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Kingsbury Hall Presents

Presented by the College of Fine Arts and the School of Music Performed by University Lyric Opera Ensemble and Utah Philharmonia

April 18 & 19 | Kingsbury HAll Nancy Peery Marriott Auditorium


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KINGSBURY HALL PRESENTS Friday, April 18 & Saturday, April 19, 2014 at 7:30 PM

The University of Utah Lyric Opera Ensemble

HANSEL AND GRETEL Fairy Tale Opera in two acts, sung in English Music by Engelbert Humperdinck Libretto by Adelheid Wette Based on Jacob & Wilhelm Grimm’s fairy tale Hänsel und Gretel English Translation by Constance Bache, revised by Hamilton Benz Used by permission of G. Schirmer, Inc., New York, NY Featuring the Utah Philharmonia Conducted by Dr. Robert Baldwin and The International Children’s Choir Founder and Director: Dr. Kathy Sorensen Production: Dr. Robert Breault & Michael Scarola Producer: Dr. Robert Breault Music Director: Jeffrey Price Set Designer: Ariel Ballif Costume Designer: Susan Memmott Allred Lighting Designer: Jeff Sturgis Choreographer: Kalise Child Wig & Makeup Designer: Yancey J. Quick Properties Designers: Kelly Nickle & Elaine Latimer Sound Designer and Engineer: Curt Schoenfeld Production Manager: Barbara Sturgis Assistant Director: Jennifer Erickson Assistant Conductor: Lawrence Spell Production Stage Manager: Ryan C. Smythe Assistant Stage Managers: Christian Stringham & Timothy Swensen Opera Teaching Assistant: Sidnei Alferes Program Coordinator: Erin McOmber

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STAGE DIRECTOR’S NOTES Two years ago I found myself in a situation that was entirely new to me: that of being a co-director. At the time I had no idea what that meant. I did know, however, that if my friend and colleague, Dr. Robert Breault, the University of Utah’s Director of Opera, suggested that co-directing could increase the students’ learning possibilities, then it was something I needed to consider seriously. You have to understand that directing is usually a one-man job. The director is responsible for coming up with the production’s concept, and then, with his team, bringing all those ideas to the stage. Once in the rehearsal room, the director shares his ideas with the cast and together they create the end result: what you see on stage. So what, exactly, would it be like to have ideas coming from two different people at once? Well, as it turned out, nothing much changed from any of the other times Bob and I had worked together, which was most commonly as singer and director. That is how closely linked our working and personal relationship is. There is no ego involved; only the need to teach and work with the students to ensure that they are given every opportunity to grow as people and performers. It was, in fact, so successful, that as we created our searing production of Carlisle Floyd’s Susannah, we knew that we wanted to co-direct at some time in the near future. This year, the opportunity has presented itself once again. Hansel and Gretel could not be more different a show than any with which I’ve been involved over the past five years. Unlike our previous productions, this opera utilizes a very

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small cast, dominated by the two title characters and, for the first time in my experience at the U, adds a children’s chorus to the mix. Dr. Breault and his fellow voice faculty have a strong tradition of selecting pieces that challenge the students in new and healthy ways. In 2010, my first year here, we presented Poulenc’s haunting Dialogues des Carmélites, which marked the first time the Lyric Opera Ensemble performed an foreign-language opera in its original language. The following year, we jumped back in time to the origins of opera with Monteverdi’s L’incoronazione di Poppea. In 2012, we plumbed the emotional depths of Floyd’s Susannah. 2013 brought our production of Verdi’s Falstaff, one of the most musically intricate pieces ever written, and the perfect example of what an ensemble piece is all about. This year there were new challenges to be faced, not the least of which was that the two title characters carry the bulk of the show’s weight on their shoulders. They are on stage for nearly the entire two-hour run time, which is especially taxing when one considers the stamina required to sing to Humperdinck’s essentially Wagnerian orchestration. And this production, as you will see, is very physical, so the singers have been learning to pace themselves not only vocally, but also physically throughout the evening. It may not be a long opera, but it certainly is a demanding one. And it was just these circumstances that made it the perfect project for both Bob and me, as a team, to tackle. His years of experience not only as a voice teacher and professor, but as a professional singer (having appeared in

