Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Digital Edition Issue February 25, 2021

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The Milwaukee Times Newspaper and milwaukeetimesnews.com Milwaukee's Only “Blue Chip” Community Newspaper

Weekly Newspaper

“Journalistic Excellence, Service, Integrity and Objectivity Always”

Vol. 40 • No. 08 • Thurs., Feb. 25, 2021 - Wed., March. 03, 2021 • An NCON Publication Serving The Milwaukee Area • 75¢

The late Nathan Conyers Founder, The Christian Times & The Milwaukee Times

The Late Dr. Mary Ellen Shadd-Strong Founder, The Milwaukee Courier

Patricia Pattillo Publisher, Milwaukee Community Journal

Robert J. Thomas Co-founder, Milwaukee Community Journal

Jerrell Jones Publisher, The Milwaukee Courier

The Milwaukee Times' Black Excellence Awards Presents:

Linda Jackson-Cocroft Publisher, Black Women 50+

The Late Eugene Releford Founder, The Chronicle, Beloit

Henry Sanders Publisher & CEO, Madison 365

The Late Harry Kemp Photographer

Don Rosette WMCS Radio

Tannette Johnson-Elie

Columnist, Milwaukee Journal Sentential An NCON Communications Publication

The Late Betty Franklin-Hammond Publisher, The Madison Times

Week#4: The Black News Media

This week the Milwaukee Times looks at the history of the Black news media. From its inception the Black media has been the voice of the community it covers. To celebrate we look at the general history of the Black press (page 5), look at the life of one of American's first black female journalists, Ida B. Wells (page 6), and bring you a list of Milwaukee's legendary members of the Black press (page 7).

The Late O.C. White WAWA Radio

The Late Maddiebelle Woods, Social Journalist

The Late Dr. Bop WAWA Radio

The Late Greg Stanford, Columnist

The Late J. Anthony Josey Founder, Wisconsin Weekly Blade, Madison

The Late Milele Chikasa Anana Publisher, UMOJA Magazine

Jacquelyn D. Heath Editor, Milwaukee Times

Thomas Michell Editor

The Late Eric Von WMCS Radio

Lynda Conyers Publlisher www.milwaukeetimesnews.com


In The News

Thursday, February 25, 2021

2

Wednesday, March 4, 2021

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

The Cole Dance Company opens its doors

On Saturday, February 20, 2021, the Cole Dance Company, 527 N. 27 St., hosted its grand opening celebration. The Cole dance company was created and founded by Camille Cole who wanted to bring more opportunities and something different for at-risk children in our community. The Cole Dance Company is a safe space for all children to not only learn new styles of dance but a space to talk, ask questions, and create memories with their dance family. During the opening event students took in some dance lessons with dance teachers

Kevin Hill and Whitney Martina. The classes officially started February 22, 2021 and will run through June 4, 2021 and are reasonably priced with children classes $15 each, and adult classes $20 each. With the current pandemic special health and safety guidelines have been established including available sanitation station, masks worn at all times, temperature checks, buzz-in entry, parents notified when students enter, regular disinfecting of equipment and surfaces and social distancing will be observed.

ERIC VON

BROADCAST FELLOWSHIP The Eric Von Broadcast Fellowship provides funding for a year-long fellowship to a recent college graduate who will receive paid experience to begin building a successful career in broadcast journalism.

TO MAKE A DONATION VISIT: WUWM.COM/ERICVON

MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Louvenia Johnson Luther Golden Nathan Conyers (1981-2008) (1981-2005) (1981- 2018 ) Lynda J. Jackson Conyers, Publisher Morgan A. Conyers, Associate Publisher Jacquelyn D. Heath, Editorial Page Editor

The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper STAFF Publisher/President Lynda J. Jackson Conyers Graphic Artists William Gooden Michelle Anibas

Founders Louvenia Johnson Nathan Conyers Luther Golden Marketing Carmen Murguía

The Milwaukee Times Weekly newspaper is published each Thursday at 1936 N. MLK Dr., Milwaukee, WI 53212 Telephone: 414-263-5088 • Fax: 414-263-4445 Email: miltimes@gmail.com • http://milwaukeetimesnews.com An NCON Communications Publication

www.milwaukeetimesnews.com


Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, February 25, 2021

3

Wednesday, March 4, 2021 24, 2021

Affordable Care Act (Obama Care) 2021 Special Enrollment Period Executive Order signed by President Biden on January 28, 2021 There will be a Special Enrollment Period (SEP) from February 15, 2021-May 15, 2021 for individuals and families to apply and enroll in the Marketplace Health Coverage. (Affordable Care Act/Obama Care) New Enrollees: • (SEP) February 15, 2021 to May 15, 2021 • No qualifying documentation needed (e.g.. loss of a job, or birth of a child) • Eligible enrollees: o Enroll during SEP o Choose your Health Plan o Coverage begins 1st of the following month Current Enrollees: • (SEP) February 15, 2021 to May 15, 2021 • Change Health Plans in your ZIP CODE AREA without restrictions • To Change to a New Health Plan: o Review and Update your existing application (Household Information and Income) o Submit Updated information o You will receive eligibility result that will allow you to select a new plan • No new questions to answer; Only validate your current information If you do not qualify for Affordable Care Act (Obama Care): o Your application will be transferred to the state Medicaid and CHIP agencies for enrollment.

How to Enroll or Update Current Plan:

Use the QR Code or call Jerry Wilson CMG Insurance at (262)222-2872.

NPN #6467722

What's Happening

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT Office of the Milwaukee Public Schools, DIVISION OF FACILITIES AND MAINTENANCE SERVICES, 1124 North 11th Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, February 11, 2021. Sealed bids will be received until Thursday, March 4, 2021 at 1:30 PM on-line through A/E Graphics, Inc., pursuant to Section 119.16(4) Wisconsin Statutes in accordance with plans and specifications for the following work: All contractor(s) and subcontractors(s) are subject to the current livable wage rate, in accordance with the City of Milwaukee Ordinance 310-13. Per 2015 WI Act 55, prevailing wage rate laws have been repealed for all MPS Construction Projects beginning January 1, 2017. BID GUARANTY TO ACCOMPANY BID: MPS Bid Bond, Certified or Cashier's Check: 10% of Contractor's Base Bid. DIV 2-BARN INFRASTRUCTURE UPGRADES Harold S Vincent High School 7501 N. Granville Road Milwaukee, WI 53224 MPS Property No. 033 MPS Project No. 7074 The HUB requirements for this project are 10% The COIN requirements for this project are 10% The minimum Student Participation requirements for this project are: Paid Employment: 100 Hours Educational Activities: 10 Hours Deposit for Drawings and Specifications: $25.00 MAILING CHARGE: $35.00 The bidding documents may be viewed and downloaded for free from A/E Graphics On-line Plan Room, at https://mps.aegraphics.com/. Hard copies may be obtained 7:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; Monday through Friday from A/E Graphics, Inc.; 4075 North 124th Street, Brookfield, WI 53005; phone (262) 781-7744; fax (262) 781-4250. Call A/E Graphics, Inc. for availability of bid documents for pick up. Plans and specifications will be loaned to a prospective bidder upon receipt of the deposit listed, which deposit will be returned upon surrender of the plans and specifications in good condition. Bid documents must be returned only to A/E Graphics, Inc. A pre-bid walkthrough for the site will be held on Friday, February 19, 2021 at 9:00 AM, meet at the school’s main entrance. All questions should be submitted in writing prior to 12:00 PM on Friday, February 26, 2021 to DFMSProcurement@milwaukee.k12.wi.us. No questions may be answered after that date and time. No questions shall be answered verbally. No verbal information from any source is to be relied upon by any respondent in the development of their Bid. Written questions and responses will be documented by way of addenda, which will be forwarded to all bidders. Each bid shall be for a fixed lump sum. Bids shall be submitted on-line through A/E Graphics On-line Plan Room, at https://mps.aegraphics.com/ using the “Submit Bid” tab on the DIV 2-BARN INFRASTRUCTURE UPGRADES - Harold S Vincent High School project information page from which bid documents were obtained. Submit bid forms per Instructions to Bidders, Article B-5 of the Specifications. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to waive informalities. Upon reasonable notice, efforts will be made to accommodate the needs of disabled individuals at the bid opening through sign language interpreters or other auxiliary aids. Keith P. Posley, Ed.D. 2-15 Superintendent of Schools

CMG Website for ACA

Black History Month Celebrates

Milwaukee’s Own

Jeannie Holliday Born in Chicago and raised in Milwaukee, Jeannie started capturing audiences at the tender age of four by dancing and singing on tabletops to everyone’s surprise and delight. She sang at a myriad of church revivals from Chicago to Florida, California and New York. She even sang in France and Italy. Traveling the world to sing her heart out to legions of awestruck fans, Jeannie has opened for the likes of Isaac Hayes, Barry White, Shirley Brown, Millie Jackson and none other than Blues Legend, B.B. King. Despite all the excitement, Jeannie felt at home in Milwaukee, where she could spend time with family and enjoy performing to some of the most sincere audiences in the nation. Jeannie has three new CDs out now. They are “It’s Party Time” and “Keep it Deep,” both written by Ms. Holliday. Her third CD is a Gospel song called “God Have Mercy,” produced by Marshall McQueen. On Friday, February 5, 2021, Jeannie performed in Milwaukee at On The Bayou for Black History Month.

