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Vol. 40 • No. 06 • Thurs., Feb. 04, 2021 - Wed., Feb. 10, 2021 • An NCON Publication Serving The Milwaukee Area • 75¢ St. Mark's A.M.E. - Est. 1868

The Milwaukee Times' Black Excellence Awards Presents:

Tabernacle B.C. - Est. 1919

Week#1: Celebrating Our Historic Black Churches Calvary B.C.- Est. 1912

Mt. Zion M.B.C. - Est. 1919

The African American Church has long been considered one of the foundational and most influential institutions in Black America. Besides serving as places of worship, they have served as places of education, health, and socialization. It is no surprise that the Civil Rights Movement was born in the Black church. As part of Black History Month we take a look at five of Milwaukee's historic Black churches. For the full story see page 5

Antioch M.B.C. - Est. 1946

Eta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., Alpha Phi Chapter lends a hand to Repairers of the Breach

Photo by Yvonne Kemp

Eta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., Alpha Phi Chapter performed one of their community service projects on Saturday, January 30, 2021 with the Repairers of the Breach agency. Alpha Phi Chapter donated men's and women's clothing; household products such bottles of bleach, cleaning agents, coffee, paper cups, masks; and other essential products. The Repairers of the Breach offers service to individuals who are temporarily out of work and homeless. An NCON Communications Publication

Reverend James West, Jr., is the executive director of the agency, along with Tommy Kirk serving as the center manager. The president of the Alpha Phi Chapter is Mahalia Kirk and project coordinator is Mary Meredith Bullock. The Eta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., is non-profit business and professional women’s organization founded in 1942 by eleven outstanding Black women in Detroit, Michigan. www.milwaukeetimesnews.com


In The News

Thursday, February 4, 2021

2

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Outreach Community Health Centers hosts 2021 Annual Meeting On Wednesday, January 27, 2021, Outreach Community Health Centers hosted their "2021 Virtual Annual Meeting," from Nyob Zoo TV Studio. The theme for this year was "Resiliency: Building on Our Past and Reshaping Our Future." The discussion for the meeting focused around how Outreach has performed meeting the health needs of the community this past year, expressly in response to the COVID-19 pandemic; and how Outreach plans to continue next year. The emcee for this event was Brewers Community Foundation Executive Director Cecelia Gore (left); with the main address being delivered by Outreach Community Health Centers President and CEO Constance Palmer (center); and the keynote address being delivered by Froedtert Hospital Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Richelle Webb Dixon (right).

Photo by Yvonne Kemp

Gov. Evers, OCI announce new open enrollment period for HealthCare.gov only two weeks away Gov. Tony Evers, with Wisconsin Insurance Commissioner Mark Afable announced Monday, February 1, 2021, that HealthCare.gov will be re-opening for Americans to enroll in health insurance coverage beginning February 15, 2021 through May 15, 2021, following an announcement from the Biden Administration last week.

Wisconsinites who missed either the original enrollment deadline or their first payment for their enrolled plan, now have another opportunity to sign up. People who are already enrolled also have another chance to review their plan to make sure it still meets their coverage needs.

from the pandemic and get Wisconsinites back to work,” said Gov. Evers. “I am appreciative to President Biden and the many advocates for making it possible for more Wisconsinites to get covered this year.”

Gov. Tony Evers

“Ensuring that every Wisconsinite has affordable, age is critical not only now COVID-19 pandemic, but as accessible healthcare cover- as we continue to battle the we move forward to recover

for you or your family. You may also still qualify for tax credits that could keep your monthly premiums low.

“Since we are only two weeks away, now is the time to help us spread the word and make sure everyone This announcement comes knows they can enroll in after advocates pushed for quality health coverage startgreater access to healthcare ing February 15th,” Comcoverage in the face of the missioner Afable said. COVID-19 pandemic. In December, Commissioner Most people on a HealthAfable joined commissioners Care.gov plan qualify for fiacross the country in send- nancial help that lowers their ing a letter to then-Presi- monthly payment. Folks who dent-elect Biden requesting a would like to know if they new enrollment period. qualify are encouraged to call 2-1-1 or visit WisCovered. “This is great news for com to find free, expert help. folks in Wisconsin,” said These experts can help you Commissioner Afable. “If understand your coverage, you missed your opportuni- simplify the enrollment proty to enroll last fall, you now cess, and help you select a have another chance to get plan that fits your family and affordable health insurance your budget.

Jerry Wilson

Independent Life & Medicare Insurance Agent License #6467722 (262) 222-2872 (office) (414) 416-3631 (Cell Phone) jwilson@selectjerry.com An NCON Communications Publication

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, February 4, 2021

3

In The News

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

Cicely Tyson, purposeful and pioneering actor, dead at 96 Cicely Tyson, the pioneering Black actor who gained an Oscar nomination for her role as the sharecropper’s wife in “Sounder,” won a Tony Award in 2013 at age 88 and touched TV viewers’ hearts in “The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman,” died Thursday, January 28, 2021 at age 96. Tyson’s death was announced by her family, via her manager Larry Thompson, who did not immediately provide additional details. “With heavy heart, the family of Miss Cicely Tyson announces her peaceful transition this afternoon. At this time, please allow the family their privacy,” according to a statement issued through Thompson. A onetime model, Tyson began her screen career with bit parts but gained fame in the early 1970s when Black women were finally starting to get starring roles. Tyson refused to take parts simply for the paycheck, remaining choosey. “I’m very selective as I’ve been my whole career about what I do. Unfortunately, I’m not the kind of person who works only for money. It has to have some real substance for me to do it,” she told The Associated Press in 2013. Tyson’s memoir, “Just As I Am,” was published this week. Besides her Oscar nomination, she won two Emmys for playing the 110-year-old former slave in the 1974 television drama “The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman.” A

new generation of moviegoers saw her in the 2011 hit “The Help.” In 2018, she was given an honorary Oscar statuette at the annual Governors Awards. “I come from lowly status. I grew up in an area that was called the slums at the time,” Tyson said at the time. “I still cannot imagine that I have met with presidents, kings, queens. How did I get here? I marvel at it.” Writing in “Blacks in American Film and Television,” Donald Bogle described Tyson as “a striking figure: slender and intense with near-perfect bone structure, magnificent smooth skin, dark penetrating eyes, and a regal air that made her seem a woman of convictions and commitment. (Audiences) sensed... her power and range.” “Sounder,” based on the William H. Armstrong novel, was the film that confirmed her stardom in 1972. Tyson was cast as the Depression-era loving wife of a sharecropper (Paul Win-

MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Louvenia Johnson Luther Golden Nathan Conyers (1981-2008) (1981-2005) (1981- 2018 ) Lynda J. Jackson Conyers, Publisher Morgan A. Conyers, Associate Publisher Jacquelyn D. Heath, Editorial Page Editor

The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper STAFF Publisher/President Lynda J. Jackson Conyers Graphic Artists William Gooden Michelle Anibas

Founders Louvenia Johnson Nathan Conyers Luther Golden Marketing Carmen Murguía

The Milwaukee Times Weekly newspaper is published each Thursday at 1936 N. MLK Dr., Milwaukee, WI 53212 Telephone: 414-263-5088 • Fax: 414-263-4445 Email: miltimes@gmail.com • http://milwaukeetimesnews.com www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

field) who is confined in jail for stealing a piece of meat for his family. She is forced to care for their children and attend to the crops. The New York Times reviewer wrote: “She passes all of her easy beauty by to give us, at long last, some sense of the profound beauty of millions of Black women.” Her performance evoked rave reviews, and Tyson won an Academy Award nomination as best actress of 1972. In an interview on the Turner Classic Movies cable channel, she recalled that she had been asked to test for a smaller role in the film and said she wanted to play the mother, Rebecca. She was told, “You’re too young, you’re too pretty, you’re too sexy, you’re too this, you’re too that, and I said, `I am an actress.’” In 2013, at the age of 88, Tyson won the Tony for best leading actress in a play for the revival of Horton Foote’s “The Trip to Bountiful.” It was the actor’s first time back on Broadway in three decades and she refused to turn meekly away when the teleprompter told her to finish her acceptance speech. ″`Please wrap it up,′ it says. Well, that’s exactly what you did with me: You wrapped me up in your arms after 30 years,” she told the crowd. She had prepared no speech (“I think it’s presumptuous,” she told the AP later. “I burned up half my time wondering what I was going to say.”) She reprised her winning role in the play for a Lifetime Television movie, which was screened at the White House. She returned to Broadway in 2015 opposite James Earl Jones for a revival of “The Gin Game.” In the 1974 television drama “The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman,” based on a novel by Ernest J. Gaines, Tyson is seen aging from a young woman in slavery to a 110-year-old who campaigned for the civil rights movement of the 1960s. In the touching climax, she laboriously walks up to a “whites only” water fountain and takes a drink as white officers look on. “It’s important that they see and hear history from Miss Jane’s point of view,” Tyson told The New York

Times. “And I think they will be more ready to accept it from her than from someone younger.” New Yorker film critic Pauline Kael offered her praise: “She’s an actress, all right, and as tough-minded and honorable in her methods as any we’ve got.” At the Emmy Awards, “Pittman” won multiple awards, including two honors for Tyson, best lead actress in a drama and best actress in a special. “People ask me what I prefer doing — film, stage, television? I say, ‘I would have done “Jane Pittman” in the basement or in a storefront.’ It’s the role that determines where I go,” she told the AP. Tyson made her movie debut in the late 1950s with small roles in such films as “Odds Against Tomorrow,” “The Last Angry Man,” and “The Comedians.” She played the romantic interest to Sammy Davis Jr.’s jazz musician in “A Man Called Adam.” She gained wider notice with a recurring role in the 1963 drama series “East Side, West Side,” which starred George C. Scott as a social worker. Tyson played his secretary, making her the first Black woman to have a continuing role in a dramatic television series. She played a role in the 1968 drama “The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter” that was hailed by a reviewer as “an absolute embodiment of the slogan ‘Black is beautiful.’” In “Roots,” the 1977 miniseries that became one of the biggest events in TV history, she played Binta, mother of the protagonist, Kunta Kinte, played by LeVar Burton. She also appeared on Broadway in the 1960s in “The Cool World,” “Tiger, Tiger Burning Bright” and other plays. Off-Broadway, she appeared with such future stars as Maya Angelou, Godfrey Cambridge and James Earl Jones in a 1961 production of French playwright Jean Genet’s “The Blacks.”

She won a Drama Desk award in 1962 for a role in the off-Broadway “Moon on a Rainbow Shawl.” After her “Sounder” and “Miss Jane Pittman” successes, Tyson continued to seek TV roles that had messages, and she succeeded with “Roots” and “King” (about Martin Luther King) and “The Rosa Parks Story.”

She complained to an interviewer: “We Black actresses have played so many prostitutes and drug addicts and house maids, always negative. I won’t play that kind of characterless role any more, even if I have to go back to starving.” She continued with such films as “The Blue Bird,” “Concorde — Airport ’79,” “Fried Green Tomatoes,” “The Grass Harp” and Tyler Perry’s “Diary of a Mad Black Woman.” She won a supporting actress Emmy in 1994 for “Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All.” She was nominated for Emmys several other times, including for “Roots,” “King,” “The Marva Collins Story” “Sweet Justice” and “A Lesson Before Dying.” In recent years, she was part of a panel discussion for “Cherish the Day,” an eight-episode OWN anthology series created and produced by Ava DuVernay. She played the mother of Viola Davis’ character on “How to Get Away with Murder.” Tyson’s parents moved from the island of Nevis in the Caribbean to New York, where Cicely (her name was spelled early on as Cecily and Sicely) was born in 1924, the youngest of three children. When her parents separated, her mother went on welfare. At age 9, Cicely sold shopping bags on the streets of East Harlem. When she graduated from high school, she found work as a secretary at the Red Cross. Her striking looks prompted friends to advise her to take up modeling and that led to acting schools, theater, movies and television. “My mother told me I could no longer live in her house because I was determined to be an actress,” she told an interviewer in 1990. “I said `OK,’ and I moved out.” Tyson was married once, to jazz great Miles Davis. The wedding was held in 1981 at Bill Cosby’s home in Massachusetts, attended by show business notables. They divorced in 1988. Tyson was never hard to spot. She tried to say no to wearing a terrifically large hat to Aretha Franklin’s 2018 funeral, only to be overruled by her designer. The hat would become a viral highlight. “I never thought in my career that I would be upstaged by a hat! And I did not want to wear it,” Tyson said later. “I said, ‘I can’t wear that hat, I will be blocking the view of the people behind me, they won’t be able to see and they’ll call me all kinds of names.’ He just looked at me and said, ‘Put the hat on'.” She came around, telling the AP she thought of the hat as homage to Franklin’s appearance at Obama’s inauguration.