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STAGE DIRECTOR’S NOTES some of the most demanding roles in the repertory) and my many years in the opera world have melded into the perfect combination to help the students hone their craft. Once again, I need to talk about the physical production itself. Because of the ongoing generosity and support of Christopher McBeth, Artistic Director of Utah Opera, we have the freedom to consistently take our productions to new heights. I would be remiss if I did not thank Christopher again for putting so many members of his personal team at our disposal to create this production, including Jared Porter, Kelly Nickle, and Elaine Latimer. And then there is the entire wardrobe staff, headed up by Patricia Campbell and Verona Green, who have spent countless hours with the students coordinating and fitting them in the beautiful costumes which were designed for Utah Opera by Susan Memmott Allred. There are the stunning wig and make-up designs of Yancey Quick. Combine that with our wonderfully supportive conductor, Dr. Robert Baldwin, our brilliant Music Director Jeffrey Price, lighting designer Jeff Sturgis, Choreographer Kalise Child, my Assistant Director Jenny Erickson, our production coordinator Barbara Sturgis, who has the unenviable task of keeping us all on track, and my stage management team, Ryan, Christian, and Tim, and I think we have been able to create a production of which the students can be proud. I thank each and every one of you for the unprecedented amount of trust you have shown me during this process.

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About that children’s chorus -- we are graced with the presence of forty members of the incomparable International Children’s Choir under the direction of its founder, Dr. Kathy Sorensen. What a joy it has been working with them and welcoming them into the Lyric Opera Ensemble family! As you will see, not only do they all sing, but many of them are also dancing as either an Angel or one of the Animals. How often do you find this level of technical accomplishment at such a young age? It is truly a privilege to have them joining us for this production. And, as always, a very special thankyou to Dr. Breault for allowing me the privilege of returning to this exceptional group of people year after year. It has, once again, proven to be one of the most enjoyable things I have been a part of this season. I value your trust in me not only as a colleague but as a dear friend. I am indeed fortunate to have you in my life. To our audience: I hope that you and your families enjoy the show this evening. And for those of you who are experiencing this amazing art form known as opera for the first time, I hope that tonight’s performance will open up a new world for you and that you will return to the opera over and over again for many years to come.

KINGSBURY HALL PRESENTS


CAST CHARACTERS IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE

Friday, April 18

Hansel Gretel The Mother The Father The Sandman The Dew Fairy The Witch

Demaree Brown Amber Stachitus Hayley Bell Tyler Oliphant Makenzie Matthews Ruth Ellis Erin McOmber

Saturday, April 19 Gretchen Windt Shana Osterloh Makenzie Matthews Elijah Hancock Alyssa Jenks Michelle Dean Olivia Custodio

Witch’s Assistants: Kim Dorland, Katie Horne, Constanza Murphy The Angels: Sarah Anderson, Carly Boyd, Kim Dorland, Ella Edgley, Erin Floresca, Frances Floresca, Lauren Furst, Katie Horne, Sara Lund, Elizabeth Miller, Constanza Murphy, Alyssa Salm, Laura Strobell, Emily Trujillo The Animals: Sarah Adamson, Paige Carlyle, Landon Fan, William Horne, Madeline Miller, Kate Smith, Sean Thomas, Tyler Eaton, Emily Webb

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES Place: On the outskirts of the Ilsenstein Forest, Central Germany ACT ONE Scene 1 – At Home Scene 2 – The Forest ACT TWO Scene 1 – The Forest Scene 2 – The Witch’s House ACT 1 Hansel and Gretel are doing their chores, but find it hard to finish before their parents return home. Hansel complains that he is too hungry to work. Gretel fills him in on a little secret - their neighbor has given their Mother a jug of milk to make rice pudding that night. Excited, Hansel takes a little sip of the cream on top. Gretel scolds him, but Hansel cannot help himself and begins dancing for joy.

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It isn’t long before Gretel also abandons her chores to join in Hansel’s merriment. Moments later, their Mother returns to find them playing. As she reprimands them, she accidentally knocks over the jug of milk. Angry, the Mother sends Hansel and Gretel out into the forest to pick wild strawberries. When the children depart, the Mother prays to God that she will be able to provide food for her family. The Father

