Michigan Milk Messenger: April 2016

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Michigan 2015 Milk

THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF MICHIGAN MILK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION

MESSENGER VOL. 98 | ISSUE 10 | APRIL 2016

JACOB & ELAINE JAHFETSON

2015 MMPA

TOP QUALITY Award Winner mimilk.com


Michigan Milk

MESSENGER Columns 4 MMPA Matters Changing Consumption Patterns Good for Dairy

6 Quality Watch Lab Pasteurized Counts: The Devil is in the Details

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8 News & Views 10 Legislative Watch

April Features 12 MMPA Awards 10 Scholarships to MSU Dairy Management Students 14 Persistent Improvement 2015 MMPA Top Quality Award Winner Jacob and Elaine Jahfetson

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16 The Evolving Role of the

Diva on the Dirt Road

Managing Editor............................................ Sheila Burkhardt Editor......................................................................... Allison Stuby Advertising Manager.................................. Nancy Muszynski Circulation............................................................................... 2,843 An Equal Opportunity Employer – F/M/V/D Michigan Milk Messenger (USPS 345-320) is the official publication of Michigan Milk Producers Association, published monthly since June 1919. Subscriptions: MMPA members, 50¢ per year; non-members, $5 per year.

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41310 Bridge Street

p: 248-474-6672

P.O. Box 8002

f: 248-474-0924

Novi, MI 48376-8002

w: www.mimilk.com

Periodical postage paid at Novi, MI and at additional offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Michigan Milk Messenger, PO Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002. (ISSN 0026-2315)


16 Departments

Cover Story

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Merchandise

Catch up with MMPA’s

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Quality Premiums

three-time Top Quality

23 Your Dairy Promotion

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Freeliners

at Work Workshops Available for

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Classifieds

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Policies

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Market Report

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Staff

18 MSU Dairy Students Receive $95,000 in Michigan Dairy Memorial Scholarships

Dairy Producers

Award winner Jacob and Elaine Jahfetson on page 14.

Michigan Milk Producers Association (MMPA) Michigan Milk Producers Association, established in 1916, is a member owned and operated dairy cooperative serving approximately 2,000 dairy farmers in Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin and Ohio.

Board of Directors Officers

Directors-At-Large Ken Nobis, St. Johns............................989-224-6170 or 248-474-6672, ext. 201 Rodney Daniels, Whittemore......................................................... 989-756-4935

Ken Nobis, President

Gertie van den Goor, Marlette......................................................... 989-550-8453

Mark Halbert, Vice President

Mark Halbert, Battle Creek.......................................................... 269-964-0511

Eric Frahm, Treasurer Joe Diglio, General Manager/ Secretary Josep Barenys, Assistant Treasurer Todd Hoppe, General Counsel

James Reid, Jeddo........................................................................ 810-327-6830

District Directors 1. Hank Choate, Cement City....................................................... 517-529-9032 2. Tim Hood, Paw Paw................................................................. 269-657-5771 3. David Pyle, Zeeland.................................................................. 616-772-1512 4. Corby Werth, Alpena................................................................ 989-464-5436 5. Doug Chapin, Remus................................................................ 231-972-0535 6. Tony Jandernoa, Fowler............................................................ 989-593-2224 7. Eric Frahm, Frankenmuth.......................................................... 989-652-3552 8. Scott Lamb, Jeddo.................................................................... 810-327-6135

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MMPA MATTERS

Changing Consumption Patterns Good for Dairy BY KEN NOBIS, PRESIDENT

Spring is in the air. The days are warmer, the grass is greening, and the winter blues are burning off in the warm spring sun. The time is near to start planting the seeds of a new crop that our cows can convert into the nutritiously dense human food we call milk. Although milk has been falsely maligned at times, it is now recognized as the very healthful food that we dairy producers always knew it was. This is good news. Whole milk for the first time in decades is showing strength. Whole milk consumption was up in 2015, even though fluid consumption was down. Many people agree with my personal belief that the rich taste of whole milk is more appealing, and a more appealing taste will result in more good news in the whole milk consumption category. It seems to me that good science and good taste are coming together.

“It may seem little consolation, but our prices would not be as good as they are in the U.S. were it not for the steady consumption of dairy plus consumers using more and more butter, cheese and whole milk.”

Other dairy categories continue to be popular with the taste buds of consumers. The per capita consumption of butter has increased 23 percent in the United States since the year 2000. Scientific evidence has discredited 1970s studies that indicated negative health effects from butter consumption. Margarine was the called the “safe substitute” for butter back then, so consumers followed the advice of pseudo-science. Margarine consumption soared to over 11 pounds per capita in 1980, but it has dropped during the last two decades to less than four pounds per capita. Butter consumption is now at a 40 year high at 5.6 pounds per capita and still climbing. With companies like McDonald’s recently switching to all butter, the upward trajectory of butter could accelerate. Within reason, butter is good for you, and it definitely is a flavor enhancer. Cheese consumption has increased 12 percent since the year 2000. The latest data available is for 2014 when total cheese consumption was 36 pounds per person. Whether eaten alone or added to another dish, cheese is a good tasting, nutritious dairy product. Even though it is generally high in fat, it can serve as a component of a healthy, well-balanced diet. Based on consumption patterns in Europe, U.S. cheese consumption has room to grow. Central Europe’s average per capita cheese consumption is about 42 pounds per capita, for example. We are already benefitting from the changing consumption patterns. It may seem little consolation, but our prices would not be as good as they are in the U.S. were it not for the steady consumption of dairy plus consumers using more and more butter, cheese and whole milk. Milkfat contributed 39 percent of the value of a hundredweight of milk from 2000 through 2014. From the beginning of 2015 up to now, milkfat contribution has risen to 52 percent of that value. So even though milk prices aren’t robust today, there is reason for optimism. We need to keep fighting for our share of stomach space of the average U.S. consumer, but for a change it looks like we are making progress. We don’t expect to see a price turn-around in the near future; however, with the global pressure on dairy profitability, global increases in production will adjust and bring supply and demand back into balance. Per capita consumption of dairy products in our country has remained fairly stable for the last ten years, in the range of 603 to 614 pounds per person. The continued gains we have seen in butter, cheese and yogurt have been offset by steady declines in fluid milk and other dairy categories. Maybe, just maybe, we are turning the corner, and we will see increases in overall dairy consumption. That would be a win for good nutrition and for dairy producers.

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QUALITY WATCH

Lab Pasteurized Counts: The Devil is in the Details BY BEN CHAPIN, NORTHWEST AREA SUPERVISOR

In the world of milk quality, standards are always evolving. For several years the focus has primarily been on raw bacteria counts (RBC), preliminary incubated counts (PIC), and somatic cell counts (SCC). But there is a fourth quality test that is increasingly being used in industry: the Lab Pasteurized Count (LPC). Lab pasteurized counts measure the bacteria that survive pasteurization. These bacteria are thermoduric bacteria, or heat resistant. LPCs are often used in industry to improve the shelf life of dairy products. Some strains of thermoduric bacteria are “spore forming” and can be capable of cold storage growth that leads to spoilage of product. The dairy industry is always striving to improve quality to deliver the safest, best tasting and longest lasting product. LPCs are becoming an important part of that process.

What is a good count? If you have your milk tested for LPC, the numbers reported are the actual counts and there is no need to add zeros as for SCC, RBC, or PIC. A LPC of 200 is good, 100 is better, 50 is best and 10 or less is excellent. Anything over 200 should be looked into, but where do you look?

How do I address an elevated LPC?

“Currently members and member representatives use LPC testing to help troubleshoot other quality problems. LPC testing is a great tool offered by the MMPA lab for milk quality management.”

It is common to have excellent RBCs and PICs, and have an elevated LPC on the same sample. RBC and PIC are typically measurements related to equipment cleanliness and cooling. LPCs however, are not only related to equipment cleanliness but can also come from equipment condition and events within the milking process. When investigating an elevated LPC, one of the first places to look is equipment cleanliness. If all milk contact surfaces are clean, the next step is to dig deeper into the details and inspect all porous parts within a milking system. This includes inflations, pipeline gaskets, milk hoses, claw gaskets, take-off sensors and diaphragms. Vacuum lines and traps can be another source for an elevated LPC. These should be checked regularly for cleanliness or sour odors. Over time the vacuum line may become soiled with milk that is drawn up the hose and into the line. For bucket systems, this would also include the vacuum hoses connecting the bucket and the vacuum line. Thermoduric bacteria are present in manure and dust, so parlor cleanliness and cow hygiene are other very important factors in keeping a low LPC. Other areas to inspect and watch are air blow valves, pinch valve drains, valve seats, and leaking pump seals. Milk filters can play a large part in preventing elevated LPCs as well. On farms with long milking hours, we recommend changing the milk filter every four hours because they can become an excellent home for the bacteria to grow. Any place you see milk leaking in a milking system, should be inspected and corrected. If milk is able to leak out, bacteria is able to get in.

Should I test for LPC? While no current MMPA customers require LPC testing for the milk they purchase, it will most likely become a common test in the future. Currently members and member representatives use this test to help troubleshoot other quality problems. When a LPC is ran with a PIC and RBC on the same load of milk, it helps paint a picture of the wash cycles, cooling, equipment condition, etc. LPC testing is a great tool offered by the MMPA lab for milk quality management. If you have further inquiries regarding LPCs, contact your member representative today. 6

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& VIEWS NEWS &NEWS VIEWS

2016 Hauler Meetings MMPA milk haulers are invited to attend the annual hauler meetings closest to their hauling operation. Meetings will take place in April and May and all contract haulers can expect a formal invitation in the mail. All meetings, except the Harris meeting, will begin at 6:15 p.m. with dinner being served at 7:00 p.m. The Harris meeting will begin at 6:45 p.m. with a 7:30 p.m. dinner.

April 26 English Hills Golf and Banquet 1200 Four Mile Rd NW Grand Rapids, MI 49544

April 28 Woodland Hills 320 Gates Rd Sandusky, MI 48471

At the 2016 National Council of Farmer Cooperatives Annual Meeting, MMPA joined state, regional and national cooperatives by entering in the 70th Annual Cooperative Information Fair. MMPA earned the following awards: first place news release, second place member magazine for the Michigan Milk Messenger and an honorable mention in the print advertisement category.

