Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Digital Edition Issue May 6, 2021

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The Milwaukee Times Newspaper and milwaukeetimesnews.com Milwaukee's Only “Blue Chip” Community Newspaper

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Vol. 40 • No. 17 • Thurs., May 06, 2021 - Wed., May 12, 2021 • An NCON Publication Serving The Milwaukee Area • 75¢

Black Women Power Brokers: Mayors and Women in Politics and Business

Alberta McCrory Hobson, AL

Shirley Washington Pine Bluff, AR

Brenda Davis Stamps, AR

Carolyn Harris Wilmot, AR

Aja Brown Compton, CA

Deborah Robertson Rialto, CA

Darquitta Riley Broxton, GA

Rochelle Robinson Douglasville, GA

Deana Holiday Ingraham East Point, GA

Elizabeth CarrHurst Fairburn, GA

Deborah Jackson Lithonia, GA

Evelyn Wynn-Dixon Riverdale, GA

LaToya Cantrell New Orleans, LA

Yvonne M. Spicer Framingham, MA

London Breed San Francisco, CA

Takisha James Bladensburg, MD

Diane Delaware Yazoo City, MS

Kamala Harris Vice President of United States Rosalind Brewer President of Walgreens Boots Alliance

Keisha Lance Bottoms Atlanta, GA

Lori Lightfoot Chicago, IL

Sharon Weston Broome Baton Rouge, LA

Malinda Miles Mount Rainier, MD

Petrella Robinson North Brentwood, MD

Deirdre Waterman Pontiac, MI

Monique Owens Eastpointe, MI

Kim Godwin President of ABC News

Shawyn Patterson-Howard Mount Vernon, NY

Lovely Warren Rochester, NY

Tishaura Jones St. Louis, MO

Elia Jones Ferguson, MO

Vi Alezander Lyles Charlotte, NC

Remonia Enoch Green Level, NC

Nickole Nesby Duquesne, PA

Miriam Green Awendaw, SC

Patricia Williams Brunson, SC

Mary Ferguson-Glenn Carlisle, SC

Francenia Ellis Furman, SC

Stellartean Jones Gray Court, SC

Sarah Ann Johnson Norway, SC

Helen CarsonPeterson St. Matthews, SC

Irene Wells Bluff City, TN

Curtistene McCowan DeSoto, TX

Yolanda Ford Missouri City, TX

Nikuyah Walker Charlottesville, VA

Deanna Reed Harrisonburg, VA

Victoria Woodards Tocoma, WA

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News Briefs

Thursday, May 6, 2021

2

Wednesday, May 12, 2021

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Brewers win 6-5 over Los Angeles Dodgers in 11 innings

Photo by Yvonne Kemp

Travis Shaw homered and hit a game-winning single, as the Milwaukee Brewers scored three runs in the 11th inning to beat the scuffling Los Angeles Dodgers 6-5 on Saturday, May 1, 2021. The game was tied at 2 after nine innings and 3-all after 10. In the 11th, Drew Smith, who entered Saturday batting .222, hit a two-run triple off Drew Rasmussen to give the Dodgers a 5-3 lead. But Milwaukee, despite owning the lowest team batting average (.215) in the National League entering Saturday and having 16 players on the injured list, responded. The Brewers loaded the bases with no outs after left-hander Alex Vesia (0-1), who was called up earlier in the day, started the inning with two walks. He was replaced by right-hander Mitch White, who had pitched 3-2/3 innings this season. White gave up a sacrifice fly to Kolten Wong, an RBI single to Avisail Garcia and the game-ending hit to Shaw, which scored Mario Feliciano in his major league debut. Feliciano had walked. “Guys just learn how to win. They expect to win. You come into spring training, you’re expecting to win the division, compete for the division and compete for the World Series,” Shaw said.

Big Daddy's BBQ hosts Black Out Pop Up Event

The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN

Photo by Yvonne Kemp

On Saturday, May 1, 2021, Big Daddy's BBQ and Soul Food Restaurant, 2730 N. Humboldt Blvd., hosted a "Black Out Pop Up." The monthly event celebrates and lifts all people of color, artists, and communities in Milwaukee. The Pop Up included vendors, community resources, free food, giveaways, live music, and a free bike to the first 25 kids. Pictured at the event are (center, from left) Big Daddy's BBQ and Soul Food owners Rita and Donald Lee.

You Can Join!

The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Founders Louvenia Johnson (1981-2008) Luther Golden (1981-2005) Nathan Conyers (1981- 2018 ) Lynda J. Jackson Conyers, Publisher Morgan A. Conyers, Associate Publisher Jacquelyn D. Heath, Editorial Page Editor

STAFF Publisher/President Lynda J. Jackson Conyers Graphic Artists William Gooden Michelle Anibas

Be a part of something better. Credit unions are locally owned cooperatives who put people before profits. We are owned by our members, not profit-driven by shareholders. This allows us to offer you a safe place to save, a low-cost place to borrow and very low service fees.

Founders Louvenia Johnson Nathan Conyers Luther Golden

As a best-in-class financial service provider, Brewery Credit Union offers you the products you need to cost-effectively manage your finances.

Marketing Carmen Murguía

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, May 6, 2021

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On The Cover

Wednesday, May 12, 2021

The number of Black women mayors leading major cities to reach historic high. Here is why they are winning

Tishaura Jones St. Louis, MO

Kim Janey (Interim) Boston, MA

Muriel Bowser District of Columbia

A new wave of Black women are breaking barriers as they ascend to mayoral seats in cities with deeply rooted histories of racism and inequality. On Tuesday, April 20, 2021, Tishaura Jones will be sworn in as the first Black female mayor of St. Louis after winning the election earlier that month. Her victory came just two weeks after Kim Janey was appointed Boston's first Black female mayor following the resignation of Marty Walsh, who is now the US Labor Secretary. Janey recently announced she would run for a full term in this year's mayoral election. With the ascension of Jones and Janey, there will be a historic high of nine Black women serving as mayors of the nation's 100 largest cities. Other major cities led by Black women include Atlanta, San Francisco; Chicago; Baton Rouge; New Orleans; Washington, DC; and Charlotte, North Carolina. Political observers say the growing number of Black female mayors signals they are gaining electoral strength and appealing to voters in races that have been historically won by White men. They say Black women have proven they are relatable with an ability to lead, organize and engage new voters. Black women are also speaking out against the racial disparities in their communities at a time when the nation is having to reckon with systemic racism and police violence against Black people. Kimberly Peeler-Allen, a visiting practitioner at the Center for American Women in Politics at Rutgers University, said as more Black women rise to political power, the electorate is seeing the importance of having diverse voices making decisions. "Black and brown women are running with a message that is a totality of their life experiences, which transcends race or gender," Peeler-Allen said. "And there are people who are saying 'she may not look like me but I know we share the same experience, because she is wrestling with credit card debt, or she has a family