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SYNOPSIS OF SCENES returns from a successful trip beyond the forest. He enters the house a little tipsy and the Mother scolds him for being drunk. He calms her down by surprising her with a large bounty of food. He tells her that the townspeople were preparing for a festival and they bought all of his brooms. He asks her where the children are. She tells him what happened to the milk and that she sent them out into the forest to pick strawberries. Horrified, he tells his wife that the forest is haunted and inhabited by a wicked witch who lures children into her gingerbread house in order to eat them. They both quickly set out into the forest in search of their children. In the forest, Hansel and Gretel delight in their task of berry-picking. Gretel busies herself with creating a crown of flowers while Hansel fills the basket with strawberries. After she crafts her crown, she jokingly places it on Hansel’s head. He scoffs and tells her that boys do not wear such things, before placing the crown back onto Gretel’s head. After telling her she looks like the queen of the forest, the two siblings begin playing make-believe. Gretel orders her “servant” to give her a strawberry. The children continue playing their game until they hear a cuckoo bird singing in the distance. Without realizing it, the two children have eaten all the strawberries and the night is fast approaching. Gretel quickly tries to find more strawberries to fill the basket, fearing her Mother’s anger, but cannot find any, as it has become too dark. Hansel tries to retrace their steps, but tells Gretel that they are lost. Suddenly, they hear a stranger in the distance. Moments later, a little man appears, startling the children. He tells them to close their eyes, for he is the Sandman, who’s come to send them off to dreamland. After he sprinkles their eyes with sand, the two children become very sleepy. Gretel reminds Hansel that they should say their prayers, after which

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they fall asleep peacefully on the forest floor. Fourteen angels descend from the heavens and protect them as they sleep. ACT 2 The following morning, the siblings are visited by the Dew Fairy. She sweeps away the sand from their eyes in order to wake them and then departs. Gretel, arising first, wakes Hansel. As the two children stretch out, they spot a large gingerbread house in the distance. Filled with curiosity, they begin to nibble on the gingerbread walls. They hear a voice but don’t think twice about it, convincing themselves that it is just the wind. They continue to eat bits and pieces of the house. The voice calls out again, but once more, the children pay it no heed. Finally, the Witch comes out of her house and catches Hansel. She invites them into her house, telling them that she loves to give children sweets and sugary treats. Hansel and Gretel try to escape but the Witch invokes a spell and the two children are frozen in their tracks. She soon locks Hansel in a cage. Gretel, forced to act as the Witch’s assistant, is commanded to fetch food to fatten up Hansel. Hansel pretends to fall asleep, but the Witch, excited for her upcoming meal, pays no attention to Gretel, who steals the Witch’s wand to loosen the lock on Hansel’s cage. The Witch has Gretel inspect the oven, but Gretel plays ignorant. The Witch, frustrated, shows Gretel how to check the oven by sticking her head inside. The children seize the opportunity and shove the Witch inside the oven, slamming the door behind her. Suddenly the oven explodes and Hansel and Gretel become aware of all the gingerbread children who are coming back to life but are still frozen in place by the Witch’s spell. Using the magic wand, Hansel releases them from the spell. The Mother and Father, weary from their searching, finally spot Hansel and Gretel and the family is reunited. Together they all thank the Lord for helping them in their time of need.

KINGSBURY HALL PRESENTS


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Costumes designed for Utah Symphony & Opera by Susan Memmott Allred Utah Opera Costume Director – Patricia Campbell Utah Opera Costume Rentals Supervisor – Verona Green Wardrobe Coordinator – Amanda Andrews Production Team Production Manager – Barbara Sturgis Lighting Designer/Technical Director – Jeff Sturgis Choreographer – Kalise Child Hair & Make-up Designer – Yancey J. Quick Assistant Director – Jennifer Erickson See-Saw Designed and Constructed by Douglas D. Hadfield Witch’s Assistants and Gingerbread Children’s Costumes Designed and Executed by Jennifer Erickson, Kiersten Erickson, JoAnn Hadfield, Jessica Erickson & Lyndsey Erickson Sound Designer & Engineer – Curt Schoenfeld Titles Programmer – Emily Nelson Supertitle Operator – Kathleen Lowe Production Stage Manager – Ryan C. Smythe Assistant Stage Managers – Christian Stringham & Timothy Swensen Rehearsal Pianists – Aaron Foster & Nathan Wambold Special Thanks Utah Opera – Christopher McBeth, Artistic Director Jared Porter – Utah Opera, Technical Director The International Children’s Choir – Dr. Kathy Sorensen, Founder and Director University of Kansas for the use of the Orchestral materials Dean Raymond Tymas-Jones Dr. James Gardner – Chair, School of Music April Walters – Director of Development, School of Music Zions Bank Friends of Opera Kelly Nickle & Elaine Latimer Randy Rasmussen Stephanie Gosdis Brooke Horejsi & Kingsbury Hall I.A.T.S.E. Local 99 Performance Audio