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Christian Times

Thursday, February 4, 2021

4

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

The Counseling Corner

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

By Rev. Judith T. Lester, B.Min. M.Th

Social justice issues in America: Food insecurity Hunger and food insecurity in communities across America is a problem most people are aware exists but some have never experienced it. Food insecurity is defined as a household’s inability to provide enough food for every person to live an active, healthy life. According to Feeding America, 1 of 9 people struggle with hunger.1

five loaves of bread and two fish.” (v. 17) Jesus took the five loaves and two fish and fed the multitude. This miracle of Jesus resonates the profound need for compassion of people today. As a church, we should be feeding the hungry, whether that hunger is a hunger for food, the Word of God, empowerment, healthcare, etc.

Fighting hunger is more than just providing food, we must look at the root problem of hunger. Hunger is the result of poverty which overly affects people of color at higher rates. Why? Poverty is created by the discriminatory barriers and laws that result in generations of inequities, thus qualifying hunger, food insecurity and poverty as a social justice and essential issue that must be addressed.

Being hungry can be a lonely place. Through ingenuity, commitment, awareness, and compassion, to• Due to the pandemic, nizations. gether we can address this more than 50 million people Are we as moved as we public health crisis. There are may experience food insecu- should be by hunger, food organizations such as Feedrity in 2020 including a po- insecurity and the long lines ing America, Hunger Task tential 17 million children. at food banks, not only Force, UMOS Food Pantry, in our local communities Metcalfe Park, Capuchin • In 2018, 14.3 million but throughout the world? Community Services, COA American households were Matthew 14 records a time Goldin Center, and other lofood insecure with limited or when Jesus was moved with cal food pantries where you uncertain access to enough compassion. Jesus had tak- can support with food or fifood. en a boat to the vicinity of nancial donations. Bethsaida. The crowds heard • Every community in the that Jesus was nearby and Jesus said: country is home to families they began to follow Him “For I was hungry and you who struggle with food in- on foot. Jesus saw the large gave me something to eat, I was security, including rural and crowd and “…had compas- thirsty and you gave me something suburban communities. sion on them…” As eve- to drink, I was a stranger and you ning approached, the disci- invited me in, I needed clothes and • Many households that ples asked Jesus to send the you clothed me, I was sick and you experience food insecurity crowd away so they can find looked after me, I was in prison do not qualify for federal nu- something to eat. Jesus told and you came to visit me.’ Then trition programs and need to the disciples they should feed the righteous will answer him, rely on their local food banks them. But the disciples an- ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and other hunger relief orga- swered: “We have here only and feed you, or thirsty and give

Source: Feeding America at www.feedingamerica.org 1

Next Month - Milwaukee’s African American Trailblazers General Disclaimer: The writer has used her best efforts in preparation of this information. No representations or warranties for its contents, either expressed or implied, are offered. Neither the publisher nor the writer shall be liable in any way for readers’ efforts to apply, rely or utilize the information or recommendations presented herein as they may not be suitable for you or necessarily appropriate for every situation to which they may refer. In some instances, this article contains the opinions, conclusions and/or recommendations of the writer. If you would like to contact Rev. Lester, write to her c/o P.O. Box 121, Brookfield, WI. 53008.

The

Food insecurity is a persistent, stubborn issue for many families and has gotten worse with the pandemic as so many in America are unemployed. Many families struggle just to put food on the table. Feeding America provides these statistics to help us put it in all perspective:

you something to drink? When did we see you a stranger and invite you in, or needing clothes and clothe you? When did we see you sick or in prison and go to visit you?’ “The King will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.’” - Matthew 25:35-40

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, February 4, 2021

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Black History Month

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

The Milwaukee Times' Black Excellence Awards Presents Honoring Black History Week 1: Celebrating Our Historical Black Churches The term “Black church” is used to describe Protestant churches that have predominately Black congregations. More broadly, the Black church is both a specific religious culture and a socio-religious force that has shaped protest movements, such as the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s. Origins of the Black Church The Black church in the United States can be traced back to the enslavement of Black people in the 18th and 19th centuries. Enslaved African people brought to the Americas by force came with a variety of religions, including traditional spiritual practices. But the system of enslavement was built on the dehumanization and exploitation of people, and this could only be achieved by depriving those enslaved of meaningful connections to land, ancestry, and identity. The dominant White culture of the time accomplished this through a system of forced acculturation, which included forced religious conversion. Missionaries would also use promises of freedom to convert enslaved African people. Many of those enslaved were told they could return to Africa as missionaries themselves if they converted. While it was easier for polytheistic beliefs to merge with Catholicism, which ruled in areas such as the Spanish colonies, than the Protestant Christian denominations that dominated early America, enslaved populations constantly read their own narratives into Christian texts and incorporated elements of their previous faiths into Christian frameworks. Out of this cultural and religious acculturation, early versions of the Black church were born. Exodus, The Curse of Ham and "Black Theodicy" Black pastors and their congregations maintained their autonomy and identity by reading their own histories into Christian texts, unlocking new routes for self-realization. For example, many Black churches identified with the Book of Exodus’s story of the prophet Moses leading the Israelites' escape from enslavement in Egypt. The story of Moses and his people spoke to hope, promwww.milwaukeetimesnews.com

In celebration of black history the Milwaukee Times and the Black Excellence Awards is honoring four of our local historical Black Churches. They are:

ise, and the benevolence of a God which was otherwise absent in the systematic and oppressive structure of enslavement. White Christians worked to justify enslavement through the employment of a White savior complex, which in addition to dehumanizing Black people, infantilized them. Some went so far as to claim that Black people had been cursed and enslavement was the necessary, God-intended punishment. Seeking to maintain their own religious authority and identity, Black scholars developed their own branch of theology. "Black theodicy" refers specifically to theology that answers for the reality of anti-Blackness and the suffering of our ancestors. This is done in a number of ways, but primarily by re-examining suffering, the concept of free-will, and God’s omnibenevolence. Specifically, they examined the following question: If there is nothing that God does that is not good in and of itself, why would He inflict such immense pain and suffering on Black people? Questions like this one presented by Black theodicy led to the development of another type of theology, which was still rooted in accounting for the suffering of Black people. It is perhaps the most popular branch of Black theology, even if its name is not always well known: Black Liberation Theology. Black Liberation Theology and Civil Rights Black Liberation Theology strove to incorporate Christian thought into the Black community’s legacy as a “protest people.” By recognizing the social power of the church, along with the safety it offered within its four walls, the Black community was able to explicitly bring God into the daily liberation struggle.

