry The following requirements apply to applicants wishing to enroll in the Secondary Teacher Education Program (STEP). • STEP mathematics - a minimum cumulative mathematics GPA of B- r an ACT mathematics subscore of 25 or higher, and precalculus

• Laboratory Science-3 credits (One credit in laboratory based biology and one credit in laboratory based physical science [chemistry or physics]. The third credit may be from any area of science (with or without laboratory experience).

• STEP science-same as STEP mathematics, plus 3 science credits with a minimum cumulative science GP A of B-, an ACT science reasoning subscore of 25 or higher, and precalculus

• Mathematics-3 credits (Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry or higher mathematics)

• STEP Spanish - 2 Spanish credits with a demonstrated level of ability on an entrance examination (Intermediate I)

• Social Studies - 2 credits

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• STEP Music-Students are required to demonstrate a sufficient background in music fundamentals on an entrance examination and a satisfactory skill level in music performance in a taped or live audition.

sex, or marital status in the administration of its educational policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletic, and other collegeadministered programs, policies, and practices. Martin Luther College, as the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod's college of ministry, serves all without exception who meet the biblical and synodical standards for service in the church.

International Students 1. Martin Luther College is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant alien students. 2.

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Martin Luther College adheres to the requirements of Title IX of the 1972 Educational Amendments, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the ADA policy of 1990.

The applications of international students from missions or congregations in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod will be processed in the normal manner.

Admissions Procedures For detailed application procedures, please contact our admissions office.

Applications from other international students will be considered on an individual basis. To be considered at all, such applicants are to submit valid reasons for wishing to attend Martin Luther College and must demonstrate the educational background necessary to meet the college's academic requirements.

Martin Luther College Office of Admissions 1995 Luther Court New VIm, MN 56073 Phone: (507) 354-8221, ext. 280 Fax: (507) 354-8225 Email: mlcadmit@mlc-weIs.edu

International students must submit English translations of their high school transcript and transcripts from any colleges they may have attended.

Deadlines • April 15 is the application deadline for those who would like to be considered for August enrollment. A fee of $25 must accompany the application.

International students whose native language is not English must demonstrate English proficiency by achieving a TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 500 or higher (paper-based) or 173 or higher (computer-based), or 60 or higher (internet based).

A non-refundable tuition deposit of $100 is required by May 1. This deposit is applied directly to the applicant's tuition at the time of registration.

International students must supply proof of their ability to meet the financial obligations of tuition, room and board, transportation, and personal expenses in accord with federal law.

• October 15 is the application deadline for those who would like to be considered for January enrollment. A fee of $25 must accompany the application.

After the above conditions have been met and the student has been admitted by the Office of Admissions, the student will be issued an 1-20 form.

A non-refundable tuition deposit of $100 is required by November 15. This deposit is applied directly to the applicant's tuition at the time of registration.

Those admitted may also apply for and be considered for financial aid.

• Applications for admission are processed upon receipt of the completed application, the pastor's and high school's recommendation forms, transcripts from all high schools and colleges attended, and ACT results. The Office of

Nondiscriminatory Policy Martin Luther College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin, age,

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Admissions begins processing fall semester applications on September 15 of the preceding academic year. • The Martin Luther College Financial Aid Office will send cost and financial aid information directly to applicants. • Non-traditional applicants (those who are married or older than 21) who are interested in any educational program should initiate the process with the Director of Admissions. These applicants may be required to meet with member of the Admissions Committee. • Non-traditional applicants who are interested in the Seminary Certification Program should initiate the process by contacting Pastoral Studies Institute Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary 11831 N. Seminary Dr. Mequon, WI 53092 Phone: (262) 242-8100 Fax: (262) 242-8110 Email: PSI@wls.wels.net

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F,NANCES Billing Procedures Incidental Charges Payment Plans Payment Policies Questions Refunds/Withdrawals Tuition and Room and Board Variable Costs

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Tuition, Room and Board

Tuition (in-state or out-of-state) Room and Board

Cost per semester

Cost per year

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damage of school property are due immediately upon receipt. Semester grade reports and transcript requests will be held if a student account is past due. Payment Plans Students pay the cost of attending school through a combination of scholarships, grants, credits for having attended a synodical preparatory school, school arranged loans, privately arranged loans, work-study programs, private funds and jobs. Financial Aid and Financial Services counselors provide planning assistance to students upon request. Prior to the beginning of the school year (see details under Payment Policies), students will be asked to select one of the following options for meeting their financial obligations:

Notes: The actual cost of enrollment for 2007-08 is reduced through a budgetary operating subsidy from the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod. Tuition for part-time students is $210 per credit. Depending on individual circumstances, education students living off campus pay afee of up to $775 (housing - $550/supervision - $225 for 10 weeks) during the professional semester in lieu of room and board. Depending on individual circumstances, staff ministry and parish music interns living off campus pay afee of up to $1395 (housing - $995 supervision - $400 for 18 weeks) during the professional semester in lieu of room and board. All charges and procedures are subject to revision as economic conditions warrant

FULL-SEMESTER PLAN: Payment in full for semester one by August 15, 2007, and payment in full for semester two by December 15, 2007. TWICE-A-SEMESTER PLAN: Payment in two equal installments for semester one by August 15, 2007, and September 30, 2007. Payment in two equal installments for semester two by December 15, 2007, and January 30, 2008. MONTHLY PLAN: Payment in ten installments through MLC's tuition management plan. Students enroll in this plan at an annual cost of $50 and make monthly payments (Iuly-April) via automatic withdrawal on the 16th of each month from a checking or savings account they have designated.

Variable Costs The cost of books, supplies, travel, laundry, personal and miscellaneous expenses varies according to the individual. For 2007-2008 the estimate per individual is $3150. Incidental Charges Automobile registration ranges in cost from $40-80. This fee is paid directly to the Student Life Office.

Students who believe that extenuating circumstances make all three payment plans personally unsuitable may request an exceptional payment plan subject to the approval of the Chief Financial Officer. An annual fee of $50 is also charged for this service.

Payment Policies Students select one of various payment plans by June 15 (or November 15 for students matriculating the second semester). Each student is responsible for meeting his or her obligation for tuition, room and board according to the plan selected. If a student does not choose a plan by June 15 (or November 15 for students matriculating the second semester), the full-semester plan is assigned by default. Fees must be paid on schedule and in full before participating in semester final exams. Bookstore purchases may not be charged to the student account. The bookstore does accept MasterCard, Visa or personal checks. Parking tickets, fines for dormitory infractions or past-due library books, and charges for the

Billing Procedures The Financial Services Office will mail an initial billing statement the first week of July. Depending on the payment plan chosen, the first payment is due either July 15 (monthly plan) or August 15 (semester plans) and considered past due 10 days later. For students matriculating the second semester, the initial billing is mailed first week of November. The first payment is due December 15 for all payment plans and considered past due 10 days later.

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Subsequent statements are distributed each month from August through April. Each payment includes a prorated portion of tuition, room and board charges for the year. The payment amount varies according to the plan selected. Failure to meet payment deadlines places a student in delinquent status. A 10-day grace period follows each due date. Failure to make appropriate payment by the end of the grace period typically will result in termination of enrollment, All students have the right of appeal to the president. A $50 charge applies when an insufficient fund notice is received from the bank on behalf of a student. Initial billing statements reflect financial aid allotments if application and other deadlines have been met; loans or aid received after these deadlines will be reflected on later statements. Duplicate billing statements may be sent to parents or another party for a yearly $20 processing fee and upon signing a release form. The school observes federal laws regarding confidentiality by sending statements only to students or persons designated by them. A separate consent form is required for students directing the college to communicate account information to other individuals. The college does not accept credit cards for payment on student accounts.

Minnesota State Grant regulations require that any unearned portion of Minnesota State Grant be returned upon withdrawal from MLC. Questions Questions with regard to payment policies or procedures should be directed to the Financial Services Office. Call (507) 354-8221.

Refunds/Withdrawals A flat fee of $75 per day on campus is charged when a student discontinues during the first quarter of a semester. Any account balance will be refunded during this period. Students discontinuing after the first quarter of a semester will not receive a credit for tuition, room and board. A $100 severance fee is charged for early termination of enrollment. A portion of any withdrawal refund may be used to repay financial aid programs. Students who withdraw during the first thirty days of a semester will not receive any institutional grants or scholarships administered by Martin Luther College. Federal regulations require that a percentage of Title IV funds be returned if withdrawal occurs before completion of 60% of a semester.

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F,NANC,AL AID Application Deadlines Family Responsibility Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy Grant and Scholarship Sources Information Loan Sources Merit Based Financial Aid Need Based Financial Aid Other Benefits Sources of Aid Special Work Programs Synod Subsidy

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.1

U U

FINANCING

THE TRAINING

Merit Based Financial Aid The college provides scholarship opportunities to incoming freshmen entering fall semester who were graduated high school the previous spring. Eligibility is determined by cumulative GP A and ACT score. Continuing students earn merit scholarships on the basis of cumulative GPA from the previous year. See MLC's Frequently Asked Questions booklet for specific information.

FOR

MINISTRY A decision to enroll at Martin Luther College involves not only a willingness to serve one's Lord in an area of Christian ministry but also a commitment of time and money. To help students reach that goal of Christian ministry, Martin Luther College maintains a comprehensive financial aid program consisting of grants, loans, scholarships, and work study.

Grant and Scholarship Sources • Martin Luther College trust fund income and reserves • Synod special and budgetary funds for financial • Federal Pell Grant • Federal Academic Competitiveness Grant • Federal Supplementary Educational Opportunity Grant • Minnesota State Grant Program

A Family Responsibility The financial aid philosophy of both the federal government and Martin Luther College is that paying for a college education is primarily the responsibility of the student and his or her family. However, because student and family resources are not equal, MLC's financial aid program exists to help students.

Loan Sources • Federal Perkins Loan

Synod Subsidy The Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod provides a subsidy for the operating costs of Martin Luther College which reduces the cost of education for each student and is a way the WELS supports its ministerial education students. Martin Luther College's tuition figure reflects this reduction; it does not appear on the student's financial statement or financial aid letter.

• Federal Stafford Loan • Federal Parent Loans for Undergraduate (PLUS) • Minnesota Supplementary (SELF)

Students

Educational Loan Fund

• Martin Luther College special loan funds Special Work Programs In addition to regular on-campus and off-campus jobs • Federal Work Study

Need Based Financial Aid Much financial aid may be described as need based, meaning that a student's family financial resources are considered. This requires a need analysis (see under Application Deadlines on the following page). Allowances are made for family size, for other family members in college, and for special expenses and circumstances. The need analysis may not be a perfect measure of a family's ability to meet costs, but it does serve to compare student and family resources and helps to distribute financial aid equitably.

Other Benefits Martin Luther College is also certified for Veteran Benefits and Native American programs for students who qualify. Application Deadlines Complete both of the following by AprillS, 2007, for August (fall semester) enrollment (November 1 for spring semester).

Need as it relates to financial aid does not necessarily mean needy. Many students qualify for some form of

./ Complete and file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This is the need analysis document which is used by all colleges. Martin Luther College's ID number is 002361. Students and parents can complete and submit a FAFSA on the Web by going to www.fafsa.ed.gov.

need-based aid, and in the 2006-2007 academic year, 90% of the students at Martin Luther College received some form of financial aid. Unless a student applies for financial aid, no aid can be awarded.

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tI


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./ Complete and file a Martin Luther College Financial Aid Application. This form collects needed information, including special family expenses and circumstances, which may be used to make adjustments.

in twelve semesters. A five year program must be completed in fifteen semesters. A two year certificate program must be completed in six semesters. Students who attend less than full time will have the time of completion appropriately adjusted.

The FAFSA may be filed right up to the end of the second semester, and it may be possible to get financial aid from federal programs late in the year. However, in order to be considered for Martin Luther College Grant Funds, both the FAFSA and the Martin Luther College Financial Aid Application must be filed by April1S, 2007, for the fall semester for the 2007-2008academic year (November 1 for spring semester).

3. Completion Rate At the end of fall and spring semesters, a student's academic progress will be measured by comparing the number of attempted credit hours with the credit hours earned (i.e., received a grade of A, B, C, or D). This includes any course for which the student has remained enrolled past the Drop/Add period. A student must earn 67 percent of credits attempted to maintain satisfactory academic progress. The following are considered when evaluating a student's satisfactory academic progress: • Withdrawn Classes: Under special circumstances a student may drop a course with the approval of the appropriate dean after the first two weeks of the semester and up to two weeks after midterm. For these courses the student's record shows Wand is not counted in computing the student's grade point average. An unauthorized withdrawal from a class is recorded as an F. This F is counted in the GPA.

Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy Federal regulations require Martin Luther College to establish satisfactory academic progress standards for student financial aid recipients. Martin Luther College's standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress measure a student's performance in the following three areas: completion rate, cumulative grade point average (GPA), and maximum time frame. The Financial Aid Office is responsible for ensuring that all students who receive federal, state, and institutional financial aid are meeting these standards. Progress is reviewed at the end of each semester. The Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress apply for all financial assistance programs including Federal Pell Grant, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study (FWS)Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG),Federal Family Education Loans (Stafford and PLUS), as well as assistance from the state and the institution. The only exceptions are Synod prep school tuition refunds and distance grants, which are based solely on being in attendance. 1. Cumulative GPA In order to retain financial aid eligibility the student must maintain a cumulative GPA of: • Following semester I 1.70 • Following semester II 1.80 • Following semester III 1.90 • Following semester IV 2.00 • Subsequent semesters 2.00 2. Maximum Time Frame A student is no longer eligible to receive financial aid once the student has been in full time attendance for more than 150% of the number of semesters normally required to complete the student's program. A four year program must be completed

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Incomplete Classes: Incomplete grades are temporary grades given when a student doing otherwise acceptable work is unable to complete the course assignments for reasons acceptable to the instructor. A first semester incomplete must be converted to a permanent grade by mid-term of the second semester, a second semester incomplete by the end of the July summer session, and a summer session incomplete by mid-term of the first semester, or the permanent grade is recorded as an F.

Pass/Fail Classes: Passing credits received for pass/fail courses are considered attempted and earned credits; failing grades in pass/fail courses are considered attempted but not earned.

Repeated Classes: Classes for failed courses that are repeated because they are required for graduation are eligible for financial aid. Repeated courses are included in the calculation of attempted and earned hours. A student is allowed to repeat a course only twice.

Audit Classes: Audited courses are not considered credits attempted or earned.

Remedial Classes: Remedial courses are included in the calculation of both attempted and earned hours.


Transfer Students: Transfer credits do not count in the calculation of the GPA, but they are included in the calculation of both attempted and earned hours.

Change of Major: If a student changes majors, the hours attempted under all courses of study are included in the calculation of attempted and earned hours.

writing. If the appeal is not granted, this does not preclude a student from enrolling in subsequent semesters. Students will have their financial aid eligibility reinstated by the Financial Aid Office once all satisfactory academic progress standards are met. 6. Publicity Martin Luther College's SAP policy is published in the college catalog. New students are informed about Martin Luther College's SAP policy by information included in the Frequently Asked Questions booklet which is sent to all applicants by the Admissions Office. Award letters include information directing the student to the college's web address where SAP policy can be reviewed. During the week of fall midterm finals, a notice is posted on the MLC Portal reminding all students of the college's satisfactory academic progress policy and directing them to the complete policy posted on the intranet or to printed copies available in the Financial Aid Office.

4. Probation and Suspension Students who fail to achieve the cumulative GPA requirements for Satisfactory Academic Progress will be on probation and will receive financial aid one additional semester. The probationary semester is meant to inform the student of academic problems and provide for corrective action. Students, who achieve the GP A requirement for the number of semesters attended following the probationary semester, will no longer be on probation. Students who do not achieve the GPA requirement following the probationary semester, will be suspended from receiving financial aid for the following semester or summer session or for as long as the student is not in good standing. The Director of Financial Aid will send a letter to the student explaining the status. A student will be granted only one probationary period.

Information Additional information about financial aid programs at Martin Luther College can be found in a separate financial aid brochure. Students who apply for admission to Martin Luther College will be sent a Financial Aid Brochure and a Financial Aid Application.

5. Appeals and Reinstatement To appeal the financial aid suspension, a student must submit to the Financial Aid Office a signed and dated letter of appeal explaining why financial aid should not be suspended. Acceptable reasons for an appeal include the following: • Medical •

Family problems

Emotional problem

Learning disability

Interpersonal problems with friends, roommates, or significant others

Difficulty balancing such things as work, athletics, family responsibilities, and course work

Financial difficulties

Change in or addition to a program requiring more than the maximum allowable credits attempted

Other special, significant or unusual circumstances

To request a brochure or an application, or if you have any questions, call, write, or email. Mr. Gene A. Slettedahl, Director Financial Aid Office Martin Luther College 1995 Luther Court New Ulm, MN 56073 Phone: 507.354.8221, Ext. 225 Fax: 507.354.8225 Email: slettega@mlc-wels.edu

Documentation verifying the situation may be requested. The Financial Aid Committee will consider the appeal and render a decision, which the Director of Financial Aid conveys to the student in

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ACADEMIC POLICIES Academic Policy Appeals Accreditation Advanced Placement Attendance Audit Credit by Examination Certificates Awarded Change of Program College Level Examination Program (CLEP) Credit Load Cross Listed Courses Eligibility Earning a Second Bachelor's Degree Experiential Learning Credit Foreign Language Testing and Placement Grade Point Average Grading System Graduation Rate Graduation Requirements Honors Incompletes Midterm Reports Repetition of Courses Review of Students Semester Exams Student Classification Students with Disabilities Undergraduate Degrees Granted Title II Regulations Transcripts Transfer Credits Withdrawals Writing Policy

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Accreditation Martin Luther College is accredited as a baccalaureate degree and as a master of science in education degree-granting institution by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org; 312-2630456)

completing work after this date are not eligible. 2. Students on the Honors List receive commendation from the Vice President for Academics. •

3.60- 3.74 3.75-3.89 3.90- 4.00

Undergraduate Degrees Granted • Bachelor of Science in Education Martin Luther College awards the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education to students who satisfactorily complete a teacher education program in the Studies in Educational Ministry curriculum. Graduates recommended by the faculty for assignment to the Christian ministry meet the teacher certification requirements of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod. Graduates who meet Minnesota Board of Teaching Standards qualify for Minnesota licensure. •

Diploma Predicates

Cum Laude Magna Cum Laude Summa Cum Laude

Graduation Requirements For All Degrees 1. The final thirty semester hours of credit must be earned at Martin Luther College. 2.

A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 for the total number of courses taken at Martin Luther College is required.

3.

A minimum 2.00 grade point average is required for the final semester/grading period of a program approved by the appropriate academic dean.

4.

Bachelor of Arts Students who satisfactorily complete the Studies in Pastoral Ministry curriculum graduate with the degree of Bachelor of Art. Graduates in Studies in Pastoral Ministry who have demonstrated an aptitude for continuing their preparation for the pastoral ministry of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod are recommended for enrollment at Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary.

The student accepts full responsibility for meeting all requirements for graduation. Note: Graduates from Studies in Educational Ministry also need to meet the requirements of their respective programs (d. page 39-51).

Credit Load Normal course load is 16-19 credits. 1. To be classified as full-time, a student must be enrolled in at least twelve hours for credit (3/4 time = 9 credits; 1/2 time = 6 credits).

Bachelor of Science Students who satisfactorily complete the Staff Ministry Studies curriculum graduate with the degree of Bachelor of Science. Graduates recommended by the faculty for assignment to the Christian ministry also meet the staff ministry certification requirements of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod.

2.

The maximum number of credits a student may take is 19 credits per semester (excluding early

field experiences, elective choir, band, piano, organ, voice, and instrument). 3.

Certificates Awarded Students enrolled in the Seminary, the Synod, or the Staff Ministry Certification Programs who satisfactorily complete their prescribed courses of study graduate with certificates.

A student enrolled in any program may be permitted to carry one additional course for credit or audit (an overload) if (1) he/ she has a cumulative grade point average of 3.00 or better, and (2) the number of credits taken in any given semester does not exceed 21 (excluding earlyfield

experiences, elective choir, band, piano, organ, voice, and instrument).

Honors • Honors List 1. Full-time students who earn a semester GPA of 3.6 and higher are on the Honors List. Students must earn a minimum of 12 graded credits to be eligible for the honors list. The Honors List is final as of 14 days after the last day of final examinations. Students

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4.

1£ a student does not have a cumulative GP A of 3.00 or better and wishes to take an overload, the student may appeal the above policy in writing to the Vice President for Academics.

5.

Studies in Pastoral Ministry students enrolling in a four-year degree program must carry a minimum of 14 credits per semester. Students

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may take any courses from the entire MLC curriculum to meet the 14 credits minimum. In special situations the Academic Dean for Studies in Pastoral Ministry may grant exceptions to this policy.

Semester Exams Semester exams are given the last week of each semester. The exam schedule with policies and procedures is published four weeks after the beginning of each semester. Attendance for exams is required. If emergencies prevent attendance, permission for an absence is obtained from the Vice President for Student Life. If exams are mailed to a student's home area, the exam must be proctored. For this situation, the cost of each exam is $50. Due to the need for exams to be returned in a timely fashion, exams are only mailed within the United States.

Midterm Reports All first-year students, freshmen and transfers, receive midterm reports. Review of Students At midterm and at the end of each semester the faculty reviews the academic progress of students and reviews students' aptness for the ministry. The faculty may take action that includes expressing concern, asking students to review continuance, or excluding students. In all cases of exclusion students may appeal to the president.