MMPA Returns $1.6 Million of Cash Patronage Refunds to Members MMPA recently paid $1.6 million in cash patronage refunds to its dairy farmer members. This cash allocation represents 25 percent of the $6 million net earnings generated by the cooperative in fiscal year 2015. “The over $5 million in patronage refunds and equity retirements we’ve recently returned to our member-owners speak to the financial viability of MMPA,” Joe Diglio, MMPA general manager said. “Our cooperative has served Michigan dairy farmers for an entire century—through all the ups

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and downs of the industry—due to our high-quality milk supply, responsible

Chip-In Island Resort and Casino W399 Hwy 2 & 41 Harris, MI 49829

financial management and competitive member value return.”

May 3 Riverwood 1313 East Broomfield Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858 Hauler Service Awards will be presented at two award banquets held at the Constantine and Ovid plants.

Upcoming Events April 14 Dairy Communicator Meeting

April 15 Young Cooperators Conference

April 28 Advisory Committee Meeting 8

MMPA Awarded Honors at NCFC Cooperative Information Fair

The cash patronage returned includes 100 percent of the farm supply earnings and 25 percent of the milk marketing earnings. All members who marketed milk through MMPA for fiscal year 2015 received a portion of the $1.6 million. MMPA members received other cash payments in April 2015 of $3.6 million through retirement of the cooperative’s 2006 equities. With the current payment of $1.6 million, cash payments in the last 10 months total over $5.2 million. Cash patronage funds and equity allocations are based on the amount of milk each individual member farm marketed and on the supplies purchased through the cooperative during the year in which the earnings were achieved. Under the current board policy, the non-cash balance of the equity allocation will be revolved back to the members in future years.

MMPA Member Representative Honored with Excellence in Agriculture Award MMPA Member Representative Lyndsay Earl and her husband, Seth, won Farm Bureau’s Young Farmer Excellence in Agriculture Award. Lyndsay is a member representative for MMPA, serving 70 dairy farms in Mason, Oceana, Muskegon and Newaygo counties. Seth is a district conservationist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service, manages the USDA Service Center in Scottville and is active in local chambers of commerce. Other Farm Bureau Young Farmer award winners in 2016 were: Nick Schweitzer of Sparta with the Agriculture Employee Award, State Representative Ed McBroom of Vulcan with the Agriculture Leader Award and John First of Ionia with the Agriculture Achievement Award.


MMPA Board Election Results During the 100th Annual State Delegate Meeting and district meetings held on March 24, MMPA members (re)elected board members. The following three-year director-at-large positions were filled: Ken Nobis of St. Johns Gertie van den Goor of Marlette During district meetings in February, two district directors were elected to three-year terms: District 5: Doug Chapin of Remus District 8: Scott Lamb of Jeddo More details about the Annual Meeting will be included in the May issue of the Michigan Milk Messenger.

NMPF Board of Directors Approves Changes in FARM Program Version 3.0 The National Milk Producers Federation Board of Directors approved changes to the National Dairy FARM (Farmers Assuring Responsible Management) program. One outcome of the revisions is a greater emphasis on accountability among program participants. The advisory committees identified several FARM Program guidelines which they felt deserved heightened focus and attention. Such criteria include a greater emphasis on employee training, having a documented Veterinarian-Client Patient Relationship, updated protocols on euthanasia and non-ambulatory cattle and the cessation of tail docking. Though evaluations on the new version of the FARM Program won’t begin until 2017, new resources and training materials will be available to program participants beginning April 2016 to help prepare for the changes. FOR A COMPLETE SUMMARY OF CHANGES, VISIT WWW.NATIONALDAIRYFARM.COM.

February Class III and IV Prices See Slight Increase The USDA said February’s Class III price was $13.80 per hundredweight, up 8 cents from last month but $1.66 below February 2015. The Class IV price was $13.49/cwt., up 18 cents from the prior month, and 33 cents more than February of 2015. APRIL 2016 | MESSENGER

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LEGISLATIVE WATCH

NMPF Board Endorses Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement Dairy Group Will Work Closely with U.S. Government to Ensure TPP Commitments Are Upheld

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he National Milk Producers Federation voted to support the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement, a historic pact between 12 countries containing features that will help America’s dairy farmers in the future. The organization is now urging Congress to pass the agreement this year, even as it also registered concerns with another major trade pact being negotiated with Europe. In addition to adopting a resolution of support for TPP, the NMPF board expressed its opposition today to moving forward with the U.S.-EU Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) in light of Europe’s continued refusal to remove barriers to U.S. dairy exports.

“Taken in its entirety, the TPP agreement is positive for the U.S. dairy industry,” said Jim Mulhern, president and CEO of NMPF. “Although it achieves less than we wanted in terms of throwing open new markets in Japan and Canada, I am particularly pleased that we did not concede to a huge surge in new imports.” NMPF’s position reflects a detailed assessment of the entire package conducted by the staffs of both NMPF and the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC).

The TPP agreement also contains important provisions designed “to knock down other trade barriers, such as food safety disputes, and to challenge the growing number of restrictions limiting trade of foods with commonly-used names such as parmesan,” Mulhern said. Despite its endorsement, in order to make sure that U.S. dairy farmers and exporters receive the full benefit of the package, NMPF said U.S. government agencies must take concrete steps to ensure the diligent enforcement of the agreement’s provisions with America’s trading partners. The NMPF resolution also urged the U.S. to establish proper enforcement measures regarding access granted to the domestic market, and monitor compliance with those measures after the TPP is implemented. The board also formally registered its view that given the lack of significant export inroads in the agreement, the

2016 MMPA Advisory Committee

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District 1

District 5

Bruce Lewis, Jonesville........................................ 517-869-2877 Jeff Horning, Manchester..................................... 734-428-8610 Art Riske, Hanover............................................... 517-524-6015 Clark Emmons, Fayette, OH................................ 419-466-4471 Jeff Alexander, Hanover....................................... 517-740-9981

Mike Rasmussen, Edmore................................... 989-304-0233 Lyle Vanderwal, Lake City.................................... 231-328-4926 Tom Jeppesen, Stanton........................................ 989-506-5287 Bruce Benthem, McBain....................................... 231-825-8182 Amy Martin, Leroy................................................ 231-388-0496

District 2

District 6

Michael Oesch, Middlebury, IN............................. 574-825-2454 Mark Crandall, Battle Creek................................. 269-660-2229 Richard Thomas, Middlebury, IN.......................... 574-825-5198 Don Bever, Delton................................................ 269-671-5050 Heather Wing, Bellevue........................................ 269-660-0498

David Reed, Owosso............................................ 989-723-2023 Jamie Meyer, Ionia............................................... 989-640-3372 Kris Wardin, St. Johns.......................................... 989-640-9420 Aaron Gasper, Lowell........................................... 616-897-2747 Steve Thelen, Fowler............................................ 989-682-9064

District 3

District 7

Tim Butler, Sand Lake.......................................... 269-330-5538 Bill Gruppen, Zeeland........................................... 616-875-8162 Burke Larsen, Scottville........................................ 231-425-8988 Bill Stakenas, Freesoil.......................................... 231-425-6913 Gary Nelsen, Grant.............................................. 231-834-7610

John Bennett, Prescott......................................... 989-345-4264 Mark Iciek, Gladwin.............................................. 989-426-5655 Eric Bergdolt, Vassar............................................ 989-652-6500 Steve Foley, Millington.......................................... 989-871-4028 Rodney Fowler, Chesaning.................................. 989-302-2299

District 4

District 8

Marvin Rubingh, Ellsworth.................................... 231-588-6084 Jeremy Werth, Herron.......................................... 989-464-4022 Dave Folkersma, Rudyard.................................... 906-630-1957 Russ Tolan, Ossineke........................................... 989-471-2993 Ron Lucas, Posen................................................ 989-379-4694

Darwin Sneller, Sebewaing.................................. 989-977-3718 Bill Blumerich, Berlin............................................ 810-706-2955 Michael Bender, Croswell..................................... 810-404-2140 Scott Lamb, Jeddo............................................... 810-404-8003 Michael Noll, Croswell.......................................... 810-404-4071

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TPP market access package should not be used as a template for future U.S. trade agreements. NMPF’s board weighed several factors in making its decision to support the TPP agreement. Among these were: • The net effect on the U.S. dairy industry of all TPP market access concessions is expected to be neutral to slightly positive, with the most notable U.S. export gains coming in Canada and Japan, along with somewhat smaller increases in new imports. • There is the potential for the agreement to expand over time to include additional participants in Asia, particularly nations that currently – or will soon – have trade agreements with major dairy competitors. It is imperative that the U.S. remain a key player in the region as its works to expand future U.S. exports. • In the areas of sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) provisions, the TPP features groundbreaking new commitments that should help keep in check the possibility for participating countries to erode existing and future market access for U.S. dairy exporters through unjustified regulatory determinations. • The TPP contains new Geographical Indications (GI) provisions establishing a more equitable international model on registering GIs for food. The text does not directly block the EU from inappropriately restricting the use of common food names important to global trade, but it does significantly strengthen the ability for the U.S. to combat barriers when they arise, thereby helping preserve market access opportunities for U.S. companies. At the same time it voted to support the TPP, the NMPF board also went on record to oppose any further advancement of the U.S.-EU Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) negotiations that does not include fully addressing U.S. dairy export concerns related to SPS, TBT and common name issues.

