Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Digital Edition Issue January 14, 2021

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“Injustice Anywhere Is A Threat To Justice Everywhere.” - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. On January 18, 2021 our nation will remember civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., with a day in his honor. It couldn't come at a better time, as this nation deals with extreme issues of racism, injustice against the Black community, and the fight against the rise of fascism that has led to unrest in Washington DC.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., never held political office, nor was he a mighty businessman. But he accomplished more for our nation with eloquent words than decades of political infighting or millions of dollars have since. He created unity and hope during a time when our nation desperately needed them. (Continued on pg. 9)

Wahl Park renamed to honor abolitionist Harriet Tubman

Photos by Kim Robinson

On Wednesday, January 6, 2021, Supervisor Sequanna Taylor led an event recognizing the renaming of Wahl Park to Harriet Tubman Park and unveiled publicly for the first time an official Milwaukee County Parks sign with the new name. This past September, Supervisor Taylor sponsored a resolution that officially renamed the park in honor of the abolitionist and political activist. Harriet Tubman (inset) was one of the most successful conductors on the Underground Railroad, a network of secret routes and houses used to help enslaved peoples escape into free states and Canada. Tubman is credited with helping more than 13 missions and assisting in the freedom of more than 70 people. Supervisor Taylor was joined by several other elected officials, including Milwaukee County Parks Director Guy Smith, and community leaders representing the area at the unveiling.

City celebrates new home construction at Walnut Circle and Josey Heights On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, The City of Milwaukee hosted a groundbreaking for new homes in two city-developed subdivisions at Walnut Circle and Josey Heights. The owners of the new houses are taking advantage of the City’s incentives of one dollar lots and a $30,000 forgivable grant. Walnut Circle and Josey Heights were developed in the mid2000s to spur new home construction and owner occupancy. These subdivisions follow a long line of new home construction and investment in the area preceded by Johnson’s Park, City Homes and the Lindsay Heights developments. Heidi Moore was the first to take advantage of the incentives and closed on her new home in Josey Heights before Thanksgiving. The new home construction incentives are made possible with funds from the City, Associated Bank, and the Zilber Family Foundation. Some incentives are still available to prospective homeowners. For more info visit: city.milwaukee.gov/DCD/ CityRealEstate/WalnutCircle. An NCON Communications Publication

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In The News

Thursday, January 14, 2021

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Wednesday, January 20, 2021

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Eric Jerome Dickey, bestselling author whose novels focused on Black life, dies at 59 Bestselling author Eric Jerome Dickey, whose novels depicted romance, erotica and suspense from the Black perspective, including Milk in My Coffee, Sleeping with Strangers and Friends and Lovers, has died. He was 59. He died in Los Angeles on January 3, 2021 after a long illness, his longtime publicist confirmed Tuesday, January 5, 2021. His publisher, Dutton, an imprint of Penguin Random House, referred to the popular writer as "an iconic author and friend" on social media. Dickey's longtime publicist Emily Canders echoed those sentiments on Twitter adding, "As Eric's publicist for many years, I'll always remember what a kind, genuine person he was. Even when I was a young publicist (that definitely made mistakes here and there!) he was always so gracious. And it's rare to find fans more loyal than his." Dickey's 29 novels connected with audiences with his conversational writing style, which translated into more than 7 million copies of his books being sold worldwide. The Memphis-born author did not set out for a career in the arts. After graduating from the University of Memphis with a degree in computer system technology, he left for Los Angeles to pursue a career in engineer-

Eric Jerome Dickey ing, according to his personal website. But through the urging of a friend, Dickey attended a writing class. As he explained to NPR's News and Notes in 2006, she dropped out and he stayed. "It wasn't until after I left Memphis that I got to L.A. and I was exposed to a lot of people who were in the arts," Dickey said. "And eventually, I landed in a writing class. I actually went to the class with a friend, who talked me into taking a class with her because she didn't want to be the only African American in the class. And I went reluctantly, and I stayed and she dropped out. I took a lot of classes, I mean, and I would sometimes take class once a week." Dickey said that many of his earliest works, including

1996's Sister, Sister, focused on the lives of a certain type of Black women because, he noted, there was a lack of "any true literary representation. "I would say before Terry McMillan there was not any true literary representation, meaning that there were no characters who looked like them, that were going through what they were going through at the time," Dickey told NPR. "We're talking about women who are educated, who are coming of their own, who, you know — so we're writing these very contemporary stories that they can connect to right now." As word of Dickey's death spread, towering voices in literature and entertainment offered condolences. Anika Noni Rose, an actor

and singer who voiced Tiana, Disney's first Black princess in The Princess and the Frog, tweeted: "RIP #EricJeromeDickey. An open spirit. A genre shifting writer." Author Roxanne Gay referred to him as "a great storyteller. "I am truly saddened to hear about the passing of Eric Jerome Dickey. His were some of the first novels I ever read about black people that weren't about slavery or civil rights. He was a great storyteller."

Netflix executive Jasmyn Lawson also weighed in on his passing, saying his books gave her and her friends "insights into pleasure and autonomy (RE the Black woman body) we wouldn't have learned at school/home." Dickey is survived by four daughters, and due to coronavirus concerns there are no plans to hold funeral services at this time, according to his publicist. His final novel, The Son of Mr. Suleman, is scheduled to be released in April.

Our Sincerest Apologies

In our January 7, 2021 issue we listed one Geneva Harris in our "In Memory" special section honoring those that have passed in 2020. However, Ms. Harris is quite alive and well. Apparently, a project that Ms. Harris had done with the Times became misfiled due to a computer cliche and thus Ms. Harris was antecedently listed in our memorial section. Ms. Harris is quite alive and well and still an active and vital part of our community. We at the Milwaukee Times are deeply and sincerely sorry for any undue stress and trouble this may have caused her and her family.

Geneva Harris

Despite this mix-up pre-planning your funeral program or any part of your service is a excellent and cost

effective idea. Please visit one of our local black owned funeral homes to inquire about their pre-planning services.

DR. KING’S WORK & LEGACY A FIGHT FOR FAIR & EQUITABLE WAGES Join United Way and Reggie Jackson from Nurturing Diversity Partners to discuss the work and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This discussion will focus on his fight for equitable wages and the work that still needs to be done. We will also take a deeper look at how the United Way Diversity Leadership Society’s Reducing Barriers to Employment & Advancement initiative works to ensure everyone has access to permanent employment with a livable wage at a workplace where they are treated with dignity and have opportunities for advancement.