member with addiction or she's a small business owner, she's a veteran.'" Peeler-Allen said she believes the advancement of Black women in all levels of government could also be inspiring more to run for office. In the last few years, Kamala Harris became the first Black female vice president, Ayanna Pressley became Massachusetts' first Black woman elected to Congress, and Tish James was elected New York's first Black female attorney general. Stacey Abrams narrowly lost her bid to become the nation's first Black woman governor in 2018, but is now a powerful advocate for voting rights for people of color. Some political analysts view Abrams as a viable candidate for Georgia's gubernatorial election in 2022. Creating equity in St. Louis Both Jones and Janey have vowed to make racial equity a priority while reflecting on their own lived experiences as Black women. Jones said during her victory speech that she would not stay silent or ignore the racism that has held St. Louis back. She told CNN she wants to address the exodus of Black residents in recent years and why they don't feel welcome in St. Louis. The city's Black population dropped from 51 percent to 45 percent in the last 10 years. Jones said she wants to revitalize the northern part of the city where she grew up because the neighborhoods have been neglected. "I am ready for St. Louis to thrive instead of just survive," Jones said on CNN "New Day" earlier this month. "We need to provide opportunities for everyone to succeed, no matter their zip code, the color of their skin, who they love or how they worship." Kayla Reed, executive director of the grassroots racial justice group St. Louis Action, said she believes Jones can relate to the plight of Black people in St. Louis because of her lived experience as a single mother from a marginalized neighbor-

hood. The city, Reed said, struggles with segregation, disparities in education, employment and housing, overpolicing and violence in the Black community. Reed said Jones has embraced the demands of a racial justice movement that started in 2014 when unrest broke out in nearby Ferguson following the police killing of Michael Brown. Ferguson elected its first Black woman mayor Ella Jones last year. Jones is listening to the concerns of organizers and giving them a seat at the table, Reed said. "She understands the unique inequality that our communities face," said Reed, who campaigned for Jones and sits on her transition team. "And it gives her an advantage to think through creative, innovative solutions to shift outcomes and conditions." Breaking the 'steel wall' in Boston In Boston, Janey has promised to answer the call for equity in a city with a reputation of being racist. Boston struggles with an enormous wealth gap, unequal economic opportunity, neighborhoods that are segregated along racial lines and disparities in access to education. The median net worth for White families is nearly $250,000 compared to just $8 for Black families, according to a 2015 study by the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. There is also a racial disparity in city contract awards, with a recent study showing that only 1.2% go to Black and Latino-owned businesses. Black and Latino workers also face higher unemployment rates than White workers in Boston. Janey wrote in a Boston Globe op-ed that she will tackle these inequities with new policies and creative solutions. She also reflected her experience with racism as a child on the frontlines of school desegregation in the 1970s. Janey said rocks and sticks were thrown at her bus while people yelled racial slurs. Janey told CNN that she believes there is an added

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Maya Wiley Dianne Morales NY Mayoral Candidate NY Mayoral Candidate burden to being the first woman and the first Black person to serve as mayor of Boston. "I know there is a perception and a reputation that Boston has, but I think what is important is that the reality and the opportunities that we create for residents here is one that is focused on equity, on justice, on love and ensuring that d prosperity in our city and shared opportunities," Janey told CNN's Abby Phillip. "It's not to say that we've solved everything when it comes to racism, but I think we have come a long way." Tanisha Sullivan, president of the Boston NAACP, said civil rights leaders have spent decades advocating for diversity in city leadership. Black people have been able to win seats on city council and Rachael Rollins was elected the first Black female district attorney of Suffolk County in 2018. However, Black Bostonians have hit a "steel wall" with the mayor's office before now, Sullivan said. "There has been more of a concerted effort and focus on breaking through with the belief that having more diversity in that office leading the way would result in public policy that was intentional about racial equity and so many other quality of life measures that would be good for our city as a whole," Sullivan said. Sullivan said racial justice advocates are now hoping Janey will create momentum around electing a woman of color as mayor in November. There are two Black women -- Janey and Andrea Campbell -- and one Asian woman, Michelle Wu, running for mayor. Sullivan said it is past time for a Black woman to win the mayor's office in Boston. "We have for generations now been the engine behind the ascension of so many others to political office," Sullivan said. "It has been our strategy, it has been our sweat equity, it has been the soles of our shoes that been worn out for others. It is not only our time, we have earned our spot." Black women mayors are a

force Jones and Janey are joining the tide of Black women mayors who have emerged onto the national stage in recent years. San Francisco Mayor London Breed gained national attention when she was one of the first to lock down her city when the Covid-19 pandemic hit US soil last year. Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms was one of the top contenders to be President Joe Biden's running mate. She was also lauded for her assertive response to protesters looting in city streets during uprisings last summer and speaking out against Gov. Brian Kemp's decision to lift Covid-19 restrictions last spring. Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot has made headlines for defending her city and standing up to sharp criticism from former President Donald Trump who threatened to send in federal law enforcement officers to fight violent crime there. Black women in New York are also hoping to join the short list of Black female mayors making history. Both Maya Wiley and Dianne Morales, who identifies as an Afro-Latina, are vying to become the first Black woman to lead the nation's largest city. Wiley has garnered the support of Black female celebrities including Gabrielle Union and Tichina Arnold. Rep. Yvette Clarke announced earlier this month that she was endorsing Wiley. Some activists say the success of Black women in mayoral offices is creating a pipeline for them to run for state and national office in the future. "We still have not had a Black woman governor, we still have not had a Black woman who has been speaker of the house, there is not a Black woman now in the US Senate," Reed said. "So, there are gaps, but I'm confident that with the election on the local level, not only are we changing things but we are building a pipeline to answer those questions."

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Christian Times

Thursday, May 6, 2021

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Wednesday, May 12, 2021

The Counseling Corner

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

By Rev. Judith T. Lester, B.Min. M.Th

Diversity Holidays and Celebrations in May (Week 1) Did you know May 21st is World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development? This day is set aside by the United Nations as an opportunity to deepen our understanding of the values of cultural diversity and to learn to live together in harmony. The article goes on to say that “acceptance and recognition of cultural diversity – in particular through innovative use of media and information are conclusive to dialogue among civilizations and cultures, respect and mutual understanding.1 Let’s begin looking at a religious observance, the Feast of Saints Philip and James, one of the Catholic Feasts. This year, the Feast of Saints Philip and James is celebrated on May 3, 2021. What does this Feast commemorate? An article posted by the Marians of the Immaculate Conception explained the celebration of the special feasts. “The Catholic Church had special feasts to honor only four of the apostles: Sts. Peter and Paul, St. John the Evangelist and St. Andrew, the brother of Peter. The Church memorialized the remaining apostles all together on June 29. But in the sixth century, the bodies of Sts. Philip and James were brought to Rome from the East and were laid to rest in

alogue and Development at: https://www.un.org/en/observances/cultural-diversity-day Retrieved March 16, 2021. 2 Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopedia. "Saint Philip the Apostle". Encyclopedia Britannica, 20 Aug. 2020, https://www. britannica.com/biography/SaintPhilip-the-Apostle. Accessed 16 March 2021. 3 Catholic Online, “St. James the Lesser”, https://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_ id=356. Accessed 16 March 2021. Next Week: Continuation the Basilica of the Holy Apostles. Since they arrived together at the same location, the Church instituted a single feast day for both apostles. Who were Saint Philip and Saint James? St. Philip was born in Bethsaida of Galilee and was one of the apostles. Mentioned only once in the Apostle lists of the Synoptic Gospels, Philip is a frequent character in John’s Gospel (John 1:43-51). Philip answered Jesus’ call to “Follow Me” and was instrumental in the call of Nathanael when he told Nathanael about Jesus. Later

