Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Digital Edition Issue June 4, 2020

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Local funeral home owner and businessman Arthur Reid, Jr., passes at age 82 Arthur Reid, Jr., business man, founder and president of Reid’s New Golden Gate Funeral Home and a longtime benefactor of student education in Milwaukee, died Wednesday, May 27, 2020. He was 82 years old. Arthur Reid was born in Jackson, Tennessee. His family relocated to Milwaukee when he was 13 years old. He first became interested in the funeral business due to the fact he was friends with the children of the late Lamar Williamson, founding director of what is now called the Leon L. Williamson Funeral Home. In an interview in 2015 with The Milwaukee Times, Arthur recalled his introduction to the funeral business. “One day in 1956, Mr. Williamson came to me and asked if I

wanted to learn the funeral business or if I wanted to keep fooling around like the other kids outside,” he said. “I never looked back.” Myra Holland, co-founder of Fred’s Ornamental Security Doors, lived in the same duplex as Arthur for the first year after her family moved to Milwaukee. “He was very ambitious and well organized,” she said. “Even when he was a young man, he had a plan to own his own funeral home. He accomplished his goal.” Before opening his own funeral home, Arthur Reid worked in a factory and at several other jobs, saving money and learning the business. In 1981, he co-founded Reid and Yandell Funeral Home, which eventually became the first Golden Gate

Jr., became the sole owner and operator of Reid’s New Golden Gate Funeral Home located at 5665 North Teutonia Avenue in 2008. In 2012 Reid's New Golden Gate Funeral Home opened up its second location at 1910 Taylor Avenue in Racine, Wisconsin. A third location was later established at 2535 North Teutonia Avenue in Milwaukee. Being successful in business was never enough for Reid, however. Milwaukee photographer George Bryant recalled that Reid was Funeral Home in 1986. For also a devoted Christian seven years, Golden Gate family man, and community Funeral Home serviced the philanthropist. Milwaukee community. In “What a great legacy,” 1993, Golden Gate Funer- Bryant said. “He had a real al Home changed its name concern for young people as to The New Golden Gate well as the organizations and Funeral Home. Arthur Reid the people who work with

The death of George Floyd sparks protests in Milwaukee and across the world

Photos by Kim A. Robinson

Hundreds rallied Friday, May 29, 2020 and through the weekend in Milwaukee to denounce the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis and other acts of police misconduct across the country before marching to I-43 and shutting down part of the freeway. The protest began with a moment of silence to honor Floyd, who died Monday, May 25, 2020, after a Minneapolis police officer kneeled on his neck for more than eight minutes as he was gasping for air and pleading that he couldn't breathe. "We're here in solidarity," said Vaun Mayes, a community activist who organized the event outside the Wisconsin Black Historical Society. The four officers involved in Floyd's death have been fired, but not all have been arrested or charged, and the ensuing protests in Minneapolis have led to several nights of violent unrest. As demonstrators rallied and An NCON Communications Publication

marched Friday afternoon in Milwaukee, authorities in Minnesota announced the officer who put his knee on Floyd's neck had been arrested and charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter. Floyd's death has been condemned by national and local politicians, law enforcement leaders and everyday Americans of all races; and for many black Americans it was another painful example of the injustice and discrimination they encounter daily. Fred Royal, president of the NAACP Milwaukee Branch, called on those gathered to keep working for justice after the rally. “This is to honor those who died at the hands of police brutality," Royal said, adding: "The question is what are you going to do when the cameras are gone and the excitement dies down?” Then, holding handmade signs reading "I can't breathe" and "Black lives matter," hundreds of people (Continued on pg. 7)

them.” Since 2011, Arthur and his wife, Mary, partnered with WISN-TV Channel 12 and The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper to donate laptop computers to the Milwaukee area high school graduates tapped by the newspaper as Louvenia Johnson Scholarship recipients during the annual Black Excellence Awards. The couple also sponsored field trips and donated to various youth causes through their church, St. Matthew Christian Methodist Episcopal Church. Arthur Reid, Jr., is survived by Mary and two daughters: Sheila Reid Johnson and Phyllis Reid. Funeral arrangements are still pending at this time.

1967 Clifford McKissick murder shows how little things have changed By William Scott Gooden By the end of the day on Tuesday, May 26, 2020, many people in this city and all over the country knew the name of George Floyd. The 44-yearold was arrested by police outside a shop in Minneapolis, Minnesota. One of the officers, Derek Chauvin, leaned on his neck for nine minutes, later resulting in Floyd’s death. But do you know or remember the killing of Clifford McKissick in 1967? Sparked by brawls with police, a racist threat and gunfire, a riot broke out on Milwaukee's north side on July 30, 1967. The National Guard was brought in to quell the violence that continued over four days with burning, looting and sniper fire. By the time it was over, 100 people had been hurt, more than 1,700 had been arrested and four people, including Police Officer Brian Moschea, were dead. On the third day, an 18-year-old African American college student, Clifford McKissick, was shot in the neck as he was running into his house. He died on the floor of his family’s home. Police officers involved in the incident said they saw McKissick and other young people lighting gasoline-filled bottles and throwing them into a paint store. The officers said the teen ignored their order to halt. McKissick was a graduate of Rufus King High School, sophomore at the Wisconsin State College–Whitewater (now the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater), and worked a summer job as a counselor for the Milwaukee Boys' Club. His death was

one of the greatest tragedies of the disturbance. The police claimed that McKissick and three other youths had tried to set fire to a building with Molotov cocktails, and that it was while fleeing from the scene that police shot McKissick. McKissick’s family and several neighbors claimed, however, that he had been sitting on the front porch when all of a sudden everyone heard gunshots. Everyone, including McKissick, ran. But his family said there was no imminent danger to anyone since Mc Kissick was running into the house. His death was followed by protests. About 500 people attended his funeral, at which local civil rights activist Father James Groppi spoke. McKissick's family filed a lawsuit alleging the officer who shot him used excessive force. The attorney for the (Continued on pg. 2) www.milwaukeetimesnews.com


