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Families of 3 people killed by same Wauwatosa police officer protest, file complaints; Common Council responds with plans for body cameras All over Wauwatosa on Thursday, June 18, 2020, calls for justice could be heard as the families of three people -- all of whom were killed by the same Wauwatosa police officer -- filed citizen complaints. Four years after Jay Anderson Jr.'s death, his family filed a citizen complaint against the officer who killed him. Police Officer Joseph Mensah has killed three people in five years while on duty. The families of those three young men traveled to Wauwatosa City Hall to file open records requests. Their message was also taken to the Wauwatosa Police Department. Protesters have demanded Mensah's badge -and criminal charges. In 2015, Mensah killed Antonio Gonzales after, police said, he came at officers with a sword.

Pictured (from left) Alvin Cole, Jay Anderson Jr., and Antonio Gonzales. Jay Anderson, Jr., was es were justified. Mensah is shot and killed by Mensah currently on administrative while sitting in his car at duty while the Milwaukee Madison Park in June 2016. County District Attorney's Police said Anderson had a Office reviews the Cole case. The police department had gun. Alvin Cole was killed near no additional comments on Mayfair Mall on Feb. 2, 2020. Thursday. One officer came Police said Cole fired a gun out to speak with the Anderhimself before Mensah re- son family and attorney, only to explain that the police turned fire. Prosecutors ruled that chief, Barry Weber, was unMensah's use of force in the available to speak with them Gonzales and Anderson cas- at the time.

The three families marched in protest on Thursday, ending at Mayfair Mall, brought together by a connection they wish they did not have. In 2015, following the fatal shooting of Gonzales, Mensah was not charged -- nor was he following Anderson's in 2016. Both shootings were investigated and ruled justified. Attorney Kimberly Motley Motley who is representing two of the families -- the Andersons and the Coles -and called on the Wauwatosa police chief to hold Mensah accountable. In addition to wanting Mensah fired and criminally charged, the families said they want all Wauwatosa police officers to wear body cameras to hold every officer accountable. Last week, the Wauwatosa Police Department issued a statement saying it remains committed to being "open

and transparent" in the ongoing Cole investigation. In response to the complant that was filed the Wauwatosa Common Council on Monday, June 29, 2020 took a step toward officers wearing body cameras. During the in-person and virtual committee-of-thewhole meeting Monday night, council members voted unanimously to send the plan to the city's government and financial committees. Equipping Wauwatosa officers with body cameras is a step, protesters said Monday. "I've been wanting this for the last four years, since my son Jay Anderson, Jr., got murdered, so this is a step forward for what I want," said Jay Anderson, Sr. The plan headed to committee calls for body cameras to be implemented, one way or another, within six months' time.

Milwaukee Health Services, Inc. hosts Juneteenth Day "Conquer COVID-19" giveaway event

On Friday, June 19, 2020, the Milwaukee Health Services, Inc. (MHSI) hosted a special event to celebrate Juneteenth Day. As regular Juneteenth Day events were canceled due to coronavirus (COVID-19), MHSI decided to host a "Conquer COVID-19 Safety Kit Giveaway," at their MLK Heritage Health Center, 2555 N. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Dr. The kit contained a mask. gloves,

hand sanitizer and several other items to keep one safe. Besides the free COVID-19 health kits, the event included free on-site COVID-19 testing, the Cream City Medical Society Doctors answering health questions and concerns, and free bag lunches togo from On the Bayou restaurant.

Pictured (from left) are MHSI President/CEO Tito Izard, MD, along with the caterer from On the Bayou and volunteers.

Pictured (from left) MHSI Chief Medical Officer Dr. Aronica Williams, MD, pictured with her sorority sisters from Sigma Gamma Rho. An NCON Communications Publication

Photos By Patricia Milliner

MHSI Teen Volunteers www.milwaukeetimesnews.com


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NC Speedway owner loses staff, 'all but 2' sponsors after post about 'Bubba Rope' The owner of a North Carolina racetrack said he has faced death threats, lost employees and seen "all but two" of his sponsors evaporate amid the backlash over his social media post involving the noose found in the garage stall of Black NASCAR driver Bubba Wallace. Mike Fulp, who owns the half-mile, dirt track 311 Speedway in Stokes County, told the News & Record he knew his troubles from what he described as a joke were self-inflicted. Fulp's post advertised "Bubba Rope" for sale on Facebook Marketplace the day after an FBI