2016 MMPA District Officers ELECTED DURING MMPA DISTRICT MEETINGS HELD IN FEBRUARY 2016.

District 1

District 5

Chairman: David Lott, Mason

Chairman: Mike Rasmussen, Edmore

Vice Chairman: Perry Cisco, Hudson

Vice Chairman: John Black, Howard City

Secretary: Art Riske, Hanover

Secretary: Gordon Dick, McBain

State Credentials Committee: Richard Chaffee, Webberville

State Credentials Committee: Tyler Wilson, Carson City

State Resolutions Committee: Carlton Evans, Litchfield; Bruce Lewis, Jonesville; Art Riske, Hanover; Glenn Preston, Quincy

State Resolutions Committee: Bruce Benthem, McBain; Bob Cnossen, Falmouth; Tyler Wilson, Carson City; Tom Jeppesen, Stanton

District 2

District 6

Chairman: Jerry Koebel, Jr., Three Oaks

Chairman: Kris Wardin, St. Johns

Vice Chairman: Mike Oesch, Middlebury, IN

Vice Chairman: David Reed, Owosso

Secretary: Richard Ultz, Burr Oak

State Credentials Committee: Jim Slavik, Ashley

State Credentials Committee: Richard Ultz, Burr Oak State Resolutions Committee: Richard Thomas, Middlebury, IN; Heather Wing, Bellevue; Mike Oesch, Middlebury, IN; Jerry Koebel,Three Oaks

District 3 Chairman: Glen Sparks, Fremont Vice Chairman: Bill Stakenas, Freesoil Secretary: Sharron Powers, Pentwater State Credentials Committee: Sharron Powers, Pentwater State Resolutions Committee: Tim Butler, Sand Lake; Bill Stakenas, Freesoil; Burke Larsen, Scottville; Gary Nelsen, Grant

District 4 Chairman: Marvin Rubingh, Ellsworth Vice Chairman: Paul Ponick, Posen Secretary: Jeremy Werth, Herron State Credentials Committee: Paul Ponik, Posen State Resolutions Committee: Jeremy Werth, Herron; Marvin Rubingh, Ellsworth; Ron Lucas, Posen; Paul Ponik, Posen

Secretary: Steve Thelen, Fowler

State Resolutions Committee: Mike Halfman, St. Johns; David Reed, Owosso; Chuck White, Fowlerville; Ken Wieber, Fowler

District 7 Chairman: John Bennett, Prescott Vice Chairman: Steve Foley, Millington Secretary: Rod Fowler, Chesaning State Credentials Committee: John Bennett, Prescott State Resolutions Committee: John Bennett, Prescott; Eric Bergdolt, Vassar; Leslie Daenzer, Frankenmuth; Rod Fowler, Chesaning

District 8 Chairman: Darwin Sneller, Sebewaing Vice Chairman: Michael Noll, Croswell Secretary: Mike Bender State Credentials Committee: Dale Phillips, Marlette State Resolutions Committee: Michael Bender, Croswell; William Blumerich, Berlin; Jeremy Sharrard, Peck; Mike Noll, Croswell

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MMPA Awards 10 Scholarships TO MSU DAIRY MANAGEMENT STUDENTS Since 1971, MMPA has sponsored scholarships for MMPA members, their children and employees enrolled in the Agricultural Technology Dairy Management program at Michigan State University. The scholarship program was initiated to encourage students to become involved in dairy production and management careers. The scholarships are based on academics, involvement in the dairy industry and letters of recommendation. MMPA First-Year Scholarships Shelby Berens is in her first semester of the MSU Dairy Management program. Shelby is from Holland where her family milks a small herd of Holsteins and Guernseys. Shelby has already invested in the family business, owning three registered Holsteins. In the future, she plans to transfer into the four year animal science program at MSU and pursue a career in the dairy industry. She is a member of the MSU Dairy Club and State 4-H Judging Team. MMPA SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS RECOGNIZED AT THE 2015 LEADERS’ CONFERENCE. PICTURED, BACK ROW (L-R): DAVID KRAFFT, SCOTT LOKKER, SETH HULST AND SHELBY BERENS. FRONT ROW (L-R): ZEKE BREUNINGER, TERRY GRIESER, CARA PERKINS, RACHEL EKKEL AND EVEYLN OKKEMA.

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Rachel Ekkel is from Fremont where she’s involved on her family’s 100-cow dairy operation, of which Rachel owns seven cows. In high school, Rachel was involved in 4-H and FFA. At MSU, she is involved in dairy cattle judging and the MSU Dairy Club. After graduation, Rachel plans to return to the family farm, increase the herd size and achieve the goal of breeding a winning national show cow. Evelyn Okkema is from Blanchard where she works on her family’s 450-cow dairy operation and owns one dairy cow. In high school, Evelyn was active in 4-H, Yellow Ribbon Group, National Honors Society, Model UN, Yearbook, Band and the Montcalm Career Center. Currently, she’s a member of the MSU Dairy Club and the State 4-H Dairy Judging Team. She plans to return to her family farm and become a 4-H leader in her county.

First-Year Employee Scholarships Zeke Breuninger, a native of Dexter, works on his father’s 400-cow dairy farm, of which Zeke owns 15 cows. In high school, Zeke was on the wrestling team, won a MIPA Honorable Mention award in journalism, and was on the


State Dairy Judging Team and the National Livestock Judging Team. Now at MSU, Zeke is a member of Alpha Gamma Rho Fraternity, the MSU Dairy Club and the wrestling club. After graduation he intends to work in the agriculture industry, before coming back home to work on his home dairy farm. Seth Hulst, of Coopersville, is employed on MMPA member Paul Courtade’s 60-cow dairy farm. In high school, he won the Zeeland Positive Impact Award and now at MSU, he is a member of the dairy club. After graduation, Seth plans to return to his employer’s operation and work to modernize the farm.

MMPA Second-Year Scholarships Terry Grieser, of Lakeview, works on his family farm milking 60 Jersey cows and personally owns 10 cows. In high school, Terry played football, wrestling and showed dairy and swine in 4-H. Terry has an internship with the MSU Dairy Farm and plans to return home after graduation to work on his family farm and another local farm. David Krafft is from Frankenmuth where he’s involved on his family’s 100-cow dairy operation. In high school, David played baseball and football and served with his church on a mission trip. At MSU, he plays club baseball, and after graduation he plans to join his father back on the family farm. Cara Perkins is from Hudson, Indiana where she works on her family’s dairy operation, where they milk 475 cows.

In high school, Cara was active in the Prairie Heights FFA chapter, LaGrange County 4-H, Stroh Church of Christ Youth Group, high school yearbook staff and National Honors Society. Currently, she’s a member of the MSU Dairy Club and plans to return to her family farm, focusing on the nutritional needs of the herd after graduation.

Second-Year Employee Scholarships Kayla Holsten is from Milan and works for Brian Sweetland milking 50 cows. In high school, she served as chapter president for the Saline FFA chapter and 4-H. At MSU, Kayla is a member of the Dairy Club and was part of the winning team at the National 4-H Dairy Cattle Judging Contest in Madison in 2014. She is a member of the Ag. Tech Dairy Judging team and this past summer, she travelled to Europe for dairy judging. She hopes to obtain a position as a herdsperson on a dairy after graduation. Scott Lokker, is from Hudsonville and is employed on Tim Baker’s farm where they milk 75 cows. In high school, he was on the honor roll all four years and played tennis. Now in college, he is a member of the MSU Dairy Club and participated in the dairy challenge. After graduation, Scott hopes to work as a herdsman. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT MMPA SCHOLARSHIPS, VISIT: WWW.MIMILK.COM/PUBLIC/INFORMATION/MSUMEMBER.ASPX.

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Persistent Improvement MMPA TOP QUALITY AWARD WINNER JACOB AND ELAINE JAHFETSON BY ALLISON STUBY “There are many salesmen, researchers, neighbors and even veterinarians who have complex formulas for keeping healthy cows which produce high-quality milk. Yet when you visit the farms recognized for producing the highest quality milk, you won’t see fancy ultramodern setups or secret formulas put in the teat-dip cups. What you see are two hard-working, dedicated families who have established priorities in such a way that milk quality ranks number one,” a Michigan Milk Messenger article read in May 1990.

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The farms—both averaging less than 77,500 somatic cell count (SCC) in 1989—set the standards for the coming years of quality award winners.

The 1990 article detailed the successes MMPA’s first Top Quality Award Winners: Ridge Run Farms and Weber’s Meadow.

This year’s winners have consistently produced quality milk year after year, always perfecting their results. In the 2015 fiscal year, the Jahfetsons averaged a SCC of 34,833, pre-incubated bacteria count of 1,500 and raw bacteria count of 1,083. The most recent year’s numbers are an improvement over their winning results in 2014 and 2013, where they averaged a SCC of 40,083 and 54,417, respectively.

wenty-six years later, that sentiment proves steadfast on Jacob and Elaine Jahfetson’s Upper Peninsula dairy. They don’t have state-of-the-art technology or magic milking procedures, but what they do have is a perfectionist mindset and a true dedication to quality. The Jahfetson’s farm was named the 2015 Top Quality Award Winner for the third consecutive year at the MMPA 100th Annual State Delegate Meeting in March.


“The member who receives the Top Quality Award is an inspiration to all MMPA members. If one member can do it, it shows what is possible for others to achieve,” MMPA Director of Member Services Dean Letter said. “The Jahfetsons are an excellent example of quality producers and continual improvement. The family pays incredibly close attention to every detail, they know exactly what their cows are doing and address any problems immediately.” The Baraga, Michigan family farm milks 25 cows in an 85-year-old stanchion barn. They have a rolling herd average of 19,092 pounds per year, with 685 pounds of butterfat and 585 pounds of protein. The Jahfetsons take a “perfectionist” approach to milking. They first wash the udder using Bac-Drop—a phosphoricbased solution—mixed with water and use Sani-Prep towels to wipe and clean the teats thoroughly. The unit is attached only when the teats are completely clean. When the milk stream lessens, they release the vacuum and pull the unit straight down. Then they post dip the teats with iodine-based I-deal. The unit is dipped in a mixture of sanitizer and water and allowed to drip. “Most bacteria enters the udder when milking, so the teats need to be absolutely clean. We teat dip after to prevent bacteria from entering the udder after milking when the cow wants to lay down,” Elaine Jahfetson advises. “It can be good to go fast, but it’s more important to be thorough and ensure the udders are clean before proceeding. When you’re focused on speed during milking, you will see more cases of mastitis and therefore lose income.” And Letter notes the importance of attention to detail. “What makes the difference in quality is what farmers are going to do day in and day out. Monitoring the herd, cattle housing, nutrition and addressing issues, it’s the little details. You have to sweat the small stuff,” Letter attests.

Over the last decade and a half, the Jahfetsons sharpened their quality figures. In July 2000, their SCC was 435,000, raw bacteria count was 16,000 and pre-incubated count was 460,000. Since understanding their quality issues, their counts have dramatically dropped. “There are three important things we did to improve our quality: getting rid of chronic cows, checking the vacuum level and getting everyone on the same page,” Jahfetson explains. “We used to treat all of our cows with infections, but we found the same problems would return after the cow was treated. Now we address any concern immediately and cull if the issue is chronic. We also found the vacuum level was too high in our milking units. If the pressure is too high, it will cause teat end damage and allow bacteria to enter the udder. It’s also important all workers are working toward the same goal and following the right procedures on the farm.” The couple, farming since 1982, plan to retire sometime this year. Jahfetson views winning the Top Quality Award for the third time as “icing on the cake” in their last year before retirement and during MMPA’s 100th Anniversary. And throughout MMPA’s century of existence, all farmers have developed higher quality milk. Even just 30 years ago, the MMPA SCC average was well over 300,000. Yet every year, farms work day-in and day-out to improve their results and produce a better product. “MMPA members produce highquality milk because we have a culture of quality,” says Letter. “There is an expectation of continuous improvement. Our customers expect continuous improvement and our members expect continuous improvement.” And honing in on the members driving the change, the Jahfetsons rise above the pack. From high SCCs to unprecedented lows, they are persistent improvers.