Her return engagement will be... Friday, March 19, 2021 At On The Bayou Doors open at 6:00 p.m. Show starts at 8:00 p.m. www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

Mattiebelle Woods & Jeannie Holliday An NCON Communications Publication


Christian Times

Thursday, February 25, 2021

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Wednesday, March 4, 2021

The Counseling Corner

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

By Rev. Judith T. Lester, B.Min. M.Th

Milwaukee’s African American Trailblazers (Week 3) This week, we have two additional trailblazers whom we are honored to celebrate, the late Vel Phillips and Jeannetta Simpson-Robinson.

Velvalea Hortense Rodgers "Vel" Phillips February 18, 1923 - April 17, 2018 Vel dedicated her life to building and empowering the African American Community. Her drive, devotion and never-ending commitment to equality were unsurpassed. Active in the women's movement and the civil rights movement, Vel Phillips built a career of Wisconsin “firsts” both as a woman and as an African American. In 1951, Vel graduated from

the University of Wisconsin Law School, the first African American woman to earn a law degree from the University of Wisconsin. After 15 years of serving on the Milwaukee Common Council—both the first woman and African American to do so—Vel resigned in 1971 and was appointed to the Milwaukee County judiciary; thus, becoming the first woman judge in Milwaukee and the first African American judge in Wisconsin. In 1978, Vel made national history as the first woman and first African American elected as the Secretary of State in Wisconsin. She was the first African American in the country elected to the National Committee of a major political party, and knew three presidents on a firstname basis: John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, and Jimmy Carter. Vel was a loving and devoted wife, mother and grandmother. We salute Vel Phillips as truly one of Milwaukee's trailblazers having celebrated five extraordinary “firsts.” Jeannetta Simpson-Robinson Date of Death: October 9, 2008

Community leader, woman of God, founder and chief executive officer of Career Youth Development, Commissioner Jeannetta Simpson-Robinson served our communities most in need of poor youth and families for more than four decades. She was well known to our community and was the host for the multi-award winning, Jeannetta Robinson television show on MATA community media for more than twenty-four years. Jeannetta Simpson-Robinson was the longest serving commissioner in state Juvenile Justice for more than 30 years.

General Disclaimer: The writer has used her best efforts in preparation of this information. No representations or warranties for its contents, either expressed or implied, are offered. Neither the publisher nor the writer shall be liable in any way for readers’ efforts to apply, rely or utilize the highway sign would mark the information or recommendations first time, in the state’s his- presented herein as they may not tory, that a woman of color be suitable for you or necessarily would have her name placed appropriate for every situation to on a highway road sign." The which they may refer. This inforJeannetta Simpson-Robinson mation is for educational purposes Memorial Highway Sign Un- only. In some instances, this article veiling and Dedication was After extensive collabo- held on Thursday, Septem- contains the opinions, conclusions and/or recommendations of the ration between community ber 17, 2020. writer. If you would like to conleaders, elected officials, and tact Rev. Lester, write to her c/o the Simpson-Robinson fam- Sources: ily, Wisconsin State Senator Vel Phillips - OnWisconsin, P.O. Box 121, Brookfield, WI. 53008. Lena Taylor announced the Molly Snyder, 2/1/19 sign installation, unveiling, and dedication of the Jean- Jeanetta Simpson Robinson netta Simpson-Robinson Published in Milwaukee Journal Memorial Highway. During Sentinel from Oct. 23 to Oct. 24, the dedication, Senator Tay- 2008 lor commented, “This week we watched the signs go up. Erected along I-43, be- Next Week: Conclusion tween North Avenue and the Keefe/Atkinson Avenue exits, we had a front row seat to Wisconsin history. This

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, February 25, 2021

5

Wednesday, March 4, 2021 24, 2021

Black History Month

The Milwaukee Times' Black Excellence Awards Presents Honoring Black History The History of the Black Newspaper The history of the Black newspaper in the United States is as rich and long as our own. They have served to tell the story of our Black history in our own words, by our own people. They have been our voice in times when it seemed we had none, and have presented a positive and accurate image of the African American as an individual and as a community.

have shut down, merged, or shrunk in response to the dominance of the Internet in terms of providing free news and information, and providing cheap advertising.

Origins Most of the early African American publications, such as Freedom's Journal, were published in the North and then distributed, often covertly, to African Americans Black newspapers (also throughout the country. By known as the Black press or the 20th century, daily papers African American newspa- appeared in Norfolk, Chicapers) are news publications in go, Baltimore and Washingthe United States serving Af- ton, D.C.. Freedom's Journal, conrican American communities. sidered the first African Samuel Cornish and John 19th century American newspaper pubBrown Russwurm started Some notable black newsthe first African American papers of the 19th century lished within the United periodical called Freedom's were Freedom's Journal (1827– States. Journal in 1827. During the 29), Philip Alexander Bell's In 1885, Daniel Rudd antebellum South, other Af- Colored American (1837–41), formed the Ohio Tribune, said rican American newspapers the North Star (1847–60), the to be the first newspaper sprang forth, such as The National Era, The Frederick "printed by and for Black North Star founded in 1847 Douglass Paper (1851–63), the Americans", the Ohio Triby Frederick Douglass. Douglass Monthly (1859–63), bune—which he later expandThe Christian Recorder (1861– ed into the American Catholic As African Americans 1902), and Daniel Rudd's Tribune, purported to be the moved to urban centers Ohio Tribune (later renamed first Black-owned national around the country, virtually to American Catholic Tribune, newspaper. every large city with a signif- 1885-1897). icant African-American pop"The American Freedman" ulation soon had newspapers In the 1860s, the news- was a New York-based paper directed towards African papers The Elevator and the that served as an outlet to inAmericans. These newspa- Pacific Appeal emerged in Cal- spire African Americans to pers gained audiences outside ifornia as a result of black use the Reconstruction peAfrican American circles. participation in the Gold riod as a time for social and In the 21st century, papers Rush. political advancement. This (like newspapers of all sorts) newspaper did so by publish-

ing articles that reference African-American mobilization during the Reconstruction period that had not only local support but had gained support from the global community as well.

payment movement of Black teachers in the southern United States. Newspaper coverage of the movement served to publicize the cause. However, the way in which the movement was portrayed, and those whose The national Afro-Amer- struggles were highlighted ican Press Association in the press, displaced Black formed in 1890 in Indianap- women to the background olis. of a movement they spearheaded. A woman’s issue, and 20th century a Black woman’s issue, was African American newspa- being covered by the press. pers flourished in the major However, reporting dimincities, with publishers play- ished the roles of the woming a major role in politics en fighting for teacher salary and business affairs. Rep- equalization and “diminished resentative leaders includ- the presence of the teachers’ ed Robert Sengstacke Ab- salary equalization fight” in bott (1870–1940) and John national debates over equalH. Sengstacke (1912–1997) ity in education. publishers of the Chicago Defender; John Mitchell, Jr. The national, Chica(1863–1929), editor of the go-based Associated Negro Richmond Planet and president Press (1919–1964) was a of the National Afro-Amer- news agency "with correican Press Association; An- spondents and stringers in all thony Overton (1865–1946), major centers of black poppublisher of the Chicago Bee, ulation." Garth C. Reeves, Sr. (19192019), Publisher Emeritus There were many specialof the Miami Times and Rob- ized black publications, such ert Lee Vann (1879–1940), as those of Marcus Garvey the publisher and editor of and John H. Johnson. These the Pittsburgh Courier. In the men broke a wall that let 1940s the number of news- black people into society. The papers grew from 150 to 250. Roanoke Tribune was founded During the 1930s and in 1939 by Fleming Alexan1940s, the Black southern der, and recently celebratpress both aided and, to an ed its 75th anniversary. The extent, hindered the equal Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder is Minnesota's oldest black newspaper and the United States' oldest ongoing minority publication, second only to The Jewish World.