Philip the disciple and apostle of Christ came confused with Philip the Evangelist, one of the deacons of the early church.2 Tradition states that Philip the Apostle went to Phrygia (which is modern-day Turkey) as a missionary for Christ and was martyred in Hierapolis. Saint James is also known as James the Less, was one of the Twelve chosen by Jesus. he is also known as James the Minor, James the Little, or James the Lesser. Saint James is also identified by some as the brother of Jesus. According to legend, Saint James was the first Bishop of Jerusalem,

and was at the Council of Jerusalem. Tradition has always recognized Saint James as the author of the Epistle that bears his name. Internal evidence based on the language, style and teaching of the Epistle reveals its author as a Jew familiar with the Old Testament, and a Christian grounded in the teachings of the Gospel. External evidence from the early Fathers and Councils of the Church confirmed its authenticity and canonicity.3

General Disclaimer: The writer has used her best efforts in preparation of this information. No representations or warranties for its contents, either expressed or implied, are offered. Neither the publisher nor the writer shall be liable in any way for readers’ efforts to apply, rely or utilize the information or recommendations presented herein as they may not be suitable for you or necessarily appropriate for every situation to which they may refer. In some instances, this article contains the opinions, conclusions and/or recommendations of the writer. If you would like to contact Rev. Lester, write to her c/o P.O. Box 121, Brookfield, WI. 53008.

Sources: 1 United Nations World Day for Cultural Diversity for Di-

CHURCH LISTINGS ARE IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER: ABIDING FAITH FELLOWSHIP B.C. to CLAVARY B.C. Abundant Faith Church of Integrity

ANTIOCH BAPTIST CHURCH 2033 W. Congress Street Milwaukee, WI 53209 414-445-3303 www.antiochmbcmke.org Rev. Victor T. Manns, Pastor

7830 West Good Hope Rd. Milwaukee, WI 53223 www.yourabundantfaith.org

(414) 464-5001 Abiding Faith Fellowship Baptist Church Pastor Anthony Oliphant Sr. 4600 West Burleigh Street Milwaukee, WI 53210

ORDER OF SERVICE Sunday School ………………… 9:00 am Sunday Morning Worship …… 10:30 am Tel: (414) 444-2822 Fax: (414) 444-2877

Albright /New Hope United Methodist Church

Weekly Schedule:

Pastor Robert Pyles

Sunday Worship…10:00 a.m. Tuesday……..……6:15 p.m.

“Discover Your Abundant Faith” Another Chance M.B.C.

ADULT LEARNING LAB

New Life New Beginnings Outreach 3500 N. Sherman Blvd., Suite 205 Milwaukee, WI 53216 (414) 445-1072 Free Computer Classes ECDL License Software Registration Fee $25 Wed. 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Mon. & Wed. evening 6:00 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Weekly Open Enrollment

1930 North 13th Street Milwaukee, WI 53205 Office #: (414) 885-6010

Pastor Charles G. Green

Pastor Thomas Tao

Weekly Schedule Sun. School.........8:00-9:00 a.m. Sun. Service...................9:30 a.m.

Come Home to Antioch

Bethany Church of God in Christ

Weekly Schedule

5555 W. Capitol Drive Milwaukee, WI 53216 414-442-8540

Order of Services Sunday School..........................9:00 am Sunday Morning Worship........11:00 am Wed. Prayer & Bible Study........6:30 pm Thurs. Mass Choir Rehearsal...7:00 pm

4441 West Fond Du Lac Ave. Milwaukee, WI 53216 (414) 527-9986 Phone Sunday School...................9:30 am Sun. Worship Service........10.45 am Wed. Bible Study...……… 6:00 pm "Not Perfect, But Forgiven"

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Pastor Donell Allen, Sr.

Sun. School………….….....9:00 a.m. Sun. Service…….……......10:15 a.m. Wed. Bible Study….............7:00 p.m. Fri. Drug Prevention…........6:00 p.m. Fri. Praise Team Rehearsal...7:30 p.m. Sat. Commty. Outreach........3:00 p.m.

"Bethany, the little church with a big heart; where everybody is somebody." - Pastor Allen

BETHEL Christian Methodist Episcopal Church 3281 N. 26th Street Milwaukee, WI 53206 Rev. Willie F. Dockery, Jr. “The Church on the Grow”

Weekly Schedule

Sun. School ……….........….… 8:30 a.m. Sun Worship …….......…..….. 10:00 a.m. Thursday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study ………………. 7:00 p.m. 442-8970.

Calvary Baptist Church www.milwaukeetimesnews.com Rev. John R. Walton, Jr., Pastor 2959 N. Teutonia Avenue Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53206


Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, May 6, 2021

5

In The News

Wednesday, May 12, 2021

Waupun weighs a future without 167-year-old prison The U.S. prison population suffered higher rates of infection, higher than most other institutions during the COVID-19 pandemic and for those living at Waupun Correctional Institute (WCI), the state’s oldest continuously operating prison, and for those who care for them, the pandemic further complicated the debate over WCI’s future. Men incarcerated at the prison shared concerns with the press recently. That is until they were put into quarantine in December 2020. Between early August and October 1, 2020, the prison reported 228 positive COVID-19 cases. By November 13, the number of positive cases had reached 700. The prison as currently configured is designed to ac-

in a bipartisan manner to help prepare Waupun for an economic future without the WCI, but as reported by Isiah Holmes in the Wisconsin Examiner, Rep. Michael Schraa (R-Oshkosh) said the prison was an essential part of the founding identity of Waupun.

commodate 882. Some 954 are currently incarcerated at the prison which was originally constructed in 1854. State Assembly legislators at a corrections committee hearing in February 2021 were divided during debate

Julie Nickel, the mayor of Waupun has adopted a middle approach to WCI. In an interview with the Examiner, Nickel said the city should be less dependent on the prison, although she believes it over a proposal to close should also remain open. WCI. Citing the City of Waupun’s own priorities on eco“The city also wants to nomic development, which keep the prison open as a lot emphasize agriculture and of the employees live withdo not mention the prison, in and around the city,” she Rep. David Bowen (D-Mil- said. “Our businesses also waukee) expressed hope that appreciate the money that the legislature could work visitors bring to the city.”

Local residents, and not just in Waupun, are concerned about the local economic impact if WCI were to continue downsizing, but Rep. Bowen told the Examiner he remains hopeful of a breakthrough leading to the closure of WCI. “I think there are a number of rural communities that are trying to focus on a 21st century economy that is shifting from where it used to be,” he said again stressing the importance of agriculture to the area around Waupun. “The demands are continuing to increase, and it creates opportunities for communities like Waupun to let go of the things that they were just used to. They were used to a facility employing 200 people as a prison.”