Thursday, January 19 from 10–11 a.m. Space is limited. Register at UnitedWayGMWC.org/Work-Legacy

Thank you to our ad sponsor: Special thanks to our event sponsor:

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MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Louvenia Johnson Luther Golden Nathan Conyers (1981-2008) (1981-2005) (1981- 2018 ) Lynda J. Jackson Conyers, Publisher Morgan A. Conyers, Associate Publisher Jacquelyn D. Heath, Editorial Page Editor

The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper STAFF Publisher/President Lynda J. Jackson Conyers Graphic Artists William Gooden Michelle Anibas

Founders Louvenia Johnson Nathan Conyers Luther Golden Marketing Carmen Murguía

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Thursday, January 14, 2021

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In The News

Wednesday, January 20, 2021

James M. Ferguson, II, announces run for vacant seat on County Board of Supervisor James M. Ferguson, II, first became politically active several years ago after a 15-year-old student he had been counseling called him from jail. “I knew he was not a criminal,” Ferguson said. “He had suffered a psychotic episode at school after being triggered by a teacher unaware. Teachers were not equipped to deal with mental health issues. He wound up at Lincoln Hills (the maximum security, staterun juvenile correctional facility for boys that was closed in 2018 after whistleblowers detailed numerous instances of abuse and mistreatment. Ferguson said he was one of those whistleblowers).

Now Ferguson is a candidate for the open 10th district seat on the Milwaukee County Board of Supervisors. The seat became open because Council member Supreme Moore Omokunde was elected to the Wisconsin State Legislature. The primary election is February 16, 2021. Ferguson said he grew up in the 10th district and has lived and worked within it for most of his life. Spending nearly his entire life within the district has provided him with a unique perspective, he said. Staff Photo

The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.

Ferguson laid out three objectives he hopes to accomplish if elected: 1) to secure funding for a 24/7 mental health triage center featuring a psychiatric emergency room within the 10th district which would provide access within the community to mental health services on demand; 2) to create a “right to work” program which would provide training or employment vouchers to employers within the district who are willing to provide on-thejob training to low-skilled and chronically unemployed workers; and 3) bringing together various stakeholders within the 10th district, residents, police, employers and others to help create solutions to important quality of life issues. “I’m a uniter,” Ferguson said. “I can bring people together to solve problems. I’ve done that throughout my career.”

Milwaukee County celebrates the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

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Ferguson is a second-generation community servant, following in the footsteps of his late father, Johnnie Ferguson, Sr., who served as a community organizer in Milwaukee for 20-plus years. Ferguson began his own career working as a tutor at the Dr. Howard Fuller Education Foundation before moving to Career Youth Development, Inc., and then Westcare Wisconsin, Inc. Ferguson currently serves as President of the Center for Family Preservation, Corp. He is an alumnus of Marquette University law school and undergraduate program, a doctoral candidate at Life Christian University and has a Certification in Executive Leadership from Cornel University. He married his wife, Kara in June 2019.

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Christian Times

Thursday, January 14, 2021

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Wednesday, January 20, 2021

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

The Counseling Corner

By Rev. Judith T. Lester, B.Min. M.Th

Social justice issues in America: Mass incarceration 20s. After that, crime drops sharply as adults reach their 30s and 40s.

• Black males are six times as likely to be incarcerated as white men, and Hispanic men are more than twice as likely to be incarcerated as non-Hispanic white men. The Sentencing Project indicates the excessive sentencing practices in the U.S. • Today people of color are largely counter-producmake up 37 percent of the tive and extremely costly. U.S. population but 67 percent of the criminal justice For one reason, incarcersystem. ation is ineffective at reducing certain kinds of crimes, • African Americans are especially crimes committed more likely than white Amer- in groups and drug crimes. icans to be arrested, once ar- When people get locked up rested, they are more likely to for these offenses, they are be convicted and once con- easily replaced on the streets victed, they are more likely to by others seeking an income face stiff sentences. or struggling with an addiction. The Sentencing Project, who has worked for fairness in sentencing laws and a fair and effective U.S. criminal justice system for nearly 30 years, posted this research in an article entitled: “Criminal Justice Facts”3 noting:

The

A social justice issue that is extremely troubling and continues to be a challenge for African-Americans and people of color in the 21st century is mass incarceration. Michelle Alexander, author of “The New Jim Crow,” 1 in an interview with Frontline 2 defined mass incarceration as: “a massive system of racial and social control. It is the process by which people are swept into the criminal justice system, branded criminals and felons, locked up for longer periods of time than most other countries in the world who incarcerate people who have been convicted of crimes, and then released into a permanent second-class status in which they are stripped of basic civil and human rights, like the right to vote, the right to serve on juries, and the right to be free of legal discrimination in employment, housing, and access to public benefits.” Mass incarceration came about because of the “tough on crime” initiative dating back to the 1980s and 90s. Now the number of the incarcerated has exploded. What’s alarming is the racial disparity in the criminal justice system.

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Secondly, people tend to age-out of crime. Research shows crime starts to peak in the mid-to late teenage years and begins to decline when individuals are in their mid-

The news involving youth is just as troubling. An African American male born in 2001 has a 1 in 3 chance of going to prison while a Latino boy has a 1 in 6 chance of the same fate. Ending the cradle-to-prison pipeline and mass incarceration takes us all. “It’s time to reroute our children, youths and parents from prison to college and productive work” according to the Children’s Defense Fund.4 Because of the number of U.S. citizens incarcerated, there’s an outcry for Next week: Social Justice prison reform. While chang- Issues in America (Prison es have taken place because Reform) of advocacy, there’s still work to be done. General Disclaimer: The writer has used her best efforts in 1 Alexander, Michelle (2012). preparation of this information. The New Jim Crow: Mass Incar- No representations or warranties ceration in the Age of Colorblind- for its contents, either expressed ness. The New Press. or implied, are offered. Neither the publisher nor the writer shall 2 Locked Up In America. be liable in any way for readers’ (April 2014). Public Broadcast- efforts to apply, rely or utilize the ing Service. information or recommendations presented herein as they may not 3 Sentencing Project, “Crimi- be suitable for you or necessarinal Justice Facts.” ly appropriate for every situation to which they may refer. In some 4 Children’s Defense Fund, instances, this article contains the Ending the Cradle to Prison opinions, conclusions and/or recPipeline and Mass Incarcera- ommendations of the writer. If tion – The New American Jim you would like to contact Rev. Crow” by Marian Wright, www. Lester, write to her c/o P.O. Box childrensdefense.org. 121, Brookfield, WI. 53008.

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Thursday, January 14, 2021

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Perspectives

Wednesday, January 20, 2021

Being Frank

By: Frank James Special to the Milwaukee Times

2021: Changes or continued ignorance?