ABOVE: WEBER’S MEADOW AND RIDGE RUN FARMS WERE HONORED WITH THE FIRST MMPA TOP QUALITY AWARDS AT THE 74TH ANNUAL STATE DELEGATE MEETING IN 1990. PICTURED IN THE TOP PHOTO (L-R) ARE: MMPA VICE PRESIDENT CARL KLINE AND ANNA, ROSEMARY, MARY ELLEN, AUGUST, TONY AND ELAINE WEBER OF WEBER’S MEADOW. PICTURED IN THE BOTTOM PHOTO (L-R) ARE: JIM, CINDY, PATTI AND STEVE GREMEL OF RIDGE RUN FARMS WITH CARL KLINE. OPPOSITE PAGE: THE JAHFESTONS WERE NAMED MMPA’S 2015 QUALITY AWARD WINNER FOR THE THIRD STRAIGHT YEAR AT THE ANNUAL STATE DELEGATE MEETING ON MARCH 24. PICTURED (LEFT TO RIGHT) ARE JASON, ELAINE, JACOB, DAVID AND JACKIE JAHFETSON.

A Culture of Quality 2015 was an excellent year for MMPA member quality, with the average somatic cell count (SCC) reaching a record low of 151,000 in December. The weighted average SCC for the year was 167,250. A “culture of quality” on MMPA farms helped the cooperative realize an almost 200,000 drop in average SCC over three decades. AVERAGE SOMATIC CELL COUNT 2015................................................. 167,250 2006............................................... 251,453 1996................................................309,453 1986................................................. 344,313

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POWER of the Past. » VISION for the Future.

JOAN BEATTY WAS THE FIRST WOMAN DELEGATE TO ATTEND AN ANNUAL MEETING, REPRESENTING THE IMLAY CITY LOCAL IN 1973.

THE EVOLVING ROLE OF

The Diva

of time. Eve influenced Adam to take a bite of the

on the

Just as the diversification of women’s roles have evolved through history, the farmwife has woven her way into every level of leadership in the 100-year existence of Michigan Milk Producers Association. The woman on the farm in 2016 paints an entirely different portrait than her comrade of 1916. But the tenacity, passion and determination that frame her soul are the same last century and today.

Dirt Road BY MELISSA HART

16

Women have been influential from the beginning

MESSENGER | APRIL 2016

forbidden fruit and the world as they knew it was turned upside down.


I

n 1916, the challenges were different. Faced with few modern conveniences on the farm, her daily chores took longer than the daily activity today. Add the cooking on a woodstove and harvesting and canning to feed the family, she was also expected to take up the slack in the fields and the barn. The lure of the big city was not unique to the most recent generation of farm kids. In the early 20th century, the bright lights of the big city and promise of employment led young men off the farm leaving the younger children and the farm wife to keep all the plates spinning. Jennifer Lewis, wife of Bruce Lewis of Pleasant View Dairy of Jonesville, a longtime member of MMPA, paints the picture of the early century farm wife, “Women of that era were educators, doctors and magicians. They could do just about anything and there were times they had to do everything. Our farm has been in the Lewis family for 75 years this year. Bruce's Grandmother, Vivian, went to college to be a teacher, graduating from OSU in 1928 (one of just a handful). When she wasn't teaching, she did it all. They had a few cows, sheep, chickens and hogs. She milked, fed, scattered and slopped.” The role of women on the farm was central to success and MMPA discovered their value early on during the Depression. Milk prices were low, feed prices were high and spirits were hopeless. In April of 1935 the first “Home Page” appeared in the Michigan Milk Messenger and women’s credibility was spelled out by writer Margaret Sheehy. “The Michigan Milk Messenger has long appreciated the influence of the woman in Association affairs. It is generally conceded that women are concerned over the family income. They naturally are interested in

producing milk of such a quality that it will net the most money for the product. There is too, a universal accepted fact that women possess a keen sense of understanding. The producer husbands and sons, members of this organization, were imbued with a sense of appreciation of cooperative principles—yet we believe that it was the intuition on the part of the wives and mothers that helped them to interpret the contract and know that the Association was their business organization.” In 1936, women were invited for the first time to meet with the Sales Committee and Dairy Council. And ten years later, Mrs. Martin Montgomery posed the question in an article for the Michigan Milk Messenger, “How Active Should Women Be in the MMPA?” SHE WROTE:

“So long as she is such an important cog in the wheel of farm management and since milk is the most important source of income on our farms today, why shouldn’t she have an active part in the association that controls the farmer’s income?” But it wasn’t until 1973 that the Imlay City MMPA Local would trust their voice to a woman, Joan Beatty as the first female delegate to the MMPA annual meeting. Joan and her husband Ron moved from the Detroit suburbs to Imlay City to start a farm in 1970. While she had a lot to learn about running a farm, she said she had never been afraid to take on something new. That ‘no-fear’ factor surfaced again in 1986 in the first female board of director Deanna Stamp from Marlette. With a long MMPA family history, Deanna and her husband were in partnership with her brother when she realized the importance of

AS MMPA CELEBRATED ITS 75TH ANNIVERSARY IN 1991, DEANNA STAMP (SECOND ROW, FAR LEFT) SERVED ON THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS. MMPA’S LEADERS AT THE TIME ALSO INCLUDED PRESIDENT ELWOOD KIRKPATRICK (FRONT ROW, CENTER), VICE PRESIDENT CARL KLINE (FRONT ROW, LEFT), TREASURER VELMAR GREEN (FRONT ROW, RIGHT) AND GENERAL MANAGER WALT WOJSE (SECOND ROW, FAR RIGHT).

the cooperative structure and milk marketing. She had the opportunity to run and was elected to the board. She commented, “Maybe I was naive but I think I stepped into that role feeling as an equal and I was treated as an equal.” Serving from 1986 – 2009 she said, “It was an easy transition for me, I felt like I was a part of the board and it was a great experience.” Today the role of women on the farm reflects the educational importance they have layered on top of their determination and desire to produce a quality product out of a livelihood they were created for. And her zeal for leadership roles within the 100-yearold milk cooperative is even stronger. Cami Martz-Evans, wife of Carlton Evans on the three generation MMPA member family farm in Litchfield summed up a woman’s role today: “She will struggle in the heat, freeze in the cold, spit out bugs, inhale dust, and keep going during harvest. She will raise her child and worry about their grades, their future, and what they need to be successful like every other woman has for 100 years. She will be a dairy farmer ‘with MMPA’. Which means she’ll be a DIVA on a dirt road in her world. Just like 100 years of women before her.”

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MSU DAIRY STUDENTS

Receive $95,000 in Michigan Dairy Memorial Scholarships £•

T

he Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation awarded $95,000 in scholarships to 33 Michigan State University (MSU) students pursuing dairy industry-related programs of study for the 2015-16 academic year.

The following nine MSU students were awarded $3,500 scholarships from the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation: Megan Ahearne, animal science senior; Nathan Buning, agribusiness management junior; Suzanna Hull, animal science freshman; Caroline Knoblock, animal science junior; Torei Kulpinski, animal science sophomore; James Luoma, animal science junior; Laura Lubeski, animal science senior; Brittni Tucker, production animal scholar; and Marin Western, animal science sophomore. Five students pursuing a two-year certificate in the MSU Institute of Agricultural Technology (IAT) dairy management program each earned $2,000 scholarships from the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation: Rachel Ekkel, freshman; Seth Hulst, freshman; Amber Iden, sophomore; David Krafft, sophomore; and Cara Perkins, sophomore. Seven first-year students were awarded the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation Freshman Scholarships worth $1,500: Shelby Berens, IAT dairy management certificate program student; Tyler Cappaert, agribusiness management sophomore; Erica Drake, IAT dairy management certificate program student; Charlene (Charley) McAlvey, animal science freshman; Mason Smith, IAT dairy management certificate program student; Elizabeth (Libby) Venema, animal science freshman; and Jared Sanderson, animal science freshman. The Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation oversees the largest scholarship program in the MSU College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and one of the largest at MSU.

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MESSENGER | APRIL 2016

GLENN AND ANNE LAKE SCHOLARSHIP:

Kelly Raterink Kelly Raterink of Zeeland, Michigan, was chosen as the 2015-2016 recipient of the Glenn and Anne Lake Scholarship from the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation Inc. The scholarship is named after Michigan dairy farmers Glenn and Anne Lake and provides $7,500 in scholarship money divided over two semesters. Glenn Lake served as president of MMPA and the National Milk Producers Federation, he also provided leadership in creating the Great Lakes Milk Marketing Federation. Raterink, the daughter of Dennis and Brenda Raterink, is currently a junior at Michigan State University (MSU) in the production animal scholar program and aspires to become an embryo transfer veterinarian. She was selected to receive the scholarship based on her academic achievements, involvement in extracurricular activities and interest in pursuing a career in the dairy industry. While at MSU, Raterink has been an active member of the Sigma Alpha professional agriculture sorority and the MSU Dairy Science Club, serving as its treasurer and a board member with the Spartan Spectacular Calf Sale. She has been a member of both the Michigan 4-H and collegiate dairy cattle judging teams. A lifelong 4-H member, Raterink has served as the treasurer for the Michigan Junior Holstein Association and was the 2013 Michigan Junior Dairy Ambassador. She is actively involved with her family’s dairy herd and manages her own club lamb business.