Transfer Credits Students who have completed work at other colleges are welcome to transfer to Martin Luther College. Transfer credit is awarded for courses that satisfy MLC degree requirements. This credit is awarded for those applicable courses in which a student received a grade of C or higher.

Student Classification Students are classified at the beginning of each semester according to the total number of credits earned. This includes remedial coursework. Transfer students are classified according to the number of credits transferred into Martin Luther College. Freshmen Sophomore Junior Senior Fifth Year Senior

Applicability of transfer credits is reevaluated when students change their program of study. Change of Program MLC students who change their area of study will have all courses reevaluated to determine applicability to their new area of study.

0-28 credits 29-63 credits 64-98 credits 99-135 credits 136+ credits

Repetition of Courses 1. Credit in a failed course that is required for graduation is earned either by repeating the course or by successfully completing an approved substitute.

Incompletes An instructor issues the temporary grade I (Incomplete) when a student doing otherwise acceptable work is unable to complete the course assignments for reasons acceptable to the instructor. A first-semester Incomplete must be converted to a permanent grade by mid-term of the second semester, a second semester Incomplete by the end of the July summer session, and a summer session Incomplete by mid-term of the first semester, or the permanent grade is recorded as an F.

2. A course may be repeated if a student desires to better his/her grade point average. Only the grade earned in repetition will be figured in the student's grade point average, but the original grade will remain on the record. 3.

Attendance and Absences 1. Martin Luther College requires regular class attendance. 2.

The MLC Portal is used for recording student absences.

3.

Students receive the attendance policy information in the Knight's Daybook (the student handbook) and in course syllabi.

Courses taken to remove a failure or repeated to better the grade point average are taken only at Martin Luther College or, in extraordinary circumstances, through the college's Continuing Education Office.

Audit 1. A student in good standing may register to audit a course with the consent of his/her advisor, the instructor of the class he/she wishes to audit, and the Records Office. 2.

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The number of hours taken (credit plus audit hours) cannot exceed 19 credits for the student with a grade point average less than 3.00 or 21


.-•

credits for the student with a grade point average of 3.00 or greater. 3.

An audit may be changed to a course being taken for credit during the first two weeks of the semester, provided the total number of credits does not exceed 19 or 21.

4.

A course being taken for credit may be changed to audit during the first two weeks of the semester, provided the total number of credits does not exceed 19 or 21.

5.

Procedures for withdrawing from a course taken for audit are identical to those followed when withdrawing from a course taken for credit. Audit courses from which there is a withdrawal will not appear on a transcript.

ineligible to attend the subsequent summer session.) 3. A student on probation discusses with his/her advisor the desirability of reducing the student's course load as an aid in regaining good standing. If the course load is reduced, consultation between the student and advisor and the advice of the Records Office determines the course(s) to be dropped. In the interest of the student as well as in the interest of maintaining proper academic standards, a student on probation also discusses with his/her advisor the extent of extracurricular activities and outside employment. 4.

6. Attendance is required for an audit. Participation beyond attendance in class activities is at the instructor's discretion.

Eligibility

Graduation Rate The following statements on graduation rate are in compliance with the Student Right-to-Know and the Campus Security Act as amended by Public Law 102-26.

1.

The cohort listed below is made up of first-time freshmen who entered in the fall of 2000 and later graduated. 2000 Cohort - 68%

Eligibility for extracurricular activities requires the minimum grade point average (GPA) for a student in good standing. As stated in # 1 above, the required GPA is the same for both the semester and the cumulative. A list of Martin Luther College activities that require eligibility appears in the Knight's Daybook.

2. An entering transfer student or freshman who is a high school graduate with no previous fulltime college attendance shall be considered eligible for extracurricular activities provided that the student meets the following two academic requirements:

Title II Regulations Martin Luther College is in full compliance with Title II regulations and its reporting structure. Based on scores reported for the 2004- 05 reporting period, Martin Luther College's pass rate was 100%. The statewide pass rate was 98%. For more detailed documentation, interested parties should call the Education Division Office at (507) 354-8221,Ext. 223. Grade Point Average 1. The following are the minimum semester and cumulative grade point averages necessary to be a student in good standing. Sem. I -1.70 Sem. II - 1.80 Sem. III -1.90 Sem. IVff - 2.00 2.

Credits earned during summer sessions in an academic program approved by the appropriate academic dean are included when calculating a student's grade point average and when determining a student's academic standing.

a.

The entering student has a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in a high school curriculum which offers at least 14 academic courses in the subject areas prescribed in the entrance requirements.

b.

The entering student has a minimum composite score of 18 on the ACT assessment. An entering transfer student or freshman who does not meet these requirements shall remain ineligible until the student's semester and cumulative grade point averages at Martin Luther College establish eligibility.

A student on probation must become a student in good standing by the end of the next semester of attendance. If the student fails to gain this status, the student is required to withdraw. Application for re-admittance is considered after a lapse of one semester. (A student required to withdraw at the end of the second semester is

3.

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The academic standing of transfer students is determined by applying Martin Luther College'S standards (see Grade Point Average #1 above) to the grade point

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Withdrawals from the College 1. The student who finds it necessary to withdraw from the college must first report to the Vice President for Student Life for instructions on procedures.

averages on the applicant's transcript. For example, a transfer student who has been enrolled in a full-time academic program for four or more semesters needs a grade point average, semester and cumulative, of 2.00 or better to enter Martin Luther College in good standing. A student who enters on academic probation is ineligible at Martin Luther College until the student's grade point averages meet the level of good standing. 4.

A low cumulative grade point average may affect financial aid eligibility. See the Financial Aid section of this catalog for more information.

Grading System A. 4.00 per semester hour A3.67 per semester hour B+ 3.33 per semester hour B 3.00 per semester hour B2.67 per semester hour C+ 2.33 per semester hour C 2.00 per semester hour C1.67 per semester hour D+ 1.33 per semester hour D 1.00 per semester hour D0.67 per semester hour F 0.00 per semester hour (Failure)

3.

When a student does not follow official procedures in voluntarily withdrawing from the college, a note recording the unauthorized withdrawal is transcribed on the student's permanent record.

4.

Students who withdraw from college and later apply for readmission must fulfill the graduation requirements that are in place at the time of readmission.

Address correspondence to Martin Luther College Records Office 1995 Luther Court New VIm, MN 56073 Writing Policy Because the college considers the ability to express oneself clearly, correctly, and responsibly in writing to be a necessity for college work and an essential characteristic of a Christian minister, it strives to teach and maintain good writing practices. Students are advised that grades on poorly written papers, regardless of the course, may be reduced because of the quality of the writing; in extreme cases, a failing grade may be given for this reason.

Withdrawals from Courses 1. Within the first two weeks of the semester and with the approval of their advisor and the Records Office, a student may drop and/ or add a course.

3.

A student who withdraws from the college after the first two weeks of the semester has W recorded for courses. See policy on Withdrawals from Courses.

Transcripts A transcript request form is available online at the MLC website by accessing Administration, then Offices, and finally, Records Office. One free transcript is available to each student. A fee of $5.00 is charged for each subsequent transcript. Make checks payable to Martin Luther College.

Other Symbols (Non-GPA) I Incomplete W Withdrawal P Pass NP No Pass AUD Audit

2.

2.

With the approval of the appropriate dean, a student may withdraw from a course after the first two weeks of the semester and up to two weeks after midterm. The dean will consult with the student's advisor and instructor before making a decision. For these courses the student's record shows Wand is not counted in computing the grade point average.

Foreign Language Testing and Placement Students completing two, three, or four years of foreign language in high school and desiring to continue that foreign language at Martin Luther College write a diagnostic test before beginning their studies, i.e., matriculating, at Martin Luther College. High school seniors who have submitted an application write the test in April/May of their senior year, transfer students during the summer prior to matriculation. The score determines their

An unauthorized withdrawal from a course is recorded as an F. This F is counted in the grade point average.

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placement in the language. Students who score adequately may receive credit by examination.

The Records Office determines if there are any general education requirements that are not met by the student's first degree. The student's academic program determines religion and program requirements.

Academic Policy Appeals Appeals for exceptions to academic policies are made in writing to the Vice President for Academics in letter format. See the Knight's Daybook (Academic Concerns and Appeals) for procedures.

The final thirty credits must be earned at Martin Luther College.

Cross Listed Courses Although cross-listed courses are able to fulfill requirements in two areas, they can only be applied to one graduation/ program requirement.

Credit by Examination Students may request to test out of certain courses. Requests are submitted to the chair of the division that offers the course. If possible, the request should be made and the test taken before registration for courses and/ or before the semester begins. The deadline for requesting credit by examination is the second class meeting of the course. Tests must be completed within one calendar week after the request is submitted. Each test may be taken only once. A $25 fee is charged for each test with the exception of MUS0001 Introduction to Music. Since this course does not apply for graduation credit, the exam is exempt from the $25 fee. A test grade of C or higher must be earned to receive credit for the course. A combined maximum of 30 credits earned by Advanced Placement testing or by this credit by examination policy may be applied to a degree program. A student cannot use credit by examination to earn credit for courses that were failed. The division chair, in consultation with the course instructor and the Academic Dean of the student's program, shall have authority to grant or deny the student's request.

Students with Disabilities Martin Luther College complies with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 to serve students who have disabilities as defined by the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990. Students accepted for admission are considered capable of meeting academic standards if reasonable accommodations can be made for their disability. It is the responsibility of students to provide written notification of the nature of the disability and the need for accommodations. Students must also provide results of formal testing and/ or evaluation of the disability as well as historical documentation of having received accommodations in educational settings. The college may require additional testing or evaluation if the documentation is inadequate or older than three years with this cost borne by the student. Students file the notification of disability and the request for accommodations with the appropriate Academic Dean. The dean, student and instructor(s) confer to develop reasonable accommodations. Responsibilities of the student as well as accommodations are outlined in this plan. Accommodations are designed to meet the individual needs of students, but they do not compromise curricular goals, performance standards, or course content. If students do not agree with the accommodation plan, an appeal may be made to the Vice President for Academics whose decisions are final in all cases.

Experiential Learning Credit An experiential learning experience is a previous learning experience in a classroom, on the job, in previous training, or through personal study that a student wishes to apply towards credit for a college course. The student must provide supporting documentation in the form of a portfolio. Three faculty members evaluate the portfolio for fulfillment of course objectives. Application forms may be obtained from the academic deans. A $50 non-refundable fee is charged for each application.

Earning a Second Bachelor's Degree Students who have completed a first bachelor's degree either at Martin Luther College or at another institution may wish to complete a second degree at Martin Luther College in one of the educational ministry programs of the college.

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) This College Board program allows students to earn college credit by demonstrating mastery of collegelevel material in introductory subjects. Students should contact the Records Office prior to taking the examination to ensure that the examination will be credited for a specific MLC course. The passing

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score for most examinations is 50. Foreign language examinations may require higher passing scores. Advanced Placement High school students who take the College Entrance Examination Board Advanced Placement Tests may receive college credit. For details and passing grades for particular subjects, see the following page or contact the MLC Records Office.

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Advanced Placement Program (APP) Examinations Applicable for Credit Crse No. ENG1301 ENG130l ENG130l ENG1302 GER2001 GER2001 GER2002 HIS2l11 HIS3001 HIS3010 HIS3024 LAT2002 LAT20ll MTH20l0 MTH20ll MTH2010 MTH20ll MTH2012 MTH2020 MUS3l0l MUSl110 PSY200lor PSY2002 SCIlOOl/2 SCIllOl SCI2025 SCI2025 SCI3025

Title Literature & Writing I Literature & Writing I Literature & Writing I and Literature & Writing II Intermediate German I Intermediate German I and Intermediate German II Western History & Culture II Survey of Art US History Since 1945 United States Government Vergil's Aeneid Classical Latin Literature Calculus I and Calculus II Calculus I, Calculus II, and Calculus III Elementary Statistics Theory of Music I and Sight Singing & Ear Training I Introduction to Psychology or Psych of Human Growth & Dev Our Living World Our Physical World General Chemistry I General Chemistry I and General Chemistry II

Cr 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 4 3 3 3 3 3 3

SCI2lOl SPN2001 SPN2001 SPN2002 SSC3202 SSC3202 SSC3211 NOTES

Physics Intermediate Spanish I Intermediate Spanish I and Intermediate Spanish II Principles of Economics Principles of Economics Human Geography

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

• • •

APP Examination Lan_gt,l_age & Com_Eosition Literature & Com_position Literature & Composition German Language

4 3

German Lan_g_u~e Euro_E_ean Histo__!Y Histo!y of Art United States Hist~ry_ U.S. Govt. & Politics Latin Vergil Latin Literature

4 4 3 3 3 3 3

AB Calculus

3

BC Calculus Statistics

3 3

Music

4

P~cholqgy Biol()gy Physics Chemistry

4 3 3 3

Chemistry AB Calculus and Pllysics ~anish Lan_g_u~e

4 3 3 3

Spanish Lan_g_u~e Microeconomics Macroeconomics Human Geography

4 3 3 3

Scoring Scale for APP Examinations: 5 - Extremely Well Qualified 4 - Well Qualified 3 - Qualified 2 - Possibly Qualified 1 - No Recommendation A student may earn up to 30 credits by APP examination . Credits granted under APP permit students to abridge their program .

28

Minimum Score 3 3

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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS Early Childhood Education Sample Five-Year Plan Elementary Education Sample Four-Year Plan General Education Core Courses Pastoral Ministry Sample Four-Year Plan Secondary Education Majors Seminary Certification Program Staff Ministry Staff Ministry Certification Studies in Educational Ministry Studies in Pastoral Ministry

.44 42 30

.35 45

36 49

51 39

31

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8

GENERAL EDUCATION COMMON CORE CREDITS All students enrolling in any program at Martin Luther College take these general education courses. English ENG1301 ENG1302 ENG1310 ENG3310

Literature and Writing I Literature and Writing 11 Public Speaking Interpersonal Communication

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

History-Social Science HIS2110 Western History and Culture I 4 credits HIS2111 Western History and Culture 11 4 credits HIS3010 United States History Since 1945 3 credits Other Cultures Requirement 3 credits SSC420l Intra to Minority Cultures is requiredfor Education students Pastoral students select from menu (see page 33) Mathematics MTH1010 or MTH1011 MTH1001

Mathematics: A Human Endeavor Computer Applications

3 credits 2 credits

Music MUS2201

Introduction to Fine Arts

3 credits

Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics

Physical Education PEDl112 Fitness for Life PEDxxxx One Activity Course Religion RELl001 RELl002 REL2001 Science SCIl001 SCIxxxx

Total Credits

0.5 credit 0.5 credit

Biblical History and Literature 1... Biblical History and Literature II Biblical History and Literature III

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Our Living World & Lab (SCIl002) Science Course SCIllOl Our Physical World is requiredfor Education Students

3 credits 3 credits

............................................................................................................... 50 credits

30

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STUDIES IN PASTORAL MINISTRY COURSE LISTING FOR STUDIES IN PASTORAL MINISTRY The Studies in Pastoral Ministry curriculum at Martin Luther College prepares men to enroll at Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary. This course of study stresses foreign languages. Hebrew and Greek, required of all students, are the original languages of Scripture. A student selects a non-biblical language option from a menu of German, Latin, a German/Latin combination, Spanish, or another spoken language. Lutheran theologians did much of their writing in German and Latin, while Spanish is the primary language of a growing segment of the American population. A student may also fulfill the non-biblical language requirement with achievement in another living language. In addition, the curriculum includes a selective liberal arts emphasis, with special attention given to literature and history. Academic Credits Required for the Bachelor of Arts Degree Psychology/Philosophy English (including an area elective) Greek (including an area elective or GRK3001) Hebrew Non-biblical language option (student chooses one) German Latin Confessional Languages (German and Latin) Spanish Another spoken language Computer/Mathematics Music/Fine Arts Physical Education Religion SCience History (including an area elective) Other Cultures '" Free Electives (four courses)

7 15 19 14 12 13 19 12 12 5 3 1 21 6 14 3 12

The curriculum includes two Greek tracks. The koine Greek track serves students in a Seminary Certification program as well as traditional students who display modest foreign language skills on their high school record. The track allows them a higher probability of success in New Testament study. The classical Greek track offers students the fullest preparation for their work in the New Testament. The academic dean assigns entering students to a Greek track on the basis of their high school record and their ACT predictive data. Students in the koine Greek track have three free electives. Students in the confessional languages option will usually also have fewer free electives. Students may select a maximum of three free electives from one academic area. Total Credits required for graduation

132/133

A student enrolling in Studies in Pastoral Ministry with the entrance requirements and preferences listed in the admissions section can complete his program of study in four years. Most students can complete a degree program in four years even if they are lacking some of the preferred high school credits.

31


COMPLETE COURSE LISTING FOR STUDIES IN PASTORAL MINISTRY Courses marked with a plus (+), or their high school equivalents, are prerequisitesfor the Bachelorof Arts (BA) program. Courses marked with a pound sign (#) are requiredfor all students in a BA program. Psychology PSY2001# PSY3001 PSY3002

Introduction to Psychology Lifespan Development Abnormal Psychology

4 3 3

Philosophy REL3030#

Introduction to Philosophy

3

German Option GER1001+ Elementary German I GER1002+ Elementary German II GER2001# Intermediate German I GER2002# Intermediate German II GER2011# Survey of Theological German GER20l2# Luther German GER3002 Readings in German Literature GER3021 European German Lutheran Writings GER3022 American German Lutheran Writings GER4010 German Immersion I

Arts & Literature One English literature areaelective is requiredfor all students in a BA program. The menu of courses fulfilling this requirement is marked with an asterisk (*).

English-Communication

ENG1301# ENG1302# ENG1310# ENG2301 ENG3001

Literature & Writing I Literature & Writing II Public Speaking Intermediate Composition Topics in Literature and Language: American ENG3002* American Renaissance Realism & Naturalism ENG3004 Twentieth Century American Literature American Minority Writers ENG30l0 ENG3101 Topics in Literature and Language: British ENG3102* British Authors before 1700 ENG3103* Shakespeare: Comedies & Histories ENG3104* Shakespeare: Tragedies & Romances ENG3105* Early British Novel ENG3106* The Age of Romanticism ENG3107* The Victorian Age Twentieth Century British Literature ENG3108 ENG3201 Topics in Literature and Language: World ENG3202 Literature of the Ancient World ENG3203 Literature of the Modern World ENG3206 Modern World Drama ENG3301 Topics in Literature and Language: Communication Arts Creative Writing ENG3302 ENG3303 Advanced Expository Writing ENG3304 Argument & Advocacy in Writing ENG3310# Interpersonal Communication ENG3320 Introduction to Logic A student may not receivegraduation creditfor both ENG3202 and GRK3002.

3 3 3 3 3

4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Greek Courses marked with a section symbol (ยง) are requiredfor students in the classical Greek track. Courses marked with a paragraph symbol (~ are requiredfor students in the koine Greek track. One classical Greek elective is requiredfor students in the classical track. The menu of coursesfulfilling this requirement is marked with an asterisk (*).

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

32

GRK1001~ GRK1002~ GRKll01ยง GRKll02ยง GRK2001~ GRK2002~ GRK2101ยง GRK2102ยง GRK3001~ GRK3002~ GRK3101* GRK3102* GRK3103* GRK3104* GRK3106*

Elementary Koine Greek I Elementary Koine Greek II Elementary Classical Greek I Elementary Classical Greek II Intermediate Koine Greek I Intermediate Koine Greek II Intermediate Classical Greek I Intermediate Classical Greek II Hellenistic Texts Greek Classics in Translation Greek Comedy Herodotus Lysias & Greek Oratory Homer's Iliad Plato

5 5 5 5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Hebrew HEBIOO1# HEBIOO2# HEB2001# HEB2002# HEB3001

Elementary Biblical Hebrew I Elementary Biblical Hebrew II Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II Prophetic & Poetic Texts

4 4 3 3 3


•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• ••

Latin Option LAT2001# LAT2002# LAT2011# LAT20l2# LAT3001 LAT3003

Intermediate Latin

Vergil'sAeneid Classical Latin Literature Ecclesiastical Latin Roman Historians Post-Reformation Latin Lutheran Writings

Computer/Mathematics MTHIOOl# Computer Applications MTH0002+ Developmental Mathematics

4 3 3 3 3 3

(required of students who have an ACT mathematics subscore of 17 or lower before they may enroll in MTHlOlO Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics) MTHIOIO#

Confessional Languages Option

The confessional languages option enables students to read theological literature in both German and Latin. The option requires the equivalent offive college semesters in each language. Individual student programs will vary, depending on the number of German and Latin credits earned in high school. Students choosing this option will usually havefewer free electives than students choosing other language options. GERIOOl+ GERIOO2+ GER2001# GER2002# GER2011# LAT2001# LAT2002# LAT20l2#

Elementary German I Elementary German II Intermediate German I Intermediate German II Survey of Theological German Intermediate Latin Vergil's Aeneid Ecclesiastical Latin

Spanish Option SPNIOOl+ Elementary Spanish I SPNIOO2+ Elementary Spanish II SPN2001# Intermediate Spanish I SPN2002# Intermediate Spanish II SPN2011# Intermediate Spanish III SPN2012# Communicating Christ in Spanish SPN3001 Latin-American Culture & Civilization SPN3002 Spanish & Latin American Literature SPN3011 Advanced Spanish Conversation SPN4001 Selected Topics in Spanish I SPN4002 Selected Topics in Spanish II SPN4011 Spanish Immersion I

2 3

MTHIOll #

Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics (a lower level course) or Mathematics: A Human Endeavor

3

3

(a higher level course) Music/Fine Arts MUSOOOl+ MUS2030 MUS2035 MUS2037 MUS2040 MUS2045 MUS2201# MUS2301':' MUS3035 MUS3101 MUS3102 MUS3103 MUS3210 MUS3211 MUS3212 MUSxxxx

4 4 3 3 3 4 3 3

4 4 3 3 3 3 3

Introduction to Music Applied Voice Chorale Male Choir Applied Instrument Band Introduction to Fine Arts Introduction to Conducting College Choir Theory of Music I Theory of Music II Theory of Music III Johann Sebastian Bach American Music World Music Applied Keyboard

1 1 .5 .5 1 .5 3 2 .5 3 3 3 3 3 3 1

.:.To qualify as a SPaM free elective of three credits, a student taking this course needs to add a 1 credit performance course: applied keyboard, applied voice, applied instrument.

