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The Milwaukee Times Newspaper and milwaukeetimesnews.com Milwaukee's Only “Blue Chip” Community Newspaper

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“Journalistic Excellence, Service, Integrity and Objectivity Always”

Vol. 39 • No. 29 • Thurs., Aug. 13, 2020 - Wed., Aug. 19, 2020 • An NCON Publication Serving The Milwaukee Area • 75¢

Wisconsin COVID-19 death toll surpasses 1,000

Gov. Tony Evers announced on Tuesday, August 11, 2020, that in just over six months, Wisconsin's COVID-19 death toll has surpassed 1,000 people. This devastating news comes just as Gov. Evers issued Emergency Order #1, requiring face coverings to be worn in response to the recent spike in new infections. Since early July, the average number of deaths and the seven-day average of new cases have been increasing. On July 9, 2020, the seven-day average was only two deaths reported per day, but nearly one month later the seven-day average was eight deaths reported per day. Out of Wisconsin’s 72 counties, 52 have reported

at least one COVID-19 death. Data also show the disproportionate impact that COVID-19 has on communities of color. While Black people make up only 7 percent if Wisconsin's population, 21 percent of COVID-19 deaths in Wisconsin are among Black individuals. Many factors impact health outcomes such as employment, income, housing, education, and accessibility of quality healthcare services. These factors are the social determinants of health and have played a role

in the higher rates of COVID-19 infections and deaths among historically marginalized populations, especially Black, Latinx, and indigenous individuals. Compared to White Wisconsinites, the infection rate is over five times higher for Latinx Wisconsinites and the death rate is over four times higher for Black Wisconsinites. As Wisconsin passes this devastating milestone, it is important for Wisconsinites to take care of their emotional and mental health, as part of their overall health and well-being. In April, Department of Health Services launched the Resilient Wisconsin initiative to provide stress-reduction strategies and behavioral health resources.

Second 'Well Mommy & Baby Care Package Drive-Up' delivers 250 care packages to Milwaukee families

Staff Photo

The African American Breastfeeding Network Inc. (AABN) hosted its second "Well Mommy & Baby Care Package DriveUp," on Saturday, August 8, 2020 at Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church, 2207 North 2nd Street. "Families are experiencing insurmountable stress due to COVID-19, and other situations. This event may lift some of the tension and stress families are feeling by providing essentials and familycentering items," said AABN Executive Director Dalvery Blackwell. After taking a brief survey families then selected from one of three care package options. Board Games and a $50 a local restaurant gift card is included in the Family Centering care package. Other care packages include Mommy Wellness and Baby Layette. Pictured at the event are (from left) AABN Executive Director Dalvery Blackwell; Mount Zion MBC First Lady Barbara Wyatt Sibley; and Mount Zion MBC Pastor Rev. Dr. Louis E. Sibley, III. An NCON Communications Publication

It's official: Biden/Harris 2020 PRES. CANDIDATE JOE BIDEN

After months of speculation, presidential candidate Joe Biden named California Sen. Kamala Harris as his running mate on Tuesday, August 11, 2020, making history by selecting the first Black and South Asian American woman to compete on a major party’s presidential ticket and acknowledging the vital role Black voters will play in his bid to defeat President Donald Trump.

“I have the great honor to announce that I’ve picked Ms. Harris — a fearless fighter for the little guy, and one of the country’s finest public servants — as my running mate,” Biden tweeted. In a text message to supporters, Biden said, “Together, with you, we’re going to beat Trump.” Harris and Biden plan to deliver remarks Wednesday, August 12, 2020 in Wilmington,

WV. In choosing Harris, Biden is embracing a former rival from the Democratic primary who is familiar with the unique rigor of a national campaign. Harris, a 55-year-old first-term senator, is also one of the party’s most prominent figures and quickly became a top contender for the No. 2 spot after her own White House campaign ended.

WEDC Commissioner Lafayette Crump announces grants to help fight coronavirus pandemic

Staff Photo

Lafayette Crump, who was approved as the new Commissioner of City Development for Milwaukee on July 7, 2020, shared efforts by the Wisconsin Economic Development Commission (WEDC) to stop the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic and assist local businesses to restart at an outdoor press conference in downtown Milwaukee on Wednesday, August 5, 2020. During brief remarks, Crump noted that WEDC has distributed more than 15,000 grants to Wisconsin small businesses worth more than $40 million as part of the “We’re All In” initiative. The grants can be applied toward the costs of business interruption, health and safety improvements, wages, salaries, rent, mortgages and inventory. With Crump is Sam Rikkers, secretary and COO of WEDC. www.milwaukeetimesnews.com


In The News

Thursday, August 13, 2020

2

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Police Chief Alfonso Morales demoted to Captain Milwaukee Police Chief Alfonso Morales has been demoted to captain, his rank before becoming chief. The Fire & Police Commission voted unanimously to make the move after many members expressed their disappointment in Morales. The commission had given 11 directives to Morales on July 20th. ‘”His conduct is unbecoming, filled with ethical lapses and flawed decisions,” said commissioner Raymond Robakowski, the lone former police officer on the seven-member commission. “Mr. Morales has failed the men and women of the Milwaukee Police Department, the people of the City of Milwaukee and he has misled me and none of this is acceptable.” Robakowski provided the second vote to call a meeting to appoint Morales to a full four-year term in December 2019. The video, which shows commission chair Steven M. DeVougas with a client during an investigation before the police department, benefitted Morales and his pending appointment when it was leaked and led to calls for DeVougas to resign. Morales, through his attorney Frank Gimbel, did not rule out suing the city if he was fired or demoted during a press appearance earlier this week. Gimbel said he believed his client was being “set up to fail.” The commissioners did not cite specific directives that the chief failed to com-

Alfonso Morales ply with. Morales previously said he would comply with all of the directives and that he had already released many of the records requested by the commission. But commissioner Nelson Soler, who was elected chair later in the meeting, singled out the conditions, including a six-month performance review, that were placed on Morales’ appointment. “It should be no surprise to the fact we have issued directives and it should be no surprise to the fact that I personally don’t feel you have worked with us as your oversight board,” said Soler. A letter issued by the Milwaukee Police Department on Wednesday night said the conditions were non-binding, citing an oral City Attorney opinion. “I am disappointed as well,” said commissioner Everett Cocroft, a former firefighter. Robakowski’s list of frustrations with Morales included his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic. “He called the outbreak at district five of 30 officers a small