February is Black History Month. Milwaukee Film will dedicate its new programming all month long to films and events that celebrate, honor, and elevate Black culture and traditions. Featuring 30 films by Black filmmakers, don’t miss out on the dozens of engaging events that strive to inspire conversation, celebration, and community.

passes and films available now mkefilm.org/bhm

www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

21st century Due to changes in the advertising industry many Black newspapers that began publishing in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s went out of business because they could not attract enough advertising. They were also victims of their own substantial efforts to eradicate racism and promote civil rights. As of 2002, about 200 Black newspapers remained. However, all was not doom and gloom. With the dawn of the Internet age and social media information was much easier to access from anywhere at any time. Publishing via the world wide web was also much more cost efficient and attracted different sources of advertisers. More and more black news websites emerged, most notably Black Voice News, The Grio, The Root, and Black Voices.

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Black History Month

Thursday, February 25, 2021

6

Wednesday, March 4, 2021

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

The Milwaukee Times' Black Excellence Awards Presents Honoring Black History Journalist, activist, and researcher: Ida B. Wells-Barnett Ida B. Wells-Barnett was a prominent journalist, activist, and researcher, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In her lifetime, she battled sexism, racism, and violence. As a skilled writer, Wells-Barnett also used her abilities as a journalist to shed light on the conditions of African Americans throughout the South. Ida Bell Wells was born in Holly Springs, Mississippi on July 16, 1862. She was born into slavery during the Civil War. Once the war ended Wells-Barnett’s parents became politically active in Reconstruction Era politics. Her parents instilled into her the importance of education. Wells-Barnett enrolled at Rust College but was expelled when she started a dispute with the university president. In 1878, Wells-Barnett went to visit her grandmother. While she was there Wells-Barnett was informed that a yellow fever epidemic had hit her hometown. The disease took both of Wells-Barnett’s parents and her infant brother. Left to raise her brothers and sister, she took a job as a teacher so that she could keep the family together. Eventually, Wells-Barnett moved her siblings to Memphis, Tennessee. There she continued to work as an educator. In 1884, Wells-Barnett filed a lawsuit against a train car company in Memphis for unfair treatment. She had been thrown off a first-class train, despite having a ticket. Although she won the case on the local level, the ruling was eventually overturned in federal court. After the lynching of one of her friends, Wells-Barnett turned her attention to white mob violence. She became skeptical about the reasons black men

Ida B. Wells-Barnett were lynched and set out to investigate several cases. She published her findings in a pamphlet and wrote several columns in local newspapers. Her expose about an 1892 lynching enraged locals, who burned her press and drove her from Memphis. After a few months, the threats became so bad she was forced to move to Chicago, Illinois. In 1893, Wells-Barnett, joined other African American leaders in calling for a boycott of the World’s Columbian Exposition. The boycotters accused the exposition committee of locking out African Americans and negatively portraying the black community. In 1895, Wells-Barnett married famed African American lawyer Ferdinand Barnett. Together, the couple had four children. Throughout her career Wells-Barnett, balanced motherhood with her activism. Wells-Barnett traveled internationally, shedding light on lynching to foreign audiences. Abroad, she openly confronted white women in the suffrage movement who ignored lynching. Because of her stance, she was often ridiculed and ostracized by women’s suffrage organizations in the United States. Nevertheless, Wells-Barnett remained active in the wom-

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en’s rights movement. She was a founder of the National Association of Colored Women’s Club which was created to address issues dealing with civil rights and women’s suffrage. She was in Niagara Falls for the founding of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Late in her career Wells-Barnett focused on urban reform in the growing city of Chicago. She died on March 25, 1931 and was awarded a posthumous Pulitzer Prize in 2020. Though she has passed Ida's legacy still lives on however. Michelle Duster, a Columbia College Chicago faculty member and great-granddaughter of Ida B. Wells-Barnett, has immersed herself into legacy of Wells’ life. Ms. Duster, who also lives in Chicago, speaks widely about her great-grandmother’s legacy, a theme explored in her book “Ida B. the Queen: The Extraordinary Life and Legacy of Ida B. Wells.” Duster is creating an initiative to educate people about the involvement of Black women in the suffrage movement and how it ties into today. She is currently raising money to raise a memorial to her great-grandmother at the site at which her house once stood in Chicago. In addition to exposing lynching as state-sanctioned murder, Michelle said her great-grandmother also encouraged Black people to exercise the power they did have, organizing boycotts of white-owned businesses and streetcars and a mass exodus of Black residents from Memphis. “That’s why they wanted to kill her,” Michelle said.

Michelle Duster with a portrait of great-grandmother, Ida B. Wells-Barnett. Michelle once said in an interview, "Ida B. Wells did not allow herself to be marginalized or silenced. Even though she faced threats, lost property, and endured criticism, she felt what she had

her

to say was important enough to say it. She refused to be silent. She refused to make herself small. She stood up. Spoke out. And she made a difference for all of us."

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT Office of the Milwaukee Public Schools, DIVISION OF FACILITIES AND MAINTENANCE SERVICES, 1124 North 11th Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, February 11, 2021. Sealed bids will be received until Thursday, March 4, 2021 at 1:30 PM on-line through A/E Graphics, Inc., pursuant to Section 119.16(4) Wisconsin Statutes in accordance with plans and specifications for the following work: All contractor(s) and subcontractors(s) are subject to the current livable wage rate, in accordance with the City of Milwaukee Ordinance 310-13. Per 2015 WI Act 55, prevailing wage rate laws have been repealed for all MPS Construction Projects beginning January 1, 2017. BID GUARANTY TO ACCOMPANY BID: MPS Bid Bond, Certified or Cashier's Check: 10% of Contractor's Base Bid. DIV 1-AUTOBODY SHOP RENOVATIONS Casimir Pulaski High School 2500 W. Oklahoma Avenue Milwaukee, WI 53215 MPS Property No. 026 MPS Project No. 7079 The HUB requirements for this project are 10% The COIN requirements for this project are 10% The minimum Student Participation requirements for this project are: Paid Employment: 100 Hours Educational Activities: 10 Hours Deposit for Drawings and Specifications: $25.00 MAILING CHARGE: $35.00 The bidding documents may be viewed and downloaded for free from A/E Graphics On-line Plan Room, at https://mps.aegraphics.com/. Hard copies may be obtained 7:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; Monday through Friday from A/E Graphics, Inc.; 4075 North 124th Street, Brookfield, WI 53005; phone (262) 781-7744; fax (262) 781-4250. Call A/E Graphics, Inc. for availability of bid documents for pick up. Plans and specifications will be loaned to a prospective bidder upon receipt of the deposit listed, which deposit will be returned upon surrender of the plans and specifications in good condition. Bid documents must be returned only to A/E Graphics, Inc. A pre-bid walkthrough for the site will be held on Thursday, February 18, 2021 at 9:00 AM, meet at the school’s main entrance. All questions should be submitted in writing prior to 12:00 PM on Friday, February 26, 2021 to DFMSProcurement@milwaukee.k12.wi.us. No questions may be answered after that date and time. No questions shall be answered verbally. No verbal information from any source is to be relied upon by any respondent in the development of their Bid. Written questions and responses will be documented by way of addenda, which will be forwarded to all bidders. Each bid shall be for a fixed lump sum. Bids shall be submitted on-line through A/E Graphics On-line Plan Room, at https://mps.aegraphics.com/ using the “Submit Bid” tab on the DIV 1-AUTOBODY SHOP RENOVATIONS - Casimir Pulaski High School project information page from which bid documents were obtained. Submit bid forms per Instructions to Bidders, Article B-5 of the Specifications. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to waive informalities. Upon reasonable notice, efforts will be made to accommodate the needs of disabled individuals at the bid opening through sign language interpreters or other auxiliary aids. Keith P. Posley, Ed.D. 2-15 Superintendent of Schools