3

A combination ofl and 0.5 credit music courses may not substitute for a 3 credit SPaM free elective.

3 3 3 6

Another Spoken Language Option

A student choosing this language option must furnish an official college transcript verifying six college semesters of another spoken language or must provide other recognized verification that demonstrates the equivalence of six collegesemesters.

33


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tI

Physical Education PEDl112# Fitness for Life PEDlxxx# Phy Ed. activity course

.5

Religion RELOOO1+ Survey of Christian Doctrine I RELOOO2+ Survey of Christian Doctrine II RELlOO1# Biblical History & Literature I RELlOO2# Biblical History & Literature II REL2001# Biblical History & Literature III REL3010# Symbolics REL30ll# St. John's Gospel REL3020 World Religions REL3021 Patristic Readings in Context REL4010# The Book of Acts REUOll# First Corinthians

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Science Two science courses are required SCllOOl# Our Living World & Lab (SCllOO2) and

History

One history area elective is requiredfor all students in a BA program (*). An elective from this history menu fulfills this requirement.

.5

HIS2ll0# HIS2ll1# HIS3001 HIS3010# HIS3020* HIS3021* HIS3022* HIS3101* HIS3102* HIS3105* HIS3110* HIS3121* HIS3125* HIS4101* HIS4ll0*

3

Western History & Culture I Western History & Culture II Survey of Art United States History since 1945 Early America: Revolution & Constitution The Union in Crisis America's Gilded Age and Progressive Era The Ancient Near East The High Middle Ages First Century Roman World History of Modem China From Despots to Nation States The Arab-Israeli Conflict The World in the Twentieth Century Foundations of History

4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

One of thefollowing science electives SCIl101

Our Physical World

(required, if student does not have a high schoolphysics credit) SCllllO SCI2001 SCI2010 SCI2020 SCI2120

Physical Geography & Lab (SClllll) Advanced Biology & Lab (SCI2002) Human Anatomy & Physiology I & Lab (SCI20ll) Marine Ecology History of Science

Other Cultures

3

One other cultures course is requiredfor all students in the BA program. 3 3 3

HIS9704 SSC3220 SSC4201

3 3

Physics Astronomy Geology & Lab (SCI2106)

3 3 3

A student may takefor degreecredit up to three additional sciencecoursesfrom the abovelists asfree electives. Also acceptableas afree elective is: SCI3010

Human Anatomy & Physiology II & Lab (SCI30ll)

3

PrerequisiteSCI2010/11 Social Sciences SSC3201 Sociology SSC3202 Principles of Economics SSC3210 World Regional Geography SSC3212 Geography of Latin America

3 3 3

Note: A student in a BA program may carry other courses from the MLC curriculum as extra courses not counting for graduation credit, provided the student has fulfilled the prerequisites or receives the approval of the instructor.

Or, with consent of the instructor SCI2101 SCI2103 SCI2105

The Civil Rights Study Tour Latin-American Culture & Civilization (Spanish Prerequisite) Introduction to Minority Cultures

3 3 3 3

A student may take only one of the geography courses (SSC321O or SSC3212) for free elective credit.

34

8

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STUDIES IN PASTORAL MINISTRY SAMPLE FOUR-YEAR Freshman ENG1301 GRK MTH1001 REL1001

- Sem. I Literature & Writing I Elementary Greek I Computer Applications Biblical History & Literature I Non-biblical Language Total Cr

Sophomore - Sem. I GRK Intermediate Greek I HIS2110 Western History & Culture I PED1112 Fitness for Life REL2001 Biblical Hist & Literature III SC11001/2 Our Living World (+ Lab) Non-biblical Language Total Cr

3 5 2 3 3/4

3 4 0.5 3 3 3

3

Elementary Biblical Hebrew I Symbolics

4 3

Science Elective Free Elective

3 3

3

Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I US History since 1945 Book of Acts Other Cultures Elective Free Elective Total Cr

3 5

Intro Cont Math/Math: Hum End

3

Biblical History & Literature II Non-biblical Language

3

Total Cr Sem.1I ENG1310 GRK HIS2111 PSY2001

Sem.1I ENG HEB1002 MUS2201 PED REL3011

19

Senior - Sem. I HEB2001 HIS3010 REL4010

Literature & Writing II Elementary Greek II

Public Speaking Intermediate Greek II Western History & Culture II Introduction to Psychology Non-biblical Language Total Cr

3 17 (33/34)

3 3 4 4

3 17 (33.5)

16.5

Interpersonal Communication Greek Elective

Total Cr

MTH1010/1011 REL1002

16/17

Junior - Sem. I ENG3310 GRK HEB1001 REL3010 SCI

Sem.1I ENG1302 GRK

PLAN

Physical Education Activity SI. John's Gospel Free Elective Total Cr

3

Sem.1I HEB2002 HIS

3 3

REL3030 REL4011

3

English Literature Elective Elementary Biblical Hebrew II Introduction to Fine Arts

3 15

3 4 3 0.5 3

3 16.5 (35.5)

Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II History Elective Introduction to Philosophy First Corinthians Free Elective Total Cr Total Program Credits

3 3 3 3 3 15 (30) 1321133

1. Students choose a non-biblical language option with the following requirements: o German Equivalent of six college semesters o Latin Equivalent of six college semesters o Spanish Equivalent of six college semesters o Other Living Language Equivalent of six college semesters o Confessional Languages Five semesters German/Five semesters Latin 2. The high school prerequisite is two years of the language of the option (equivalent to two college semesters if the student scores adequately on the placement test). 3. There are required area electives English Literature, Greek, history, physical education, science and Other Cultures. 4. Koine students carry GRK3002Greek Classics in Translation and have one less free elective. 5. Confessional languages option students usually have fewer free electives.

35


8

" •• •• U

SEMINARY

CERTIFICATION

FOR STUDIES

IN PASTORAL

PROGRAM MINISTRY

Purpose The purpose of the Seminary Certification Program at Martin Luther College is to provide an opportunity for men who are older than traditional college students to prepare for the pastoral ministry of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Objectives 1. To accept into the Seminary Certification Program qualified men who have expressed a desire to serve in the WELS pastoral ministry. 2. To provide these men with the academic skills needed to meet the course requirements at Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary (WLS). Policies 1. All men who are interested in preparing for the pastoral ministry and who are married or older than 21 should contact the Pastoral Studies Institute at Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary (address on page 14 of the MLC Catalog). 2. Men whom the Pastoral Studies Institute recommends to apply for the MLC Seminary Certification program must meet with the Non-traditional Student Committee of Studies in Pastoral Ministry before they are accepted into the program. 3. The Seminary Certification program is designed for men who have demonstrated spiritual maturity and leadership skills in their local congregations. 4. Men older than traditional college students have the option of a degree program or a Seminary Certification program. 5. Under ordinary circumstances, men discontinuing their studies at MLC and later returning resume the program they were carrying when they discontinued. 6. The Academic Dean for Studies in Pastoral Ministry tailors a Seminary Certification program to correspond with the academic background of each student. 7. The Academic Dean for Studies in Pastoral Ministry arranges a program that allows each student to acquire the needed academic skills in the fewest possible semesters. 8. MLC awards a certificate to men who successfully complete their prescribed program. Goal The goal of the Seminary Certification program is to recommend to WLS a continuing number of mature men who have demonstrated appropriate spiritual, academic, and personal attributes to continue preparation for the pastoral office.

36

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COURSE LISTING FOR SEMINARY CERTIFICATION PROGRAM I. Students without a bachelor's degree. Computer/Mathematics MTH1001 Computer Applications MTH10l0 Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics (a lower level course) or MTH1011 Mathematics: A Human Endeavor(a higher level course) Credit Subtotal

Religion RELOOOI RELOOO2 RELlOO1 RELlOO2 REL2001 REL3010 REL3011 REL4010 REL40l1

2

3 5

English-Communication Arts & Literature ENG130l Literature & Writing I 3 ENG1302 Literature & Writing II 3 ENG1310 Public Speaking 3 ENG3310 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENGxxxx English literature elective 3 Credit Subtotal 15 Greek GRK100l GRK1002 GRK300l

Hebrew HEB100l HEB1002 HEB2001 HEB2002

Elementary Koine Greek I Elementary Koine Greek II Hellenistic Texts Credit Subtotal

5 5 3 13

Elementary Biblical Hebrew I Elementary Biblical Hebrew II Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II Credit Subtotal

4 4 3 3 14

Music/Fine Arts MUSOOOI Introduction to Music MUS2201 Introduction to Fine Arts Credit Subtotal Physical Education PEDll12 Fitness for Life PED1xxx Phy Ed activity course Credit Subtotal Psychology/Philosophy PSY2001 Introduction to Psychology REL3030 Introduction to Philosophy Credit Subtotal

Science SCIlOOl SCIxxxx

Survey of Christian Doctrine I Survey of Christian Doctrine II Biblical History & Literature I Biblical History & Literature II Biblical History & Literature III Symbolics St. John's Gospel The Book of Acts First Corinthians Credit Subtotal

Our Living World & Lab (SCIlOO2) One additional science course Credit Subtotal

History-Social Science HIS2110 Western History & Culture I HIS2111 Western History & Culture II HIS3010 United States History since 1945 Credit Subtotal

1 3 4

.5 .5 1

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 27

3 3 6

4 4 3 11

Other Cultures HIS9704 Civil Rights Study Tour or SPN3001 Latin-American Culture & Civilization or SSC4201 Introduction to Minority Cultures Credit Subtotal

3 3

Free Electives xxxx Four free electives Credit Subtotal

12 12

Total Credits Required for Certification

3 3

118

The length of time needed to complete the requirements of a Seminary Certification program (jor students enrolling without a bachelor's degree) may extend from two to four years depending upon previous college credits.

4

3 7

37


II. First Rank GRK1OO1 GRK1OO2 HEB100l HEB1OO2 HEB2001 HEB2002 RELOOO1 RELOOO2 RELlOO1 RELlOO2 REL2001 REL3010 REL3012 REL4010 REL4011

Students with a bachelor's degree.

Elementary Koine Greek I Elementary Koine Greek II Elementary Biblical Hebrew I Elementary Biblical Hebrew II Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II Survey of Christian Doctrine I Survey of Christian Doctrine II Biblical History & Literature I Biblical History & Literature II Biblical History & Literature III Symbolics Selections from John's Gospel The Book of Acts First Corinthians

Credit Subtotal Second Rank ENG1301 Literature & Writing I ENG1302 Literature & Writing II ENG1310 Public Speaking ENG3310 Interpersonal Communication PSY2001 Introduction to Psychology MTH100l Computer Applications REL3030 Introduction to Philosophy SSC4201 Introduction to Minority Cultures or SPN3001 Latin-American Culture & Civilization or HIS9704 Civil Rights Study Tour

Credit Subtotal

Third Rank HIS2ll 0 Western History & Culture I HIS2111 Western History & Culture II HIS3010 United States History since 1945

5 5 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3

Credit Subtotal Total Possible Credits for Seminary Certification

4 4 3

11 85

Students who hold a bachelor's degree before they enroll need two years to complete their certification requirements. Total credits carried over thefour semesters may rangefrom fewer than 60 (15 orfewer hours/semester) to 68 (17 hours/semester) depending upon previous collegecredits. Courses are ranked on three levels, with thefirst rank assigned top priority in setting up individual programs.

50

3 3 3 3 4 2 3 3 3

3 24

38

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •


•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •

STUDIES IN EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY (Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Secondary Education, Staff Ministry)

GeneralInformation

required to take a Middle School Specialty test) before they are eligible for graduation, licensure, and recommendation for a call into the teaching ministry.

The programs in Educational Ministry exist to prepare qualified educators and staff ministers for schools and congregations of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod. Therefore, both Teacher Education programs and Staff Ministry programs lead to Bachelor of Science degrees.

Policies concerning admission to teacher education programs, continuance in the programs, admission to student teaching, and licensure requirements are detailed in the Martin Luther College Teacher Education Handbook. This handbook can be viewed online by accessing the college website.

The following policies apply to all Studies in Educational Ministry students. 1. A 2.5 GPA is required for all majors. The majors are staff ministry, early childhood education, elementary education, and the Secondary Teacher Education Program (STEP)majors. A one-semester probationary period is given if students fall below 2.50. During this semester students may take new courses or may repeat courses in the major to reach a 2.50 average. If students fail to gain this status, they are required to withdraw from the major. 2.

Martin Luther College's teacher education programs are designed to prepare students for the teaching ministry. Students demonstrate a firm grounding in God's Word, demonstrate competency in planning, teaching, and evaluating lessons, and demonstrate the ability to create effective learning environments. Students also demonstrate a service attitude toward their students, their schools, and their congregations. Included within the education curriculum are music courses so that, as far as abilities permit, graduates may serve as organists and choir directors in congregations of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod. Programs available are elementary education, secondary education, and early childhood education.

A minimum grade point average of 2.00 for the three Bible courses (RELl001, RELl002, and REL2001)and a minimum grade point average of 2.00 for the three doctrine courses (REL3001, REL3002,and REL4001)are required for graduation.

Teacher Education Programs To prepare qualified educators, the college offers a curriculum that leads to the Bachelor of Science in Education degree. The elementary teacher education program is approved by the Minnesota Board of Teaching. Successful completion of the curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science in Education degree enables graduates to meet the Minnesota standards for elementary school licensure.

Elementary Education Major The elementary education curriculum prepares graduates for teaching in K-8 classrooms. Graduates are eligible for the following Minnesota licensure areas. • Elementary Education (K-6) Licensure with Communication Arts & Literature Specialty (Grades 5-8)

The education curriculum includes a thorough general education, a more in-depth study of a curricular area, and professional education courses. Professional education includes courses that prepare graduates for teaching and gives students five clinical experiences plus two student teaching experiences in which they apply standards of effective teaching. Students must pass the Praxis I (Pre-Professional Skills Test) before they register for student teaching. Students also are required to pass the Praxis II tests (Elementary Education: Content Knowledge, Principles of Learning and Teaching K-6 and are

Elementary Education (K-6)Licensure with Mathematics Specialty (Grades 5-8)

Elementary Education (K-6) Licensure with Science Specialty (Grades 5-8)

Elementary Education (K-6)Licensure with Social Studies Specialty (Grades 5-8)

Elementary Education (K-6)Licensure with World Language: Spanish Specialty (5-8)

Students also have the option of adding one of the following non-licensure Emphasis areas - Coaching, German, Music, Physical Education, Spanish.

39


.••.

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MAJOR PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS General Education (includes Common Core courses) Emphasis Professional Education Credits required for graduation

77 9 52.5 138.5

General Education English - Communication Arts & Literature ENG1301 Literature & Writing I ENG1302 Literature & Writing II ENG1310 Public Speaking ENG3310 Interpersonal Communication

12 3 3 3 3

History HIS2110 HIS2111 HIS3010

11 4 4 3

Western History & Culture I Western History & Culture II United States History since 1945

Mathematics 8 MTH1001 Computer Applications 2 MTH10l0 Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics (a lower level course) or MTH1011 Mathematics: A Human Endeavor 3 (a higher level course) MTH2001 Contemporary Mathematics for Teachers or MTH2002 Modern Concepts of Geometry 3

Music Students take one of thefollowing two course sequences to meet the general education requirements in music. For students with little or no keyboard background: MUS1001 Keyboard for Classroom Teachers I MUS1002 Keyboard for Classroom Teachers II MUS1101 Vocal Musicianship I MUS1102 Vocal Musicianship II MUS2201 Introduction to Fine Arts MUSxxxx Piano (two semesters) MUS4201 Lutheran Worship For piano students with moderate keyboard background or organ students: MUS1101 Vocal Musicianship I MUS1102 Vocal Musicianship II MUS2201 Introduction to Fine Arts MUS3320 Music Technology MUSxxxx Piano/Organ (three semesters) MUS4201 Lutheran Worship Physical Education PED1112 Fitness for Life PED1xxx Two Phy Ed activity courses PED1xxx Phy Ed activity course with First Aid

11

1 1 1 1

3 2 2

Religion RELlO01 RELlO02 REL2001 REL3001 REL3002 REU001

Biblical History & Literature I Biblical History & Literature II Biblical History & Literature III Christian Doctrine I Christian Doctrine II Lutheran Confessional Writings

Science SCHOOl SCI1101 SCH110

Our Living World & Lab (SCH002) Our Physical World Physical Geography & Lab (SCH111)

Professional

EDU4220 EDU4251 EDU4252

1 1

3 1

3 2

2 .5 1 .5

40

9

Social Science SSC2201 Geography of North America SSC4201 Introduction to Minority Cultures

EDU1401 EDU2401 EDU3201 EDU3205 EDU3210 EDU3215 EDU3220 EDU3225 EDU3230 EDU3235 EDU3240 EDU3245 EDU3401 EDU3405 EDU3410 EDU4201 EDU4210

PSY2002 PSY3020

18 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 6 3 3

Education

Early Field Experience I Early Field Experience II Children's Literature Teaching Language Arts Teaching Reading Teaching Religion Teaching Music Teaching Physical Education Art in Elementary & Middle Schools Teaching Social Studies Teaching Science Teaching Mathematics Early Field Experience III Individual Field Experiences Junior Clinical Foundations of Education Curriculum & Instruction for Elementary & Middle Schools Educating the Exceptional Child Student Teaching in Elementary & Middle Schools I Student Teaching in Elementary & Middle Schools II Psychology of Human Growth & Development Psychology of Learning

52.5 .5 .5 2 2 4 3 2 2 2 1 2 2 .5 .5 .5 3 3 2 9 5 3 3

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• ••


•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• ••

Emphasis Areas English--communication Arts and Literature Students take three courses chosenfrom thefollowing menu. 01 courses may befrom the communication arts. Two or three courses may be literature courses.

For students entering with a good Spanish background (diagnostic test placement) SPN2001 Intermediate Spanish I SPN2002 Intermediate Spanish II SPN2011 Intermediate Spanish III

3 3 3

Select 0-1 Communication Arts courses Creative Writing ENG3302 Argument & Advocacy in Writing ENG3304 TESOL ENG3321 Structure of English ENG3322

0-3 3 3 3 3

Mathematics MTH2010 Calculus I MTH2020 Elementary Statistics MTH2022 Discrete Mathematics

3 3 3

Select 2-3 Literature courses American Renaissance, Realism & ENG3002 Naturalism ENG3004 20th Century American Literature ENG3010 American Minority Writers ENG3102 British Authors Before 1700 ENG3103 Shakespeare: Comedies & Histories ENG3104 Shakespeare: Tragedies & Romances ENG3105 Early British Novel ENG3106 Age of Romanticism ENG3107 Victorian Age ENG3108 20th Century British Literature ENG3202 Literature of the Ancient World Literary Criticism ENG3225

6-9

Music MUS2301 MUS3101 MUSxxxx

2 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

German (9-13) For students entering with no German: GERI001 Elementary German I GERI002 Elementary German II Intermediate German I GER2001

4 4 3

For students entering with some German (diagnostic test placement) GERI002 Elementary German II GER2001 Intermediate German I GER2002 Intermediate German II

4 3 3

For students entering with a good German background (diagnostic test placement) GER2001 Intermediate German I Intermediate German II GER2002 GER2011 Survey of Theological German

MUSxxxx

Physical Education PED2010 Foundations of Physical Education PED3001 Curriculum Development PED3002 Motor Learning PEDxxxx Two additional Phy Ed activity courses

Coaching PED2015 PED2016 PED3004 PED3006 SCI2010

Science SCI2015 SCI2025 SCI2120

3 3 3

Spanish (9-11) For students entering with no Spanish background: Elementary Spanish I SPNI00l Elementary Spanish II SPNI002 Intermediate Spanish I SPN2001

4 4 3

For students entering with some Spanish (diagnostic test placement) Elementary Spanish II SPNI002 Intermediate Spanish I SPN2001 Intermediate Spanish II SPN2002

4 3 3

Introduction to Conducting Theory of Music I Piano / Organ/Voice/ Instrument (1 credit per semester) Band/Choir (.5 credit per semester)

Coaching Theory I or Coaching Theory II Care & Prevention of Athletic Injuries Principles of Coaching Anatomy & Physiology I & Lab (SCI2011)

Botany & Lab (SCI2016) General Chemistry I History of Science

History-Social Science HIS3024 United States Government HIS3025 The American Scene to 1877 SSC3201 Sociology or SSC3202 Principles of Economics

41

1

2 3 3 1

2 2 2 3

3 3 3

3 3

3


ELEMENTARY EDUCATION SAMPLE

FOUR-YEAR

Freshman Year - Sem. I

MAJOR PLAN

Freshman Year - Sem. II

ENG1301

Literature & Writing I

3

ENG1302

Literature & Writing II

MTH1001

3

Computer Applications

ENG1310

Public Speaking

MUS1101

2 1

MTH1010/1011 MUS1102 PEDxxxx

Intro or Cont Math / Math: Hum End Vocal Musicianship II Phy Ed Activity

3 3

REL1002 SCI1001 & 1002

Biblical History & Literature II Our Living World (+ Lab)

EDU1401

Early Field Experience I

PEDxxxx

Vocal Musicianship I Phy Ed Activity

PSY2002

Psych of Human Grow & Dev

3

REL1001

Biblical History & Literature I

3

SC11110& 1111

Physical Geography (+ Lab)

3

Total Cr

0.5

15.5

Total Cr

Sophomore Year - Sem. I HIS2110

Western History & Culture I Keyboard

MUS2201 PEDxxxx

Phy Ed Activity + First Aid

REL2001

Biblical Hist & Literature III

SSC2201

Geography of North America

3 3

Emphasis Course

3

Total Cr

3 3 0.5 17(32.5)

Sophomore Year - Sem. II

MUSxxxx.