President Biden nominates three Black women for Federal Court of Appeals Remember these names: Ketanji Brown Jackson, Tiffany Cunningham, and Candace Jackson-Akiwumi. These are President Joseph Biden’s first three nominations for the federal Court of Appeals.

first African American judge ever on the Federal Circuit. In December 2020, Biden said, “We are particularly focused on nominating individuals whose legal experiences have been historically underrepresented on the federal bench. Including those who are public defenders, civil rights and legal aid attorneys and those who represent Americans in every walk of life.”

In 2020, Biden pledged to name the first African American woman to the U.S. Supreme Court. A number of retirements are expected from the federal judiciary now that Donald Trump is out of office. The percentage of African American judges on the federal appellate circuit is inconsistent with the makeup of the broader U.S. population overall. Former President Trump nominated no African Americans of 54 U.S. appellate nominations.

For his first three federal Court of Appeals nominations, President Biden named three Black women— Tiffany Cunningham, Ketanji Brown Jackson, and Candace Jackson-Akiwumi.

Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to serve on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit. She would replace Merrick Garland who is now U.S. AtPresident Biden has now torney General. The position nominated U.S. District

is also seen as a stepping- to the Seventh Circuit where stone to the U.S. Supreme no African American judge Court. has served in three years. Biden has also nominated President Biden nominated Tiffany Cunningham who Candace Jackson-Akiwumi will now likely become the

The power of the federal judiciary to be the final decision maker on policies that impacts that lives of African Americans unmatched. Former President Trump, along with Sen. Mitch McConnell, nominated many judges to the federal bench who were defined as unqualified by the leading groups who follow judicial nominees.

AKA Day at the Derby goes virtual

Photo by Yvonne Kemp

www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

In celebration of the Kentucky Derby, the members of the Diamond Jubilee Pearls Foundation of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., hosted their annual fundraising event "AKA Day at the Derby". This year, there's a little twist as the event went totally VIRTUAL. This one-of-a-kind Derby Experience serves as the major fundraiser for the Foundation's scholarships and community service programs in the greater Milwaukee community. The event was presented and organized by Foundation President Candice Wright, Vice President Jaquilla Ross and Chairmen Kendra Bloodsaw, Berthena Brister, and Judith Mouton. An NCON Communications Publication


Mother's Day

Thursday, May 6, 2021

6

Wednesday, May 12, 2021

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

A Litany of Love for Womanhood We believe in the goodness and value of women; Our strength and sanity, our willingness to weep; Our capacity to support each other, Instead of being rivals; Our ability to cope with children’s demands and the burdens of life; Our willingness and ability to get on with the job; Our spirituality and our earthiness, flowing with life, birth and death. We affirm the story of women as the story of humankind; Food gatherers and farmers Child rearers and teachers Pioneers and policy makers Homemakers and factory-workers Parents, scientists, doctors, Housekeepers and economists Givers of life and creators of art and thought Unpaid hidden workers at home and paid members of the workforce outside. We rejoice in our diversity and versatility, Our intuition and logic. We confess our failures, frailties and imperfections, Including our past acceptance of violence and injustice In relationships between women and men. We look forward to the future in faith and hope, Working for the day when we and all our sisters No longer have to fit that stereotype, But are free to use all of our gifts And to share in all the benefits of human life and work. We look forward to an age of peace, When violence is banished, Both women and men are able to love and to be loved, And the work and wealth of the world is justly shared. We believe that our future depends on us, But that all the forces for good, love, peace and justice, All the creative powers of the universe, Work with us to achieve that vision. May it come soon. Amen. Written by Norma Hardy Church Women United An NCON Communications Publication

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, May 6, 2021

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Wednesday, May 12, 2021

Mother's Day

What Does Momma Mean To Me? She wears several different hats and stands tall. For all she has done, we should make everyday Mother's Day. Thank you MommaA - Leslie Rogers

To me, Momma means Life, Support, Nurturing Discipline, Protection, Correction, Tolerance, and Motivation..."A Mother's Love" compares to no other. - Keyon Jackson-Malone

Momma Means To Me My Everything, Unconditional Love, A Beauty That Runs So Deep ! I Love You Momma ! - Patricia Morgan and her mother Evelyn Williams

eulah Jackson's anana Pudding Recipe

"Try this recipe and you will never use (jello) pudding mix ever again." -Lynda Jackson-Conyers saucepan. Stir together milks and egg yolks; whisk into dry ingredients. Cook over medium heat, whisking constantly, until smooth and thickened. Remove from heat; stir in vanilla.

Yield: 8-10 servings 2/3 cup sugar 1/4 cup all-purpose flour Dash of salt 1 (14-ounce) can sweetened condensed milk 2 1/2 cups milk 4 large eggs, separated 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1 (12-ounce) package vanilla wafers 6 large bananas 1/3 cup sugar 1/2 teaspoon banana extract or vanilla extract

ARRANGE one-third of wafers in bottom of a 3-quart baking dish. Slice 2 bananas, and layer over wafers. Pour one third of pudding mixture over bananas. Repeat layers twice, arranging remaining wafers around outside edge of dish. BEAT egg whites at high speed with an electric mixer until foamy. Add 1/3 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon at a time, beating until stiff peaks form and sugar dissolves (2 to 4 minutes). Add banana extract; spread egg whites over pudding. (The egg white topping is optional. Bake for 25 minutes or until golden brown.)

INSTEAD decorate the top with wafers COMBINE first 3 ingredients in a heavy and enjoy. www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

Deloris and Morgan Conyers with Granny Jackson

Happy Mother's Day to all the dedicated

Moms, both still with us and those that are gone!

Lynda Jackson Conyers An NCON Communications Publication


What's Happening

Thursday, May 6, 2021

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Wednesday, May 12, 2021

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Make Mom Feel Special This Mother's Day With A Bra Fitting From…

Voluptuous Secrets

Gift Certificates Available!

1740 N Dr. M.L.King, Jr., Drive • Milwaukee, WI 53212

(414) 264-7776 • https://www.voluptuoussecrets.com. Theresa Gazdik - Owner New Hours: Sun.: Closed Mon. - Tues.: By Appointment Only! Wed.-Sat.: 12:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. - No Appt. Necessary

MEET THE FUTURE OF INNOVATION

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, May 6, 2021

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What's Happening

Wednesday, May 12, 2021

Makes A Great Mother's Day Gift! You Will Fall In Love With Aloekui Soaps! All natural handmade soaps, health and beauty products for the whole family!

