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IN THIS THIS ISSUE IN NAVY COLLEGE COLLEGE NAVY IN THIS ISSUE PROGRAM SURVEY:

Vol. 26, No. 30 Norfolk, VA  |  flagshipnews.com  Vol. 26, No. 30 Norfolk, VA  |  flagshipnews.com 

PROGRAM SURVEY: NORFOLK NAVAL The Navy Navy College Program Program The College SHIPYARD CELEBRA(NCP) announced a new, more more announced a new, TION(NCP) FOR OUR NAefficient customer customer service service efficient TION’S VETERANS opinion survey survey July July 24, 24, as as part part opinion of the continuing improvement Every year in November, our of the continuing improvement processtogether for Voluntary Voluntary nation process comes to celefor Education. brate those who fought for»» See See A6 Education.  A6 freedom. ❯❯See A6

07.26.18–08.01.18 07.26.18–08.01.18

TRUMAN STRIKE GROUP RETURNS TO NORFOLK, REMAINS READY

VOL. 26, No. 45, Norfolk, VA | flagshipnews.com

11.19.2020_11.25.2020

“ Courtesy photo

The last American POW released by North Vietnam wanted “one last return” to an aircraft carrier. The Navy made it happen on Veterans Day. F/A-18 Super Hornets perform a fly over the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman F/A-18 Super Super Hornets Hornets perform perform aa fly fly over over the the Nimitz-class Nimitz-class aircraft aircraft carrier carrier USS USS Harry Harry S. S.Truman Truman F/A-18 (CVN 75) during a change of command ceremony for the “Fighting Checkmates” of Strike (CVN 75) 75) during during aa change change of of command command ceremony ceremony for for the the “Fighting “Fighting Checkmates” Checkmates” of of Strike Strike (CVN Fighter Squadron (VFA) 211. Fighter Squadron Squadron (VFA) (VFA) 211. 211. Fighter

MC2 Scott T Swofford MC2 Scott Scott TT Swofford Swofford MC2

The health and safety of our Navy family is our number one priority. We’ve been fighting this virus for a long time, but we’ve still got some more work to do and can’t give in to fatigue. As we enter the holiday season, it’s more important than ever that we look out for each other and ensure our Sailors’ mental health and resiliency remains strong. Check in with one another often and take time to recharge.”

group remains ready to surge forward or regroup remains ready to surge forward or redeploy when called upon. deploy when called upon. “Our strike group’s missions have dem“Our strike group’s missions have demNORFOLK onstrated we are inherently maneuverable NORFOLK NORFOLK onstrated we are inherently maneuverable Nearly 6,500 Sailors of the Harry S. Tru- and flexible while remaining operational unNearly 6,500 Sailors of the Harry S. Tru- and flexible while remaining operational unman Carrier Strike Group (HSTCSG) arrived predictable to any potential adversary,” said man Carrier Strike Group (HSTCSG) arrived predictable to any potential adversary,” said in Naval Station (NS) Norfolk, Virginia, July Black. “This epitomizes the Navy’s dynamic epitomizes Navy’s dynamic in Naval Station (NS) Norfolk, Virginia, July Black. “This By aviation, andconcept thethe younger Agnew was inspired to join force employment and shows this 21.Brock Vergakis Rear Adm. Charles W. Rock, Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic force employment concept and shows this 21. the Navy andand work in theofaviation is ready capable accom- community beThe aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman strike group and capable of accomThe aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman strike group isofready his grandfather. any mission, at any time, as our na(CVN 75) and strike group ships USS Nor- plishingcause NORFOLK mission, at any as our na(CVN 75) and strike group ships USS Nor- plishing any Chase Agnew wastime, an aircraft electrician’s mate, mandy (CG 60), USS Arleigh Burke (DDG tion directs.” mandy (CG 60), USS Arleigh Burke (DDG tion directs.” Lt. Cmdr. Al Agnew was on a reconnaissance his first the job strike brieflygroup took will himnot aboard the aircraft Whileand in Norfolk, 51) and USS Forrest Sherman (DDG 98) MC2 Thomas Gooley While in Norfolk, the strike group will not 51) and over USSHanoi, ForrestVietnam Sherman (DDG 98) mission during tail end of conduct carrier USS Enterprise (CVN MC2 Thomas Thomas Gooley Gooley MC2 only routine maintenance on65). ships, A Sailor embraces his loved on after USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) arrived at Naval arrived after operating for more thanthe three Station onlyaconduct routine maintenance on ships, arrived after operating for more than three when the Vietnam on and December 28,areas 1972 A Sailor Sailor embraces embraces his his loved loved on on after after USS USS Harry Harry S. S.Truman Truman (CVN (CVN 75) 75) arrived arrived at at Naval Naval Station Station A the same his grandfather andThat’s equipment, butaircraft Sailorscarrier will also months in the War U.S. 5th 6th fleets of aircraft Norfolk. had and equipment, butday Sailors willshot alsodown. monthsjet in escorting the U.S. 5th and 6th fleets areas of aircraft Norfolk. Norfolk. fighter him across enemy territory radilaunched from the he was be able to continue advanced training, mainresponsibility. be able to continue advanced training, mainresponsibility. oed in with an urgent message: Turn right. “I guesscertifications, in a roundabout was full circle for as way wellit as “I couldn’t be more proud of this strike tain warfighting certifications, as well as “I couldn’t be his more proudVigilante of this strike Agnew turned RA-5C sharptain thatwarfighting Additionally, the HSTCSG conducted spend time with family and friends. focused and ready for whatever lies ahead.” group team’s performance over more so than Additionally, the HSTCSG conducted spend time with family and friends. focused and ready for whatever lies ahead.” group team’sbecame performance over more thanenough. his jet months nearly inverted. it wasn’t “I’m incredibly proud of the grit, determiWhile deployed, the strike group partici- bilateral operations with allies and partners three of operating in But a highly-dy“I’m incredibly proud of the grit, determiWhile deployed, the strike group partici- bilateral operations with allies and partners three monthsfrom of operating a highly-dyA missile an across enemyinhe saw smashed nation and phenomenal effort Truman’s Sail- pated in a variety of partnership and interop- in both U.S. 5th and 6th fleets, to include namic environment twonever theaters,” nation and phenomenal effort Truman’s Sail- pated in a variety of partnership and interop- in both U.S. 5th and 6th fleets, to include namic environment across twototheaters,” into his aircraft, forcing Agnew eject and killing said HSTCSG Commander Rear Adm. Gene ors have shown over the last three months erability exercises, as well as maritime and Egypt, Morocco, Italy, France, Germany and said 26-year-old HSTCSG Commander Rear Adm. Gene orsofhave shown over the last three months erability exercises, as well as maritime and Egypt, Morocco, Italy, France, Germany and his navigator, Lt. Michael Black. “We carried out the full spectrum Haifely of operating at sea,” said Harry S. Truman’s theater security operations. Strike group the United Kingdom. Also, aircraft from emBlack. “We carried out the full spectrum of operating at sea,” said Harry S. Truman’s theater security operations. Strike group the United Kingdom. Also, aircraft from emLisbon, Ohio. missions from sustained combat flight oper- Commanding Officer Capt. Nick Dienna. units participated in Exercise Baltic Opera- barked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 supported Exercise Baltic Operabarked CarrierAffairs Air Wing (CVW) 1 supported Officer Capt. Nick Dienna. units participated in missions fromfell sustained combat flight oper- Commanding As Agnew to the earth, the sur- we plan Carrier Strike Group 12 Public from the Adriatic Sea and (CSG) Operation Inherent Resolve during May and to enjoy our time in port, tions (BALTOPS) From ations to training and integration with32-year-old NATO “While we plan to enjoy our time in port, tions (BALTOPS) from the Adriatic Sea and Operation Inherent Resolve during May and ations to training and integration with NATO of“While mised he’d be captured and held as a prisoner war including reconnecting with those who sup- Exercise Lightning Handshake with the Moallies and regional partners.” reconnecting with those who sup- Exercise Lightning Handshake with the Moalliesyears. and regional partners.” for A popular song that fromthe the strike era by including Kris us from Force. ported afar, we’re continuing to stay roccan Navy and Air Black also emphasized »»See HOME | A6 ATLANTIC Force. OCEAN Black also popped emphasized that mind the strike »»See HOME | A6 Kristofferson into his - “Whyported me, us from afar, we’re continuing to stay roccan Navy and Air Lord?” Under the leadership of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12, USS Agnew landed in a North Vietnamese rice patty, Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) along with Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8, where he was quickly apprehended and taken to a Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2, CSG-12’s Air and Missile Deprison where he was interrogated, blindfolded and put fense Commander, Commanding Officer of USS Gettysburg (CG through a mock execution. 64), and CSG-12’s Information Warfare Commander commenced Frightening days turned into weeks and then first-ever fully integrated carrier strike group operations for the months, but the years in captivity Agnew feared never Ford-class carrier, Nov. 8. came to fruition. During independent steaming event (ISE) 13, CVW-8 will exHe was released 91 days after he was shot down, ecute cyclic flight operations while CSG-12 oversees unit-level making him the last American prisoner of war freed training, maritime strike exercises, an air defense exercise, and other by the North Vietnamese as the years long conflict larger force exercises. By MC3 Caledon Rabbipal was the guest speaker. By MC3 MC3 Caledon Rabbipal By Caledon Rabbipal was the guest speaker. came to a close. “Recent underway periods have provided my staff and my warNavy Public Affairs Support Element – East Scorby, a native of Manlius, N.Y., asNavy Public Affairs Affairs Support Element Element East his nation in various Navy Public Support –– East Scorby, a native of Manlius, N.Y., asAgnew continued to serve fare commanders a greater understanding of how Ford and Nimitzsumed command of CNRMA on March sumed command of CNRMA on March roles until he retired as a commander in 1986, but he classes are similar and how they are different, but this underway will NORFOLK 10, 2016 and demonstrated innovative NORFOLK NORFOLK 10, more 2016 and demonstrated innovative always told his family the Navy owed him “one enable us to learn how we will fight the Ford-class,” said Rear Adm. Rear Adm. Charles W. Rock relieved leadership in guiding 14 installations Courtesy photo Rear to Adm. Charlescarrier. W. Rock relieved leadership in guiding 14 installations return” an aircraft Craig Clapperton, commander, CSG-12. “This is another stepping Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr. as Com- across a 20-state region. Rear Adm. JohnDay, C. Scorby Jr.now as Comacross ain20-state region. On Veterans Agnew, 80 and living stone to learn, synchronize, and coordinate with fleet stakeholders mander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic While under Scorby’s command, mander, NavySouth Region Mid-Atlantic While under Scorby’s command, rural Mullins, Carolina, finally set foot on an and mature our processes and capabilities to posture the ship and the us,” he said.energy conserva(CNRMA), during a change of command CNRMA encouraged (CNRMA), during a change offirst command CNRMA encouraged energy conservaaircraft carrier again for the time in more than strike group for success in their first workup and deployment cycle.” The only catapults ceremony held at Naval Station Norfolk, tion through initiatives such as working Battle during Chase Agnew’s ceremony held when at Naval Station Norfolk,aboard tion USS throughtime initiatives such as Battle four decades he was invited While this is the first time the entire strike group has operated the shipresulting were catapults No. 4 and No. 3, July 20. “E” for energy on program, in July 20. D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). “E” for energy program, resulting in Dwight together, this past May elements of CVW-8 embarked Ford to which was same catapult The change of command ceremony the region garnering 27the Secretary of the his grandfather used the The change of command ceremony the region garnering 27 Secretary of the It was a trip his family wasn’t sure would ever complete critical milestones that prepared the air wing for this dayand of his fatefulmanagement flight. was immediately followed by a retire- Navy energy water was immediately followed by a retire- Navy energy Chase and water management happen. current scale of operations. They conducted cyclic flight operations was 2017. able to get a photo of an F/A-18 ment ceremony for Scorby. awards during 2016 and Scorby ment ceremony for Scorby. awards during 2016 and 2017. Scorby with thousands of pounds of inert ordnance transported via Ford’s launching catapult Vice Adm. MaryMISSION M. Jackson, com- also championed the from Fleetthat and Fam- that he had framed for a A Vice GRANDSON’S Adm. Mary M. Jackson, com- also championed the Fleet and Famadvanced weapons elevators to F/A-18 Super Hornets to be emgift for his grandfather. mander, Navy Installations Command ily Support Christmas Program, collaborating with mander, Navy Installations Command ily Support Program, collaborating with ployed during close air support and air-to-ground training missions. Agnew’s oldest grandson, Chase Agnew, had But he still wanted to give his grandfather the final “It’s great to embark our air wing on the USS Gerald R. Ford once wanted to get his grandfather aboard an aircraft return knew he craved. »»Seehe CEREMONY | A8 » » See CEREMONY | A8 MCSN Caledon Rabbipal carrier again for years. MCSN Caledon Caledon Rabbipal Rabbipal MCSN The pair share a special bond over their love of ❯❯ See VETERAN | A7 ❯❯ See FORD CSG | A7 From Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group From Harry Harry S. S. Truman Truman Carrier Carrier Strike Strike Group Group From Public Affairs Public Affairs Affairs Public

Gerald R. Ford Carrier Strike Group commences first-ever integrated operations

CNRMA HOLDS HOLDS CNRMA CHANGE OF OF COMMAND, COMMAND, CHANGE RETIREMENT CEREMONY CEREMONY RETIREMENT

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Volunteer group FATHER & SON FATHER & SON gives back to vetINVENTORS INVENTORS erans in a special RECOGNIZED: RECOGNIZED: way A father and son team A father and son team were among 32 inventors were among inventors A special group 32 of volunhonored at the Naval honored at the teers is giving backNaval to miliSurface Warfare Center Surface Warfare Center tary veterans by preservDahlgren Division Dahlgren Division ing the headstones in cem(NSWCDD) Patent Awards (NSWCDD) Patent Awards eteries in the local area. ceremony, July 19. ceremony, July 19.  See » See See A7 A4A7 ❯❯»