Intro to Fine Arts

0.5

4

HIS2111 MTH2001/2002 MUSxxxx.

1 3 0.5

Western History & Culture II

4 3 1

Cont Math Tchrs/Mod Con Geometry Keyboard

PED1112

Fitness for Life

REL3001

Christian Doctrine I

3

SCI1101

Our Physical World

3 3

0.5

Emphasis Course

17.5 (50)

EDU2401

Early Field Experience II Total Cr

0.5 18 (68)

Junior Year - Sem. I

Junior Year - Sem. II

ENG3310 MUSxxxx.

Interpersonal Communication Keyboard

3 1

EDU3215 Teaching Religion EDU3230 & 3231 Art in Elem & Middle Schools (+ Lab) EDU4210 C & I in Elem & Middle Schooltoc HIS3010 United States History since 1945 MUSxxxx. Keyboard PSY3020 Psychology of Learning

3

REL3002

Christian Doctrine II

3

Emphasis Course

3

Total Cr

15.5 (83.5)

EDU3401

EDU3405+

3 2 3 3

Early Field Experience III

0.5

Total Cr

18.5 (102)

Individual Field Experiences

0.5 (102.5)

Total Cr

19(138.5)

Senior Year - Sem. I EDU3220

Teaching Music

EDU3225

Teaching Physical Education

2 2

EDU4201

Foundations of Education

3

EDU4220 MUS4201 REL4001

Educating the Exceptional Chid Lutheran Worship

2 2

Lutheran Conf Writings

3

SSC4201

Intro to Minority Cultures Total Cr

3 17 (119.5)

Courses and semesters may be shifted. Fitness for Life and First Aid are required Phy Ed Activities MUSxxxx. Minimal Sequence = MUS1001, MUS1002, two semesters of piano (4 cr) Moderate Sequence = MUS3320, three semesters piano/orqan (4 cr) Prerequisites for EDU4250 Student Teaching: PSY2002, PSY3020, EDU3210, EDU3215 ... EDU3405 All inditndual EFE hours are due the 1,1 Friday after Spring Break.

42

The courses in gray are scheduled as a block.

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• ••.! •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •


•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION MAJOR PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Students in the early childhood education program complete both the elementary education major and the early childhood education major. Normally, this double major program requires five years of college.

General Education Emphasis Elementary Professional Education Major Courses Total Credits for Graduation

77 9 49 33

168

Major courses EDU3101 EDU3110 EDU3111 EDU3112 EDU4101 EDU4102 EDU4103 EDU4150 PSY3010

Teaching Kindergarten & Primary Grades Early Childhood Education Curriculum The Child in the Family Emergent Literacy Foundations in Early Childhood Education Early Childhood Exceptionality Administration of Early Childhood Programs Student Teaching in Early Childhood Child Development (Ages 0-8)

2 3 3 3 3 3 3 10 3

43


EARLY CHILDHOOD MAJOR

It ELEMENTARY

SAMPLE FIVE-YEAR Freshman Year - Sem. I ENG1301 MTH1001 MUS1101 PEDJ()()()( PSY2002 REL1001 SCI1110 & 1111

Literature & Writing I Computer Applications Vocal Musicianship I Phy Ed Activity Psych of Human Growth & Dev Biblical History & Literature I Ph~sical Ge09ra~h~ (+ Lab) Total Cr

Western History & Culture I Keyboard Intro to Fine Arts Phy Ed Activity + First Aid Biblical Hist & Literature III Geography of North America Em~hasis Course Total Cr

PLAN

Freshman Year - Sem. II 3 2 0.5 3 3 3 15.5

Sophomore Year - Sem. I HIS2110 MUSxxxx. MUS2201 PEDJ()()()( REL2001 SSC2201

EDUCATION MAJOR

ENG1302 ENG1310 MTH1010/1011 MUS1102 PEDJ()()()( REL1002 SCI1001 & 1002 EDU1401

Literature & Writing II Public Speaking Intro Cont Math / Math: Hum End Vocal Musicianship II Phy Ed Activity Biblical History & Literature II Our Living World (+ Lab) Earl~ Field Ex~erience I Total Cr

3 3 3 0.5 3 3 0.5 17 (32.5)

Sophomore Year - Sem. II 4 1 3 0.5 3 3 3 17.5 (50)

HIS2111 MTH2001/2002 MUSJ()()()(. PED1112 REL3001 SCI1101 EDU2401

Westem History & Culture II Cont Math Tchrs / Mod Con Geometry Keyboard Fitness for Life Christian Doctrine I Our Physical World Emphasis Course Early Field Experience II Total Cr

4 3 0.5 3 3 3 0.5 18 (68)

Junior Year - Sem. II

EDU3101 MUSJ()()()(. PSY3010

Tchg Kdgtn & Primary Grades Keyboard Child Development Em~hasis Course Total Cr

2 1 3 3 17.5 (85.5)

Senior Year - Sem. I

Total Cr

EDU3110/3111 EDU311214101 EDU3215 MUSJ()()()(. PSY3020 REL3002 EDU3401 EDU3405"

ECE Curriculum / Child in the Family Emergent Literacy / Foundations ECE Teaching Religion Keyboard Psychology of Learning Christian Doctrine II Earl~ Field Ex~erience III Total Cr Individual Field Experiences

3 3 3 3 3 0.5 16.5 (102) 0.5 (102.5)

Senior Year - Sem. II

15.5 (118)

Fifth Year - Sem. I

EDU3110/3111 ECE Curriculum / Child in the Family Emergent Literacy / Foundations ECE EDU311214101 Teaching Music EDU3220 EDU3225 Teaching Phy Ed EDU3230 & 3231 Art in Elem & Middle Schools (+ Lab) EDU4220 Educating the Exceptional Chid ENG3310 Inte!Eersonal Communication Total Cr

3 3 2 2 2 2 3 17 (135)

Fifth Year - Sem. II Total Cr

16 (151)

EDU4201 EDU4210 HIS3010 MUS4201 REL4001 SSC4201

Foundations of Education C & I in Elem & Middle Schools United States History since 1945 Lutheran Worship Lutheran Cont Writings Intro to Minori!}' Cultures Total Cr

3 3 3 2 3 3 17 (168)

Courses and semesters may be shifted. The Courses in gray are scheduled as a block. Fitness for Life & First Aid are required Phy Ed activities. SENIOR YEAR student teaching must be semester I MUSxxxx. Minimal Sequence = MUS1001, MUS1002, two semesters of piano (4 cr) Moderate Sequence = MUS3320, three semesters pian%rgan (4 cr) Prerequisites for EDU4250 Student Teaching are PSY2002, EDU3210, PSY3020, EDU3215 additional prerequisitesfor EDU4150 Student Teaching in Early Childhood are EDU3110, PSY3010. .. EDU3405 All individual EFE hours are due the 1stFriday after Spring Break.

44

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •


•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •

SECONDARY EDUCATION MAJORS PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Students in the secondary education program complete both the elementary education major and the secondary education major. Normally, this double major program requires five years of college. Secondary Professional Education for all majors EDU4301 Reading Strategies for the Content Areas EDU431x Teaching in the Secondary School EDU4350 Student Tchg in the Secondary School PSY3030 Adolescent Psychology

English - Communication Arts and Literature Major General Education Elementary Professional Education Major Courses Secondary Professional Education Total Credits

2 3 10 2

77 49

* Approved courses for MN K-8 elementary licensure specialty in Communication Arts & Literature 27 3

*ENG31 04)

Literary Criticism Tchg English in the Secondary School Structure of English Electives

3 3 3 15

(Students select a minimum of one elective from each category)

American Literature *ENG3001 Topics in Literature and Language *ENG3002 American Renaissance,Realism & Naturalism *ENG3004 Twentieth Century American Literature *ENG3010 American Minority Writers British Literature *ENG3101 Topics in Literature and Language *ENG3102 British Authors Before1700 *ENG3105 Early British Novel *ENG3106 Age of Romanticism *ENG3107 Victorian Age *ENG3108 20th Century British Literature

Communication Arts *ENG3301 Topics in Literature and Language *ENG3302 Creative Writing *ENG3304 Argument & Advocacy in Writing *ENG3321 TESOL

3 3 3 3

History-Social Science Major General Education Elementary Professional Education Major Courses Secondary Professional Education Total Credits

listed with RELlOOl, RELl002, REL2001.)

*ENG3225 ENG4301 *ENG3322 ENGxxxx

3 3 3 3

27 17 170

The following required general education courses support the English major: ENG1201,ENG1202, ENG1310,ENG1301,ENG1302,ENG2201, ENG3310.(ENG1201, ENG1202, ENG2201 are cross-

Required Courses Beyond General Education *ENG310x Shakespeare (select *ENG3103 or

World Literature *ENG3201 Topics in Literature and Language *ENG3202 Literature of the Ancient World ENG3203 Literature of the Modern World ENG3206 Modern World Drama

3 3 3

77 49

27 17 170

The following required general education courses support the HistoryjSocial Sciencemajor:, HISllOl, HISll02, HIS2101,HIS2110,HIS2111,SSC1210, SSC2201,HIS3010,SSC4201. (HISII01, HISll02, HIS2101 are cross-listed with RELl001, RELl002, REL2001. SSCl210 is cross-listed with SCI1110.)

Required Courses Beyond General Education HIS3024 United States Government HIS3025 The American Scene to 1877 HIS3104 The Reformation Era HIS4110 Foundations of History SSC3201 Sociology SSC3202 Principles of Economics SSC3210 World Regional Geography HISjSSCxxxx Electives

27 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6

3

3 3 3 3 3 3

45

American Electives HIS 3020 Early America HIS 3021 The Union in Crisis HIS 3022 America's Gilded Age & Progressive Era HIS 3023 Lutheranism in America

3 3 3 3


V

World Electives

HIS3101 HIS3102 HIS3105 HIS3110 HIS3121 HIS3125 HIS4101 SSC3212 SSC3220

MUS1111

The Ancient Near East The High Middle Ages First Century Roman World History of Modern China From Despots to Nation States The Arab-Israeli Conflict The World in the Twentieth Century Geography of Latin America Latin American Culture & Civilization (Spanish prerequisite)

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Sight Singing & Ear Training II

1

(Substituted for MUSI102: Vocal Musicianship II)

MUSxxxx MUS3201

Piano (two semesters) Music History I

MUS4201

Lutheran Worship

2 3

(Substituted for MUS2201 Intra. to Fine Arts)

2

II. For piano students with moderate keyboard background or organ students. MUS1110 Sight Singing & Ear Training I (Substituted for MUSll01:

MUS1111

1

Vocal Musicianship I)

Sight Singing & Ear Training II

1

(Substituted for MUSI102: Vocal Musicianship II)

Mathematics Major General Education Elementary Professional Education Major Courses Secondary Professional Education Total Credits

MUS3201 77 49 27 17 170

The following required general education courses support the mathematics major: MTH1011,MTH2002. Required Courses Beyond General Education MTH2010 Calculus I MTH2011 Calculus II MTH2012 Calculus III MTH2020 Elementary Statistics MTH2021 Linear Algebra MTH3004 Computer Programming MTH3005 Computer Applications in Mathematics MTHxxxx Electives

27 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6

Students select two coursesfrom thefollowing menu MTH2022 Discrete Mathematics MTH3001 Number Theory MTH3002 History of Mathematics MTH3003 Statistics

Music Major General Education Elementary Professional Education Major Courses Secondary Professional Education Total Credits

3 3 3 3

Students take one of thefollowing two course sequences to meet the general education requirements in music.

1 1 1 I)

46

3

(Substituted for MUS2201: Intra. to Fine Arts)

MUS3320 MUSxxxx MUS4201

Music Technology Piano/Organ Lutheran Worship

Required Courses Beyond General Education Students choose one of thefollowing two areas to complete the music major. Choral/Vocal MUS2030 Applied Voice (three semesters) MUS2301 Introduction to Conducting MUS3101 Theory of Music I MUS3102/3 Music Theory II & III. MUS3202 Music History II MUS3301 Choral Repertoire MUS3305 Training Child Singers MUS4202 Musical Heritage of the Lutheran Church MUS4301 Advanced Conducting MUSxxxx Piano/Organ/Voice (one semester) MUSxxxx Choir (six semesters) MUSxxxx Elective Instrumental Major MUS2040 Applied Instrument (3 semesters) MUS2045 Band (6 semesters) MUS2301 Introduction to Conducting MUS3101 Theory of Music I MUS3102/3 Music Theory II & III • MUS3202 Music History II MUS3302 Instrumental Rehearsal Techniques MUS3310 Brass Techniques MUS3311 Woodwinds Techniques MUS3312 Percussion Techniques Musical Heritage of the Lutheran Church MUS4202 MUS4301 Advanced Conducting

77 49 32 17 175

1. For students with little or no keyboard background. MUS1001 Keyboard for Classroom Teachers I MUS1002 Keyboard for Classroom Teachers II MUSl110 Sight Singing & Ear Training I (Substituted for MUSll01: Vocal Musicianship

Music History I

• If students enter with enough music theory background to bypass, MUS3101, the music theory sequence would then be MUS3102, MUS3103, and either MUS4101 or MUS4102.

1 3 2 32

3 2 3 6 3 2 2 2 2 1

3 3

3 3 2 3 6 3 2 2 2

2 2 2

•• •• •• "• "• •• •• •• ••" •.•, •t.,t V

tf

•• ..•., "• •., •• • "•


•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •

Physical Education Major General Education Elementary Professional Education Major Courses Secondary Professional Education Total Credits

SCIxxxx 77 49 33 17 176

The following required general education courses support the Physical Education major: three activity courses, one of which is PEDll12.

33 2 2 2 3 3 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 1 3

77 49 27 17 170

The following required general education courses support the Science major: SCIl101, SCIl001, SCIlllO. Required Courses Beyond General Education

27

Students choose either a life science or physical science major. Life Science SCI2001 Advanced Biology & Lab (SCI2002) SCI2010 Anatomy and Physiology I & Lab (SCI20ll) SCI2015 Botany & Lab (SCI2016) SCI2025 General Chemistry I SCI2120 History of Science SCI3003 Zoology & Lab (SCI3004) SCI3010 Anatomy and Physiology II & Lab (SCI30ll) SCI4025 Chemistry of Life SCI4105 Science in Our Society

3

One elective from the following menu. SCI2020 Marine Ecology SCI3015 Fundamentals of Ecology SCI3025 General Chemistry II

3 3 3

Physical Science. MTH2010 Calculus I (prerequisite for Physical Science

3

major)

Required Courses Beyond General Education PED2010 Foundations of Physical Education PED2015 Coaching Theory I PED2016 Coaching Theory II PED3001 Curriculum Development PED3002 Motor Learning PED3003 Safety First Aid & CPR PED3004 Care & Prevention of Athletic Injury PED3005 School and Personal Health PED3006 Principles of Coaching PED4001 Organization& Administration of Physical Education & Athletics PED4002 Applied Kinesiology PED4003 Physiology of Exercise PED1xxx Two Phy. Ed. activity courses SCI2010 Anatomy & Physiology I & Lab (SCI20ll)

Science Major General Education Elementary Professional Education Major Courses Secondary Professional Education Total Credits

One Elective

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

47

SCI2025 SCI2101

General Chemistry I Physics I (replaces General Education

SCI2102 SCI2103 SCI2105 SCI2120 SCI3025 SCI3103 SCI4105 SCIxxxx

Physics II Astronomy Geology & Lab (SCI2106) History of Science General Chemistry II Meteorology Science in Our Society One Elective

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

One elective from thefollowing menu. SCI30l5 Fundamentals of Ecology SCI4025 Chemistry of Life MTH2011 Calculus II

3 3 3

3 3

requirement for SCI1101 Our Physical World)

All Science majors (Life Science or Physical Science) need 36 credits of science courses.

Spanish Major General Education Elementary Professional Education Major Courses Secondary Professional Education Total Credits Required Courses Beyond General Education SPN2001 Intermediate Spanish I SPN2002 Intermediate Spanish II SPN20ll Intermediate Spanish III SPN2012 Communicating Christ in Spanish SPN3001 Latin-American Culture & Civilization SPN3002 Intro. to Spanish & Latin American Literature SPN30l1 Advanced Spanish Conversation SPN4001 Selected Topics in Spanish I SPN4002 Selected Topics in Spanish II SPN40ll Spanish Immersion I EDU3301 Teaching Foreign Language

77 49 35 17 178

35 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6 2


Parish Music Major General Education Elementary Professional Education Major Courses Professional Studies Total Credits

77

49 32

16 174

Students take thefollowing course sequence to meet the general education requirement in music. MUSll10

Sight Singing & Ear Training I (Substituted for MUSll01:

MUS1111

1

Vocal Musicianship I)

Sight Singing & Ear Training II (Substituted for MUSll02:

1

Vocal Musicianship II)

MUSxxxx MUS3201

Organ (three semesters) Music History I

MUS3320 MUS4201

Music Technology Lutheran Worship

3 3

(substitute for MUS2201: Intro. to Fine Arts)

1 2

Required Courses Beyond General Education MUS2030 Applied Voice (one semester) MUS2301 Introduction to Conducting MUS3101 Theory of Music I MUS3102j3 Music Theory II & III • MUS3202 Music History II MUS3301 Choral Repertoire MUS3305 Training Child Singers MUS4202 Musical Heritage of the Lutheran Church MUS4301 Advanced Conducting MUSxxxx Organ (three semesters) MUSxxxx Organ or Voice (one semester) MUSxxxx Choir (four semesters) MUSxxxx Elective

32 1 2 3 6 3 2 2 2 2 3 1

2 3

• If students enter with enough music theory background to bypass MUS3101, the music theory sequence would then be MUS3102, MUS3103, and either MUS4101 or MUS4102. Professional Education MUS4351 Parish Music Practicum

16

48

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •


••

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •

STAFF MINISTRY PROGRAMS The staff ministry program of Martin Luther College exists to prepare qualified staff ministers (e.g., Minister of Family and Youth, Minister of Discipleship, Minister of Christian Education, etc.) for the congregations of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod. This program leads to the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in ministry. Students choose from the following three options-the staff ministry major option (4 years), the staff ministry plus elementary education option (5 years), or the staff ministry plus parish music option (5 years). The staff ministry program provides students with a broad background in general education as well as professional courses and practical experiences designed to equip candidates with the competencies necessary to serve as staff ministers. Staff Ministry Major General Education Staff Ministry Credit Total General Education ENG130l Literature & Writing I ENG1302 Literature & Writing II ENG1310 Public Speaking ENG3310 Interpersonal Communication HIS2110 Western History & Culture I HIS2l11 Western History & Culture II HIS3010 United States History since 1945 MTHlOOl Computer Applications MTHlOlO Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics (a lower level course) or MTHlO11 Mathematics: A Human Endeavor (a higher level course) MUS1101 Vocal Musicianship I MUS1102 Vocal Musicianship II MUS2201 Introduction to Fine Arts PEDl112 PEDlxxx PEDlxxx PSY2001 PSY2002 RELlOOl RELlO02 REL2001 REL3001 REL3002 REUOOI

SCIlOOl SClllOl SCIl110 SCI2120 SSC2201 xxxx

Fitness for Life 2 Phy Ed activity courses Phy Ed activity course with First Aid Introduction to Psychology Psychology of Human Growth & Development Biblical History & Literature I Biblical History & Literature II Biblical History & Literature III Christian Doctrine I Christian Doctrine II Lutheran Confessional Writings Our Living World & Lab (SCIlO02) Our Physical World or Physical Geography & Lab (SCI111l) History of Science Geography of North America Other Cultures requirement

xxxx 84 53 137 84 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 2

3 1 1 3 .5 1 .5 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3

49

Free Electives in General Education

9

Staff Ministry EDU3215 Teaching Religion MUS4201 Lutheran Worship SMN1102 Staff Ministry Early Field Experience I

53 3 2 .5

SMN2001 SMN2003 SMN2l02 SMN3001

3 3 .5 3

SMN30l0 SMN3011 SMN3020 SMN3030 SMN3031 SMN3040 SMN3042 SMN3l03 SMN4l52

The Theology & Practice of Ministry Biblical Interpretation Staff Ministry Early Field Experience II Introduction to Youth & Family Ministry Foundations of Evangelism Congregational Assimilation & Retention Parish Education Caring & Counseling Parish Visitation Organization & Administration in the Parish Developing and Training Leadership Staff Ministry Early Field Experience III One-semester Internship

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 .5 16

Staff Ministry & Elementary Education Program This five-year program has a major in elementary education and a major in ministry. See elementary education major (page 39) for a listing of required courses in General and professional education. General Education Elementary Education Professional Courses Staff Ministry Major Total Credits Staff Ministry SMN2001 The Theology & Practice of Ministry SMN2003 Biblical Interpretation SMN3001 Introduction to Youth & Family Ministry SMN30l0 Foundations of Evangelism

77 49 46 172 46 3 3 3 3


SMN3011

Congregational

SMN3020 SMN3030 SMN3031 SMN3040 SMN3042 SMN4152

Retention Parish Education Caring & Counseling Parish Visitation Organization & Admin. in the Parish Developing & Training Leadership One-semester Internship

Assimilation

&

3

SCIl101

3 3 3 3 3 16

SCIlll0 SCI2120 SSC2201 xxxx

Staff Ministry Major and Parish Music Major This five-year program has a major in parish music and a major in ministry. General Education Parish Music Staff Ministry Total Credits General Education ENG1301 Literature & Writing I ENG1302 Literature & Writing II ENG1310 Public Speaking ENG3310 Interpersonal Communication HIS2110 Western History & Culture I HIS2111 Western History & Culture II HIS3010 United States History since 1945 MTH1001 Computer Applications MTH1010 Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics (a lower level course) or MTH1011 Mathematics: A Human Endeavor (a higher level course) MUS1110 Sight Singing & Ear Training I

77 48 51 176 77 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 2

3 1

MUS1111

(Substituted for MUS1101: Vocal Musicianship I) Sight Singing & Ear Training II (Substituted for MUS1102: Vocal Musicianship II)

1

MUS3201

Music History I

3

(Substituted for MUS2201: Intra. to Fine Arts)

MUS3320 MUS4201 MUSxxxx PED1112 PED1xxx PED1xxx PSY2002 RELlOO1 RELlOO2 REL2001 REL3001 REL3002 REL4001 SCIlOO1

Music Technology Lutheran Worship Organ (three semesters) Fitness for Life 2 Phy Ed activity courses Phy Ed activity course with First Aid Psychology of Human Growth and Development Biblical History & Literature I Biblical History & Literature II Biblical History & Literature III Christian Doctrine I Christian Doctrine II Lutheran Confessional Writings Our Living World & Lab (SCIlOO2)

1 2 3 .5 1 .5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

50

Our Physical World or Physical Geography & Lab (SCIlll1) History of Science Geography of North America Other Cultures requirement

•• ••

3 3 3 3

Parish Music Major and Professional Studies See page 47 for a listing of courses in Parish Music.