Welcome to 2021. 2020 is in the trash bin of history. Many people in the USA are breathing a sigh of relief because 2020 has come to an end. COVID-19 has punished the US population over the past 10 months. 2021 is being viewed by many people as a chance for the US to gain a semblance of normalcy in all facets of life. Will the US rebound and go into 2021 with fresh ideas? Or will the majority of people in the US carry the ignorance smoothy as long as African of 2020 into the New Year? Americans are clear in the understanding that they are In the African American second class citizens in the community 2021 should be USA. viewed as an opportunity to apply old lessons retaught In 2021 the US governduring 2020. In 2020 Afri- ment has agreed to send can Americans had to be en- more money in the form of rolled in refresher courses on 600 dollars to many citizens. topics that they should have This stimulus check will be mastered two centuries ago. a needed boon for many The fact that African Amer- Americans. Yet, there are icans are not equal to whites many businesses that will not in the USA was reinforced. reopen when the COVID 19 The reality that Black lives pandemic passes. If the US matter as long as African population does not overAmericans know their place. come old platforms of ecoThe sad truth that Black nomic dispersement, then no males are still public enemy amount of stimulus will help. number one. 2021 should go The USA has to let go of the

racist ideology that strives to keep money isolated in old white institutions that have permeated US society since 1776. The education system has changed in many major US cities. The virtual classroom has become the norm. In 2021 many cities are preparing to bring children back into the physical classroom. Parents should have a good idea of what they send to the school in the form of a child. This new knowledge gained from parents having to be on lockdown with their children. Will parents use the knowledge to hold their chil-

situation in 2020 should have a great 2021. Understanding that you can be your own best friend or worst enemy can change a life in a positive way. You can complain that the government isn’t doing anything. Or you can moan about racism holding you back. These may be true statements. The biggest thing holding a person back is usually between their ears. In 2021 at least acknowledge your role in your lot in life. dren accountable for actions Once this is done find some in school? Or will parents way to make a change or two simply breath a sigh of relief for the better. Enjoy 2021 and send the same old prod- and let ignorance from 2020 uct back into the classroom? RIP. Only time will tell if the majority of parents learned any- Frank James IV © 2021 thing from their time with beingfrankwithfrank@ their offspring. gmail.com 2020 was a time for people The opinions expressed in this to get to know the person editorial are those of the writer in the mirror. Many people and not of the Milwaukee Times had time to do the all-im- Weekly Newspaper or NCON portant self-assessment. The Communication, its staff or need to overlook one's own management. "Being Frank" is a shortcomings is typical to all bi-weekly column exclusive to the races of people. A person Milwaukee Times Weekly Newsthat took time during various paper. COVID-19 lockdown protocols to look at oneself and

The meaning of The Martin Luther King, Jr., birthday holiday in 2021 By Douglas Haynes Vice chancellor for equity, diversity and inclusion at the University of California, Irvine Monday, January 18 marks the 35th anniversary of the federal holiday in honor of Rev. Martin Luther King’s birthday. Signed into law in 1983 and first observed in 1986, the holiday is a deserving tribute to King for advancing civil rights and social justice through non-violent protest. His was only the second birthday designated as a federal holiday after the observance of George Washington’s birthday. The making of their respective holidays reveals the still unresolved tension between independence and freedom in the making of the United States. Washington secured the nascent democracy as general and as its first president (1789-1797). As a Baptist pastor, King led a mass movement for freedom and

attention on the country’s origins in revolution while ignoring slavery and the condition of Black Americans. Two years before Congress honored Washington, President Rutherford B. Hayes removed federal troops from former confederate states. This decision would facilitate the restoration of unchecked white supremacy for nearly one hundred years. human rights in the twentieth century. Washington accepted slavery even while he defended the revolution. In confronting white supremacy, King challenged a fundamental contradiction at the heart of the United States, one that denies equality for all. One was a slave owner. The other was descended from slaves. At 67, Washington died on December 15, 1799 on his plantation in Mount Vernon

Virginia. His wife Martha was at his side. At 39, King was a private citizen engaged in public protest when he was assassinated on April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee. As president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, King was preparing to lead a march in support of striking Black sanitation workers as part of the Poor People’s Campaign. Shot in the face, King died in the company of movement associates. The country celebrated Washington in many ways, including readings of his farewell address and local parades. On January 31, 1879 Congress declared Washington’s birthday as a federal holiday. Even though Lincoln preserved the union during the Civil War, Washington’s birthday promoted sectional reconciliation. It focused

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Born in 1929, King’s existence as a Black man was always contingent and conditional. In insisting that America live up to its promise, Black men and women had no choice but to sacrifice their bodies and lives. King’s assassination was not the first. NAACP representative Medgar Evers was gunned down in front of his home in June 1963 in Jackson, Mississippi. Age did not exempt Black children from racial terrorism. In September four young girls—Addie Mae Collins, Cynthia Wesley, Carole Robertson and Carol Denise McNair—were killed when the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama was bombed. Following King’s death, multiple petitions and bills submitted to Congress proposing a federal holiday in his honor failed to garner support. However, a growing number of states observed

his birthday. In the second verse of the 1980 hit song Happy Birthday, Stevie Wonder ponders "I just never understood How a man who died for good Could not have a day that would be set aside for his recognition. Because it should never be Just because some cannot see The dream as clear as he That they should make it become an illusion" Fifty-three years after King’s death, the promised land where Black people “take their rightful place on earth,” remains elusive. The protests against police brutality and the demonstrations in support of Black Lives are a powerful reminder that the United States has yet to fulfill its promise to Black Americans. King’s closing words at the Bishop Charles Mason Temple the night before his death captures the purpose and meaning of Black protest and sacrifice. “I might not get there with you, but I want you to know tonight that we as a people will get to the promised land.” On this MLK Day let us all re-dedicate ourselves to building a promised land where Black protest and sacrifice are not a requirement to live in the United States.

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In The News

Thursday, January 14, 2021

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Wednesday, January 20, 2021

Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

Breaking the Barrier African Americans who have broken past color lines in the world of business, community leadership and beyond

Medical College of Wisconsin names vice president and chief people officer

Adrienne Mitchell, MBA, has been named vice president and chief people officer at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW), effective Jan. 1, 2021. In this role, Mitchell will oversee and direct strategy and operations of the Human Resources (HR) Department and the Office of Faculty Affairs (OFA) to oversee the development, well-being and advancement of faculty and staff. “The people at MCW are most important in shaping the health of our communi-

ty, Wisconsin and the world,” said John R. Raymond, Sr., MD, president and CEO of MCW. “Adrienne brings proven ability to lead human resources strategy and will be instrumental in driving and guiding our strategic objectives. Her deep understanding of academic medicine and passion for fostering a diverse and inclusive workforce will be instrumental in further fueling health and science innovation, growth and opportunity at MCW.”

Prior to joining MCW, Mitchell served as vice president, chief Human Resources and Information Technology at Wayne Health (formerly Wayne State University Physician Group) in Detroit. During her more than 25-year career in human resources, Mitchell has also held positions of increasing responsibility and leadership at Rush University Medical Center and University of Chicago.

Adrienne Mitchell, MBA

in Human Resources and Health Sector Management from DePaul University in Chicago and a Bachelor of Business Administration degree with a major in Computer Systems Management from Eastern Michigan University.