Ford refines Navy and Marine MINE EXERCISE VETERAN’S MINE EXERCISE VETERAN’S combat Corps Public Health BEGINS: KITCHEN HELPS BEGINS: KITCHEN HELPS systems Center U.S. Navy mine countermeasure HOMELESS U.S. Navy mine countermeasure HOMELESS units, Japan Maritime Self VETS: Atunits, the Navy andMaritime Marine Corps Japan Self USS VETS: Gerald R. Ford Defense Force MCM units, and The non-profit Public Health Center (NManother Defense Force MCM units, and completed The non-profit Indian Navy Explosive Ordinance organization, is CPHC), Dr. MarkExplosive Long, Public round of sea-basedis Indian Navy Ordinance organization, Disposal units commenced 2JA preparing to place Health Educator, this testDisposal unitshas commenced 2JAdevelopmental preparing to place mine countermeasure exercise its 500th veteran into month on his calendar. minecircled countermeasure exercise ing, another mileits 500th veteran into 2018 near Ominato, Japan, on new housing within 2018 near Ominato, Japan, on stone. new housing within July 18. the next week. July 18. the next week. ❯❯See» A2 »  See B1 See C1 ❯❯See A3 »  » See B1 See C1 Sign up

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Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center Taking the fight to tobacco addiction By Hugh Cox

Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH

Across America each November, we ‘give thanks,’ honor our veterans, and campaign heavily to help tobacco users address their addiction. At the Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center (NMCPHC), Dr. Mark Long, Public Health Educator, has this month circled on his calendar. Managing the Navy’s tobacco cessation efforts is “job one” for Dr. Long. Long works closely with Navy Medicine experts to help develop policy that will aid Navy and Marine Corps leaders implement a tobacco control approach that focuses on maintaining the health and readiness of Sailors, Marines, and their families. Part of the strategy involves the development of tools and resources that health care providers and health promotion staffs Navy and Marine Corps-wide can use to help educate Sailors and Marines on the dangers of tobacco use, and promote tobacco-free living. In his preface to the 2020 Report on Smoking Cessation, Vice Adm. Jerome Adams, U.S. Surgeon General states, “As a nation, we can and must spare no effort to reduce the completely preventable health and financial costs that tobacco smoking has on society. Everyone has a role in helping to continue to reduce the burden of tobacco use on our society.” Dr. Long agrees and advises that with coronavirus and the flu season here, quitting now will improve your health and keep you on the job. As noted on website for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are many proven and effective ways to help with cessation. Developing an individual strategy can hold the key to quitting tobacco use. The CDC recommends that tobacco users find their reasons to quit, make a decision to quit, and create a plan. Additional information is available on the CDC’s website: https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/ quit_smoking/how_to_quit/. Individuals who have never used tobacco or have

successfully stopped using tobacco can also play a helping role in the strategy. “Have a support person or two to help you with quitting,” said Long. “If you are tobacco free, offer to be a buddy and assist someone who is preparing to quit.” According to Long, tobacco users can speak with their Primary Care Provider about quitting and medications that help with urges and withdrawal. “Military Treatment Facility (MTF) pharmacies carry them and they are free. Tobacco users can also learn about the availability of counseling at their MTF,” added Long. The Great American Smokeout (GASO) on November 19 offers an opportunity to quit. More Americans have quit on this day than any other day of the year. For more information on GASO visit: https:// www.cdc.gov/tobacco/features/great-americansmokeout/smokefree-through-generations/ Information, resources, and tools including webbased programs are available online at the NMCPHC website. https://www.med.navy.mil/sites/nmcphc/

health-promotion/tobacco-free-living/Pages/TobaccoForYouSelfHelp.aspx Additional resources to consider: • Chat and text live with a coach on YouCanQuit2 https://www.ycq2.org/live-chat/ • Call the state quit line and speak with a coach/ counselor -1800-QUIT NOW. • Consider using an app, like quitSMART, for support. https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/campaign/tips/ quit-smoking/quitstart-app/index.html The Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center (NMCPHC) develops and shapes public health for the U.S. Navy and Marines Corps through health surveillance, epidemiology and analysis, disease and injury prevention, and public health consultation. Learn more by going to www.nmcphc.med.navy.mil. Follow NMCPHC on social media at https://www.facebook.com/ NavyAndMarineCorpsPublicHealthCenter http://twitter.com/nmcphc and https://www.instagram.com/nmcphc/

USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79) holds change of command ceremony By MC2 Jacob Milham

Commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic Public Affairs

NORFOLK

In a socially distanced change of command ceremony, Cmdr. Matthew I. Krull relieved Cmdr. Wesley A. Brown as commanding officer, USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79), Nov. 13, 2020, at Naval Station Norfolk. “It has been an absolute honor to have sailed with you and to have been your captain,” said Brown in addressing the crew. “You have embraced the hard work; you have done it smartly and you have done it together. Your fighting spirit and dedication to each other have inspired me every single day in command. I know Pfc. Oscar Austin would be proud too.” Also honoring the crew and their performance was the ceremony’s guest speaker Rear Adm. Brad Cooper, commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic. “To the crew of Oscar Austin, I am so very proud of your hard work, your achievements, and the sacrifices you’ve made,” Cooper said. “When I speak of elite performance as our North Star, your example sets the standard. I challenge every one of you to keep your foot on the gas and continue to excel. Lastly, and most importantly, I look forward to hearing one prolonged blast from DDG 79. Oscar Austin will be back to sea in 2021!”

As the ship was in the midst of its previous deployment, Brown reported aboard as executive officer, in August 2017. He assumed command in May 2019 and led Oscar Austin through the ship’s mid-life Depot Modernization Period to upgrade her with the latest combat systems suite. Krull’s previous sea duty assignments include tours on USS Carr (FFG 52) as electrical and auxiliaries officer and USS Cole (DDG 67) as navigator. His department head assignment was aboard USS Momsen (DDG 92) as weapons and combat systems officer. In remarks to the crew, Krull thanked Brown for his steady leadership and vision, noting the legacy of success the former commanding officer leaves behind. He also expressed his excitement in being the one to help write the next chapter in the ship’s life. Oscar Austin is the first Flight IIA Arleigh Burke-class, guided-missile destroyer and proudly bears the name of Pfc. Oscar P. Austin, United States Marine Corps. Displaying indomitable courage and selfless devotion to duty, Pfc. Austin was killed near Da Nang, Vietnam, Feb. 23, 1969, when he sacrificed his own life to save an injured companion. Austin was recognized with numerous medals and decorations, including the Medal of Honor; Purple Heart; National Defense Medal; Vietnam Service Medal with two bronze stars; and the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal.

MC2 Darien Kenney Cmdr. Mathew I. Krull salutes Capt. Matthew Kawas, commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2 Commodore, as he assumes the duties and responsibilities of the guided-missile destroyer USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79) during a change-of-command ceremony, November 13, 2020. Krull relieved Cmdr. Wesley A. Brown as commanding officer of the destroyer.

Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (CNRMA): Rear Adm. Charles W. “Chip” Rock Regional program manager for Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (NRMA):

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MCSN Anton Wendler A C-2A Greyhound, attached to the "Rawhides" of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 40 taxis aboard USS Gerald R. Ford's (CVN 78) flight deck Nov. 8, 2020. Under the leadership of Carrier Strike Group 12, Gerald R. Ford is underway in the Atlantic Ocean conducting first-ever integrated carrier strike group operations with Carrier Air Wing 8, Destroyer Squadron 2 and their Air and Missile Defense Commander, Commanding Officer of USS Gettysburg (CG 64).

Ford refines combat systems during sea-based developmental testing From USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) Public Affairs ATLANTIC OCEAN

USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) completed another round of sea-based developmental testing (SBDT), Nov. 10, another milestone in Ford’s 18-month post-delivery test and trials (PDT&T) phase of operations, now in month 13. SBDT is designed to mimic conditions Ford’s radar sensors could face using various air and surface assets in order to test the ship’s ability to detect and to engage external threats. “SBDT allowed us to simulate engagements and position ourselves to conduct warfighting operations,” said Fire Controlman 2nd Class Douglas Huyge from Kalamazoo, Michigan.

The tests were completed by Ford’s combat systems department, and watch standers in the ship’s Combat Direction Center (CDC), who worked hand-in-hand with a team of contractors, led by Program Executive Office Integrated Warfare Systems (PEO IWS) 10.0, the ship’s self-defense system (SSDS) integrated combat systems program. CDC is where most of the coordination occurs. It’s the hub that connects and controls many of the various weapons and sensors integrated into Ford’s SSDS. The weapons and sensors that play into it, however, are dispersed throughout the ship. Chief Warrant Officer 2 Todd Williamson, Ford’s fire control officer, said “we’re refining our communication and coordination to a high-level of precision. We continue to work toward standardizing communications so that our watch standers, especially those in the kill

chain, know what to expect in certain situations—in other words, to perfect the mission tasks required to employ specific weapons against specific threats.” SBDT is vital to ensuring Ford’s combat systems are operating according to design, and functioning to protect the ship from high-end threats. The successful completion of these tests is one of many milestones scheduled during Ford’s PDT&T. “The operations were a huge success because we learned how to coordinate better as a team and practiced our warfighting skills so as to be more combat effective for deployment,” said Fire Controlman 2nd Class Anthony Anadon from Stockton, California. “Our biggest accomplishment was being able to use the close-in weapons system thermal imager to conduct intercepts on live targets.” Under the leadership of Carrier Strike Group TWELVE, commanded by Rear Adm. Craig Clapperton, Gerald R. Ford is under way in the Atlantic Ocean conducting first-ever integrated carrier strike group operations with Carrier Air Wing EIGHT, Destroyer Squadron TWO and their Air and Missile Defense Commander, Commanding Officer of USS Gettysburg (CG 64).

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Volunteer group gives back to veterans in a special way By Katisha Draughn-Fraguada PORTSMOUTH

A special group of volunteers is giving back to military veterans by preserving the headstones in cemeteries in the local area. It all began when Cmdr. Jim Nogle, Director of Current Operations, Naval Medical Forces Atlantic, saw something online one day that peaked his interest. “I saw a group on a social media site and they were cleaning veterans’ headstones,” he said. “After that, I called [Lt. Stephanie Burkhart] and asked if she would be interested in starting a group and doing the same thing here in the Hampton Roads area.” Nogle and Burkhart, Medical Administration Officer, USS George H. Bush, did their research and then signed up for a one-day class at the Norfolk Society for Cemetery Conservation in Norfolk’s Forest Lawn Cemetery where they learned how to properly clean and repair headstones. “It was a great experience and we met a lot of people with the same interests,” said Burkhart. During the class, they learned specifically about the cemetery approved cleaning materials and solutions that worked best and would not damage the delicate granite and marble stones. Following their class, Nogle and Burkhart met with Kenneth Pugh, Site Director at Naval Support Activity (NSA) Hampton Roads-Portsmouth Annex to see if they could start cleaning headstones in the cemetery on base. “I was very happy that they were interested in honoring those Sailors who made the ultimate sacrifice to defend our freedom,” said Pugh. “Cleaning these headstones was important to them and I wanted to ensure that they had everything needed to start the work.” The group met with Pugh and did a walk-through of the cemeteries at NSA Hampton Roads, but ultimately decided on Captain Ted Conaway Memorial Naval Cemetery first due to its size. This particular cemetery includes graves of more than 850 fallen Soldiers, Sailors and Marines from Brazil, Great Britain, France, the Netherlands, Russia, Spain, Sweden, and Germany. “We plan on cleaning other headstones in other cemeteries once we complete the more than 840 stones at Portsmouth Annex,” said Nogle.

Courtesy photo Cmdr. Jim Nogle, director of current operations, Naval Medical Forces Atlantic, cleans one of the headstones at Captain Ted Conaway Memorial Naval Cemetery.

The group, Renewed Remembrance, consist of a few volunteers with multiple Navy groups and associations helping with the cleaning of the headstones. “It’s our way of giving back to those who came before us,” said Nogle. “The mission of our organization is to clean, repair, preserve and catalog veteran and military gravesites.” The group meets on most weekends, but with the colder months approaching, they will have to take off most of the winter. “The product that we are required to use prefers the stones to not be less than 45 degrees on the surface of the stone,” said Nogle. Cleaning the headstones gives the volunteers the opportunity to connect and reflect on the sacrifices

made by those veterans. “It is so peaceful out there at [Portsmouth Annex] and usually a nice breeze coming off the river,” said Burkhart. The group has a Facebook page where they post events and information about their organization and any upcoming events. “We also post stories and photos of the men who are buried in the cemetery,” said Nogle. “Most people are unaware there are six Medal of Honor recipients buried at Captain Ted Conaway Memorial Naval Cemetery.” For additional information on the Renewed Remembrance group, visit www.facebook.com/RenewedRemembrance.