tober and was a coincidence, "My employees got hanot a hate crime. rassed," he said. "I had seven employees quit." “Buy your Bubba Rope today for only $9.99 each, they The Greensboro newspacome with a lifetime warran- per reported Fulp canceled ty and work great,” the post a "Stand for America" event said. planned for Saturday, June 28 for safety reasons but plans "I've lost all but two of to reopen 311 Speedway, my sponsors," Fulp told the perhaps as soon as next Satnewspaper. "I'm responsible. urday, and follow the state's I'm responsible for trying to coronavirus guidelines. make some jokes." He said he wants "low-proFulp said he's been getting file" racing and he plans to death threats and received stay off social media. Fulp Bubba Wallace messages threatening his said he is not a racist in an infamily. terview in which the newspainvestigation determined the Superspeedway garage had per reported he broke down noose found at the Talladega been there since at least Ocin tears and sobbed.

Milwaukee Health Services, Inc. hosts Juneteenth Day "Conquer COVID-19" giveaway event

Photo by Yvonne Kemp

It wasn't just volunteers that came out to support Milwaukee Health Services, Inc.'s "Conquer COVID-19 Safety Kit Giveaway." A number of local leaders came out to participate in the event, too. Pictured at the event are (center left) State Senator Lena Taylor; and (center right) Milwaukee Common Council President Cavalier Johnson.

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

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News Briefs

Wednesday, July 08, 2020

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings donates $120-million to support Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings and universities. “Because there’s so much social isolation in America, there’s just less awareness in the white community — certainly in my community — of the role that HBCUs have played over the last 150 years,” said Hastings, who has a net worth of about $4.7- billion. Hastings has been involved in education throughout his life. After graduating from Bowdoin College, he taught math in Swaziland through the Peace Corps. Since then, he’s financed a 1998 campaign to push for charter schools, provided start-up funding to the Aspire Public Schools charter network and served on the California Board of Education and KIPP Foundation.

He had donated to his alma mater in Maine but hadn’t considered giving to historically Black colleges and universities until he spoke with United Negro College Fund President Michael Lomax. “He said, ‘Well, capital is isolated also, in addition to social [isolation]. So white people generally give to predominantly white institutions. It’s natural, but it’s not healthy. We need to do a better job of kind of getting to know each other and cross-investing,’” Hastings said. The donation announced Wednesday is not Hastings’ first gift to benefit historically Black colleges and universities. In 2016, he created a $100-million Hastings Fund

toward education, $1.5-million of which went toward the United Negro College Fund. He then foreshadowed the 2020 gift, posting on Facebook that “I hope to do more in the future.” Morehouse College President David Thomas said the gift is powerful because Hastings and Quillin allocated it specifically toward scholarships. The donation makes up nearly 10 percent of Thomas’ goal to reach a $500-million endowment. Now, he plans to raise the target amount. Ideally, the endowment would be large enough so the college can admit students without considering their family’s economic status. “We’ve done the calculations. To be where I want our college to be, which is need-blind, we need an endowment of roughly $1.2billion,” he said. Thomas hopes Hastings and Quillin’s donation will indicate to other high-income people that historically Black colleges and universities are worth investing in. High rates of annual alumni giving (more than 35 percent at Spelman) have not been enough to overcome educational inequality. To reverse the inequity, more people must support HBCUs, a news release said. Spelman President Mary Schmidt Campbell said scholarships relate directly to students’ success. If not for a scholarship, the

school’s 2020 valedictorian, Kendra Grissom, wouldn’t have been in the same position to help others, Campbell said. She was a mentor for 10 first-generation freshmen and sophomores. She’d tutor them, advise them about course selection and tell them about off-campus events. Now, she’ll pursue a doctoral program in history at Johns Hopkins University. And if it weren’t for his scholarship, Los Angeles native Lomax said he may not have become president of the United Negro College Fund. “In 1964, my mom, who was a journalist, decided to go back to the Deep South and cover the civil rights movement. I was going to be a senior at L.A. High. My only option was to go to Tuskegee Institute High School, which was a segregated school,” he said. So his mother wrote to Benjamin Mays, then-president of Morehouse. After looking at Lomax’s transcript, he offered Lomax a spot in a Morehouse program for high school seniors. “I got a scholarship, a Charles E. Merrill early admissions scholarship, founded by the son of the man who created Merrill Lynch. And that $1,200-a-year tuition scholarship gave me the opportunity to get a Morehouse education, the most powerful education I’ve had in my life,” he said. “It has made all the difference.”

