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Calmar Courier Community News. Community Service. Address: PO Box 507, Calmar, IA 52132 Email: calmarcourier@hotmail.com Phone: (563) 562-3488 Web: www.calmarcourier.com USPS: 335-690

Official Paper of Calmar, Fort Atkinson, Spillville, Ridgeway, Waucoma, Winneshiek County, South Winneshiek & Turkey Valley Community Schools

November 12, 2013

By Joyce Meyer With Veterans Day upon us, it is time for us to reflect on what our freedom has cost our American veterans who answered the call to military duty when their country needed them. Like other things of great value, our security did not come cheaply. Many have died for our freedom, and it is so important that we take the time to be reminded of what the veterans went through for us and the generations

Vol. 35, Issue 46

to come. For many the memory is still vivid. John Dale Meyer of Calmar answered the call when he enlisted in the Navy soon after high school and remembers boot camp was in San Diego. After boot camp he went to the University of California as an aviation cadet. After the Navy dropped the program in June of 1946, he was then assigned to the famous USS Doyle, DD494/ DMS 34 in San Francisco and

back to radio school in San Diego. He served on the Doyle 34 months as a radio operator and doing radio maintenance and repair. Some may remember the 1954 movie, “The Caine Mutiny” which was filmed on the Doyle with actors Humphrey Bogart and was based on the 1951 Pulitzer Prize winning novel by Herman Wouk “The Caine Mutiny.” The reason USS Doyle was so famous says a history website is

because, “On 5 June, 1944 she sortied with the 31st Minesweeping Flotilla to clear the assault area. She gave fire support to the landing forces on D-Day, 6 June, received on board 37 survivors of LCIs 93 and 487, and served on patrol. Sailing 1 August, 1944 for Oran, Doyle departed from that port ten days later for the invasion of southern France, escorting a convoy to the assault area and patrolling to cover the landings. She

continued to support the invasion by escorting convoys from Naples and patrolling off Marseilles. Doyle made three more voyages to escort convoys to North Africa between 3 January and 10 June, 1945. She arrived at Norfolk on 20 June for conversion to a high speed minesweeper, and was reclassified DMS-34, 23 June, 1945. After conversion, she sailed from Norfolk 27 August for the Pacific, calling at San Diego, Pearl Harbor, MEYER to page 3

inside this issue: Santa’s Helpers..................2 Election Results.................2 Christmas Child.................3 West Union Fire.................4

$0.50 per copy Veteran’s Day Program Information is on page 4.


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news

Calmar Courier

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Unofficial Election Results

Calmar Courier

Regular City Elections for Winneshiek County (November 5th)

Calmar—135 of 557 (24.24%) Mayor Keith Frana Council (elect 2) Dennis Kleve T.J. Schissel Chris Wiltgen Aaron J. Brincks Patrick Nervig

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Fort Atkinson—60 of 212 (28.30 %) Council (elect 2) Michele Elsbernd 42 Robert S. Glass 30 Allen Blong 11 Kevin A. Karnik 9 Council (vacancy write-in elect 1) Kevin Karnik 11 Steve Neuzil 5 Janice Myers 3 Ridgeway—31 of 145 (21.38 %) Mayor Paul Stevens Council (elect 2) Ethan Novotny Scott Engelhardt Spillville—61 of 244 (25.00 %) Mayor Jeff Ira (w-i) Council (elect 3) Scott Balik Tom Straube Ben Van Horn (w-i) Elsie Swehla (w-i) Ossian—154 of 512 (30.08 %) Mayor Charles Covell Council (elect 2) Mike Meyer Mitchell Holthaus Karl F. Schroeder Ree Meyer

24 27 21

40 48 45 25 6

140 99 87 60 43

Jackson Junction—21 of 36 (58.33%) Mayor Mae Schmitt 15 Council (elect 5) Leon Warnke 20 Ken Kriener 19 Art Perry 19 Richard Vrzak 18 Rodney Vrzak 17