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A5 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 11.19.2020

Ford Sailors reflect on Veterans Day By MCC RJ Stratchko

USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) Public Affairs

ATLANTIC OCEAN

Veterans Day marks the anniversary of the end of World War I in 1918 and honors those who served in the armed forces. Formerly celebrated as Armistice Day, until it was renamed in 1954, Veterans Day is a day to not only honor those who have served, but for those still serving, it is an opportunity to reflect on their service and what it means to be a veteran. For some Sailors like Chief Quartermaster Levi Osmondson, from Abbotsfordd, Wisconsin, assigned to the USS Gerald R. Ford’s (CVN 78) navigation department, being called a veteran is more than a title given. “[I] enlisted in March 2004, so I’ve been in for 16 1/2 years”, said Osmondson. “I was tired of the corn fields and pig and cow smells across the countryside.” Being a young kid from a small town, when he first enlisted in the Navy it was hard for Osmondson to reconcile the honor of being called a veteran with the inexperience of a brand-new Sailor. “The first ten years of my career it was tough to realize that being a veteran was a reality,” continued Osmondson. “At that stage I didn’t see myself in the likes of those you see movies made of and statues built for our previous heroes. I have never thought of myself in those regards.” For other Sailors, like Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Gretchen Jackson, from Virginia Beach, Virginia, assigned to Ford’s aircraft intermediate maintenance department, being a veteran is not only an honor but an integral part of service. “I am extremely proud to be a veteran. It is a humbling experience when I meet new people who are not as familiar with the military, who are genuinely impressed by what I do for a living, and take the time to thank me for my service,” said Jackson. “My response is always ‘It’s my pleasure!’ because it really is.” Leaving her hometown of Arden Hills, Minnesota to join the Navy, Jackson was in basic training during one of the most tragic events in American history. “During boot camp was the fateful day of 9/11. I was sad, scared and angry that anyone would bring harm to so many Americans,” recalled Jackson. “I desperately wanted to be a part of keeping that from ever happening again.” On Veteran’s Day in particular, Jackson remembers family members that served before her and inspired her.

MC2 Jason Pastrick The exterior lights of Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) illuminate during sunset, April 1, 2017. Flight deck lights help illuminate the ship and remain on throughout the night until morning colors is called.

“My grandfather was a pilot in World War II, and part of the reason why I chose the Navy as my desired branch of service,” said Jackson. “To people such as those and the many thousands more, I am honored to celebrate.” Ford is underway in the Atlantic Ocean conducting

first-ever integrated carrier strike group operations with Carrier Air Wing EIGHT, Destroyer Squadron TWO and their Air and Missile Defense Commander, Commanding Officer of USS Gettysburg (CG 64). For more news from USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), visit www.dvidshub.net/unit/CVN78

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A6 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 11.19.2020

Norfolk Naval Shipyard VET-ERG leads America’s shipyard in celebration for our nation’s veterans By Kristi R Britt

Norfolk Naval Shipyard Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH

Every year in November, our nation comes together to celebrate our veterans – those who fought for the freedom of the American people. At Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY), the Veteran Employee Readiness Group (VETERG) led the charge in celebration, hosting the annual Veterans Day Fall-In for Colors Nov. 10. “This is one of our most significant events of the year as we gather together and pay tribute to the many service members—both active duty and retired—here at our shipyard, in our families, and throughout our country who have devoted their lives to protecting our nation,” said NNSY Executive Officer Capt. Todd Nichols. “So many of our nation’s veterans have served in the face of adversity without regard for self, and in the face of danger. They have modeled for us the qualities of heroism, leadership, sacrifice, honor and devotion to duty. Chances are many of you recognize and appreciate that some of the most influential persons in your lives have been veteran friends, family and mentors—through their lifechanging advice, through lighting our life’s path, and through constant modeling of what right looks like.” Veterans Day originated from Armistice Day, marking the end of World War I, which occurred on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918. Each year at NNSY, the shipyard workforce comes together to support the men and women who fought and continue to fight for the freedom of the nation. At NNSY alone, there are more than 3,000 veterans employed with more than 650 considered Naval Sea Systems Com-

Daniel DeAngelis Retired NNSY Employee Rick Nelson and members of the NNSY Command Duty Office raise the flag over America’s Shipyard during the Veterans Day Fall-In For Colors, Nov. 10.

mand (NAVSEA) Wounded Warriors. The fall-in invited all shipyard personnel, tenants, and Sailors to attend in the current COVID-19 safety regulated environment, with attendees wearing face coverings at all times and practicing physical distancing. Following the ceremony, Shipyard Commander Rear Admiral Howard Markle hosted a cake cutting with Oscar Thorpe and Rashad Williams, the oldest and youngest veterans employed at America’s Shipyard. “Veterans Day honors all of those who have served the country in war or peace — dead or alive — although it’s largely intended to thank living veterans for their sacrifices. Celebrating Veterans Day is a matter of historic and

patriotic significance reaching back to the end of World War I, which ended on Nov. 11, 1918, and dubbed Armistice Day. With 2020 being an interesting and challenging year, especially with restrictions and precautions for COVID, it is even more significant to continue with traditions to keep a sense of normalcy alive and strong and celebrate our Veterans,” said Nicholas Boyle, VET-ERG President. “For me as a Navy-Retiree, as well as President of the VET-ERG, it is important to celebrate the service of those who came before us, those that are currently serving on Active Duty, and the future Veterans who are yet to serve. ” For VET-ERG Officer Ricky Bur-

roughs, celebrating Veterans Day at NNSY is something he looks forward to each year, as a reminder to others of those who have sacrificed so much to service the nation. “My military service was the ultimate test for me that manifested and became my destiny,” said Burroughs, a Navy-Retired Chief Warrant Officer (CWO4). “Being part of the service strengthened me both mentally and physically and opened up the world to me. I feel it brought out the best in me as I’ve seen it do for others as well. I have so much respect for those who served or continue to serve – and to see that the pride that resides in us also resides in those who celebrate our accomplishments really brings me joy.”

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A7 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 11.19.2020

Veteran | The last American POW released by North Vietnam wanted “one last return” to an aircraft carrier. The Navy made it happen on Veterans Day. Continued from A1 Even though he was a petty officer first class with Helicopter Mine Countermeasure Squadron 15 onboard Naval Station Norfolk - home to every aircraft carrier on the East Coast - he was never quite sure how to get his grandfather aboard one. When his grandfather visited him on base several years ago, the pair were told the best they could do was go on a tour of the base in a bus and see an aircraft carrier as they drove by the installation’s piers. They couldn’t come aboard. “He was just like, ‘Okay, well that’s a bummer.’ But I kind of took it very personal,” he said. After 13 years of service, Chase Agnew left the Navy, but he stayed in Norfolk. Word spread through the tight-knit military and civilian community that Agnew’s grandfather never got to go aboard an aircraft carrier again like he wanted. Eventually, Rear Adm. John Meier, Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic, heard about it. It was past time to honor a living hero written about in history books, Meier said. He made sure Agnew would get his final return.

‘SEA STORIES AND LIES’ On Nov. 11, Veterans Day, Al Agnew walked down Pier 14 at Naval Station Norfolk and up the brow of the Eisenhower, and finally stepped foot aboard an aircraft carrier once again. A bell rang to announce his arrival and he was immediately greeted by Meier and Capt. Kyle Higgins, the Eisenhower’s commanding officer. Agnew and his grandson were taken to

the ship’s state room, where Al Agnew quickly started swapping stories with Meier and Higgins. Agnew was so excited he declined an offer to take a seat. “I’ll stand up until I fall over,” he said. Meier noted that he shared something in common with Agnew because he was forced to eject from his EA-6B Prowler during carrier qualifications in the lead up to the Persian Gulf War. They talked about how slow time seems to move in that moment. They spoke about aircraft, flight instructors and the perils of ejection. They told jokes. They laughed. They bonded. That connection with other aviators is something that will always be important to Agnew. It’s what helped get him through his time in the North Vietnamese prison camp called “The Zoo,” where he was locked up with other American pilots and they survived off of cabbage soup and camaraderie. In prison, they did what aviators always do when they get together, he said. They told “sea stories and lies.” “I don’t think we knew it was important at the time, because we had never heard of PTSD,” Agnew said. “We were just doing what aviators do when you’ve got time on your hands. So we talked and I guess … unbeknownst to us we were doing it, we got through a lot of issues before we ever came home.” While Agnew enjoyed walking around the Eisenhower - even pausing to take in the unique smell of an aircraft carrier that hasn’t changed - it was the conversations he had with his fellow aviators Meier and Higgins he liked the most. “Just talking aviator stuff,” he said. “You don’t get to do it in a farming community very often.”

‘OVERDUE’ For their part, Meier and Higgins wanted Agnew to know his presence meant just as much to them. On the Eisenhower’s flight deck, Meier presented Agnew with a framed proclamation signed by President Donald Trump and pins for Vietnam War veterans. “A little bit overdue I think, as a nation, to recognize you this way,” Meier said.

Courtesy photo

“For some reason we never got one of those (pins) to you. Well, we got it to you now.” Agnew smiled as his grandson looked on with pride. Finally, Chase Agnew could say he completed the mission he set out years ago to accomplish. “It was very, very important,” he said. “I

think the people who paved the way for us are so underrated, so undervalued. I think we kind of lose sight of the reason we still have these freedoms are because of people like him and the men that he served with in that timeframe. So it became very important that we recognize and remember them and let them know that they’re not forgotten.”

Ford CSG | Gerald R. Ford Carrier Strike Group commences first-ever integrated operations Continued from A1 again,” said Capt. Josh Sager, commander, CVW-8. “This is an incredible opportunity to exercise air wing missions in a carrier strike group setting, and Team Factory conducted a significant regimen of unit-level training in preparations for this at-sea training period. We’re thrilled to continue our integration aboard the flagship of the Fordlass of aircraft carriers.” During ISE 13 DESRON-2 will focus on preparing the Gerald R. Ford Carrier Strike Group to defend against surface and subsurface threats using CVW-8 aircraft and ship’s self-defense. According to Capt. Stefan Walch, DESRON-2’s deputy commodore, the command and control of long-range missile strikes against enemy warships, and the protection of assets in constrained waters are challenging missions that require both technical proficiency and solid unity of command. “There is no substitute for underway, integrated operations with all of the various staffs that make up the strike group,” said Walch. “This underway will be a huge benefit to building the necessary command relationships and collaboration required to effectively execute our mission.”

MC2 Ryan Seelbach Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Aaron Stevens, from Jacksonville, Florida, assigned to USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) air department, directs an E-2C Hawkeye, attached to the "Bear Aces" of Airborne Command and Control Squadron (VAW) 124 on Ford flight deck during flight operations Nov. 9, 2020. Under the leadership of Carrier Strike Group TWELVE, Gerald R. Ford is underway in the Atlantic Ocean conducting first-ever integrated carrier strike group operations with Carrier Air Wing EIGHT, Destroyer Squadron TWO and their Air and Missile Defense Commander, Commanding Officer of USS Gettysburg (CG 64).

For more military news visit FlagshipNews.com


A8 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 11.19.2020

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COVID-19 study published in New England Journal of Medicine Additional actions, such as widespread and repeated testing, are recommended to reduce the risk of viral spread according to naval research. ❯❯See B4

SECTION B | FLAGSHIPNEWS.COM | 11.19.2020

MC1 Bryan N. Blair Sailors prepare to man the rails as the Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), returns to Yokosuka, Japan following a six-month deployment, Nov. 14, 2020. During Ronald Reagan’s deployment, the ship transited nearly 60,000 nautical miles, conducting dual-carrier operations with USS Nimitz (CVN 76) Carrier Strike Group, Exercise Valiant Shield, Exercise Keen Sword, expeditionary strike force operations with USS America (LHA 6), flight operations in the Indian Ocean for the first time in more than four yearsand as trilateral integrated operations with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force and Royal Australian Navy.

USS Ronald Reagan returns to Yokosuka From USS Ronald Reagan Public Affairs YOKOSUKA, Japan

The U.S. Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), returned to Yokosuka, Nov. 14, following a six-month Indo-Pacific deployment. Ronald Reagan transited nearly 60,000 miles as embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5 flew more than 20,000 flight hours during a deployment that included exercises and operations with allies and partners across the region. “Ronald Reagan’s flexible presence is a key element in helping assure our regional allies and partners that the United States remains committed to ensuring freedom of the seas,” said Capt. Fred Goldhammer, commanding officer of Ronald Reagan. “From the international dateline to the Indian Ocean to the Philippine Sea, and everywhere in between, on board Ronald Reagan we seek to preserve

‘peace through strength,’ and remain ready to answer the call.” While deployed the Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group conducted trilateral integrated operations with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force and Royal Australian Navy, flight operations in the Indian Ocean for the first time in more than four years, dual-carrier operations with the USS Nimitz (CVN 76) Carrier Strike Group, exercises Valiant Shield and Keen Sword, as well as, Expeditionary Strike Force operations with USS America (LHA 6). In port, Ronald Reagan will continue to provide forward presence and the crew will maintain a high level of training and warfighting proficiency. Ronald Reagan will be postured and ready to respond to regional contingencies. As Ronald Reagan returned to its forwarddeployed base, Sailors manned the rails in dress blue uniforms, following more than 60 COVID-free-days at sea since last visiting

MC1 Ian Cotter The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) returns to its homeport of Commander, Fleet Activities Yokosuka (CFAY) following more than 60 COVID-free days at sea since last visiting Yokosuka, Nov. 14, 2020.

Yokosuka in September. The crew disembarked the ship in a controlled, socially-distanced manner, eager to see their families. "The USS Ronald Reagan family is excited to be home and realize how special each Sailor’s reunion with their family and friends will be,” Goldhammer said. “This year’s homecoming may look a little different, but with everybody’s cooperation and patience on base and within the local community, our homecoming is just as special as any other year.”

The Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group is forward-deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of a free and open IndoPacific region. U.S. 7th Fleet is the largest numbered fleet in the world, and with the help of 35 other maritime-nation allies and partners, the U.S. Navy has operated in the Indo-Pacific region for more than 70 years, providing credible, ready forces to help preserve peace and prevent conflict.