The

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings and his wife, Patty Quillin, announced Wednesday, June 17, 2020, that they have given $120 million toward scholarships at historically Black colleges and universities — the largest individual donation to the institutions to date. Spelman College, Morehouse College and the United Negro College Fund each received $40 million. The two colleges, focused on educating women and men, respectively, are located in Atlanta. They are top producers of Black graduates receiving Fulbright scholarships and pursuing doctorates. The United Negro College Fund is a minority education organization that awards scholarships to more than 10,000 students each year and financially supports 37 historically Black colleges and universities. Endowments at historically Black colleges and universities remain significantly lower than at comparable colleges. The median endowment for American historically Black colleges and universities is $15.7-million, compared with the median endowment of $36.8-million for non-HBCUs, a news release said. Hastings attributes this to white people’s lack of understanding about the record of historically Black colleges

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Wednesday, July 08, 2020

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The Counseling Corner

By Rev. Judith T. Lester, B.Min. M.Th

The parables of Jesus modernized for a contemporary audience (Conclusion)

At: St. Paul Episcopal Church 914 E. Knapp St. Milwaukee, WI 53202

General Disclaimer: The writer has used her best efforts in preparation of this information. No representations or warranties for its contents, either expressed or implied, are offered. Neither the publisher nor the writer shall be liable in any way for readers’ efforts to apply, rely or utilize the information or recommendations presented herein as they may not be suitable for you or necessarily appropriate for every situation to which they may refer. This information is for educational purposes only and in no way is meant as a literal paraphrase of the parable discussed. It is an attempt to aid in understanding and applying the material. In some instances, this article contains the opinions, conclusions and/or recommendations of the writer. If you would like to contact Rev. Lester, write to her c/o P.O. Box 121, Brookfield, WI. 53008.

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Beloved, this parable has a number of theological themes, but one of the most prominent is the emphasis on evangelism. The second group of invitees were urged to accept the invitation. God has given us the task of evangelism, of sharing the Good The parable of the Great News of salvation with othBanquet is in response to the ers. May we fulfill that task by attitude of the Jewish leaders compelling those “whosoevof Jesus’ day. The Host rep- er will” to accept God’s invitation for salvation!

If you’ve missed any articles in this series, feel free to view the archived digital edition at: https://milwaukeetimesnews.com/category/ digital-editions

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had bought a new house and this was the only window he could get for delivery of his appliances. Another one of their friends said she had bought a new puppy and she was taking her to her first pet training class. Yet, another gave the excuse he had just gotten married implying his buddy should know what time it was! The man got into his feelings big time! He then invited a few residents of the local homeless shelter who were willing to come."

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resents God. The announcement that the banquet was ready carries the meaning that Jesus had come. The guests on the A-list represented the Jews and the second list of invitees allegorically represented the Gentiles. The excuses given represents the excuses people make today rejecting God’s invitation to accept Jesus as Savior and Lord! The good news is the Host in the parable did not cancel the banquet, but extended the invitation to the marginalized of society.

ARS

a sermon on its applicability for today’s audience while maintaining parable integrity. The concluding parable of this series is the parable of the Great Banquet - Luke 14:15-24, first presented in a modern scenario using similar concepts and discussed afterwards: "A man decided to throw a small backyard party at his house. The party was for only a limited number of guests to adhere to social distancing rules and the guidelines recommended by the CDC. The couple even offered to provide masks to everyone who attended. The man is celebrating the good news that his wife was expecting a baby after years of infertility. When everything was ready and the grill fired up, he sent reminders via social media to the couple’s close friends reminding them of the backyard kickback. The responses began coming in and each of the friends had an excuse as to why they couldn’t now attend. One gave the excuse he

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The parables spoken by Jesus were all relatable to Jesus’ audience. Jesus often took an everyday, common subject to explain a deeper and valuable moral lesson to His hearers and followers. This month, my goal has been to take a parable of Jesus and recreate a modern scenario using the interpretive elements in the parable to speak to my contemporary audience. These modern scenarios have used today’s cultural elements to not only make them more accessible to today’s reader, but to also show that the parables Jesus spoke are as applicable today as they were when first spoken. It is my prayer I have captured the essence of what Jesus was saying and that this process of information transfer has been useful and helpful to you. My inspiration for this series has been Pastor Fred L. Crouther, New Covenant Baptist Church, Milwaukee. God has blessed him with the gift of being able to take a parable of Jesus, update it and movingly and persuasively deliver