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PRODUCTION TEAM BIOS Tenor Robert Breault enjoys an international career that features an extraordinary breadth of repertoire. His warm, flexible voice and superb artistic sensibilities combine to make him a consummate singing actor. As Opera News noted, “Besides a ductile tenor that allows him to negotiate a full dynamic span, from silvery head tone to ringing forte, even within a single phrase, Breault offers truly superb diction.” Opera News also praised him for making “an excellent impression, his mellifluous tenor boasting clarity of both tone and diction; clearly reveling in high notes, he sang with notable dynamic variety.” Opera Canada recently wrote, “Tenor Robert Breault made his EO (Edmonton Opera) debut with distinction as the Duke of Mantua. He looks the part of a man who can seduce women with more than just his power and wealth, and he has a lustrous voice.” Robert Breault’s concert career highlights include over 200 performances with major orchestras such as the Philadelphia Orchestra, Cleveland Symphony, St. Louis Symphony, Milwaukee Symphony, Toronto Mendelssohn Choir, Atlanta Symphony, Orchestre Philharmonique de Monte-Carlo, London Philharmonia Orchestra, National Symphony of Taiwan, Jerusalem Symphony, Mormon Tabernacle Choir, San Francisco Symphony, and the Utah Symphony, to name but a few. Robert’s opera career features over 80 roles in a wide array of repertoire and companies. Performances with

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New York City Opera include Carmen, La traviata, and Semele, for which he was awarded the company’s “Kolozsvar Award.” He has performed numerous times with Arizona Opera, Opera Orchestra of New York, and, Atlanta Opera. Robert has also appeared with companies such as Portland Opera, Edmonton Opera, Opera New Orleans, Florentine Opera, Santa Fe Opera, Die Bayerischer Rundfunk Symphonieorchester. His performances of Prince Tamino in Die Zauberflöte and Narraboth in Salome were highlights of his 2013 season with Utah Opera. Robert also serves as stage director at the Italian “La Musica Lirica” opera program as stage director. Born and raised in Wisconsin, Robert received his Master’s and Doctorate degrees from the University of Michigan and has served as Professor of Voice and Director of Opera at the University of Utah since 1992. WWW.BobBreault.Com Robert Baldwin is Director of Orchestral Activities and professor of music at the University of Utah. He is also Music Director of the Salt Lake Symphony and conductor of “It’s a Grand Night for Singing”, in Lexington, Kentucky. During his tenure at the University of Utah, the orchestral program has become known for innovation and quality programs, with noted tour performances in London, England, Vienna, Salzburg, and Graz, Austria. Nationally, the Utah Philharmonia has performed

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PRODUCTION TEAM BIOS for the College Music Society and NASM Conferences, the Utah Arts Festival, the Utah Music Educators’ Association Conference, and will serve as the host orchestra for the national composition contest of the College Orchestra Director’s Association this coming September. In 1998, Dr. Baldwin made his European conducting debut with the Hermitage Camerata in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Recent guest conducting appearances include the Eutin Festspiele in Germany, Kuopio Academy of Music in Finland, Lafayette Symphony, Lexington Philharmonic, Flagstaff Festival of the Arts, the Abilene Tri-Collegiate Opera, and numerous festivals and All-State Orchestras around the country. His performances and ensembles have been featured on National Public Radio’s Performance Today and Weekend Edition, as well as in national publications. He has previously held conducting positions with the University of Kentucky, Lexington Philharmonic, New American Symphony, Northern Arizona University, and Flagstaff Symphony orchestras. Also an accomplished violist, Baldwin has held several positions, including professor of viola at Northern Arizona University and principal viola with the Arkansas Symphony, Flagstaff Symphony, and Arizona Opera Orchestras. Dr. Baldwin has studied in the United States and in Saint Petersburg, Russia. He holds degrees from the University of Northern Colorado,

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University of Iowa, and the University of Arizona, where he received his Doctor of Musical Arts degree in orchestral conducting in addition to the Graduate Achievement Award. His conducting teachers have included Mikhail Kukushkin, Alexander Polishuk, James Dixon, Duilio Dobrin, Eugene Corporon, and Gregg Hanson. He has studied viola with Jeffrey Showell, William Preucil, Sr., Ronald Smith and Vernon Ashcraft and has performed in master classes for Gustav Meier, Kenneth Kiesler, the Tokyo String Quartet, Atar Arad, and Alice Preeves, among others. This is the twelfth production he has conducted for the Utah Lyric Opera Ensemble. Jeffrey Price is a Professor of Piano and Opera at the University of Utah, a position he has held for fourteen years. In addition to teaching piano and coaching singers, he serves as the musical director for the University’s Lyric Opera Ensemble and teaches diction and accompanying. During a versatile and multifaceted career, he has been extremely active as a pianist, coach, accompanist, soloist, chamber musician, conductor and musical director, (for opera, musical theater, and dance), as well as composing. For over ten years, he was a co-director of the Contemporary Music Consortium, which presented concerts of new music in Salt Lake. He has composed chamber and orchestral music, piano pieces and songs, including several works for the stage in a variety of idioms. For the last eleven summers,

KINGSBURY HALL PRESENTS


PRODUCTION TEAM BIOS he has been a member of the faculty at La Musica Lirica, a program in Italy for young American singers, where he has musically directed productions several full operas in Italian as well as scenes recitals. Mr. Price was recently honored by being named a “Steinway Artist.”