Castalia—28 of 107 (26.17 %) Mayor Margaret Jones Council (elect 2) Joseph C. Moellers Jamie K. Smith Lawler—28 of 107 (26.17 %) Mayor Margaret Jones Council (elect 2) Joseph C. Moellers Jamie K. Smith

A Division of Mid-America Publishing Corporation

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19 26 20

St. Lucas—35 of 117 (29.41 %) Mayor James Rausch 32 Council (elect 5) Janet Kuennen 34 Terry Costigan 33 David Anderson 32 Kurt Huinker 32 Sue Franzen 18 Public Measure (Change Term of Office) Yes 22 No 11 Waucoma—68 of 150 (45.33 %) Mayor Dave Klimesh Write-ins Council (elect 5) Amy Hanson Sam Wenthold Mark Schmitt Faye Winter Kevin Kleve (w-i) Write-ins Hawkeye—137 of 267 (51.31 %) Mayor Donald E. Kelly Brent Ungerer John Necker Write-ins (Scattering) Council (elect 3) Terry Buenzow Allison Moschel John Campbell Tony Sebring Walter Herman Write-ins (scattering)

It’s almost that time of year again! With the weather changing and the Holiday Season approaching, it is time to pick out your photos for the 2013 edition of Santa’s Helpers. The deadline is Wednesday, November 27, 2013. Forms can be dropped off at the Calmar Courier office during normal business hours, placed in the green drop box outside of the office door or mailed to the office at: Calmar

Courier, P.O. Box 507, Calmar, IA 52132. Mailed entries must be postmarked November 27. Cost is $5.00 per photo. We will not accept photos by email. You can find a form in the Calmar Courier this week and in the next two issues or on our Facebook page at Calmar Courier Sportsology. Don’t miss out on this year’s edition of Santa’s Helpers, get your forms and money in early!

Submit your Santa’s Helper photos today!

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A salute goes out to all the men and women who have or are serving in the military today and every day! This is a special time to remember, honor and recognize the important contributions of the millions of our citizens whose military service had a profound effect on our history and freedom. (Photo by Joyce Meyer)

DEADLINES: • Legal Notices: Thursdays, 5 p.m. • Submitted news: Fridays, noon. • Newspaper Ads, Inserts: Fridays, noon. • Classified Ads: Fridays, noon. • Obituaries: Mondays, noon. • Coverage requests: 24 hour notice. TELEPHONE CALLS: Our telephone is answered 24/7. Extensions for various services and contacts are listed below. • Local Telephone: 563-562-3488 • Fax Communication: 563-562-3486 ADMINISTRATION: • Publisher: Ryan L. Harvey: 1-800-5581244, extension 118, or email ryanharvey. map@gmail.com.

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OFFICE LOCATION & INFORMATION: • Office hours: 8:30-3 Monday, Thursday and Friday; 8:30-2 Wednesday; Closed Tuesday. • Office location: 109 N. Maryville St., Calmar, IA 52132 • Physical product deliveries to: 9 2nd St. NW, Hampton, IA 50441. • Mail: PO Box 507, Calmar, IA 52132

CIRCULATION & SUBSCRIPTIONS: • Dial 1-800-558-1244, extension 122, or email mapcirculation@iowaconnect.com.

DEADLINE is Wednesday, November 27th MUST be postmarked by 11/27 Child/Childrens Name(s)/Ages:_______________ _________________________________________ _________________________________________ Parents:__________________________________ _________________________________________ Grandparents:_____________________________ _________________________________________ _________________________________________ _________________________________________ _________________________________________ Mail form and $5.00 per photo submission to:

PAPER OR INTERNET ADVERTISING: • Publisher: Ryan L. Harvey: 1-800-5581244, extension 118, or email calmarcourier@ hotmail.com • Leah Kruse, 563-562-3488, or email calmarcouriersports@yahoo.com • Annette Kriener, 563-562-3488 PRINTING, RETAIL & PHOTO SERVICES: • Lisa Flack: Dial 1-800-558-1244, extension 113, or email lisaflack.map@gmail.com.