In The News

Thursday, June 4, 2020

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Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Mayor names Lafayette Crump to head city development Commissioner-nominee is a champion of economic growth and inclusion

On Wednesday, May 27, 2020, Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett appointed Lafayette Crump as Commissioner of City Development. Commissioner-designate Crump is a Milwaukee native, an attorney, and a widely respected figure in the city’s development community. Currently, Crump is Chief Diversity, Vendor and Engagement Officer for the Milwaukee 2020 Host Committee for the Democratic National Convention. “Lafayette Crump is an ideal candidate to lead the Department of City Development because of his remarkable qualifications and

his strong commitment to connect everyone with Milwaukee’s economic success,” Mayor Barrett said. “Throughout this city there are opportunities for new investment, more jobs, and improved inclusiveness. Commissioner Crump will be a champion of this economic development work.” Crump will succeed Rocky Marcoux, who has led the Department for almost sixteen years. Marcoux recently announced his longplanned retirement. After graduating from

kee law firms. He has held leadership positions with Prism Technical Management and Marketing Services, a company engaged as a consultant on many of the prominent development projects in Milwaukee in recent years, including the Northwestern Mutual Tower, the Fiserv Forum and public plaza, and the Milwaukee streetcar. Almost one year ago, he began his Lafayette Crump assignment with the convention host comDuke University School of Law, Crump worked as an mittee. He is an Adjunct Proattorney at multiple Milwau- fessor of Law at Marquette

University, and was recently President of the Board of Directors of Safe and Sound. His appointment as Commissioner of City Development is subject to Common Council confirmation. The Department of City Development is Milwaukee’s lead agency for economic development, planning, real estate, commercial corridor development, and private sector housing development. Both the Redevelopment Authority of the City of Milwaukee and the Neighborhood Improvement Development Corporation are housed within the Department.

'67 McKissick murder

On October 30, 1975, eleven years after Clifford McKissick’s death, the law firm of Eisenberg & Kletzke S.C., who had earlier represented the family in the original lawsuit, argued on appeal before the Wisconsin Supreme Court. One of the lawyers who had spoken during the hearing was Michael F. Hupy, who would later go on to be a senior partner of Hupy and Abraham, S.C. Mr. Hupy, who had only graduated from law school about 4 years prior, found the facts in the case shocking and appalling; Hupy stated, “Clifford McKissick was an 18 year old young man needlessly killed by the police in his own house. When Clifford's mother went to her door to

call for help from the police officers, they shot at her. "The police then went into the house, refused to aid her in calling for help for her son, made her march into the kitchen with her hands up and questioned her at length in the presence of her dying son.” Despite some of these facts, the state high court sent the case back to the lower court, where it was eventually dismissed in 1981. Flash forward to 2020 and the George Floyd and McKissick cases have very unsettling similarities. Both men were unarmed; both were confronted by three or more police officers; both clearly involved the use of excessive force; and that use

who have witnessed the killings or have information on them rarely break their silence." One of the things that has changed in the last few years is that bystanders are no longer just watching these events unfold; they are pulling out their cameras on their phones and filming the event in progress. Thanks to this we now have a clearer picture of these incidents and the intent and attitude of the individuals involved. It is because of this evidence that many are calling for change in police force policies across the country. In essence, 8 minutes of cellphone footage can speak volume and trigger change. No pun intended…

(Continued from pg. 1) city used what is known as a Demurrer lawsuit (what would be known today as a motion to dismiss), an assertion by the defendant that although the facts alleged by the plaintiff in the complaint may be true, they do not entitle the plaintiff to prevail. Essentially, the defense stated that since McKissick did not cooperate with the officers’ orders, McKissick was responsible for his own death. The court would rule in the officer's favor. However, that was not the final word on the incident.

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of excessive force resulted in both men’s deaths. When asked about the similarities of the cases, Hupy stated, “The clearest similarity is the ‘shoot first, ask questions later’ attitude of the police officers involved, and their blatant racism in regards to handling the victims.” When asked why so little has changed with respect to these killings, Hupy said, "The public wants to believe and trust the police officers as they are supposed to protect us. And since most of these cases have very little evidence other than the word of the officers involved (as the victim is often dead and unable to speak for themselves) we tend to believe them. Also, fellow officers

MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Louvenia Johnson Luther Golden Nathan Conyers (1981-2008) (1981-2005) (1981- 2018 ) Lynda J. Jackson Conyers, Publisher Morgan A. Conyers, Associate Publisher Jacquelyn D. Heath, Editorial Page Editor

The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper STAFF Publisher/President Lynda J. Jackson Conyers

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Graphic Artists William Gooden Michelle Anibas

Founders Louvenia Johnson Nathan Conyers Luther Golden Marketing Carmen Murguía

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

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Perspectives

Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Our Community Voices Now is the time for racial justice By: Ellen M. Gilligan President and CEO, Greater Milwaukee Foundation There are two public health crises in America right now. One is quite recent. One has been afflicting us for generations. Racism is our nation’s oldest sin and most vile disease, and I am grief-stricken that we are again mourning more black lives lost and more communities capsized, all the while lamenting that nothing has changed since the last atrocity. Well, we must change, and we must start now. Our communities of color are vibrant, unique and essential, yet we accept that in Milwaukee, an African American can expect to live 14 fewer years than a person who is white. There are no excuses, and there can be no more delays. We need to eradicate the systemic racism that withholds wellness and power from people of color and keeps our entire region from truly thriving. We cannot continue to tolerate the apathy or intent that causes the lives of black and brown fathers, brothers, mothers, sisters, children to be disregarded, devalued and discarded. This cycle of pain endlessly affects people

in our community, and the recurring injustice – whether in our back yard or 1,000 miles away – causes damage in equal amounts to the heart and health of all who live with the reality that the next time history repeats, they or their loved ones could be in harm’s way. Individual acts of violence and prejudice inflame these wounds, but the roots are embedded in how we have shaped society in a manner that benefits people differently, and for the most part, those differences are favorable if you’re white and detrimental if you’re not. That cardinal disparity of embedded racism, and the systems that support it, are what leaders across our community – especially white leaders – must work together to dismantle. The policies, practices and social norms that drive life experiences to diverge by race are obvious to those affected but often remain invisible to those with privilege: Housing covenants and real estate practices that have prevented nonwhite residents from living in communities of their choice and securing mortgages and homes that would have changed their family’s trajectory for prosperity. The uneven application of