48

Staff Ministry EDU3215 Teaching Religion SMNll02 Staff Ministry Early Field Experience I SMN2001 Theology & Practice of Ministry SMN2003 Biblical Interpretation SMN2102 Staff Ministry Early Field Experience II SMN3001 Introduction to Youth & Family Ministry SMN3010 Foundations of Evangelism SMN3011 Congregational Assimilation & Retention Parish Education SMN3020 Caring & Counseling SMN3030 Parish Visitation SMN3031 Organization & Admin. in the Parish SMN3040 Developing & Training Leadership SMN3042 Staff Ministry Early Field Exper III SMN3103 Staff Ministry Individual Field Exper SMN3104 One-Semester Internship SMN4152

51 3 .5

3 3 .5 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 .5 .5

16

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •


•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •

STAFF MINISTRY CERTIFICATION PROGRAM Candidates who already hold a bachelor's degree or who are 35 years of age or older may be granted certification for service in the WELS as a staff minister upon completion of the religion and professional components of the program. An internship or series of practica is also required. Options exist for full-time study on campus and for part-time study through Martin Luther College summer sessions, extensions courses, distance learning and independent and directed studies. Academic Courses and Field Experience for Staff Ministry Certification Religion Courses RELlOOl BiblicalHistory and Literature I RELl002 BiblicalHistory and Literature II REL2001 BiblicalHistory and Literature III REL3001 Christian Doctrine I REL3002 Christian Doctrine II REL4001 Lutheran ConfessionalWritings

18 3 3 3 3 3 3

Professional EDU3215 MUS4201 SMN2001 SMN2003 SMN3001 SMN3010 SMN3011 SMN3020 SMN3030 SMN3031 SMN3040 SMN3042

35 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Courses Teaching Religion Lutheran Worship Theology & Practice of Ministry BiblicalInterpretation Introduction to Youth & Family Ministry Foundations of Evangelism Congregational Assimilation & Retention Parish Education Caring & Counseling Parish Visitation Organization & Admin. in the Parish Developing & Training Leadership

Field Experience An internship or series of practica is required of all staff ministry candidates. The experiences are structured on an individual basis and vary depending on previous involvement in congregational ministry.

•• •

•• •

51


• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• .••. 8

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Education English-Communication Arts and Literature German Greek Hebrew History Latin Mathematics Music Physical Education Psychology Religion Science Social Science Spanish Staff Ministry

53 55 57 57

58

60 60 60 61 64 64 65

66 68 68

69

52


••

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •

•• ••

••

EDU3210Teaching Reading 4 credits. Philosophy, methods, and resources for teaching elementary and middle level classroom reading. This course is a prerequisite for EDU4250and EDU4350.

EDUCATION EDU1401Early Field Experience I: Introduction to the Teaching Ministry 0.5 credits. A week of activities and experiences designed to introduce students to the roles and responsibilities of the teaching ministry. (Freshmen remain on campus for this week.) (Minimum-40 hours)

EDU3215Teaching Religion 3 credits. Objectives,curriculum requirements, materials, and methods of conducting classroom devotions and of teaching Biblehistory, catechism, and hymnology in the Lutheran elementary and middle level classrooms. This course is a prerequisite for EDU4250and EDU4350.

EDU2401Early Field Experience II: Observation and Participation 0.5 credits. A week of observation and participation in an elementary or middle school classroom. (Minimum-40 hours)

EDU3220Teaching Music 2 credits. Methods and materials for teaching music in elementary and middle schools with emphasis on music programs for Lutheran elementary and middle level classrooms.

EDU3101Teaching Kindergarten & Primary Grades 2 credits. Objectives, methods, and materials for teaching in the kindergarten and primary grades.

EDU3225Teaching Physical Education 2 credits. Curriculum planning and methods of teaching physical education in elementary and middle level classrooms.

EDU3110Early Childhood Curriculum appropriate activities and materials, including the teaching of religion to the very young. This course is a prerequisite for EDU4150.

EDU3230Art in Elementary & Middle Schools 2 credits. Exploration of the basic elements and principles of art, as well as a variety of art media and processes useful in elementary and middle schools, with an emphasis on the discipline-based approach to teaching art. One lecture period and two one-hour laboratory periods per week.

EDU3111The Child in the Family 3 credits. The preschool child in the family and the family as a socialj cultural unit. Development of Christian parenting programs and teacher-parent relations. EDU3112Emergent Literacy 3 credits. The process of language acquisition from birth to age eight. Emphasis on classroom activities which provide language stimulation and communication skill attainment for young children. Attention is given to the nature and effect of delayed speech and language as well as to effective intervention techniques and referral services.

EDU3231Art in Elementary & Middle Schools Lab Two one- hour laboratory periods taken concurrently with EDU3230 EDU3235Teaching Social Studies 1 credit. Goals, curriculum, methods, and materials for teaching social studies in elementary and middle level classrooms. Emphasis on authentic assessments and technology in teaching and learning social studies.

EDU3201Children's Literature 2 credits. An integrated, response-centered approach to literature in the elementary and middle level classroom curriculum with an emphasis on evaluating, selecting, and presenting literature for learning, enrichment, and pleasure.

EDU3240Teaching Science 2 credits. Objectives, techniques, and materials for teaching science in elementary and middle level classrooms. Emphasis on process-oriented teaching, using technology, and implementing science standards.

EDU3205Teaching Language Arts 2 credits. Objectives, instructional strategies, and materials for teaching writing, speaking, listening, media literacy, and the related areas of handwriting, spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and grammar in elementary and middle level classrooms.

EDU3245Teaching Mathematics in Elementary and Middle Schools 2 credits. Philosophy, objectives,techniques, and materials for teaching mathematics in elementary and middle level classrooms. Emphasis on process-oriented teaching.

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8 fit EDU3301 Teaching Foreign Language 2 credits. Objectives, instructional strategies, and materials for teaching a foreign language in elementary, middle, and secondary schools. Prerequisite: Foreign language major with junior status or consent of instructor.

EDU3401, EDU3405, EDU3410, EDU4250 (or with special approval"), psy 2002, PSY 3010, PSY 3020. "Special approval is given by the Teacher Education Committee.

EDU4201 Foundations of Education 3 credits. A study of the historical, social, and religious foundations of American and Lutheran education and the teaching profession, with particular reference to the interrelationships among family, society, and school.

EDU3401 Early Field Experience III: Observation, Participation, and Teaching 0.5 credits. A week of observation, participation, and teaching selected lessons in elementary and middle level classrooms. (Minimum-40 hours)

EDU4210 Curriculum & Instruction in Elementary & Middle Level Schools

EDU3405 Individual Field Experiences 0.5 credits. Individual field experiences related to the teaching ministry. (Minimum-50 hours)

3 credits. Curricular designs and instructional strategies appropriate for elementary and middle level classrooms. Included are the multiage model, middle level model, and an emphasis on teaching to standards.

EDU3410 Junior Clinical 0.5 credits. A semester-long experience of one day a week in elementary and middle level classrooms completed in conjunction with the language arts block

EDU4220 Educating the Exceptional Child 2 credits. Study of legislation, current issues, instruction, and resources as they apply to the needs and characteristics of exceptional children.

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of courses. Students observe, tutor, teach small groups, and teach selected whole class lessons. (Minimum-l04 hours)

EDU4251 Student Teaching in Elementary and Middle Schools I 9 credits. A full-time nine-week professional experience in elementary and middle level classrooms of cooperating schools, providing an opportunity to learn effective teacher behavior through observation and practice under the guidance of licensed teachers and college supervisors. Prerequisites: EDU1401, EDU2401, EDU3210, EDU3215, EDU3401, EDU3405, EDU3410, PSY2002, PSY3020.

EDU4101 Foundations in Early Childhood Education 3 credits. Historical, philosophical, sociological, and theological foundations of current thought and practice in early childhood education. Popular curricular models and theoretical principles and their application to Christian education. EDU4102 Early Childhood Exceptionality 3 credits. Examines special needs and/ or intellectual, socioeconomic, cultural, physical or emotional exceptionality found in children. Techniques to develop curriculum and instruction to meet the unique needs of individual children in early childhood settings.

EDU4252 Student Teaching in Elementary and Middle Schools II 5 credits. A full-time five-week professional experience in elementary and middle level classrooms of cooperating schools, providing an opportunity to learn effective teacher behavior through observation and practice under the guidance of licensed teachers and college supervisors. Prerequisites: EDU1401, EDU2401, EDU3210, EDU3215, EDU3401, EDU3405, EDU3410, PSY2002, PSY 3020.

EDU4103 Administration of Early Childhood Programs 3 credits. Current and relevant topics in early childhood education, such as organization of an early childhood program, funding, budgeting, state laws and requirements, use of teacher aides, team teaching, and place and function of the early childhood program in the church's mission.

EDU4301 Reading Strategies for the Content Areas 2 credits. Methods for teaching reading in the content subjects to middle level and high school students. Emphasis on previewing text, vocabulary development, comprehension strategies, and study skills.

EDU4150 Student Teaching in Early Childhood 10 credits. A full-time, ten-week professional experience, providing an opportunity to learn effective teacher behavior through observation and practice under the guidance of early childhood teachers and college supervisors. Emphasis on experiences in the school's preschool and kindergarten classes and the congregation's early childhood ministry. Prerequisites: EDU1401, EDU2401, EDU3110, EDU3210, EDU3215

EDU4310 Teaching Communication Arts in the Secondary School 3 credits. Methods and materials for teaching forensics, journalism, and drama in the secondary school.

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ENG1202Biblical History & Literature II 3 credits. The biblical record of God's grace from the destruction of Jerusalem, through the Intertestamental Period, to the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. (Cross-listed with RELl002and HISll02)

EDU4311Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School 3 credits. Trends, issues, methods, and materials in the teaching of mathematics. EDU4312Teaching Music in the Secondary School 3 credits. Materials, methods, curriculum organization, and administration of the secondary school music program. Discussion and demonstration of general music classroom procedures. Vocal and instrumental ensemble rehearsal techniques and performance.

ENG1301Literature & Writing I 3 credits. A composition course that combines writing with the reading of prose forms, including short story and novel. ENG1302Literature & Writing II 3 credits. A composition course that combines writing with the reading of poetry and drama. Prerequisite: ENG1301or consent of instructor.

EDU4313Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School 3 credits. Objectives, methods, and materials for teaching physical education.

ENG1310Public Speaking 3 credits. A review of basic speech fundamentals with an emphasis on in-depth speaking assignments.

EDU4314Teaching Science in the Secondary School 3 credits. Trends, issues, methods, and materials in teaching the life and physical sciences.

ENG2201Biblical History & Literature III 3 credits. The biblical record of God's grace in the life of the primitive church. A study of selected New Testament epistles and their background in the Acts of the Apostles. (Cross-listed with REL2001and HIS2101

EDU4315Teaching Social Studies in the Secondary School 3 credits. Current theories, objectives,methods, and materials for teaching the social sciences. EDU4316Teaching German in the Secondary School 3 credits. Trends, issues, methods and materials in the teaching of German as a foreign language.

ENG2301Intermediate Composition 3 credits. A course designed to provide additional practice in writing. Weekly writing assignments under personal direction. (Instructors may request a student to take this course.) Prerequisite: ENG1301and ENG1302or consent of instructor. (Does not apply to major.)

EDU4317Teaching Spanish in the Secondary School 3 credits. Methods and materials for teaching Spanish in the secondary school. EDU4350Student Teaching in the Secondary School 10 credits. A full-time professional experience in cooperating Lutheran secondary schools for ten weeks, providing an opportunity to learn effective teacher behavior through observation and practice under the guidance of Lutheran secondary school teachers and college supervisors. Prerequisites: EDU1401,EDU2401, EDU3210,EDU3215,EDU3401,EDU3405,EDU3410, EDU4250(or with special approval"), psy 2002,psy

ENG3001Topics in Literature & Language 3 credits. An investigation of specific literary themes, movements, authors, or works, with a view to giving added breadth and depth to the understanding of special areas of American literature. May be taken twice with different content. Prerequisite: ENG1301 and ENG1302or consent of instructor. ENG3002American Renaissance, Realism, & Naturalism 3 credits. A study of the major themes and literary movements from the early 19th century to the dawn of modernism in the 20th century. Prerequisite: ENG1301 and ENG1302or consent of instructor.

3020. 'Special approval is given by the Teacher Education Committee.

ENGLISH - COMMUNICATION ARTS

ENG3004Twentieth Century American Literature 3 credits. Analysis of selected works of American fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction as they emphasize current thought. Prerequisite: ENG1301 and ENG1302or consent of instructor.

AND LITERATURE ENG1201Biblical History & Literature I 3 credits. The biblical record of God's grace from creation to the destruction of Jerusalem. (Cross-listed with RELl001and HISll01)

ENG3010American Minority Writers 3 credits. An analysis of selected works of contemporary American minority writers, including

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Asian-Americans, African-Americans, HispanicAmericans, and Native Americans. Prerequisite: ENG1301 and ENG1302 or consent of instructor.

ENG3201 Topics in Literature and Language 3 credits. An investigation of specific literary themes, movements, authors, or works, with a view to giving added breadth and depth to the understanding of special areas of World literature. May be taken twice with different content. Prerequisite: ENG1301 and ENG1302 or consent of instructor.

ENG3101 Topics in Literature and Language 3 credits. An investigation of specific literary themes, movements, authors, or works, with a view to giving added breadth and depth to the understanding of special areas of British literature. May be taken twice with different content. Prerequisite: ENG1301 and ENG1302 or consent of instructor.

ENG3202Literature of the Ancient World 3 credits. A concentration upon and an evaluation of a significant part of world literature which has contributed to Western thought and culture. Prerequisite: ENG1301and ENG1302or consent of instructor.

ENG3102 British Authors before 1700 3 credits. A study of major British authors from the 14th through the 17th centuries with emphasis on Chaucer, Spenser, Milton, and on the literary and religious issues in their writing. Prerequisite: ENG1301 and ENG1302 or consent of instructor.

ENG3203Literature of the Modern World 3 credits. A study of 19th and 20th century work from around the world, not including British and American authors. Key issues are the movement from realism to modernism and cultural understanding. Prerequisite: ENG1301and ENG1302or consent of instructor.

ENG3103 Shakespeare: Comedies and Histories 3 credits. A representative sampling of dramatic writings by William Shakespeare, with major emphasis on his comedies and history plays. Prerequisite: ENG1301 and ENG1302 or consent of instructor.

ENG3206Modern World Drama 3 credits. An analytical and critical survey of modem drama beginning with the 19th century. Prerequisite: ENG1301and ENG1302or consent of instructor.

ENG3104 Shakespeare: Tragedies and Romances 3 credits. A representative sampling of dramatic writings by William Shakespeare with major emphasis on his tragedies and later romances. Prerequisite: ENG1301 and ENG1302 or consent of instructor.

ENG3225Literary Criticism 3 credits. A study and analysis of the development of literary theories and interpretations of texts. Prerequisite: ENG1301and ENG1302or consent of instructor.

ENG3105 Early British Novel 3 credits. The origin and development of the most flexible narrative type of British prose to 1832. Prerequisite: ENG1301 and ENG1302 or consent of instructor.

ENG3301Topics in Literature and Language 3 credits. An investigation of specific literary themes, movements, authors, or works, with a view to giving added breadth and depth to the understanding of special areas of language. May be taken twice with different content. Prerequisite: ENG1301and ENG1302 or consent of instructor.

ENG3106 The Age of Romanticism in England 3 credits. The Romantics, their ideals as opposed to those of the Neo-classicists, and their impact upon nineteenth and twentieth-century thought and action. Prerequisite: ENG1301 and ENG1302 or consent of instructor.

ENG3302Creative Writing 3 credits. An opportunity for students as writers to communicate literature born of experience, introspection, and conviction, to afford them the discovery of power of expression. Prerequisite: ENG1301and ENG1302or consent of instructor.

ENG3107 Victorian Age 3 credits. Selected works of the major Victorian writers, with special emphasis on ideas, interpretation, and historical background. Prerequisite: ENG1301 and ENG1302 or consent of instructor.

ENG3303Advanced Expository Writing 3 credits. A study and practice in a variety of nonfiction prose forms to develop a lively and effective writing style, using models from classic essays to contemporary literary nonfiction. Prerequisite: ENG1301& 1302or consent of instructor.

ENG3108 Twentieth-Century British Literature 3 credits. An analysis of selected British writers as they emphasize current thought. Primary focus on novels; secondary focus on short stories, essays, and poetry. Prerequisite: ENG1301 and ENG1302 or consent of instructor.

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acceptable score on the placement test. (3 hours + lone hour language lab).

ENG3304 Argument & Advocacy in Writing 3 credits. While developing a sound background in argumentation, style, and ethics, the student practices the discovery of warrantable assertions, improves them in discussion, and ultimately sets them forth in polished and powerful written form.

GER2002 Intermediate German II 3 credits. Continuation of GER2001.Prerequisite: GER2001 or a minimum of 3 years of high school German with an acceptable score on the placement test. (3 hours + lone-hour language lab).

ENG3310 Interpersonal Communication 3 credits. The theory and practice of communication in informal settings, focusing on relationships, conflict resolution, and small-group dynamics. Prerequisite: ENG1310 or consent of instructor.

GER2011 Survey of Theological German 3 credits. A reading and writing focused German language course using Luther's Bible, the Catechism, hymns, and selected writings from the Lutheran heritage. This course is taught in German. Prerequisite: GER2002.

ENG3320 Introduction to Logic 3 credits. The course aims to lead the student both to analyze and construct sound and effective arguments on the basis of deductive and non-deductive logic.

GER2012 Luther German 3 credits. A reading and writing focused German language course with an emphasis on Luther's writings, language, history, and thought. This course is taught in German. Prerequisite: GER2011.

ENG3321 Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages 3 credits. An examination of major methods used in teaching ESLjEFL and criteria for adopting, adapting, and developing teaching materials. Prerequisites: ENG130l and ENG1302 or consent of instructor.

GER3002 Readings in German Literature 3 credits. The reading and discussion of German authors and genres with an emphasis on the postClassical period. This course is taught in German. Prerequisite: GER2012.

ENG3322 Structure of English 3 credits. An application of modem linguistics and an introduction to the theories and methods of comparative grammars. Prerequisite: ENG1301 and ENG1302 or consent of instructor.

GER3021 European German Lutheran Writings 3 credits. Selected readings from German Lutheran authors from the sixteenth to the early nineteenth centuries (Chemnitz, Andreae, Gerhard, Loeber, Loescher, Brunn, et al.). Prerequisite: GER2011.

ENG4301 Teaching English in the Secondary School 3 credits. Trends, issues, objectives, methods, and materials for teaching literature and language arts in the secondary school. Prerequisite: ENG1301, ENG1302, and ENG3225 or consent of instructor.