This was famously done within the Civil Rights Movement. Although Martin Luther King, Jr., is most often associated with the Black church in the context of civil rights, there were many organizations and leaders during that time who leveraged the church’s political power. And although King and other early civil rights leaders are now famous for their nonviolent, religiously-rooted tactics, not every member of the church embraced nonviolent resistance. On July 10, 1964, a group of Black men led by Earnest “Chilly Willy” Thomas and Frederick Douglas Kirkpatrick founded The Deacons For Defense and Justice in Jonesboro, Louisiana. The purpose of their organization? To protect members of the Congress For Racial Equity (CORE) against violence from the Ku Klux Klan. The Deacons became one of the first visible self-defense forces in the South. Although self-defense was not new, the Deacons were one of the first groups to embrace it as part of their mission. The power of Black Liberation Theology within the Black church did not go unnoticed. The church itself came to serve as a place of strategy, development, and reprieve. It has also been a target of attacks by numerous hate groups, such as the Ku Klux Klan. The history of the Black church is a long one. The church continues to redefine itself to meet the demands of new generations; there are those within its ranks who work to remove factors of social conservatism and align it with new movements. No matter what position it takes in the future, it cannot be denied that the Black church has been a pivotal force within Black American communities for hundreds of years and that these generational memories are not likely to fade.

1. St. Mark African Methodist Episcopal Church 1616 W. Atkinson Ave. Milwaukee, WI 53206 Founded: est. 1869 Current Pastor: Dr. Joy L. Gallmon Known as A.M.E. for short, St. Mark African Methodist Episcopal was the first African American church established in Milwaukee by Ezekiel Gillespie. Also referred to as the “Church of the Anvil,” the first A.M.E. church service was held in a blacksmith shop. The anvil serves as a symbol and expression of the history and faith of the congregation. This is the oldest African-American congregation in Wisconsin.

due to legal difficulties with taxes and related issues. In 1913 Calvary relocated to 414 W. Cherry Street. Circumstances for Calvary Baptist Church greatly improved and in 1922, the pastor and members purchased the edifice at 1727 N. 4th Street and the adjacent home at 1737 N. 4th Street for the parsonage. By 1965, the membership of Calvary had grown to over 1,000 members, and more space was needed, even though an annex had been added. Under Rev. Dr. Melvin James Battle, the mortgages had been liquidated on the church building, the parsonage, and the annex to the church; therefore preparations were being made to build a larger edifice. Rev. Walter B. Hoard was the pastor when the groundbreaking took place on August 3, 1969, and the congregation moved to the new church facility at 2959 N. Teutonia Avenue in 1970. During Rev. Dr. Leary’s pastorate, the mortgage was burned and an elevator was installed.

3. Mt Zion Missionary Baptist Church 2207 N. 2nd St. Milwaukee, WI 53212 Founded: est. 1919 Current Pastor: Rev. Louis E. Sibley, III 2. Calvary Baptist Church On Sunday, May 1,1919, a 2959 N. Teutonia Ave. group of God’s people, who Milwaukee, WI 53206 were divinely inspired, orgaFounded: est. 1912 nized themselves in order to Current Pastor: fulfill a promise made to God Rev. Dr. John R. Walton, Jr. to teach and preach His GosCalvary Baptist Church pel. The result of this orgatraces its beginning in 1895 nized body was the founding to a small mission church of a church located on Fifth called Mt. Olive Baptist Street, just north of State when the black population Street, later to be known as of Milwaukee was 551. Rev. Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist J.D. Odom had attempted to Church. organize a church prior to 1895, but was unsuccessful. The following people met Thus, Alexander W. Herron, to organize the church that Thomas L. Jackson, and Al- we now call Mt. Zion Misfred Copeland organized sionary Baptist Church: Rev. Mt. Olive Baptist, the first Winchester Boyd, Howard Black Baptist church in Mil- Harper, Walter Williams, and waukee. The congregation Rev. I.A. Coppage was selectmoved to 227 Seventh Street ed to act as Moderator, and and called Rev. J. D. Odom, after prayer and the reading in 1897 to be the first pastor. of the Scripture, the church Established in 1895 as Mt. was organized on the letter Olive Baptist Church, Rev. of the following: Brother George J. Fox was pastor Charles Stokes, Sister Claudia when the name was legally Stokes, Sister Sylvia Miller, changed to Calvary Baptist Church on August 26, 1912 (Continued on pg. 13) An NCON Communications Publication


MICAH

Thursday, February 4, 2021

6

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

MICAH to host virtual Black History Celebration On Thursday, February 11, 2021, from 7:00 to 8:30 p.m. MICAH "We Rise" will offer a lively virtual version of its annual Black History Celebration. Honoring the past by celebrating the present, this year's theme is "Building a Healthy Community," and will feature Milwaukee Health Services, Inc. Chief Medical Officer Dr. Aronica Williams as the keynote speaker. There will also be a reading by Wisconsin Poet

tory in Milwaukee, with 32 years of dedicated interfaith and 39 multi-racial community members rising up, together, to confront the most pressing social justice issues in our community through a strategy of congregation-based organizing. Core teams and task forces work on specific justice issues including: high central city unemployment; About MICAH: Milwaukee mass incarceration; voter suppresInner-City Congregations Allied sion, unjust immigration policies; for Hope (MICAH), a multi-ra- inadequate transit service; and edcial, interfaith grassroots organi- ucation inequity. zation has a strong and vital hisThe cost of this event is $20 and open to the public. To register visit https:// secure.ever yaction.com/ GIbiG_vsRU-CHd-N_eSvrQ2. You can also call 414264-0805, or visit our website at micahmke.org. for more information and to register.

Laureate Dasha Kelly Ham- Lisa Jones, lead organizer, ilton, along with music, vi- will outline MICAH's goals sual art, praise dancing and for the year. remarks by MICAH leaders.

MICAH PRESENTS A VIRTUAL BLACK HISTORY CELEBRATION

ERISďż˝: ILDING A

co Keynote Speaker - Dr. Aronica Williams Chief Medical Officer, Milwaukee Health Services

02.11.21

7:00 PM - 8:30 PM ON ZOOM DONATION $20 PER PERSON GROUPS OF TICKETS AVAILABLE

Dasha Kelly Hamilton named as both Milwaukee & Wisconsin's Poet Laureate

CLICK HERE https://bit.ly/micah2021blackhistory TO RSVP, CALL 414.264.0805, OR EMAIL OFFICE@MICAHMKE.ORG An NCON Communications Publication

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

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Milwaukee Pub

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

Join us for a virtual event!