Ellen M. Gilligan laws resulting in incarceration rates for black men that have reached epidemic levels. School and social structures built to be navigated by English language speakers, leading to disparate access to learning and resources for those whose fluencies do not include English. And now, COVID-19, which, through the disproportionate rates of infection and loss of life in black and Latino communities, has proven just how deep our health inequities run. These and many other systems of bias predate us all, but many in power have tended to them through the years while others have per-

petuated them through inaction. For how long have our friends and neighbors of color cried for justice, only for their calls to be met with silence and indifference by those who should be their allies? The reactions to injustice we see now are the result of accumulated oppression and the denial of hope that the disparities, the persecution, the dehumanizing treatment will ever end. But end they must – if not yesterday, then today. First, we must be willing to honestly see the suffering in our neighborhoods, our communities and our country. We must exit the comfort of our individual existence and hold tight to the humanity that allows us to recognize the innate worth all people possess. We must celebrate diversity, including the rich contributions that communities of color have made and continue to make to our collective way of life. Most importantly, we must hold ourselves and each other accountable for permanently changing both our narrative and reality. The Greater Milwaukee Foundation made a genera-

tional commitment to racial equity and inclusion in 2016, and the work we have accomplished side-by-side with community means something, but it is not enough. Our pace must be faster, our resolve must be sharper, our urgency must be greater as we seek justice. A much greater burden must be carried by white leaders and white institutions, and I pledge to do all I can to advance a new era that ends racist structures. As your community foundation, we love Milwaukee and have spent the last 105 years dedicated to its brightest future. I know you love Milwaukee too. Our community has come together before to develop bold solutions to big problems. We have the knowledge. We have the ability. Together, we have everything we need to transform Milwaukee. I want you to hear and know that you matter. Your family matters. Your community matters. Now is the time to rid ourselves of the virus of racism so everyone in our community can experience the joy, health, safety and fulfillment in life that they deserve. Now is the time for everyone to thrive.

How long, O Lord, how long? The words of King David that appear in Psalm 13 of the Old Testament echo in the hearts of American people of color today: “How long, O Lord? Will you forget me forever? How long will you hide your face from me? How long must I take counsel in my soul and have sorrow in my heart all the day? How long shall my enemy be exalted over me?”

Spanish-speaking people, whose ancestors inhabited this land for many decades before the arrival of English speakers, have been robbed and abused at almost every point of contact with the oppressive forces of “Manifest Destiny.”

Asian immigrants and their descendants, who bent their backs to build this nation’s wealth, have at different times been unjustly barred entry into this country, deDespite its self-aggran- ported for no legitimate readizement, America is an ugly, son and interned in concenhateful place, filled with pain. tration camps merely because of their cultural ancestry. The building blocks of this nation were not freedom and The perverse notion of democracy, but genocide, en- white supremacy has done all slavement and race hatred. of this. There are those who The historical record is clear. believe that, because of their For more than 400 years “whiteness,” they are more since we were dragged here, deserving of the fruits of the existence in this country for labor of our community garAfrican Americans has been den than are people of colheart-wrenching. or. This evil notion of white supremacy can be tracked For more than a century be- through the ages. fore that, people of the first nations suffered systematic There no longer can be any attempts at extermination at pretext that America is poputhe hands of European in- lated with only kind and carvaders bent on genocide. ing people who abide by the rule of law and respect the sanctity of human life. www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

Texas;

Oscar H. Blayton

Trump when he lies about China bringing COVID-19 Breonna Taylor, killed in to U.S. shores, rekindling old her bed in Louisville; fears and intolerance toward anyone with Asian ancestry. George Floyd, killed on a Minneapolis street. There must be responses to these injustices. These These are just a few of transgressions must stop. the Black victims murdered Americans of all stripes must in the name of law enforce- make a legitimate effort to ment in America. stop them.

But let us not forget the King David prayed for a suffering of other people of cure to injustice thousands of years ago when he wrote: We live in a country that color in America. placed a pernicious and perLet us not forget the “Consider and answer me, O verse human being in the daughters and mothers of Lord my God; highest seat of authority. the first nations, whose murlight up my eyes, lest I sleep And in so doing, all the minders and disappearances at the sleep of death, ions of the worst demons of an alarming rate cause little lest my enemy say, ‘I have this country were let loose to concern among most Ameriprevailed over him,’ victimize the most vulneracans and get little attention in lest my foes rejoice because I ble segments of our national the country’s media. am shaken.” community. Let us not forget the Latinx children locked up in cages like animals because they tried to enter this country in the same manner as countless Europeans who came without passports or papers Ahmaud Arbery, killed two centuries earlier. while jogging in a Georgia Let us not forget the Asian suburb; Americans who are spat Atatiana Jefferson, killed on, punched and kicked by in her home in Fort Worth, bigots who believe Donald African Americans are not the only people bearing the brunt of white supremacy, but we see our humanity denied and cry out for justice for:

We must open our eyes and not sleep the sleep of death. We must not let the enemies of justice prevail over us. We must march on, ‘til Victory is won. Oscar H. Blayton is a former Marine Corps combat pilot and human rights activist who practices law in Virginia.