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SENIOR LIVING

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Wednesday, July 08, 2020

Beat the heat: Eight summer safety tips for seniors Cookouts. Festivals. Gardening. Parades. Summer is a wonderful time for outdoor fun and enjoyment, but for seniors, the heat and sun that come with the season can be dangerous if certain precautions aren’t taken. In fact, a recent University of Chicago Medical Center study found that 40 percent of heat-related fatalities in the U.S. were among people over 65. Here are eight tips to help ensure you and your senior loved one stays safe during the summer months. Keep hydrated. Seniors are more prone to dehydration because they aren’t able to conserve as much water as they could when they were younger and their sense of thirst becomes less acute as they age. Seniors should drink at least 8 glasses of wa-

ter or sports drinks daily and avoid alcohol and caffeinated drinks, which are dehydrating. Stay cool. High temperatures can be life threatening, especially for seniors. If your loved one’s home isn’t air conditioned, encourage them

to visit a friend or relative’s home during high temps. Senior centers, shopping malls, movie theatres and libraries are also good options to stay cool. Dress appropriately. A senior’s summer wardrobe should be full of light-col-

ored, loose-fitting clothing. Choose cotton and other natural fabrics that are more lightweight and breathable than synthetic fabrics like nylon and polyester. Wearing a wide-brimmed hat will help keep the sun off your face and neck. Wear sunscreen. Apply a sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher at least 15-30 minutes before sun exposure. Look for a sunscreen that blocks both UVA and UVB rays. Reapply frequently if engaging in water activities. Preserve your vision. Sun exposure can irritate seniors’ eyes and cause vision damage. Sunglasses should always be worn when exposed to the sun. Avoid sun during peak hours. Plan outdoor exercise or activities either first thing

in the morning (before 10 a.m.) or later in the evening (after 4 p.m.) when the sun isn’t as hot. Remember to hydrate even more than usual when exercising. Watch for heat stroke. Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition. Look for heat stroke symptoms, which include high body temperature, dizziness, headache, confusion, and nausea. Seek immediate medical attention if these signs are present. Use bug spray. The elderly are more susceptible to West Nile virus, so be sure to protect yourself with bug spray, especially at night. By following just a few common sense precautions, you and your senior loved one are sure to have a safe and enjoyable summer.

The impact of COVID-19 on older adults (part 1)

COVID-19 poses a risk not only to the health of older adults who contract the disease but also to those without the health care resources and social structures that contribute to overall wellness Before becoming a professor, Sarah Szanton made house calls to older adults as a nurse practitioner. On her visits, she saw how an older person's home environment can contribute to health outcomes. Now, as the Endowed Professor for Health Equity and Social Justice at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing and the director of the Center for Innovative Care in Aging, Szanton works to identify solutions to narrow racial and socioeconomic disparities for older people.

Szanton joined one of her PhD student mentees, Sarah LaFave, to discuss the challenges that COVID-19 poses for older adults. This conversation has been edited for length and clarity. How is the COVID-19 pandemic affecting older people differently than younger generations? Older adults are more likely to have dire outcomes from the virus. It can also be

daughter to come and help her with groceries or take a shower. As another example, some older people depend on help from a family member or friend with sorting mail and sending in checks to pay bills. At this point, people may not have had a challenge to prevent older someone come into people from being exposed the home to help with those to the virus because they kinds of things for many may not be be fully indepen- weeks. What happens if one dent. For example, a moth- of those unpaid bills is for an er might rely on her adult essential resource or accrues

a lot of interest during this time? We also have to think about all of the ways that the pandemic affects older people's lives beyond morbidity and mortality from the virus itself. I am concerned about people experiencing social isolation as a result of not being able to have visitors and not being able to go out and do things with other people. The effects are compounded for any older person who doesn't have access to technology platforms like Skype and FaceTime or who has limited access to phone calls. Many lower-income older people have payper-minute phone plans, for example, and may have to choose between using their limited minutes for a phone visit with a doctor or a conversation with a grandchild. So we can't assume that a switch to virtual socialization or virtual access to resources is going to work for all older people. Also, I think there's a fair amount of ageism—of people thinking right now, even if they aren't saying it out loud, "Well, older people are going to die anyway." But who are we to say that an 80-year-old wouldn't have otherwise lived to be 100 and done a lot of wonderful things in those 20 years? We would never think that the first 20 years of someone's life don't matter; we should recognize that the last 20 years are just as valuable. (Continued Next Week)