***we do not accept photos via email***

UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE REQUIRED NOTICE: The Calmar Courier is produced weekly and distributed on Tuesdays by Mid-America Publishing Corporation, Hampton, IA 50441. Periodicals postage paid at the Calmar Post Office, Calmar, IA 52132. Send address changes to Calmar Courier, PO Box 507, Calmar, IA 52132. Postal Permit USPS 335-690. This is issue Volume 35, Number 46, on Tuesday, November 12, 2013.

Calmar Rental Storage

OPINION PAGE POLICIES: The Courier accepts letters. All such material should clearly and concisely express an opinion or solicit a call to action regarding a particular issue. Letters must include the name, address and phone number of the author for verification purposes. The Courier’s standard practice is to not publish unsigned or anonymous letters. The Courier has the right to edit all letters and guest editorials for length, clarity, taste and libel. All personal columns and letters are the views of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Calmar Courier.

Calmar Courier PO Box 507 Calmar, Iowa 52132

Daytime: 563-562-3583 | Evenings: 563-562-3482


news

Calmar Courier

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Photo from Samaritan’s Purse International Relief website.

OSSIAN—With holiday supplies already covering the store shelves, Ossian individuals, families, churches and groups are working to make Christmas a reality for needy kids around the world by filling shoeboxes with toys, school supplies, hygiene items and notes of encouragement. Operation Christmas Child, the world’s largest Christmas project of its kind, is ramping up as Ossian residents prepare to collect 180 gift-filled shoeboxes during National Collection Week (Nov. 18–25). At this local collection site in the Ossian area, anyone can drop off a gift-filled shoebox to send to a child overseas. Then using whatever means necessary—trucks, trains, boats, bikes and even elephants—the shoebox gifts will be delivered to children worldwide. For many children, the shoebox gift will be the first gift they have

ever received. Though the shoebox gifts will often travel thousands of miles, Operation Christmas Child offers a way for participants to follow their box, by using the donation form found at samaritanspurse. org. Donors will receive an email telling the country where their shoeboxes are delivered. Operation Christmas Child has collected and delivered more than 100 million shoebox gifts to suffering children in more than 100 countries since 1993. Celebrating its 20th anniversary, Operation Christmas Child hopes to collect another 9.8 million gift-filled shoeboxes in 2013. Operation Christmas Child is a project of Samaritan’s Purse, an international Christian relief and evangelism organization headed by Franklin Graham. For more information on how

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to participate in Operation Christmas Child, call (612) 359-7025 or visit samaritanspurse.org. National Collection Week for giftfilled shoeboxes is Nov. 18-25; however, shoebox gifts are collected all year at the Samaritan’s Purse headquarters in Boone, N.C. Participants can also build a box through an online tool offering a personalized and convenient way to send a gift to a child in one of the hardest-to-reach countries. OSSIAN COLLECTION SITE: Bethany Lutheran Church 29746 Iris Road Ossian, IA 52161 1-800-567-8580 Operating Hours: Mon-Fri, Nov. 18-22: 4:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. Sat, Nov. 23: 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Sun, Nov. 24: 12 p.m. - 2 p.m. Mon, Nov. 25: 8 a.m. - 10 a.m.