Rita Estremera Owner

2450 W. North Avenue Milwaukee, WI 53205 info@aloekui.com • aloekui.com 414-399-0979

Brought to you by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

We waited over a year for this. And we don’t have to wait any longer. Because COVID vaccines are just a click away. So, we’re all signing up to get ours. And get on with everything else we’ve been waiting for. Sign up for your vaccine today at city.milwaukee.gov/CovidVax

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Health & Fitness

Thursday, May 6, 2021

10

Wednesday, May 12, 2021

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Millennials, COVID-19, and YOLO By Sandra Millon Underwood, RN, PhD, FAAN Professor, UW-Milwaukee College of Nursing You only live once (YOLO) is even more important in the wake of COVID-19. These days, in the wake of COVID-19, one of the best ways to help ensure longevity, is to get vaccinated. And, while some Millennials appear to be hesitant about getting vaccinated, others are quick to take advantage of the shots, to help make sure they are around to live their best lives! The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine predicts that vaccine uptake could drop to as low as 75 percent among younger age groups in countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom. That confirms with what polls have shown during the pandemic: “Millennial and Gen Z young adults are more hesitant about getting vaccinated than their elders.’’ While COVID-19 fatigue has taken its toll on most of us, the COVID-19 lock downs have hit young adults even harder. Data reveal that during the pandemic young adults were more likely to lose their jobs or be furloughed. Many young adults have suffered from the mental health impact of having to put their lives on hold. Given all that has been reported about the pandemic and the reported effectiveness and safety of available COVID-19 vaccines, it seems surprising that young adults are more likely than older adults to

minimize the seriousness of the virus and more hesitant about taking the vaccines. Young adults typically do not worry about transmitting or getting COVID-19. Many describe seeing friends “shake off ” the virus or report recovering from what they describe as “mild COVID-19 symptoms”. While less likely to be hospitalized due to the COVID-19 virus, young adults are more likely than older adults to transmit the virus; therefore, messages that communicate the importance of masking, social distancing, avoiding crowds and vaccination are especially crucial to convey among millennials.

Barbara Minor, a nurse who had COVID-19, is not shy about advising millennials to get the vaccine. She readily shared her personal experience with the virus. “I’m a nurse, but initially I wasn’t going to get the vaccine. Then I got COVID. I was first diagnosed on December 5, 2020. At first, it felt like a sinus infection— everything on my right side hurt—my teeth, eyes, and ears. I got tested at my job and the initial test came back negative. I took it again and it was positive. It felt like I had a bad case of the flu,

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and I was off work for two weeks. Then it got worse—I could not breathe. I was short of breath just walking around like I normally do. I was sent to the emergency room and was told that my condition had gone from the infection stage to the inflammation stage. My heart rate and blood pressure were extremely high, so they would not let me leave the hospital. The medical staff thought I had a heart attack. My heart was enlarged. My lungs were scarred, full of fluid, and infected. My condition was potentially fatal. I was in the hospital for three and onehalf days. I was off work for two and a half months. I just recently returned to work. I am better now and on March 29th I got the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. “I realize there’s a stigma attached to the vaccine— with folks thinking they are experimenting with Black people. The reality is that COVID-19 is affecting Black people more than anyone, so we should be running to get vaccinated. A lot of people are saying they are not going to take the vaccine. I was one of them. Since then, I’ve done my research and now I’m encouraging everyone to get tested and get vaccinated,” said Minor. Millennials have expressed multiple reasons for the doubt and hesitancy about COVID-19, the recommended precautions, and the COVID-19 vaccines. Included among the reasons for doubt and delay in getting vaccinated are what they “have heard or read about, and unethical medical experiments that took place with African Americans”, “ fear of the unknown”, and

“attitudes and beliefs that young people can shake off the virus”. Included among the reasons for getting vaccinated are “concerns for others”, and “desires beyond self and desires to help others”. We wanted to hear directly from millennials within our community regarding their feelings about the vaccine— and their advice to other millennials. Here is what they shared with us about getting vaccinated.

Damien Payne, Technical Coordinator for Ezekiel / Project Hope My decision to get the COVID-19 vaccination came without hesitation because of a pre-existing medical condition: asthma. As an African American, there is a certain built-in leeriness regarding governmentmandated vaccines because of our history with the Tuskegee experiment. Yet, when I was given the opportunity as an essential worker to partake in the Moderna vaccine, I simply could not pass on the chance to get immunized. About a month ago, I received both shots with minimal side effects. A sense of health, security, and safety that has been missing for 16 months

has returned with the long awaited optimism of looking forward to a summer of festivals, live music, family gatherings, barbecues, and fellowship.

Janette Millon, College Student I received both shots. I decided to get the vaccine because after doing some research, I understood that it would best protect me from the virus. After the second dose, I was very sleepy, but that was the only side effect. I would advise others to get the vaccine. It is going to protect us, and the ones we care about.

Jasmine Jones, Selfemployed Entrepreneur Initially I had a ‘wait and see’ attitude. I’m going to get the vaccine, though I haven’t yet. I did not want to get vaccinated until my children (ages 13 and 15) were eligible, and we could all get it together. But I will be getting it even though my kids are not yet eligible. (Continued on pg. 11)

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, May 6, 2021

11

All Of Us

Wednesday, May 12, 2021

ALL ABOUT SCIENCE & RESEARCH WITH ALL OF US About Science and Research with All of Us! family members and friends die from COVID-19 in the past year. Our communities are also the ones who have been left out of research in the past. In some cases, research experiments have been detrimental to ethnic communities – for example the Tuskegee experiment and Henrietta Lacks and her super HeLa cells. All of this erodes the trust of research and the clinical trials that lead to vaccines, but we have tried to provide information on our All of Us MKE Facebook page to help our communities make informed decisions for themselves about vaccines and research.

Milwaukee Times: The past year has been extremely tough on the African American community. COVID-19 has hit communities of color hard, on top of racial justice issues that have impacted families physically and mentally. How do you reconcile the current climate with the work that you are trying to get done with the All of Us Milwaukee Times: ExResearch Program? plain the All of Us Research Program for those who may Dr. Bashir Easter: Many not have heard about it yet or of us on our team come who need more clarification. from the communities of color we serve, so we know Dr. Bashir Easter: All of first-hand of the tremendous Us was created in 2015 during health disparities in the Af- the Barack Obama Adminisrican American and LatinX tration and our UW-Madicommunities. We have seen son Center for Community

Millennials, COVID-19, and Yolo (Continued from pg. 10) I hope it is worth it. I am a little worried about it making me sick. I usually do not even get a flu shot. My mom has been vaccinated and she had no side effects, so I decided to go ahead and get it.

Eryhah Wright, Full-time Employee / Student at MATC, Studying Web Design I have gotten my first Pfizer shot and scheduled the second shot. My grandmother and I were talking about what is happening in the world and she explained that the vaccination was more than about me. She told me that she wanted me to be safe for her, and safe living and working around other people. Prior to that conversation I was sitting on the fence about getting the vaccination. My arm was www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

ers can use to study health and illness. We want to support researchers in efforts to understand how different genetic, lifestyle, and environmental factors impact health and disease. With this information, researchers can look to improve the ways to diagnose, prevent, and treat health conditions. This could lead to improved health for generations to come.

this by answering online surveys and by donating blood, urine, and/or saliva samples. By looking for patterns in this information, researchers may learn more about what affects people’s health. Milwaukee Times: Thank you, Dr. Easter. What will you have for us next week?