GER3022 American German Lutheran Writings 3 credits. Selected readings from German Lutheran authors in America from the early nineteenth to the early twentieth centuries, (Stoeckhardt, Walther, Pieper, Hoenecke, et al.). Prerequisite: GER2011.

GERMAN

GER40l0 German Immersion I 3 credits. A four-week immersion in Germany living with a host family and studying German language and culture. Prerequisite: GER2002.

Foreign language prerequisites may be waived with consent of instructor.

GERIOOl Elementary German I 4 credits. An introduction to the German language and culture that includes listening, reading, writing, and speaking. (4 hours + lone-hour language lab).

GREEK

GERI002 Elementary German II 4 credits. Continuation of GERIOOI.Prerequisite: GERIOOIor its equivalent. (4 hours + lone-hour language lab).

Foreign language prerequisites may be waived with consent of instructor. Courses followed by an asterisk [*]fulfill the Area Elective Requirement in classical Greekfor Studies in Pastoral Ministry students.

GER2001 Intermediate German I 3 credits. Development of listening, reading, writing, and speaking skills. Prerequisite: GERI002 or a minimum of 2 years of high school German with an

GRKIOOI Elementary Koine Greek I 5 credits. Basic vocabulary, morphology, and syntax of koine Greek.

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GRKI002 Elementary Koine Greek II 5 credits. A continuation of GRKIOOl.

GRK3104 Homer's Iliad* 3 credits. Translation of selected portions of the Iliad, with the rest read in translation. Prerequisite: GRK2102.

GRKllOl Elementary Classical Greek I 5 credits. Basic vocabulary, morphology, and syntax of classical Greek. Translation of simple prose.

GRK3106 Plato* 3 credits. Reading of a major dialogue in Greek with appreciation of its literary form and critique of its argument. Supplementary readings in other dialogues (in English) and in the secondary literature. Prerequisite: GRK2102.

GRKl102 Elementary Classical Greek II 5 credits. A continuation of GRKllOl. GRK2001 Intermediate Koine Greek I 3 credits. Comprehensive review of vocabulary, morphology, and syntax of koine Greek. Translation selected koine Greek texts. Prerequisite: GRKI002.

of

HEBREW

GRK2002 Intermediate Koine Greek II 3 credits. Reading of New Testament Greek texts. Prerequisite: GRK2001.

Foreign language prerequisites may be waived with consent of instructor.

GRK2101 Intermediate Classical Greek I 3 credits. Comprehensive review of vocabulary, morphology, and syntax of classical Greek. Translation of selected classical texts. Prerequisite: GRKl102.

HEBIOOIElementary Biblical Hebrew I 4 credits. Elements of grammar, basic vocabulary, oral reading, and translation of simplified Biblical Hebrew. Translation and discussion of the book of Jonah. Introduction to the weak verbs.

GRK2102 Intermediate Classical Greek II 3 credits. Translation of Plato's Apology. Study of key

HEBI002 Elementary Biblical Hebrew II 4 credits. A continuation of HEBIOOl.

Greek verbs. Prerequisite: GRK2101. GRK3001 Hellenistic Texts 3 credits. Translation of selections from the Septuagint, pseudepigraphal writings, Josephus, and early Christian documents. Collateral reading provides background on the history, culture, and religion of the Hellenistic period. Prerequisite: GRKI002 for seminary certification candidates, GRK2002 or GRK2102. GRK3002 Greek Classics in Translation 3 credits. A study of the literary achievements of the ancient Greeks, including epic, drama, history, and philosophy. For students in the koine Greek program.

HEB2001 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I 3 credits. Review of elementary Hebrew. Introduction to Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia and the Brown-DriverBriggs' Hebrew lexicon. Translation from a historical book. Special emphasis on verb analysis, oral reading, and developing a working vocabulary. Prerequisite: HEBI002. HEB2002 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II 3 credits. Translation of larger sections of prose and translation of poetry. Introduction to resource books. Special emphasis on verb analysis, dictionary use, oral reading, and developing a working vocabulary. Prerequisite: HEB2001.

GRK3101 Greek Comedy* 3 credits. Translation of selections from Aristophanes and/ or Menander supplemented by readings in translation. Prerequisite: GRK2102.

HEB3001 Prophetic & Poetic Texts 3 credits. Translation of selected Old Testament prophetic and poetic texts with discussion of content. Prerequisite: HEB2001.

GRK3102 Herodotus* 3 credits. Selections from the History, read in the original and in translation. Discussion of Herodotus' approach to history and his treatment of the Persian War. Prerequisite: GRK2102.

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HISTORY

GRK3103 Lysias & Greek Oratory* 3 credits. Selections from Lysias' speeches, read in the original and in translation. Review of historical background. Emphasis on aspects of Greek rhetoric with attention to application for modem speakers and writers. Prerequisite: GRK2102.

HISllOl Biblical History & Literature I 3 credits. The biblical record of God's grace from creation to the destruction of Jerusalem. (Cross-listed with ENG1201 and RELlOOl).

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HIS3022 America's Gilded Age and Progressive Era 3 credits. Political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States from the late 19th century to the early 20th century.

HISll02 Biblical History & Literature II 3 credits. The biblical record of God's grace from the destruction of Jerusalem, through the Intertestamental Period, to the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. (Cross-listed with ENG1202 and RELl002).

HIS3023 Lutheranism In America 3 credits. A study of how Lutheranism transferred to and developed on the American scene, with special attention to the role of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod.

HIS2101 Biblical History & Literature III 3 credits. The biblical record of God's grace in the life of the primitive church. A study of selected New Testament epistles and their background in the Acts of the Apostles. (Cross-listed with ENG2201 and REL2001).

HIS3024 United States Government 3 credits. The development, form, and function of the United States federal government.

HIS2110 Western History & Culture I 4 credits. Rise of Western Civilization from its beginnings to the Italian Renaissance.

HIS3025 The American Scene to 1877 3 credits. An examination of the American way of life from the nation's colonial foundations to the cementing of the Union after the Civil War.

HIS2111 Western History & Culture II 4 credits. Maturation and diffusion of Western Civilization from the Italian Renaissance to World War

HIS3101 The Ancient Near East 3 credits. A study of the foundations of Western civilization in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Aegean. Political, economic, and social institutions and activities are examined, as well as religious life and cultural achievements.

II.

HIS2120 History of Science 3 credits. An overview of science from ancient times to the present, using the scientific ideas of people set in their historical times and places with their unforeseen limitations. Success of scientific explanations in their times will be shown by demonstrations and experiments. The change of scientific thought and its process will be emphasized. (Cross-listed with SCI2120.)

HIS3102 The High Middle Ages 3 credits. The history of political, cultural and religious trends in Europe from the beginning of the eleventh century to the end of the thirteenth century.

HIS3001 Survey of Art 3 credits. A study of representative artists of the western world and their works for the purpose of developing an appreciation of the graphic arts, architecture, and sculpture.

HIS3104 The Reformation Era 3 credits. The history of the Reformation in the sixteenth century. Examines at first hand the concerns and conviction of those who participated in the Reformation.

HIS3010 United States History Since 1945 3 credits. A post-World War II survey on both domestic and foreign developments in the United States, examining political, economic, social, cultural and religious trends.

HIS3105 First Century Roman World 3 credits. The Roman empire from Augustus to Domitian. Topics include government, regions and cities, religions, and social and cultural issues. HIS3110 History of Modern China 3 credits. The evolution of modern China. An ancient civilization emerges as a provocative power.

HIS 3020 Early America: Revolution & Constitution 3 credits. Examines the pivotal era in American history from the close of the French and Indian War in 1763 to the ratification of the Bill of Rights in 1792 in its military, political, and social aspects.

HIS3121 From Despots to Nation States 3 credits. The causes, courses, and effects of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars and their significance for the rise of nationalism and the creation of modern European nation-states. Changes in Europe's political structure are highlighted from the absolutism of Louis XIV to the new model for nation states that culminates in the creation of Bismarck's Germany.

HIS3021 The Union in Crisis 3 credits. The struggles and trials of the Federal Union during the Ante-bellum, Civil War, and Reconstruction periods of the nineteenth century, with emphasis on the problems of sectionalism, slavery, recession, warfare, and stresses of reunion.

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HI53125 The Arab-Israeli Conflict 3 credits. The development of the state of Israel and Arab reaction to it in the modem Middle East. Issues and ideologies involving Israel and Palestine are traced from the nineteenth century to the present.

LAT3003Post-Reformation Latin Lutheran Writings 3 credits. Selections from Lutheran theologians active during the century and a half after Luther's death. Translation and discussion. Prerequisite: LAT2012.

HI54101 The World in the Twentieth Century 3 credits. This course, following a seminar approach, explores various issues relative to the history of Europe, Asia, and Africa from 1900 to the present. The course material revolves around themes with an emphasis in research, discussion, and analytical writing.

MATHEMATICS MTHOOOlWord Processing 1 credit. An introduction to word processing using Microsoft Word. This course is required for all students who did not have a word processing course in high school or who desire to review the skills that a college student should know for effective use of word processing as a tool. (This course does not fulfill any mathematics requirements for graduation.)

H154110 Foundations of History 3 credits. An investigation of the historical method, the historical approach, the meaning of history as viewed from the Christian and secular perspectives, and various problems of interpretation. Required of all History-Social Sciences majors.

MTH0002 Developmental Mathematics 3 credits. Mathematical topics with special emphasis placed upon the use of mathematical ideas and mathematical thought processes. Topics include critical thinking, problem-solving, and concepts from set theory, logic, patterns of mathematics and number theory. Placement based on an ACT math sub-score of 17 or lower. (This course does not fulfill any mathematics requirements for graduation. It is designed to prepare students for MTHI010 Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics.)

LATIN Foreign language prerequisites may be waived with consent of instructor. LAT2001Intermediate Latin 4 credits. Review of elementary Latin morphology and syntax. Further development of translation skills. Prerequisite: a minimum of two years of high school Latin with an acceptable score on the placement test. LAT2002Vergil's Aeneid 3 credits. Reading of the entire epic in translation and detailed study of selected passages from Books I-XIIin the original. Prerequisite: LAT2001or its equivalent.

MTH1001 Computer Applications 2 credits. An examination of current computer application tools, including file management, electronic communications, spreadsheets (Excel),databases (Access),Biblereference software (Logos),presentation managers (PowerPoint), graphic design, multimedia, and desktop publishing (Publisher) as they relate to student use on campus and beyond. MTH1010 Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics 3 credits. A survey of mathematics that includes problem solving, sets, probability, statistics, discrete mathematics, and economic applications. Placement based on an ACT math sub-score of 24 or lower.

LAT2011Classical Latin Literature 3 credits. Selections from classical Latin prose and poetry. Translation and interpretation. Prerequisite: LAT2001or its equivalent. LAT2012Ecclesiastical Latin 3 credits. Selections from the Latin literature of the church, with emphasis on the writings of Lutheran theologians. Translation and discussion. Prerequisite: LAT2001or its equivalent.

MTH1011 Mathematics: A Human Endeavor 3 credits. A study of mathematics used in daily life. Applications include problem solving, probability, statistics, graph theory, mathematics of finance, and voting techniques. Placement based on an ACT math sub-score of 25 or higher.

LAT3001Roman Historians 3 credits. Study of historical writings from the best periods of classical Latin literature. Discussion of selected passages in Latin and readings in English, and their relevance to New Testament studies. Prerequisite: LAT2011.

MTH2001 Contemporary Mathematics for Teachers 3 credits. Study of topics from the elementary and middle school curriculum with an emphasis on the properties and structure of numeration systems,

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MTH3004 Computer Programming 3 credits. An introduction to computer programming using the Microsoft Visual Basic language, with special emphasis on appropriate mathematical applications.

number theory, logic, and geometry. Prerequisite: MTHIOIO. MTH2002 Modern Concepts of Geometry 3 credits. Geometric concepts studied visually, analytically, inductively, and deductively. Prerequisite: MTHIOll.

MTH3005 Computer Applications in Mathematics 3 credits. Problem solving using computer software tools for representing numerical, symbolic, and graphical representations of quantitative relationships. Prerequisite: MTH3004.

MTH20l0 Calculus I 3 credits. An introduction to analytic geometry and single-variable calculus, with emphasis on limits and on differentiation and its application.

MUSIC

MTH2011 Calculus II 3 credits. A continuation of Calculus I extending to integration of algebraic functions as well as differentiation and integration of trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions. Prerequisite: MTH2010.

MUSOOOlIntroduction to Music 1 credit. An introduction to music fundamentals and singing skills. Two class periods per week. Fulfills entrance requirement for Studies in Pastoral Ministry degree programs.

MTH20l2 Calculus III 3 credits. A continuation of Calculus II, emphasizing three-dimensional analytic geometry, central conics, infinite sequences and series, vectors, polar coordinates, and partial derivatives. Prerequisite: MTH2011.

MUSlOOl Keyboard for Classroom Teachers I 1 credit. Technology-based approach to beginning piano keyboard skills. Placement determined by evaluation of previous experience. MUSl002 Keyboard for Classroom Teachers II 1 credit. Continuation of Keyboard for Classroom Teachers 1. Prerequisite: MUSIOOIor its equivalent.

MTH2020 Elementary Statistics 3 credits. Statistical concepts and methods for application. Topics include descriptive statistics, vicariate linear models, discrete and normal distributions, central limit theorem, estimation, and hypothesis testing.

MUSlOlO Beginning Piano 1 credit. Private instruction. Course may be repeated. Placement determined by evaluation of previous experience.

MTH202l Linear Algebra 3 credits. The study of matrices, determinants, vectors, and linear transformations with applications of each.

MUSl02l Organ Basic Service Playing 1 1 cr. Private Instruction. Entrance by audition and evaluation of previous experience.

MTH2022 Discrete Mathematics 3 credits. The study of algorithms, graph theory, and Boolean algebra with applications of each.

MUSl022 Organ Basic Service Playing 2 1 cr. Private Instruction. Prerequisite: MUSI021.

MTH300l Number Theory 3 credits. The study of number properties, relationships, and congruencies, with emphasis on beginning proof. Prerequisite: MTHI010 or MTHIOll.

MUSl023 Organ Basic Service Playing 3 1 cr. Private Instruction. Prerequisite: MUSI022. MUSllOl Vocal Musicianship I 1 credit. Instruction in proper singing technique, sight singing, and ear training. Thorough review of music fundamentals. Offered on several levels: placement determined by evaluation of previous experience. Two class periods per week.

MTH3002 History of Mathematics 3 credits. Patterns of thought which served as background to the mathematical revolution of the seventeenth century. Prerequisite: MTHIOIOor MTHIOll.

MUSl102 Vocal Musicianship II 1 credit. Continuation of Vocal Musicianship 1. Two class periods per week. Prerequisite: MUSllOl.

MTH3003 Statistics 3 credits. A study of statistical processes from a probability perspective. A calculus-based approach to distribution theory and statistical inference. Prerequisites: MTH2011 and MTH2020.

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Sight Singing & Ear Training I 1 credit. Prerequisite: enrollment in Music major program, consent of instructor. MUSll10

MUS2301Introduction to Conducting 2 credits. Basicconducting techniques and rehearsal procedures including individual conducting experiences. Concurrent enrollment in band or choir required.

MUSlll1 Sight Singing & Ear Training II 1 credit. Prerequisite: MUSI110.

MUS3010Advanced Piano 1 credit. Private Instruction. Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MUS2001Intermediate Piano 1 credit. Group Instruction. Course may be repeated. Placement determined by evaluation of previous experience or two semesters of MUSI010.

MUS3011Advanced Piano 2 credits. Private Instruction. Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MUS2010Intermediate Piano 1 credit. Private Instruction. Course may be repeated. Placement determined by evaluation of previous experience.

MUS3021Organ Intermediate Service Playing III 1 credit. Private Instruction. Prerequisite: MUS2022

MUS2021Organ Intermediate Service Playing I 1 credit. Private Instruction. Prerequisite: MUSI023.

MUS3022Organ Intermediate Service Playing IV 1 credit. Private Instruction. Prerequisite: MUS3021.

MUS2022Organ Intermediate Service Playing II 1 credit. Private Instruction. Prerequisite: MUS2021

MUS3035College Choir 0.5 credit. Five periods per week. Open to sophomores and above. Normally students enroll for an entire academic year. Membership by audition.

MUS2030Applied Voice 1 credit. Private instruction. Course may be repeated. Placement determined by evaluation of previous experience.

MUS3101Theory of Music I 3 credits. Basicstructures and principles of traditional Western tonal harmony. Intervals and triads, voiceleading, part-writing, cadences, and chord progression. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on placement examination.

MUS2035Chorale 0.5 credit. Three periods per week. Normally students enroll for an entire academic year. Membership by audition.

MUS3102Theory of Music II 3 credits. Continuation of Theory of Music I. Seventh chords, secondary dominants, and modulations. Composition in binary and ternary forms. Prerequisite: MUS3101.

MUS2036Women's Choir 0.5 credit. Three periods per week. Normally students enroll for an entire academic year. Membership by audition. MUS2037Men's Choir 0.5 credit. Three periods per week. Normally students enroll for an entire academic year. Membership by audition.

MUS3103Theory of Music III 3 credits. Continuation of Theory of Music II. Advanced chromaticism, 9th through 13th chords. Serial, non-tonal, and other compositional techniques of the 19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisite: MUS3102.

MUS2040Applied Instrument 1 credit. Private instruction. Course may be repeated.

MUS3201Music History I 3 credits. Survey of Western music from the Medieval through the Baroque periods. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Music major, consent of instructor.

MUS2045Band 0.5 credit. Wind Symphony performs standard and contemporary literature. Concert and tour performances. Normally students enroll for an entire academic year. Membership by audition.

MUS3202Music History II 3 credits. Survey of Western music from the Classical through the Twentieth Century periods. Prerequisite: MUS3201.

MUS2201Introduction to Fine Arts 3 credits. An overview of music and the visual arts, explored within religious, cultural, and historical contexts.

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MUS4021Organ: Advanced Service Playing and Performance 1 credit. Private Instruction. Prerequisite: MUS3022.

MUS3210Johann Sebastian Bach 3 credits. Survey and analysis of Bach's keyboard, orchestral, and choral works as they relate to his creed, career, and cultural milieu. Prerequisites: MUS3201and MUS3102

MUS4022Organ: Advance Service Playing and Performance 2 credits. Private Instruction. Prerequisite MUS3022.

MUS3211American Music 3 credits. Composers, selected works, and performance in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Includes noting the influences of other cultures. Prerequisites: MUS2201

MUS4101Counterpoint for the Parish Musician 3 credits. Development of compositional skills necessary to combine several melodic lines into an intelligible musical unity. Emphasis on practical composition for use in the parish. Prerequisites: MUS3101and MUS3102.

MUS3212World Music 3 credits. A selected survey of music from various cultures.

MUS4102Arranging & Instrumentation 3 credits. Basictechniques and practice in arranging choral and instrumental music. Emphasis on writing for high school and parish ensembles. Prerequisite: MUS3102.

MUS3301Choral Repertoire 2 credits. A study of choral literature suitable for use in Lutheran worship. Performance practice of varying styles. Prerequisite: MUS2301.

MUS4201Lutheran Worship 2 credits. A study of hymnody and orders of worship in Christian Worship: A Lutheran Hymnal with application to the life and work of those called into Gospel ministry. Includes significant developments in the history of Western worship.

MUS3302Instrumental Rehearsal Techniques 2 credits. Selection, study, and rehearsal procedures of music for concert band, jazz ensemble, marching band, and chamber groups. Includes management and administration of a school instrumental program. MUS3305Training Child Singers 2 credits. A study of voice development from early childhood through adolescence. Vocal technique, sightsinging strategies, choral materials. Clinical experiences with children where possible. Prerequisites: MUSl101 and MUSl102 or MUSll10 and MUS1111.

MUS4202Musical Heritage of the Lutheran Church 2 credits. A study of the diverse musical heritage of the Lutheran church. Survey and assessment of literature in relation to the Gospel and the function of music within the Lutheran church. MUS4301Advanced Conducting 2 credits. A study of conducting advanced choral literature and instrumental ensembles. Score reading and preparation, rehearsal procedures, concepts of good tone, balance, and blend. Individual conducting experiences. Concurrent enrollment in band or choir required. Prerequisite: MUS2301.

MUS3310Brass Techniques 2 credits. Fundamental performance skills and methods for teaching brass instruments including maintenance and minor repair. MUS3311Woodwind Techniques 2 credits. Fundamental performance skills and methods for teaching woodwind instruments including maintenance and minor repair.

MUS4305Piano Pedagogy 2 credits. Methods and materials for the beginning piano teacher. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.

MUS3312Percussion Techniques 2 credits. Fundamental performance skills and methods for teaching percussion instruments including maintenance and minor repair.

MUS4351Parish Music Practicum 16 credits. A full-time professional experience in cooperating congregations during which students experience activities such as service playing, choir directing, music teaching in parish educational agencies, and working with instruments.

MUS3320Music Technology 1 credit. Using the electronic keyboard in the elementary classroom. Computer applications including music notation, sequencing, and music tutorial programs. Two class periods per week. Prerequisite: a minimum of one semester of MUS2001 or MUS2010or MUS3010or organ.

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curricula for Lutheran elementary and secondary schools.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Note: Only selected activity courses are offered each semester.

PED3002 Motor Learning 3 credits. Investigation and analysis of the evidence concerning the learning of motor skills, and the relationship of these skills to the growth and development of the individual.

PEDllOl Tennis & Gymnastics 0.5 credit PEDl103 Archery & Volleyball 0.5 credit

PED3003 Safety, First Aid, & CPR 2 credits. Instruction and practice in proper first aid principles, procedures and emergency care, and CPR.