JOHN AND BARBARA DILLAND SCHOLARSHIP:

REDMOND AND EDNA COTTER SCHOLARSHIP:

RUSSEL ERICKSON SCHOLARSHIP:

Alyssa Gehring

Courtney Doan

Kyle Benthem

Alyssa Gehring of Harbor Beach, Michigan, was chosen as the 2015-16 recipient of the John and Barbara Dilland endowed scholarship through the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation Inc., at Michigan State University (MSU). The $3,500 scholarship is named in honor of John Dilland, former controller, director of finance and general manager for the Michigan Milk Producers Association (MMPA), and his wife Barbara. The award is presented to an MSU sophomore, junior or senior student majoring in the field of agribusiness management. Gehring, the daughter of William and Lenai Gehring, received the award based on her academic achievements and involvement in extracurricular activities. She is a junior at Michigan State University (MSU) pursuing a degree in agribusiness management with specializations in animal science and crop and soil science and expects to graduate in spring 2017. At MSU, Gehring is a member of the MSU Block and Bridle Club and the MSU Dairy Club. She was active in 4-H, FFA and the National Honor Society in high school. The John and Barbara Dilland endowed scholarship was established in 2010 by MMPA upon John’s retirement after 35 years of service.

Courtney Doan of Merrill, Michigan, was chosen as the 2015-16 recipient of the Redmond (“Red”) and Edna Cotter endowed scholarship through the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation Inc., at Michigan State University (MSU). The $4,000 scholarship is named in honor of Red Cotter, an inspirational dairy industry leader and respected motivator of sales and marketing executives, and his wife Edna. Doan, the daughter of Dean and Cheryl Doan, received the award based on her academic achievements, involvement in extracurricular activities and interest in pursuing a career as a large animal (production animal) veterinarian. She graduated from MSU with a bachelor’s degree in animal science in 2014 and is currently a second year student in the MSU College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) Production Medicine Scholars Program. At MSU, Doan participated as an undergraduate in the MSU Dairy Challenge and the Tri-State Dairy Nutrition Conference and was a member of the Animal Science Undergraduate Research Student Association. She worked for Bebow Dairy Farm, the MSU Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition and for the MSU Dairy Research and Teaching Center. Doan is a member of the Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association. The Redmond (“Red”) and Edna Cotter endowed scholarship honors the Cotter couple and their many contributions to the dairy industry.

Kyle Benthem of McBain, Michigan, was chosen as the 2015-16 recipient of the Russel Erickson Scholarship from the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation, Inc. The $5,000 scholarship is named after Russel Erickson, Michigan State University (MSU) professor emeritus in the Department of Animal Science, and is awarded to a student whose career aspirations include working on or with dairy farms. Benthem, the son of Bruce and Karen Benthem, is a senior majoring in agribusiness management and on schedule to graduate in May. He received the scholarship based on his academic achievements, involvement in extracurricular activities and interest in pursuing a career related to dairy cattle breeding or production. At MSU, Benthem is involved in intramural athletics and has been on the Dean’s List. He has been helping with the MSU women’s basketball team since fall 2015. Upon graduating from MSU, Benthem plans to return to his family’s dairy farm, Benthem Brothers Dairy. Prior to attending MSU, Benthem studied business at Alma College for two years and competed on the university’s men’s varsity basketball team. He also completed a missions project to Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, as a high school junior.

APRIL 2016 | MESSENGER

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JACK AND BETTY BARNES SCHOLARSHIPS:

Silas Bonczyk, Anne Meyers and Louise Vanderploeg Three Michigan State University (MSU) students have been awarded the Jack and Betty Barnes Scholarship from the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation for the 2015-16 academic year. Three students each received the $1,000 scholarship earmarked towards completing an international study experience. The students were selected as recipients of the scholarship based on their cumulative academic achievements and involvement in extracurricular activities. The scholarship is named after the late Jack and Betty Barnes. Jack Barnes was employed with the Michigan Milk Producers Association (MMPA) for 39 years and served 26 of those years as general manager.

» Silas Bonczyk

» Anne Meyers

» Louise Vanderploeg

Bonczyk, the son of Janice Heuer and Andrew Bonczyk, enrolled in the “Ecology of the Mountains” study abroad program in India during summer 2015. While at MSU, Bonczyk has worked in the MSU dairy processing plant for three years and participated on the MSU dairy product evaluation team. His future career aspirations include cheesemaking and dairy sensory studies.

Meyers, the daughter of Renee LeVasseur and James Meyers, completed a 10-day study abroad program to Vietnam in March 2015.While at MSU, she has been involved in the Animal Science Undergraduate Research Student Association, the International Relations Organization and the MSU Model United Nations. She received the American Society of Animal Science Scholastic Achievement Award in June 2013.

Vanderploeg, the daughter of Klaas and Mares Vanderploeg, completed a one-month study abroad trip to South Africa in 2015. At MSU, she is a member of the MSU Dairy Club and competed on the MSU collegiate dairy cattle judging team in 2015. Vanderploeg completed a lab technician internship with NorthStar Cooperative and has worked in the MSU Mastitis Laboratory.

When the occasion

Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation

suggests

Make a contribution to the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation, where the earnings provide scholarships to students in dairy industry-related fields.

flowers,

MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO:

consider

Michigan State University

a living,

DESIGNATE

growing TRIBUTE.

Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation (A10901) MAIL TO: Dr. Miriam Weber Nielsen, Department of Animal Science; Michigan State University, 1250 Anthony Hall, 474 S. Shaw Lane, East Lansing, MI 48824-1225

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MESSENGER | APRIL 2016


HAROLD AND LILLIAN GREMEL ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP:

ARCHIE STUDER SCHOLARSHIP:

VELMAR GREEN SCHOLARSHIP:

Meggan Freeland

Timothy Frahm

Paul Dunneback

Timothy (TJ) Frahm of Frankenmuth, Michigan, was chosen as the 201415 recipient of the Archie Studer Scholarship from the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation Inc. at Michigan State University (MSU). The $3,500 scholarship is named after the late Archie Studer, who owned and operated Kenowa Acres Dairy Farm for more than 35 years. Frahm is the son of Eric Frahm and Teresa Crook. He received the award based on his academic achievements, involvement in extracurricular activities and interest in one day attaining a career in dairy breeding. Timothy is a senior majoring in animal science and expects to graduate in Dec. 2016.

Paul Dunneback of Grand Rapids, Mich., was chosen as the 201516 recipient of the Velmar Green Scholarship from the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation Inc., at Michigan State University (MSU). The $3,500 scholarship is named in honor of innovative dairy leader C. Velmar Green of Elsie, Mich. The award is presented to a secondyear student in the MSU Institute of Agricultural Technology dairy management certificate program.

Meggan Freeland of Allegan, Michigan, has been chosen as the 2015-16 recipient of the Harold and Lillian Gremel endowed scholarship through the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation Inc., at Michigan State University (MSU). The $3,500 scholarship is named in honor of Harold and in memory of Lillian Gremel of Sebewaing. The scholarship is awarded annually to a student currently in veterinary school at MSU who completed the Production Animal Scholars Program in the Department of Animal Science. Freeland, the daughter of Ron and Cindy Freeland, received the award based on her academic achievements, involvement in extracurricular activities and interest in pursuing a career as a large animal (food production animal) veterinarian. She graduated from MSU with a bachelor’s of animal science degree in production medicine in May 2015, and plans to earn her doctorate of veterinary medicine specializing in production animal medicine in May 2019. As an MSU student, Freeland was a varsity letter winner and member of the Big Ten Cross Country championship team from 2010 to 2013. She also earned Academic All-Big Ten honors from 2009 to 2013. Freeland has gained practical experience working for Alta Genetics, Schaendorf Dairy Farm, Rich-Ro Dairy Farm, the Oakdale Large Animal Clinic, Fleming Dairy Farm and the MSU Swine Farm. She was a member of 4-H for 10 years. The Harold and Lillian Gremel endowed scholarship was established in 2007 by the Gremel family. Together during their 52 years of marriage, the Huron County dairy producers and lifetime industry supporters.

At MSU, Frahm has been an active member of the MSU Dairy Club and competed on the Michigan 4-H dairy cattle judging team at the All-American in Harrisburg, Penn., and the North American International Livestock Exhibition in Louisville, Ky. He will compete as a member of the MSU intercollegiate dairy cattle judging team in 2016. In 2012, Frahm won the All-American 4-H Dairy Management Contest in Harrisburg, Penn., and attended the Dairy Challenge Academy in Syracuse, NY, in 2015. Prior to attending MSU, Frahm was active in 4-H and was selected to attend the National 4-H Dairy Conference. Frahm has been employed as a relief artificial insemination technician for ABS Global, Inc. since 2012. After graduation, he plans to continue working for ABS Global, Inc., as well as on his family’s Golden Elm Dairy farm.

Dunneback is the son of Max, Sr., and Linda Dunneback. He received the award based on his academic achievements, involvement in extracurricular activities and interest in returning to his family’s dairy and beef operation after graduation. While at MSU, Cole completed a sales internship with Alta Genetics in Michigan, Indiana and Ohio. He also participated in the MSU and National Dairy Challenge contests in 2015. The Velmar Green Scholarship was established in 2009 by MMPA to recognize Green for his 40 years of service to the MMPA board of directors. Green is the owner of Green Meadow Farms, Inc., one of the largest herds of registered Holsteins in North America and home to an on-site teaching laboratory for MSU College of Veterinary Medicine students.

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Apply for an MDMSF Scholarship! DONALD AND VALERA MURRAY ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP:

NICK BELLOWS SCHOLARSHIP:

Kathryn Kesler

Ethan Haywood

Kathryn Kesler of Hastings, Michigan, was chosen as the 2015-16 recipient of the Donald and Valera Murray endowed scholarship through the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation Inc., at MSU. The $4,000 scholarship is named in honor of Donald Murray, a former MSU Extension dairy specialist, and his wife Valera. Kesler, the daughter of Mike and Marge Kesler, received the award based on her academic achievements, involvement in extracurricular activities and interest in pursuing a career in the dairy industry. She is currently a senior majoring in animal science with a concentration in the production animal scholars program and on schedule to graduate in May. Kesler aspires to practice production animal medicine. At MSU, Kesler is a member of the MSU Honors College and routinely made the Dean’s List. She is a member of the Block and Bridle Club, participated on the MSU Dairy Challenge and competed on the MSU Livestock Judging Team. Kesler is a board member of both the Michigan Junior Chianina and Maine-Anjou breed associations. She has worked on 1,000, 5,000- and 10,000-head commercial dairy operation, and for a 100-head commercial beef herd. The Donald and Valera Murray endowed scholarship was created in 2007 to recognize Dr. Murray’s leadership role in establishing the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation. He guided the Foundation and served as its secretary from its beginnings in 1957 until he retired in 1972. 22

MESSENGER | APRIL 2016

Ethan Haywood of Hastings, Michigan, was chosen as the 2015-16 recipient of the Nick Bellows Scholarship from the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation Inc., at Michigan State University (MSU). The $3,500 scholarship is named in honor of Nick Bellows, the former chief executive officer of the United Dairy Industry of Michigan (UDIM). The award is presented to an MSU student with a career interest in dairy promotions. Haywood is the son of Luke and Renee Haywood. He received the award based on his academic achievements, involvement in extracurricular activities and interest in one day attaining a career in agricultural marketing or communications or dairyrelated sales. Haywood is a sophomore majoring in animal science and minoring in agronomy with an emphasis on forage production. At MSU, Haywood has been an active member of the MSU Dairy Club and the MSU Block and Bridle Club. Prior to attending MSU, Haywood was active in FFA, serving as the Michigan FFA State Vice President in 2014. Haywood was also active in 4-H. Haywood is involved in Haywood Brothers Sweet Corn, Haywood Family Cheese and Sand Creek Dairy. After graduation, Haywood intends to be the sixth generation family member to return to the over 100-year-old dairy operation and continue diversifying the business. The Nick Bellows Scholarship was established in 2011 by the UDIM board of directors and staff members to recognize Bellows for his two and a half decades of commitment and dedication as the organization’s CEO.