MEYER from page 1 and Okinawa, and arriving at Sasebo 24 October. She served in the Far East on occupation duty, at Sasebo as flagship for Commander, Mine Force, Pacific, for most of her tour returning to San Francisco on 31 March, 1946. Thereafter, she operated on the west coast and in the western Pacific 18 August, 1947 to 19 April, 1948.” John explains, “Our ship spent nearly a year in Qingdao (Tsingtao) China, assisting the Nationists in their move to Taiwan. Tsingtao beer is noted to be about the best in the world.” When the sailors had leave they would get to experience the beer and see beautiful geisha girls. The Doyle also visited Hawaii, Japan, Midway, Shanghai and others. John was dischared in May of 1949 to the Naval Reserve. It didn’t take long and John was bored with the farm life and dreamed of being on the open seas again. He reenlisted for the Korean Conflict. “I was then assigned to the staff of Commander, Landing Ship Dock Squadron One as senior radioman. During this period, we spent nearly a year in Inchon, Korea. Our helicopter made almost daily trips with secretaries, ice and laundry for Rear Admiral Charles Turner Joy working on a well known armistice agreement. John served his country for 3 years, 9 months and 11 days leaving the service in May of 1951. He met Dolores at the Inwood and soon decided not to go back to San Diego where he had a job lined up. They married September 22, 1953 and had six children. John was honored as one of the veterans to get to go on the Honor Flight and had this to say about it, “All Honor Flight Veterans agree on one thing, it’s a fabulous trip!” He is thankful that there are so many wonderful people in this world who put these trips on for the veterans. “The plane carried 162 passengers with 90 veterans, 22 in wheel chairs with the rest guardians and crew. My companion vet was also a retired postal supervisor, so we

had much in common. Our guardian was his daughter and she was just super. We reported to the airport around 5 a.m. There we were greeted by Salvation Army ladies in WWi USO uniforms. At 6:00, the plane took off and landed at 8:45. As we were taxied to the gate, we were met by two very large fire trucks and they showered the plane with water cannons as a greeting. The airport gangway was lined with people expressing their thanks and a small army band played a welcome. Three passenger buses took us on our tour. It was a great day in D.C. The World War II Monument was impressive. I especially liked FDR’s monument. There were acres of huge blocks of red granite with many waterfalls. There were very few dry eyes at the Changing of the Guard, military precision at it’s finest. Taps was another tearjerker…all three times. We arrived back in Cedar Rapids at 10:30 and I can’t describe the sights and sounds from there on. The crowd in the airport was estimated at 1,000. A band played military marches, a large group was singing. There were between 50 and 75 students thanking us with banners and posters. We veterans were all choked up after this display of gratitude from caring, giving, generous, loving and wonderful people.” Let’s all stop and take a moment this Veteran’s Day to honor our living and dead soldiers from all the wars who gave us the freedom we have today. We owe a debt to our American veterans and we are happy to see these WWII Korean Conflict veterans get the opportunity of a lifetime by going to Washington DC.

Front Cover: A collection of Meyer’s items from the time he served our country. Above: John Dale Meyer remembers his years of service and Honor Flight. (Photos by Joyce Meyer) Left: On leave with friends in a club in Japan 1951 with Geisha girls. John Dale is at the right. (Photo courtsey of John Dale Meyer)


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news

Calmar Courier

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Both of our local schools, South Winn and Turkey Valley, held Veteran’s Day presentations yesterday, Monday, November 11 to honor local veterans, active military members and to remember those that paid the ultimate price for the United States. Details of both presentations will be in next week’s issue of the Calmar Courier. Left: Students at South Winn wrote the names of family and friends that have served or are serving in the military in honor of Veteran’s Day. The SW student government arranged the names into an American flag, making the names into a visual memorial. Below: Local veterans attended the Veteran’s Day program held at South Winn. (Photos by Bridget Adam)

By Katie Huinker History repeated itself last Tuesday afternoon in downtown West Union as a fire destroyed two buildings; the same two buildings burned down 110 years ago. Before Gary and Justin Steinlage took over Unionland Feed and Supply, the building housed the town grocery store, but even earlier was the Arlington Hotel. On March 22, 1903, the Arlington Hotel was burned down along with the adjoining Livery (Top Hat Tavern). Jessica Sadler was in her embroidery shop, next to the Top Hat Tavern, when she looked outside and saw smoke near Unionland where her son William currently was as it was his after school hangout. “I thought it was just some leaves burning at first and thought nothing of it,” until she looked closer and realized it was coming out of the building. She informed Justin, the store manager, that his roof was engulfed in flames and got her son and everyone else out of the building. Five area fire stations responded shortly after 3:45 but the fire had spread too quickly. Unionland Feed and Supply and the Top Hat Tavern were knocked down