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In Lov Loving ing Memory Of Sandra Campbell Scott Sandra Campbell Scott was born on September 11, 1954 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She was born to Alfredia Scott and Freddie Jones, with a loving father, Frank James Campbell, who raised her from birth. She was preceded in death by her dad, Freddie Jones, siblings Mary Jane (died at birth), Arjean Campbell, Alfred Holiman, Gloria Jones and Brian Jones. Sandra grew up in Wyatt, Missouri, graduating from Charleston High School. She returned to Milwaukee in 1972. Sandra obtained a Bachelor of Arts in Communications and a Master of Arts in Global Business. Retiring from Miller Brewing Company after 36 years in 2010, Sandra founded the Scott Institute of Learning. She developed “The Be Present Program,” a tutoring and mentoring program with Milwaukee Public Schools. Sandra was most proud of her work leading the implementation of the Milwaukee Tutorial Program. She served as the lead in designing and implementing the Milwaukee Chapter of Blacks In Data Processing (along with Melinda Green, Albert Thomas and Fred Reed). Sandra had a supporting role with New Testament Church's Education Committee. Sandra volunteered with many community organizations, such as Hansberry Sands Theatre Company, Milwaukee Times Black Excellence Committee, Community Brain Storming and McGovern Park Block Watch. Sandra was President of Hansberry Sands Theatre Company for more than ten years. Sandra accepted the love of Christ at an early age while in Wyatt, Missouri. She was baptized at New Testament Church in Milwaukee, WI. She leaves to cherish her memory: beloved son, Jeromie; sisters, Loraine Campbell, Gloria Campbell, Floredia Saffold (Tommy), Beverly Kennedy (David) and Mary Jones; brothers, Frank Campbell, Freddie Campbell, Tommy Jones, Jeffrey Jones, Michael Jones; and a host of aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Sandra cherished her family and all that family means. She treasured good friends and often quoted one of her longtime compadres, "Friendships are like bank accounts, you put nothing in, you most certainly can get nothing out." Sandra spent her entire adult life focusing on educating young people, helping them to understand the importance of education. She willingly gave her time, money and talent to improving young lives through her volunteerism in the church, businesses and community. Services for Sandra Campbell Scott were held Saturday, June 27, 2020, at Graceland Cemetery, 6401 North 43rd Street.

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, July 02, 2020

7

Community Focus

Wednesday, July 08, 2020

Focus on Community Community Care's Adult Day Center helps seniors maintain healthy life Paulette Butler looks forward to the days she spends at Community Care’s Vliet Street adult day center. The people are nice. The food is good. While her favorite activity is art, she really looks forward to the time she spends exercising. This is just one of the many ways with which Community Care engages members enrolled in a one-of-a kind program in Wisconsin. The Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly, or PACE, helps frail and disabled individuals age 55 and older live as independently as possible for as long as possible within the community. Community Care is the only managed care organization in Wisconsin to offer the program. Butler has been coming to the PACE day center, 3220 W. Vliet Street, for about 15 years. She enjoys the variety of programming available, like the tai chi class she is currently taking. This is not your typical exercise class. The pace is slower. There’s no sweating. As physical ac-

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now, researchers are studying the effects of tai chi on individuals with chronic health conditions. Tai chi has shown benefits in improving health-related fitness, muscle strength, fall prevention, and flexibility. Kevin Konieczka, a PACE rehab therapy supervisor, inherited the program when he joined Community Care. With a background as a personal trainer, Konieczka quickly discovered the benefits this form of exercise provided to participants at the day center. tivities go, tai chi is low impact. “I like it because I can do it either sitting or standing, because I can’t stand yet because of my balance,” Butler said. “It’s just a smooth, quieter exercise than what most exercise classes are and I like that.” Tai chi is an ancient form of exercise that originated in China. While it has been popular in China for generations, it has taken awhile to catch on in the U.S. But

“You don’t have to be super fit to do this. This is really geared toward the senior population,” Konieczka said. “It helps keep the mind sharp or make new connections.” For more than 40 years, Community Care has been helping adults with longterm care needs connect with the services they need to remain in their own homes and foster independence. In June, Community Care began providing Family Care in Dane County, bringing to 15 the total number of counties it currently serves. Community Care serves more than 15,000 members. In addition to PACE, Community Care also offers Family Care and Family Care Partnership. Community Care contracts with the Wisconsin Department of Health Services to provide all three programs, which are funded through a combination of Medicaid and Medicare.

An NCON Communications Publication


Health & Fitness

Thursday, July 02, 2020

8

Wednesday, July 08, 2020

Focus on Health

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Brought to you by:

Safe and fun summer activities in the age of the coronavirus pandemic   By Karen Stokes  

easy to maintain a six-foot distance is considered low risk. Families can also set up badminton or pickleball courts at home for a change of pace.  

After being quarantined for months, the sun, blue skies and warm temperatures are calling us outdoors. However, the coronavirus is still a threat and there are concerns on how to safely engage in activities this summer.   “Safer at Home” has given time for scientists to better understand how the virus spreads. While they’re still learning, they now have some important clues about which behaviors and activities impact transmission.  