Opera and Madison Opera in addition to making debuts with the Utah Symphony, the Boston Pops, Opera Pacific, Arizona Opera, Michigan Opera Theatre, Fort Worth Symphony, Dayton Opera, Tulsa Opera, the Academy of Vocal Arts in Philadelphia, and San Antonio Opera.

A native of New York City, Michael Scarola returns for his fifth production at the University of Utah, having previously directed Dialogues des Carmélites, L’incoronazione di Poppea, Susannah, and Falstaff. He recently made his Lyric Opera of Chicago debut as the Associate Director of the Covent Garden production of Simon Boccanegra. He has directed criticallyacclaimed productions for Utah

Career highlights include productions of Bernstein’s Mass for the Dallas Symphony Orchestra in commemoration of the 40th Anniversary of the JFK Assassination, and excerpts from Mass for the reopening of the Opera House at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC. Mr. Scarola recently had the honor of working with Emmy Award-winning Partisan Pictures as Music Consultant


and on-set camera director for its filming of a feature documentary on the story of Raphael Schächter and his performances of Verdi’s Messa da Requiem in the concentration camp of Terezín, near Prague in the Czech Republic. The completed film, entitled Defiant Requiem: Voices of Resistance, was recently shown as part of the prestigious DocuWeeks Film Festival in New York City and Los Angeles and was aired on PBS last year. Mr. Scarola was on the Directing Staffs of the Metropolitan Opera and New York City Opera for five seasons each. He has also worked with numerous opera companies around the country including Dallas Opera, Cabrillo Music Festival, Opera Company of Philadelphia, Santa Fe Opera, Cincinnati Opera, Florida Grand Opera, Sarasota Opera, Indianapolis Opera, Virginia Opera, Israel Vocal Arts Institute in Tel Aviv, Opera Orchestra of New York, and the Collegiate Chorale. He has had the privilege of working with such prestigious artists as Renée Fleming, Teresa Stratas, Ruth Ann Swenson, Cecilia Bartoli, Susan Graham, Plácido Domingo, Luciano Pavarotti, Matthew Polenzani, Lawrence Brownlee, Bryn Terfel, Thomas Hampson, Ferruccio Furlanetto, James Morris, Sherrill Milnes, and many others.

and Andre Previn’s A Streetcar Named Desire staring Renée Fleming. He returns there next season to work on Daniel Catán’s Florencia en el Amazonas and Il barbiere di Siviglia. Kathy Sorensen earned a PhD in music at the University of Utah. Her research involved interviewing hundreds of immigrants and refugees, then recording and transcribing their songs. She has been a professor of music at Brigham Young University, a multicultural music and linguistics consultant for Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Publishers, and an author for Hal Leonard Music. She has served as vice president of the Utah Music Educators Association and on the executive board of the Utah chapter of the American Choral Directors Association. She received the George Washington Medal of Honor from the Freedom Foundation at Valley Forge, the Days of ’47 Pioneer of Progress Award, the State of Utah Elementary Music Award, the State of Utah Outstanding Service to Education Award, and the Business and Professional Women’s Accolades to Women of Achievement Award. She plays flute, harp, piano, organ, and guitar, and sang in the Mormon Tabernacle Choir from 1988 to 2009. 

This season marked Mr. Scarola’s third season on the Directing Staff of Los Angeles Opera where he worked on New Productions of Falstaff, Die Zauberflöte, Lucia di Lammermoor

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INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN’S CHOIR The International Children’s Choir (ICC) began as an outgrowth of founder Kathy Sorensen’s research on the music of immigrants and refugees in Utah. The choir specializes in welcoming the world to Utah with songs in many languages and colorful authentic folkloric costumes from many countries. Some of the children add their talents as instrumentalists and dancers. The ICC had the great honor of being invited to represent the American continent in the opening ceremonies of the World Choir Olympics in Xiamen, China. They also participated in the competitions that followed, which involved over 20,000 singers, and came home with two bronze medals. The choir has performed with the Czech National Orchestra in Smetana Hall, Prague, Czech Republic, and with the St. Petersberg Radio Orchestra in St. Petersburg, Russia. In addition, the choir has performed at Carnegie Hall in New York City, the Duomo in Florence, Italy, St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican, and throughout Austria, England, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Jordan, and Norway. The choir has sung for the Dalai Lama, royalty, heads of state, and hundreds of dignitaries and delegations from around the world.