www.milwaukeetimesnews.com


Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, February 25, 2021

Wednesday, March 4, 2021 24, 2021

7

Black History Month

The Milwaukee Times' Black Excellence Awards Presents Honoring Black History Great Names in Milwaukee's Black Press FOUNDERS & PUBLISHERS The Late Nathan Conyers, Founder, The Christian Times and The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Dr. Mary Ellen Shadd-Strong, Publisher, Milwaukee Community Journal Patricia Pattillo, Founder, CEO and Publisher, Milwaukee Community Journal Robert J. Thomas, Co-founder, Milwaukee Community Journal Jerrell Jones, Publisher, Milwaukee Courier Linda Jackson-Cocroft, Publisher, Black Women 50+ Lynda Jackson Conyers, Publisher, The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Ken Lumpkin, Publisher, Insider News, Racine The Late Eugene Releford, Founder, The Chronicle, Beloit The Late Betty Franklin-Hammond, Publisher, The Madison Times The Late J. Anthony Josey, Founder, Wisconsin Weekly Blade, Madison Henry Sanders, Publisher & CEO, Madison 365 The Late Milele Chikasa Anana, Publisher, UMOJA Magazine R. Thomas, Publisher, The Racine Star Times

Print Journalists The Late Mattiebelle Woods, Social Journalist, Milwaukee Courier The Late Jay Gilmer, Journalist The Late Dr. James Cameron, Journalist The Late Lynda L. Jones-Reyes, Editor-In-Chief, Milwaukee Courier Linda Presberry, Journalist Virginia Williams, Journalist Jacquelyn D. Heath, Editor, The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Jill Williams, Senior Editor-Features, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel D.L. Davis, Multiplatform Producer, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Talis Shelbourne, Reporter, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Mark Stewart, Prep Sports Editor, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel The Late Gregory Stanford, Columnist, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel James Causey, Columnist and Speaker, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel The Late Felicia Thomas Lynn, Columnist, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Tannette Johnson-Elie, Columnist, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel The Late Leonard Sykes, Journalist, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Sherman Williams, Assistant Managing Editor, Visual Journalism, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Berford Gammon, Director of Photography, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Angela Peterson, Photo Editor, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Mikel Holt, Editor & Columnist, Milwaukee Community Journal Jamaal Abdul-Alim, Journalist, Milwaukee Journal Dr. Shirley Moutry, Columnist, Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Clarene Mitchell, Freelance Journalist, Educator & Social Media Trainer Thomas E. Mitchell, Editor-In-Chief, Milwaukee Community Journal Rev. Judith Lester, Columnist, The Christian Times & Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Rev. Dr. Hugh Davis, Columnist, The Christian Times Katherine Hicks, Writer, Milwaukee Journal Kathy Gaillard, Journalist and Public Relations Dr. Lillian Hunter Johnson, Columnist, for the Christian Times

Photojournalists The Late Harry Kemp, Photographer Yvonne Kemp, Photographer Pat Robinson, Photographer Kim Robinson, Photographer Robert Bell, Photographer The Late Dennis Williams, Photographer Cermachiavelli Hibbler, Photographer Willie Mitchell, Retired Photographer

www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

TELEVISION CBS 58 - Winnie Dortch, Reporter; Kim Shine, Reporter; Amanda Porterfield, Anchor; Darius Joshua, Sports Reporter Today's TMJ4 - Tony Atkins, Reporter; Ryan Jenkins, Reporter; Taylor Lumpkin, Multimedia Journalist; Shannon Sims, Anchor; Carole Meekins, Anchor; Vivian King, Retired Anchor; Bill Taylor, Retired Anchor; Elise Grant-Taylor, Retired Managing Editor; The Late Lynise Weeks, Reporter; Rod Burks, Sports Anchor/Reporter Fox 6 Milwaukee - Aaron Maybin, Reporter; Gabrielle Mays, Reporter; Brhett Vickery, Multimedia Journalist; Derica Williams, Reporter and Anchor; Cassandra McShepard, Real Milwaukee co-host; Kim Murphy, Anchor; Mary Stoker Smith, Anchor; Beverly Taylor, Former Anchor WISN TV12 - Derrick Rose, Anchor/Reporter; Toya Washington, Anchor; Dwight E. Moss, Senior Newscast Director; Melinda Davenport, Former Anchor; The Late Mike Anderson, Reporter; Sheldon Dutes, Former Anchor; Eleanor Hayes, Former Anchor; DeMarco Morgan, Former Anchor; Ben Hart, Former News Director Milwaukee Public Television - PBS Portia Young, Host, 10 Thirty-Six, Earl Arms, Host, Black Nouveau; Walter Harvey, formerly at PBS; Everett Marshburn, Producer, Black Nouveau; Liddie Collins, Producer; Joanne Williams, Journalist, Filmmaker & Former PBS Host, Black Nouveau; Faithe Colas, Former PBS Host,Black Nouveau and Public Relations; Patricia Davis, MPTV 10/36; Denise Callaway, Reporter WTMJ-TV; former Host of 4th Street Forum & co-host InterCHANGE Matthew Johnson, Program Developer for Strive Media RADIO Andrea Williams, On Air Host and Executive Producer, WJMR Radio, WVTV-WCGV Television Don Rosette, WMCS Radio, Retired Ella Smith, WMCS Radio, Retired Earl Ingram, WMCS Radio Jerrell Jones, Courier Communications/WNOV Radio The Late O.C. White, WAWA Radio The Late Dr. Bop, WAWA Radio The Late Eric Von, WMCS Radio The Late Willie Davis, All Pro Broadcasting Teran Powell, Reporter, WUWM LaToya Dennis, Reporter and Producer, WUWM

Yvonne Kemp Photographer

Portia Young Host, 10 Thirty-Six, MPTV

Beverly Taylor Former Anchor Fox 6

Mike Holt Editor & Columnist MKE Community Journal

“Every day, we write the future Together, we sign it Together, we declare it We share it For this truth marches on Inside each of us.” - Amanda Gorman (Believer’s Hymn for the Republic) An NCON Communications Publication


What's Happening

Thursday, February 25, 2021

8

Wednesday, March 4, 2021

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

BLACK HISTORY IS AMERICAN HISTORY

Milwaukee County Sheriff Earnell R. Lucas

HONORING

BLACK HISTORY MONTH matc.edu An NCON Communications Publication

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, February 25, 2021

9

NAACP

Wednesday, March 4, 2021 24, 2021

Now More Then Ever, We Need You As Part of the

Milwaukee Branch NAACP Education has always been important to newly elected Milwaukee NAACP President Clarence P. Nicholas. After growing up in Charlottesville, Virginia, at the urging of his high school English teacher, Nicholas attended and graduated from Wilberforce University in Wilberforce, OH, the nation’s oldest private school that became a historically black university owned and operated by African Americans. Its roots trace back to its founding in 1856.

Prior to retiring, he was principal of Cornerstone Achievement Academy from 2007 to 2009. While teaching full-time, Nicholas also earned a Para-Legal Certificate from MATC and a master’s degree in Education from Cardinal Stritch University. As a lifetime member of the NAACP, Nicholas was influenced to become involved in the organization by the late Felmers Chaney, who served as president of the NAACP for 12 years starting in 1987. Today Nicholas continues his passion for education and advocacy as President of the NAACP—Milwaukee Branch. Elected in December 2020, his term expires in November 2022.

After earning a bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education, he headed to Milwaukee in 1970 to become a Milwaukee Public School (MPS) teacher. For more than 40 years, Nicholas was employed by MPS where he acquired a lifetime teaching license, a principal’s license, and completed post graduate studies to obtain a district The mission of the Nationand superintendent’s license. al Association for the Ad-

the organization’s relevancy and is determined to help make a positive difference in the community.