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Obituaries

Obituary Notices

Thursday, June 4, 2020

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Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

In Loving Memory of Dorothy Balenger Stanley

Dorothy Frances Balenger was born on August 11, 1927 to the union of Russell T. and Dorothy (nee: Adams) Balenger in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Dorothy received her formal education in the Milwaukee Public School system in Milwaukee, WI; Cincinnati Public School System in Cincinnati, Ohio; and the St. Paul Public School System in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Dorothy accepted Christ as her Savior at a young age and was united with St. Mark African Methodist Episcopal Church, where she sang along with her mother in the church choir. Dorothy F. Balenger was united in holy matrimony with Gaston Stanley on January 26, 1943 in Milwaukee, foods at home; horse back WI. Their union was blessed riding; playing piano, singing in the church choir, and with three children. loving on her grandchildren great-grandchildren. She was employed by In- and Dorothy was a member of land Container as a shipping the Women’s Auxillary of clerk for 30 years. In her leithe Esquire Social Club and sure, she enjoyed reading, a member of the Milwaukee dancing, cooking dessert Old Timers.

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Dorothy F. Balenger Stanley departed this life on May 22, 2020. She was preceded in death by her father, Russell Balenger; mother, Dorothy M. Balenger; husband Gaston Stanley; youngest daughter, Cecelia D. Stanley Khalil; and granddaughter, Shearida “Babydoll” Stanley.

"Grandma Chief," as she was known to many of the children in her tribe, leaves to cherish her memory her daughter, Regina GS (Willie) Johnson; son, Gaston L. Stanley; brother, Russell T. Balenger II; and; fourteen grandchildren, Dominique D. Devereaux, Qunicy J. Davis, Lawrence Lasciers, Sherell Stanley, Donta Stanley, Christal (Garett) Eversley, Reginal Stanley, Erika Stanley, Gastone Stanley, Taj (Christal) Stanley, Willie (Tamika) Wilsantis, Michael (April), Richard A. Johnson, Vanessa (Anthony) Johnson; nineteen great grandchildren, Denver (William) Dobay, Landon Stanley, Kaliha Davis, Isabella Davis, Emora Davis, Prince Davis,

Taj Stanley, Jr., Jala Gray Stanley, Cecelia Stanley, Ishmale Stanley, Kamal Stanley, Avery Johnson, Grace Johnson, Emitt Johnson, Natalie Johnson, Anthony Wesley Jr., Ace Wesley, Kristofor Lascreis, and Mahogony Lascreis; five great great grandchildren, Landon Stanley, Maya Dobay, Memphis Dobay, Donavan Johnson, and Kessidy Lasereis; nephews, Russell T. Balenger III and Rashidi Balenger; niece Rasaha Balenger Singleton; and a host of nieces, nephews, relatives and friends.

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

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Christian Times

Wednesday, June 10, 2020

The Counseling Corner

By Rev. Judith T. Lester, B.Min. M.Th

ALS Awareness Month - #ALSAwareness (conclusion) ALS (or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) Awareness Month is observed in the United States during the month of May. In Canada, June has been declared as ALS Awareness Month by the Canadian Minister of Health. It has been my resolve for nearly 20 years, to bring awareness to various topics through this column. This month, the focus has been on ALS (also known as “Lou Gehrig’s Disease”). If presenting awareness days in this column gets people’s attention, involved in advocacy, or talking about the issue, even if it includes social media activism; then the attention given is achieving the purpose for which it is intended. It is my prayer that you just don’t read these ‘raising awareness’ articles; but that you will go a step further and do something about what you have been made aware of. In other words, don’t just post a status in support of the awareness, but choose a cause and act to address it!

offers the following areas where you can show your support for the ALS community by participating, advocating or donating to advance the fight toward a world free of ALS. The suggestions were published in the ALS News Today1: 1. Educate. The ALS Association recognizes that many people, even if they have heard of ALS, have only a limited or hazy conception of what the disease is or what life is like for persons living with it. The ALS Association has created a video that can be shared via social media, email or posting on a volunteer participant’s blog or website. Go to: http://www.alsa.org/ news/public-awareness/ als-awareness-month/2017/ signs-symptoms-vid.html to view the short video.

2. Color It Red. The official color of the ALS Association is red. ALS Association suggests that you increase ALS Awareness by changIn the conclusion of this ing your Facebook status to series, the ALS Association red during ALS Awareness

one; donations are also accepted in the form of medical equipment or the donation of auction or raffle items. Volunteer opportunities are also available. Contact the local ALS Wisconsin Chapter for more information on donation opportunities:

ration of this information. No representations or warranties for its contents, either expressed or implied, are offered. Neither the publisher nor the writer shall be liable in any way for readers’ efforts to apply, rely or utilize the informaWisconsin Chapter of the tion or recommendations presented herein as they may not be suitable ALS Association for you or necessarily appropriate 3333 North Mayfair Road for every situation to which they Month. Wauwatosa, Wisconsin may refer. This information is for 53222 educational purposes only and is 3. Fundraising. One of P: 414-763-2220 not intended to replace the advice the biggest contributions a www@alsawi.org of your medical doctor or health person can make in the fight 1 against ALS is through fundMay is ALS Awareness care provider. If you would like raising. Fundraising helps to Month, Charles Moore, May to contact Rev. Lester, write to her c/o P.O. Box 121, Brookfield, raise money for research and 2017. WI. 53008. supply essential services for people living with the disIf you’ve missed any artiease. Contact the Wisconsin cle in this series, feel free to chapter of the ALS for addi- view the archived digital editional events they sponsor in tion at: https://milwaukeesupport of ALS. timesnews.com/category/ digital-editions If you are interested in donating to ALS Wisconsin Next Month: Selected parChapter, to help in the fight ables of Jesus modernized against ALS, go to https:// for our contemporary auwww.alsawi.org/donate. Do- dience. nations are accepted in any amount as a personal donaGeneral Disclaimer: The writer tion or in honor of a loved has used her best efforts in prepa-

The New Jubilee Community Choir Presents Our 18th Annual Scholarship Concert Our New Date: Sunday, October 11, 2020 at 4:00 P.M. At: St. Paul Episcopal Church 914 E. Knapp St. Milwaukee, WI 53202 We pray God's peace for the families who have lost loved ones as a result of the Coronavirus, as well as for individuals who have contracted the virus and are struggling to recover.