During the 2002 Winter Olympics, the ICC performed in Light of the World, in Welcome the World concerts with the Utah Symphony, and in Cultural Olympiad concerts with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, Frederica von Stade, John Williams, and the King’s Singers. The choir has performed Gustav Mahler’s Symphony no. 8 with the Tabernacle Choir and Utah Symphony; Mahler’s Symphony no. 3 with the Orchestra at Temple Square; and Carmina burana, Pagliacci, Otello, La bohème, and Hansel and Gretel with Utah Opera. The ICC was chosen by the Music Educators National Conference to be the featured choir in its PBS television special, The World’s Largest Concert. The ICC has also been featured in other PBS specials, including Choir of Angels and A Gift of Music with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, and in TV specials such as Touched by an Angel. They were selected to perform at numerous national and international conventions, including The International Society for Music Education conference in Bergen, Norway. The ICC’s recording O Come Little Children received a Pearl Award for Best Holiday CD. They are also heard in numerous movie and video soundtracks.

Dr. Kathy Sorensen, Founder/Director Allyson Schenk, Assistant Director Christine Carlyle and Lucinda Webb, Co-Managers Craig Larabee, President/Head Chaperone Sarah Adamson Sarah Anderson Carly Boyd Joy Carlyle Paige Carlyle Tyler Eaton Ella Edgley Landon Fan Erin Floresca Frances Floresca

Macken Frandsen Lauren Furst David J. Horne Gwen Horne William Horne Eva Huber Hannah Huber Elizabeth Miller Madeline Miller Kameron Moss

Andrea Nef Natalie Nef Megan Oaks Sabine Planelles Tristan Planelles Alyssa Salm Kate Smith Zion Smith Savannah Steenblik Laura Strobell

Emma Sun Sierra Sun Meredith Thomas Sean Thomas Emily Trujillo Emily Webb Rebecca Wells

MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH LYRIC OPERA ENSEMBLE Courtney Bergen Aerin Loizos Kiersten Erickson Brandy Stubbs Mika Holbrook

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UTAH PHILHARMONIA Violin 1 Jasmine Campbell, concertmaster Melissa Combe Tim McMurray Michael Nebeker Nathan West Violin 2 Danielle Lewis, principal Max Brennan Tara Anderson Kristen Olson Kaylie Earl Paisley Tarboton Viola Sunny Johnson, principal Staci Armstrong Joshua Lohner Hanna Kim Cello Garrick Woods, principal Bryn Boogert Steven Farr Ambrynn Bowman Rachel Jorgensen Bass Hillary Fuller, principal Alex Ewoniuk Flute Nadine Luke, principal Alicia Kim

Oboe Kirstin Hoyt, principal Haehyun Jung

Tuba Adam Snider Keyboard/Piano Ubeeng Kueq

Clarinet Kattiusca Marin, principal Sam Noyce Ivan Fantini

Harp Virginia Speirs Timpani Stephen L. Hughes

Bass Clarinet Jairo Velazquez Bassoon Emily Grady, principal Brent Mitchell Bodily Horn DeAunn Davis, co-principal Benjamin Gooch, co-principal Maren Christensen Kaitlyn Hill Alyse Mourdock, assistant

Percussion Paul Cassens, principal Nick Jackson Gerritt Seymour Assistant Conductor Lawrence Spell Librarian Staci Armstrong

Trumpet John Olshinski, principal Tobin Yehle Jake Johnson Trombone Jay Nygaard, principal Spencer Nelson Bass Trombone Graham Gibson

Piccolo Emily Olsen

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DONORS $25,000+ The Bireley Foundation Nancy Peery Marriott Foundation Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts and Parks $10,000-$24,999 Art Works for Kids Sally Langdon Barefoot Foundation George Q. Morris Foundation National Endowment for the Arts John and Marcia Price Family Foundation Salt Lake City Arts Council $5,000-$9,999 B.W. Bastian Foundation R. Harold Burton Foundation Prince Yeates & Geldzahler Utah Arts Council $2,500-$4,999 The Castle Foundation Richard K. and Shirley S. Hemingway Foundation Mountain West Small Business Finance