USS William P. Lawrence joins Hurricane Eta relief in Honduras From U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. Fourth Fleet Public Affairs

HONDURAS

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110) and the 'Easyriders’of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 37 are supporting humanitarian assistance disaster relief (HADR) in Honduras in response to the devastation left by Hurricane Eta. William P. Lawrence arrived off the coast of Honduras Nov. 12, to support Joint Task Force Bravo’s (JTF Bravo) mission by conducting familiarization flights, delivering medical supplies, and coordinating with other JTF Bravo assets to identify future HA/DR needs. These actions support the overall relief led by the Honduran government and build on a foundation of many years of partner relations with the country. When Hurricane Eta caused devastating damage to the Central American countries of Honduras, Panama, and Guatemala, JTF Bravo was directed by U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) to conduct lifesaving efforts in the region. As search and rescue efforts are being taken over by host nations, JTF Bravo has transitioned from rescue operations to the delivery of necessary aid to communities that have been stranded for days since Hurricane Eta passed through Central America.

Airforce Staff Sgt. Elijaih Tiggs A U.S. Navy MH-60R Seahawk, assigned to the USS William P. Lawrence (DDG-110) takes off from the forward joint operations center to deliver life-saving supplies to those isolated by Hurricane Eta's effects at San Pedro Sula, Honduras, Nov. 13, 2020. JTF-Bravo's forward deployment to Honduras highlights the importance of cooperation and training with partners to build trust and teamwork.

The mission has been a collaborative effort between the host nation governments and organizations, the U.S. military and the U.S. embassies in each country. Years of working together has solidified relationships of trust and mutual cooperation to aid in times of crisis. The mission of Joint Task Force-Bravo includes being prepared to support disaster relief operations in Central America, South America and the Caribbean when directed. They con-

duct constant training both on-base and with partners across Central America to prepare for contingency operations, which allows forces to integrate for a unified response when a disaster strikes. William P. Lawrence is deployed to the U.S. 4th Fleet area of operations to support Joint Interagency Task Force South’s mission, which includes countering illicit drug trafficking in the Caribbean and Eastern Pacific.


HeroesatHome The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | 11.19.2020 | B2

My spouse is about to enter A school. Is my spouse required to live in unaccompanied housing? If I live in the community, will we receive BAH?

In general, students are typically required to be housed in unaccompanied housing for the duration of A school and are not eligible for BAH. Contact your spouse’s command for specific information.

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Courtesy Photo

To all the turkeys I’ve ruined before By Lisa Smith Molinari

Since my husband, Francis, and I tied the knot many years ago, I’ve cooked exactly twenty six Thanksgiving turkeys. We ate every one of them, from their white tenderloins to their sinewy wings. Molinaris are not known to waste food, after all. But truth be told, not every turkey I cooked was perfect. In fact, quite a few of the twenty-six birds could best be described as “learning experiences.” As a newlywed, I envisioned myself on our first Thanksgiving, aproned and waving a basting brush like a magic wand, wafting gracefully in and out of our kitchen on the delectable scent of roasting turkey, simmering cranberries, herbed dressing, and buttery potatoes. The perfect new Navy wife preparing the perfect holiday feast. However, at age 27, I had never been taught how to roast a chicken drumstick, much less a whole turkey. I had lived the simplified life of a single woman,

subsisting on a diet dominated by noodles and eggs, and believing that as long as I could melt cheese on something, I’d be fine. Although I had grown up watching my mother cook elaborate meals from scratch, I had assumed that such skills were automatically bestowed upon taking marital vows. And even if cooking wasn’t an innate ability, I’d been given the key and essential wedding gift that would show me the way: a Better Homes and Gardens New Cook Book. Despite having thoroughly perused the poultry section of this iconic gingham manual of domesticity, I neglected to thaw the bird properly, couldn’t decipher the cooking time from the complicated weight chart, and forgot to remove the bag of giblets. Naively, I thought basting the turkey was the ultimate key to success, but I opened the door so many times, the oven couldn’t maintain enough heat to cook the bird properly. Two hours later than expected, we took our Butterball out of the oven and nibbled cau-

tiously at the breast meat, which was singed because I’d gotten frustrated and turned on the broiler. The next year, I found the kitchen gadget that would solve my culinary problems — a meat thermometer, which Better Homes and Gardens New Cook Book instructed should be inserted into the turkey’s thigh for a proper reading. The only issue? I had no idea where that was. The succeeding Thanksgiving holidays were a craps shoot. After one year’s turkey proved to be too small as evidenced by our guests nibbling at vertebrae in search of meat morsels, the next year’s turkey was so large, our repertoire of leftovers lasted until Christmas and included turkey sandwiches, turkey salad, turkey soup, turkey divan, turkey stroganoff, turkey tetrazzini, and turkey enchiladas. After serving one underdone bird whose bloody juices tainted the stuffing and had us all fearing salmonella poisoning, I cooked the next several turkeys so thoroughly, eating them required alternating bites with swigs of water in order to swallow the dry meat. I received a turkey deep fryer one year for Christmas in hopes that I’d find the key to moist white

meat, but after weighing the substantial risk of lighting my own hair on fire, I opted to stick with my oven. That year, I discovered that the plastic leg holder doesn’t actually melt after you forget to take it off the turkey. Another year, I found that a hair dryer comes in handy when defrosting. And the next year, I ascertained that, no matter what Martha Stewart says, there’s no need to brine your turkey with fresh juniper berries. I eventually realized that the perfect Thanksgiving turkey is nearly impossible to attain. While stationed in Germany, I tried a method of roasting breast-side down, which resulted in delicious, juicy meat; however, the finished bird looked like it had flown out of a Zombie Turkey Apocalypse with sodden, hanging chunks of pale skin. Last year in Rhode Island, I tried the convection roast function on my oven, which produced a turkey that appeared to have been electrocuted, but was surprisingly edible. Every year, I learn something new, and regardless of how my twenty-seventh bird turns out, I know I’ll be grateful for at least one thing this Thanksgiving: Thank goodness for gravy.

EFMP & Me Online Tool Empowers Military Families With Special Needs From Military Onesource

For families with special needs, the Department of Defense Office of Special Needs Exceptional Family Member Program provides support and resources to help you thrive in military life. Now, the new EFMP & Me online tool, available through Military OneSource, expands and tailors support to help you quickly navigate services, connect with resources and advocate for yourself or your family member with special needs anytime, anywhere. Designed for military families with special needs and with the caregiver in mind, EFMP & Me can be used by both families enrolled in EFMP and those who are eligible to enroll. The website also gives EFMP Family Support providers and military leaders another tool to guide families to the resources they need. Ways EFMP & Me puts you in charge EFMP & Me can be used on any computer or mobile device – so you always have information and resources at your fingertips: • Help understanding and finding medical and educational resources

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• Step-by-step support for EFMP enrollment, PCS preparation, deployment and other military life moments • Convenient 24/7 access to EFMP resources and services from a range of programs. Begin using the tool by answering a few questions on the homepage. Then, you can select the categories that reflect your needs and interests, including: • About EFMP and Enrollment • Child Care • Education • Medical • Deployment • Accessibility and Housing • PCS • Family and Community Life • Separation and Retirement • Long-Term Financial Planning The tool lets you choose from the checklists available in each category. Each checklist can be expanded to display related tasks, tips, programs and other resources. Tips

often include links to helpful resources outside of the tool. If you are logged in, you can save your progress on a checklist, return to it another time, or download a PDF of the checklist. You do not need a Military OneSource account to use the tool. However, an account allows you to save your checklists and return to them anytime. Follow the directions on the homepage to log in or create an account. You can also use EFMP & Me to sign up for the quarterly Exceptional Advocate eNewsletter, a publication for families with special needs, to contact EFMP Family Support staff, or to learn more about how the program can help you and your family. EFMP & Me enhances and supplements the services of the Exceptional Family Member Program Family Support, which are available to families at their nearest installation office. EFMP serves families by making sure special needs are considered during assignments and by easing access to assistance wherever families are.

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B3 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 11.19.2020

MC3 James Hong Sailors man the rails as the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Antietam (CG 54) returns to Yokosuka, Japan, Nov. 10, 2020. Antietam’s return marked the end of a nine-month deployment in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific.

USS Antietam returns to Yokosuka following 260-day deployment By MC3 James Hong

USS Antietam (CG 54) Public Affairs

YOKOSUKA, JAPAN

The crew of the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Antietam (CG 54) returned to Naval Station Yokosuka following a successful deployment. The return marked the end of a ninemonth deployment to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations. “Antietam’s success in this demanding operating environment and during deployment is attributed to my Sailors doing the right thing every day,” said Capt. Russell Caldwell, commanding officer, USS Antietam. “They never lost focus on the accomplishment of the mission.” From May to October, Antietam escorted the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) during a deployment in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations, includ-

ing missions in the South China Sea, East China Sea and Indian Ocean, as well as dual carrier operations with the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) and attached carrier strike group in July. While assigned to the Reagan Strike Group in July, Antietam strengthened U.S. alliances through participation in a trilateral naval exercise with the Japan Maritime SelfDefense Force (JMSDF) and the Australian Defense Force in the Philippine Sea. Antietam also participated in Valiant Shield in late September, a U.S. only, biennial field training exercise (FTX) with a focus on integration of joint training in a bluewater environment among U.S. forces. During the FTX, Antietam demonstrated their proficiencies in surface, subsurface and air warfare and tactics, and participated in a live-fire sinking exercise, targeting the exUSS Curts (FFG 38), and a live-fire Tomahawk land attack cruise-missile (TLAM)

strike scenario. In October, Antietam capped off the rest of the deployment with independent operations in the East China Sea to support standing commitments to regional allies and partners. Antietam traveled more than 60,000 nautical miles and conducted multiple sea lane and strait transits, to include the San Bernardino Archipelagic Sea Lane, Balabac Strait and the Strait of Malacca. “For 260 days of COVID-free bubble operations, Antietam’s Sailors performed with honor, courage and commitment,” said Caldwell. “I cannot be more proud and it was my privilege to lead and serve alongside each and every one of them.” In order to prevent the introduction of COVID-19 to the crew and maintain the ship’s combat readiness, the majority of Antietam’s crew, including embarked air detachment from Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 77, remained aboard since their departure in late February. Several pierrestricted port visits were visited to facilitate crew rest amidst the deployment’s long periods at sea in support of operational tasking.

“Since we were already underway at the start [of the Pandemic], we set a lot of standards in preventing COVID-19 at sea,” said Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Nico Watt, a member of Antietam’s medical staff. “We were the first to run an underway quarantine and MEDEVAC as a training scenario.” Despite being “in the bubble”, Antietam’s Sailors conducted critical depot-level maintenance and repairs and passed multiple major inspections, including high scores on their Fleet Support Operations-Medical (FSO-M) and 3-M Program validation inspections. USS Antietam is forward-deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of a free and open Indo-Pacific region. U.S. 7th Fleet is the largest numbered fleet in the world, and with the help of 35 other maritime-nation allies and partners, the U.S. Navy has operated in the Indo-Pacific region for more than 70 years, providing credible, ready forces to help preserve peace and prevent conflict. For more information on USS Antietam and other forward-deployed ships in Japan, visit https://www.facebook.com/CTF70.

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B4 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 11.19.2020

Surafel Asfaw Sailors aboard the expeditionary fast transport ship USNS Millinocket (T-EPF 3) navigate the ship from the bridge as ships from the Bangladesh navy maneuver in formation during the sea phase of Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Bangladesh, Nov. 7, 2020. This year marks the 26th iteration of CARAT, a multinational exercise designed to enhance U.S. and partner navies' abilities to operate together in response to traditional and non-traditional maritime security challenges in the Indo-Pacific region.

USNS Millinocket represents U.S. in exercise with Bangladesh From Military Sealift Command Far East Public Affairs

BAY OF BENGAL

The Spearhead-class expeditionary fast transport USNS Millinocket (TEPF 3) took part in the annual Cooperation and Readiness Afloat Training exercise, known as CARAT Bangladesh. While this marks the 11th time Bangladesh has joined CARAT, the series of bilateral exercises has been conducted for the last 26 years throughout South and Southeast Asia. CARAT is an adaptable, evolving exercise as both U.S. and Bangladesh forces contributed to the plans for the 2020 iteration, based on their shared vision. The exercise aims to promote regional security cooperation, main-

tain and strengthen maritime partnerships, and enhance interoperability with partner navies, including the Bangladesh Navy Fleet. “Being able to still execute CARAT 2020 with our Bangladesh partners has proven the strong resiliency that exists between both nations in ensuring the partnership of our navies continues to grow stronger even during challenging times,” said Lt. Alexander Laabs, one of the exercise planners with Destroyer Squadron 7. “The exercise presented another great opportunity to enhance interoperability between the United States and Bangladesh Navy.” During the at-sea portion of the exercise, Millinocket and Bangladesh crews worked through numerous events, focusing on tactical maneuvering while concurrently practicing

tracking, pursuing targets, and screening for potential threats through the coordinated deployment of surface ships and maritime patrol aircrafts. They took part in a gunnery exercise, rehearsed division tactics, man overboard and search and rescue procedures, and replenishment-at-sea approaches. CARAT planners designed the exercise to enhance communication in complex maneuvers. “The CARAT series returns immediate value and has proven a long-term investment,” said Capt. Erwin Lao, master of USNS Millinocket. “CARAT contributes to regional maritime security by enhancing our ability to work side-by-side at sea across a wide range of naval competencies.” Although the exercise has concluded, the United States and the

The exercise presented another great opportunity to enhance interoperability between the United States and Bangladesh Navy.” Lt. Alexander Laabs, Millinocket crew remain committed to strengthening this partnership through more frequent and sophisticated engagements. As always, while underway, the Millinocket crew took precautions to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. Typically, CARAT Bangladesh would include members of ships’ crews cross-decking to other ships to get a real sense of how the other participant operates. This year, though, crew members stayed aboard their own ships and communicated in a variety of other methods.