Interim Chief of Police Michael Brunson outbreak,” said Robakowski. He also said that Morales took credit for spending $43,000 to clean the police academy after 12 individuals tested positive. “What the chief and his command staff failed to tell the commission was the federal government paid for it.” One of the 11 directives was to develop a COVID-19 policy within the department. Another directive included records releases regarding a number of cases, including the tasing of Milwaukee Bucks guard Sterling Brown. The friction between DeVougas and Morales has been attributed to the fallout from that incident. Other directives included instructions to implement a ban on the use of tear gas and “large volumes” of pepper spray; to partner with local organizations and the commission on community-oriented policing strategies; to produce and implement a discipline matrix; to appear at all FPC full board and committee meetings “unless unavailable” and written no-

tice submitted 24-hours in advance; to copy the executive director on all communications with the commission; and to comply with all commission records requests regardless of the status of an investigation. The commission voted to appoint assistant chief Michael Brunson as acting chief on a unanimous vote. The commission took special care to establish Brunson as only “acting” chief and plans to meet in the coming weeks to chart a path forward on finding a permanent replacement. Morales became interim chief following the retirement of chief Edward A. Flynn in 2018 and served out the remainder of his term. A national search for a new chief was never conducted. But Brunson, a 25-year department veteran, was a finalist alongside Morales and another department veteran. He has recently faced criticism from the Common Council for the department’s use of tear gas and rubber bullets on protesters. The now-former chief has worked for the Milwaukee Police Department since 1993. Before becoming chief, Morales served as captain of district two on the city’s south side. The demotion of Morales doesn’t end the challenges facing the police department and commission. DeVougas still faces an investigation from the city’s ethics board related to his conduct and a potential conflict of interest. Mayor Tom

Barrett, who has called for DeVougas to resign, must appoint a replacement for FPC executive director Griselda Aldrete who withdrew before the council could vote on her reappointment and the commission has a number of staffing vacancies. The commissioners must complete the investigation and preside over the possible termination of officer Michael Mattioli who also faces homicide charges for the killing of Joel Acevedo. With protesters in the streets for nearly 70 days, a budget model on what a 10 percent reallocation of resources towards public health and away from the police department is now overdue on its delivery to the Common Council. The council is next scheduled to meet in September and will shortly thereafter begin its budget deliberations. MPD, the FPC and city must also continue work to comply with the American Civil Liberties Union settlement from 2018. In a press briefing following the decision, Barrett said what the commission did was “not good government.” Barrett has the authority to overrule directives, but said he was okay with them. “I thought [Morales] would be given the opportunity to respond to those directives,” said the mayor. “At the same time, I understand some of the frustration, because rather than respond to some of the directives he spent two weeks on a [public relations] campaign.”

Outreach Community Health Centers hosts back-to-school event Staff Photos

MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Louvenia Johnson Luther Golden Nathan Conyers (1981-2008) (1981-2005) (1981- 2018 ) Lynda J. Jackson Conyers, Publisher Morgan A. Conyers, Associate Publisher Jacquelyn D. Heath, Editorial Page Editor

The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper STAFF Publisher/President Lynda J. Jackson Conyers

Eunice Asiedu (top photo), a nurse midwife with Outreach Community Health Centers, assists with a Drive/WalkThrough Community & Health Resource Fair at the Outreach Community Health Centers (inset), 210 West Capitol Drive, on Thursday, August 6, 2020. Outreach distributed 400 book bags and school supplies to children ages 6-11. An NCON Communications Publication

Graphic Artists William Gooden Michelle Anibas

Founders Louvenia Johnson Nathan Conyers Luther Golden Marketing Carmen Murguía

The Milwaukee Times Weekly newspaper is published each Thursday at 1936 N. MLK Dr., Milwaukee, WI 53212 Telephone: 414-263-5088 • Fax: 414-263-4445 Email: miltimes@gmail.com • http://milwaukeetimesnews.com www.milwaukeetimesnews.com


Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, August 13, 2020

3

Perspectives

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Being Frank

  By: Frank James Special to the Milwaukee Times

The crime of sameness In the USA today there is a miasma that has affected the entire culture of the country. I am not talking about COVID 19. Look around you at the people of the two major groupings in the US, white and black. Do you notice how there seems to be a similarity in how they dress, act and in some cases look? I know. I know. There are distinct differences, hair, etc. Yet, if one went into any semi integrated school they would notice how the two races are strikingly similar. The sad part is that this newfound similarity has killed the culture and creativity of the USA. Integration was the rallying cry in the 60’s and is still shouted in 2020. Integration

and still are, treated like feces but in the past they used adverse conditions to be innovative. Black people used miserable living conditions to create the Blues music genre. From the Blues you get R&B, Rap, Hip Hop music genres. White people used these music genres to create their own versions, Rock and Roll, Heavy Metal, Swing music. Creativity flourished in spite was supposed to be the soluThere is one major reason of the animosity between tion to all the race woes in the USA was so advanced white and black people. the USA. Integration never in the arts, music and even Fast forward to the 2020 truly happened. What hap- industry in the past. This music scene. African Ameripened was a perverse form reason was because the can music went from groups of assimilation. Black peo- white people had an endless like Earth, Wind and Fire ple wound up assimilating amount of black creativity to to nothing. There are no a white culture which killed draw upon. Black people in African American musical their creativity. This action the USA were creative and groups that can even comby blacks in turn watered whites capitalized on this for pare. Why you ask? The asdown white culture. their own gain. Blacks were, similation into white culture.

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This assimilation has given a false sense of acceptance by whites to the later generations of African Americans. If this were not true why then are African Americans shocked by the murder of African American males by police? Better yet, why are African Americans still seeking salvation from a court system that never cared for them and act shocked with the rulings? These new African Americans think they are white and are constantly being rudely reminded that this is not the case. How does this affect white people? We’ll stick to the music industry. The 80’s was a glorious time for music in the USA. You had Prince, Micheal Jackson and rap music was beginning to go nationwide. On the white side of the coin there was: Bruce Springsteen, Billy Joel, David Bowie and the Second British Invasion. During the 80’s you had both races producing good music in genres associated with their race. In a sense it was musical segregation with an occasional crossover. In 2020 Hip Hop and R&B seems to have taken over. You can see both white and black people nodding their heads to this sad dissertation of failure. This music may bring the two races together but it has dumbed both races down. This dumbing effect is one reason why you see males and females of both races walking around in school wearing sleep clothes. This also is why the hoodie and tight or too-big pants have become the uniform for teens of both races. The adults are no smarter. Both white and black adults in the USA wear similar clothes. Women wear leggings like they were the new Kalmanovich party dress. Men wear basketball shorts, pro team shirts, ball caps with beards. Sameness has killed the USA. Separate but equal or even unequal, would have never wiped out culture in the USA the way sameness has. Just watch the American Music Awards in November and you’ll see proof of the collapse of culture in the USA. Frank James IV © 2020 beingfrankwithfrank@ gmail.com