Kindergarten Enrollment Fair Register at mpsmke.com/boothcentral

Will your child turn 3, 4, or 5 by September 1, 2021? Enroll now for Head Start and kindergarten this fall. Find out about the great options in Milwaukee Public Schools! ] Bilingual education ] Montessori ] Language immersion ] Art and music ] Traditional classrooms

SATURDAYS February 6 and February 20, 2021 Drop in from 9AM – 2PM

Learn about MPS schools and programs from the comfort of home! Visit mpsmke.com/Enroll or call (414) 267-5100 for more information. Interpreters will be available. The first 1,000 students to enroll beginning on Feb. 6, 2021, will receive a free backpack. The first 1,000 families to enroll will be entered in a drawing to win an Apple TV device! Drawing to be held on Friday, Sept. 24, 2021. Details at mpsmke.com/Enroll. Š2021 Milwaukee Public Schools www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

MPS_KFair_CommJournal_6.4375x10.5_121 V2.indd 1

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What's Happening

Thursday, February 4, 2021

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WE’RE HIRING! Youth Development Professionals Security Personnel

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Wednesday, February 10, 2021

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Art that inspires. Careers that excite. The Milwaukee Art Museum seeks an enthusiastic Marketing Strategist to develop and strategize media plans, coordinate contracts, and engage audiences through paid advertising and media partnerships.

Part-Time 20-29 Hours/week AM and PM Shifts $12.50-$13.50/hour Apply at bgcmilwaukee.org/careers

Learn more about the position and apply today at mam.org/jobs.

Girls’ nights IN are gonna take COVID-19 OUT.

We don’t get enough laughs these days. But, wherever they are, our friends are as close as a click. Vaccines are coming. But until enough of us are vaccinated, we still need to slow the spread. We can watch our distance, and not let COVID-19 keep us apart. Learn more about vaccines and slowing the spread at cdc.gov/coronavirus

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

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What's Happening

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

The right to swim was important to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. It was a skill he learned as a young boy and an activity he enjoyed with his family.

FREE SWIM PROGRAM

for Children 3 Years Old and Up with enrollment in St. Ann Center’s child day care The program includes: - Swimming in a warm-water pool that is fully accessible - Small group classes supervised by a certified swimming instructor - Classes geared for swimmers and nonswimmers

“When I hear the question ‘People aren’t ready,’ it’s like telling a person who is trying to swim, ‘Don’t jump in that water until you learn how to swim.’ When actually you will never learn how to swim until you get in the water.” - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

To enroll for childcare, call: 414-210-2468 For more on the swim program, call: 414-977-5015 BUCYRUS CAMPUS 2450 W. North Ave. (414) 210-2450 StAnnCenter.org

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Financial Assistance Available

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Health & Fitness

Thursday, February 4, 2021

10

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Wisconsin’s Department of Health Services launches campaign to improve flu vaccine rates in the state’s communities of color The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) has recently launched the “Be an InFLUencer” education and awareness campaign to help promote flu vaccination within Wisconsin’s communities of color. During the 2019-2020 flu season, the DHS reports that an average of 42 percent of Wisconsin residents received a flu shot. However, vaccination rates were much lower among communities of color with only 26 percent of black Wisconsinites getting a flu shot, the lowest rate among all ethnic groups in the state.

Dr. Kevin Izard, the campaign spokesman and a physician with Paladina Health, said the low flu vaccination rates in Black communities and building trust in communities of color are the major reasons he wanted to be the spokesman for the DHS campaign. “The numbers show that we’re less likely to get the flu vaccine. So, it’s important to get the word out to African American communities and dispel the myths, build trust, encourage, and influence our communities of color to get a flu shot,” he said “The vaccine

has been proven to be safe and it’s available now, “Dr. Izard added. The healthcare system has been historically untrustworthy for African Ameri-

cans. Because of this, a mistrust of health care has been passed down generationally and it’s still prevalent today in many Black communities. A major reason for this skep-

ticism relates to the Tuskegee experiments, the unethical study in which 600 Black men were used as guinea pigs for syphilis research from 1932 to 1972. Dr. Izard says a lack of access to healthcare is also a barrier which is preventing many people of color from getting a flu shot. “Hopefully by having more sites and providing more convenient hours, we’ll make the flu vaccine more available to more people wherever they are,” he said. Dr. Izard said people of color frequently move in (Continued on pg. 13)

SaintA brings stability to families amid COVID-19 When COVID-19 hit, SaintA staff were ready to assist. We introduced SaintA CARES as an effort to support the families in our care who have been most impacted by the pandemic. Our approach to COVID-19 is modeled after our Five Pillars of Stability, which prioritizes access to education, employment, health, housing and caring connections. These pillars are the social and basic necessities for stability success. food to those in need was one vided 125 grocery gift cards Assisting with distributing of our top priorities. We pro- to families in our care, served

catered meals to frontline staff in five Milwaukee youth group homes and assessment centers and made monetary donations to two local food pantries. It was all made possible through the $32,000 raised from donors. In addition, support came from the Oprah Winfrey Charitable Foundation. Through a generous grant, we were able to provide 158 families with tablets and Wi-Fi so children and families could continue distance learning access therapy.

Some of the first people affected by COVID-19 in the Milwaukee area were African American. The effects of the pandemic have only exaggerated how difficult stability has become in certain populations. As we enter our 170th year in the Milwaukee community, SaintA is committed to creating healing and offering hope, while facilitating learning, healing, and wellness by restoring connections that help children and families thrive.

We salute our employees for their continuous commitment to equity, learning, healing and wellness.

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, February 4, 2021

11

What's Happening

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

The Alverno College

BOWMAN INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE & LEADERSHIP

Now inviting applications for this full-tuition scholarship program for Black women with a strong desire to serve as leaders High school graduate in 2021 Demonstrated record of academic success Admissable to Alverno College Clear evidence of civic and/or community engagement in high school, community and/or place of worship Ability to discuss intended college major and career goals Successful interview with the selection committee

For more information, visit alverno.edu/bowman

88NINE RADIO MILWAUKEE PRESENTS

ASK THE EXPERTS

Jan 14 - Feb 11 Thursdays at noon Facebook – YouTube – Twitch

Hosted by award-winning journalist Reggie Jackson and our own Tarik Moody, the podcast By Every Measure explores systemic racism in five major sectors: Criminal Justice & Policing, Housing, the Racial Wealth Gap, Education and Healthcare. Join us as we learn from national experts in these five fields, and join us as we continue the fight for racial justice.