PEDl107 Soccer & Basketball 0.5 credit

PED3004 Care & Prevention of Athletic Injury 2 credits. Prevention and treatment of athletic injuries, with emphasis on injury management, theory and practice of taping, and preventive measures.

PEDl108 Weight Training & Softball 0.5 credit PEDl109 Racquetball & Badminton 0.5 credit

PED3005 School & Personal Health 2 credits. Investigation of elementary and secondary school health problems and a study of personal health in the areas of physical, emotional, and social health.

PEDIllO Bowling & Orienteering 0.5 credit

PED3006 Principles of Coaching 2 credits. Theory and psychology of coaching analyzed and studied in a Christian context.

PEDllll Self-Defense & Softball 0.5 credit PEDl1l2 Fitness for Life 0.5 credit

PED4001 Organization & Administration of Physical Education & Athletics 3 credits. Methods of developing administrative policies for physical education, intramural athletics, and interscholastic athletic programs. Financing, care, use, and purchase of equipment, and public relations within the congregation and/ or high school association.

PEDl113 Archery & Bowling 0.5 credit PED1201 First Aid & Golf 0.5 credit PED1202 First Aid & Badminton 0.5 credit

PED4002 Applied Kinesiology 3 credits. Study and analysis of human motion based on anatomical, physiological, and mechanical principles, with application to fundamental movement and sport skills. Prerequisite: SCI2010.

PED1204 First Aid & Soccer 0.5 credit PED2010 Foundations of Physical Education 2 credits. Investigation of the sociological, psychological, physiological, and historical foundations of physical education.

PED4003 Physiology of Exercise 3 credits. Effects of exercise on the various functions of the body. Prerequisite: SCI2010.

PED20l5 Coaching Theory I 2 credits. Techniques, systems, training methods, and strategy of coaching. (2 periods per week)

PSYCHOLOGY PSY2001 Introduction to Psychology 4 credits. An overview of the field of psychology, covering basic areas of human behavior and mental processes.

PED2016 Coaching Theory II 2 credits. Techniques, systems, training methods, and strategy of coaching. (2 periods per week) PED3001 Curriculum Development 3 credits. Theories, principles, and practices of curriculum development, with emphasis on preparation of specific health and physical education

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Period, to the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. (Cross-listed with ENG1202 and HISll02).

PSY2002 The Psychology of Human Growth and Development 3 credits. Study of physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development throughout the lifespan. This course is a prerequisite for EOU4250 and EOU4350.

REL2001Biblical History & Literature III 3 credits. The biblical record of God's grace in the life of the primitive church. A study of selected New Testament epistles and their background in the Acts of the Apostles. (Cross-listed with ENG2201 and HIS210l)

PSY3001 Lifespan Development 3 credits. A study of human growth and development from conception to death, with emphasis on adult development and aging. Prerequisite: PSY 2001.

REL3001Christian Doctrine I 3 credits. A study of those truths which the Bible, as the divinely inspired source of doctrine, presents concerning the author, the object, and the mediator of salvation. Prerequisites: RELlOOland RELl002 or consent of instructor.

PSY3002 Abnormal Psychology 3 credits. A study of mental disorders, with emphasis on the various types of disorders, methods of therapy, and applications for the Christian. Prerequisite: PSY 2001.

REL3002 Christian Doctrine II 3 credits. The Scriptural truths concerning the blessing the Holy Spirit showers on believers, individually and collectively, in the presentation and appropriation of the gift of salvation. Prerequisites: RELl001, RELl002, and REL2001,or consent of instructor

PSY3010 Child Development (Ages 0-8) 3 credits. Cognitive, physical, emotional, spiritual, and social development in early childhood. Rates and styles of learning, perceptual motor development, and health and safety. Teacher observational skills for assessment. This course is a prerequisite for EOU4150.

REL3010 Symbolics 3 credits. The ecumenical creeds and the Smalcald Articles are studied according to content and historical development. Prerequisites: RELl001, RELl002 and REL2001,or consent of instructor

PSY3020 Psychology of Learning 3 credits. Psychological findings and concepts regarding the leamer, the learning process, and learning situations. This course is a prerequisite for EOU4250 and EOU4350.

REL3011 St. John's Gospel 3 credits. An exegetical reading of John on the basis of the Greek text. Study of New Testament vocabulary, syntax, and textual criticism. Prerequisite: GRK2102 or GRK3001 or consent of instructor.

PSY3030 Adolescent Psychology 2 credits. Principles of psychology as they relate to teaching the adolescent. Emphasis on the physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and moral development of the adolescent, on the theories and problems of adolescence, and on the design of instruction.

REL30l2 Selections from John's Gospel 2 credits. An exegetical reading of selected chapters from St. John's Gospel. For Seminary Certification students. Prerequisite: GRK1002or consent of instructor.

RELIGION

REL3020World Religions 3 credits. A survey of the major religions of the world.

RELOOOlSurvey of Christian Doctrine I 3 credits. A survey of fundamental Christian doctrines with emphasis upon justification and sanctification. Various Christian topics assigned and discussed. Brief history of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod.

RELlOOlBiblical History & Literature I 3 credits. The biblical record of God's grace from creation to the destruction of Jerusalem. (Cross-listed with ENG1201 and HISll01)

REL3021 Patristic Readings in Context 3 credits. Study of selections from the fathers of the early church (100-451A.O.) and their contemporaries. Emphasis on how the church fathers met the challenge of communicating the gospel to their age. Prerequisites: Open to all students who have completed four semesters of classical Greek or who have completed the requirements of the Latin or confessional languages option. Students lacking classical language skills may elect the course with the permission of the instructor.

RELl002 Biblical History & Literature II 3 credits. The biblical record of God's grace from the destruction of Jerusalem, through the Intertestamental

REL3030 Introduction to Philosophy 3 credits. A survey course in the history of Western philosophy.

REL0002 Survey of Christian Doctrine II 3 credits. A continuation of RELOOOL

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SCI200I Advanced Biology 3 credits. Study of the major principles of biology applied in diverse life forms. Topics covered are interaction and interdependence, genetic continuity and reproduction, growth, development and differentiation, maintenance of a dynamic equilibrium, cellular structure and organization, and evolution. Two lecture periods and one two-hour lab period. Prerequisite: SCIlOOl.

REL400I Lutheran Confessional Writings 3 credits. The origin, content, and significance of the confessions of the Lutheran Church as contained in the Book of Concord (1580). Prerequisites: RELlOOl, RELl002, REL200l, REL300l, REL3002 or consent of instructor. REL4010 The Book of Acts 3 credits. An exegetical reading of chapters 13-28 on the basis of the Greek text, with an emphasis on the life and work of the Apostle Paul and on the setting of Paul's epistles. Prerequisite: REL3011 or consent of instructor.

SCI2002Advanced Biology Laboratory A two-hour laboratory taken concurrently with SCI200l. SCI2010Human Anatomy & Physiology I 3 credits. A study of the structure and function of the human body. Integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems are covered. Two lecture periods and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: SCIlOOl.

REL4011 First Corinthians 3 credits. An exegetical reading of the First Epistle to the Corinthians on the basis of the Greek text, with an emphasis on the doctrinal and practical aspects of Paul's writing. Prerequisite: REL40l0 or REL3022 or consent of instructor.

SCI2011Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory A two-hour laboratory taken concurrently with SCI20l0.

SCIENCE SCIlOOlOur Living World 3 credits. An introduction to the diversity of life forms and the correlation of their unifying and interdependent mechanisms with an emphasis on how humans interact with them. Two lecture periods and one two-hour laboratory per week.

SCI20I5 Botany 3 credits. Introductory plant biology, emphasizing plants' structure, reproduction, and function in the biosphere. Two lecture periods and one two-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: SCIlOOl. SCI20I6 Botany Laboratory A two-hour laboratory taken concurrently with SCI20l5.

SCIl002 Our Living World Laboratory A two-hour laboratory taken concurrently with SCIlOOl.

SCI2020Marine Ecology 3 credits. An introduction to marine ecology in a unique field and laboratory environment on the Caribbean island of Jamaica. Major habitats studied include turtle grass beds, mangrove swamps, coral reefs, estuaries, and tide pool and rocky shore communities. Prerequisite: SCIlOOl.

SCIlIOl Our Physical World 3 credits. A case study examination of science as a human enterprise with emphasis on the relationship between matter and energy. Two lecture periods and two one-hour laboratory periods per week.

SCI2025General Chemistry I 3 credits. A study of matter through an examination of atomic theory and structure, chemical bonding and molecular shapes, periodicity and descriptive chemistry of the elements, physical states, inorganic nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, solutions, an introduction to chemical kinetics and equilibria acids and bases. Two lecture periods and two one-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: SCIlOOl.

SCllllO Physical Geography 3 credits. The interrelationship of air, water, soil, and vegetation, their distribution in space, and their relation to mankind. Two lecture hours and two onehour laboratory periods per week. (Cross-listed with SSC12l0). SCIlIll Physical Geography Laboratory Two laboratory periods taken concurrently with SCllllO.

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SCI3004Zoology Laboratory A two-hour laboratory taken concurrently with SCI3003.

SCI2101Physics I 3 credits. A calculus-based presentation of the conservation of matter, energy and momentum. A molecular statistical approach is used to explore the topics of pressure and temperature and their relationship to entropy as a macroscopic quantity. Examination of microscopic quantities reveals the arrow of time and entropy reversals at disequilibrium. Wave theory is introduced and relativity emerges from failures in Newtonian dynamics. Two lecture periods and two one-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: MTH20ll

SCI3010Human Anatomy & Physiology II 3 credits. A study of the structure and function of the human body. Endocrine, immune, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems are covered. Two lecture periods and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: SCI2010. SCI3011Human Anatomy & Physiology II Laboratory A two-hour laboratory taken concurrently with SCI3010.

SCI2102Physics II 3 credits. A calculus based presentation of atoms with respect to electromagnetism, various physical models of the atom, photon theory of light, radioactivity, fission and fusion, field theory, Gaussian fields, AC and DC circuits, ICRcircuits, Ampere's Law, Maxwell's equations and topics from quantum physics. Two lecture periods and two one-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites: MTH2011and SCI2101

SCI3015Fundamentals of Ecology 3 credits. The study of interrelationships between living organisms and forest, woodlot, grassland and fresh-water environments. The course develops fundamental knowledge and procedures necessary for laboratory and field investigations. Two lecture periods and one two-hour laboratory period per week. SCI3016Fundamentals of Ecology Laboratory A two-hour laboratory taken concurrently with SCI3016.

SCI2103Astronomy 3 credits. A laboratory-oriented approach to general astronomy. An in-depth study of stellar astronomy and cosmology. Two lecture periods and two one-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SCIlIOI or SCI2101.

SCI3025General Chemistry II 3 credits. A continuation of General Chemistry I through an examination of nuclear processes, oxidation-reduction reactions, electrochemistry, ionic and acid-base equilibria, chemical kinetics, thermochemistry, chemical thermodynamics and application of chemical principles to environmental problems. Two lecture periods and two one-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: SCI2025

SCI2105Geology 3 credits. An examination of the composition, surface, and structural features of the earth and related geologic processes. Includes laboratory and field experiences. Two lecture periods and one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SCIlIOI or SCIlllO or SCI210l. SCI2106Geology Laboratory A two-hour laboratory taken concurrently with SCI2105.

SCI3103Meteorology 3 credits. An observational approach to the study of local and global weather systems emphasizing solar energy, thermal differences, wind systems, frontal weather, and cloud formation. Two lecture periods and two one-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SCIlllO.

SCI2120History of Science 3 credits. An overview of science from ancient times to the present, using the scientific ideas of people set in their historical times and places with their unforeseen limitations. Success of scientific explanations in their times will be shown by demonstrations and experiments. The change of scientific thought and its process will be emphasized. (Cross-listed with HIS2120).

SCI4025Chemistry of Life 3 credits. An examination of the nomenclature, structure, function and reactivity of organic compounds and their relationship to human life. Two lecture periods and two one-hour laboratory periods

per week. Prerequisite: SCI2025

SCI3003Zoology 3 credits. An introduction to the animal kingdom, with emphasis on the principles of animal diversity and behavior in the natural environment. Two lecture periods and one two-hour laboratory period per week.

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SCI4105 Science in Our Society 3 credits. A seminar approach to the examination of the nature of science and the role of science in society through a comparison of secular and Christian perspectives. Current areas: energy, the environment, and bioethical issues. Open to science majors for whom it is a required capstone course.

States as compared to the student's own culture. This course aims to help students understand how they might better share the gospel of Jesus Christ crossculturally.

SPANISH All courses are taught in Spanish. Foreign language prerequisites may be waived with consent of instructor.

SOCIAL SCIENCES SSC1210 Physical Geography 3 credits. The interrelationship of air, water, soil, and vegetation, their distribution in space, and their relation to mankind. Two lecture hours and two onehour laboratory periods per week. (Cross-listed with

SPNIOOI Elementary Spanish I 4 credits. An introduction to the Spanish language and Latino culture, with an emphasis on listening and speaking and the development of reading and writing skills. (4 hours + lone-hour language lab).

SSC1211 Physical Geography Laboratory Two one-hour laboratory periods taken concurrently with SSC1210.

SPNI002 Elementary Spanish II 4 credits. Continuation of SPNIOOl. Prerequisite: SPNIOOIor its equivalent. (4 hours + lone-hour language lab).

senno;

SPN2001 Intermediate Spanish I 3 credits. A transition to the intermediate proficiency level. This course develops reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills and increases awareness of Latino culture. Prerequisite: SPNI002 or a minimum of 2 years of high school Spanish with an acceptable score on the placement test. (3 hours + lone-hour language lab).

SSC2201 Geography of North America 3 credits. A regional analysis of the physical, demographic, economic and cultural characteristics and patterns of the United States and Canada. SSC3201 Sociology 3 credits. A study of the basic concepts of society, its culture, and the functioning of its institutions.

SPN2002 Intermediate Spanish II 3 credits. Further development of language proficiency. Included is an in-depth study of grammatical concepts with a strong focus on reading and writing. Prerequisite: SPN2001. (3 hours + lone-hour language lab).

SSC3202 Principles of Economics 3 credits. An introductory course in macroeconomics. An examination of human behavior and choices as they relate to the entire economy. Topics such as supply and demand, economic measurements, fiscal and monetary policies, international trade, etc. are examined.

SPN2011 Intermediate Spanish III 3 credits. An upper intermediate level course with a strong focus on development of writing skills. Prerequisite: SPN2002.

SSC3210 World Regional Geography 3 credits. Basic factual knowledge and understanding of the world's physical and cultural features, and their relationships. SSC3212 Geography of Latin America 3 credits. A study of the physical, historical, cultural, political, and economic patterns in Latin America.

SPN2012 Communicating Christ in Spanish 3 credits. A specialized intermediate level course building language proficiency through the use of Bible studies and adult information course materials used in Latino mission fields. Prerequisite: SPN2011.

SSC3220 Latin-American Culture & Civilization 3 credits. An advanced level course presenting an overview of beliefs, customs, and behaviors of Hispanics in the United States and abroad. Prerequisite: SPN2012. (Cross-listed with SPN3001)

SPN3001 Latin-American Culture & Civilization 3 credits. An advanced level course presenting an overview of beliefs, customs, and behaviors of Latinos in the United States and abroad. Prerequisite: SPN2012. (Cross-listed with SSC3220)

SSC4201 Introduction to Minority Cultures 3 credits. An overview of the beliefs, customs, and behaviors of minority ethnic groups in the United

SPN3002 Spanish & Latin American Literature 3 credits. A survey of literature from Spain and Latin America. Prerequisite: SPN30ll.

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SPN3011 Advanced Spanish Conversation 3 credits. An advanced level course giving opportunities to practice language skills through a wide range of topics. Although the focus is on increasing speaking proficiency, reading and writing are used as strong support skills. Prerequisite: SPN3001.

application of the correct principles that are used to understand the Bible. SMN2102 Staff Ministry Early Field Experience II 0.5 credit. A week of observation and participation in congregational ministry. SMN3001 Introduction to Youth & Family Ministry 3 credits. A study of marriage, the family, and the biblical role of the family in spiritual growth, with an emphasis on youth ministry as a part of an integrated ministry to families. Addresses both developing healthy families and ministering to hurting families.

SPN4001 Selected Topics in Spanish I 3 credits. An advanced level course for bilinguals that develops reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills as a native Spanish speaker would approach these issues. Included is translation work and the study of advanced grammatical issues. Prerequisite: SPN3011and completion of or concurrent enrollment inSPN3002.

SMN3010 Foundations of Evangelism 3 credits. An examination of the biblical concept of evangelism as it relates to the mission of the church, and a presentation of personal and programmatic methods for evangelism.

SPN4002 Selected Topics in Spanish II 3 credits. An advanced level course involving discussion and analysis of selected readings from representative authors of the Spanish-speaking world. Included are readings, discussions, and activities relating to the teaching of Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN3011and completion of or concurrent enrollment inSPN3002.

SMN3011 Congregational Assimilation and Retention 3 credits. A study of ways to integrate members into the life of the church through active use of the Means of Grace, Christian fellowship, and service. Includes examination of factors that can help to prevent inactivity and of methods for reaching out to inactive members.

SPN4011 Spanish Immersion I 6 credits. A month-long study program in Latin America requiring a Spanish only language pledge. Prerequisite: 4 semesters of intermediate Spanish.

SMN3020 Parish Education 3 credits. An examination of the principles, methods, and materials of religious education in the parish for adults, youth, and children.

SPN4012 Spanish Immersion II 6 credits. A month-long study program in Latin America requiring a Spanish only language pledge. Prerequisite: SPN4011

SMN3030 Caring and Counseling 3 credits. An introduction to the basic principles and techniques of a Christian approach to counseling, based in Law and Gospel, and the formal and informal congregational settings in which they may be applied.

STAFF MINISTRY

SMN3031 Parish Visitation 3 credits. A presentation of visitation as a method of ministry, especially as a way to minister to the needs of the grieving, the sick and shut-in, and the inactive member.

SMNl102 Staff Ministry Early Field Experience I 0.5 credit. Participation with teacher education students in a week of on-campus activities and experiences designed to introduce students to the roles and responsibilities of the teaching ministry.

SMN3040 Organization and Administration in the Parish 3 credits. A presentation of organizational structure, planning, decision making, supervision, leadership, and human relations as tools in the administration of the church.

SMN2001 The Theology and Practice of Ministry 3 credits. An examination of the biblical concept of ministry and the ways in which ministry is carried out, the use of timeless biblical principles in developing programs of ministry, and the responsibilities and relationships of called workers in the public ministry as they participate in congregational life.

SMN3042 Developing and Training Leadership 3 credits. Methods and techniques for training lay people. Includes how to identify their gifts and abilities, recruitment, and options for training.

SMN2003 Biblical Interpretation 3 credits. An analysis of the major approaches to biblical interpretation, and an examination and

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SMN3103 Staff Ministry Early Field Experience III 0.5 credit. A week of observation and participation in congregational ministry. SMN3104 Individual Field Experiences 0.5 credit. Fifty hours of individual field experiences related to parish ministry, completed prior to internship. SMN4152 One-semester Internship 16 credits. A full-time experience of learning and serving in a congregation, carried out under the direction of a pastor or a pastor and a staff minister.