“We must confront systemic racism and continue to fight. The laws, codes, and statutes that existed in the Jim Crow South are norms in the North and West. The “The NAACP Black Lives Matter movehas four focus areas ment is relevant. We work this year—educa- with our youth as they are intion, criminal justice, terested in coalescing with us healthcare and eco- to ensure we alleviate those nomic development. acts and behaviors that negOf those, we most atively impact people of colurgently need to ad- or,” he said. dress education and 21st Century policThe Milwaukee Branch of ing. Regarding the the NAACP serves the entire latter, we’re looking Metro Milwaukee communiat (former President) ty with respect to equality of Obama’s policy and treatment in five essential arbuilding a communi- eas of healthcare, education, ty coalition for qual- employment, social justice, ity policing,” he said. and housing.

Clarence P. Nicholas NAACP President

The NAACP has a local membership of about 800, and his goal is to activate 200 more vancement of Colored Peoto move the organizaple (NAACP) is to ensure the tion’s agenda forth. Nicholas political, educational, social, is quick to acknowledge that and economic equality of Milwaukee has its work cut rights of all persons, and to out for the organization and eliminate race-based discrim- he lauds the commitment of ination. Nicholas maintains the younger generation.

“If one of those essentials is missing, the community is not healthy. Thus, Milwaukee is in a State of Emergency since all five are missing in the African American, central city community. We need to engage and re-engage the faith community’s involvement on a larger scale through our Religious Affairs Community, youth through our Youth Committee (1224), and Young Adults (age 25-45). We are asking people to encourage their networks to support the NAACP’s movement to build political power and ensure the well-being of our community,” said Nicholas. Nicholas will spearhead initiatives during his tenure to not only re-engage Milwaukee residents, but increase membership by 100 for the year 2021-2022. And, while his plate is full serving as president, he is also a member of the City of Milwaukee Ethics Board and Milwaukee County Ethics Board. An active member of Mount Moriah Missionary Baptist Church, where he has served as a deacon since 1975, he is also a Sunday School Teacher/Superintendent, and Church Clerk. Now both retired, Nicholas and his wife, Dr. Gloria J. Pitchford-Nicholas, enjoy spending time with family, entertaining, playing cards, bowling, and traveling. Our Membership Meeting is held at 11:30 a.m. every third Saturday of the month. For more information, please email us at naacpmkeorg@gmail. com, visit our website at naacpmke.org; or call us at 414-562-1000

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What's Happening

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You Can Join! Be a part of something better. Credit unions are locally owned cooperatives who put people before profits. We are owned by our members, not profit-driven by shareholders. This allows us to offer you a safe place to save, a low-cost place to borrow and very low service fees. As a best-in-class financial service provider, Brewery Credit Union offers you the products you need to cost-effectively manage your finances. n Checking and savings

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What's Happening

Join us March 5 for

FREE ADMISSION

Reserve your tickets and learn about our safety protocols at mam.org/visit. Presented by

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT Office of the Milwaukee Public Schools, DIVISION OF FACILITIES AND MAINTENANCE SERVICES, 1124 North 11th Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, February 11, 2021. Sealed bids will be received until Thursday, March 4, 2021 at 1:30 PM on-line through A/E Graphics, Inc., pursuant to Section 119.16(4) Wisconsin Statutes in accordance with plans and specifications for the following work: All contractor(s) and subcontractors(s) are subject to the current livable wage rate, in accordance with the City of Milwaukee Ordinance 310-13. Per 2015 WI Act 55, prevailing wage rate laws have been repealed for all MPS Construction Projects beginning January 1, 2017. BID GUARANTY TO ACCOMPANY BID: MPS Bid Bond, Certified or Cashier's Check: 10% of Contractor's Base Bid. DIV 3-TECHNOLOGY LAB RENOVATIONS Washington Complex 2525 N. Sherman Blvd. Milwaukee, WI 53210 MPS Property No. 035 MPS Project No. 7080 The HUB requirements for this project are 10% The COIN requirements for this project are 10% The minimum Student Participation requirements for this project are: Paid Employment: 100 Hours Educational Activities: 10 Hours Deposit for Drawings and Specifications: $25.00 MAILING CHARGE: $35.00 The bidding documents may be viewed and downloaded for free from A/E Graphics On-line Plan Room, at https://mps.aegraphics.com/. Hard copies may be obtained 7:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; Monday through Friday from A/E Graphics, Inc.; 4075 North 124th Street, Brookfield, WI 53005; phone (262) 781-7744; fax (262) 781-4250. Call A/E Graphics, Inc. for availability of bid documents for pick up. Plans and specifications will be loaned to a prospective bidder upon receipt of the deposit listed, which deposit will be returned upon surrender of the plans and specifications in good condition. Bid documents must be returned only to A/E Graphics, Inc. A pre-bid walkthrough for the site will be held on Friday, February 19, 2021 at 10:30 AM, meet at the school’s main entrance. All questions should be submitted in writing prior to 12:00 PM on Friday, February 26, 2021 to DFMSProcurement@milwaukee.k12.wi.us. No questions may be answered after that date and time. No questions shall be answered verbally. No verbal information from any source is to be relied upon by any respondent in the development of their Bid. Written questions and responses will be documented by way of addenda, which will be forwarded to all bidders. Each bid shall be for a fixed lump sum. Bids shall be submitted on-line through A/E Graphics On-line Plan Room, at https://mps.aegraphics.com/ using the “Submit Bid” tab on the DIV 3-TECHNOLOGY LAB RENOVATIONS - Washington Complex project information page from which bid documents were obtained. Submit bid forms per Instructions to Bidders, Article B-5 of the Specifications. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to waive informalities. Upon reasonable notice, efforts will be made to accommodate the needs of disabled individuals at the bid opening through sign language interpreters or other auxiliary aids. Keith P. Posley, Ed.D. 2-15 Superintendent of Schools

The Alverno College

BOWMAN INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE & LEADERSHIP

Now inviting applications for this full-tuition scholarship program for Black women with a strong desire to serve as leaders High school graduate in 2021 Demonstrated record of academic success Admissable to Alverno College Clear evidence of civic and/or community engagement in high school, community and/or place of worship Ability to discuss intended college major and career goals Successful interview with the selection committee

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Health & Fitness

Thursday, February 25, 2021

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity each week. The guidelines also recommend that children and adolescents be active for at least 60 minutes every day. A single round of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity can improve sleep, memory, and the ability to think and learn. It also reduces anxiety symptoms. Following these guidelines can contribute to overall health and decrease the risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. When some people think of exercise, they think of gyms. These options often come with prohibitive barriers such cost and transportation. There is another, FREE way to exercise—walking. Walking is a great way to get the physical activity needed to obtain health benefits and it does not require any special skills, gym membership or expensive equipment. Dr. Nygil Matthews, DNP, RN, AGPCNP-BC, a nurse practitioner at the Medical College of Wisconsin agrees. “Too many people undervalue the impact of a 10-15 minute walk. It can make a big difference. And, if walking outside isn’t your best option, try walking in place while watching television, during commercials. It also helps to find a walking buddy to keep you on track and be

Wednesday, March 4, 2021

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Staying heart healthy

By Sandra Millon Underwood, RN, PhD, FAAN Professor, UW-Milwaukee School of Nursing Most of us know that the heart is one of the most important organs of the body, but did you know that the average heart is the size of an adult’s fist? Your heart beats about 115,000 times each day and pumps about 2,000 gallons of blood every day. And, the Scripture that paraphrased reads, “a merry heart does good like medicine” is true. Laughter really is good for your heart. It reduces stress and gives a boost to your immune system. While these facts are meant to be light and interesting, maintaining a healthy heart is serious business. One of the best ways to do this is by practicing healthy eating habits and exercising.