Navy/Marine Corps COVID-19 study findings published in New England Journal of Medicine From Naval Medical Research Center Public Affairs SILVER SPRING, Md.

Implementing best practice public health measures on their own among young adults may not be enough to prevent SARS-CoV-2 transmission, and additional actions, such as widespread and repeated testing, are recommended to reduce the risk of viral spread, according to research published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. Researchers from Naval Medical Research Center (NMRC), in collaboration with scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, conducted a study to understand the dynamics of viral transmission and host response to COVID-19 in young adults in order to inform public health measures in response to COVID-19 in a group setting. The study, COVID-19 Health Action Response for Marines (CHARM), took place at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina, and included nearly 2,000 participants, composed mostly of 18- to 20-yearold healthy Marine recruits predominantly from the Eastern United States. Upon arrival for recruit training, they spent two weeks in a strict, supervised group quarantine that required wearing masks and emphasized hand washing and social distancing as they began their initial military instruction, primarily outdoors. To determine asymptomatic and symptomatic SARSCoV-2 prevalence and transmission among study participants during the quarantine period, researchers collected study questionnaires and specimens weekly and conducted both polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and serology tests. PCR tests are the gold standard for diagnosing COVID-19. “The study hopes to improve medical readiness for the

Marines and the DoD as well as inform force health protection measures,” said Cmdr. Andrew Letizia lead researcher for the study and deputy director of NMRCs infectious diseases directorate. “The investigators and I believe these findings will help the DoD, other public health entities, and society as a whole mitigate the spread of the pandemic not only among this particular population, but to those they might unknowingly infect as well.” The authors also found that nearly 6% of study participants arrived to recruit training with antibodies for SARS-CoV-2, indicating a previous exposure to the virus. Additionally, at the start of the supervised quaran-

tine, 1% of participants tested positive, 95% of whom were asymptomatic. All reported self-quarantine at home for two weeks before reporting, denied any direct exposure to sick contacts and did not have any risk factors for exposure to COVID-19. Therefore, questions assessing current symptoms or risk factors would not have identified 95% of these individuals who were infected. According to the authors, these results suggest the need to augment public health measures with widespread initial and repeated surveillance testing to prevent COVID-19 transmission in group settings.


B5 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 11.19.2020

MC2 Markus Castaneda Ships from multiple nations sail in formation during a live-fire gunnery exercise as part of Malabar 2020, Nov. 5, 2020. Malabar is an India-led multinational exercise designed to enhance cooperation between Indian Navy (IN), Royal Australian Navy (RAN), Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) and U.S. maritime forces. Australian, Indian, Japanese and American maritime forces routinely operate together in the Indo-Pacific, fostering a cooperative approach toward regional security and stability.

U.S. Navy conducts multinational gunnery exercises in Indian Ocean, Philippine Sea By Lt. Mark Langford

Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 15 Public Affairs

INDO-PACIFIC

Two U.S. Navy Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers participated in separate, multinational live-fire gunnery exercises on the same day, Nov. 5, in both the Indian Ocean and international waters off the coast of Japan. USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) conducted live-fire surface and air exercises in the Bay of Bengal as part of exercise MALABAR while USS Curtis Wilbur (DDG 54), in the Philippine Sea, joined the Royal Canadian Navy Halifax-class frigate HMCS Winnipeg (FFH 338) during a live-fire surface

engagement exercise. “Today’s simultaneous live-fire events in two different oceans across the theater are an example of the lethality we bring to bear alongside our strategic allies and partners in the region,” said Capt. Steven DeMoss, commodore, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 15. McCain joined ships from the Indian Navy, Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF), and Royal Australian Navy (RAN) for a coordinated live-fire air gunnery exercise, targeting a towed aerial target, followed by a similar surface engagement during scheduled events for MALABAR. On the same morning, more than

3,000 miles away, Curtis Wilbur joined HMCS Winnipeg of the Royal Canadian Navy during a live-fire gunnery exercise to engage an unmanned, remote-operated surface target. “We were able to test and train our close-in weapon system (CIWS), 25mm machine gun and .50-caliber machine gun operators,” said Ensign William Lee, gunnery officer of USS Curtis Wilbur. “Being able to test those capabilities as well as our crew’s abilities against a moving surface target was a great opportunity.” Exercises such as these allow for practical training while exchanging skills and cultures and increasing understanding of multinational opera-

tions. “Australia, Canada, India, and Japan are key strategic allies and partners and critical stakeholders to upholding stability and regional security,” said DeMoss. “Together, our job is to be ready – now and always – to bring as much responsive, flexible, enduring, and overwhelming force as we can, to any situation where force is required.” Participants in both exercises include USS John S. McCain (DDG 56), USS Curtis Wilbur (DDG 54), along with Indian Navy Ships Shakti (A57), Ranvijay (D55), Shivalik (F47), HMAS Ballarat (FFG 155), from the RAN, JS O nami (DD 111) from the JMSDF, and HMCS Winnipeg (FFH 338) from the Royal Canadian Navy. John S. McCain and Curtis Wilbur are underway conducting operations in support of a free and open Indo-Pacific, while assigned to Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 15, the Navy’s largest forward-deployed DESRON and the U.S. 7th Fleet’s principal surface force.

Success at sea: 61st UNITAS exercise enhances interoperability among forces From U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Public Affairs

ECUADOR

UNITAS LXI, the world’s longest running multinational maritime exercise, concluded with a closing ceremony in Manta, Ecuador, Nov. 11. For this year’s iteration of UNITAS, Ecuador served as the host nation, joined by forces from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Peru, Uruguay, and the United States. Partner nations used 13 warships and 12 aircraft to conduct scenario-driven joint and combined operations and training to enhance interoperability, flexibility, and increase maritime, air, and ground-domain awareness in the Western Hemisphere. Events included: surface tactical maneuvers, a sinking exercise (SINKEX), a live-fire exercise, a replenishment-at-sea, search and rescue exercises, anti-submarine warfare exercises, air defense exercises, amphibious landing, reconnaissance, assault, security, and humanitarian assistance/disaster relief response training. The at-sea phase culminated in a multi-threat, multi-day scenario that allowed participants to work together, further increasing preparedness for realworld crises that would require a multi-national force response effort. Additionally, U.S. Marine Corps Forces South hosted partner-nations at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, to integrate with Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force – Southern Command and conducted further interoperability

MC2 Allen Amani Cmdr. Rion Martin, commanding officer of Independence-class littoral combat ship USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10), oversees a replenishment-at-sea (RAS) with Chilean Navy replenishment oiler CNS Almirante Montt (AO-52) Nov. 7, 2020. Both Gabrielle Giffords and CNS Almirante Montt are supporting UNITAS LXI, off the coast of Manta, Ecuador, the world longest running multi-national maritime exercise. UNITAS is the world's longest-running, annual exercise and brings together multinational forces from nine countries to include Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Peru, Uruguay, and the U.S. The exercise focuses in strengthening the existing regional partnerships and encourages establishing new relationships through the exchange of maritime mission-focused knowledge and expertise during multinational training operations.

training for humanitarian assistance and disaster relief situations. “Congratulations to all participants on the successful execution of UNITAS LXI,” said Brig. Gen. Phillip Frietze, commander, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, South. “Your efforts and performance have contributed to building the capacity and strength of our nations to rise together and achieve common goals.” Peru will host UNITAS LXII next year to celebrate the bicentennial of the country and the Peruvian navy. For 61 years, the United States has built upon commonalities and increased capabilities within the Western Hemisphere through exercise UNITAS. Different countries host the exercise each year, facilitating the opportunity to gain experience leading a multinational force through complex joint and combined maritime warfare scenarios and exercises.

UNITAS, Latin for “unity,” was conceived in 1959, first executed in 1960 and has been held every year since. This year marks the 61st iteration of UNITAS. The exercise continues to develop and sustain relationships that improve the capacity of our emerging and enduring partners’ joint and combined maritime forces to achieve common desired effects and fosters friendly cooperation and understanding between participating military forces. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet is responsible for U.S. Naval forces in the U.S. Southern Command area of responsibility, including the Caribbean, Central and South America. For more information and news from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command & U.S. 4th Fleet, visit www.navy.mil/local/cusns/, https://www.facebook.com/NAVSOUS4THFLT, and https://twitter.com/NAVSOUS4THFLT.


B6 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 11.19.2020

MC1 Nardel Gervacio The guided-missile destroyer USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) departs Joint Base Pearl-Harbor-Hickam for a scheduled underway, July 27, 2015. John Paul Jones replaced USS Lake Erie (CG 70) in Hawaii as the nation's ballistic missile defense test ship.

Fulfilling the need: USS John Paul Jones Sailors conduct lay leader training By MC3 Aja Bleu Jackson

USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) Public Affairs

U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS

Sailors assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) completed lay leader training and can now provide religious support services on board the ship to interested members of the crew. Smaller ships may not have a permanently assigned chaplain and receive visits from affiliated strike group or destroyer squadron chaplains. Throughout Carrier Strike Group 11 and Destroyer Squadron 9, there are seven chaplains from multiple faith backgrounds, including Judaism, protestant Christianity and Catholicism. Lay leaders reflect a wide variety of faith traditions and can lead prayer or religious study groups and augment religious opportu-

nities the crew would not otherwise have when a chaplain of their faith is not embarked. “The [lay leader] program seeks to 'fill in the blanks’in terms of helping us to provide for the religious and spiritual needs of the entire crew,” said Lt. Cmdr. Charlie Mallie, from Tomball, Texas. Mallie is a Lutheran chaplain and the Carrier Strike Group 11 lay leader coordinator assigned to flagship USS Nimitz (CVN 68), but visits deployed ships in the strike group via helicopter. A ship wide Religious Needs Survey determines the need on board a ship, and volunteers receive training from a chaplain aligned with their religious affiliation. Ensign Juvany Frianeza from San Diego, Operations Specialist 3rd Class Brenden Campbell, from College Station, Texas and Retail Services Specialist 3rd Class Michael Chavez, from Devine,

Texas, completed lay leader training to support their Catholic shipmates. “Chaplains for each religious group train their lay leaders in accordance with the doctrinal principles of that faith and teaches them the scope of their [lay leader] responsibilities,” said Lt. Matthew Benjamin, a Catholic priest and Navy chaplain who like Mallie, is embarked on Nimitz but provides strike groupwide support. Frianeza, Campbell and Chavez are now able to augment Catholic support services. “A Catholic lay leader is someone who is in good standing within the church and is also someone who is willing to facilitate prayers for the faithful in the absence of a Catholic priest,” said Benjamin, a Madison, Ala. native. Some of the responsibilities for a Catholic lay leader include leading interested service

members in praying the Rosary and providing daily readings. “Growing up, I’ve always been really religious,” said Campbell. “I went to church every Sunday. It makes me feel more centered to have faith and read the Holy Bible.” “I really enjoy it,” added Campbell. “Praying the rosary pretty much saved my life.” Frianeza said she believes it is important for service members to be able to practice their religious beliefs. “Finding a group of people to relate with who have the same beliefs and values to find that solace and peace, especially on deployment….this is a great opportunity for that,” added Frianeza. John Paul Jones is part of Nimitz Carrier Strike Group and is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations to ensure maritime stability and security in the Central Region, connecting the Mediterranean and Pacific through the Western Indian Ocean and three critical chokepoints to the free flow of global commerce.

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B7 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 11.19.2020

Courtesy photo

Sailors, civilians at new facility in Poland crucial to national security, NATO allies By Coleen R. San Nicolas-Perez Commander, Navy Installations Command Public Affairs