to contain the fire. These businesses were just starting to see an increase in sales after the completion of a streetscape project just months before. Due to community demand, Steinlage’s have temporarily relocated their shop to the former H & H building (now Crystal Ice Distribution). Unionland Feed and Supply and the Top Hat Tavern were very much community-gathering places. When walking in the Top Hat Tavern, anyone could feel the sense of community with big tables filled with locals talking about life and business, while Unionland sold locally grown products ranging from eggs and meat to animal feed. West Union citizen Lester Hope sells his organic vegetables in the supply store and says, “This community will come together and the store will bounce back.” When asked why they named the store “Unionland,” it seems appropriate that Gary replied, “Union reminds me of a union of friends or community so that’s what I named it after.” Investigators say there is still no determined cause of the fire and may never be due to the extensive damage. No one was injured in this incident.

fort atkinson council The Fort Atkinson City Council addressed issues with regards to its mending sewage lift station project at its regular council meeting on Monday, November 4. The City Clerk told the Mayor and Council that she, along with Barta, Casey Mai (who is assisting the City in preparing the grant application) and the City’s engineer met with two representatives from Homeland Security to discuss the application for FEMA funding to up-grade the city’s sewage lift station. If eligible, the City will submit the application after which it could take up to eight

to twelve12 months before being notified if the funding was approved or not. The council approved an addendum to the January 13, 2013 agreement between the City of Fort Atkinson and Erdman Engineering for additional services necessary for the sewage lift station improvements project. The council received information regarding the Winneshiek County Community Foundation’s Online Grant Training Session that will be held on November 13 in Decorah. The council heard a report on testing issues concerning the City’s sewage lagoon. Per DNR

requirements the extra testing will continue. The council directed the city clerk to sell a snow blower that no longer gets used. The council approved a building permit for Christie Schmitt. The council approved a resolution for the purpose of flood insurance rating. The council changed the meeting time for January due to the New Year’s holiday. The meeting was rescheduled to Wednesday January 8, 2014.

ATTENTION: If you received a Good Luck @ State Cross Country poster in your paper this week, we meant to send it. We had the poster ready to go and sent it to the printer with our October 29 paper but it didn’t get printed. Our new owners, Mid-American Publishing, wanted to make sure the runners, coach and their families and fans did not miss out it. Enjoy!

Four alumni honored by Upper Iowa University Upper Iowa University has selected four alumni to receive the 2013 UIU Alumni Awards, which were presented during Homecoming recently. Awards went to alumni Natalie Brown, Cedar Falls, Iowa; Lawson Coapstick, Iowa City, Iowa; Michael Aschinger, Monona, Iowa; and Raleigh Amyx, Washington, D.C. Brown, a member of the Class of 2005, was honored as an “Emerging Alumni.” Brown is

the founder and owner of Scratch Cupcakery, which she opened in June 2010 to serve three cupcake flavors. Today, she has four cupcake stores and serves 120 flavors, a menu she is constantly expanding. The young entrepreneur, who was cited for her “work ethic, creativity and drive,” earned a bachelor’s degree in public administration through the UIU online program. Coapstick is a 1983 UIU gradu-

ate and retired as a lieutenant colonel from the U.S. Army Reserves. He received the UIU Alumni Award for Service to Country. Coapstick served 34 years with the medical service corps and as a logistics officer, ensuring that soldiers had the necessary training and equipment if deployed to combat. Coapstick was deployed to Balad, Iraq, for a year with 3d COSCOM as the medical planner, supporting 275,000 military perUIU ALUMNI to page 6