Golf   If you feel you can stay a safe distance from others, you should feel free to head to the course. 

Hiking, walking, camping, jogging, biking   ● All good examples of lower risk outdoor activities    ● Exercise contributes to good health, which helps us maintain a healthy immune system.  

Summer offers more opportunities for outdoor activities. Generally, outdoor activities pose less risk than indoor activities. Greater airflow outside reduces your chance of encountering a large dose of the airborne virus, especially activities without large concentrations of Visiting a park or beach   ● Stay at least six feet from people.   others at all times. Do not Social distancing and wear- use crowded trails and paths.   ing a mask can alter risk level ● Avoid gathering with significantly.   others outside of your There are different levels household.   of risk for various social in● Wash hands often with teractions and activities. Staysoap and water for at least ing home as much as possi20 seconds, especially after ble is still the safest. While no going to the bathroom and activity is without risk, some before eating.   activities may have a reduced risk of COVID-19 infection.   ● Use hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol if

An NCON Communications Publication

could be considered high risk, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Travel and airlines   Traveling to different states in an airplane, where people are in close proximity to one another is considered high risk. Airlines have scrambled to adapt to the new environment. They’ve implemented new measures aimed at reducing contact between travelers, crews and other airport workers. The CDC still advises against all nonessential travel.  

Swimming   ● Being in the water is not a risk, soap and water are not availbut that depends on able.   someone’s ability to remain People with underlying distant from other swim- health conditions and those Backyard BBQ   mers, especially when they’re over the age of 65 are still ● Getting together with not wearing a face covering.   considered at increased risk family or friends who don’t of serious illness from the live in your household comes ● Avoid crowded pools coronavirus, according to the with a risk of infection. The and beaches.   CDC. When gathering with fewer the people, the lower family and friends, consider the risk.   ● Consider going on a the age and underlying conweekday, in the morning or ditions of the people there ● Use disposable plates late in the day.   and those you live with.   and utensils   Reconsider participating This summer people need ● Use Single serve bever- in activities with large gath- to embrace the ‘new norages and condiments.   erings like parades, festivals, mal’. They can still have fun sporting events and concerts, but with smaller groups and Playdates   they are still considered high closer to home. Some situ● Keep the number of kids risk because they bring large ations are difficult to assess limited and stay outside.   groups of people in close but by following the basic proximity to one another for guidelines of social distanc● Keep activities to those an extended period of time. ing, good hand washing hywhere physical distancing Playing soccer, basketball giene and wearing a mask in isn’t challenging.   and football, where you have public, everyone should be large teams in close proxim- able to get outside and enjoy Tennis   ity are also problematic and summer activities.  Singles tennis where it’s

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, July 02, 2020

9

Meal Times

Wednesday, July 08, 2020

Recipes for Meal Time Pop goes the 4th: Serving up some culinary firecrackers Spicy Coleslaw

Level: Easy | Total: 5 min | Active: 5 min Yield: 4 to 6 servings Ingredients Two 14-ounce bags shredded coleslaw mix 1/4 cup mayonnaise 1/4 cup pickled jalapeno peppers, chopped, plus 2 tablespoons pickling juice 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar, plus more if needed 1/4 cup canola oil, plus more if needed 1/2 Vidalia onion, minced Fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper Directions Toss the coleslaw mix, mayonnaise, pickled jalapenos and pickling juice, vinegar, oil, onion and salt and pepper to taste in a large bowl. If the slaw seems too dry, add more vinegar and oil.

Fourth of July Cocktail Level: Easy|Total: 10 min Prep: 10 min | Yield: 1 drink

Ingredients 1 ounce watermelon schnapps 1 big splash cranberry juice 1 very thin slice jalapeno or serrano pepper 1 slice lemon 1 slice lime 1 1/2 ounces tequila 1/4 ounce blue curacao 1/2 ounce simple syrup Watermelon wedge, for garnish (optional) Directions 1.) Mix the schnapps and cranberry juice in a shaker; pour into an ice-filled glass. 2.) Muddle the jalapeno pepper, lemon and lime slices, tequila, blue curacao and simple syrup (to make a batch, dissolve sugar in equal parts hot water and chill) in the shaker. Slowly strain into the glass over the red layer. Garnish with watermelon, if desired.