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The opinions expressed in this editorial are those of the writer and not of the Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper or NCON Communication, its staff or management. "Being Frank" is a bi-weekly column exclusive to the Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper. An NCON Communications Publication


Perspectives

Thursday, August 13, 2020

CHILD WATCH

4

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

  By: Marian Wright Edelman Founder and President Emerita of the Children's Defense Fund

Persevere

The last few months have been a very difficult time for so many of us. I repeat here this “Request for Transfer” by an unknown author that has gotten me through some dark times when I’ve wanted to give up. I wanted to share it to help keep spurring us forward today. “Request for Transfer” To: Commander-in-Chief From: Battlefield Soldier Subject: Request for Transfer Dear Lord, I’m writing this to You to request a transfer to a desk job. I herewith present my reasons: I began my career as a private, but because of the intensity of the battle, You quickly moved me up in the ranks. You made me an officer and gave me a tremendous amount of responsibility. There are many soldiers and recruits under my charge. I’m constantly being called upon to dispense wisdom, make judgments, and find solutions to complex prob-

My weapons are marred, tarnished, and chipped from You have placed me in a constant battle against the position to function as an enemy. Even the Book of officer, when in my heart I Regulations I was issued has know I have only the skills been torn and tattered from of a private. I realize that endless use. The words are You promised to supply all now smeared. I would need for the battle. You promised You would But Sir, I must present You a realistic picture of my equip- be with me throughout the ment. My uniform, once so war, but when the noise of crisp and starched, is now the battle is so loud and the stained with tears and blood confusion is so great, I can of those I have tried to help. neither see nor hear You. I The soles of my boots are feel so alone. I’m tired. I’m cracked and worn from the discouraged. I have battle familes I have walked trying tigue. to enlist and encourage the troops. I’d never ask for a discharge. I love being in Your lems.

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service. But I humbly request a demotion and transfer. I’ll file papers or clean latrines. Just get me out of the battle — please, Sir. and make all things new. Your faithful, but tired, have been wounded in soldier, theYou battle, soldier. Your John/Jane Q. Servant wounds areMy not visible, but you have received grave internal injuries. I will heal you. have been weakened in To: Faithful but Tired Soldier You the battle. strengthFrom: Commander-in-Chief en you, andI Iwill will Subject: Request for Transfer strength. I will instillbein your you confidence and ability. My Dear Soldier: Words will rekindle within a renewed love, zeal, and Your request for transfer you enthusiasm. has been denied. I herewith present My reasons: Report to Me tattered and empty. I will refill you. You are needed in the battle. I have selected you, and I Compassionately, gave My word to supply your Your Commandneed. You do not need a deer-in-Chief, God​ motion and transfer. (You’d never cut it on latrine duty.) Marian Wright Edelman is a You need a period of “R lifelong advocate for disadvantaged and R” — renewal and re- Americans is the Founder kindling. I am setting aside a and PresidentandEmerita of CDF. place on the battlefield that Under her leadership, CDF has is insulated from all sound become the nation’s strongest voice and fully protected from the for children and families. enemy. I will meet you there, and I will give you rest. I will remove your old equipment

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, August 13, 2020

5

Christian Times

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

The Counseling Corner

By Rev. Judith T. Lester, B.Min. M.Th

Kids Eat Right Month (Week 2) August is celebrated as Kids Eat Right Month sponsored by the Academy of Nutrition Dietetics (“Academy”). The Academy is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals founded in Cleveland, Ohio in 1917 by a visionary group of women dedicated to helping the government conserve food and improve the public’s health and nutrition during WWI.1 This month’s series is focusing and there’s no better time to on the theme of kids eating start learning how to cook as right to encourage families early as possible. and children to eat healthy. 2. Incorporate daily physC a r l i e S a i n t - L a u r e n t ical activity. Physical activiBeaucejour, MS, RD, LDN ty promotes healthy weight, posted a Family Food blog at bones, mood and imporfamilyfoodllc.org in August tantly helps lower the risk of 2019 encouraging healthy cardiovascular disease and eating habits for children and certain cancers. Whether it families.2 Carlie’s suggestions is playing on a sports team, will be presented in part this joining the gym, or taking a week due to space restric- family walk, help your child tions. To read the entire blog to find movement they enjoy. visit familyfoodllc/august-is3. Be a good role model. kids-eat-right-month/. Children need people to look 1. Get kids involved in the up to and the most effective kitchen. Cooking is an es- examples are their caregivers, sential skill to fuel your body who they trust and see on

force your picky eater to eat the more likely they are going to resist, so be careful with your approach. If you have concerns about your child’s eating habits, always consult with your pediatrician or dietitian to help ensure your child is getting the proper nutrition they need to grow into healthy adults. a daily basis. What a parent eats and drinks the child will emulate those same behaviors.

5. Practice food safety. Healthy behaviors begin at home so remember to encourage your kids to wash their hands before preparing or eating and afterwards as well, to prevent the spread of germs. According to a USDA study, 97 percent of consumers neglect to wash their hands. While washing hands is a simple task it is one of the most effective actions to reduce the spread of germs and food-related illnesses. Other food safety practices to encourage are proper thawing, cutting, and cooking at safe temperatures, when age-appropriate.

4. Don’t give up. According to pediatric research 20 percent of children between age 2 to 6 are selective eaters. This phase is usually transient so do your best to just observe rather than acknowledge their behavior and take note when it can have serious impact on your child’s weight, digestion, and overall health. One study found parents who identified their kids as a picky eater resulted in the child actually being a Source: picky eater. The more you 1 www.kidseatright.org

2

Beaucejour, Carlie Saint-Beaucejour, August is Kids Eat Right Month, Aug. 2019, at familyfoodllc/august-is-kids-eat-rightmonth/ Next Week: Series continuation General Disclaimer: The writer has used her best efforts in preparation of this information. No representations or warranties for its contents, either expressed or implied, are offered. Neither the publisher nor the writer shall be liable in any way for readers’ efforts to apply, rely or utilize the information or recommendations presented herein as they may not be suitable for you or necessarily appropriate for every situation to which they may refer. This information is for educational purposes. In some instances, this article contains the opinions, conclusions and/or recommendations of the writer. If you would like to contact Rev. Lester, write to her c/o P.O. Box 121, Brookfield, WI. 53008.

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Health & Fitness

Thursday, August 13, 2020

6

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

At last, two new meds to fight sickle cell disease

For the first time in 20 years, the FDA has approved two transformative new treatments for the approximately 100,000 people with sickle cell disease (SCD). One new med will prevent the excruciating pain of SCD while the other is formulated to prevent organ damage.