New England Foundation for the Arts Steiner Foundation, Inc. Western States Arts Federation XMission Zions First National Bank $1,000-$2,499 Kenneth P. and Sally R. Burbidge Foundation Sue Ellis Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund John and Ilauna Gurr Robert and Mikelle Mansfield Sarah Meehan Dinesh and Kalpana Patel Foundation Robert and Barbara Patterson Memorial Foundation Jerry and Linda Rowley $500-999 Kevin and Andrea Barnes Richard and Darlene Hirschi Geoffrey and Jonette Mangum Peter and Michelle Morgan Jeri and Richard Pugh

$250-499 John and Sheryl Allen Don Barlow Kenneth and Barbara Calney Diversity Foundation Eric and Shellie Eide Henryk and Margaret Hecht Lee and Audrey Hollaar Gilbert and Thelma Iker Cosette and Matthew Joesten Jim and Janet Schnitz Randy and Susan Turpin $100-249 Carolyn Abravanel Stacy Ann Anderson Patricia Andriano Anonymous Fred and Linda Babcock Rodney and Carolyn (Mitzi) Brady Carol, Rete, and Celine Browning David Dean Ashby and Anne Cullimore Decker Patrick and Lynn deFreitas Jack and Joyce Dolcourt Mr. and Mrs. W. Jeffery Fillmore

Joan and John Firmage Joni Glynn Shanna Hall Geraldine Hanni H. Ric and Janet Harnsberger Henry Paul Harris Grant Hicinbothem Jerry Hussong Pat and Boyer Jarvis John Johnson Robert and Sharon Kain Sharon Kessel David Kieda Carolyn and Peter Kowalchik Ruth Lundgren Gerri Mackey Vincenzo Mancini Mark Marzolf Michael and Liz McCoy Matthew Probst Purjes Foundation Diane and Robert Rolfs Kim and Craig Selzman Maria Sgambati Ida Smith William And Donna Vogel Perry and Margie Walters Erica Wangsgard Pamela Weisberg Bonnie and Paul Weiss, M.D. Matthew Whitten Mark and Dana Wiest David Winder

Gifts received between January 1, 2013 and January 1, 2014

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KINGSBURY HALL STAFF John Caywood...................................................................... Interim Executive Director Wally Anderson.................................................................................... House Manager Emily Aplin.............................................................................. Development Associate Gay Cookson.......................................................................... Director od Development Michael Draper....................................................................................Sound Engineer Brooke Duffy.............................................................................. Ticket Office Manager Stephanie Gosdis............................................................................Executive Assistant Sheri Jardine........................................................................ Communications Manager Tony Portillo......................................................................................... Venue Security Randy Rasmussen............................................................................Technical Director Sarah Schoenwolf...................................................................................... Accountant Cody Watkins......................................................................... Assistant Stage Manager Robin Wilks足-Dunn....................................................... Events and Outreach Coordinator Steve Wimmer...................................................................................... Stage Manager

KINGSBURY HALL ADVISORY BOARD Mark Wiest, Chairman Sheryl Allen Dorothy Anderson Andrea Barnes Bill Bireley May Bradley Todd J. Cook Robert J. Eaton

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Michael Feehan Don Gale Marian Ingham Brent Goodfellow Paul Jacobsen Jennifer Kohler Geoffrey Mangum

Robert Mansfield Sarah Meehan Peter Morgan Taft Price Jeri Pugh Luz Robles

Kevin M. Rowe Matt Sanders Krista Sorensen Dr. Raymond Tymas - Jones

KINGSBURY HALL PRESENTS


PATRON INFORMATION • In the event of an emergency, please walk to the nearest exit and follow instructions given by theatre personnel and ushers. Auditorium exits are clearly marked with lighted exit signs above each door. Move away from the building to a safe place. • Late-comers will be seated in accordance with the seating guidelines of the individual production. • Restrooms are available in the lower lobby. • Refreshments are available in the lower lobby. • Drinking fountains are available in the upper and lower lobbies. • Coat check service is available in the lobby on the west side. • Free assisted-hearing devices are available from the coat check room in the main lobby on the west side. • Cameras and recording devices are strictly forbidden unless permission for their use is authorized in writing by theatre management. • Ticket office is located on the lower plaza, east of the main staircase. For ticket information, call 801-581-7100. • Children under six are not admitted to performances. All patrons must have a ticket regardless of age. Lap sitting is not allowed.