To complete an application or learn more about MDMSF Scholarships, please visit www.ans.msu.edu.

IMPORTANT DATES: September 27, 2016 Deadline for freshman, Ag Tech and vet student scholarship applications.

February 28, 2017 Deadline for four-year scholarship applications (first-time and renewal)


YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

Workshops Available for Dairy Producers

H

Answering difficult questions

ave you ever walked away from a conversation with a consumer about dairy and thought “I wish I had an answer to their question?” Or, do you want to share pictures and stories from your farm but don’t know how to get started?

Why do you remove the calves from their mom? Are there antibiotics in milk? These are just a few questions you may receive in the grocery store, at a community meeting or even at a family gathering. Join us to learn tips to navigate potentially heated questions.

The United Dairy Industry of Michigan (UDIM), works on behalf of dairy producers across the state to provide dairy product promotion and nutrition education service, and to connect consumers with dairy producers.

We’ve all thought, “It won’t happen to me, not on my farm, not to my family.” But if a crisis does occur, who will you call, what steps will you take and how will you recover? As dairy producers you have a plan for everything, how you raise your calves, the milking process and the crops you grow, we’ll help you create an onfarm crisis plan and introduce the resources to help your farm and family prepare for a potential crisis

You may be familiar with the resources available, from educational materials to promote dairy to dairy producer grants that provide funding for dairy products at local events, to chocolate milk grants for high schools. UDIM also host workshops to arm producers with the tools and resources needed to tell their dairy story. Are you already meeting with farmers in your area? Is there an opportunity for a workshop to be added to the agenda at your local vet clinic or feed mill meeting? UDIM will cover the cost of the conference room, provide the materials and equipment needed for each workshop, arrange a meal or snack depending on when the meeting is held, and create an invitation you can mail or hand to your peers. All you have to do is connect UDIM to the organization hosting the meeting, and recruit your fellow dairy producers! Choose from one of the sessions listed at right, or a combination, that will best fit the needs of you and the dairy producers you will recruit. These workshops can be tailored to fit the time the group has available, we recommend 1-3 hours.

Create an on-farm crisis plan

Connecting with your community Our neighbors and others may know us in the community, but what do they think about our farm or product? Join us to discuss how to share your dairy story with those in your community

Hosting a memorable farm tour Do you host farm tours, or has your family talked about hosting farm tours? We have checklists to help you plan an event, from the first phone call asking you to host a visit, through the preparations in the weeks before, and to the last-minute details. We’ll also walk through the resources available to host farm tours. Sharing your dairy story through social media More and more information, photos and stories are shared online. Good or bad. And dairy needs to continue having a voice in this avenue. Join us to learn how to navigate online, post photos, or start a farm account. If you’re already online, join us to learn tips to enhance your social presence and gain new followers. If you’re not entrenched in social media, invite someone from your farm who is!

I’m trained, now what? If you’ve participated in a past session and are connecting with consumers every chance you get, keep up the great work! Check out our Dairy Promotion toolkit at: http://goo.gl/iwVvRX for other ideas and topics to connect with consumers. The table contains a suggested monthly topic, click on the links for additional details, resources and checklists to help you connect on each topic. TO SCHEDULE A SESSION OR TO LEARN MORE, PLEASE CONTACT JOLENE GRIFFIN AT JOLENE@MILKMEANSMORE.ORG OR 517-349-8923.

RIGHT: YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION ORGANIZATION HAS TIPS AND TOOLS TO HELP YOU CONTINUE CONNECTING WITH CONSUMERS ABOUT YOUR FARM, THE MILK YOU PRODUCE AND THE DAIRY PRODUCTS THEY FEED THEIR FAMILIES.

APRIL 2016 | MESSENGER

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MERCHANDISE

Spring Cleaning Even after a relatively mild winter, April and the promise of springtime is welcome to all. But maybe what is not so welcome is the thought of spring cleaning. Like it or not, this is the time of year to prepare the milkhouse and parlor ready for the Grade A surveys. While we may not be able (or willing) to do the cleaning for you, the merchandise warehouse carries many products to help you keep your inspector reasonably happy. Listed below are products designed to help our members keep their milking facilities as clean as possible. 2171 General Cleaner is a powdered, non-chlorinated manual cleaner. It rinses readily, leaving no residue or soap films on stainless surfaces. It is packaged in a 50# box containing 100- 8 oz. individual packets. Stock #: 6081

Member price: $123.94

HC-10 is a powdered alkaline manual detergent used to clean stainless steel. It rinses readily leaving no residue or soap films on equipment. It does contain a chlorine releasing compound to aid in the removal of protein soils. It comes in a 10# plastic pail. Stock #: 6005

Stock #: 5901 - 1 gal. / Member price: $20.0

Stock #: 6101 - 55 gal. / Member price: $953.31

Shine Pro is a liquid self-foaming acid detergent suitable for manual and foam cleaning applications. Simply pre-rinse to remove loose soil, foam all equipment surfaces at the recommended concentration level. Then allow it to soak for 5 to 15 minutes and rinse thoroughly. Heavily soiled surfaces may require some scrubbing. It is available in a 5 gallon pail.

Stock #: 7012- 1 gal. / Member price: $27.20

Stock #: 6075-55 gal. / Member price: $1444.71

Liquid Sep-ko is liquid general purpose cleaner. It is suitable for most surfaces including plastic, metal and painted. It is available in one gallon containers. Member price: $16.65

In addition to the cleaners listed above, we have stiff bristled wall brushes and soft bristled equipment brushes and the handles to fit them. Even if we can’t make the “spring cleaning” task more pleasant, we can make it more efficient with the products mentioned above. If you have any questions concerning these products or any other merchandise matter, please call us at the warehouse.

Three Ways to Order your MMPA Merchandise 1. Place order through your milk hauler 2. Call in your order: Duane Farmer, Supervisor........................................................... 989-317-8370 Toll Free..............................................................................................877-367-6455 Orders (Novi).......................................................... 800-572-5824 then dial 2 3. Fax in your order: MMPA Merchandise fax.................................................................989-317-8372

24

supplies through your hauler.

ECOLAB 24 -Hour Medical Emergency Hotline: 1-800-328-0026 For Service, call the Ecolab Service Message Center 1-800-392-3392 or one of the following service representatives:

2105 Fohl Street SW Canton, OH 44706 330-407-0220

Member price: $ 76.99

Liquid K is a concentrated liquid, general purpose cleaner. It cleans all types of surfaces including glass, plastic, metal and painted. It rinses readily, leaving no film. It is available in 1 gallon and 55 gallon containers.

Stock #: 5912

Order your Member Merchandise

Stan Palmer

Member price: $90.36

Enforce LP is a liquid self-foaming chlorinated alkaline detergent suitable for manual and foam cleaning applications. Pre-rinse to remove loose soil and foam all equipment using the recommended concentration level. Allow to soak for 5 to 15 minutes, then rinse thoroughly. Some scrubbing may be required for heavily soiled surfaces. Stock #: 604

These are service personnel only.

Member price: $17.65

HD LC-30 is an acid detergent designed for manual cleaning of stainless equipment. It rinses readily leaving equipment free of film. It is available in both a 1 gallon container and a 55 gallon drum.

Stock #: 6049

Chemical, Sanitizer and Teat Dip Contact Information

MESSENGER | APRIL 2016

Ben Johnson 4461 Cambridge Dr. Port Huron, MI 48060 810-824-0636 Pat Mitchell 7273 N. Rollin Hwy. Addison, MI 49220 517-403-0928


PREMIUMS MERCHANDISE

MMPA Quality Premium Program

MMPA Member Testing Fees

Somatic Cell Count premiums and deductions (in addition to Federal Order SCC Adjustments computed in the producer pay price) will be paid at the following levels:

Payment for testing will be made through an automatic milk check deduction. All costs are listed per individual sample.

50,000 or below..........+55¢/cwt.

201,000-225,000..........+20¢/cwt.

51,000-75,000.............. +50¢/cwt.

226,000-250,000..........+15¢/cwt.

76,000-100,000.......... +45¢/cwt.

251,000-300,000......... +00¢/cwt.

101,000-125,000..........+40¢/cwt.

301,000-400,000........ - 30¢/cwt.

126,000-150,000..........+35¢/cwt.

401,000-500,000...... -$1.00/cwt.

151,000-175,000........... +30¢/cwt.

501,000-600,000.......-$1.50/cwt.

176,000-200,000........+25¢/cwt.

601,000 and greater.-$2.00/cwt.

Cow Tests: $1 Cow samples may be tested for: Culture for Streptococcus agalactiae, Strep non ag, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase negative staph, gram negative and/or SCC. Additional testing can be coordinated through your MMPA member representative to include:

A payment of 5¢/cwt. will be added for each of the following, if the count is equal to or below: • 10,000 Raw Bacteria Count • 20,000 Pre-Incubated (PI) Count

Raw bacteria count and components.

There will be a deduction of 10¢/cwt. for: • Greater than 100,000 Raw Bacteria Count A high raw count deduction will be waived if the producer has received the quality premium the previous three months for raw bacteria count.

All costs are listed per individual sample.