POLAND

A new Navy facility in Poland is key to missile defense and operations with NATO allies, as well as support to Sailors throughout the region. A base within a base. Inside a former military base near Slupsk, Poland, a densely populated and historically significant northern town close to the coast of the Baltic Sea, lies the U.S. Navy’s only installation in the country -- Naval Support Facility (NSF) Redzikowo. Getting to the point where the Navy could identify the base as operational was not an easy task, to say the least, especially considering structures had to be built from the ground up and relationships with the Polish community had to be established. This undertaking required a team not only dedicated to mission success, but also to making history. “As I share with every Sailor onboard, arriving and departing NSF Redzikowo -- treat this base now with the pride you would be proud to share with your children and grandchildren who might one day serve here,” said Capt. Eric M. Williams, the base’s commanding officer. “I am proud as a CO to be afforded the opportunity to lead a team of Sailors in which every day is an opportunity to make a difference, see the difference and be a part of history being made.” In the past few months alone, Team Redzikowo has achieved major milestones unique to standing up a base. In June, the team took over its new headquarters as the first vertically erected building on the installation. Soon after, they shifted Colors from their temporary administrative buildings to their new center of operations. By July, base personnel occupied all military constructed buildings. As simple as that may sound, it was far from it. It took coordination with multiple agencies, checking off logistics requirements amidst a pandemic, and ensuring that U.S. Navy traditions were upheld in a foreign country while maintaining respect to their hosts. “I’m proud of how well the entire team has come together over the past year to truly move the installation forward,” said Williams, who took charge of the base last November. “We have become CNIC’s newest naval installation with an identity reflective of the hard work and pride of every Sailor and civilian in her.” To truly appreciate Team Redzikowo’s hard work this past year and beyond, it would be best to understand the road traveled to get to where they are today. Start at the Beginning The United States and Poland are among 30 nations that are part of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). NATO countries are committed to the principle of collective defense, where an attack against one is considered an attack against all. The Navy’s Aegis Ashore Missile Defense System is part of a layered defense network designed to defend against ballistic missiles coming from the Middle East. NSF Redzikowo is the second base to house

the Aegis Ashore system, with the first being NSF Deveselu in Romania. However, before NSF Redzikowo was an operational base, teams with the Army Corps of Engineers, Naval Facilities and Engineering Command and Missile Defense Agency alongside the installation’s current and past leaders spent approximately four years to complete the necessary structures and infrastructure that would make up the core components of the base. After the base was established in 2016, the area became a construction site – literally speaking. Old buildings, of what was once a German air force base, still existed in the immediate area, but were unsuitable for modern mission requirements. The Navy had to start construction at the, or in the case of an installation, at the foundation. Just this past September, a historical milestone was achieved as the Army Corps of Engineers officially turned over support facilities to the Navy. In recognition of this momentous occasion, the Navy held a commissioning ceremony rather than the standard ribbon-cutting ceremony, as with most facility turnover events. “The commissioning ceremony is traditional to Navy warships, but we were authorized the same tradition to be observed for our installation,” the skipper said. “The historymaking ceremony was shared with great success with participation from our Sailors, local Polish civic leaders and Polish military leaders.” Every member of the tight-knit team pitched in to prepare for the ceremony and symbolically bring the installation to life. The security officer and senior enlisted leader took lead of the ceremony logistics. One of the petty officers sang the National Anthem. Others made sure the ceremony site was set up to the standards of a traditional Navy ceremony. Even the acting executive officer used his artistic talent to design the commemorative plaques, commissioning coin and ceremony program. “It was great to witness,” said the base’s Executive Officer Lt. Cmdr. Joshua A. Turner. “The commissioning ceremony was a beast and took the effort of everyone on base. It turned out great, and it was a huge boost to morale. It helped us shift our Sailors’ mentality to ‘Hey, we’re a naval installation now.’ It was wonderful to see the pride in the Sailors’ faces and hear the buzz of many excited conversations.” Navy Shore Support Although the ballistic missile defense system is primarily a NATO mission, the base itself is like any other base in that it provides essential support services to its tenant commands and those who live and work on the installation. “We support our Sailors with the same concept as a Navy ship,” Williams said. “We are self-sustaining in that we have here on the base everything to support our Sailors’ day-to-day activities and work.” The newly constructed multi-purpose facility, for example, contains housing for officers and enlisted personnel, a galley, dining facility, library, theater room and a fitness center. There is also a laundry room, conference

rooms and a Navy Exchange shop within the multipurpose facility. In addition, the base has anew main entry control point, where entering visitors and personnel are vetted, as at any Navy installation. “Since the time of my arrival to NSF Redzikowo, there has been drastic progress not only in the appearance of the installation but with the ownership, duties and responsibilities of our Sailors,” said Command Senior Chief Christi L. Montes, the installation’s most senior enlisted Sailor. “Our Sailors are excited to see the progress our installation has made and having access to new buildings and resources and increased mission responsibility. Our Sailors take ownership of their base and are seeing the effects of their hard work to get to where NSF Redzikowo is today.” The base may be up and running, but according to installation leaders, it is the Sailors and government civilians who are the heart and soul of NSF Redzikowo. There are approximately 85 Sailors and 38 civilian personnel who call NSF Redzikowo home away from home. Faces of NSF Redzikowo Seaman Master-at-Arms Taryn E. Bishop is one of the Sailors who is very proud to be part of Team Redzikowo. Hailing from Lynchburg, Virginia, Bishop arrived at Poland in June of last year directly from boot camp. In the past 17 months since reporting for duty, she has witnessed significant development at the base. “This is a learning experience for everyone as this is the Navy’s newest installation, and not many people can say they have been a part of the process of getting a new base up and running,” Bishop said. “The base now is already completely different than it was when I first arrived. There has been a lot of progress in just a year and a half. We have great Sailors here of all different rates, and I think that has played a huge part in the success of the base.” It is those same shipmates she considers her family while away from her own flesh and blood. “NSF Redzikowo is a small base, and you are bound to become close with your shipmates,” Bishop explained. “I have made lifelong friends here. Anything I have ever needed help with, my shipmates have not hesitated to help me. I have learned a lot from them. If I ever need someone to talk to, they are there.We have each other’s backs.I work with great people and could not ask for a better team.” Being a part of the U.S. Armed Forces is not something new to Bishop. A self-proclaimed “military brat,” military service is Bishop’s family legacy. Her mother and father are veteran Marines, both of whom spent their military careers moving from one assignment to another, wherever the Marine Corps needed them, with Bishop and her eight younger sisters in tow. So, why not join the Marine Corps. For Bishop, she decided to follow in the footsteps of her great-grandfather – a Sailor who served during World War II. “Unfortunately, he passed away before I joined,” she said. “I do wish he could have been at my graduation to see me as a new Sailor. I know he would be proud.” Others with Team Redzikowo know what it

is like to continue a family tradition. Paul F. Griffin, the installation’s plans, programs and readiness integrator, recently retired from the U.S. Army as a brigadier general after 31 years of service. His father and grandfather were Navy submariners, so upon retirement, he decided to accept a civilian position with the Navy to learn the culture and to continue the tradition of service. “What I love about the military is there is always a purpose,” Griffin said. “Everyone in the military pulls the wagon in the same direction.” According to base leadership, Griffin is one of the trusted advisors who does more than his fair share of pulling that wagon. He considers himself a “jack-of-all-trades,” responsible for integration of plans and programs, funding strategies, hiring boards, civilian personnel administrative requirements, and even planning events when necessary. Just as important, Griffin is also helping to build NSF Redzikowo and be a part of its history. “Seeing the base as a construction site versus completely built is interesting,” he said. “Knowing the CO’s vision and seeing it come to life is a great feeling. Watching the Sailors bust their humps to make it happen is priceless. I am very proud of being a plank owner of NSF Redzikowo.” For each of the base’s plank owners – a Navy tradition and custom bestowed upon Sailors who are the first to sail a ship on her maiden voyage – pitching in and doing more than what is required of them seems to be a resonating business practice when it comes to NSF Redzikowo. Bishop, for example, who loves to sing, has already performed the National Anthem at several of the base’s events, including its recent commissioning ceremony. The base’s executive officer is also another example. Turner is also NSF Redzikowo’s public works officer and its first engineer. “I love this base,” said Turner, who arrived to Poland just this past June. “In a short amount of time, I’ve sacrificed time, blood and dark hairs for this base because I love it, the people stationed here, and the Polish people and their culture.” Poland: ‘Great Country, Great People’ One of the benefits of being assigned to NSF Redzikowo is the opportunity to explore Central Europe. Poland is known for a history that spans thousands of years, Gothic churches, old towns with cobbled streets, centuries-old architecture, and more than 500 castles. “When I stepped off the plane, I immediately knew Poland was very special and interesting,” said Griffin, who after one year of serving at the base has recently extended his assignment for another year. “The people are terrific and the culture is deep. There is no comparison to living inside the beltway. Much calmer, lots to do and many friendly people to meet.” For others of the tight-knit team, living in Poland while serving in the Navy is a once-ina-lifetime experience. Although families are not allowed to accompany Sailors to NSF Redzikowo, the one-year tour goes by fast, thanks in large part to the busy mission requirements and many explorations in country while off duty. “Poland is a great country with great people,” Bishop added. “Being stationed here is an experience I will never forget. I have made some of the best memories of my life here and because of that, Poland will always have a special place in my heart.” To learn more about NSF Redzikowo, visit https://www.cnic.navy.milr follow the base on Facebook @NSFRedzikowo.


B8 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 11.19.2020


Important Turkey Cooking Tips You Need to Know we rounded up our best turkey cooking tips, including how to season a turkey, what mistakes to avoid and how to cook a turkey without drying it out (yes, it’s possible!), to ensure that the star of your dinner can truly shine. ❯❯ See

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SECTION C | FLAGSHIPNEWS.COM | 11.19.2020

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18th ANNUAL WWE® TRIBUTE TO THE TROOPS® TO AIR ON FOX From WWE STAMFORD, CONN.

The 18th annual WWE Tribute to the Troops will air on FOX on Sunday, December 6, adjacent to Sunday’s regional NFL broadcasts. Viewers with an NFL matchup airing at 1:00 PM ET can watch WWE Tribute to the Troops at 4:30 PM ET; viewers with an NFL matchup airing at 4:05 PM ET can watch the special at 3:00 PM ET. The event will take place inside the state-of-the-art WWE ThunderDome™, and include servicemen and women and their families from Marine Corps Air Station New River, US Army Post Fort Hood, U.S. Navy Aircraft Carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), Naval Air Station Fallon and Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake.

“Supporting the United States military year-round is an essential part of FOX Sports’ mission, and partnering with WWE on their Tribute to the Troops is an incredible extension of this ongoing commitment,” said Eric Shanks, Chief Executive Officer & Executive Producer, FOX Sports. “This is a unique time and we look forward to providing our troops and their families with an interactive experience that only WWE can deliver as we celebrate our servicemen and women with millions of our fans watching at home on FOX,” said Vince McMahon, WWE Chairman & CEO. In what is considered TV’s most patriotic and heartwarming show of the year, WWE began Tribute to the Troops in 2003 to honor our servicemen and women and their families and thank them for their continued

sacrifice to our country. In addition to the event, WWE will also be hosting virtual meet and greet sessions with WWE Superstars and military members. Marine Corps Air Station New River in North Carolina is home to Marine Aircraft Groups 26 and 29, Headquarters and Support squadron, and several premiere training units. New River also serves as the East Coast’s only rotary wing and tiltrotor Air Station, with approximately 8,000 Marines, Sailors and civilian employees. With more than 37,000 active duty Soldiers and Airmen assigned to the post along with more than 100,000 family members, Fort Hood in Texas is the largest active duty armored post in the United States Armed Forces and trains an additional 22,000 Reserve Soldiers annually. USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) is a

Nimitz-class aircraft carrier responsible for protecting American interests across the globe. With 4.5 acres of sovereign U.S. territory, 75 aircraft, and a crew in excess of 5,000 Sailors while deployed, the John C. Stennis is one of the most lethal assets, capable of engaging in sustained power projection operations in support of U.S. and coalition forces. The pinnacle in Naval Aviation training, Naval Air Station Fallon is the US Navy’s “Carrier in the Desert.” As the home of TOPGUN, the air base in Nevada’s high desert trains aircrews and Navy SEALS before they deploy around the globe. Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake in Ridgecrest, CA, covers more than 1.1 million acres and is known for research, development and testing of some of the world’s most cutting-edge weapons, including the Sidewinder & Tomahawk. In the coming weeks, WWE will announce celebrity guests from the world of sports and entertainment that will take part in the Tribute to the Troops broadcast on FOX.

SHOP FOR EXTRA SPECIAL HOLIDAY GIFTS AT THE CHARLES H. TAYLOR VISUAL ARTS CENTER From Hampton Arts HAMPTON, VA

The Charles H. Taylor Visual Arts Center will host the “Small Works” exhibition from December 12, 2020 through January 2, 2021. While many of the most famous works of art catch our attention due to their grandiosity, the Small Works Exhibition is here to paint a different picture – a miniature one! Artists from around the region were invited to submit miniature and small artworks in any media. The exhibition presents a wide range of styles, techniques, content, imagery and intent. Wonderful things do come in small packages – and they make amazing holiday gifts! “It takes talent to make art tiny. Though the works are miniature in size, their presence and meaning speaks volumes to the resourcefulness and ingenuity of our visual arts community,” said Hampton Arts Artistic Director Richard M. Parison, Jr. Betsy Henderson, Executive Director of Arts on Main in Gloucester, will serve as judge for the exhibition. “This is our most popular annual exhibition with over 620 artworks submitted last year. Because the show falls over the holidays, all sold artwork can be taken at the time of purchase for that extra-special gift giving. From 3D printed works to traditional media, this show always delights and surprises,” said Visual Arts Center Manager Jennifer Morningstar. A virtual awards ceremony will take place on Saturday,

Bethany Houston Pagoda

December 12 at 3:00 p.m. in a special episode of The HeART of Hampton, a live-streamed talk show produced by Hampton Arts. The episode can be viewed for free on the Center’s Facebook page. The previously announced Hampton Holiday Fine Arts Bazaar has been postponed until Spring 2021.

The Charles H. Taylor Visual Arts Center 4205 Victoria Boulevard Hampton, VA 23669 Hours: Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays from 11:00 a.m.4:00 p.m.

INSIDE: Check out Flagship Values, your source for automobiles, employment, real estate and more! Pages C6-7


C2 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 11.19.2020

Community

nSubmit YOUR events, news and photos The Flagship welcomes submissions from our readers online. Please submit events here: www.militarynews.com/users/admin/calendar/event/ Please submit news and photos here: www.militarynews.com/norfolk-navy-flagship/submit_news/

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Local Lighting Company Tasked with Illuminating an Icon From Nauticus NORFOLK, Va

A local lighting design company has begun work on its most ambitious project to date - illuminating the last and largest battleship built by the United States Navy. Chesapeake-based Blue Steel Lighting Design is tasked with designing and installing more than 250,000 outdoor holiday lights and projections as part of Nauticus’ new experience, WinterFest on the Wisconsin. The six-week festival opens on November 21, giving the team just one week to complete the installation. “This ship is enormous,” said Jeremy Kilgore, owner of Blue Steel Lighting Design. “We’ve been planning since July, but it’s hard to get a sense of the scale until you’re onboard and setting the light forms in place. We’re so grateful for the amazing opportunity though. It’s been a really tough year for the event community.” WinterFest on the Wisconsin will feature a walk-through light trail that

includes a forest of 100 trees on the ship’s bow, giant candy structures, drums, musical notes and presents. The Battleship Wisconsin’s guns - the largest cannons built by the U.S. Navy - will be transformed into six massive candy canes. “This is a huge, complex project,” said Stephen E. Kirkland, Nauticus’ executive director. “My challenge to the lighting team was to think of this ship as the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree. It has to be that iconic.” Blue Steel Lighting Design will be onboard each day/night leading to the grand illumination on Saturday, November 21 at 5:30PM. WinterFest on the Wisconsin will also feature live entertainment, holiday displays, and a lighted sailboat parade on the Elizabeth River each Saturday evening. At the conclusion of each parade, Santa will arrive by boat. WinterFest on the Wisconsin is primarily an outdoor event, offering guests a safe, openconcept experience to enjoy the holidays and will run through Dec. 31st. For more information, visit www.nauticus.org/winterfest . The experience

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is brought to the community by the Nauticus Foundation, a nonprofit 501©3 developed to support the mission and activities of Nauticus. Nauti-

cus’ mission is to benefit the community through education, impactful experiences and by sharing access to maritime resources.