Mitchell earned a Master of Business Administration degree with a concentration

MSNBC names Rashida Jones president; first African American to lead cable news network In a year plagued by a pandemic that has disproportionately affected African Americans, and one rife with racial strife, MSNBC has named Rashida Jones the first Black person and Black woman president of the network. Jones, who easily becomes the most prominent woman in cable news, is scheduled to step into the top role on Feb. 1, Black History Month, replacing Phil Griffin, who had been at the cable news channel for more than 25 years. “Rashida knows and understands MSNBC, in part because it’s where she started when she first joined NBCU seven years ago,” the company reportedly wrote in an email to NBC News employees. “She knows that it is the people who work here that make it great, and she understands its culture. She also appreciates the impact and potential of the brand.” Currently serving as senior vice president for NBC News and MSNBC, Jones oversees MSNBC’s daytime and weekend programming. In the past year, the company noted that Jones has helped guide MSNBC’s coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic, the unrest and social justice protests that broke out over Black Americans’ treatment, and the 2020 election. She also helped with two influential series at the network, “Justice for All” and “Climate in Crisis.” Her promotion is seen as part of a mandate by NBC News to ultimately roll out a staff of 50 percent of women and 50 percent of color. According to a news release, Jones was part of the team that helped NBC News White House correspondent Kristen Welker prepare for

her role as moderator in the final presidential debate of 2020. Jones did not release a statement, but many of her journalism peers saluted her on social media. “Congratulations to a wonderful person and Broadcast titan,” April Ryan wrote. “Rashida Jones is everything! We will be watching with pride as she becomes Presi- Her promotion is bigdent of MSNBC.” ger than our industry,”

NABJ President Doro-

Yamiche Alcindor of PBS thy Tucker wrote. “It’s wrote: “Congratulations.”

the kind of story Black and Brown children everywhere need to see, so they can know what’s possible.” (Image cour“I got my first job in At- tesy BlackPressUSA)

Georgia Dawkins, a producer at the Fox Magazine Show, “Central Ave,” offered a fond memory about Jones. lanta because #RashidaJones

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spoke my name. Three years later, I finally got the chance to say thank you. Congratulations, Queen,” Dawkins tweeted. A graduate of Hampton University, where she earned induction into the Scripps Howard Journalism Hall of Fame, Jones previously served as news director for an NBC affiliate in Columbia, South Carolina, where she rebuilt and rebranded the news team to focus on indepth investigative reporting. According to Jones’ biography, the station was number one in the market.

events, including Hurricane Katrina, mass tornado outbreaks and paralyzing snowstorms. She serves as co-chair of Hampton University’s Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications Advisory Board, a board member of the Carole Kneeland Project for Responsible Journalism, and a non-resident senior fellow with the University of Pennsylvania’s Fox Leadership Program.

“Her promotion is bigger than our industry,” wrote Jones also served as direc- NABJ President Dorothy tor of live programming at Tucker. “It’s the kind of stoThe Weather Channel, lead- ry Black and Brown children ing coverage and program- everywhere need to see, so ming for some of the net- they can know what’s possiwork’s most historic weather ble.”

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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

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Health & Fitness

Wednesday, January 20, 2021

Understanding diabetes to live your best life By Sandra Millon Underwood, FAAN Professor, UW-Milwaukee School of Nursing Many of us grew up in households where we heard our elders talk about people who had ‘the sugar’. As adults, we have come to understand that what they were referring to was diabetes. The good news is that with some lifestyle changes, rather than being a death sentence, diabetes can be managed. According to the Federal Drug Administration (FDA), 34.2 million people in the United States—just over one in ten people—have diabetes. In addition, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Diabetes Statistics Report (2020), found that about 88 million adults—approximately one in three people—have been diagnosed with prediabetes. Lola Awoyinka, a full-time doctoral student in public and community health at the Medical College of Wisconsin, has researched volumes of data surrounding local diabetes disparities. She reports that, according to data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, nearly one in six African American adults in Milwaukee County—or 15 percent—have been diagnosed with diabetes. Whether you’ve been newly diagnosed, have been fighting against type 1 or type 2 diabetes for a while or are helping a loved one, knowing the difference between the two and understanding the resources, health tips and managing proper food intake can help you live your best life. According to the American Diabetes Association type 1 diabetes occurs at every age and in people of every race, shape, and size. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. The body breaks down the carbohydrates you eat into blood sugar that it uses for energy—and insulin is a hormone that the body needs to get glucose from the bloodstream into the cells of the body. With the help of insulin and other treatments, individuals can learn to manage their diabetes and live longer, healthier lives. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. In this instance, the body doesn’t use insulin properly. And while some people can control their blood sugar levels with healthy eating and exercise, others may need medication or insulin to help manage it. www.milwaukeetimesnews.com

ty in minorities is a combination of risk factors, including lack of access to health care, socioeconomic status, cultural attitudes, and behaviors. These factors can become barriers to preventing diabetes and effectively managing diabetes once diagnosed. In addition, diabetes can progress faster in minority populations. This rapid progression can be compounded by a poor diet, obesity, and a sedentary life.

Clayborn Benson, founding Executive Director of the Wisconsin Black Historical Society/ Museum, understands and appreciates the benefits of lifestyle changes. When he was first diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, his A1C hovered around 12. He changed his eating habits and made a conscious effort to incorporate exercise into his daily regime. After about seven months, Benson is feeling better, has more energy, and during his last check up, his A1C was 6.9. “Before I changed my diet and started exercising, I was experiencing dizziness and, at one point, was unable to keep food down. I was extremely sick for one week last year—that’s when I knew I had to take my diabetes diagnosis seriously because typically nothing stops

In order to be diagnosed with prediabetes or diabetes depends on your A1C. A1C is a blood test for type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. It measures your average blood glucose, or blood sugar, level over the past 3 months The following are the measurements that determine whether you have normal blood sugars, or have prediabetes, or are diabetic.

The American Diabetes Association offers a test to help determine if you or a me from living my best life, loved one may be at risk of but this did. I incorporated diabetes. Go to https://www. more fruits and vegetables diabetes.org/risk-test to take into my diet and cut down the test and learn more about on carbs. I also started tak- diabetes so you can live your ing daily walks. Now that I best life! understand how this disease can adversely affect me, I’m Normal: The Healthy Eating and Acnot going to stop. Diet and tive Living Milwaukee (HEAL) Below 5.7% exercise have made a huge is a culturally-tailored program difference and drastically im- that aims to provide education, rePrediabetes: proved my quality of life,” sources to secure healthy foods, and 5.7% to 6.4% Benson said. active living supports for adults atrisk for developing lifestyle-related Chef Marvin, who demon- diseases; and, to empower adults Diabetes: strates healthy cooking op- to make changes in their physical 6.5% or above tions on HEAL’s Facebook and social environment to improve page each Thursday at 12 nutrition and physical activity. noon, is a staunch advocate ‘Like’ their Facebook page that’s of healthy eating. full of videos of healthy recipes and low-cost, no-cost exercise.  “When we talk about healthy cooking, I tend to cut corners in the caloric department, but not in nutrition. One easy way to do this is to cut salt from the diet and you can do this without comThe Milwaukee Times Newspaper, promising flavor. There are also many ways to eliminate located at 1938 N. Dr. Martin Luther King carbohydrates and glucose Drive, has a limited number of adult and to make recipes more diabetic-friendly. You can also child masks available, free of charge, use meat substitutes to fulfill as long as supplies last. The masks are nutrition goals. For example, mung bean products can be provided courtesy of the Wisconsin Well used as meat substitutes. A Women Community Partnership and the cup of these beans only has 60 calories while the same American Cancer Society Healthy Eating quantity of soybean prodActive Living Milwaukee Project. ucts that are typically used as meat substitutes have 200 calories,” said Chef Marvin.