Dr. Bashir Easter: Next week, we’ll talk about what Engagement and Health Milwaukee Times: When people can expect when enPartnerships in Milwaukee you say large, how large do rolling in the All of Us Research Program. is part of the Wisconsin you mean? consortium comprised of Do your own research UW-Madison, Marshfield Dr. Bashir Easter: We about the All of Us Research Clinic, the Medial College of hope that one million or Program nationally, by going Wisconsin, and Gunderson more people will join the All to www.joinallofus.org, visitHealth System. All of Us is of Us Research Program. Peoing our All of Us MKE Facea national effort that aims to ple who join will share inbuild the largest most diverse formation about their health, book page or calling (414) database of health informa- habits, and what it’s like 882-1376. tion of its kind that research- where they live. They do Dr. Bashir Easter

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a little sore and I was a little nation) can get to herd imtired afterward getting the munity. Once we reach that, we can all get back to what vaccine, but that is about it. we call normal. There is no excuse for not ‘being in the know’. Everything you need to know is at the touch of your fingers. Look it up! Echoing the thoughts of Reese, dismiss the myths and innuendo, do your own research, make an educated Mauricia (Reese) Finney, decision, and decide what is Nurse, recent University best for you and those you of WI-Parkside graduate love—after all, you only live I did get the vaccine. I got once! the first dose of the ModThe COVID-19 Awareerna vaccine in January and ness, Understanding, Screenthe second dose in February. ing, Social Support, and I was very skeptical at first Empowerment Project encourbecause there is a saying in ages COVID-19 vaccinamy family, “you never take tions among men and women the first of anything.” I did in Southeastern Wisconsin not get the vaccine for my- by increasing public awareself. At first, I did it for my ness and understanding about grandmother. She lives in an COVID-19; increasing acassisted living facility that cess to resources essential to only allowed individuals that COVID-19 prevention and have been vaccinated to visit. control in venues where Black Later, I got the vaccine for Americans work, worship and myself and my parents; they are otherwise engaged; and, proare in their late 50s, early 60s. viding resources for navigation This was the most suscepti- to COVID-19 screening and ble age range (for contract- COVID-19 vaccination. ing COVID-19), and I did The project receives support not want to be the cause of through the Wisconsin Dethem getting sick. My advice partment of Health Services. to millennials is—because For more information about we are more tech savvy—do the project and access to availthe research, look at all the able COVID-19 awareness, data on Pfizer and Moder- prevention, and control resourcna, and pick a vaccine that’s es, contact Dr. Sandra Millon best for you. Even if you Underwood at " underwoo@ decide it’s not for you, get a uwm.edu, 414-229-6076, or vaccine anyway so we (as a 262-595-2723.

The

This is the beginning of a weekly conversation about science and research. Today we speak with Bashir Easter, Ph.D., Assistant Director of the University of Wisconsin-Madison All of Us team at the Center for Community Engagement and Health Partnerships in Milwaukee.

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For Your Entertainment

Thursday, May 6, 2021

12

Wednesday, May 12, 2021

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Alexis J. Roston Salutes Ella Fitzgerald as ‘First Lady of Song’

By Jacquelyn D. Heath Special to The Milwaukee Times

The last week of April, 2021 marked the return of live theater to Milwaukee, with the opening of First Lady of Song: Alexis J. Roston Sings Ella Fitzgerald, at the Milwaukee Repertory Theater. With a program presented concert-style, Chicago-based actress Alexis J. Roston either could have tried to assume the persona of Ella, or simply have performed the music Fitzgerald made famous; Roston chose the latter approach, accompanied by a four-piece combo; and she did not disappoint. Between songs, she shared vignettes about the life of the legendary singer, who rose to fame in the early 1930’s after winning first prize at the Apollo Theater’s iconic weekly amateur talent show. She went on to become the featured vocalist with some of the most famous Big Bands of the era, including the

Alexis J. Roston sings Ella Fitzgerald Chick Webb Orchestra and the Benny Goodman Orchestra. She was also a top recording artist, performing solo as well as in collaboration with other popular music greats, such as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Nat King Cole, Frank Sinatra and Tony Bennett. She also acted in movies and commercials, and was a frequent guest performer on the top television variety shows of the 1950’s, ‘60’s and 70’s.

Her repertoire comprised large portions of what nowadays is known as “The Great American Songbook” – those songs composed by some of the greats of American songwriting, such as Ira and George Gershwin, Cole Porter, Hoagy Carmichael, Harold Arlen, Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart, which have stood the test of time and genre. They’re the kind of songs that make you recall what you were doing and where you were the first time you

heard them, and that con- tertained and sit back and tinue to evoke memories enjoy a musical stroll down memory lane. The concert and emotions. was delivered in two sets, By the time Ella Fitzger- time enough for Roston ald’s 50-plus year career to make a quick wardrobe ended in 1993 with her change. It also gave the final public performance musicians – musical di– she passed away in 1996 rector Jo Ann Daugherty at age 79 -- she had per- on piano, drummer Ryan formed around the world Bennett, Joshua Ramos for fans on every conti- on bass, and Rajiv Halim nent. Her distinctive mel- on saxophone and flute low vocal styling – charac- -- the opportunity to treat terized by her impeccable the audience to a mini-jazz diction, pure tone, timing, jam session. phrasing and signature First Lady of Song: Alexis improvisational ability known as “scat singing” J. Roston Sings Ella Fitzgerald -- had graced not only jazz, runs through Sunday, May but swing, be-bop, tradi- 23, 2021 at the Milwautional pop and blues as kee Repertory Theater’s well. Whatever she sang, Quadracci Powerhouse, Ella Fitzgerald allowed her 108 East Wells Street. Cavoice to become another pacity is limited to 25 perfinely tuned instrument cent of seating and masks in the band, whose job it are required. For tickets was to deliver the words to evening and matinee and melody and all their performances, visit milwaukeerep.com; or call moods. 414/224-9490. Please Roston’s vocals were ver- remember to allow extra satile and strong enough to time before curtain to obdeliver a performance that serve required COVID-19 was a tribute to Ella, not an safety protocols, which inimitation of her. Hence, clude temperature-taking the audience could be en- and social distancing. By Terri Schlichenmeyer

“Dear Black Girl: Letters from Your Sisters on Stepping Into Your Power” by Tamara Winfrey Harris Black girls, Tamara Winfrey Harris asked a small group of Black women to write letters of support and positivity to give the girls. She wanted the letters to be “loving, truthful... feminist, antiracist...and pro-Black girl.” She figured she’d receive twelve letters to hand out.

no shame in making your own path, in asking for help, or in surviving.