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'Come Study With Us The Book Of I Peter. This Is A Community Bible Study. You Will Truly Be Blessed

Presented By: The Committee for the Promotion of Excellence in Music Savannah Reeves, Board Chair

Dr. Hugh Davis, Jr., Th.D. Bible Teacher Mount Carmel Baptist Church

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In The News

Thursday, June 4, 2020

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Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Ella Jones is elected first Black mayor of Ferguson, MO Jones is also the first woman to lead the Missouri city, which erupted in protests in 2014 after a white police officer shot and killed Michael Brown, a black teenager. Ella Jones became the first African American and first woman elected mayor in Ferguson, MO, on Tuesday, June 3, 2020, nearly six years after the city erupted in protests when a white police officer shot and killed a black teenager Michael Brown, propelling Ferguson into the national spotlight and galvanizing the "Black Lives Matter" movement. The victory for. Jones, a Ferguson City Council member, came as another night of protests unfolded throughout the country over the killing of George Floyd and persistent police brutality against black Americans.

had both vowed to continue changes enacted after the 2014 shooting of Brown, including a federal consent decree, a legally binding agreement requiring reforms to a police department. Both had made clear that they supported peaceful protests after the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, while condemning the violence that has broken out in several cities.

“I’ve got work to do — because when you’re an African American woman, they require more of you than they require of my counterpart,” Jones said after her victory, in Jones, 65, and her oppo- a video posted online Tuesnent, Heather Robinett, 49, day night by journalist Jason

Rosenbaum of St. Louis Public Radio. “I know the people in Ferguson are ready to stabilize their community,

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and we’re going to work together to get it done.” Jones, who prevailed with 54 percent of the vote, will succeed James Knowles III, who has been the mayor since 2011 and could not run for re-election because of term limits. Jones lost to Knowles in the 2017 mayoral election. A resident of Ferguson for more than 40 years, Jones is also a pastor in the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Protests convulsed Ferguson for weeks in 2014, after the white officer, Darren Wilson, shot and killed Brown, 18. A grand jury and the Department of Justice declined to prosecute Wilson, who eventually resigned.

After losing her 2017 bid for mayor, Jones said that many black residents told her that they did not believe electing her would change their own fortunes and questioned whether she had accomplished anything in her two years on the City Council.

In 2015, Jones became the first black woman elected to the City Council, and though she was critical of the city’s law enforcement system, she did not have enthusiastic backing from protesters at the time.

Ferguson is one of the smallest cities in the country with a federal consent decree, which includes scores of new policies to reform the police department.

“If you’ve been oppressed so long, it’s hard for you to break out to a new idea,” Jones said at the time. “And when you’ve been governed by fear and people telling you that the city is going to decline because an African American person is going to be in charge, then you tend to listen to the rhetoric and don’t open your mind to new possibilities.”

Like many other cities throughout the country, Fer“I don’t get along to go guson officials declared a along,” she said then. “If I state of emergency and issee something that needs to sued a curfew in recent days, be addressed, I will address as the protests over police it.” brutality have continued.

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What's Happening

Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Con-drag-ulations Milwaukee: Presenting our new Queen, Jaida Essence Hall

"America's next drag superstar" is Milwaukee's own Jaida Essence Hall. Hall, a leading player in the local drag scene for nearly a decade, won season 12 of VH1's hit reality competition Friday, May 29, 2020. "I know how it is to grind so hard and so many times be told no," Hall told RuPaul on Friday's finale. "(Winning) will give me validation that once you know what your craft is and you know what you're doing, that you're at the right place at the right time for the right reasons." And winning the show is exactly what Hall did Friday, after she faced off against finalists Crystal Methyd and

Gigi Goode for three virtual lip-sync battles, all filmed from their respective homes due to the coronavirus pandemic. "She is performing like she's in Madison Square Garden and the place was packed," said judge Ross Matthews of Hall's fierce, hair-flipping, high-kicking performance of Ciara's "Get Up" from her living room. Evidently RuPaul agreed, giving Hall the crown Friday following a triumphant season that included three competition wins and ending up in the bottom two only once, and praise from

Jaida Essence Hall

guest judges like Chaka Khan, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Jeff Goldblum. Portrayed by Jared Johnson, 32, who grew up on Milwaukee's north side, Hall emerged in Milwaukee's drag scene nine years ago, becoming a regular performer at Hamburger Mary's. Hall, who currently lives in West Allis, has performed at a Milwaukee Bucks halftime show, won pageants in Madison and Minneapolis, and taken the stage multiple times at PrideFest in Milwaukee. "I've gained a really good support group in my own city," Hall told the Journal Sentinel in February. "I'm glad that I'm from my city, and I'm so happy when I walk through different parts of my city that I came from here and I made something for myself." Talking to RuPaul on Friday's finale, Hall shared some more insight into that Milwaukee upbringing. "Growing up‌in one of the worst neighborhoods in the city it was one of those things where you had to fight for everything that you wanted no matter what it was," Hall said on Friday's finale. "Coming up from a place

that was so hard to grow up in and so rough, it made me a better competitor in so many aspects of my life." Hall was also brought to tears by video messages from her father and brother on Friday's finale, and talked about how important her late grandmother was in her life. "I would want to tell my grandmother, 'Thank you so much for being the first person to accept me for who I was even though I didn't even know who I was then," Hall told RuPaul Friday. "She was this super glamorous woman all the time. ... Every time I get to step on the stage in drag I get to live this glamorous fantasy. I get to live all the opportunities I don’t get to share with my grandmother now." As the winner of "RuPaul's Drag Race" Friday, Hall won a year supply of Anastasia Beverly Hills Cosmetics and a $100,000 cash prize. And Friday she became the second Milwaukee drag scene star to win "RuPaul's Drag Race." Wisconsin native Trixie Mattel, who competed on season seven of the show, won "RuPaul's Drag Race All Stars" in 2018.