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FACULTY

Academic Chairs Adjunct Faculty Emeriti Instructors Tenured Faculty

72 76 77 76 72

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ACADEMIC Robert F. Klindworth Arlen L. Koestler John H. Schmidt Paul E. Koelpin Richard F. Ash John P. Nolte DrewM. Buck MarkJ. Lenz

Brutlag, Ronald D., (1999) (E) Admissions/Recruitment B.S.Ed., DMLC M.A., Eastern Michigan University

CHAIRS Education English Foreign Language History-Social Science Math/Science Music Physical Education Religion

Czer, Lawrence J., (1992) (E) Professor of English B.S.Ed., DMLC M.A., St. Cloud State University Dallmann, Gary L., (1964) (E) Professor of Physical Education B.S.,Mankato State University M.S., Mankato State University

TENURED FACULTY

Danell, James c., Jr., (1998) (P) Professor of German B.A.,NWC M.Div., WLS M.A., Middlebury College

Date indicates the year in which service began at Northwestern College, Dr. Martin Luther College, or Martin Luther College. (E) Advisor to Studies in Educational Ministry students (P) Advisor to Studies in Pastoral Ministry students DMLC- Dr. Martin Luther College NWC - Northwestern College WLS - Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary

Dose, Brian L., (1990) (P) Professor of English B.A.,NWC M.Div., WLS M.A., UW-Milwaukee

Ash, Richard F., (1999) (E) Professor of Science as. Ed., DMLC M.S.T., UW-Eau Claire

Fredrich, Joel D., (1987) (P) Professor of Latin, Religion and Greek B.A.,NWC M.Div., WLS M.A., University of Wisconsin

Balge, Daniel N., (1995) (P) Professor of Greek B.A.,NWC M.Div., WLS M.A., University of Wisconsin

Gosdeck, David M., (1985) (P) Professor of Religion/Librarian B.A.,NWC M.Div., WLS M.A., University of Wisconsin

Balge, Jonathan R. (2002) (E) Professor of Religion and History B.A.,NWC M.Div., WLS

Gronholz, John H., (1985) (E) Professor of Physical Education B.S.Ed., DMLC M.S., Mankato State University

Bases, Paul A., (1996) (E) Professor of Spanish B.s., University of Dayton M.A., UW-Milwaukee

Grunwald, James R, (1998) (E) Director of Academic Computing/ Professor of Mathematics B.S.Ed., DMLC M.S., UW-Oshkosh M.A., Clarke Ph.D., Nova Southeastern

Bauer, David T., (1998) (E) Professor of Music B.S.Ed., DMLC M.C.M., Concordia-River Forest Bode, Glenn E., (1991) Technology Director B.S.,Mankato State University

Haar, Susan G. (2005) (E) Professor of Early Childhood Education B.S.Ed., DMLC M.A.E., Towson University

Boeder, John c., (2000) Campus Pastor B.A.,NWC M.Div., WLS

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Hartzell, J. Lance, (1993) (E) Professor of Education as. Ed., DMLC M.s. MSU-Mankato

Leyrer, Philip M., (2000) Professor of English B.S.Ed., DMLC M.s.T.E., UW-Whitewater

Heidtke, Earl R, (1992) (E) Professor of Science and Social Sciences as. Ed., DMLC M.A, Concordia-Seward M.A, Minnesota State Univ-Mankato

Loomis, Cheryl A, (1997) (E) Professor of Early Childhood Education B.S.Ed., DMLC M.s., Minnesota State University-Mankato Lotito, Lawrence W. (2002) (E) Professor of Education B.S.Ed.,University of Michigan M.A, Marian College

Hunter, Thomas N., (1991) (E) Professor of English B.S.Ed., DMLC M.E.P.D., UW-Whitewater Klindworth, Robert F., (2004) (E) Professor of Education as. Ed., DMLC M.A, St. Mary's University

Mattek, John, (2000) (E) Professor of History and Religion B.A,NWC M.Div., WLS M.A, Minnesota State University-Mankato

Klockziem, Roger c., (1979) (E) Professor of Science as. Ed., DMLC M.AT., Washington State University Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Melendy, Carla E., (1999) (E) Professor of Education B.A, Concordia-River Forest M.AE., Towson University Ph.D., Capella University

Koelpin, Paul E., (1994) (P) Professor of History and Religion B.A,NWC M.Div., WLS M. A, Minnesota State University-Mankato

Micheel, John H .., (1970) (E) Professor of Mathematics B.A, ns, South Dakota St. U-Brookings M.S., Mankato State University Minch, Jack N., (1992) (E) Professor of Education B.S.Ed., DMLC M'S; Winona State University

Koestler, Arlen L., (1978) (E) Professor of English as. Ed., DMLC M.S., UW-Milwaukee

Moldenhauer, Kermit G., (1995) (E) Professor of Music B.S.Ed., DMLC M.C.M., Concordia-River Forest Ph.D., International Seminary (FL)

Lange, Douglas F., (2005) (P) Professor of Physical Education B.A,NWC M.Div., WLS Lange, Lyle W., (1978) (E) Professor of Religion B.A,NWC M.Div., WLS

Nass, Thomas P., (1994) (P) Professor of Hebrew B.A.,NWC M.Div., WLS M.A, University of Wisconsin

Lenz, Mark J., (1981) (E) Professor of History and Religion B.A,NWC M.Div., WLS Ph.D., International Seminary (FL)

Nolte, John P., (1986) (E) Professor of Music as, Ed., DMLC M.C.M., Concordia-River Forest Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Leopold, Barbara L., (1974) (E) Professor of Physical Education as. Ed, DMLC

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Schubkegel, Joyce c., (1970) (E) Professor of Music B.S.Ed., Concordia-River Forest M.Mus., Northwestern University

Ohm, Ronald C. (2002) (E) Professor of Education

as.Ed., DMLC M.A, Saint Mary's University Olson, Lawrence 0., (1993) (E) Professor of Religion/Staff Ministry Director B.A,NWC M. Div., WLS D.Min., Fuller Theological Seminary

Sellnow, David D., (2000) (P) Professor of History and Religion B.A,NWC M.Div., WLS

Paustian, Mark A, (2001) (P) Professor of English B.A,NWC M.Div., WLS

Shilling, Ronald L., (1965)(E) Professor of Music B.S.Ed., DMLC M.Mus., University of Cincinnati M.C.M., Concordia-River Forest

Pekrul, William A (2002) (E) Professor of English B.S.Ed., DMLC M.S.Ed., UW-Oshkosh

Sponholz, Martin P., (1982) (E) Professor of Science B.S.,University of Wisconsin M.S., University of Wisconsin

Pelzl, David J., (1983) (E) Professor of Mathematics s.s. Ed., DMLC M.S., University of Oregon

Spurgin, Alan M., (1992)(E) Professor of Education B.S.Ed., UW-Eau Claire M.s., UW-Milwaukee Ed.D., University of South Dakota

Pope, James F., (2000)(E) Professor of History and Religion B.A,NWC M.Div., WLS

Tess, Paul A, (2006) (E) Professor of Education B.S.Ed, DMLC M.A, Silver Lake College

Potratz, Robert c., (1999) (E) Professor of Music B.5. Ed., DMLC

Thiesfeldt, Steven R, (1997) Professor of Science B.S.Ed., DMLC M.S., UW-Platteville

Rupnow, Kenneth c., (2000)(E) Professor of Mathematics B.S.Ed., DMLC M.S., UW-Oshkosh, Marquette Univ. Ph.D., Marquette Univ.

Unke, James M., (1997) Professor of Physical Education Athletic Director B.S.Ed., DMLC M.S., Minnesota State University

Schmidt, John H., (1981) (P) Professor of Greek and Religion B.A.,NWC M.Div., WLS M.A, University of Wisconsin

Wagner, Wayne L., (1978)(E) Professor of Music B.S.Ed., DMLC M.S., Mankato State University Ph.D., University of Colorado

Schone, Jeffrey L., (1997) Professor of Religion B.A,NWC M.Div., WLS

Wendler, David 0., (1980) Professor of Education B.S.Ed., DMLC M.s., UW-Oshkosh Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Schroeder, Timothy J., (1992) (E) Professor of English s.s. Ed., DMLC M.A, Concordia-River Forest

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Wessel, Keith C. (2002) (P) Professor of Foreign Language B.A,NWC M.Div., WLS Whaley, Cynthia E., (1993) (E) Professor of Education B.S.Ed., DMLC M.A, Silver Lake College Ph. D., University of Minnesota Wittmershaus, Kurt A, (1998)(E) Professor of History B.S.Ed., DMLC Wurster, Miles B. (2006) (E) Professor of Music B.A, Gustavus Adolphus College Zahrt, Sarah E., (2004) (E) Admissions/ Recruitment s.s. Ed., MLC Zarling, Mark G. (2007) President B.A,NWC M.Div., WLC MSE, Concordia University, Mequon

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ADJUNCT FACUL TV

2006-2007

Balge, Bethel A. Music B.A., Michigan State University M.Mus., University of Wisconsin

Hacker, Jason C. Religion B.A.,MLC M.Div., WLS

Mattek, Ruth J. Music B.S.Ed., DMLC

Naumann, David C. Foreign Language B.A.,MLC M. Div., WLS

Nolte, Brent J. Music B.S.Ed.,DMLC M.Mus., Central Michigan University Nolte, Lanita M. Music as. Ed., DMLC Ohm, Carlotta L. Music B.S.,Concordia College Paulsen, John W. Director of Academic Success Center B.S.,St. Cloud State University M.A., Penn State University M.s., Mankato State University Thiesfeldt, Jeneane M. Music B. S. Ed., DMLC Wurster, Kathryn M. B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College M.Mus., University of Colorado, Boulder

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INSTRUCTORS

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EMERITI Anderson, Ames E. (MLC) 1961-1999 Arras, William D. (DMLC) 1969-1982 Backer, Bruce R. (DMLC) 1956-1995 Barnes, Glenn R. (DMLC) 1966-1992 Bartel, Fred A. (DMLC) 1978-1990 Birsching, William H. (MLC) 1979-1998 Brick, Delmar C. (DMLC) 1954-1987 Buck, Drew M. (MLC) 1983-2007 Carmichael, Gary G. (MLC) 1964-1999 Deutschlander, Daniel M. (MLC) 1984-2004 Fischer, Gilbert F. (DMLC) 1962-1984 Franzmann, Gerhard W. (NWC) 1959-1994 Glende, Arthur F. (DMLC) 1965-1980 Haar, Beverlee M. (MLC) 1974-2005 Hartwig, Theodore J. (MLC) 1955-2002 Huebner, LloydO. (DMLC) 1967-1993 Hussman, Charles E. (MLC) 1992-2003 Ingebritson, Mervin J. (DMLC) 1971-1984 Isch, John R. (MLC) 1970-2004 Kirst, Eugene A. (NWC) 1954-1991 Koelpin, Arnold J. (MLC) 1962-2001 Krueger, Robert H.(MLC) 1971-2003 Lehmann, Arnold O. (NWC) 1962-1979 Levorson, LeRoy N. (MLC) 1968-2003 McLean, Irma R. (MLC) 1967-1996 Meihack, Marvin L. (MLC) 1970-2003 Menk, Rolland R. (MLC) 1980-2005 Meyer, Edward H. (MLC) 1970-2002 Nolte, Gertrude E. (DMLC) 1962-1983 Nolte, Waldemar H. (DMLC) 1962-1986 Olsen, Theodore B. (MLC) 1971-1978,1994-2007 Paulsen, John W. (MLC) 1971-2006 Plitzuweit, Jerald J. (MLC) 1967-2003 Raddatz, Darvin H. (MLC) 1970-2001 Schenk, Otto H. (MLC) 1965-1997 Schibbelhut, John H. (MLC) 1992-2002 Schroeder, Martin D. (DMLC) 1961-1992 Schroeder, Morton A. (DMLC) 1971-1990 Schubkegel, Francis L. (DMLC) 1970-1995 Schulz, Arthur J. (MLC) 1957-2002 Spaude, Cyril W. (NWC) 1966-1995 Stoltz, Robert J. (MLC) 1982-2001 TenBroek, Wayne B. (NWC) 1979-1987 Voss, Robert ], (NWC) 1987-1993 Wessel, Howard L. (MLC) 1964-1999 Wulff, Frederick H. (MLC) 1971-1998 Yotter, Harold D. (MLC) 1970-2000 Dates up to 1995 indicate years of service to Dr. Martin Luther College (DMLC) or Northwestern College (NWC). Dates after 1995 indicate years of service to Martin Luther College.

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ADMINISTRATION 2007-2008 Calendar CollegeDirectory Explanation of MLC Seal Governing Board

82

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MARTIN LUTHER COLLEGE DIRECTORY For additional information, contact the following persons directly. To reach the person dial (507)354-8224and the extension number. Martin Luther College 1995 Luther Court New VIm, MN 56073-3300 FAX (507) 354-8225 OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: www.mlc-wels.edu Administration Mark G. Zarling, President Steven R. Thiesfeldt, Vice-President for Administration Diana L. Burt, Secretary to the President..

Ext. 211 Ext. 211 Ext. 211

Academics David o. Wendler, Vice-President for Academics Deborah A. Plath, Secretary to the Vice-President for Academics Daniel N. Balge, Academic Dean-Pastoral Ministry Kurt W. Wittmershaus, Academic Dean-Educational Ministry Margaret M. Louters, Academic Deans Office

Ext. 207 Ext. 207 Ext. 377 Ext. 377 Ext. 377

Student Life, Housing, Automobiles, Student Government Jeffrey L. Schone, Vice-President for Student Life John C. Boeder, Campus Pastor Susan M. Willis, Director of Women's Housing Hacker, Jason c., Director of Men's Housing Naomi R. Hippert, Student Life Office

Ext. 289 Ext. 310 Ext. 219 233-6101 Ext. 289

Enrollment, Admissions, Recruitment, Informational Presentations Philip M. Leyrer, Vice-President for Emollment Management Vacancy, Associate Director-Pastoral Ministry Ronald D. Brutlag, Associate Director-Educational Ministry Sarah E. Zahrt, Admissions Counselor, Educational Ministry Janet N. Pelzl, Admissions/Recruitment

Ext. 289 Ext. 362 Ext. 360 Ext. 356 Ext. 280

Financial Aid Gene A. Slettedahl, Director Lynnda S. Kalk, Financial Aid Assistant Valerie J. Bovee, Financial Aid Operations Assistant

Ext. 221 Ext. 225 Ext. 293

Records, Courses, Transcripts, Evaluation of Credits David o. Wendler, Vice-President for Academics Kurt W. Wittmershaus, SEM Transcript Evaluator Daniel N. Balge, SPaM Transcript Evaluator Diane L. Brutlag, Office Manager, Records Office Gwen L. Kral, Records Office

Ext. 207 Ext. 377 Ext. 377 Ext. 369 Ext. 222

Mission Advancement Jonathan J. Scharlemann, Director of Mission Advancement.. William A. Pekrul, Director of Public Relations Arlene B. Stolte, Secretary James R. Hahn, Resource Development Director Kathryn J. Tohal, Resource Development Director

Ext. 362 Ext. 367 Ext. 295 Ext. 286 Ext. 220

Education Office Robert F. Klindworth, Chair, Paul A. Tess, Director of Clinical Experiences Cyntha E. Wahley, Licensure Officer

Ext. 223 Ext. 287 Ext. 347

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Kristal L. Miller, Clinical Experiences Lynne A. Eggert, State Licensure

Ext. 282 Ext. 379

Graduate Studies Director of Graduate Studies

Ext. 341

Financial Services Gary L. Sonnenberg, Chief Financial Officer Janet L. Kramer, Accountant/Business Office Manager Ginger I. Melzer, Accounts Payable/Insurance Marlys A. Rosenau, Student Accounts Receivable/Payroll Heidi K. Schoof, Clerical Assistant/Secretary

Ext. 292 Ext. 391 Ext. 218 Ext. 217 Ext. 365

Staff Ministry Lawrence O. Olson, Director of Staff Ministry Program

Ext. 252

Continuing Education Office David T. Bauer, Director of Special Services Julie L. Balge, Special Services

Ext. 352 Ext. 368

Athletics James M. Unke, Director of Athletics Barbara L. Leopold, Assistant Athletic Director Barbara A. Gorsline, Athletics Secretary

Ext. 256 Ext. 200 Ext. 232

Library David M. Gosdeck, Library Director Helen E. Krueger, Circulation Manager Grace M. Bases, Technical Services Manager Janice A. Nass, Serials Manager Katherine M. Lotito, Media Specialist and Reference Librarian

Ext. 296 Ext. 242 Ext. 364 Ext. 327 Ext. 249

Technology, Network Services Glenn E. Bode, Director of Technology Ken D. Jones, Network Support Services Lois J. Bode, Computer Network Support Karen L. Shilling, Network Support Services Aaron C. Spike, Network Support Services

Ext. 100 Ext. 100 Ext. 100 Ext. 100 Ext. 100

Bookstore Pam J. Kitzberger, Bookstore Manager

Ext. 214

Health Services Charlene K. Friedrich, Nurse

Ext. 101

Support Staff Brian S. Messer, Food Service Manager George E. Schimmele, Maintenance Supervisor Kevin A. Neuman, Custodial Supervisor Tim A. Rambow, Grounds Supervisor John L. Ring, Graphic Arts Director Lynn M. Boesch, Graphic Arts Secretary Rachel L. Sturm, Graphic Arts Printer Irene D. Flatau, Music Division Secretary Constance L. Paustian, Receptionist Grace A. Potratz, Receptionist.

Ext. 213 Ext. 304 Ext. 235 Ext. 298 Ext. 230 Ext. 230 Ext. 230 Ext. 215 354-8221 354-8221

Early Childhood Learning Center Catherine J. Biedenbender, Director

233-9105

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MLC GOVERNING BOARD Pastor Ralph E. Scharf, Chairman (2009)*,West Allis, Wisconsin Pastor Michael D. Schultz, Vice Chairman (2008),Lawrenceville, Georgia Pastor Roy M. Beyer, Secretary (2006),Algoma, Wisconsin Pastor Raymond R. Beckmann (2008),Waco, Nebraska Teacher Keith R. Bowe (2008),Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin Mr. Steven Danekas (2010),Naperville, Illinois Teacher Jonathan J. Hahm (2008),Caledonia, Minnesota Mr. Robert D. Hinnenthal (2010),New VIm, Minnesota Teacher Scott R. Huebner (2010),Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin Mr. Stephen D. Loehr (2008),Onalaska, Wisconsin Mr. Barry V. Price (2012),Durand, Michigan Mr. David A. Sauer (2008),Spokane, Washington Mr. William Steinbrenner (2008),Fond du Lac, Wisconsin *Date indicates the year when term expires. Advisory Members to the Governing Board Pastor Karl R. Gurgel, Lake Mills, Wisconsin, President, WELS Pastor Larry E. Cross, Rochester, Minnesota, President, Minnesota District, WELS Pastor Peter H. Kruschel, Franklin, Wisconsin, Administrator, Board for Ministerial Education, WELS Pastor Mark G. Zarling, President, Martin Luther College Executive Committee of the Governing Board Pastor Ralph E. Scharf Pastor Michael D. Schultz Mr. Robert D. Hinnenthal Pastor Roy M. Beyer

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2007-2008 Academic Calendar First Semester Aug. 23-25 Aug. 25&26 Aug. 27 Aug. 27 Sept. 3 Oct. 17* Oct. 22 Nov. 20* Nov. 26 Dec. 13 Dec. 14-19 Dec. 16 Dec. 19*

Thursday to Saturday Saturday & Sunday Monday Monday Monday Wednesday Monday Tuesday Monday Thursday Friday - Wednesday Sunday Wednesday

Freshman Orientation Days Arrival of Upper Classes Classes Begin 9:40 AM - Opening Service - WCC Chapel! Auditorium Labor Day - No Classes Midterm Recess Begins after Classes (4:35pm) Classes Resume Thanksgiving Recess Begins after Classes (4:35pm) Classes Resume Last Day of Classes before Exams Exams (Exams on Saturday Morning & all day Wednesday) Christmas Concert in LSC 9:30 AM - Commencement Service in the WCC Chapel Christmas recess begins after the last exam which finishes at 4:35 pm

*Note: Students in their professional semester (Student Teaching & Senior Practicum) follow the school calendar of where they are teaching.

Second Semester Jan. 10 Jan. 10 Jan. 23 Mar. 7 Mar. 8-12

Thursday Thursday Wednesday Friday

Mar. 12 Mar. 8-24*

Wednesday

March 25 May 8 May 9-14

Tuesday Thursday Friday Wednesday 12:00M

May 9-16 May 16 May 17

Friday -Friday 12:00M Friday Saturday

Saturday-Wednesday

Classes Begin 10:15 AM - Opening Service - WCC Chapel! Auditorium Evangelism Day Midterm - Easter Recess/Spring Break After Classes (SPaM) Freshman Early Field Experience Week (SEM) Easter Recess/Spring Break for Freshmen after EFE Classes (SEM) Easter Recess/Spring Break and a Week of EFE for Sophomores & Juniors (SEM) Classes Resume Last Day of Classes Before Exams Seniors and 5th Year STEP Exams (No exams on Saturday) Exams (No Exams on Saturday) 7:30 PM - Commencement Concert 10:00AM - Commencement Service

"Note: Students in their professional semester (Student Teaching & Senior Practicum) follow the school calendar of where they are teaching.

2008 Summer Session June 16 July 4

Monday Friday

First Term Opening Service and Classes Begin End of First Term

July 7 July 24 July 25

Monday Thursday Friday

Second Term Registration - Second Term Begins 9:30 a.m. - Closing Service in WCC Chapel Summer Session Closes

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MARTIN LUTHER COLLEGE SEAL The Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod's college for ministry bears the name of the great sixteenth century reformer, Martin Luther, whose ministry is an inspiration for all who aspire to the high calling of the public ministry today. The MLC campus is located in the city of New DIm in the state of Minnesota.

1995 MLC opened on July 1, 1995.

MDCCCLXV /MDCCCLXXXIV MLC continues the service rendered to the WELSby Northwestern College of Watertown, Wisconsin (1865-1995),and by Dr. Martin Luther College of New DIm, Minnesota (1884-1995).The Roman numerals on the seal are the founding dates of these two schools.

Luther's Seal MLC borrows from the seal of Dr. Luther. He wrote the following things about the items which MLC has appropriated for its seal: Cross: "A black cross within the heart reminds me that faith in Christ crucified saves me." Heart: "Although the cross is black, mortified and intended to cause pain, yet it does not change the color of the heart, does not destroy nature, i.e., does not kill, but keeps alive. The just shall live by faith!" Rose: "The heart is fixed upon the center of a white rose, to show that faith causes joy, consolation, and peace. The rose is white because white is the ideal color of all angels and blessed spirits." V-I-V-I-T: "The letters of the word VIVIT[Latin for 'he lives'] are written on the petals of the rose. Because Christ lives, I too shall live."

MOTTO Below, supporting the seal, are words of Jesus from John 14:6,"I am the way [Latin: VIA], the truth [Latin: VERITAS], and the life [Latin:VITA].

COLORS Red, white, and black are the colors of MLC. Black: MLC trains young people to bring the true way of life to a world dying in darkness. White: The way is by grace alone. Truth is by Scripture alone. Life is by faith alone. These are the darkness-dispelling gifts Jesus brings. Red: Red is the color of martyrs, Christ's faithful witnesses. MLC's mission is to send forth ministers of the gospel who proclaim but one way, but one truth, and but one life.

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2007-2008 MLC Catalog  
2007-2008 MLC Catalog