Clayborn Benson Prediabetes is when the blood sugar is higher than it should be but not high enough for your doctor to diagnose diabetes. More than a third of people in the United States have it, but most don’t know it. Prediabetes can make you more likely to get Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Exercising more and losing extra pounds, even as little as five to seven percent of your body weight, can lower those risks. In any of these instances, knowing and understanding your A1C is critical. According to the CDC, the A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures the average blood sugar levels over the past three months. It’s a commonly used test to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes and is also the main test to help manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is important.

Diagnosing Prediabetes or Diabetes

Important Announcement!!!

The Office of Minority Health and Health Equity (OMHHE) at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is building relationships with the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and other groups to help Americans prevent and treat diabetes, and to specifically address the disparities surrounding how severely it affects minority groups. Typically, racial and ethnic minorities have higher rates of diabetes, worse diabetes control and are more likely to experience complications.

Make sure you wear your mask properly. Here’s how:

• Put it over your nose and mouth and secure it under your chin • Try to fit it snugly against the sides of your face • Make sure you can breathe easily

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Why Dr. King's 'dream' is important now more than ever (Continued from pg. 1) While his focus was primarily on eliminating racism, King also pushed for equality among economic sectors of the nation. Many say this is the key issue that dominated recent elections, and nationwide, it continues to be obvious in our schools, our court rooms, and even our public health centers. Those who come from communities and families with more resources have disproportionate opportunities and quality of life, and there continues to be little action to change that. When you think about it, true equality requires a portion of people to give something up. While it may be true that equality benefits us all, there

around and a lot of despair, and it's understandable despair, and I've tried to say to them, 'Don't lose hope; don't give up; picture disappointments and transform them into your own assets and into something creative'," King told an audience at a Feb. 15, 1968, rally for the campaign.

is deep inertia from many toward the act of true equalization and instead, our nation seems to be moving slowly toward deeper and deeper inequality, especially in our economy.

a minimum wage worker's children can, theoretically, attend college, most can barely afford the cost of co-curricular activities, let alone four years of tuition. To get in, most would have to fight tirelessly for scholarships Take education, for ex- and loans, and even with a ample. While it is true that four-year degree, would not be guaranteed a job. Where social barriers have been removed between many races since King's famous "Dream" speech, economic barriers have been constructed in their place.

If Martin Luther King were here today, he would see amazing victories for equality, like an outgoing president with skin the same color as his. But he would also see, surely, the myriad of ways people in our nation continue to suffer from discrimination and inequality and he surely would urge us to take Oprah Winfrey once in- action against those crimes. terviewed Michelle Obama about her experiences as "Our lives begin to end the the First Lady of the United day we become silent about States. Throughout the inter- things that matter," King view, Obama exhibited ex- said. traordinary poise and grace as she refused to criticize the With continued focus, we incoming president or his can, as a state and a country, supporters. Our nation needs overcome many forms of to be behind its leader, she discrimination, even if the said, and most importantly, it political climate says otherneeds to have hope. wise.

That does not mean that Persistent, educated preswe go blindly forward with- sure can effect change. out questioning the policies or the actions of our leaders. Write a letter to your legislator or congressperson adInstead, Martin Luther vocating for better education, King, Jr., preached arming health and justice programs. oneself with knowledge and Tell the world your story moving forward with deter- over and over again. Refuse So how do we reconcile mination and perseverance. to be discouraged when your this disparity and move for- It is hard to imagine that our efforts are rejected time and ward? The answer can again nation once allowed outright again. And above all else, albe found in King's belief in discrimination against people ways maintain hope. Or as because of the color of their King put it so much more the power of hope. skin. But in more subtle ways, eloquently, "we must accept "I see a lot of cynicism we continue to discriminate. finite disappointment, but never lose infinite hope."

JANUARY 14, 2021

Milwaukee Urban League Reflects on the Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy,” said Dr. King in 1963. Since 1919 and especially during the current unprecedented times, MUL has remained true to urban advocacy, empowerment programs and initiatives, and meeting challenges and controversies as they arise.

When COVID-19 hit last year, Black communities were disproportionately affected by the disease and its economic consequences. According to the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development, Milwaukee’s unemployment rate rose to 8.6% as of December 2020. Since the onset of the pandemic, MUL staff has continued to provide quality job services and training to lower unemployment rates and help individuals establish economic stability. We not only place individuals in jobs within the city of Milwaukee, but soon will launch a pilot initiative to transport employees to jobs in surrounding counties not easily accessible by public transportation.

By serving in collaboration with other like-minded organizations, corporate donors, and partnership schools like Target, U.S. Bank, Auer Avenue Elementary, and Oliver Wendell Holmes Elementary—MUL assesses the needs of youth and families and responds accordingly. Whether it be holding a coat drive to combat the harsh Wisconsin winters, providing food during the holiday season, distributing COVID-19 safety packets, or hosting youth summits that help students strengthen their leadership and entrepreneurship skills, MUL strives to empower communities and change lives.

Aligned with Dr. King’s work in ensuring African Americans had the right to vote in 1965, MUL has served tirelessly to maintain the Black vote with voter registration and participation—especially during the 2020 presidential election where Milwaukee was instrumental for Black voter turnout in the Midwest. MUL sponsored Get Out the Vote rallies and voter registration drives to increase African American turnout at the polls.

Dr. King’s legacy continues to serve as the standard for how we as leaders operate today. His work was built on civil rights, unwavering dedication, compassion for the poor and those without a voice, and a relentless drive to effect change. As Dr. King once said, “Whatever affects one directly affects all indirectly. I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be. This is the interrelated structure of reality.”

As we enter the 53rd year without Dr. King’s physical presence, we remain committed to continue to emulate and uphold his tenacity and courage needed to fight for an America that respects and protects the rights to equality and equity in all aspects of life for black and brown citizens. Milwaukee Urban League will continue to collaborate and work with others—intentionally striving for unity to benefit the Milwaukee community and the state of Wisconsin.