Photo by Kim A. Robinson

Milwaukee protests

Milwaukee leaders urged demonstrators to act peacefully and condemned the killing of Floyd, with May(Continued from pg. 1) or Tom Barrett calling it began marching east on Cen- "shocking, undefendable and ter Street, slowing traffic as unjustifiable." they made their way toward As the protest continued downtown Milwaukee. into the weekend, what had The crowd marched onto started for the most part I-43 from the North Avenue and had remained peaceful, off-ramp, stopping traffic in some looting and vandalthe northbound lanes before ism did occur throughout walking off at Fond du Lac the city. Due to the looting, Avenue. Mayor Tom Barrett ordered The crowd paused out- a curfew starting at 9:00 p.m. side Milwaukee Police De- and lasting until 5;00 a.m. partment headquarters, then Sunday morning. looped north to the MilwauProtests not only took kee County Courthouse beplace this past week in Milfore heading back to N. 27th waukee and several other and W. Center streets. cities in the U.S. Peaceful Those who organized and marches also took place in spoke at the rally repeatedly cities across the globe, incalled for a safe demonstra- cluding Toronto Canada; tion and sought to avoid the London, England; Auckland, violent unrest seen in Min- New Zealand; Sydney, Ausneapolis and other cities in tralia; Paris, France; Tokyo, Japan Copenhagen, Denrecent days. mark; and a number of other locations. www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

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If I could do one thing, I’d make sure we stay healthy. If you could do one thing for your community, what would it be? More walk-in clinics? More funding for health services closer to home? Completing the 2020 Census is a safe and easy way to inform billions in funding for hundreds of services and programs in your community. Respond online, by phone, or by mail.

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Announcements

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We Offer Year Round Services at Affordable Rates!

WINTER, SPRING, SUMMER & FALL!

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ALL WEATHER, LLC. Managing & Maintaining Properties

Helping Make Milwaukee Beautiful Again! We Can Help You With: • Managing and maintaining properties • Home remodeling and renovations • Lawn Maintenance • Bush/Hedge/Shrub trimming and removal • Outdoor clean-up

• Flowerbed planting and maintenance • Leave raking and removal • Gutter Cleaning • Yard Winterization • Snow Removal and salting • And much more!

Call Home & Lawn Care Specialist Rodney Cell #: 920-815-1534

Email: Rodneyfisher187@gmail.com

We service rental properties big and small.

You’re Not Just A Customer, You’re Family! Mission Statement Our mission at All Weather LLC is to preserve and increase the value of the owner properties we service. Vl/e provide professional and cost conscious services for our customers and we are committed to solving problems and not creating them. We value each relationship involved in the process which is reflected in our motto, "You're not just a customer, You're family". We achieve this through open communication, by providing responsive and personal attention to our customers, and by emphasizing professionalism and teamwork within our company. By beautifying your properties we are also beautifying the community.

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

MILWAUKEE PUBLIC SCHOOLS RFP DOCUMENT INFORMATION FOR A/E GRAPHICS, INC. 1. REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL: RADON EVALUATION SERVICES System Wide - Various Locations 1124 N. 11th Street Milwaukee, WI 53233 Project No. 20-001 2. RELEASE DATE: Thursday, May 21, 2020 3. PROPOSALS DUE: Thursday, June 11, 2020 at 3:00 PM at Facilities and Maintenance Services, 1124 North 11th Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233. The Pre-Proposal Conference Call is scheduled for Tuesday, June 02, 2020 at 9:00 AM. This is an open request for services as outlined in the RFP and is advertised in the Daily Reporter and numerous local papers and plan agencies. 4. FOR A/E GRAPHICS PLANROOM PROJECT WEBPAGE: Electronic Bid Submission: YES PROJECT TITLE: MPS - System Wide - Various Locations - Radon Evaluation Services, #20-001 STATUS: Automated Field (“Accepting Bids”, etc…) Pre Proposal Date: Tuesday, 6/2/20 9:00 AM RFP Due Date: 6/11/20 3:00 PM COMPANY & CONTACTS MPS Facilities and Maintenance Steve Wellman 262-781-7744 LOCATION: MPS System Wide - Various Locations, Site No. 600 1124 N. 11th Street, Milwaukee, WI 53233. NOTES AT BOTTOM OF PAGE: Prebid Notes: Meeting location is listed in the documents found under the Specs Tab. Questions Due: Monday, 6/8/20 @ 12:00 PM to: DFMSProcurement@milwaukee.k12.wi.us A/E Project Consultant: Division of Facilities and Maintenance Services MPS Project Manager: Heather Dietzel Consultant Cost Estimate: $0.00 Files are available for download. There is no cost involved in downloading files, but you must be a registered user and logged in to do so. This allows us to recognize you as a plan holder and issue addendums and notices if necessary. If you are not a registered user, you may register for an account under the Login section on the left-hand margin of the plan room. Documents may also be shipped to you via UPS Ground if you provide a $10.00 delivery fee; check made out A/E Graphics. Documents will be shipped when mailing check has been received. Maximum Number of Sets Bidders may receive: Two (2) sets. If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact Steve Wellman of A/E graphics at 262-649-3965 or at stevew@aegraphics.com. 5. MPS PERSONNEL TO RECEIVE RFP DOCUMENTS: - Drawings and Specs – No RFP Forms Required: • One (1) set - Linda Dahl - Contracts Clerk (for file) • One (1) set – Michelle Lenski – Project Specialist, Shop #928 • One (1) set – Heather Dietzel • One (2) set – Affected Shop personnel, Shop #928 Kane and Luzney 6. RFP DOCUMENT SETS TO BE PRINTED AT START: Distribution to be handled electronically. Print copies on an as needed basis, plus all copies necessary to send out to MPS. Copies of RFP documents shall be maintained @ A/E for 60 days after RFP Due Date. 7. BILLING (Include MPS Project Number on all invoices): Linda Dahl - Procurement Associate Milwaukee Public Schools Division of Facilities and Maintenance Services 1124 N. 11th Street Milwaukee, WI 53233 8. MPS CONTACT PERSON: Ms. Michelle Lenski, (414) 283-4702; lenskimj@milwaukee.k12.wi.us An NCON Communications Publication