To qualify for Raw and PI Bacteria Count premiums there must not be any of the following during the month: • Positive drug residue • Abnormal freeze points • High load count shipment or rejected load shipment • #3 or #4 sediment • Raw Bacteria count over 100,000 The count levels for raw and PI will be determined on one test run per month. To qualify for MMPA SCC premiums there must be: • No abnormal freeze points during the month To qualify for MMPA volume premiums there must be: • No abnormal freeze points during the month • An average somatic cell count of 750,000 or less

All herd tests must be scheduled with the laboratory through your MMPA member representative.

Additional Tests Available: • Mycoplasma Cultures...........................................................................$13 • Bacteriology Cultures..........................................................................$15 – Includes identification of bacteria and drug susceptibility.

• Bovine Viral Diarrhea - PCR.........................................................................................................$40 - ELISA........................................................................................................$6 • Johne’s Milk Test - PCR.........................................................................................................$40 - ELISA – cows.........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank......................................................................................... $10 • Bovine Leukosis Test - ELISA – cows.........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank......................................................................................... $10 • Milk Pregnancy ELISA.................................................................... $4.50 Lab test results by mail: $2/month All tests must be scheduled through your MMPA member representative or the laboratory for proper sample submission protocol.

ANTEL-BIO TESTING Loc/Hlr/Producer # _________________________________ Sample Date______________________________ Member name_______________________________________________________________________________ Sample ID__________________________________________________________________________________ BLV ELISA_________ Johne’s ELISA____________ Johne’s PCR____________ Pregnancy_____________

Refer to above for current pricing. The cost of testing is the responsibility of the producer. This card MUST be filled out completely when sending in samples to be tested by Antel-Bio to avoid potential service charges.

APRIL 2016 | MESSENGER

25


FREELINERS To place your freeliner ad please call 1-800-572-5824, ext. 202, or fax 248-426-3412, or email your ad to: Muszynski@mimilk.com.

Bulls Registered Holstein Bulls: We now have a nice selection of service age bulls, sired by top AI sires. Green Meadow Farms, Elsie, MI. 989-862-4291 or visit www.greenmeadowfarms.com. Service age Holstein bulls. Call Steve Alexander, 810-622-8548 evenings or 810-404-8548. Registered Holstein breeding bulls, all AI sired from top bulls, b&w, red, red carrier and some polled, high production, low SCC herd. Bulls are priced to sell. Ver Hage Holsteins, 269-673-4886 or 269-217-6076, ask for Tim. www.verhageholsteins.com.

Cows & Heifers Holstein Cows - herd average 84 pounds & 110 somatic cell - your pick. 734-776-0285. 85 Head Holstein Dairy Cattle Farm Auction Friday, April 8th. Complete line farm machinery and Belgian Horses, owner Wm. Byler. For more info and brochure. Yoder Bros. Auction Service 989-386-9082.

Equipment 716 New Holland Forage Wagon, 10 ton Kilbros, running gear, three beater, roof telescopic tongue. All in good condition, $2,000 firm. 989-574-7229.

Weaver 18-ft. crowd gate, $6,000. Double 7 free standing parallel parlor with air gates. 3-in. Surge low line with receiver. 14 Delaval SST2 automatic takeoff. Sutorbilt oil less 4mp vacuum pump. Navigator pipeline washer. Mueller 51 plate cooler, $10,000. Newer bulk tank model OE 1,500-gal. with a 5-hp. compressor and tank washer, $10,000. Delaval 1,000 gal. milk tank with newer agitator, a 5-hp. compressor, 3 years old, $2,500. Bradford White 80 gal. electric hot water tank, $100. AO Smith electric hot water tank, $100. Calf Hutches – Calf Tel hutches, Agra Plastic Calf hutches, Poly Dome Calf hutches, Safeguard Calf hutches, several to pick from. $200 each or best offer. 989-205-0963 or 989-2050962. 1550 Klaus hay rake. 989-436-3910. Roto-Mix Mixer 274-12. Capacity is 270 cubic foot. New scale head. Good tires. Merlin Yoder, Colon, MI. 269-432-2714. Best time: 8:30-9:00 or leave message.

Dairy Equipment Used Single 10 treated cow parlor, heavy duty homemade butt pan, bomatic pulsators and bottom unload claws, newer pulasator control, 7.5 hp. lobe vacuum pump. $6,900 obo. 517-749-9112. 16 Schlueter milker take off boxes, boards, sensors, control box and valve. Any reasonable offer accepted. 989574-7229.

Bou-Matic variable speed vacuum pump 7.5 hp, $3000. 10 flo-star claws, $20 each. Plate cooler, $200. 3” low line with receiver and milk pump, $600. Free heater, $200. Houle 3” 12 ft. electric pump for milk house waste water $800. Bradford White 75 gal commercial LP Gas water heater, $600. Call 517-331-4475 Delaval plate cooler model MP3DE-81 SS stainless steel, 81 plates, $2,100. Call 231-920-8025.

Misc. Dairy Farm, Cheboygan, Michigan. 367+ acres, set up for dairy with double 14 parallel parlor, 2000 gal. bulk tank, 400+ freestall barn, many other out buildings. Could also be a place to raise heifers, beef, crops, etc. Can be a turnkey operation that would include farm, equipment, cows, package deal just set up. Or will sell farm, equipment, cattle separately. 7 bedroom brick home, on one floor. 600 acres of rental land available. Call for new prices & packet on farm. 517-202-9421 Cheboygan, Mich.

Wanted Registered Holsteins. Call Brent at 989-551-0681. Used freestall mats and used head locks for feeding area. Harley Schrock 260-463-3275 ext. 3.

Freeliner Policy The Freeliners column is open to current MMPA members who wish to advertise— at no charge—goods or services relating directly to their dairy farm operations. • An item submitted will be published for no more than two consecutive months (one month, unless otherwise requested). After that, it will be withdrawn. • It will be published again for no more than two consecutive months only if the member resubmits the item by writing or calling the Novi office. • Reference to a name of a firm or other commercial enterprise with which a member is involved will be deleted, with permission of the member. • If the member does not wish such deletion, he/she may choose to have the item published as a Classified Ad at the regular per-line Classified Ad rate. • Freeliners must be received by the 10th of the month preceding the desired month of publication. Example: To be included in the May issue, the freeliner must be at the MMPA office by April 10.

26

MESSENGER | APRIL 2016


CFP

Pounds of Fat and Protein in your bulk tank pay the bills. Turn to these elite CFP sires to positively impact your bottom line.

SUPERSIRE

+2,359 M

+181 CFP 99% Rel.

HEADLINER

+2719GTPI®

+1,928 M

+145 CFP 98% Rel.

ElitE CFP SuPEr SamPlErS¯

MOGUL

Milk

CFP

+2,353

+179

75

+2698

7HO12255 PETERPAN +2,063

+169

78

+2540

7HO12413 EZIO

+1,740

+165

78

+2579

7HO12518 SNOWBOY

+2,022

+159

78

+2529

7HO12256 MAGUIRE

+1,525

+157

79

+2465

7HO12600 MODESTY

+1,828

+156

75

+2854

7HO13267 DUKE

+1,439 M

+133 CFP 99% Rel.

™ Super Sampler, gender SELECTed are trademarks of Select Sires Inc. TPI® is a registered trademark of Holstein Association USA, Inc.12/15 USDA-CDCB Genomic Evaluations.

+2568 GTPI®

+2540 GTPI®

800.631.3510 www.northstarcooperative.com

Rel.% GTPI®


CLASSIFIED ADS

Cost for classifieds is $20 per ad, up to six lines. All ads must be received by the 10th of the month before the month of desired publication. Send check or money order for $20 for up to 6 lines with your order. MMPA neither sponsors nor endorses products or services advertised in the Messenger. You may submit your ads by: MAIL:

Classified Ads | Michigan Milk Messenger

P.O. BOX 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002

EMAIL: Muszynski@mimilk.com FAX: 248-426-3412

OPPERMAN GROOVING: We can fix your scabbled floors. Diamond sawed grooves, no hammering or cracking of concrete. No hoof damage. Call Opperman Grooving Inc., Portland. 517-647-7381. DAVIDSON CEMENT GROOVING, INC: NO water needed. Wider, rougher grooves for better traction. We also offer texturing for your previously grooved floors. 3 operators will travel Michigan and other states. No interest payment terms. Est. since 1987. Call 1-800-365-3361. CONCRETE GROOVING BY TRISTATE SCABBLING, home of the 2” wide groove. Best traction, lowest prices. (800) 554-2288. www. tristatescabbling.com A SURE WAY TO KEEP YOUR COWS UPRIGHT! Concrete grooving/ texturing provides high quality traction in new & old concrete, fast service. Call for your below pricing 989-635-1494. BLUE RIBBON HOOF TRIMMING, LLC. FOR SALE: 5000-4000-3000-25002000-1500 OH MUELLER LATE MODEL BULK TANK MILK TANKS, complete, will trade. 1-800-558-0112.

ROUNDUP READY II, LIBERTY LINK, AND MCIA 2323 SOYBEAN SEEDS. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414. 2014 RB 450 ROUND BALER. 4X5 Baler, laced belts, 1.8 meter pickup, twine net wrap, $29,000. 517-5434770. 2012 NEW HOLLAND BR7060. 4X5 Baler, endless belts, 1.8 meter pickup, twine net wrap, Silage Special, $24,500. 517-543-4770. 2012 NEW HOLLAND H7450 DISCBINE. 13-ft., drawbar, swivel hitch, very nice, $22,500. 517-543-4770. 2013 NEW HOLLAND H7230 DISCBINE. 10-ft. 4-in., drawbar, swivel hitch, very nice, $19,900. 517-5434770.

Concrete Grooving and Texturing

PTO and Automatic Start Generators

Call: Jeff Brisky - Owner Toll Free: 1-800-294-1202

1-800-248-8070 M-40 South Hamilton, MI 49419

Cell: 1-716-353-1137

www.hamiltondist.com

WANTED TO BUY: USED BULK MILK TANKS, 200 gallons & larger, Sunset & Mueller, 1-800-558-0112. DRY HAY & STRAW (large & small bales) & BARLEY FOR FEED. 989-7231886 or 989-277-1414. FARMERS: INCREASE YIELDS 7 PROFIT by using the 1# crop production system. Distributors needed. 260-768-8137 ext. 1 ALFALFA/TIMOTHY/BROME MIX HAY AVAILABLE. Newer seedings, quality net wrapped 4x5 round bales. Stored inside immediately after baling, very nice hay! Big Rapids, 231-598-4871.