“After decades of waiting, there is now a treatment option that could change the course of this disease,” Beverley Francis-Gibson, president and CEO of the Sickle Cell Disease Association of America, said in a news release. “Hope has never been higher for people living with sickle cell disease with a pipeline of new treatments on the horizon.

Adakveo is administered complications and repeated by infusion once per month and you must be at least 16 years-old to be approved to use. The side effects are moderate including nausea, back or joint pain and fever. Infusion dosage depends on patient’s weight. Oxbryta (voxelotor) Developed by Global Blood Therapeutics, Oxbryta is an oral, once a day tablet that was developed for patients 12 years and over to help prevent severe anemia from SCD that can lead to permanent damage to the brain and other organs. By increasing hemoglobin’s affinity to oxygen, it halts polymerization (the root cause of SCD) which is the clumping and sticking together into rigid long rods that deform blood cells. Researchers say Oxbryta can reduce patients’ risk of stroke as well as the need for blood transfusions. Most common side effects are headache, diarrhea, nausea, rash, fever and tiredness.

The opportunity before us in the coming months and years is profound and historic because, in most cases, medications treat disease complications or symptoms but not the condition itself. Finally, these two new medications the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Next, the not so great news. recently approved for Sickle Adakveo and Oxbryta Cell Disease are vastly differ- could both be revolutionary ent in that respect.” treatments for Sickle Cell Disease but each costs apAdakveo (crizanlizumab) proximately $100,000 per Manufactured by Novar- year and must be taken for tis, Adakveo can prevent life! vaso-occlusive episodes of unbearable pain that occur The cost for Oxbryta oral when malformed blood cells tablet 500 mg is around get caught in blood vessels. $10,885 for a supply of 90 Vaso-occlusive crisis is ex- tablets. Oxbryta is available tremely painful and is a fre- as a brand name drug only, quent reason for emergency a generic version is not yet department visits and hos- available. Adakveo costs bepitalization for patients with tween $7,000 and $9,500 a sickle cell disease. month. The management of sickle-cell disease is already expensive because of health

hospitalizations. It now costs an average of $10,000 a year to treat children, and roughly $30,000 a year to treat adults for complications like pain crises, organ damage and strokes. Unfortunately, for many, the devastatingly expensive annual cost of these drugs only proves the claims about the average person not having fair access to cutting edge medicines.

people who meet specific guidelines. Eligibility requirements vary for each program.

novations.

With these two new drugs, people with sickle cell disease have much to look forward to and, hopefully, a cure is within reach. Before these two new drugs for this inherited blood disorder that primarily affects African Americans, and causes painful crises that can put those living with it in the hospital regularly, living with the disease was difficult.

This disease was once thought to be incurable until the discovery of bone marrow transplants. It is currently the only available “cure” for Sickle Cell Disease, although ongoing research in Don’t let the huge price gene therapies hold great tags frighten you! Check with promise. your insurance provider and All these new advanceremember that patient assisments in sickle cell disease tance programs (PAPs) are should give sickle cell pausually sponsored by phartients a more positive outmaceutical companies and Check with your doctor provide free or discounted look on the future. to discuss obtaining these medicines to low income or new sickle cell disease in- uninsured and under-insured After discussing these innovative new medications with your doctor or specialist, you may find the hope you’ve been looking for in managing your Sickle Cell.

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, August 13, 2020

7

Focus on Community

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Focus on Community

Sponsored by:

Despite challenges, King Drive looks to have a bright future While many businesses continue to struggle due to the coronavirus pandemic, Deshea Agee, Executive Director of the Historic King Drive Business Improvement District (BID) #8, is using his unique skillsets to help ensure that businesses in his district not only survive the pandemic, but thrive. Agee, who has headed the King Drive BID for more than four years, is optimistic about area businesses’ survival and he’s hoping to expand the district’s boundaries to help more of King Drive. Currently, BID District #8 extends south to McKinley Avenue and north to Locust Street. On August 17, 2020, Agee will go before the City of Milwaukee Planning Commission to request an expansion of the Historic King BID, extending it north of Locust Street, to Capitol Drive. The proposed boundaries would also expand westward on McKinley Avenue, to Sixth Street, and North Avenue to 8th Street. “I am hopeful that Historic King BID District #8 can have the best Martin Luther

King Drive, but we can’t just include part of it. We want ALL of King Drive included,” said Agee. Started in 1992, the mission of the Historic King Drive BID is to improve the district by fostering a culture that enjoys a trendy and authentic retail experience while attracting businesses that embrace the commitment to hard work and strong character. Over the past 15 years, BID 8 has exceeded that mission—realizing more than $400 million of new development. “The growth that we’re experiencing is phenomenal. It’s also the result of an extraordinary collaborative effort that includes residents, property and business owners, and individuals who believe in the vision for King Drive. We’re working together to cultivate this thriving community,” said Agee. Among those property owners who have accessed the King Drive BID’s services is Terrance McClain. McClain, who grew up in the area, owns residential and commercial properties along

Deshea Agee, Executive Director of the Historic King Drive Business Improvement District (BID) #8. King Drive. He credits Agee for helping negotiate a lease with Milwaukee County’s Office of African American Affairs. “With Deshea’s help, we were able to facilitate the lease with Milwaukee County. Fostering a relationship with the BID has helped grow my footprint as a commercial and residential property owner. They also helped me with signage and referred me to grant resources. More

of us need to utilize those services to help ensure we are developing and growing our businesses appropriately,” said McClain. Business Improvement Districts (BID) are strong partners in efforts to develop robust commercial, residential, and industrial areas that create jobs and a higher quality of life in Milwaukee. The City’s 31 BIDs are funded and operated by businesses, property owners and other community members located within each district’s defined boundaries. In addition to major, new redevelopment efforts, many locally owned and operated businesses, restaurants and services continue to add to the area’s vibrancy. Pete’s Fruit Market, Gee’s Clippers, Rise & Grind Café, America’s Black Holocaust Museum and Crown Hardware help make the neighborhood a destination for entertainment, services, and a variety of retail shops. Dasha Kelly Hamilton and her husband, Kima, are owners of a trendy new business called The Retreat—a

venue for meetings, training, events, and podcast studio. They credit Agee with helping them navigate their start up. “The Historic King BID served as counsel to us as we worked through identifying and hiring contractors. They were an invaluable resource and advocate as we developed our business. It was helpful to have professionals in our corner. Much of their assistance occurred on the front end,” said Hamilton. Agee’s career experience has played a huge role in King Drive’s success. In addition to earning a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from Marquette University, Agee’s first job out of college was in sales at WMCS 1290 radio station. He later pursued a career in real estate after completing Marquette’s extensive ACRE training, and interned with Pabst Farms Development, a 1500-acre master plan community. Agee remained in that position for a year learning the real estate industry, (Continued on pg. 14)