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June 3rd Elaine T. Gooden Malik Bridges Annie Green June 4th Melvin Fumbanks William S. Gooden June 6th Anthony Neal Toloren Fumbanks June 7th Robin Farin-Fumbanks June 8th LaDonna Sharpe June 9th Willie Lyons, III Kwon Smith Mary Leach-Sumlin June 10th D'Jayka Graves June 11th Stella M. Miller Ernestine Dodd Barbra Chamberlain June 12th Eugenia Hicks Cedric B. Gordon June 14th Aaron Cross Malaya Pendur Jacquelyn Heath June 15th Jordan Hutcherson June 16th Carolyn Hogan Darryl Lyons Carolyn Bolton

June 5, 1987 – Dr. Mae C. Jemison becomes first Black woman astronaut. June 17th Marcus Saffold June 18th Nicholas Patterson Nicole McDade June 19th Wilbert Williams, Jr. Sarah Bridges June 20th Jaylen Hutcherson Sean Chamberlain Lionel Richie Erica Saffold June 22nd Barbra Rodgers June 23rd Dester Martin Kyron Lyons June 24th Bonnie Rogers Lester Binns Mother Cecelia B. Young Kenneth Smith June 25th Matthew Duncan Kourtney Blevines Dorothy R. Richards June 26th Charles Wallace

ATTENTION MBE/DBE/DVB/SBE/WBE: C.D. Smith Construction, Inc. is requesting proposals for the following project(s): FOX LAKE CORRECTIONAL DRINKING WATER SYSTEM July 8th at 1:00PM

June 6, 1831 – First annual “People of Color” convention held in Philadelphia.

Please send bids to: bids@cdsmith.com C.D. Smith Construction, Inc. P.O. Box 1006 Fond du Lac, WI 54936-1006 Ph: (920) 924-2900

June 7, 1917 – Poetess Gwendolyn Brooks, first African American to win the Pulitzer Prize (Poetry 1950), born.

“An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer”

June 8, 1953 – Supreme Court ruling bans discrimination in Washington, D.C. restaurants. June 9, 1995 – Lincoln J. Ragsdale, pioneer fighter pilot of World War II, dies. June 10, 1854 – James Augustine Healy, first African American Roman Catholic bishop is ordained.

SBE/RPP BID NOTICE Aldridge Electric, Inc. invites all firms who are certified as SBE by the City of Milwaukee and the OSBD to submit proposals along with a current certification letter for the following project: KOMATSU – Corporate Headquarters, Bid Package 05 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, which bids on June 18th, 2020. Aldridge is seeking interested SBE subcontractors for the following opportunities: Underground sight work, Electrical Distribution, Lighting, Branch Power, Fire Alarm, Sound Masking, BIM Modeling, and Professional Services. This contract also carries a 40% goal for the Residence Preference Program (RPP). Interested parties should contact Nikki Nichols at nnichols@aldridgegroup.com by June 5th, 2020. Aldridge Electric, Inc. is an EOE/M/F/D/V

June 27th Louis Lee William Jackson Kamal Willis June 28th Triotia Jackson Timothy Jackson Veronica Roberson June 29th Dawin Williamson Jane Hutcherson Annie Harris

Do you have a friend, family member, or colleague who has just celebrated or is about to celebrate a birthday? Stop by our office with their name on Monday to get them in that week’s edition of Happy Birthday Salutes! Visit us at 1936 N. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, call us at (414) 263-5088 or e-mail them to miltimes@gmail.com. www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

The Classifieds

Wednesday, June 10, 2020

June 4, 1972 – Angela Davis acquitted of all murder and conspiracy charges.

Mrs. Fumbanks' Birthday Salutes "Wishing You All The Best!" June 2nd Antonette Green Katrina McGee

13

Public Institutions • City Hall • County Courthouse • Milwaukee Public Library (Downtown) • Shorewood Library • Washington Park Library • Atkinson Library • King Drive Library Drug Stores/Clinics • Carter/Hyatt Herbal Shoppe • Walgreen's on King Drive • MHS Clinical Services Banks • BMO Harris Bank on King Drive • Columbia Savings & Loan

• Self-Help Credit Union (formerly Seaway Bank)

• Pick & Save/Metro Market (Shorewood)

Social Service Agencies • Milwaukee Urban League • St. Anne's Intergenerational Care

Other Locations • The Milwaukee Times Offices - 1936 N. MLK Dr. • WAAW Center - 3020 W. Vliet • Washington Park Seniors Center • Local Churches

Food Stores • Galst Foods Teutonia & Capitol • Pick & Save 76th & Good Hope Road • Pick & Save North 35th Street • Pick & Save - Midtown (West Capitol Drive)

Or visit our website at: http:// milwaukeetimesnews.com/ to download a free PDF version of this week's paper.

• Pick & Save (Brown Deer Rd.)