She got “more than fifty from all over the world.” There’s a history behind the need Harris sees for these letters. For four hundred years, she says, c.2021, Black girls have been Barrett-Koehler laboring under myths that Publishers, Inc. belie their vulnerability; that $16.95 / $22.95 Canada make them more “grown” 185 pages than they are, physically and emotionally; and that steal There’s some mail for you. the opportunities they have to love their bodies, their And it’s not the e-variety, hair, and themselves. The lies either; it was brought by a ignore Black girls’ hopes and human, carried down the wishes. and “lies can start to street and left at your home. feel like facts.” It’s in an envelope with a stamp, and the good news is But: “Dear Black Girl...” that it isn’t a bill. It’s a letter for you, and in “Dear Black “Sometimes, it’s hard to Girl” by Tamara Winfrey remember that you are a Harris, it could be important. star,” says one letter-writer. Another reminds girls that Well over a year ago, in melanin is “an asset!” Others anticipation of a workshop write acknowledge the issues she was giving for a group of of being a Black girl in a white An NCON Communications Publication

Tamara Winfrey Harris family or foster situation. “... love your body beyond how appealing it is to others,” says one writer. Remember that “there is no single definition of family.” Love your mother but know that “daughtering ain’t easy,” either. You will attract close friends when you “learn to love, honor and value yourself...” Know that there’s “no shame” in working to pay the bills but life is better if a job is “a thing you really love and that suits you.” There’s also

“You are hope and promise for tomorrow in Black girl skin.” Don’t you wish there was a book like this around when you were a teenager? Nobody’d blame you if you did; even Grandma probably wished she’d had “Dear Black Girl.” Bottom line: it’s time for a book like this that doesn’t feel high-horsey or superior or preachy. No, author Tamara Winfrey Harris pulled together letters that are relevant and everyday, and that don’t

make harsh demands on its readers. Instead, there’s empathy in here, a beenthere-done-that tone, and a sense that a girl is about to be taken under someone’s wing for awhile. Letters are loosely categorized, they’re accompanied by drop-in “Know This” pages of explanation, and there’s room for a girl to write a letter to herself to sort her feelings now, or note-taking for later. Beware that some of the letter-writers dive deep into raw subjects, making this book best for ages 13-andup. Give “Dear Black Girl” to your favorite teen, and envelope her in all its love.

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, May 6, 2021

The Department of Mission & Ministry at Marquette University announces part-time job openings in its programs serving clergy and congregations. Pastoral Leadership in a Cultural Context (PLCC) prepares early-career clergy from across denominations to engage as public theologians on social issues in the greater Milwaukee area. PLCC is hiring: • Assistant Director, with MDiv or equivalent and knowledge of social issues to assist in recruiting, planning, communication, and organization. Hours are flexible but include quarterly 3-day events. Learn more and apply at: https://employment.marquette. edu/postings/14634 The Examen(ed) Church (TEC) will work to promote thriving congregations across the Christian community of Milwaukee through seminars, coaching, and reflection. TEC is hiring for two positions: • Office Associate, with knowledge of word processing and spreadsheets, to handle scheduling, communication, budgets, and event planning. Learn more and apply at: https://employment.marquette. edu/postings/14635 • Assistant Director, with MDiv or equivalent and church ministry experience, to work in promotion, communication, recruitment, and delivery of program. Hours are flexible but will include some evenings and weekends. Learn more and apply at: https:// employment.marquette.edu/postings/14633 It is the policy of Marquette University to provide equal employment opportunities (EEO) to all employees and applicants without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, protected veteran status or any other applicable federal or state-protected classification. NOTICE Milwaukee Public Schools (MPS) is requesting sealed quotations for a 3 year blanket contact for Aluminum Roof Coating - Material Purchase for System Wide - Various Locations, Milwaukee, WI. Material specifications, quotation requirements and guidelines may be obtained online at: https://mps.aegraphics.com/, THEN: 1. Click on "All Public Jobs". 2. Search for the project listed above. 3. OR paper copies may be obtains from 7:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; Monday through Friday from A/E Graphics, Inc.; 4075 North 124th Street, Brookfield, WI 53005; phone (262) 781-7744; fax (262) 7814250. Call A/E Graphics, Inc. for availability of proposal documents. The HUB requirements for this contract is 0% The minimum Student Participation requirements for this contract are: Paid Employment: 100 Hours Educational Activities: 10 Hours A pre-quotation conference call will be held at 1:00 PM on Thursday, May 6, 2021. See RFQ for instructions on how to participate. All questions should be submitted in writing prior to 12:00 PM on Thursday, May 13, 2021 to DFMSProcurement@milwaukee.k12.wi.us. No questions will be answered after that date and time. No questions will be answered verbally. No verbal information from any source is to be relied upon by any respondent in the development of their response to the RFP. Written questions and responses will be documented by way of addenda, which will be forwarded to all bidders.

13

The Classifieds

Wednesday, May 12, 2021

ATTENTION MBE/DBE/DVB/SBE/WBE: C.D. Smith Construction, Inc. is requesting proposals for the following projects: Public Institutions • City Hall • County Courthouse • Milwaukee Public Library (Downtown) • Shorewood Library • Washington Park Library • Atkinson Library • King Drive Library

La Crosse EDA Storm Water Lift 5/6/2021 at 2:00PM Please send bids to: bids@cdsmith.com C.D. Smith Construction, Inc. P.O. Box 1006 Fond du Lac, WI 54936-1006 Ph: (920) 924-2900 “An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer”

ATTENTION MBE/DBE/DVB/SBE/WBE: C.D. Smith Construction, Inc. is requesting proposals for the following projects:

Drug Stores/Clinics • Carter/Hyatt Herbal Shoppe • Walgreen's on King Drive • MHS Clinical Services Banks • BMO Harris Bank on King Drive • Columbia Savings & Loan • Self-Help Credit Union (formerly Seaway Bank) Social Service Agencies • Milwaukee Urban League • St. Anne's Intergenerational Care

Kiel Dewatering and Drying 5/27/2021 at 11:00AM Please send bids to: bids@cdsmith.com C.D. Smith Construction, Inc. P.O. Box 1006 Fond du Lac, WI 54936-1006 Ph: (920) 924-2900 “An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer”

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The Classifieds

Thursday, May 6, 2021

Mrs. Fumbanks' Birthday Salutes "Wishing You All The Best!" May 1st Shelia Jackson Linda Estes May 3rd Na Tasha Isabell Alexis Taylor Josephine Montgomery Tonia Wells Tammie Kaine May 4th Jackie Jackson Katherine Jackson May 5th Chris Brown Raheem Devaughn Ike Taylor Allen Fumbanks May 6th Morgan Hills Meek Mill Chris Paul Willie Mays May 8th Anthony Fumbanks James Renfro, Jr. Natasha N. Banks May 9th Duane A. Ingram Keith Davis Latoya Wimpy Billie J. Thomas Carissa Hart May 11th Jaye Syc Andrew Franks May 12th Adrian Saffold Vanessa Saffold Ella Ruth Harrel

May 14th Yolanda Davis Louis Davis, III DeWannda Taylor May 15th Dion Saffold Derrick Seals Riambria Parker Teaza Wells Briambria Parker May 19th Quiney Matthews Dorothy Summers May 20th Virginia Stricklen-Grady Terri Goodwin May 22nd Chanté Chamberlain

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Wednesday, May 12, 2021

May 6, 1991 – The Smithsonian Institution approves the creation of the National African American Museum. May 7, 1878 – Joseph R. Winters patents first fire escape ladder.