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Dr. Nygil Matthews, DNP, RN, AGPCNP-BC,

Dr. Deborah M. Boateng

accountable to each other,” “Diet and exercise are critsaid Matthews. ical to having a healthy heart. I’m surprised at the number Matthews is also a big pro- of people in the communiponent of health education ty that consume sunflowand learning to advocate for er seeds in the shells. This yourself. product has a lot of salt. Other foods that are heavily “Health education is big in consumed are potato chips maintaining a healthy heart. and soda; they both contain So much of clinical time is lots of salt. I try to educate spent rushing patients in people about the importance and out, so sometimes we of decreasing their salt intake miss that teaching compo- and exercising. And, in terms nent. Blood pressure is a si- of exercise, I tell my patients lent killer and, over time, can to start small and set achievcontribute to heart disease. able goals for walking— As health providers, we must gradually moving from five do a better job of meeting minutes a day to ten minutes. people where they are; where The goal is to get to at least they are more comfortable 30 minutes of daily exercise,” talking about some of the said Dr. Boateng. things that affect their health. Then, once they are comfortAlong with diet and exerable, we can share the educa- cise, Dr. Boateng also advotion piece,” said Matthews. cates engaging proactively According to the CDC with your health care prohigh blood pressure is a ma- vider and asking questions jor risk factor for heart dis- or expressing your concerns. ease and stroke because it She said that sometimes faith damages the lining of the or lack of funds also cause arteries, making them more patients to neglect their plan susceptible to the buildup of of care. plaque, which narrows the arteries leading to the heart “Sometimes patients with and brain. About 108 million strong religious beliefs look US adults (1 in 3) have high to their faith—not medicablood pressure. Only about tion—for help and deliverhalf (48 percent) of these ance. They believe their highpeople have their high blood er power will help them stay pressure under control. Eat- healthy and alive, but there is ing too much sodium can human responsibility to conlead to high blood pressure. sider as well. Other times, Americans aged two years or money is a barrier—but it older consume an average of shouldn’t be. At Outreach about 3,400 mg of sodium Community Health Centers each day, well over the 2,300 and other local federally qualmg recommended by the Di- ified health centers, we have etary Guidelines for Amer- programs that can connect icans. More than 70 percent patients to resources to get of the sodium Americans the medications they need. consume is added outside Our pharmacy also has a subthe home (before purchase), sidized medication program. not added as salt at the table Follow up and transportation or during home cooking. are also barriers that prevent people from staying on track Dr. Deborah M. Boateng, with their plan of care. Our a nurse practitioner with clinics works hard to address Outreach Community those barriers as well. Health Centers, regularly sees patients living with hy“Pay attention to your body. pertension and is somewhat If you’ve been diagnosed surprised by patient dietary with high blood pressure, it’s choices—especially since the important to understand the African American commu- gravity of the situation. Hynity is plagued with many pertension (high blood preshealth disparities. sure) can be controlled, but

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Outreach Community Health Centers Outpatient Clinic 210 W. Capitol Dr. Milwaukee, WI 53212 (414) 727-6320 left unchecked it can lead to stroke or heart attack,” said Dr. Boateng. The Healthy Eating and Active Living Milwaukee (HEAL) is a culturally-tailored program that aims to provide education, resources to secure healthy foods, and active living supports for

adults at-risk for developing lifestyle-related diseases; and, to empower adults to make changes in their physical and social environment to improve nutrition and physical activity. ‘Like’ their Facebook page that’s full of videos of healthy recipes and low-cost, no-cost exercise.

HEART ATTACK SYMPTOMS

CHEST DISCOMFORT Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain. DISCOMFORT IN OTHER AREAS OF THE UPPER BODY Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw, or stomach. SHORTNESS OF BREATH with or without chest discomfort. OTHER SIGNS may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea, or lightheadedness. STROKE SYMPTOMS Spot a stroke F.A.S.T. FACE DROOPING Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile. ARM WEAKNESS Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward? SPEECH DIFFICULTY Is speech slurred, are they unable to speak, or are they hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, like "the sky is blue." Is the sentence repeated correctly? TIME TO CALL 9-1-1 If the person shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 and get them to the hospital immediately. Source: American Heart Association

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UWM

WE WANT YOU TO

MAKE HISTORY! You dream of starting a business, teaching in a Milwaukee classroom or providing health care to your community. Those dreams are within reach, and we want to help you get there. At UWM, you’ll find support from a host of programs, including:

Black Student Cultural Center African Diaspora Council Department of African and African Diaspora Studies Connect with us at undergraduateadmissions@uwm.edu or 414-229-2222.

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Louvenia Johnson Scholarship

Thursday, February 25, 2021

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

2021 Louvenia Johnson Scholarship Recipients It's Not Just About Our History, It's About Our Future Janae Adams is a senior at Rufus King International High School where she has earned a 4.1 cumulative grade point average during her first three years. She has been active in Girl Scouts for 13 years and is a member of the National Honor Society, Advanced Orchestra, Swim Team and Link Crew Freshman Mentor. She has been a volunteer at No Cat Shelter, Feeding America, Hunger Task Force and Praise Dance Ministry at her church. She intends to major in biology and minor in dance. Her goal is to become a veterinarian. During her high school career, at Madison Academic High School, Trinay Austin earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.8. Trinay challenged herself by among other things, taking advanced placement and college-level courses. She has applied to Concordia University and St. Norbert University where she intends to major in nursing. Shaylin Crosby hopes to attend either Columbia College in Chicago or Marquette University where she plans on majoring in music or theater. She is a senior at Rufus King International High School where she earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.2. For the past five years, she has dedicated her summers to teaching leadership skills to students at a Girls Scout camp. Jonillia Davis would like to pursue a degree in mechanical engineering when she enrolls in college. She has applied to Massachusetts Institute of Technolog y. As a student at Bradley Technical High School, she An NCON Communications Publication

earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.9. During her high school career, Jonillia participated in debate/forensics, student leadership council, advisory council, basketball, tennis, track and field, book club and Skills, USA. Throughout her high school career Anyiah Lobley said she was driven by two goals: to excel academically and to discover a compelling potential career. Anyiah is a “deep thinker and an exceptional writer,” according to her AP Literature and Composition instructor at Golda Meir High School. She earned a cumulative grade point average of 4.1 and she hopes to compose, produce, direct and act in film and on stage. M o n i c a Slade studied at Academy of Dance Arts in Brown Deer for four years. As a dancer, she stands out for awareness and willingness to challenge dance as an art form for all people, according to her instructor. She will graduate from Nicolet High School where she earned a cumulative 3.9 grade point average. Monica hopes to study dance at either Columbia College in Chicago or Rutgers University.

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D a v i d i Alepembwe was born and raised for most of his life in Tanzania, which is located near the Equator in East Africa. For a while after he left Tanzania, Davidi lived in a refugee camp where he could not afford to attend school. In the short time he has known him, his Advanced Composition teacher at Bradley Tech High School became convinced that Davidi “is doing everything he can to make a better life for himself.” He has a 3.7 cumulative grade point average. Stephawn Easley is a scholar/ athlete, community volunteer, committed to making a difference in the world and “a young gentleman in every way,” according to one of his mentors with the Milwaukee chapter of Top Teens of America. Stephawn attended University School of Milwaukee where he earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. He has applied to UW-Whitewater and Bethel University and intends to major in either business administration or sports management. His active participation and well-rounded hobbies and interests demonstrate that Leroy Hope is serious about his education and community, according to a talent search advisor with UW-Milwaukee. He will graduate from Milwaukee School of Languages High School where he compiled a 4.0 cumulative grade point average. Leroy is fluent in English and Spanish and served as president of the National Honor Society chapter at Milwaukee School of Languages H.S. He has applied to UW-Madison and Marquette University and intends to major in finance.

Jakobie Jackson “has a passion and natural talent for the performing arts,” according to his AP Literature and Composition instructor at Golda Meir High School where he has compiled a 2.9 cumulative grade point average. He has performed in numerous plays and musicals not only at school, but also with various community groups. He has applied to the University of Minnesota Twin Cities and UW-Milwaukee where he hopes to major in either biology or marketing. His “ability to grasp complex infor mation, inherent desire to learn, intrinsic motivation and ownership of his academic performance” place Jalen Reed among the top 10 percent of his peers, according to his 11th-grade Anatomy and Physiology instructor at Rufus King International High School where Jalen compiled a 3.1 cumulative grade point average. Jalen has applied to Concordia University in St. Paul, Minnesota and Marquette University. He plans on majoring in either kinesiology or sports management. J o s h u a Wilder is the 2021 Lester L. Carter, Jr., Scholarship Honoree. He is interested in pursuing a degree in engineering and has applied to UW-Madison and Marquette University. Joshua earned a 4.3 cumulative grade point average as a student at Riverside University High School. He sets ambitious goals for himself and develops detailed plans to achieve those goals, according to his talent search advisor.