28

MESSENGER | APRIL 2016

REGISTERED HOLSTEIN BULLS OVER 100 SERVICE AGE BULLS FOR YOUR SELECTION! A special herd sire or a truck load of breeder bulls. Ready to go to work on your farm!

• Sired by the top sires from the U.S. and Canada • From our top production cows

GREEN MEADOW FARMS 6400 Hollister Road, Elsie, MI 48831 Phone: 989-862-4291

www.greenmeadowfarms.com


POLICIES MERCHANDISE

MMPA Policy on Drug Residue in Milk MILK ON FARM – DRUG RESIDUE SUSPECTED

MILK SHIPPED — POSITIVE DRUGS CONFIRMED

If a member suspects milk in the farm bulk tank contains drug residue:

If a member ships milk from the farm and testing by approved laboratory methods show that the milk contained drug residue, the member will be assessed the penalties imposed by the state regulatory agency and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums.

1. Call a MMPA member representative to have the milk in the tank tested. A “hold” must be placed on the tank contents until the test results are known.

OR 2. The member can test the milk on the farm. If dumped, the member must be sure to take the stick reading, record the number of pounds of milk and report the information to their member representative. • If the tank tests negative (no drugs present), the milk may be released and shipped. • If the tank tests positive (drugs present), the member representative will authorize the member to dump the tank of milk. The member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.* • If for any reason MMPA personnel must pick up samples at the farm for testing three or more times within 12 consecutive months, the member involved will be charged $25 per trip.

If a loss is incurred by MMPA due to the disposal and/or non-marketability of a load of milk or milk products containing drug residue, then the member responsible will be provided an invoice for the entire value of the loss plus transportation and disposal costs as required by the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance. This invoice may be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. Milk from that member’s farm tank must be tested and found clear of drugs before the next tank of milk can be picked up. A hauler whose entire load sample shows the presence of drugs will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all show negative.

ALL POSITIVE DRUG RESIDUE SHIPMENTS MUST BE REPORTED TO THE ENFORCEMENT AGENCY.

MMPA Milk Quality Policy QUALITY QUESTIONABLE When a member suspects that the milk in the farm bulk tank is of poor quality they should call a MMPA member representative who will authorize milk in the tank to be dumped. If the member dumps the milk on their own, they must be sure to take the stick reading and record the number of pounds of milk, and report the information to the member representative. If the milk is dumped, the member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.* In order to receive payment for an added water voluntary dump, the member must install a Swingline Safety Switch. The Swingline Safety Switch can be ordered from the Mt. Pleasant warehouse. The MMPA member representative will verify the switch has been installed. Reimbursement for the Swingline Safety Switch and the voluntary dump will then be made to the member. The member assumes all liability for losses incurred as a result of shipping poor quality or contaminated milk.

MILK SHIPPED – HIGH BACTERIA COUNT

If… 1. a load of milk is received (unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2. a sample from the load has a bacteria count of 300,000 or more and, 3. testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members having a bacteria count of 300,000 or more, then the member or members involved will be charged the value of one-half of one day’s production** and will be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums. * The member will only be paid for two (2) voluntary dumps in a rolling 12 month period. ** For members using more than one bulk tank, the assessment will be based on the value of milk in the tank or tanks in violation of the MMPA quality policy.

REJECTED LOAD SHIPMENT

If… 1. a load of milk is rejected (not unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2. the milk cannot be sold through normal Grade A channels for reasons of quality which results in the load being sold or disposed of at a loss to MMPA, and, 3. testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members that caused the contamination or rejection of the load, then, the member or members responsible will be charged the full value of the loss to MMPA plus transportation and disposal costs, and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums except for loads rejected for temperature. 4. MMPA will provide an invoice to the member for the amount of the loss, to be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. If a member has three or more occurances within 12 consecutive months, that member must appear before the MMPA board of directors to review steps taken on the farm to correct the quality problem which will enable MMPA to continue to market the milk for this member.

HAULER A hauler whose entire load sample exceeds 300,000 cells per mL bacteria count will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all are less than 100,000. A hauler will be responsible for all costs incurred by MMPA for loads rejected for temperature. Charges and assessments made under this program will be withheld from milk checks of members or haulers involved.

APRIL 2016 | MESSENGER

29


MARKET REPORT

Statistical Summary | FOR MILK MARKETED IN FEBRUARY 2016 Market Statistics - Mideast Federal Order #33 (pounds)

% This Month Year Ago Change

National Trends* (million pounds)

2015

2014 % Change

Total Class 1 Sales

518,037,384

493,758,866

+4.92

Production

Total Class 2 Sales

305,527,018

303,881,918

+0.54

California

3,300 3,282 +0.5

Total Class 3 Sales

497,116,591

512,034,988

-2.91

Wisconsin

2,381 2,187 +8.9

Total Class 4 Sales

280,915,532

261,124,097

+7.58

Total Production

1,601,596,525

1,570,799,869

+1.96

New York

1,144

Class 1 Utilization

32.3%

Idaho

31.4%

1,056

+8.3

1,111 1,052 +5.6

Pennsylvania 869 840 +3.5

Mideast Federal Order #33 Total Producers...............................................................................................5,323 Avg. Daily Production per farm............................................................... 10,375 Avg. Protein Test............................................................................................. 3.15%

Michigan

855 766 +11.6

Texas

826 814 +1.5

Minnesota

768 731 +5.1

New Mexico

591

Avg. Butterfat Test.......................................................................................3.83% Avg. Oth Solids Test..................................................................................... 5.75% Avg. SCC - MMPA......................................................................................159,000

Component Pricing Information Mideast Federal Order #33

-2.6

Washington 525 507 +3.6 Ohio

440 421 +4.5

Indiana

334 309 +8.1

Total U.S.*

15,820

15,124

+4.6

Butterfat Price /lb...................................................................................... $2.3778

U.S. Y-T-D*

32,401

31,668

+2.3

Other Solids Price /lb.............................................................................. $0.0492

* For 23 States

Protein Price /lb........................................................................................... $1.7389

Class III Price @ 3.5%................................................................................... $13.80 Prod. Price Diff /cwt. - Mich Mkt...............................................................$0.37 Uniform Price @ 3.5%....................................................................................$14.17 SCC Adjustment /cwt /1000............................................................. $0.00076

AMS Survey Prices Product

Monthly Avg

Cheese /lb..........................................................................................................1.5178 Butter /lb........................................................................................................... 2 . 1 3 5 Nonfat Dry Milk /lb.........................................................................................0.789 Dry Whey /lb............................................................................................... 0.2469

30

607

MESSENGER | APRIL 2016


MERCHANDISE MMPA STAFF

MMPA Field Staff*

Novi Headquarters

Northwest Area Supervisor Ben Chapin, Blanchard.............................................................. 989-289-0731

Main Office Local line.................................................................................. 248-474-6672 Toll free.....................................................................................800-572-5824

Energy Auditor Frank Brazeau, Oconto, WI....................................................906-250-0337

General Manager Joe Diglio............................................................................................. ext. 200

Lyndsay Earl, Ludington.............................................................231-519-2455 Deb Gingrich, Leroy...................................................................248-520-3580 Sarah Michalek, Portland.........................................................248-305-0537 Dirk Okkema, Blanchard........................................................ 248-756-2062

Chief Financial Officer Josep Barenys.................................................................................... ext. 240 Member and Government Relations Sheila Burkhardt.................................................................................ext. 208

Northeast Area

Quality Amandeep Dhillon.............................................................................ext. 305

Supervisor & Mastitis Management Specialist Christy Dinsmoore, Fairgrove................................................. 248-513-7920

Manufactured Product Sales Jim Dodson.......................................................................................... ext. 229

Animal Care Coordinator, Energy Auditor Lindsay Green, East Lansing................................................... 989-488-8159

Laboratory Supervisor Patti Huttula.......................................................................................... ext. 219

Animal Care Coordinator Drew Rupprecht, Clio................................................................ 269-986-6793

Member Services Dean Letter.............................................................................. 989-289-9251

Ben Butcher, Durand...................................................................248-514-5273

Sales Michael Morrissey................................................................................ ext. 213

Ashley Herriman, Alpena......................................................... 269-245-6632 Bridget Moore, Sears................................................................... 231-414-4539

Milk Sales/Dispatch Carl Rasch.............................................................................................ext. 244

South Area

Credit/Insurance Cheryl Schmandt.................................................................................ext. 210

Supervisor & Energy Auditor Ed Zuchnik, Three Rivers...........................................................269-967-7351 Krista Beeker, Topeka, IN........................................................ 269-986-6792 Dave Brady, Grass Lake................... 517-522-5965 or (c) 517-937-9061 Elyse Martin, Charlotte............................................................... 810-701-6460 Joe Packard, Kalamazoo.......................................................... 248-520-3481 Emily Smith, Bronson................................................................ 269-535-0822

Other Services Bulk Tank Calibration Gary Best, Lapeer........................... 810-664-4984 or (c) 586-484-9279 Mastitis Management Specialist Steve Lehman, Ithaca...................... 989-875-3441 or (c) 989-330-1638 Sustainability Coordinator Lynn Nagengast.......................................................................... 248-444-6775 Merchandise Coordinator, Energy Auditor Katie Pierson, Coleman............................................................989-289-9686

Data Processing Gregory Schulkey.............................................................................. ext. 237 Communications Allison Stuby........................................................................................ext. 296 Human Resources Cindy Tilden.........................................................................................ext. 220 Member Relations Jessica Welch......................................................................................ext. 303

Manufacturing Plants Constantine Dave Davis, Plant Manager................................................ 269-435-2835 Ovid Colt Johnson, Plant Manager...........................................989-834-2221

MMPA Labs Novi (Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) In Michigan............................................................................... 800-572-5824 Toll Free..................................................................................... 800-233-2405 Ovid (Daily, 6 a.m.-10 p.m.)..................................................989-834-2515 Constantine (Daily, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.)...................................800-391-7560

Merchandise - Mt. Pleasant Supervisor: Duane Farmer Main Line.......................................................................................... 989-317-8370 Toll Free ...........................................................................................877-367-6455 Orders (Novi)........................................................ 800-572-5824, then dial 2

*If you are unable to

reach your assigned member representative, please contact the representatives listed in your area.

Fax.......................................................................................................989-317-8372

APRIL 2016 | MESSENGER

31


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