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Arts and Entertainment

Thursday, February 4, 2021

101:

12

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Discovering Our Deep Cultural Roots In The Arts

Landscape by 19th century Black abolitionist painter given to President Biden as inaugural gift Alongside two U.S. flags and a pair of commemorative vases, newly swornin President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris received an artwork as a gift: Robert S. Duncanson’s Landscape with Rainbow, an 1859 painting on loan from the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) in Washington, D.C. Roy Blunt, a Republican senator from Missouri, called the work “a good sign” as he presented it Credit: Smithsonian American Art Museum to Biden and Harris at their "Landscape with Rainbow" (left) inauguration on Wednesday, by Robert S. Duncanson (right). January 20, 2021. Duncanson was among the most lauded Black art- accrued a reputation for his Cincinnati-based painter was ists in the U.S. in the years lush landscapes done in the known, among other things, around the Civil War, having mode of Thomas Cole. The for his abolitionist political

views, which often figured in his landscapes in metaphorical ways. Many of his paintings envision peaceful vistas that could be seen as alternate visions of a conflict-free country. Landscape with Rainbow features a rainbow arcing over a verdant idyll that has been seemingly untouched by humankind. Below the rainbow, a man and a woman gaze at its beauty as a dog sniffs at the land around them. The painting is characteristic of much of his art, representing a vision of the U.S. as a paradise-like Arcadia—“a late hope for peace before the onset of Civil War,” according to SAAM’s

website—and bearing out a message of unity that was echoed in Biden’s campaign speeches, as well as his inaugural address and Amanda Gorman’s inaugural poem. Although Duncanson has been well-known to historians for well over a century, he and his work have rarely been given major recognition outside Ohio. Until 2018, he did not even have a tombstone. “While he faced lots of challenges, he was optimistic, even in 1859, about America,” Blunt said as he thanked Jill Biden, the First Lady, for helping him select the work.

National Gallery hires Kanitra Fletcher as its first curator of African American Art Kanitra Fletcher, an associate curator at the Museum of Fine Arts (MFA) Houston in Texas, has been hired as the first-ever curator of African American art at the National Gallery of Art (NGA) in Washington, D.C. She started as the museum’s associate curator of African American and Afro-Diasporic art on February 1, and will oversee how Black art is presented at the museum.

month. And Eric Bruce began as the National Gallery’s head of visitor experience and evaluation in August.

art museum, we must articulate and live up to our values, including excellence, empathy, diversity, inclusion, and deepening the public’s understanding of art.”

tional Gallery of Art and the three other organization institutions—the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, the MFA Houston, and Tate Modern in London—delayed the exhibition, sparking an outcry. Fletcher’s hire comes in In a Hyperallergic podcast, the wake of a controversy Feldman said, “An exhibition over a Philip Guston retro- with such strong commenspective now due to open tary on race cannot be done at the National Gallery of by all white curators.” Art in 2023. Last year, after staff raised concerns about the “painful” imagery in the artist’s work focused on Ku Klux Klan members, the Na-

“Each of our new colleagues comes to us with deep expertise in engaging audiences and inspiring curiosity about art, history, and culture,” Kaywin Feldman, director of the National Gallery, said in a statement to Culture Type. “Now more than ever, we must model At the MFA Houston, the America that we expect Kanitra Fletcher Fletcher oversaw that mu- and hope for. As the nation’s seum’s presentations of two critically acclaimed shows— “Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power,” which originated at Tate Modern in 2017; and a survey of Jack Whitten’s sculptures, which first opened at the Met Breuer in 2018. Her most recent project is the U.S. version of the exhibition “Historias Afro-Atlanticas,” which opened in 2018 at the Museu de Arte de São Paulo as part of its closely watched “Historias” series and is set to travel to the MFA Houston and the NGA. (“HistoFebruary is Black History Month. Milwaukee Film will dedicate its new rias Afro-Atlanticas” ranked programming all month long to films and events that celebrate, honor, on an ARTnews list of the most important shows of the and elevate Black culture and traditions. Featuring 30 films by Black 2010s.) Alongside Fletcher’s hire, the NGA also announced three other appointments. Mikka Gee Conway, formerly associate general counsel at the J. Paul Getty Trust, began as the National Gallery’s chief diversity, inclusion, and belonging officer in September. Nick Sharp started his job as the museum’s chief digital officer that same An NCON Communications Publication

filmmakers, don’t miss out on the dozens of engaging events that strive to inspire conversation, celebration, and community.

passes and films available now mkefilm.org/bhm

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Historical Black Churches (Continued from pg. 5) Omar Jackson, and B.G. Gordon. The five members called the Rev. I.A. Coppage as the first pastor of Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church. Dorothy May Flowers, eight years old, was the first candidate for baptism who was followed by William Jackson and Henry Nance. Some of the deacons were Charles Stokes, B.G. Gordon, Henry Nance, William Jackson W. Reese, and Mr. Curtiss, who served as trustee also. Two of the first trustees were L.S. Smith and Julius Harp. The director of the first choir was Mrs. Gladys Butcher. The “Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church” was suggested by Brother Stokes and Sister Jackson, and it was then accepted by the body.

4. Tabernacle Community Baptist Church 2500 W. Medford Ave. Milwaukee, WI 53206 Founded: est. 1922 Current Pastor: Rev. Dr. Donna Childs Brought into being by a vibrant faith and enduring hope of our spiritual an-

Flu campaign (Continued from pg. 10) different circles, which is another reason for the campaign. “The things that have worked in the past for the majority culture might not necessarily work for us,” he said. “So, we’re trying to get the word out differently. Through word of mouth, social media and influencers we’re trying to do things in a different way to get the word out.” According to the latest 10-year analysis project by the Center for Disease Control (CDC), Black people have the highest flu-related hospitalization rate. With COVID-19 raging on into 2021, Dr. Izard said this is a major call to action for people of color to get a flu shot. “Everyone over 6-monthsold should get a flu shot, especially this year because of COVID-19 continuing to surge,” he said. “We really want to take flu off the table as we deal with COVID-19. If we can eliminate the flu, that would make things a lot easier for us and take some of the burden off of our hospitals.” For more information about the DHS campaign, https://www.dhs.wisconsin. gov/influenza www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

Thursday, February 4, 2021

tecedents, the Tabernacle Community Baptist Church has been a citadel of hope for Milwaukee and its people for 97 years. The early band of believers gave a new estimation of black Christians when they organized the congregation under the name of Saint Paul Baptist Church, at a time when there were only a few Baptist churches for African Americans in the city. Bearing witness to a divine impulse, an aspiring minister, Reverend Hooks, cast a grand vision and long arc for our charter members, laying a firm foundation for the new assembly in 1922. He would be succeeded by Reverend Johnson in 1926, after just four years of leadership; and the Reverend R. H. Foy, would assume the pastorate upon the completion of Reverend Johnson’s six-year ministry, in 1932. It was during this period that the congregation changed its name to Tabernacle Baptist Church.