Congratulations To Our Future Leaders! www.milwaukeetimesnews.com


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Louvenia Johnson Scholarship

Louvenia Johnson Scholarship Recipients 1988 - 2020

Jamaal Abdul-Alim Nyairah Abdullah Silvia I. Acevedo Daelon Adaway Job Alexander Abdilkarim Ali Sequoya Allen Priscilla Avant Raven Avery-Moore Jonathan O. Babalola Shaneika Baldwin Jennifer Ball-Sharpe Lauren Barber Darren Barton Chez Bass London Bates Aris Battiste Marita Benvenue Risharda Bond Jevita D. Brister Sharvon Montgomery Brown Jaslyn Brown Reniqua Brown Montae Brown-Crawford Qiana Burns Louis Burrell Devin Burton Raetricia Byrd-Townsell N’namdi Carter Michah Childs Brianna Christian Qiana Christian Mindee Cohen Tamyra Cooper Noah Cotton Jacqueline Gail Crymes Destiny Dallas Trenton Daniels Jamal Davis Carla Dew Jordan Dinsmore Sa’Sha Nicole Edwards Adrian Ellis Kurtez Ellis Quina Elzie Henry Eruchalu Muhammad Faizal Fakaruddin Kaiyla Farrington David Faye Shaun Flanagan Chelsey French Shanilah Frierson Jessica Gathing Deanna Gauthier Nathan Gollop Isaiah Gordon www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

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Donald Grace Darnell Granberry Jeanessa Gant Jaelyn Green Michael Green Pamanisha Gross Denean P. Hall Timothy Hall Treyvon Hamberlin Megan Harmon Shak'la Harrington Gary Harvey Ebony Haynes Michaiah Hinds Cynthia M. Hodnett Malik Holt Sade Hood Jamea Hoover Kayla Howze Kiera Hudson Autherine Ikanih Monique Ingram Wendy Isom Isaac Izard Kiara Jackson Marcell Lanell Jackson Torey Jobe Camille Johnson Courtney Johnson Naoshi Johnson Siarah Jones Fred Jones-Rosa Asiane Jordan Demond Jude Kendall Keith Domonique Kent Kathryn Lanier Camille Lester Justin Lester

Robyn Lockett Kara Macon Kayla Madlock Raven Major Nandi Mallett Tre’Quan Martin Asani Mashaka Billie Jo Mason-Saffold Collins McClain Trevonte McClain Alice McCoy Brian McDowell, Jr. LaDae'meona McDowell Kharma McGee Kara McKinney Tanya McNeaL James Miller Martinez Milton, Jr. Treba Mitchell Maasio Mohamed Na Mia Moore Crystal Morgan Marissa Morgan Wendmy Nida Moyenga Mohamed Mursal Nathan Nelson Kevin Norri Ikenna Obiora Jaya Owens Darian Perkins Melissa Pettis Clifton Phelps Levar Pickens Robert Pickens Carter Piggee Denise Pitchford Amber Polk Eva Porter Dominique Portis

Lawrence Rabon Knjya Reed Mia Rimmer Rahsaan Roberson Teague Briana Roberts Stephon Roby Corbin Robinson DeArquise Robinson Tammy Robinson Edward Rogers, Jr. Angellic Ross Ismel Sahid Shakura Salahaladyn Savanna Samuels Chiara Sanders Devaki Sanon Josephine Scott Destiny Scott-Dyson Avrianne Seals Tanzania Sewell Trentyn Shaw Justine Shorter Donald Singleton Nicole Singleton Brittany Smith Jordyn Smith Lonnie R. Smith Alexandria Smith-Richard Rhonda Stingley Sonia Summers Alyssa Sylvester Courtney Teague Lori Lynn Tharps Verla Thibou Devon Thomas Olivia Thomas Quinton Thomas Abigail Thompson Benjamin Thompson Nikki Denise Thompson Ashanti Travers, Jr. Trinity Tucker Myles Walker Dalyn Ward Jaymes Warrior Nicole White Aaron Wilder Joshua Williams Richard Williams Tabithas Williams Yaaji Williamson Jonathan Woods Deondre Wright Khamaria Wright

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The Classifieds

Thursday, February 25, 2021

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

February 25, 1853 – First Black YMCA organized in Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Fumbanks' Birthday Salutes "Wishing You All The Best!" February 1st Karen M. Ingram Jayzion Fumbanks February 2nd Donald Driver Hannah Ivy Blanche Hogans February 3rd Frances Brown Evelyn Glover Evelyn Blake Kiana Hunter Sabrina Grant February 4 Yashika Graves JaRon Williams Cleveland Hathaway Christine Pearson th

February 5th Kylah Lyons Mahalia Kirk February 6th Lawrence Smith Mark Phillips February 7th Beniee A. Randle Trynayl Banks Pastor Joseph H. Jackson, Jr. February 8 Emily Davis Deborah (Burnside) Turner th

February 14th Angela T. Fumbanks Vicki Chamberlain Dora Hogan Willie Speed

Security Personnel 20-29 Hours/week AM and PM Shifts $12.50-$13.50/hour

February 16th Steffanie Boyd Quiana Staten Charella Davis Tony Chamberlain

Apply at

February 17th Kim Lyons Tony J. Thompson February 18th Tina Spears Courtney Kelly Louise Barnett Jamerh Banks Charles B. Strokes

bgcmilwaukee.org/careers

February 27, 1988 – Debi Thomas becomes first Black to win an Olympic medal in figure skating.

North Division Alumni & Friends "Call To Action Committee" to rebuild North Division High School.

February 19th Andrew Green, Sr. Gloria Hunt Jamera Ellis February 20th Mable Taylor Channing M. Williams February 21st Nia Fizpatrick Margo Gipson Terese Robinson

February 10th Bertha Thompson

February 24th Janice Williams

February 11th Lyrics Serenity Bell

February 25th Betty Speed Jeffery Matlock

February 13th Terry Taylor

Youth Development Professionals

February 15 Annabelle Banks

February 9 Joyce Nash Lori Ann Jackson Blount

February 12th Stacy D. Ingram Kieva Smith Robert Garner

WE’RE HIRING! Part-Time

th

February 23rd Chloe Ann Taylor Bryanna Barnes Jasmine Rammesses

th

February 26, 1965 – Civil rights activist Jimmie Lee Jackson died after being shot by state police in Marion, AL.

February 26th Geraldine Walker Sandrene Watts Louis Davis, Jr. Jo Dean Walker February 28th Louis Taylor, Jr. Lyric Burnside

Do you have a friend, family member, or colleague who has just celebrated or is about to celebrate a birthday? Stop by our office with their name on Monday to get them in that week’s edition of Happy Birthday Salutes! Visit us at 1936 N. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, call us at (414) 263-5088 or e-mail them to miltimes@gmail.com. An NCON Communications Publication

February 28, 1984 – Michael Jackson wins eight Grammy awards.

NORTH DIVISION IS A PART OF MILWAUKEE'S BLACK HISTORY! For more information call MacArthur Weddle at 414-534-5545

March 1, 1994 – Leonard S. Coleman, Jr. elected president of the National Baseball League. March 2, 1867 – U.S. Congress enacts charter to establish Howard University. March 3, 1865 – Freeman’s Bureau established by federal government to aid newly freed slaves.

NOW HIRING PLUMBERS Roy's Plumbing, Inc. seeks experienced plumbers and apprentice plumbers to train. Call Paula at: 414-264-2812 or drop off your resume to: Roy's Plumbing 1830 W. Hampton Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53209 www.milwaukeetimesnews.com


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Thursday, February 25, 2021

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Our History

Wednesday, March 4, 2021 24, 2021

UR HISTORY

AN EXPLORATION OF OUR LIVES AND LEGACIES

Henrietta Lacks: A Black history legacy of giving as told by Jeri Lacks By: Jeri Lacks-Whye, granddaughter of Henrietta Lacks

RN CARE MANAGER (FT), $3,000 SIGN-ON BONUS! Do you want to make a difference every day? Are you fulfilled by helping others to live their best lives? If you have a passion for helping others and a zest for a workday that’s never the same, you will love working for My Choice Wisconsin. We are Wisconsin’s largest Managed Care Organization that serves seniors and adults with disabilities, making a difference in over 50 counties across the state. Our RN Care Manager will meet with individuals in their homes to complete assessments and provide coordination of services to improve or maintain the member’s independence and quality of life. Medical, dental, and vision insurance programs, generous 401(k) program with 100% vesting AND company match on day 1 and other excellent benefits. Must meet DHS minimum qualifications of bachelor’s degree, working with target group population, good communication skills. EOE. Requires one or three years of experience with target group and RN license. Apply by visiting https://mychoicewi.org/careers/ job-openings/

CARE MANAGER (FT) Do you want to make a difference every day? Are you fulfilled by helping others to live their best lives? If you have a passion for helping others and a zest for a workday that’s never the same, you will love working for My Choice Wisconsin. We are Wisconsin’s largest Managed Care Organization that serves seniors and adults with disabilities, making a difference in over 50 counties across the state. Our Care Manager will meet with individuals in their homes to complete assessments and provide coordination of services to improve or maintain the member’s independence and quality of life. Medical, dental, and vision insurance programs, generous 401(k) program with 100% vesting AND company match on day 1 and other excellent benefits. Must meet DHS minimum qualifications of bachelor’s degree, working with target group population, good communication skills. EOE. Requires one or three years of experience with target group and RN license. Apply by visiting https://mychoicewi.org/careers/ job-openings/.