• Lost and found is located in the ticket office or by asking the house manager. Please leave your name, phone number and description of the lost item with the ticket office (581-7100) or house manager. • Disabled parking is located on the east side of Kingsbury Hall via Presidents Circle. • The patron elevator is located on the west side of all three lobbies. • Food and drink are not allowed in the auditorium. • Bottled water purchased in the theatre is the only refreshment allowed in the auditorium. The $2 cost benefits the Student Performance Fund and the theatre’s care. • Please silence mobile phone, pagers and watches. Patrons expecting an emergency call are urged to leave pagers and seat numbers with the house manager. • Kingsbury’s past? Visit the historic photographic retrospective in our Legacy Gallery in our mezzanine lobby. • Kingsbury’s future? Visit the Wall of Recognition in our lower lobby. Find out howv you can join those who have so generously supported Kingsbury Hall. Thank you for your patronage. • Visit Kingsbury Hall online at www.kingsburyhall.org

Dan Miller, President; Cynthia Bell Snow, Office Administrator; Jackie Medina, Art Director; Leslie Hanna, Ken Magleby, Patrick Witmer, Graphic Design; Paula Bell, Karen Malan, Dan Miller, Paul Nicholas, Advertising Representatives; Jessica Alder, Office Assistant The Hansel and Gretel playbill is published by Mills Publishing, Inc., 772 East 3300 South, Suite 200, Salt Lake City, Utah 84106, 801/467.9419. Inquiries concerning advertising should be directed to Mills Publishing, Inc., Copyright 2014

HANSEL AND GRETEL

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For information about including

Kingsbury Hall in your will or trust,

call Gay Cookson at

OUTON

THE

801-587-7844. TO W N

dining guide

M

Consistently Rated “Tops”–Zagat

• An intimate euro café •

60 W. Market Street • 801.363.0166

22 East 100 South Phone • 801.363.9328 www.martinecafe.com

THE NEW YORKER 60 West Market Street. SLC’s premier dining establishment. Modern American cuisine is featured in refined dishes and approachable comfort food. From classic to innovative, from contemporary seafood to Angus Beef steaks – the menu provides options for every taste. Served in a casually elegant setting with impeccable service. Private dining rooms for corporate and social events. Lunch & Dinner. No membership required. L, D, LL, AT, RR, CC, VS. 801.363.0166

MARTINE 22 East 100 South. Located in an historic brownstone, Martine offers Salt Lakers a cosmopolitan experience. Cafe and Tapas. Casual European dining. Extensive bar and wine service. Highly rated in Zagat 2000 survey (26). L, D, T, LL, RA, CC, VS. 801.363.9328 To advertise in the Out On The Town Guide, please contact Mills Publishing Inc. 801.467.8833

B-Breakfast L-Lunch D-Dinner S-Open Sunday DL-Delivery T-Take Out C-Children’s Menu SR-Senior Menu AT-After-Theatre LL-Liquor Licensee RR-Reservations Required RA-Reservations Accepted CC-Credit Cards Accepted VS-Vegetarian Selections

cosm dini High CC,


UTAH’S PREMIER PROFESSIONAL THEATRE JOIN US FOR OUR 2013~2014 SEASON

The Musical

December 6 – December 24, 2013

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A Few Good Men

January 24 – February 8, 2014

Much Ado About Nothing February 21 – March 8, 2014

Deathtrap

March 28 – April 12, 2014

Sweet Charity May 9 – May 24, 2014

All Shows on sale NOW! 801-581-6961

www.PioneerTheatre.org

Exploring the Breadth of Human Experience.

Pioneer Theatre Company thanks the voters of Salt Lake County for their support of the Zoo, Arts & Parks program.


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“An Upscale Casual American Bistro”

2011

2012

2013

Award-winning Utah Museum of Contemporary Art offers a variety of programs, talks, and youth and adult workshops each month to engage you in the art of our time. Bring this ad into UMOCA to register for a free dual membership on your first visit. Plan your visit at utahmoca.org WHERE ART HISTORY IS MADE 20 S. WEST TEMPLE | 801.328.4201

Intermountain Therapy Animals PETS HELPING PEOPLE

Serving Our Communities Since 1993

801.272.3439

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456 Trolley Square Salt Lake City, Utah 84102 (801) 359-2020 www.thespectacle.com


All of the flavor.

NONE OF THE AUSTERITY.

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224 S 1300 E, SLC • 801.581.0888 • aristosUT.com for reservations & information Serving lunch and dinner Mon-Sat • Live Bouzouki Music every Thursday night

2010 DINING AWARDS WINNER

2009

2008

Hansel and Gretel  
Hansel and Gretel  

Preformed by University Lyric Opera Ensemble and Utah Philharmonia