news By Joyce Meyer As we turned our clocks back recently, it’s time to wind back a bit ourselves as the fall weather has a chill in the air and take in some historic grand timepieces in Northeast Iowa, like The Bily Clocks in Spillville. This may even get you pondering about the huge job of turning back all the clocks at the museum as you went about setting your own microwave, DVD, alarm clock, car clock and other clocks. First of all, all of the expertly carved clocks run and most do play music---but no, they are not all set at the correct time because it would be way too noisy if all the clocks when off on the hour at the same time while giving tours! November they are open Saturdays only from 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. and closed December, January, February and March, so hurry up and plan your fall adventure at the world famous Bily Clocks. May through October the museum is open daily from 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. and Sundays 12 – 4 p.m.. What’s the thrill? Amazingly, these talented men, with only a fifth grade education and a hankering for beer, were offered a million dollars for just one clock by Henry Ford, but they turned him down. That’s a lot of dough, especially in those days! Some of the clocks stand nine feet tall, and AAA Travel book calls them a “gem� em� as they portray ay history, art, religion and culture re and are covered ed with hundreds of expertly carved d figures. The Bily Clocks ks Museum and the Antonin Dvorak rak Exhibit (which ch is housed upstairs) has brought ght people from all over the world d to Spillville. When at our small mall Czech village, ge, many visit other notable sites like the historic 93-yearold Inwood nwood Ballroom at Riverside iverside Park or the St. We n c e s l a u s Church ch where Dvorak ak played the organ whilee he visited in n 1893. A bit of

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Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Frank attended school at the Conover School and farmed with his parents. Frank married Alice Kostohryz on November 20, 1945, at the Holy Trinity Catholic Church in Protivin. Together they farmed the family farm. Frank enjoyed polkas, playing cards, and especially his granddaughters. Frank was a life-long member of St. Wenceslaus Catholic Church and was a member of the Knights of Columbus and Farm Bureau.

Above: Besides bus tours, many car and motorcyle tours also visit the Bily Clocks. Bottom left: The brothers used a variety of types of wood to make their creations. The Apostles Clock has each of the 12 apostles handcarved and they move with the music. Bottom right: Director Carol Riehle giving a tour. (Photos by Joyce Meyer) history about the Bily brothers: the mailman who delivered the Frank and Joseph Bily carved at large packages for the clocks such their home farm between Ridge- as wood from foreign countries, way and Spillville only in the win- people began to line up in their auter months as a hobby. Otherwise tomobiles to see the fine delicate they were farmers and carpenters. work, so much so that the family They carved the intricate pieces began charging a dollar a vehicle and ordered the clock portion from to try to discourage the flocks of a catalog, which they put in them- people from coming, though it selves. didn’t stop the flow of traffic. Then Their first large clock carved in in 1946, the brothers moved their 1915 and 1916 was the enchant- collection to town and bequeathed ing Apostles Clock from which their masterpieces to the town of the Twelve Apostles slowly Spillville with the agreement that stroll out on the hour. This the clocks would never be sold or is something to see! moved from their present location. They continued to add They chose the building bemore masterpieces from cause the second floor had been 1923 to 1927, includ- where the famous Czech composing The American er, Antonin Dvorak, and his family Pioneer History lived during the summer of 1893. Clock. These talented brothers could In 1928 a me- have had some of their clocks morial clock to displayed at the Smithsonian, but Charles Lind- instead wanted the clocks to stay b e rg h w a s together in their hometown. While carved com- working at the museum, this writer memorating his had heard stories that some people historic flight had heard strange noises like footas they kept up steps, especially down the basewith the news. ment steps and possibly the smell However, they of beer. It would be fitting that didn’t even their spirits stayed with the clocks see some of all these years as they put their t h e p l a c e s heart and soul in their work. I can they carved almost smell the beer mixed with a like The Little smell of varnish now. B r o w n Church i n Nashua (the wedding party strolls out of the church). That one was carved from a postcard that was sent to them. As word got out, possibly from

Frank Puffer Frank Puffer, age 92, of rural Spillville, died on Saturday, November 2, 2013, at his home. A Mass of Christian Burial was held at 11 a.m. on Thursday, November 7, at St. Wenceslaus Catholic Church, Spillville, with Rev. Donald Hawes officiating. Interment was in the St. Wenceslaus Catholic Cemetery in Spillville. The Balik Funeral Home of Spillville was in charge of arrangements. Frank Louis Puffer was born on July 30, 1921, to Joseph and Emma (Bouska) Puffer on the family farm north of Conover.