Local Businesses Need Your Support! The Historic King Drive Business Improvement District encourages you to come and explore new and established independently owned businesses. Within the district there are a variety of businesses ready to serve you. These businesses include retail shops, specialty services, eateries, grocers, and nightlife options just to name a few. By supporting businesses in your district you contribute to making the community thrive. Historic King Drive BID No. 8 encourages you to visit businesses now and throughout the year for all your needs. 4th Quarter 2722 N. Dr. MLK Jr. Drive Dream Bikes 2021A N. Dr. MLK Jr. Drive Bijou Nails and Company 2107 N. Dr. MLK Jr. Drive

Glorious Malone's Fine Sausage 300 W. Walnut Street Dead Bird Brewing 1726 N. 5th Street Fein Brothers 2007 N. Dr MLK Jr. Drive

Best Fish 1335 N. Dr. MLK Jr. Drive Birdsong's 2216 N. Dr. MLK Jr. Drive Pete's Fruit Market 2303 N. Dr. M.L.K Dr. Import Designs 2101 N. Dr. MLK Jr. Drive

For more information call us at (414) 265-5809, email us at info@kingdriveis.com or visit www.kingdriveis.com for complete business listings www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

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What's Happening

Thursday, August 13, 2020

8

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

NOW ENROLLING FOR adult day services

AND

childcare!

BUCYRUS CAMPUS 2450 W. North Ave. (414) 210-2450

StAnnCenter.org

Financial Assistance Available

Chromebook Distribution Fall 2020 Make sure your child is #MPSReady for online learning! Come to MPS curbside Chromebook distribution. • new! MPS students • Kindergarten

GET YOUR CHILD’S Chromebook

• 6th Grade • 9th Grade

Chromebook Distribution Dates Early Start Calendar: August 3 – 7, 2020 Traditional Calendar: August 24 – 28, 2020

School staff will be on site to make sure your child receives their Chromebook. Get guidance for how to engage in online learning for Fall 2020. Contact your MPS school to arrange pickup at the school. For more information, call (414) 267-5100 or visit mpsmke.com.

RETURN A Chromebook

Return Chromebook Dates Early Start Calendar: July 30 – 31, 2020 Traditional Calendar: August 13 – 14, 2020

Chromebooks must be returned to the school that issued the device. Only students who will not return to their school in fall need to return their Chromebooks.

school starts soon! Early Start Calendar

Traditional Calendar

Monday, August 17, 2020

Tuesday, September 1, 2020

©2020 Milwaukee Public Schools

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$100 Auto Refinance

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, August 13, 2020

9

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

What's Happening

You could lower your monthly payment by refinancing at Brewery CU and we’ll give you $100 CASH when you transfer your current loan, plus no payments for 90 days!*

414-273-3170

brewerycu.com

* Automatic payment may be required. Minimum $7,000 new money and current Brewery Credit Union loans not subject to refinancing. Interest will begin accumulating at the date of loan signing: the first payment will include all interest accrued from the loan origination date. Membership eligibility required. $100 Refinance Offer: Loan must be transferred from another financial institution or finance company. The vehicle must be used as collateral. Offer valid for a limited time and subject to change. Only one transfer per vehicle. Some restrictions may apply.

It’s been said that absence makes the heart grow fonder. We couldn’t agree more. Our parks, trails, RiverWalk, museums, restaurants and retailers await your safe reacquaintance. With so much to discover and rediscover, we’re certain you’ll feel right at home again. So MKE the most of your time out. MKE it back Downtown. MDI25526-AD4_mkeTimesHalfPageMKEitBack_v01.indd 1

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www.MilwaukeeDowntown.com 8/6/20 11:17 AM

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Thursday, August 13, 2020

Senior Living

10

SENIOR LIVING

Pamela was no stranger to planning for the end of life. She had already paid for her burial plot and funeral service. She had even started working on a will. Then in June 2018, she got the news that would change her life, she was diagnosed with COPD and severe emphysema.

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

It’s time to talk about advance directives

“That’s when I realized I needed to do something because I had so much to do and very little time,” said Pamela, 62, who asked that we not use her last name. planning, and it is one aspect “Even now, I don’t fear of aging that many people death, but at the same time choose to avoid. I like having answers to the questions I may have.” As a member of Community Care’s Program Some of those questions of All-Inclusive Care for may be: do I want my life the Elderly (PACE), Pamela prolonged, do I want to be received guidance on put on a ventilator, do I want completing the necessary to be resuscitated. forms to guarantee that her wishes are granted when By completing an advance the time comes. While there directive, Pamela was able are a few types of advance to provide the answers that directive, the most important would ensure she lived out is the power of attorney for her life on her terms. It is part health care. of what is called advanced care planning, or end of life

An NCON Communications Publication

not talk about, especially members on advance care African Americans and planning as soon as they Latinos. enroll.

This is a legal document that allows a person to choose someone to carry out their wishes should they become unable to do so themselves. Many families assume they can make decisions for a family member. However, Wisconsin does not allow this. The only way to authorize someone to make decisions on your behalf is to have a power of attorney for health care. While advance directives have been around for about 30 years, it is still something many people would rather

While this was not the case for Pamela, who is African American, studies show that African Americans are less likely than other ethnic groups to complete advance directives. The reasons can include cultural and religious objections, distrust of the health care industry, or low health care literacy. Community Care, a local non-profit and expert in long term care, is dedicated to helping its members overcome these obstacles. For more than 40 years, they’ve helped their members – vulnerable elders and adults with disabilities – live independently within the community. As a charter member of Honoring Choices Wisconsin, an initiative of the Wisconsin Medical Society, Community Care works to make advance care planning a routine part of the aging process. Community Care employees are trained to work with

“The whole goal is to make sure our members still have their voice even if they’re no longer able to say what their wishes are,” said Christine Peterson Watts, Community Care’s Palliative Care Ethics Manager. “It’s the only way to honor a person’s wishes and have their voice throughout their life.” For Pamela, who was born and raised in Milwaukee, having an advance directive provides peace of mind for her and her family. It lays out clearly what she wants done and what she does not want done at the end of her life. After her experience, she has a message for anyone who might be on the fence about completing an advance directive. “You don’t know when your number is up, only God knows,” Pamela said. “Don’t wait until it’s too late.”

www.milwaukeetimesnews.com


Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Presidential candidates have traditionally taken the Black vote for granted. True, urban communities have overwhelmingly voted for the candidates who best understand our lived experience.  But party leadership has increasingly been losing touch with our reality.    Democratic leaders need to hear from us that yes, many of us support a progressive platform that calls for quality health care for all, education for all, and justice for all.   But that justice also must include our unborn Black and brown babies, as well as mothers and grandmothers, and fathers and grandfathers.    The Democratic party has silently undergone a drastic shift in recent years.