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

May 10, 1950 – Boston Celtics select Chuck Cooper first Black player drafted to play in the NBA. May 11, 1895 – Composer William Grant Still, the first African American to conduct a major American symphony orchestra, born.

May 8, 1983 – Lena Horne awarded the Spingarn Medal May 12, 1820 – The New for distinguished career in York African Free School the field of entertainment. population reaches 500. May 9, 1899 – John Albert Burr patents lawn mower.

May 23rd Tonia Moore May 24th Andrew Green, Jr. Deborah Tasker May 25th Darion Saffold May 27th Zarion Davis Callie J. Jackson May 29th Tracy R. Ingram May 30th Evag. Shirley Tribble Lorelie Jones May 31st Garry L. Ingram Cyril Fumbanks

May 13th Portia Banks

Do you have a friend, family member, or colleague who has just celebrated or is about to celebrate a birthday? Stop by our office with their name on Monday to get them in that week’s edition of Happy Birthday Salutes! Visit us at 1936 N. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, call us at (414) 263-5088 or e-mail them to miltimes@gmail.com. An NCON Communications Publication

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2.99

SALE

Look for these tags.

WEEKLY DIG ITAL DEAL Use each coupon UP TO 5 TIMES in one transa ction.

Visit our app or website!

2X 299

$

Pork Back Ribs

*Restrictions apply.

$

18 oz Blueberries

1

Scan me to download digital coupon!

277

Previously Frozen

/LB

With Card & Digital Coupon

Weekly sale price without digital coupon is $3.99 lb with Card. While supplies last.

$ 49

or Organic Honeycrisp Apples, $1.99 lb

.

with digital coupon.*

Every Thursday - Sunday, through May 30

Honeycrisp or Cosmic Crisp Apples

With Card

Fuel points

/LB

With Card

7

or 18 oz Simple Truth Organic Blueberries, $3.99

$

.

99 /LB

With Card

Black Angus Boneless New York Strip Steaks Family Pack or Bulk Colossal Shrimp, Raw, 13-15 ct

99¢

Keebler Town House or Club Crackers 9-13.8 oz or Nabisco Snak-Saks, 8 oz; Select Varieties

Red, Orange or Yellow Bell Peppers or Seedless Cucumbers

/EA

With Card & Digital Coupon

Weekly sale price without digital coupon is $1.99-$2.99 each with Card. While supplies last.

99

¢

or 2 ct Simple Truth Organic Bell Peppers, $2.99

With Card

Party Size Lay's Potato Chips 8.12-13 oz or Tostitos, 14.5-17 oz; Select Varieties

Fresh Heritage Farm Boneless Chicken Breasts

1

2/$5

$ 99 /LB

With Card

16 oz or Silk Almondmilk or Soymilk, Half Gallon; Select Varieties

With Card

Dozen FreshRose 80%Bouquet Lean With Ground Filler &Chuck Greens

/ /LB

With Card

When You Buy 3

$ / 3 12

Sold in a 3 lb Package or More

Wonderful Pistachios

Store Made Chocolate Dipped Strawberries

With Card

6

Coca-Cola, Pepsi or 7UP

Select Varieties, 8 oz

99 Weekly sale price without digital coupon is $3.99 each with Card. While supplies last.

With Card

H MATC MIX &

FREE

al of Equ

e

er Valu

or Less

With Card

20 oz or Ball Park Meat Hot Dogs, 15 oz or French's Mustard, 12-14 oz or Vlasic Pickles, 24 fl oz; Select Varieties

19.99 -15%

With Card

1699

$

Dozen Rose Bouquet With Filler & Greens

$

Heinz Ketchup

.

1699

Ore-Ida Frozen Potatoes

/EA*

22-32 oz or Yoplait Yogurt or Go-Gurt Multipack, 4-16 ct; Select Varieties

Meiomi or Chandon Select Varieties, 750 ml

SAVE 1 EACH

Look for these tags.

*When you buy any 5 or more participating items with Card. Participating item varieties and sizes may vary by store.

Kroger Breakfast Sausage

1

/EA*

*Free pickup on orders of $35 or more.

Shop our app or website. Restrictions apply. See associate for details.

Thursday, May 6 through Tuesday, May 11, 2021

Selection may vary by store, limited to stock on hand.

1

/EA*

48 fl oz or Snickers or Twix Ice Cream Bars, 6 ct; Select Varieties

DELIVERY OR FREE PICKUP*

SNAP EBT CARDS NOW ACCEPTED AT PICKUP! See our website or app for details.

With Card

$ 99

/EA*

Edy's or Turkey Hill Ice Cream

Post Cereal

SALE DATES:

2.99 -1.00

249

$

$ 79 .

3.49 -1.00

Select Varieties, 12 oz

With Card

Doritos

6-10.75 oz or Nabisco Chips Ahoy Cookies, 7-13 oz or Smartfood Popcorn, 5-7 oz; Select Varieties

32 oz Roundy's Cheese

599

$

/EA*

Select Varieties

Restrictions apply. See associate for details.

We reserve the right to limit quantities and correct all printed errors. Not all items and prices available at all locations unless otherwise noted. Prices subject to state and local taxes, if applicable. No sales to dealers. Purchase requirements exclude discounts, coupons, gift cards, lottery tickets, bus passes, alcohol, tobacco and use of Fresh Perks Card®. All prices “with card” are discounted by using your Fresh Perks Card® *Free promotion will be applied to item of least value.

An NCON Communications Publication

6.99 -1.00

With Card

FEE FREE GOVERNMENT CHECK CASHING LIMITED TIME OFFER!

/EA

With Card & Digital Coupon

Weekly sale price without digital coupon is $2.99-$3.99 each with Card. While supplies last.

MIX & MATCH 5 or more participating items with Card.

$

1

$ 99

*Save 15% when you purchase 6 bottles of wine 750 ml with Card. Mix and Match 6 bottles. Other restrictions may apply. See store for details.

BUY 5 OR MORE

With Card

/EA

With Card & Digital Coupon

GREAT GIFTS FOR MOM!

When you buy 3 in the same transaction with Card. Limit 2 Rewards per transaction. Quantities less than 3 priced at $5.99 each.

BUY 1 GET 1

299

$

6 ct

$

Select Varieties, 12-Pack, 12 fl oz Cans or 8-Pack, 12 fl oz Bottles

11-14.75 oz or Quaker Cap'n Crunch or Life Cereal, 11.5-14 oz or Kellogg's Special K Cereal, 11-13.3 oz; Select Varieties

/EA

With Card & Digital Coupon

Weekly sale price without digital coupon is $3.99 each with Card. While supplies last.

16 29999

$$

FINAL COST

2.79 -1.00

249

$

Kroger Butter

Weekly sale price without digital coupon is $2.49 each with Card. While supplies last.

1

$ 99 /EA

With Card & Digital Coupon

Rubbermaid Easy Find Lids Food Storage Sets Select Varieties, 3 Cup, 5.5 Cup & 14 Cup

599

$

/EA

With Card & Digital Coupon

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