Frank is survived by his wife: Alice Puffer, Ridgeway; a son, Ronald Puffer, Ridgeway; a daughter, Betty (Steve) Ragaller, Minneapolis, MN.; a son-in-law, Kenneth Smith, of Springfield, MO.; five grand-daughters: Carmen (Rob) Broadbent, Danielle (Ryan) Fitzpatrick, Sara, Terese, and Kathryn Ragaller. Frank was preceded in death by his parents: Joseph and Emma (Bouska) Puffer; a daughter, Patricia Smith; a brother, Joseph (Marcella) Puffer; four sisters, Helen (Louis) Balik, Emma (Thomas) Pecinovsky, Mary (George) Phillips, and Christina (Vincent) Kellner; and two brothers-in-law, Raymond (Evelyn) Kostohryz and Edwin Kostohryz.

I know health insurance.   

FARM BUREAU AGENT

214 Winnebago Decorah, IA 52101 563-382-8714 " % " ## %  &#!$# $ % " ## % ## $      


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news & events

Calmar Courier

Tuesday, November 12, 2013 UIU ALUMNI from page 4 sonnel and contractors. His second deployment was to Kandahar, Afghanistan as executive officer to the 649th Regional Support Group, which provided life support at Kandahar Airfield. His awards include the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star, Meritorious Service Medal (2), Army Commendation Medal (2), Army Achievement Medal (3), and the Navy Good Conduct Medal. After earning his bachelor’s degree in physical education from UIU, he earned his master’s degree in exercise science at the University of Iowa. Currently he is a certified pharmacy technician at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Iowa City. Aschinger, class of 2011, received the UIU Alumni Award for Service to Community. Aschinger, who became a UIU student while serving in the Army, earned his bachelor’s degree with honors in social science. In addition, he has completed training at the Iowa Law Enforcement Academy, first becoming a certified reserve state of Iowa peace officer, and then being named the top academic graduate of the 249th Basic Class to become a certified state of Iowa peace officer. He also served as class secretary. Aschinger also has earned his master’s degree in human services and executive leadership at Liberty University. His UIU award recognizes his work

with the city of Monona. When the city was unable to pay someone to fill the vacancy left when a full-time officer was activated from the Reserves and deployed overseas, Aschinger, a reserve officer, volunteered to fill the vacancy without pay. He contributed more than 600 hours of service to the position. Aschinger recently accepted a full-time law enforcement position with the Clayton County Sheriff’s Department. Amyx, who received the UIU Alumni Award for Service to the University, was selected to recruit students for the new UIU Coordinated Off-Campus Degree Program (COCDP) in 1973. The relatively untried concept of off-campus education was a challenge; but Amyx rented an office near the Pentagon and filled it will UIU memorabilia and began meeting with Washington professionals to talk with them about how to advance their education without giving up their career. Enrollment in the COCDP program increased, providing important revenue for UIU, and laying the foundation for what is today 19 off-campus UIU education centers in the United States, an online program and the Self-Paced Degree Program. Amyx earned his bachelor’s degree from UIU in 1974 through the COCDP program; his wife followed, graduating in 1977.

UIU to help Rainbow Land Daycare and Preschool dish up the sixth annual Soup Supper Upper Iowa University’s Art Department and Rainbow Land Preschool are joining forces to organize the annual Soup Supper fundraiser for the not-for-profit organization that provides essential daycare and pre-school services for the local community. UIU art students helped the Rainbow Land and Little Hawks preschoolers decorate ceramic bowls on October 29, which will be sold at the annual Soup Supper. The Soup Supper is scheduled

for Friday, December 6, from 5 to 7:30 p.m. at the Fayette Opera House. The finished ceramic bowls will be available for sale at the Soup Supper. The bowl fundraiser is to benefit the Rainbow Land Daycare and Preschool which is a nonprofit organization in Fayette. Students and visitors can show support by buying the ceramic bowls or providing a donation at the event. Contact Elissa Wenthe at wenthee@uiu.edu for more information.