Thursday, August 13, 2020

11

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Democrats fro Life of Wisconsin

Presidential candidates must earn our vote Now leaders want to make abortion -- including late term abortion -- a permanent policy paid for with our tax dollars.  They won’t even allow an alternative opinion to be heard at their meetings, let alone run a candidate who disagrees with third trimester abortions.  The leaders need to hear from us that supporting women and families does not mean killing the babies.    Significant and up-to-date research concludes that financial reasons -- simply not being able to pay for groceries and rent -- and lack of good childcare options -- lead women into a choice they do not want to make.    Pro-abortion extremism means trying to solve our problems by killing our babies -- rather than by actually

supporting our women and men.    Now, we approach a critical Presidential election where a Democratic victory is essential.  This is a terrible time to exclude voters who demand better ways to solve problems.   Democratic voters have accepted that we need to make compromises to achieve the greater victory; many are unenthusiastically voting for Biden.  Why would the Party not take it one step further and include the Pro-Life

Democrats? We make up one-third of the party.    Opening the party up to Pro-Life candidates will get more progressives into office. In 90 percent of districts nationwide, a majority of voters support a ban on abortion after 20 weeks. For many voters, abortion is a deal breaker issue, given that it is truly a matter of life and death.

behavior. To be clear, we know the Democratic Party is home to a wide coalition of worldviews, religions, and ideologies. We are happy to work alongside our pro-choice colleagues to create a more just and responsible government. We know the abortion debate is a challenging issue, full of nuance and difficult moral questions, and that it will take time to convince all our progressive friends of the need to protect women and unborn humans. However, in the meantime, all we’re asking for is an invitation to the party.  Let’s make our voices heard!  

Many are looking for a party where they can support ethically consistent policies which protect and aid all humans. On the flip side, an extreme position of fully legalized abortion needlessly gives President Trump fuel for energizing his base – especially those who vote for Paid for by Democrats for Life of him despite his policies and America Wisconsin Chapter.

Join us this weekend as we march downtown to support unborn Black babies while promoting social and economic justice for all (with masks please!). RSVP for up-to-the-minute details at tinyurl.com/dnc2020march. Register for Monday noon caucus at democratsforlife.org or e-mail us at WIdems4life@gmail.com. www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

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The Classifieds

Thursday, August 13, 2020

12

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

August 13, 1981 – The Reagan Administration undertakes its review of 30 federal regulations, including rules of civil rights to prevent job discrimination.

Mrs. Fumbanks' Birthday Salutes "Wishing You All The Best!" August 1st Bobbie J. Lathan Antoinee Ollie Andoneé Smtih India Jennings August 3rd Angel Green Jamila Johnson August 4th Audia Young Elon Chamberlain Christopher Fumbanks August 5th Coleman H. Davis, Sr. Pastor Micaiah J. Young Kelly Davidson Pastor Nigel Young

August 14, 1989 – The North Carolina Black Repertory Company hosts the first National Black Theater Festival in Winston-Salem, NC.

August 17th Israel Willis Mildred Lewis

August 15, 1888 – Granville T. Woods patents electromechanical brake.

August 18th Gregory A. Brooks

August 16, 1922 – Author Louis E. Lomax born.

August 21st Emily Smith Mariah Parker Shamiah Bridges

August 17, 1849 – Lawyer-activist Archibald Henry Grimké, who challenged the segregation policies of President Woodrow Wilson, born.

August 22nd Montrell A. Fumbanks Willie F. Harris

August 6th Kelly Chamberlain Minister Willie Doss August 9th Sarah Chamberlain Vivian Brookshire

August 26th Kelly Cooper Coleman H. Davis, Jr.

August 10th Darryl Seals Vennesa Bridges Paul Guy Rosetta Carr

August 27th Mother Mae L. Lewis

August 14th Khalia Bridges August 16th Bishop Sedgwick Daniels

August 18, 1859 – Harriet Wilson’s Our Nig is first novel publsihed by a black writer.

August 23rd Lawrence Williams James Hicks, Jr. Lionel J. Heath, Jr. August 25th Terrell Brumfield Ebony Chamberlain Ebene Williams

August 13th Kenneth Smith, Jr. Janicha Smith

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

August 29th Joan Davis Wesley Pope, Jr. Charmell Fumbanks August 30th Ariana Roberson Nathaniel Saffold August 31st Christopher Fumbanks Roslyn Taylor

Do you have a friend, family member, or colleague who has just celebrated or is about to celebrate a birthday? Stop by our office with their name on Monday to get them in that week’s edition of Happy Birthday Salutes! Visit us at 1936 N. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, call us at (414) 263-5088 or e-mail them to miltimes@gmail.com. An NCON Communications Publication

August 19, 1954 – Dr. Ralph J. Bunche namedundersecretary of the United Nations.

Honor the memory of Civil Rights Pioneer and Congressman John Lewis, by proudly wearing this limited edition T-shirt from The Milwaukee Times.

T-shirts are available in sizes Small-3XL. Only $30 (plus tax) Phone in your Pre-order to 414-263-5088. We can take your credit card over the phone.

Or stop by our office to purchase immediately, while supplies last.

1936 N. MLK Drive Milwaukee, WI 53212 Payment due at the time your order is placed.

EXCLUSIVE TO THE Weekly Newspaper • Printing & Publishing

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, August 13, 2020

13

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Meal Times

I

FAMILY FEATURES

f spending more time at home than usual has you reaching for snacks more often, keep some quick, flavorful options on-hand to help fuel you and your family throughout the day when hunger pangs strike. One versatile pantry staple that can fit a variety of snack cravings: popcorn. With no artificial additives or preservatives, light and airy popcorn is naturally low in fat and calories, non-GMO and gluten free, making it a sensible option to enjoy one handful at a time or sprinkled with seasonings that satisfy your taste buds. A whole-grain food, popcorn has energy-producing carbohydrates and fiber, which can help keep you satisfied longer. Plus, it's simple enough to make that kids can help in the kitchen by popping it themselves or adding toppings. Whether you're craving something sweet, salty, spicy – or nearly anything else – freshly popped popcorn can serve as the perfect base ingredient to simply mix in your favorite toppings or create more unique tastes by combining a variety of herbs and spices. For example, consider these hacks to add easy flavor: n