Dr. Eve M. Hall President & CEO of Milwaukee Urban League

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In Memory…

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In Memory of Those We Have Lost

(part 2)

In Remembrance of Our Beloved

Sunrise

June 27, 1984

Sunset

May 8, 2020

Earl Jones, Sr.

Eva L. Jones

Freddie Jones

Celebration of Life Keshaunda Jones Jason Lloyd Jones James K.L. A Jason Lloyd Homegoing Celebration For the Life of Jones, Sr. Jones

James Jones

TUESDAY, May 19, 2020

Visitation: 12:30 p.m. - Service: 1:30 p.m.

The New Pitts Mortuary

2031 West Capitol Drive • Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Pastor Aaron Morgan - Officiating

Magnolia Jones "Granny"

Teel Joshua

Callie Kates

Thomas Kelly

William Ray William Kennedy Ray Kennedy

Mary Lackey

Gayle Marie Kirk

“Chicken”

Sunrise March 12,1947

Gayle M. Kirk Sunset June 15, 2020

August 10, 1951 – August 30, 2020

Tuesday, June 23, 2020 • 11:00 a.m.

Faith And Hope International Ministry Friday, September 18, 2020 6737 N. Teutonia Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53209 9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. Pastor Arthur Kennedy - OfficiatingWisconsin Memorial Park

13235 W. Capitol Drive • Brookfield, Wisconsin

Elder Albert J. Carrington, Jr. - Officiating Eulogy Reverend John W. McVicker, Sr. - Officiating Committal

James LaGrone, Jr.

Hosea Lee Lake

Earnestine Langdon

Betty Jean Lester-Crawley

Mildred Lawton

George Lee

James Lester

Ray Anthony Luckett

Roger Luckett

In Loving Memory of

Henry Love

Stella Little

Timothy Lloyd

Henry Love "Loves Lounge"

Vance L. Love Sunrise April 16, 1938

Calvin Luckett

Sunset Sept. 30, 2020

Friday, October 9, 2020 Visitation: 3:00-7:00 p.m. at Reid’s New Golden Gate Funeral Home 5665 North Teutonia Avenue • Milwaukee, Wisconsin Saturday, October 10, 2020 Visitation: 9:00 a.m. • Service: 10:00 a.m. Greater Mount Sinai Church of God in Christ 5384 North 60th Street • Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Superintendent Victor C. Davis, Officiating

In Loving Memory of

Charles McMillin, Jr.

Gloria Malone

Dewayne Mann

Jessie Martin

Sharon Mays-Ferguson

Clara McKinney

Gracie McKinney

Charles McMillin, Jr.

Hugh Mitchell

Sunrise

July 15, 1947 An NCON Communications Publication

Sunset

March 1, 2020

Mildred McCarty Irma McFarling

Juanita Mitchell

Ophelia Mitchell

Dominique McGhee

Michael Moore Continued Next Issue

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If you care enough to give your loved one the very best, call. At Reid’s, you’re not just a customer,

You’re Family! Family!

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Arthur Reid, Jr., Founder

There’s no better team to foster I can’t say enough wonderful with than Foundations. They things about Foundations and guide you through the the staff. When our family was decision-making process so that in need of support, Foundations you can decide for yourself stepped in and supported us! with the full knowledge of the We are thrilled to be apart of expectations and challenges. the Foundations family! ~Chelle F. ~Katie S.

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reidsgoldengate.com. • Fax: 414-358-0452

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Celebrating a Legacy In Milwaukee County we are taking an all-hands approach to realizing our vision that by achieving racial equity, Milwaukee is the healthiest county in Wisconsin. We believe this vision will be achieved when race no longer predicts health and other quality of life outcomes and when outcomes for everyone improve. As a government, County Executive we acknowledge our role in David Crowley historically inequitable policies, and will act by challengIn the spirit of Rev. Dr. ing our policies, practices Martin Luther King, Jr., we and power structures to upstand in solidarity with the root systemic racism. current movement against Under the leadership of racism and police brutality, County Executive David and commit to doing the Crowley and the Board of work of eliminating barriSupervisors, with support ers so all Milwaukee County from the Milwaukee County residents can reach their full Office on African American potential. Affairs, we have three strateTogether we can build a gic priorities: diverse and inclusive county • Create Intentional where everyone is healthy, Inclusion, so our workforce safe, and prosperous. We will reflect the full diversity can’t do this work without of the County • Bridge the Gap, you. If 2020 was any india commitment to breaking cation of how things will be down silos across County this year, we can not sit idly. government to maximize Please join us on this journey access to and quality of ser- by sharing your thoughts and ideas at africanamericanafvices fairs@milwaukeecountywi. • Invest in Equity, to address root causes of health gov or call (414) 278-7979. disparities

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Building the Future

Northcott, celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by continuing to build up the community with programs that provide training, hope and guidance for a better future. Programs offered: Youthbuild, Milwaukee Builds, Arborist Pre-Apprenticeship, Transform Milwaukee Jobs, Stockbox, Summer Meal for the Youth, Food Pantry and our Clothing Pantry. Annual Community Events: Juneteenth, Miss/Mr. Juneteenth Pageant for Educational Youth scholarships, Thanksgiving Dinner, Christmas Dinner/Toy Giveaway and a Candle Light Vigil for those we have lost during the year. Our impact on the community can be seen at website: http://northcotthouse.org/ Help support our mission!

2460 N. 6th Street • Milwaukee, WI 53212 • Phone: 414-372-3770

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88NINE RADIO MILWAUKEE PRESENTS

ASK THE EXPERTS

Jan 14 - Feb 11 Thursdays at noon Facebook – YouTube – Twitch

Hosted by award-winning journalist Reggie Jackson and our own Tarik Moody, the podcast By Every Measure explores systemic racism in five major sectors: Criminal Justice & Policing, Housing, the Racial Wealth Gap, Education and Healthcare. Join us as we learn from national experts in these five fields, and join us as we continue the fight for racial justice.

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Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream lives in acts of justice big and small The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., had to have known as he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech 57 years ago that the moment would change a nation. After the historic March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, King stood before a sea of 250,000 people gathered Aug. 28, 1963, below the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. He rose to the occasion, departing from his prepared text to deliver a passionate message, words that would become the most pivotal and signature moment of the civil rights movement. Today, America is better and more diverse than King could have envisioned back in 1963, when just weeks after his speech, four little girls would die in the Sunday morning bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, AL,

a racially hostile and divided city known in the civil rights movement as “Bombingham.” For dreams to endure, however, they must transcend moments of doubt and touch future generations whose accomplishments confirm the righteousness of the struggle. Had he lived to see 2016, King would

have celebrated the symbolic breakthrough of a two-term president who shared his skin color, but he also would have shed bitter tears of anger and sadness over new legal scuffles over voting rights, crime in poor minority neighborhoods, seemingly intractable poverty, and the racial divisions among Americans over the death of Trayvon Martin.