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PNC presents A Christmas Carol at Virginia Stage Company From Virginia Stage Company

Virginia Stage Company’s beloved holiday classic returns in a new small cast rendition to bring some much needed holiday cheer. Follow Ebenezer Scrooge’s journey through time with the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future as he learns about redemption, kindness, and compassion. Filled with music and mirth, this timeless play is recommended for all ages and is fun for the whole family to enjoy. In order to adhere to health and safety guidelines, this production will include a small cast of VSC favorites playing multiple roles and will tenta-

tively be performed live to a limited group of people at the Wells Theatre in Downtown Norfolk. The production will be recorded, providing a free streaming option available the week of Christmas. Pending city approval, A Christmas Carol will begin performances on Wednesday, December 16 through Thursday, December 24. Thanks to the generosity of PNC, tickets are free to the general public but seats will be assigned at the box office’s discretion to adhere to socially-distanced protocols. Reservations for the free tickets are mandatory and there will be a flat fee charged for any unclaimed reserva-

tions. Ticket requests can be made at www.vastage.org. Face coverings will be required for all in-person attendees and a pre-performance health questionnaire will be provided. In addition to the in-person and streaming viewing options, support provided by PNC will also enable VSC to take a version of the production into the Hampton Roads community for select performances in collaboration with VSC community partners. “We are honored to sponsor this year’s Virginia Stage Company production of A Christmas Carol,” said PNC Bank Hampton Roads Commercial Banking Group Manager Jeff

Clemons. “Whether it’s ‘Merry Christmas’ or ‘Bah Humbug’, this adaptation of the popular holiday story will be fun for the whole family.” Interviews can be arranged with members of the cast, crew, creative team, or staff of Virginia Stage Company. ‘Tis the season for holiday shopping! VSC presents its first-ever online shop called Mistletoe Market. This online marketplace features local artisans and small businesses that offer limited inventory to purchase as holiday gifts. A mini-fundraiser for VSC, the Mistletoe Market also supports these artists and small businesses through a profit-sharing model. Learn more at: www.vastage.org/mistletoemarket


C3 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 11.19.2020

Craft Therapy Healing the Nation's Veterans From Statepoint

Therapeutic and rehabilitation benefits of crafting are well-known to those who’ve experienced them firsthand, but advocates want more people to understand what a powerful healing tool it can be, particularly for the nation’s veterans during this time of increased isolation and anxiety. To raise awareness of the healing and unifying power of crafting, the non-profit Help Heal Veterans recently hosted a nationwide online art contest honoring Veterans Day called “Craft & Salute.” Open to all, veterans, crafters and families submitted art pieces depicting what military service or patriotism means to them. Submissions included mixed media, digital art, sculpture, blacksmithing, woodwork, performance art and body and face paint. The prize winners were: First Place: Maria-Eliza Cabarrus, an Army Veteran from Maywood, Ill. who created a sculpture entitled, “But on the Inside.” Cabarrus turned to art as a way of healing from an injury sustained in the Army. Her piece depicts the injury, which ultimately catapulted her to her true calling—making art that inspires others. Second Place: Sherman Watkins, a U.S. Air Force Veteran from Hampton, Va. who submitted two paintings he called, “Black History V-I-P,” and “The Quilt”. Taking two years to complete, they illustrate the accomplishments of Black Americans. Third Place: Ting Du, a Navy Veteran from San Diego, who submitted two wood sculptures she called “Sail Boat of Hope” and “Beacon of Light.” They symbolize the days and nights she spent at sea and the hardships she navigated. “Even during the darkest nights with the most difficult conditions in the ocean, as long as we can see the beacon of light within our own hearts, we will be able to find our own path back home,” says Du. Winning entries will be displayed at military hospitals and VA facilities throughout the U.S., and the three top winners will be awarded a Southwest Airlines gift card for $1,500, $1,000 and $500 respectively. “Through Craft & Salute, we wanted to share and elevate the healing power of crafting,” says Joe McClain, retired Navy captain and Help Heal Veterans CEO. For almost 50 years, Help Heal Veterans has supplied free arts-and-crafts kits to veterans and active duty military recovering from wounds, injuries and long-term psychological effects of warfare. These kits can provide many therapeutic ben-

Courtesy Photo / The winning entry, “But on the Inside,” by Army Veteran Maria-Eliza Cabarrus.

efits, including an improvement in fine motor skills, cognitive functioning, memory, anger management and dexterity. They also help address symptoms from post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. In a recent survey, 94 percent of respondents said the kits helped them have a more positive outlook on life, and 89 percent said the kits helped relieve their pain. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the need for effective coping strategies has only grown, according to McClain, with millions of veterans on lockdown and experiencing increased isolation, boredom and anxiety. Not surprisingly, Heal Vets has seen a huge increase in demand, shipping nearly 290,000

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craft kits to veterans since the beginning of the pandemic, including deliveries to over 90 VA medical centers, a large number of domestic and overseas military bases, state veteran homes and other locations where the need is great. To view the winning pieces and learn more about the Craft & Salute competition, visit bit.ly/ CraftAndSalute. For more information about craft therapy and the work of Help Heal Vets, visit healvets.org. “In today’s unprecedented environment, we hope to inspire others to bring about positive change by managing stress in creative ways,” says McClain.

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C4 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 11.19.2020

10 Very Important Turkey Cooking Tips You Need to Know By Samantha Macavoy and Kate Merker

Most of the recipes we cook annually for Thanksgiving dinner aren’t all that complicated. You’ve got your go-to green bean casserole and you could practically make mashed potatoes in your sleep. But there’s one dish that we’re always getting questions about, especially as the big day approaches: The all-important, yet ever-intimidating, Thanksgiving turkey. So we rounded up our best turkey cooking tips, including how to season a turkey, what mistakes to avoid and how to cook a turkey without drying it out (yes, it’s possible!), to ensure that the star of your dinner can truly shine. Choose the right size turkey If you’re buying a whole turkey, plan on 1 pound (uncooked) per person. For a boneless turkey breast, get ½ pound per person. Feeding an army? Rather than buying the biggest bird you can find (which can be tricky to cook evenly while retaining moisture), get two smaller turkeys or one whole turkey and one breast. These generous estimates will likely leave you with delicious Thanksgiving leftovers to enjoy when all that hard work is over. Plan for the long thaw According to the USDA, the safest way to thaw turkey is in the refrigerator. This is also our Test Kitchen’s preferred method because it’s the most hands-off and results in an evenly defrosted bird that’s ready to roast. So, how long does it take to thaw a frozen turkey in the refrigerator? You want to allow 1 day in the fridge for every 4 pounds of turkey, so refrigerate a 12-pound bird for 3 days, a 20-pound bird for 5 days, and so on. Dry brine or bust Thanksgiving turkey is something we wait all year to eat, but it often comes out dry and flavorless, merely a vehicle for gravy. Dry brining is the best way to ensure the turkey is seasoned all the way through (not just on the surface), the skin gets extra crispy, and the turkey retains its moisture. All you really need to dry brine a turkey is salt; just rub salt all over the raw turkey, place the turkey into a large plastic bag (you may need 2) and refrigerate overnight or up to 2 days before cooking. Skip the stuffing Instead of packing your bird with bread cubes that inevitably turn soggy, the Test Kitchen prefers stuffing recipes baked out-

side of the bird, in a deep casserole dish, as the safest (and tastiest!) option. Not only does this ensure that the stuffing avoids contact with raw turkey, but the final product is a deliciously moist, crisp-topped creation that your guests won’t be able to get enough of! Add aromatics While salt works well to bring the flavor out of bland turkey, there are a few ways to add even more oomph. Most herbs you might have on hand during Thanksgiving (rosemary, thyme, sage, etc.) will work great. Since you’re not stuffing the bird, add those herbs into the cavity of the bird (about 12 sprigs total), along with a quartered onion. If you have an extra head of garlic, cut it in half and pop that in (skin and all!), too. You can also add a halved lemon or small orange. As the turkey roasts, the seasonings in the cavity will flavor the rest of the bird. Use a roasting rack The roasting rack helps keep the bottom of your turkey from steaming and sticking to the bottom of the pan. No rack? No worries! Just cut onions into 3/4-inch thick slices, arrange in two parallel rows, and place the bird on top. Or, try this trick from our 1968 issue: Create a bed of celery stalks and carrots to elevate your roast — and you’ll have extra flavorful veggies to use later, too. Forget about basting While it is true that basting can help to keep the turkey evenly brown, it has little — if anything! — to do with keeping the bird moist and juicy. In fact, opening the door for frequent basting lowers the oven temperature, which may prolong the overall turkey cooking time. Instead, we rub the bird with olive oil and butter before roasting, which helps produce that crisp, golden brown skin. Take its temperature Roasting a turkey is not something most of us do regularly and tricks like jiggling the leg, using the 15-minutes-a-pound rule, or even keeping your eye on that plastic popper are just not exact enough to make sure you don’t get all of your guests sick. All sorts of factors from fridge temperature to oven accuracy will affect how long to cook a turkey. An instant read thermometer is your friend here. You can know that your turkey is done cooking when you insert a meat thermometer into the thickest part of its thigh (without touching the bone) and the temperature reads 165°F. Its juices should also run clear

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when part of its thigh is pierced with the tip of a knife. Let it rest Letting the bird, or any piece of meat, rest allows the juices (a.k.a. moisture) to redistribute. If you carve too soon, the liquid will be mostly on the cutting board and your meat will be dry. So, don’t make the mistake of rushing the resting period. When you take it out of the oven, carefully tilt the turkey to empty the juices from the cavity into the pan (you’ll want to save these juices for your gravy). Transfer the turkey to a carving board set within a rimmed baking sheet. This will catch the bird’s juices while it rests and as you’re carving, which you can also add to your gravy (and won’t have to mop off the floor!). Cover loosely with foil and let the turkey rest at least 30 minutes before carving. Do not carve the turkey at the table Yes, that’s how they do it in the movies — but, unless you have a resident surgeon who wants to show off their skills, it’s better to carve your turkey in the kitchen. For our foolproof turkey carving method, follow these steps: First, remove the twine. Then, remove the

legs. Cut down in between where the leg meets the breast to remove the entire leg. Transfer to another cutting board. Repeat with the other leg. Next, remove the breast and the wing. Cut along one side of the breast bone and using the non-knife hand, gently pull the breast meat away from the bone. Cut as closely to the bone and ribs as possible, and then cut through the wing joint. Transfer to the other cutting board. Separate the drumsticks from the thighs. Transfer the drumsticks to a platter. Remove the thigh bones, then slice the thigh meat and transfer to the platter. Remove the wings from the breasts and transfer to the platter, if your family and guests like the wings. Now, all that’s left is the breast. Slice the turkey breast crosswise (against the grain), and arrange on the platter. Garnish with herbs and fresh fruit (oranges, clementines, figs, or grapes) for an equally pretty presentation. Try roasted pears for extra juiciness or caramelized winter vegetables for earthy sweetness. Small, sweet champagne grapes are also fun to munch on in between bites of savory turkey.


C5 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 11.19.2020

Bernard Little Peter Liacouras, Ph.D., director of the 3-D Medical Applications Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, explains to physicians from the Washington DC Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center the capabilities of the 3D MAC at WRNMMC.