Pop it on the stove. Stovetop popping allows you to choose your toppings. Cover the bottom of a pot with a thin layer of oil and popcorn kernels, shake to coat, cover with a lid then turn on the heat. Once popping has slowed to 2-second intervals, remove from heat and add toppings.

n

Add some sweetness. When you're in the mood for something sweet, add a dash of salt and a pinch of sugar (or more to meet your taste) to a bowl of popcorn. Or add sugar to the pan before it’s popped, like this recipe for Sugar Corn.

n

Melt some butter. For a classic taste treat, melt a little butter and pour over your bowl of popped corn.

n

Satisfy multiple cravings. Pop a large pot of popcorn and divide it in half; top one half with sweeter toppings like honey, which is a key ingredient in Honey Matcha Popcorn, and the other with something savory, like nutritional yeast or dill. When hunger strikes, you're ready, regardless of the flavor craving.

n

Spice it up. Cayenne pepper and a blend of other spices can be sprinkled on popcorn to create a spicier snack like Cajun Corn.

n

Add mix-ins. Add dried fruits, nuts or candies to a bowl of popcorn to make your own trail mix.

n

Cheese, please. A sprinkle of Parmesan cheese can make your snack a bit more substantial. Mix in some dried herbs like basil and parsley to create this Popcorn Con Pesto.

For more snack ideas that deliver on both flavor and nutrition, visit popcorn.org.

Sugar Corn

Yield: 8 cups 1/4 cup vegetable oil, for popping 1/2 cup popcorn kernels 1 pinch white sugar, plus additional, to taste In medium pan, heat oil until hot. Add popcorn to pan and sprinkle sugar over it. Add more sugar, if desired, to taste. Cover and shake pan continuously until popcorn is popped.

Sugar Corn

Popcorn Con Pesto

Yield: 5 quarts 5 quarts popped popcorn 1/2 cup butter 1 tablespoon dried basil leaves, crushed 1 teaspoon dried parsley, crushed 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1/3 cup Parmesan cheese 1/2 cup pine nuts (optional) Place popped popcorn in large bowl and keep warm. In small saucepan, melt butter; add basil, parsley, garlic, Parmesan cheese and nuts, if using. Stir to blend. Pour over popped popcorn, stirring well. Note: Dried thyme or oregano, or combination of ingredients, may be used in place of basil.

Cajun Corn

Cajun Corn Honey Matcha Popcorn

Honey Matcha Popcorn

Yield: 12 cups 12 cups unsalted, unbuttered popped popcorn 1/4 cup butter 1/4 cup honey 1 teaspoon matcha green tea powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon black sesame seeds Preheat oven to 300 F.

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Line large, rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Place popped popcorn in large mixing bowl. In small saucepan over medium heat, melt together butter, honey, matcha powder and salt, stirring until dissolved. Pour over popcorn; toss to combine. Spread onto baking sheet. Sprinkle with sesame seeds. Bake, stirring occasionally, 25-30 minutes, or until popcorn is dry. Let cool completely before serving. Tip: Matcha powder can be found in the tea and coffee aisle at supermarkets.

Popcorn Con Pesto

Yield: 2 1/2 quarts 1/4 cup butter, melted 2 1/2 quarts popped popcorn, warm 1 teaspoon paprika 1/2 teaspoon onion powder 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon lemon pepper Heat oven to 300 F. In bowl, pour butter over warm popcorn. In separate bowl, combine paprika, onion powder, garlic powder, cayenne pepper and lemon pepper; sprinkle over popcorn. Toss to mix. Bake 5-10 minutes for crispy popcorn.

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Obituary Notices

What's Happening

Thursday, August 13, 2020

14

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

One of the more unique places on King Drive is Gee Clippers, a men's barbershop with a basketball motif.

King Drive future (Continued from pg. 7)

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MELV INJ CEO OHNSO /Found N er

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• Professional Services • Advertisements Creative Services • Typesetting Image Scanning • Photography Business Writing & Editing Stationery • Brochures Invitations • Tickets • Forms Badges • Signs • Banners

leasing, tax increment financing, infrastructure development and selling homes and lots. He was offered a job with the City of Milwaukee as an economic development specialist, where he served as the Bronzeville Project Manager for seven years. These days Agee has amassed experience in community development, including nearly nine years with Milwaukee’s Department of City Development and assisting with Milwaukee’s commercial revitalization programs. “My experience in radio and marketing have given me a unique vantage point to help businesses succeed. I can review potential entrepreneurs’ business plans and offer them advice. I’m also able to provide marketing insight in terms of creating a roadmap to assist them once their businesses open. I draw from my knowledge of social media, advertising, and marketing to help entrepreneurs understand the metrics they need to become familiar with on a weekly and daily basis. At the City level I could not discuss these things, but at the BID level, I can provide these value-added services. I am also able to help property and business owners find middle ground in lease negotiations, so it becomes a winwin for everyone,” said Agee. Agee continues to work to attract businesses into the area, easing and eliminating some of the red tape associated with leasing, financing, and startups. Entrepreneurs like Dwight Jackson, owner of Pepperpot Catering knows the challenges of navigating the hurdles of securing financing “I was about to walk away from moving into the Historic King BID until Deshea stepped in to help. He cut through the red tape in terms of my financing. I didn’t know what was going on behind the scenes and wasn’t getting any response.

The City gave me the building but securing a loan to renovate the space became a frustrating process. Deshea helped jumpstart the process and got things moving,” said Jackson. Jackson is now on the road to renovating his new space on King Drive and Clark Street, with plans to open in 2021. While COVID-19 has not left businesses unscathed, Agee and Diana Wilkinson, the Business and Outreach Coordinator hired two years ago to assist him, continue to offer hope and help to residents and businesses. During the racial unrest prompted by the murder of George Floyd, the BID facilitated and assisted with neighborhood clean ups and, through donations from the MMAC, provided grants to help repair broken windows and doors, replace some of business owners’ inventory and help businesses rebound. “With support from LISC Milwaukee, we’re providing $150,000 in assistance to business and owners. This includes over $25,000 to help more than 20 businesses recently with rent payments. Also, Greater Milwaukee Foundation granted $150,000 to support our efforts. We have hosted ‘cash mobs’ to drive traffic to the area to help keep businesses afloat. We’ve also helped residents thanks to private donors Tonit Calaway, Judge David Swanson and Major League Baseball Commissioner Emeritus Bud Selig. For example, over a twomonth period we surprised families shopping at Pete’s Market with over $20,000 in free groceries. “These tactics have been made possible because of the buy-in of our vision from our partners, property owners, businesses, and residents. Four years ago, many of these relationships did not exist. They have come about through networking and trust we’ve been able to build,” said Agee. www.milwaukeetimesnews.com


Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, August 13, 2020

15

CW18/My24

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

FOR THE WIN

W E E K D AYS THE ONLY GAMES WE PLAY ARE TO WIN CASH & PRIZES

25 WORDS OR LESS • AMERICA SAYS • FAMILY FEUD • FUNNY YOU SHOULD ASK

W E E K D AY S 2 P

WEEKNIGHTS S E E W H AT A L L T H E B U Z Z I S A B O U T

1 5 E M M Y ® N O M I N AT I O N S INCLUDING OUTSTANDING COMEDY SERIES OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A COMEDY SERIES

FROM THE BEGINNING

STARTS SEPT 28TH www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

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Pick'n Save

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Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

BUY 5 OR MORE

SAVE $1 EACH Mix and match 5 or more participating items with Card.