King also would have seen an America no longer defined almost exclusively in black and white but a nation of many hues, and one in which civil rights debates about opportunity and economic inclusiveness are filtered through a more complex lens. King was right that day in 1963, when beneath the towering presence of the Great Emancipator, he said, “Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. Let us not wallow in the valley of despair.” Because many did exactly as he preached, their children and grandchildren are growing up in a nation that is closer to realizing King’s dream

than the America he knew. It is a trek that continues to this day. President Barack Obama’s speech at the Lincoln Memorial to mark the 50th anniversary of King’s speech focused on civil rights and race relations. Dallas City Council member Dwaine Caraway called for a conversation about race. And a racial-justice think tank held its national conference on race in North Texas. Just as important are the simple daily ways that many Americans embody the spirit of the “dream speech” as they quietly mentor, inspire, and seek to cash the check of opportunity. Fifty-seven years later, the dream faces hurdles, just as it did on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial that historic day. In the spirit of King, it will overcome and endure.

Three important lessons we can learn from Dr. King’s legacy Exactly 91 years ago to the day, a child was born in Atlanta, Georgia named Michael King, Jr., who would change the world. His father would eventually change his name in honor of the German leader of the Protestant Reformation, and it was by that name – Martin Luther King, Jr. – that the world would remember him nearly a century later. Few names in modern American history ring more powerfully than Martin Luther King’s. He remains the only person born in the 20th Century for whom we celebrate a federal holiday. His name is synonymous with great speeches, with inspiring hope, and with the brutal assassination which took his life before he even reached the age of 40. His name is still invoked constantly in modern political discussions, and he arguably left a more profound, longer-lasting legacy than nearly any other American over the last century. When you think of great historical leaders, Martin Luther King’s name constantly makes the short list.

So what can we learn from Dr. King’s legacy? What knowledge can we apply to our own lives today to make the world a better place? It would be impossible to list all of them, but here are a few of the most important lessons from Dr. King’s life and legacy, as represented by some of the most powerful passages from his speeches: “Darkness cannot drive out darkness – only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate – only love can do that.” One of Dr. King’s most well-remembered quotes is also the one perhaps most relevant to our own lives. Our political system and even our popular culture are all heavily centered around the concept of conflict and hate. There is a whole industry in entertainment and politics built around the idea of outrage – we’re supposed to get mad at the people on the other side of the partisan fence, or we’re supposed to hate the celebrities who annoy us or do outrageous things. Hate may be an animating force – that is, it may get us out of our seats to do something,

but that “something” is hardly productive or positive. Our world won’t get better until we stop revolving our collective existence around hate, and our collective existence won’t get better until we personally make the choice to stop the cycle of hate and try to find common ground with all people. “Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now… I’ve seen the promised land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people will get to the promised land.” MLK said those prophetic

words the day before he died in a speech titled, “I’ve Been To The Mountaintop.” Reading those words 53 years later, after all of the ups and downs we’ve experienced as a society, you still can feel their power to lift us up and make us hope for something better. There’s also a lesson there for all of us: leadership is sometimes as simple as inspiring a shared vision. We want to be reminded that the world can be better, and sometimes it’s up to us as leaders to do the reminding. We may not have the platform of Dr. King, but all of us have the potential to lift others up. “I have a dream that my

four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” King’s most famous line was spoken more than 50 years ago, but it still describes a future we have not yet attained. We still have much to learn in how we treat those different from us, whether the lines that separate us are gender, race, socioeconomic status, religion, sexual orientation, or any other countless divisions which still exist, and which motivate people to act with fear or hate. We will always be a nation of many different types of people, and those differences should be celebrated and embraced – but we can also work toward a future in which those differences no longer cause us to push away our fellow humans. Dr. King was a revolutionary leader in many respects, and this month we will take just 24 hours to celebrate his legacy. What we do after the celebration will determine our own legacy.

He Spoke his words, so we could Bring you Ours!

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By The Late Coretta Scott King Special to the Milwaukee Times Reprint from 1985, during the passage of the King Holiday bill by the U.S. Senate. We have set in motion a great celebration of freedom and justice, in honor of America’s hero and patriot, Martin Luther King, Jr. When Martin began his career, the principles of social justice for which he stood were very controversial. But by the end of his career he was a widely respected leader of international stature, who helped lead an extraordinary revolution in America’s laws and customs. Martin’s moving example of dignity in the face of threats and hatred gave the whole nation a new hero to admire and emulate. Martin knew that America’s democracy was not perfect. But he also knew that, when aroused, America’s conscience could be a powerful force for reform. His unique combination of moral leadership and practical political wisdom enlisted America’s conscience on the side of peaceful change. His memory is engraved in the hearts and minds of his fellow Americans, and it is appropriate, as the President and the Congress have said, to remember and honor the values for which he stood. Each year, Martin’s national

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Special Edition: Celebrating Dr. King

The legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. birthday celebration will rekindle in the hearts of all our people a new pride in America, a determination to make it an even greater nation. It will also spark a new appreciation for its son, who was born into a world where bigotry and racism still hold sway. But before he died, he contributed immeasurably to the human rights of all people. In my travels to the 50 states and U.S. territories as chairperson of the King Federal Holiday Commission, I find that Americans from all walks of life and every political persuasion share a common enthusiasm and excitement as we prepare to celebrate what has been called by President Reagan “A Celebration of Freedom and Justice to Unite All Our Citizens.” There is a spirit of unity and good will sweeping this land. People of all races,religions, classes, politics and stations in life are coming together and putting aside differences in a spirit of reconciliation to make Monday, January 20, 1985 “Martin’s Day,” a day of great national unity and renewed patriotism consistent with the non-violent tradition of the man we prepare to honor. It was not too long ago

loved community and for the values that distinguish our republic in this troubled world. The commission has chosen “Living the Dream” as its theme for the birthday celebration. We see “Martin’s Day” - the third Monday of each year - as: ...a day to celebrate the life and dream of Martin Luther King Jr... ...a day to reaffirm the American ideals of freedom, justice and opportunity for all... The late Coretta Scott King ...a day for love, not hate; for understandthat Martin painted a vivid ing, not anger; for peace, not picture of what an America war... united would look like...an ...a day for the family to America in which all children share together, to reach out could grow up to realize their to relatives and friends and to full potential. January 20, mend broken relationships... 1985 must be seen as a way ...a day when people of all to reflect that vision, a way to races, religions, classes and celebrate the life and legacy stations in life put aside their of a man with a dream for all differences and join in a spirseasons. it of togetherness... The special recognition ...a day for our nation to accorded Martin by the pay tribute to Martin Luther American people provides King, Jr., who awakened in a unique opportunity for all us the best qualities of the Americans to reaffirm their American spirit... faith in nonviolence at a time ...a day for nations of the when violence in all its ugly world to cease all violent acforms seems to be a way of tions, seek non-violent solulife. It also gives Americans a tions and demonstrate that special moment to reaffirm peace is not just a dream but their support for Martin’s be- a real possibility, if only for

one day. We have come too far to be discouraged or to lose hope or to stop believing in the dream. If we believe in the justice for which he died, if we embrace his dream of a community where we can all come to love and care for one another, we will strive to complete his unfinished agenda, we will make his unfinished work our own. Let us be grateful for the providence that sends among us men and women with the courage and vision to stand peacefully but unyieldingly for what is right. Let us also make this a time when we rededicate ourselves to carry on the work of justice. Martin showed how much good a single life, well led, can accomplish. Let Americans honor his memory by pledging in their own lives to do everything they can to make America a place where his dream of freedom and brotherhood and sisterhood will grow up and flourish and we can all be proud to sing with new meaning, “From every mountainside, Let freedom ring.” Coretta Scott King, widow of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was chairperson of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Federal Holiday Commission and President of The Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change, Inc. She died in 2006.