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You’ve seen this iconic photo of beautiful Henrietta with her hands on her hips, a broad smile and eyes that seem to say “LOVE.” Henrietta Lacks is a name now known and revered, for hers is a life that keeps on giving. In this month of Black History and Valentine’s Day, Henrietta’s life is a love story of family meeting science – and gifting humanity, though unknowingly, with the power of discovery and healing, that continues immortally. Henrietta (HeLa) is Black History, forever. HeLa cells, those given by Henrietta Lacks in 1951, continue to reproduce today. They have been to the moon. They are the source of millions of scientific papers. They prompted new initiatives and strategies for human trials. They are the baseline for innumerable laboratory studies of new pharmaceuticals and vaccines, including COVID-19. We thank you, Henrietta! Celebrating Henrietta Lacks’ 100th birthday began on August 1, 2020. Led by the Lacks family, the kick-off was an unparalleled sequence of events, beginning with an International Virtual Symposium of scientific notables such as Dr. Francis Collins of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), as well as Rebecca Skloot, author of the bestselling book “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,” Dr. Ruha Benjamin, Helen Wilson Roe, and Jeri and David, children of David “Sonny” Lacks, and grandchildren of Henrietta Lacks. Other events that followed included “pop-up” museum exhibits with artifacts and accolades honoring Henrietta’s life and legacy, and the family’s journey. They partnered with the World Health Organization (WHO) to develop plans to eradicate cervical cancer through awareness of vaccines and taking the annual pap smear for women, as well as HPV education for males and females. HPV is preventable and highly treatable. Through annual HeLa Conferences at the Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia, created by Dr. Roland Pattillo and Baltimore and Dundalk, Maryland, new scientific information is being introduced and

reviewed by other clinicians, scientists, and the general public annually. “Health awareness and equity remain a high priority,” Ms. Jeri Lacks explained. In January 2021, the Henrietta Lacks Enhancing Cancer Research Act became law, with initial guidance by the late Elijah Cummings. The new law removes barriers to participation in clinical trials for under-represented communities. This is a major breakthrough! And through the NIH, the family partnered to allow researchers to apply to access the HeLa Genome Data. Three members of the Lacks family are part of the working group, so they know who is seeking to do research. “This sequencing is like a bridge to discovering genetic information that helps researchers solve problems,” Ms. Lacks described, “and we are proud to be a part of that process.” As the balance of the 100th Birthday of Heroine Henrietta Lacks, Black History legend, continues, the family reminds readers to visit the family website: wwwLacksfamily.com and HeLa100. org to learn more about family strategies to educate the public about Henrietta’s story and their growing healthy community initiatives. A children’s book is expected to be published soon, and two structures bearing Henrietta’s name are in architectural and first-phase

construction. They are the Henrietta Lacks Life Science Center, in Halifax, Virginia and the Henrietta Lacks Hall at Johns Hopkins Medical School in Baltimore, Maryland. “We congratulate all of the queens who were inducted with our Grandmother into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in December 2020, thanks to the Henrietta Lacks Legacy Group of Turner Station, who nominated her,” said Jeri Lacks. And in this recovery year, 2021, we salute Henrietta Lacks for her gift that keeps on giving life and health to all of us. To all who have come to love, respect, and honor her, we conclude by saying, “Thank you, Henrietta.” Jeri Lacks is the daughter of David “Sonny” Lacks, the middle son of Henrietta Lacks. She is an esteemed speaker, historian, and family advocate of the legacy of Henrietta Lacks. In that capacity, she gives generously of her time. We thank her. To make your lasting gift to health research, consider joining the NIH’s All of Us Research Program! All of Us is building one of the largest and most diverse health research databases in the world. Let’s make sure we’re ALL included by visiting JoinAllofUs.org and clicking JOIN NOW. Or contact the All of Us office at the Medical College of Wisconsin: (414) 955-2689 / Email: allofus@mcw.edu

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All Of Us

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Stand out. Value your differences. We do. The more researchers know about what makes each of us unique, the more tailored our health care may become.

To start your journey, go to Participant.JoinAllofUs.org and:

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After completing these steps, you’ll receive a $25 gift card.

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Pick'n Save

Thursday, February 25, 2021

Wednesday, March 4, 2021

20

7

$

99 /LB

With Card

Black Angus Ribeye Steaks

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

WEEKLY DIGITAL DEALS Use each coupon UP TO 5 TIMES in one transaction.

2.99

SALE

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WEEKLY DIGITA L DEAL Use each coupon UP TO in one transactio 5 TIMES n.

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Bone-In, Family Pack

Kroger Butter Select Varieties, 16 oz

3 5 /$

1

$ 99

FRESH SAVINGS EVERY DAY

With Card

Premium Strawberries

/EA

With Card & Digital Coupon

Weekly sale price without digital coupon is $2.99 each with Card. While supplies last.

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16 oz

Fresh Heritage Farm Chicken Drumsticks or Thighs

Green Asparagus

77¢ /LB

88¢ Bone-In

With Card & Digital Coupon

Weekly sale price without digital coupon is $1.49 each with Card. While supplies last.

/LB

With Card

Red, Orange or Yellow Bell Peppers or Seedless Cucumbers

99

¢

or 2 ct Simple Truth Organic Bell Peppers, $2.99

FREE

BUY 1 GET 1

Lay's Party Size Potato Chips

e er Valu

12.5-13 oz or Tostitos Party Size Tortilla Chips, 14.5-18 oz; Select Varieties

ss

al or Le

of Equ

With Card

With Card

Fresh Express Salad Blends

$

Smithfield Marinated Pork Loin Filets

2 4 /$

Select Varieties, 5-11 oz

Select Varieties, 1.43 lb-1.7 lb

$

With Card

91

Weekly sale price without digital coupon is $3.99 each with Card. While supplies last.

With Card

Jack's Original Pizza

5/$10

Select Varieties, 30-Pack, 12 fl oz Cans

Private Selection Ice Cream

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48 fl oz or Kroger Deluxe Churned Light Ice Cream, 128 fl oz; Select Varieties

Select Varieties, 13.8-16.6 oz

When You Buy 4

$ / 4 10

$

EVENT BABY $ 40 SPEND

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Coca-Cola, Pepsi or 7UP Select Varieties, 6-Pack, 16.9 fl oz Bottles

299 /EA

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rd.* with Ca

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MIX AND MATCH 5 or more participating items with Card.

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17

249

$

*When you buy any 5 or more participating items with Card. Participating item varieties and sizes may vary by store.

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Weekly sale price without digital coupon is $7.99 lb with Card. While supplies last.

677 /LB

With Card & Digital Coupon

With Card

1.99 -1.00

1

$ 99

With Card

99

/EA* .

¢

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Doritos

Pepperidge Farm Goldfish 6-11.25 oz or Kroger Purified Water, 32-Pack, 16.9 fl oz or Smartfood Popcorn, 5-7.25 oz; Select Varieties

3.49 -1.00

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Thursday, February 25 through Tuesday, March 2, 2021

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499

249

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$

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2.99 -1.00

1

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Oscar Mayer Deli Fresh Lunch Meat

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4-8 oz or Cheez-It Crackers, 7 oz; Select Varieties

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88¢

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