 Grilled T-Bone Steaks with BBQ Rub

TRY THIS

Total: 25 min | Cook: 25 min | Yield: 4 Servings Ingredients 2 to 4 beef T-Bone or Porterhouse Steaks, cut 1 inch thick (about 2 to 4 pounds) Salt BBQ Rub: 2 tablespoons chili powder 2 tablespoons packed brown sugar 1 tablespoon ground cumin 2 teaspoons minced garlic 2 teaspoons cider vinegar 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1/4 teaspoon ground red pepper Directions 1.) Combine BBQ Rub ingredients; press evenly onto beef steaks. 2.) Place steaks on grid over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill, covered, 11 to 16 minutes (over medium heat on preheated gas www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

grill, 15 to 19 minutes) for medium rare (145 degrees F) to medium (160d egrees F) doneness, turning occasionally. Remove bones and carve steaks into slices, if desired. Season with salt, as desired. To broil, place steaks on rack in broiler pan so surface of beef is 3 to Turn summer drinks into firecrackers by coating the 4 inches from heat. Broil 15 to 20 minutes glass rims with Pop Rocks. Just dampen with lemon for medium rare to medium doneness, turnjuice, then dip the rims in the candies on a plate. ing once.



To get the red-white-and-blue effect, use Tropical Punch (blue) Pop Rocks, then fill the glasses with any red drink or cocktail; we mixed pomegranate and cranberry juice with seltzer.

An NCON Communications Publication


Thursday, July 02, 2020

The Classifieds

10

Wednesday, July 08, 2020

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

DRIVERS WANTED Full Time & Part Time Drivers Wanted Drivers License, Car Insurance Required Opens At 4 p.m., Apply In Person After 4 p.m. Zayna's Pizza, 714 E. Brady Street

Mrs. Fumbanks' Birthday Salutes "Wishing You All The Best!" July 2nd Dawan Davis David Lee Kelley Pennington Aaron Gray July 3rd Brandon Kennedy Anthony Smith July 4th Christina Fumbanks James Fumbanks, Jr. July 6th Juan Chamberlain July 7th Perry Ingram July 5th Daniel D. Lee July 9th Gregory A. Ingram Ariel Ivy July 10th Alexis Smith Christopher Rimmer July 11th Charles Worthington, Jr.

July 18th Karen Rimmer Bobbie J. Lathan Cynthia Fumbanks July 19th George Neal Deirdre Saffold July 20th Jackie Saffold Candace Montgomery July 21st E-Mani Ingram Amaya Fumbanks Layla McGee July 22nd Carry Ingram Glenn Phillps Winnetka Fumbanks Ashley Davis Debra Fields

For application information visit the National Baptist Convention website https://www.nationalbaptist.com/ resources/ministry-opportunities/pastor-openings Any questions regarding the application process should be submitted to the pastoral search committee at: pastoralsearch@mobcmke.org

July 24th Tabitha Ivy Sidney O. Fumbanks, Sr. July 25th Charlene Chamberlain Carene Bass Anastashia Hunté

July 13th Jarett Fields

July 26th Rogerick Griffin

July 14th Geraldine Howard Sharon Turner

July 27th Jason Bailey Leona M. Duncan Laila J. Duncan Morgan A. Conyers Adrienne Green Ann Nichols Nakisha Vernardo

July 16th Sam Ingram

The Mt. Olive Baptist Church located in Milwaukee, WI is prayerfully seeking a full-time Pastor who is called by God and dedicated to the ministry of Jesus Christ. We are seeking a Pastor who will lead and guide us focused on our mission statement: “a church designed to meet the needs of the people through equipping them to evangelize the world for Christ.”

July 23rd Tayo Fumbanks James Hicks, Jr.

July 12th Rhia Thornton Timothy Jones

July 15th Christopher Duncan Jewel Rose Green

Pastor Wanted

July 28th Roslyn Taylor

Do you have a friend, family member, or colleague who has just celebrated or is about to celebrate a birthday? Stop by our office with their name on Monday to get them in that week’s edition of Happy Birthday Salutes! Visit us at 1936 N. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, call us at (414) 263-5088 or e-mail them to miltimes@gmail.com. An NCON Communications Publication

www.milwaukeetimesnews.com


Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, July 02, 2020

11

Wednesday, July 08, 2020

What's Happening

KEEPING YOU CONNECTED to to to to

new music. local talent. incredible stories. each other.

88.9FM | radiomilwaukee.org

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An NCON Communications Publication


Pick'n Save

Thursday, July 02, 2020

12

Wednesday, July 08, 2020

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

STAR SPANGLED

SAVINGS!

2X FUEL POINTS

Fresh Atlantic Salmon Fillets Farm-Raised

7

$

with digital coupon.*

*Restrictions apply. See associate for details. Redeem at BP or Amoco

Every Thursday-Sunday, through July 26.