Because She Was As Much A Part Of The Civil Rights Movement As He Was!

W isconsin A frican A merican W omen's C enter 3020 W. Vliet St. • Milwaukee, WI 53208 (414) 933-1652 Coretta Scott King was as much a force in the civil rights movement as her husband, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the WAAW honors both for their work and legacies! For more than 20 years the Wisconsin African American Women's Center has serviced socially and economically disadvantaged women and families in Milwaukee, as well as providing a clean, safe and beautiful space for business, community, social events and celebrations. We continue to work for Dr. King's Dream by empowering women and families in our community!

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How to honor Martin Luther King Jr. in the post-Trump age By Jonathan Capehart Opinion writer Last year, I was invited to give the keynote address at a celebration of the life and legacy of Martin Luther King Jr., at Bethany Baptist Church in Newark. Judging by the reaction of the congregation, there is righteous anger and pain over what is happening in our country under President Trump. Below are the remarks I delivered. As you read them, if you imagine an “Amen!” was said, it most likely happened, for the gathered seemed eager to hear not just a celebration of King but also a call to reclaim the dream for a nation that has lost its way. "This weekend, the weekend we celebrate the life of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., is the perfect weekend to take stock of where we are and who we are. As a nation and as a people. Both are in trouble. And it’s going to take, in the words of legendary Rep. John Lewis, “good trouble, necessary trouble,” to get us back on track. "The one nice thing I can say about President Trump is that he has opened our eyes to just how fragile our Constitution and our democracy are. "Trump is a daily civics lesson in the fragility of our founding document. See, what we now understand is that the power of the Constitution doesn’t just lie in its words and the ideals and aspirations they represent. It also resides in the reverence of them by the 44 men who have sworn to protect it as president of the United States. President Trump, the 45th president of the United States, is not among them. "No matter the party — whether Republican President George W. Bush or his successor, Democratic President Barack Obama — once they walked into the Oval Office, their personal interests took a back seat to the interests and well-being of the nation. Preservation of the moral authority of the presidency came first. Upholding the rule of law and the fundamental tenets of democracy came first, if only to serve as a model for other nations or as a beacon of hope for those in nations where liberty and justice are in short supply. "That’s not to say that ours is a perfect nation. It isn’t. Nor was it before Trump came into office. Ours is a nation that struggles, even in good times, to live up to its ideals. And the King holiday serves as an annual reminder of the power of people, regular people, to keep things on track, to do powerful things. "Actually, let me put a finer point on it: Regular, churchgoing people. "What sometimes gets lost in the celebration of Dr. King is the role of the black

partisan message. But some things rise above partisanship when you’re talking about the moral fiber and character of our country. Like I said, and as we all know, we are not a perfect country.

church that forged him and the countless unacclaimed foot soldiers in the battle for freedom, equality and civil rights. The rights that we enjoy today were won by people who were by no means wealthy. But they were rich in spirit and conviction and determination. And they honed their calls for freedom in the sanctuaries of black churches around the country, especially throughout the Jim Crow South. "Through the marches and sit-ins and boycotts they organized, Dr. King and other leaders of the civil rights movement held up a mirror to the nation to show Americans how the ideal of America didn’t live up to the reality facing their fellow Americans. "Their every action asked the question: "How can you pledge allegiance to ‘one nation under God with liberty and justice for all’ when your fellow citizens are being denied the right to vote and maimed and murdered for even trying?” "By literally putting their bodies on the line for freedom, the voices of the oppressed were heard in the halls of power by those who could move the machinery of power to pass the laws that made it possible for us to be able to live out the stirring, aspirational words of our Constitution. "With the election of President Barack Obama, the nation’s first black president, how could we not think that progress was continuing its forward march? And, yet, three years into the Trump presidency, we have watched Obama’s successor not only try to dismantle his every accomplishment, but also reverse the rights won by the King generation nearly six decades earlier. "Let me talk for a moment to the young people here today or watching online. Many of the giants of the King generation are still alive. We think of them as superheroes today, but they were regular folks who did extraordinary things. "I’ve interviewed Minniejean Brown-Trickey, who was

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one of the Little Rock Nine who integrated Central High School in 1957. "Clarence Jones, who was Dr. King’s personal lawyer, the man who in 1963 smuggled out the scraps of paper that became “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” has become a dear friend. "I’ve walked with John Lewis three times across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Alabama. It was at the foot of that bridge in 1965 where a young John Lewis got his skull cracked open by law enforcement. "All of those heroes are dismayed by what is happening today. By the ease with which the country stopped progress. By the decimation of their hard work. Young people, you are surrounded by countless people who lived through those years, who saw the nation get better — not perfect — better.

"But we can’t afford to NOT tap into the bravery of our lineage and our heritage. To hold up the mirror, once again, to the nation. This time, to show Americans how the reality facing their fellow Americans does not live up to the ideals that were taking hold just three years ago, does not live up to the promise of an America that Dr. King and others worked "These are people to whom so hard to create, no longer you are related. And to lives up to the hopes and whom you are not. But you dreams of people around the are linked to them, we are all world who once looked to linked to them, through an the United States as a beacon incredible lineage. And that in a sea of uncertainty and with lineage comes responsi- want. bility — for all of us. "To honor Dr. King this "The time we’re in right year is to recommit to the now in Trump’s America is fight for America, where an all-hands-on-deck mo- freedom rings “from every ment. city and every hamlet, from every state and every city” "Anyone who cares about where we are “free at last” our country, our communi- from a president and an adties, our role in the world, ministration that ignore the what it means to be Ameri- rule of law, from a president can, must be part of the ef- and an administration that fort to take our country back. disrespect its people and beIf we’ve learned anything in little the oppressed. the Trump era, it is that our rights, our freedom, our de"King and our ancestors, mocracy require everyone living and dead, need to see to do their part to maintain that we are willing to fight to them, to protect them. save all that they did, as hard as they worked and pushed "My apologies for what to create something worth might seem like an overly saving.

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