Walter Reed, VA focus on joint efforts in 3D medical application By Bernard S. Little, WRNMMC Public Affairs

Leadership from the Washington, D.C. Veterans Affairs Medical Center visited Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last month to acknowledge the new Joint Incentive Fund (JIF) award between the two centers. The JIF award focuses on the Department of Defense/VA 3D Printing Consortium for Medical Applications. The total JIF award was for more than $8.8 million with the WRNMMC/3D MAC portion at over $4.1 million for a project length of two years, according to Dr. Peter Liacouras, director of the services for WRNMMC’s 3D Medical Application Center. In 2002, the 3D MAC opened at the former Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC), a predecessor of WRNMMC with the former National Naval Medical Center (NNMC), stated Liacouras, who joined the 3D MAC team in 2006. He added that in the late 1990s, an individual at NNMC was doing some 3D printing as well. In 2007, the Naval Postgraduate Dental School (NPDS), at the then NNMC, started to invest in 3D printing for dental prosthetics, and then in 2011 with the Base Realignment and Closure law, the 3D MAC was relocated from the closing WRAMC to the new WRNMMC, Liacouras explained. According to Military Health System (MHS) officials, the JIF was established under Section 721 of the FY 2003 National Defense Authorization Act “to

provide seed money and incentives for innovative DoD/VA joint sharing initiatives to recapture Purchased Care The TRICARE Health Program is often referred to as purchased care. It is the services we “purchase” through the managed care support contracts.purchased care, improve quality and drive cost savings at facilities, regional and national levels. JIF is only designated for use by the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and Defense Health Agency (DHA) entities for direct medical sharing initiatives or for services or systems that facilitate DOD/VA interoperability.” “Telehealth and 3D printing in health care settings are the wave of the future,” VA Secretary Robert Wilkie recently stated. In March, VA activated its 3D printing network to test 3D designs of medical equipment used by the nation’s health-care providers to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. This effort included developing 3D masks and other critical personal protective equipment (face shields, masks and ventilators) to bolster the nation’s fight against COVID-19. The VA is the first integrated health care system in the country to establish a national 3D Printing Network, allowing its health-care staff to share ideas, resources and best practices to deliver quality care to patients throughout its enterprise, according to VA officials. This collaboration will include the 3D at WRNMMC. “The VA and DOD share a vision to

provide a centralized system of services to service members that will benefit them throughout a lifetime,” Liacouras stated. “This system is created through an interdependent network of partnerships and establishes a national model for excellence, quality, access, satisfaction, and value.” He explained the vision is supported by three key goals: Delivering comprehensive benefits and services through an integrated client-centric approach that anticipates and addresses client needs. Providing a patient-centered healthcare system that delivers excellent quality, access, satisfaction, and value, consistently across the departments. Establishing a national model for the effective and efficient delivery of benefits and services through joint planning and execution. Liacouras further added that the JIF proposal sought funding to unify fieldlevel DOD and VA hospital 3D printing efforts into a scalable DoD/VA 3D Printing Consortium through joint planning and execution. At WRNMMC, the five-person 3D MAC team uses digital technology combined with additive manufacturing to provide medical-specific models and devices for MHS beneficiaries. The team produces custom implants, medical simulators, surgical guides, orthotics, prosthetic devices and patientbased anatomical models. They also assists in virtual-treatment planning, image capturing and research projects throughout DOD. The 3D MAC at

“Telehealth and 3D printing in health care settings are the wave of the future,” VA Secretary Robert Wilkie WRNMMC is the DOD’s largest 3D medical printing center with a team that serves not only WRNMMC beneficiaries, but also other military facilities, federal entities and worldwide allied medical institutions. This JIF award will allow WRNMMC to update and purchase multiple 3D printers and other digital technology; register with the FDA as a medical manufacturer; and increase training within WRNMMC and DOD. Liacouras, explained to the capabilities of the center, elaborating on its role in four main areas of reconstructing patient radiological images to produce medical models and devices; developing new, low cost, high fidelity simulation models for resident training; designing and manufacturing unique limb prosthetic attachments for specialty activities; and producing devices and assisting in numerous research projects. The 3D MAC team produces more than 1,000 products annually in support of military medicine, according to Liacouras. Liacouras explained how the 3D MAC’s expertise, combined with collaborations across hospital departments and within DOD provides physicians and other professionals with the opportunity to use the state-of-the-art technology to positively impact the quality of life for military members and their families.

Naval Medical Forces Pacific’s commander tours NH Twentynine Palms By Dave Marks, NHTP PAO Public Affairs

Navy Rear Adm. Tim Weber visited Naval Hospital Twentynine Palms at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center in California earlier this month to observe big-initiative efforts as well as to meet with installation leadership to address Navy Medicine’s role in taking care of warfighters and their families during a pandemic. Not wasting a minute, the Commander, Naval Medical Forces, Pacific, met with hospital leadership, enlisted sailors and subject-matter experts to gauge the performance of high-visibility initiatives and to solicit a ground-eye view on how the military treatment facility is rising to the challenge on multiple administrative fronts. Weber was briefed on the implementation of MHS GENESIS, the new electronic health record, and the hospitals response to COVID-19; and meet with sailors and civilians to get their deck-plate view. Weber congratulated hospital staffers for their recent highly successful Medical Inspector General’s inspection, in which only two findings out of 57 programs were

Dave Marks/ Navy Rear Adm. Tim Weber congratulates and offers career advice to two sailors at Naval Hospital TwentyninePalms’ Adult Medical Care Clinic.

recorded. He then met with the Commanding General of the Marine Air Ground Task Force Training Command/ Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Maj. Gen. William Jurney. In addition, Weber toured the adult medical care clinic, where active-duty service members are treated. He also learned about the establishment of the acute respiratory clinic, a tent with diagnostic equipment to evaluate and isolate possible COVID-19 infections. As Director, Medical Service Corps, Weber capped

the day meeting with the command’s MSC officers. “The visit has been fantastic,” Weber said. “We’re really seeing the ingenuity, collaboration and high morale in this command. We’re seeing sailors, whether in uniform, or our civilian shipmates, operating at the top of their game. I’m seeing great innovation in the establishment of the acute respiratory clinic and COVID-19 tents. We didn’t do that a year ago, but we figured it out. All skill sets are being used, and that’s good.”


C6 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 11.19.2020

AntiquesSales & Collectibles Estate

BUYING COINS

757-474-1303 Coin Collections STAMP COLLECTIONS

Dogs, Cats, Other Pets CHRISTMAS BULLDOG/ENGLISH BULLDOG Pups avail. Litters Akc reg.,Vet ckd, Utd vacs/deworm w/Pup guar. Home loved. Taking dep. $3000 and up pet price Call/text 919-280-2975

DECOYS WANTED

Room For Rent PORTSMOUTH Parkview furnished rm, mature person. $150/week neg. Call 757-235-7299

CRISPUS ATTUCKS CULTURAL CENTER, INC. DISSOLUTION CACC will dissolve. Mail outstanding business claims by December 31, 2020, to CACC Board of Directors, P. O. Box 25, Norfolk, VA 23510.

#01A BLACK SIFTED TOPSOIL 6 yds $220, Mulch $28/yd; Compost $28/yd. Rock, playground mulch, firewood, lawn care. D Miller’s 536-3052

*TV ARMOIRE*

1ST MO. FREE, FULL DEP. PAID Ingleside Sq. Apts, Norfolk. 466-8111. Premium IIloaded, sunroof, 47k miles, $12,950 VA Dlr Proc. fee $395. 757717-1715/757-963-2299

CADILLAC 2011 SRX

Highest CA$H prices paid Old wooden ducks or Canvas geese Swans and Shorebirds. Also buying Old fishing tackle & Wooden lures Boat oars Nautical & Lifesaving items Call Mark at 757-721-2746

Estate Sales CHURCH POINT 4604 Church Point Pl, VB Sat-Sun Nov 21-22, 104. Din & bedrm, furn, recl., leather sofa, Orig art, antiq, china, kit, collect, Sterl, jewelry. Masks req’d. Pix on Blvd Treasures FB

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CADILLAC 2019 XTS

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Estate Sales

BUICK 2014 REGAL

Apartments For Rent

Misc. Merchandise For Sale Announcements

Autos for Sale

Gentle used with space enough for a 75” TV. Purchased at Willis Wayside for $2600 selling for $1000. All wood wicker tan color call for more info Steven 757-613-1702 FIREWOOD FOR SALE $170/Cord, Delivery Available Call: 757-478-9914 Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

KEMPSVILLE Virginia Bch. Lg furnished rm, priv entr, all inclusive. $175/wk. 757-652-2151

Dogs, Cats, Other Pets AMERICAN BULLY PUPPIES for sale, ABKC registered, 2 blue and white males, first shots and dewormed $1800. 757-641-1723.

Subscribe to The Virginian-Pilot today. Call 757-446-9000 or go to PilotOnline.com

LAKE CHRISTOPHER Rm for rent. Kitch privileges. Internet, WA/DR No smoking. Utils Incld $560/mo. Call: 757-639-7707 CHESAPEAKE 2 furn rooms with basic cable. all rooms located in South Norfolk section of Chesapeake. $160/week, singles only, drug free, no pets. 757-494-7848

Travel/Camping Trailers 2015 COACHMAN TRAILER 25 ft, pull behind, 2 doors with one slide. Excellent Condition. $17,500 OBO. 757-686-8468 CONSIGNMENTS WANTED! Let us clean, sell, & finance your RV. Snyders RV 499-8000.

Luxury beautiful car, still under warranty. Save thousands! $26,450. VA Dlr Proc. fee $395. 757-7171715/757-963-2299

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757.622.1455 | placeanad.pilotonline.com Electricians ANY ELECTRICAL 498-2653 10% OFF ABSOLUTELY ANY JOB. Free Estimates $100 OFF ANY BREAKER BOX. COLE ELECTRIC - 498-2653 THOR ELECTRIC 757-545-0400 Licensed & Insured, Service Calls, Upgrades Free estimates, 10% discount 757-545-0400

Care For The Elderly HEALTH & SPIRITUAL CARE PROVIDER For elderly or special needs. 757-287-9561

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Home Improvements ADDITIONS, SUNROOMS, ROOFS, Decks, more. Member BBB. 757-986-3777. www.builderscorporation.com ALL HOME IMPROVEMENTS Custom Home Repairs & Renovations. Patrick Ellis Ent. Inc. Lic. & Ins. BBB A+ 757-635-6609 BEST PRICE EXTERIORS 757-639-4692 Siding, Windows, Trim, Roofing. FREE ESTIMATES! Lic. & Ins’d. Lowest Prices & Top Quality Work. No Repairs. BBB A+ Rating BRICK & STONE REPAIRS Steps, Walls, Foundations, etc. Virginia Beach Native. Masonry Contract. 40+ yrs Known As Stone Smith USA. Semi-Retired - A Legend In His Own Mind! Earl Smith 757-2700578. You Won’t Find A Better Man! D & W GARAGES 20x24’ $15,995; 24x24’ $17,995; 24x30’ $20,995; w/Slab & Vinyl Siding. 465-0115 or 362-1833. dandwgarages.com

YOUR PERFECT

HIRE

IS WAITING

FRANK’S SIDING & REPAIRS Repairing Siding & Trim. Small & large jobs. Lic/Ins. Low Prices. BBB A+ RATING 757-227-8964 RICHARD’S /RGSPROS.COM PLUMBING REPAIRS/CLOGGED DRAINS/ JETTER SERVICES/KITCHENS/BATHROOMS/ADDITIONS/ROOFLEAKS/HANDYMAN REPAIRS/CRAWL SPACE REPAIRS/ VAPOR BARRIERS/SEWAGEPROS.COM/24 HR SERVICES/7578690380 CALL RICH ANYTIME WE’RE HERE TO HELP VIRGINIA STUCCO & EIFS CONTRACTOR We offer inspection and repair services. EIFS, STUCCO, STONE 757-900-9103 WWW.EIFSWALLSYSTEMS.COM

Lawn and Tree Service ★★★AFFORDABLE TREE SERVICE★★★ Josh 757-998-5327 Theo 757-515-6933

AMERICANTREESERVICE.CO ★Catering to all your tree & yard needs.★ ★100% Price Match Guarantee★ ★24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICES★ ★Norfolk, Virginia Beach, & Chesapeake★ ★757-587-9568. 30 years experience★ FOR ALL YOUR LANDSCAPING GIVE US A CALL Fall Clean Ups. Renovations, monthly maintenance, mulching, shrub trimming seeding, aeration. Buddy 757-535-0928 GODWIN TREE SERVICE 25yrs. Trimming, topping, total removal. Free es. Senior disc. Lic’d & Ins’d 757-237-1285 or 757816-3759 BBB Member LEAF RAKING AND CLEANUP Yard Work, Weed Control, Mulching, Trimming, Planting, Transplanting of Shrubbery and Trees. 25 yrs exp. Call 757-918-4152

Plumbing ★HONEST PLUMBING ANY & ALL PLUMBING SEWER & DRAIN CLOGS WATER HEATERS & FAUCETS (757)510-5970

Roofing CALVIN’S ROOFING REPAIR LLC Specializes in roofing repair, also guttering, Free estimates, roofing of all types, reasonable prices, Shingles, metal, slate, rubber. Over 30 yrs -business, BBB 757-377-2933 ROOFING SALE 30 Yr. Architect Shingles $1.99 sq ft. Labor & Material included, repair, siding. Class A Lic’d & Ins’d. (757) 345-9983.

Miscellaneous Services

YARD CLEAN UP - GRASS CUTTING & WOOD FENCE REPAIR Weed eating, Blowing, Bushes & Mulch, Reasonable prices. Call 757-477-2158

AUCTION Now Accepting Consignments Estates, Equipment, Etc. www.BlueBoxAuction.com

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C7 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 11.19.2020 Autos for Sale

Autos for Sale

CHEVROLET 1999 CAMARO

BL w/Lea T-Top Pw win/door 23,903 mi, new insp $4500 757-483-8147

HONDA 2017 CIVIC

Trucks and SUVs

FORD 2019 EXPEDITION MAX

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XLT. Low mileage, all serviced, new inspection, runs & looks great, $38,900. 757-675-0288. Va. Dlr.

TOYOTA 2017 CAMRY

FORD 2019 F-150

LE 4 cycl, auto, AC, cruise, backup cam, pwr seats/windows/locks, 25K mi, excellent condition! Toyota Warranty. $16,900 Call: 757-351-5611

Trucks and SUVs

HONDA 2017 CIVIC

Wanted Automotive

GMC 2020 TERRAIN

MAZDA 2014 CX-9

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Auto, alloid, leather, good miles. $13,950. VA Dlr Proc. fee $395. 757-717-1715/757-963-2299

HONDA 2016 CR-V

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DODGE 2020 RAM 1500

FORD 2019 RANGER

NISSAN 2014 NV200

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VOLKSWAGEN 2020 TIGUAN

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Call 757-446-9000 or go to PilotOnline.com

Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

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Boats & Watercraft

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DODGE 2018 JOURNEY

FORD 2015 FIESTA

Trucks and SUVs

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C8 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 11.19.2020

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Flagship 11.19.2020  

Flagship 11.19.2020