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Thursday, June 4, 2020

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Congratulations to the 2020 Graduating Class of

North Division High School

vonte o J , n a etria m Allm a C rson, Ande niae e D , rd Ashfo iffany T , s aelon Bate k a M ett, L. Benn mus a J , l l we n amio Black w K , man J. Boat niya a R , ley n Bunk arion v a K r, Car te aria M , n o Z. Cast sani a D , ry Cher anna ' i r B y, h Darb riana B , s i a Dav leath r A , s Evan Kelis , h c Fin n t, Dio t e r r Ga

y estin D , n o Gord ey Har v , y d Gan aevia t a J , n Gree , Jada d o o Hayw Dejanae on, Jacks sarae e D , on , Jacks anier p e r on-T Jacks Aver y ia anay L , e Job yron B , n so l John Fatel , n o s a John ictori V , n e Jorda ictori V , n iah Jorda r, Isa e d n Lave ndrew A , g h Lon akiya M , g Lon

seem a N , Malik laysia A , n i elizia Mar t a M , radic y McC Rand , n o t lin McC r, Tya e l l i M arhan F , d ame ni Moh ovan i G , s i th Mor r enne K , n o Mor t illion m a T ell, h Mur r osep J , n i Musk el , Isra e g a P h aliya A , e Rav ence s s E s, er, Rawl -Car t n o s n Robi laus Nick iyyah n a S , Roth

Keon , l l na e s Rus ntian i u Q ath, r Sihar tophe s i r h ,C ia Smith arenc l C , Smith olie , Enj h t i Sm hello c r a ,M Smith aJuan J , s e n Snip aQua J , s e Snip ykale M , y e Spiv i , Taij s a m Tho eisha r T , r e ha Tuck ar nis D , r e Walk er rill T , e c Walla eEric D , s am y Willi estin D , t h Wrig

Class of 2020 You Are

the Hope for Our Future! - Mr. Keith Carrington, Principal An NCON Communications Publication

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CONGRATULATIONS! CLASS OF

2020 View virtual graduation ceremonies for all MPS high schools at: www.youtube.com/milwaukeemps/

#MPSPROUD

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Pick'n Save

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2018_RSMET

Thursday, June 4, 2020

Wednesday, June 10, 2020

2X

FUEL POINTS

with digital coupon.*

Redeem at BP or Amoco.

Every Thursday-Sunday, through June 28. *Restrictions apply. See associate for details.

BUY 5 OR MORE

$ SAVE 1 EACH 5 or more

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FRESH DEAL

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$

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99 /LB

5-8 ct or General Mills Fruit Snacks, 6-10 ct or Santa Cruz Organic Lemonade, 32 fl oz; Select Varieties

1

$ 99

/EA*

With Card

Snow Crab Clusters

With Card

99¢

/LB

With Card

BUY 5 OR MORE

SAVE $1 EACH

SALE

Mix and match 5 or more participating items with Card.

1.99 -1.00

Quaker Chewy Granola Bars

Fresh Heritage Farm Boneless Chicken Breasts

SAVE

5-8 oz

Pork Back Ribs

299

$

/LB

With Card

3.49 -1.00

Red, Green or Black Seedless Grapes

With Card

249

or Organic Red, Green or Black Seedless Grapes, $1.99 lb with Card

$

97¢

/EA* Edy’s Ice Cream

48 fl oz or Outshine Fruit Bars, 12 ct; Select Varieties

/LB

With Card

Starbucks Coffee 10-12 oz Bag or K-Cups, 6-12 ct or Maxwell House Coffee, 24.5-30.6 oz; Select Varieties

FRESH DEAL

2

$

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Large Whole Pineapples

1

$ 88

99

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599

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Keebler Town House or Club Crackers

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9-13.8 oz or Chips Ahoy Cookies, 7-13 oz; Select Varieties

18 oz Blueberries

or Organic Blueberries, 6 oz, 2/$5 with Card

2.79 -1.00

Roundy's Ham Off the Bone or Colby Jack Cheese

1

$ 79

Select Varieties, In the Deli

6

$

FINAL COST

49

/LB

With Card

When You Buy 5

5 10 /$

With Card

/EA*

1.99 -1.00

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99¢

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32-Pack Kroger Purified Water

With Card

16.9 fl oz Bottles or Kroger Seltzer Water, 12-Pack, 12 fl oz Cans; Select Varieties

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3.49 -1.00

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249

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NATIONAL CHEESE DAY JUNE 4TH 2020

Sargento Shredded Cheese Select Varieties, 5-8 oz

1

$ 99 With Card

Tyson Frozen Chicken Select Varieties, 13.25-28.05 oz

4

$

99

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1

$ 79

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2/$5 With Card

Kellogg's Pop Tarts Brew Pub Pizza Select Varieties, 22.25-30.75 oz BUY 1, GET 1

of Equal or Lesser Value

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12 ct or Minute Maid Orange Juice from Concentrate, 59 fl oz or Kellogg's Eggo Waffles, 10-16 ct; Select Varieties

FREE PICKUP!

Thursday, June 4 through Tuesday, June 9, 2020 Selection may vary by store, limited to stock on hand.

39¢

1

With Card

With Card

Shop our app or website. Restrictions apply. See associate for details.

SNAP EBT CARDS NOW ACCEPTED AT PICKUP!

We reserve the right to limit quantities and correct all printed errors. Not all items and prices available at all locations unless otherwise noted. Prices subject to state and local taxes, if applicable. No sales to dealers. Purchase requirements exclude discounts, coupons, gift cards, lottery tickets, bus passes, alcohol, tobacco and use of Fresh Perks Card®. All prices “with card” are discounted by using your Fresh Perks Card® *Free promotion will be applied to item of least value.

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$ 99

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See our website or app for details.

SAVE UP TO per gallon of BP or Amoco fuel!*

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Tide Laundry Detergent 46-50 fl oz or Tide Pods or Gain Flings, 15-20 ct or Downy Fabric Softener, 40-77 fl oz; Select Varieties

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