5. Antioch Missionary Baptist Church 2033 W. Congress St. Milwaukee, WI 53209 Founded: est. 1946

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The Classifieds

Current Pastor: Rev. Victor Manns The Antioch Missionary Baptist Church was organized October 8, 1946 by the Reverend Louis Samuel Beauchamp, with only three members, in a one-room building at 1844 North 7th Street. Others who participated in the organization of Antioch were Reverend Charles H. Brumfield, pastor of Greater Galilee Missionary Baptist Church and Moderator of the General Baptist State Associate of Wisconsin; Reverend J.L. Williams, pastor of Tabernacle Baptist Church; Reverend M.C. Ward, pastor of the Mount Olive Baptist Church; Reverend L.C. Lampkins, pastor of the Mount Erea Baptist Church; Dr. M. J. Battles, pastor of Calvary Baptist Church; and the State Missionary. After a brief review of Reverend Beauchamp’s life and religious background, the council decided to proceed with the organization of Antioch. The Reverend George Beauchamp, father of Reverend L.S. Beauchamp, served as evangelist. Following the completion of the organization service, the State Missionary extended the invitation and approximately eighteen others were added to the newly organized church.

Hallelujah! OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT Office of the Milwaukee Public Schools, DIVISION OF FACILITIES AND MAINTENANCE SERVICES, 1124 North 11th Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, January 29, 2021. Sealed bids will be received until Wednesday, March 3, 2021 at 1:30 PM on-line through A/E Graphics, Inc., pursuant to Section 119.16(4) Wisconsin Statutes in accordance with plans and specifications for the following work: All contractor(s) and subcontractors(s) are subject to the current livable wage rate, in accordance with the City of Milwaukee Ordinance 310-13. Per 2015 WI Act 55, prevailing wage rate laws have been repealed for all MPS Construction Projects beginning January 1, 2017. BID GUARANTY TO ACCOMPANY BID: MPS Bid Bond, Certified or Cashier's Check: 10% of Contractor's Base Bid. EXTERIOR AND GYM LIGHTING UPGRADES Washington Complex 2525 N. Sherman Blvd. Milwaukee, WI 53210 MPS Property No. 035 MPS Project No. 6549 The HUB requirements for this project are 15% The COIN requirements for this project are 0% The minimum Student Participation requirements for this project are: Paid Employment: 100 Hours Educational Activities: 10 Hours Deposit for Drawings and Specifications: $25.00 MAILING CHARGE: $35.00 The bidding documents may be viewed and downloaded for free from A/E Graphics On-line Plan Room, at https://mps.aegraphics.com/. Hard copies may be obtained 7:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; Monday through Friday from A/E Graphics, Inc.; 4075 North 124th Street, Brookfield, WI 53005; phone (262) 781-7744; fax (262) 781-4250. Call A/E Graphics, Inc. for availability of bid documents for pick up. Plans and specifications will be loaned to a prospective bidder upon receipt of the deposit listed, which deposit will be returned upon surrender of the plans and specifications in good condition. Bid documents must be returned only to A/E Graphics, Inc. A pre-bid walkthrough for the site will be held on Tuesday, February 16, 2021 at 9:00 AM, meet at the school’s main entrance. All questions should be submitted in writing prior to 12:00 PM on Wednesday, February 24, 2021 to DFMSProcurement@milwaukee.k12.wi.us. No questions may be answered after that date and time. No questions shall be answered verbally. No verbal information from any source is to be relied upon by any respondent in the development of their Bid. Written questions and responses will be documented by way of addenda, which will be forwarded to all bidders. Each bid shall be for a fixed lump sum. Bids shall be submitted on-line through A/E Graphics On-line Plan Room, at https://mps.aegraphics.com/ using the “Submit Bid” tab on the EXTERIOR AND GYM LIGHTING UPGRADES - Washington Complex project information page from which bid documents were obtained. Submit bid forms per Instructions to Bidders, Article B-5 of the Specifications. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to waive informalities. Upon reasonable notice, efforts will be made to accommodate the needs of disabled individuals at the bid opening through sign language interpreters or other auxiliary aids. Keith P. Posley, Ed.D. 2-3 Superintendent of Schools

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The Classifieds

Thursday, February 4, 2021

February 2nd Donald Driver Hannah Ivy Blanche Hogans February 3rd Frances Brown Evelyn Glover Evelyn Blake Kiana Hunter Sabrina Grant February 4 Yashika Graves JaRon Williams Cleveland Hathaway Christine Pearson th

February 5th Kylah Lyons Mahalia Kirk February 6 Lawrence Smith Mark Phillips th

February 7th Beniee A. Randle Trynayl Banks Pastor Joseph H. Jackson, Jr. February 8 Emily Davis Deborah (Burnside) Turner th

February 14th Angela T. Fumbanks Vicki Chamberlain Dora Hogan Willie Speed February 15th Annabelle Banks February 16th Steffanie Boyd Quiana Staten Charella Davis Tony Chamberlain February 17th Kim Lyons Tony J. Thompson February 18th Tina Spears Courtney Kelly Louise Barnett Jamerh Banks Charles B. Strokes February 19th Andrew Green, Sr. Gloria Hunt Ellen Fumbanks Jamera Ellis February 20th Mable Taylor Channing M. Williams February 21st Nia Fizpatrick Margo Gipson Terese Robinson

February 9 Joyce Nash Lori Ann Jackson Blount February 10th Bertha Thompson

February 24th Janice Williams

February 11th Lyrics Serenity Bell

February 25th Betty Speed Jeffery Matlock

February 12th Stacy D. Ingram Kieva Smith Robert Garner February 13th Terry Taylor

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Catalyst Construction would like to invite your company to bid on The Watertown project. ATTENTION: DBE/MBE/SBE/WBE Firms (Targeted Business) Catalyst Construction is requesting bids/quotes from subcontractors and suppliers for the following project:

February 23rd Chole Ann Taylor Bryanna Barnes Jasmine Rammesses

th

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

February 4, 1913 – Rosa Parks, civil rights pioneer who sparked Montgomery bus boycott, born.