FRESH DEAL

FRESH DEAL

99¢

7

$

/LB

With Card

Premium California Yellow or White Peaches or Nectarines

Look for these tags.

SAVE BUY 5 OR MORE

SAVE $1 EACH

SALE

Mix and match 5 or more participating items with Card.

*When you buy any 5 or more participating items with Card. Participating item varieties and sizes may vary by store.

99 /LB

With Card

Boneless Black Angus Beef Ribeye Steak

or Red or Black Plums

Family Pack

YOUR PIT STOP FOR

STONE FRUIT Fresh Ground Sirloin 90% Lean, Sold 3 lbs or More

3

$

99

Breyers Ice Cream 48 fl oz or Häagen-Dazs Ice Cream, 14 fl oz or Outshine Fruit Bars, 12 ct; Select Varieties

3.49 -1.00

With Card

249

$

/EA*

/LB

With Card

Large Hass Avocados or Organic Avocados, 3/$5 with Card

97¢

/EA

With Card

Fresh Perdue Boneless Skinless Chicken Breasts

No Antibiotics Ever

BUY 1, GET 1

of Equal or Lesser Value

FREE

1.99 -1.00

With Card

Pepperidge Farm Goldfish 4-8 oz or Mission Tortilla Chips, 13 oz or Kellogg’s Fruit Snacks, 8-10 ct or Gerber Puffs or Lil’ Crunchies, 1.48 oz; Select Varieties

Seedless Mandarins

With Card

99¢

/EA*

FINAL COST When You Buy 2

3 lb Bag

349

2/$10

Rotisserie Chicken or 8-Piece Fried Chicken

$

32 oz or 24 oz, In the Deli

2.99 -1.00

With Card

With Card

When you buy 2 or more in the same transaction with Card. Quantities less than 2 will be $6.99 each.

Nabisco Snack Crackers Select Varieties, 3.5-9.1 oz

With Card

1

$ 99 /EA*

FINAL COST When You Buy 3

$ / 3 11 With Card

Pepsi or 7UP

12-Pack, 12 fl oz Cans or 8-Pack, 12 fl oz Bottles or AHA Sparkling Water, 8-Pack, 12 fl oz Cans; Select Varieties

Josh Cabernet Sauvignon 750 ml or Truly or Vizzy, 12-Pack, 12 fl oz Cans; Select Varieties

When you buy 3 in the same transaction with Card. Limit 2 Rewards per transaction. Quantities less than 3 priced up to $5.49 each.

1499

$

Ice Mountain Spring Water 24-Pack, 16.9 fl oz

3.99 -1.00

With Card

299

$

/EA*

With Card

Little Debbie Snack Cakes 6-12 ct or Minute Maid Fruit Drink or Ade, 59 fl oz; Select Varieties

4/$5

Starbucks Coffee 9-12 oz Bag or K-Cups, 6-10 ct or Maxwell House Coffee, 24.5-30.6 oz Can; Select Varieties

With Card

FINAL COST When You Buy 3

1

$ 99

Lay's Potato Chips 5-8 oz or Lay's Kettle Cooked Potato Chips, 8 oz or Cheetos, 6.5-8.5 oz; Select Varieties

Stouffer’s or Lean Cuisine Entrée

/EA

When you buy in multiples of 3 in the same transaction with Card. Quantities not purchased in multiples of 3 will be $2.99 each with Card.

With Card

Select Varieties, 5.25-12.875 oz

5/$10

6.49 -1.00

With Card

549

$

With Card

/EA*

3.99 -1.00

With Card

299

$ Dannon Greek Yogurt

/EA*

TRESemmé Shampoo or Conditioner

5.3 oz or Sparkling Ice, 17 fl oz; Select Varieties

28 fl oz or Pantene Shampoo or Conditioner, 12-12.6 fl oz or Axe Body Wash, 16 fl oz; Select Varieties

88¢ With Card

FINAL COST When You Buy 8

Powerade or Powerade Zero Select Varieties, 28 fl oz

59

¢

/EA

With Card

When you buy 8 or more in the same transaction with Card. Quantities less than 8 will be 89¢ each with Card.

DELIVERY OR FREE PICKUP!

Kraft Natural Shredded Cheese

Shop our app or website. Restrictions apply. See associate for details.

SALE DATES: Thurday, August 13 through Tuesday, August 18 2020 Selection may vary by store, limited to stock on hand.

1

$ 99

7-8 oz or Philadelphia Soft Cream Cheese, 7.5-8 oz; Select Varieties

With Card

SNAP EBT CARDS NOW ACCEPTED AT PICKUP!

See our website or app for details.

Kellogg's Family Size Cereal 19.1-24 oz or Simple Truth Organic Milk, 64 fl oz; Select Varieties

299

$

With Card

MASKS REQUIRED

We reserve the right to limit quantities and correct all printed errors. Not all items and prices available at all locations unless otherwise noted. Prices subject to state and local taxes, if applicable. No sales to dealers. Purchase requirements exclude discounts, coupons, gift cards, lottery tickets, bus passes, alcohol, tobacco and use of Fresh Perks Card®. All prices “with card” are discounted by using your Fresh Perks Card® *Free promotion will be applied to item of least value.

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To stop the spread of the virus, Pick 'n Save requires all customers and associates to wear a mask while in our stores.

SAVE UP TO per gallon of BP or Amoco fuel!*

*Restrictions apply. See PicknSave.com/fuel for details.

Tide Liquid Laundry Detergent 46 fl oz or Tide Pods or Gain Flings, 15-20 ct; Select Varieties (Excludes 16 ct Power Pods)

5.99 -1.00

With Card

499

$

/EA*

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Digital Edition Issue August 13, 2020  

Miltimes 08-13-20 issue_16 pgs

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Digital Edition Issue August 13, 2020  

Miltimes 08-13-20 issue_16 pgs

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