99

FRESH DEAL

/LB

6

With Card

$

BIG SAVINGS FOR YOUR BBQ!

99

With Card

Johnsonville Party Pack Brats or Italian Sausage Select Varieties, 2.85 lb

Red, Green or Black Seedless Grapes or Organic Red, Green, or Black Seedless Grapes, $1.99 lb with Card

99¢ With Card

/LB

FRESH DEAL

1

Red, Orange or Yellow Bell Peppers or English Cucumbers

99

799

$

$ 99

¢

With Card

Black Angus T-Bone or Porterhouse Steaks

/EA

/LB

With Card

With Card

2 lb Strawberries

8-Piece Fried Chicken

or 16 oz Organic Strawberries, 2/$5 with Card

or Rotisserie Chicken, 32 oz or 24 oz, Fully Cooked, In the Deli

FINAL COST When You Buy 2

2/$10

JULY 6TH

FRIED CHICKEN DAY

When you buy 2 or more in the same transaction with Card. Quantities less than 2 will be $6.99 each.

$

93% Supreme Lean Ground Beef

With Card

FINAL COST

Sold in 3 lb Package or More

499 /LB

With Card

When You Buy 4

$ / 4 12

Potato Salad, Macaroni Salad or Coleslaw Select Varieties, In the Deli

1

$ 99

With Card

/LB

Coca-Cola, Pepsi or 7UP

With Card

12-Pack, 12 fl oz Cans or 8-Pack, 12 fl oz Bottles or Bubly Sparkling Water 12-Pack, 12 fl oz Cans; Select Varieties

FINAL COST

When you buy 4 in the same transaction with Card. Limit 2 Rewards per transaction. Quantities less than 4 priced up to $5.49 each.

When You Buy 3

1

288

$

Pork Back Ribs Bone-In

$ 88

/LB

With Card

/EA

Raw Shrimp, 13-15 ct or Bulk Salmon Burgers

With Card

Lay's Potato Chips

5-8 oz or Doritos, 9.25-11.25 oz or Barcel Takis, 9.9 oz; Select Varieties

Vizzy or Blue Moon

799

Select Varieties, 12-Pack, 12 fl oz Cans

$

When you buy 3 in the same transaction with Card. Quantities not purchased in multiples of 3 will be $2.79-$2.99 each with Card.

$

11

99

/LB

With Card

With Card

Kemps Ice Cream Select Varieties, 48 fl oz BUY 1, GET 1 of Equal or Lesser Value

FREE

SAVE

Roundy's Cottage Cheese or Kroger Sour Cream or Dip

10 10 /$

With Card

With Card

Select Varieties, 1.5-6.7 fl oz

Select Varieties, 6-8 oz

1

$ 88

Kroger Butter Select Varieties, 16 oz

1

$ 99

FREE PICKUP!

SALE DATES:

Thursday, July 2 through Tuesday, July 7, 2020 Selection may vary by store, limited to stock on hand.

699

$

With Card

Shop our app or website. Restrictions apply. See associate for details.

When You Buy 10

32 fl oz or Propel, 24 fl oz or Honest Tea, 16.9 fl oz; Select Varieties

SNAP EBT CARDS NOW ACCEPTED AT PICKUP!

We reserve the right to limit quantities and correct all printed errors. Not all items and prices available at all locations unless otherwise noted. Prices subject to state and local taxes, if applicable. No sales to dealers. Purchase requirements exclude discounts, coupons, gift cards, lottery tickets, bus passes, alcohol, tobacco and use of Fresh Perks Card®. All prices “with card” are discounted by using your Fresh Perks Card® *Free promotion will be applied to item of least value.

An NCON Communications Publication

FINAL COST Gatorade, G2 or G Zero

69¢ /EA

With Card

When you buy 10 in the same transaction with Card. Quantities less than 10 will be priced at $1.00-$1.25 each with Card.

With Card

With Card

Shelf Tag Reflects Savings With Card

Sale Price, $2.79-$5.59

Neutrogena Sun Care

Roundy's Shredded or Bar Cheese

30%

Everyday Living Kitchen Gadgets

Select Varieties, 16 oz

See our website or app for details.

SAVE UP TO per gallon of BP or Amoco fuel!*

*Restrictions apply. See PicknSave.com/fuel for details.

Kroger Original or Instant Light Charcoal Briquets 11.6-15.4 lbs

699

$

With Card

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Profile for Milwaukee Times News

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Digital Edition Issue July 2, 2020  

Miltimes 07-02-20 issue_12 pgs

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Digital Edition Issue July 2, 2020  

Miltimes 07-02-20 issue_12 pgs

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