Mrs. Fumbanks' Birthday Salutes "Wishing You All The Best!" February 1st Karen M. Ingram Jayzion Fumbanks

14

February 26th Geraldine Walker Sandrene Watts Louis Davis, Jr. Jo Dean Walker February 28 Louis Taylor, Jr. Lyric Burnside th

Do you have a friend, family member, or colleague who has just celebrated or is about to celebrate a birthday? Stop by our office with their name on Monday to get them in that week’s edition of Happy Birthday Salutes! Visit us at 1936 N. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, call us at (414) 263-5088 or e-mail them to miltimes@gmail.com. An NCON Communications Publication

February 5, 1934 – Major league home run champion Hank Aaron born. February 6, 1867 – Robert Tanner Jackson becomes first African American to receive a degree in dentistry. February 7, 1883 – Ragtime pianist and composer Hubie Blake born. February 8, 1968 – Three South Carolina State students killed during segregation protest in Orangeburg, S.C.

February 9, 1964 – Arthur Ashe, Jr. becomes first African American on U.S. Davis Cup team. February 10, 1989 – Ronald H. Brown is elected chairman of the Democratic National Committee.

PROJECT: The Watertown LOCATION: 9150 Watertown Plank Road, Wauwatosa, WI BID DATE: Tuesday, February 16th at 4:00 pm CONSTRUCTION START DATE: April 2, 2021 END DATE: July 20, 2022 OWNER: Watertown Apartments, LLC PROJECT CONTACT: Ryan Raskin, Senior Project Manager rraskin@catalystbuilds.com or Michael Schumacher, Estimator mschumacher@catalystbuilds. com PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The Watertown is a proposed apartment building with 5 stories and 147 units on the former Milwaukee County Food Services site. Targeted Business, Milwaukee County Resident Workers, and apprentice inclusion is required. Catalyst Construction 833 E Michigan St # 1000 Milwaukee, WI 53202 Ph: 414-727-6840 catalystbuilds.com “An Equal Opportunity Employer” OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT Office of the Milwaukee Public Schools, DIVISION OF FACILITIES AND MAINTENANCE SERVICES, 1124 North 11th Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, January 29, 2021. Sealed bids will be received until Thursday, March 4, 2021 at 1:30 PM on-line through A/E Graphics, Inc., pursuant to Section 119.16(4) Wisconsin Statutes in accordance with plans and specifications for the following work: All contractor(s) and subcontractors(s) are subject to the current livable wage rate, in accordance with the City of Milwaukee Ordinance 310-13. Per 2015 WI Act 55, prevailing wage rate laws have been repealed for all MPS Construction Projects beginning January 1, 2017. BID GUARANTY TO ACCOMPANY BID: MPS Bid Bond, Certified or Cashier's Check: 10% of Contractor's Base Bid. EXTERIOR, GYM LIGHTING, AND EXIT SIGN UPGRADES Alexander Hamilton High School 6215 W. Warnimont Avenue Milwaukee, WI 53220 MPS Property No. 018 MPS Project No. 6541 MPS HUB, COIN and Student Employment / Participation requirements are identified on the Project Manual Cover and Bid Form and defined within the Contract Compliance Services Participation Plan Requirements in the Project Manual. Deposit for Drawings and Specifications: $25.00 MAILING CHARGE: $35.00 The bidding documents may be viewed and downloaded for free from A/E Graphics On-line Plan Room, at https://mps.aegraphics.com/. Hard copies may be obtained 7:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; Monday through Friday from A/E Graphics, Inc.; 4075 North 124th Street, Brookfield, WI 53005; phone (262) 781-7744; fax (262) 781-4250. Call A/E Graphics, Inc. for availability of bid documents for pick up. Plans and specifications will be loaned to a prospective bidder upon receipt of the deposit listed, which deposit will be returned upon surrender of the plans and specifications in good condition. Bid documents must be returned only to A/E Graphics, Inc. A pre-bid walkthrough for the site will be held on Thursday, February 18, 2021 at 9:00 AM, meet at the school’s main entrance. All questions should be submitted in writing prior to 12:00 PM on Thursday, February 25, 2021 to DFMSProcurement@milwaukee.k12.wi.us. No questions may be answered after that date and time. No questions shall be answered verbally. No verbal information from any source is to be relied upon by any respondent in the development of their Bid. Written questions and responses will be documented by way of addenda, which will be forwarded to all bidders. Each bid shall be for a fixed lump sum. Bids shall be submitted on-line through A/E Graphics On-line Plan Room, at https://mps.aegraphics.com/ using the “Submit Bid” tab on the EXTERIOR, GYM LIGHTING, AND EXIT SIGN UPGRADES - Alexander Hamilton High School project information page from which bid documents were obtained. Submit bid forms per Instructions to Bidders, Article B-5 of the Specifications. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to waive informalities. Upon reasonable notice, efforts will be made to accommodate the needs of disabled individuals at the bid opening through sign language interpreters or other auxiliary aids. Keith P. Posley, Ed.D. 2-3 Superintendent of Schools

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Thursday, February 4, 2021

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Wednesday, February 10, 2021

What's Happening

My Choice Wisconsin serves government-funded programs to frail seniors and adults with disabilities. We care for the whole person and well-being of all by offering services that promote independence, value diversity, and inspire self-advocacy.

Caring Starts Here

www.mychoicewi.org/mt 800-963-0035

TTY 711

The

For more information on the Family Care program, call your local ADRC.

Weekly Newspaper

Have you had your flu shot? There are a lot of myths going around

about getting a flu shot. Here’s the truth: getting a flu shot can protect you from the flu. It can help you stay healthy.

We got ours.

If you haven’t already, it’s not too late to get yours. For more information or to find out where you can get your flu shot, call (414) 264-6869 or visit www.generalbaptistwi.org. Reverend Dr. Garry Levy & Dr. Dessie Levy

Protect yourself. Protect others. Get your flu shot. www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

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Froedtert

Thursday, February 4, 2021

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Committed to serving our community Froedtert Health is committed to valuing and celebrating the wealth of diversity reflected in patients, their families, staff and communities. We are committed to being an inclusive and culturally competent organization that provides exceptional care to everyone. As a health care organization, we often care for people who have been impacted by racism. We are taking action to treat racism as a health crisis.

Learn more at froedtert.com/end-racism

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Profile for Milwaukee Times News

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Digital Edition Issue February 4, 2021  

Miltimes 02-04-21 issue_16 pgs

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Digital Edition Issue February 4, 2021  

Miltimes 02-04-21 issue_16 pgs

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