JUNIOR HIGH FALL DANCE Sponsored by: B.A.S.I.C Training Youth Group

Saturday, November 16 Fort Atkinson Community Center ALL 6th, 7th & 8th Graders 5-7 p.m.: Lesson & Potluck 8-11 p.m.: Dance $5.00 plus a new or gently used children’s book (to be donated!) *Please dress to impress* DJ & Concession stand

Fort Public Library Winter Hours Monday: 2-6 p.m. Tuesday: 2-6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Thursday: 2-6 p.m. Friday: 2-6 p.m. Saturday: 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

A Song for Every Season Everyone is cordially invited to the Northern Lights’ upcoming concert, “A Song for Every Season”, on Sunday, November 24, at 3 p.m. at Decorah Lutheran Church. The 50 voice women’s chorale, under the direction of Jane Kolarich, will sing you through the calendar year with a variety of accompanied and a cappella numbers. Piano accompanist for Northern Lights is Linda Gjerdrum of Mabel, MN. Suzanne Ernst of Decorah will be featured on penny whistle and two Luther College percussionists, Casey Tecklenburg and Aidan Schmitt, will add their

talents to the African selection, O Sifuni Mungu. Rachael Buresh, one of the newest members of the ensemble, will be a featured vocal soloist. Prior to relocating to Decorah, Rachael resided in Minneapolis where she instructed studio voice lessons and performed with the renowned Dale Warland Singers. Special invited guests at this concert will be the Luren Singers, conducted by Dr. David Judisch and accompanied by Sophia Huang. The Luren Singers has the distinction of being North America’s oldest Norwegian-American male chorus, now in their 146th

year of continuous existence. They will sing five selections alone and conclude the concert by joining the Northern Lights on an arrangement of the folk tune, Homeward Bound, arranged by Mack Wilberg, conductor of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, and the inspiring piece, We Rise Again, featuring David Judisch as soloist. There is no admission cost; a free will offering will be accepted. Gifts to Northern Lights are tax deductible. Coffee and refreshments will be served following the concert. CD recordings of both choirs will be available for purchase.

ʻFascinatingʼ 100-year-old films from Iowa collector to be shown at Nov. 17 pre-Oneota Film Festival event During the late 1890’s Iowa world traveler W.F. (Frank) Brinton and wife, Indiana, began touring the upper Midwest showing a mesmerizing collection of short films at opera houses, Chautauqua tent shows and town celebrations. Documenting everything from scenes of the Battle of Manila and

ASSUMPTION CATHOLIC Little Turkey Father Nicholas March Sunday: No mass BETHANY LUTHERAN Rural Ossian Sunday 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service; Communion 11/4, 12/2

CALMAR COMMUNITY UNITED METHODIST Calmar Pastor Linda Thompson Sunday: 9:00 a.m. Worship CALMAR LUTHERAN & SPRINGFIELD LUTHERAN Pastor Phil Olson Sunday Worship: 9:00 a.m. Calmar 10:30 a.m. Springfield DE SALES CATHOLIC Ossian Msgr. Cletus J. Hawes Saturday: 4:00 p.m. Mass Sunday: 10:00 a.m. Mass LIVING HOPE BAPTIST Ossian Sunday: 9:00 a.m. Worship

Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders to scenes in Jerusalem streets with beggars and peddlers, the films enthralled audiences everywhere they were seen. Even several films by French film pioneer Georges Melies (whose mesmerizing turnof-the century films of the fantastic were subjects of the 2011 Scorcese

film Hugo) were in the collection. On Sunday, Nov. 17 the Oneota Film Festival is giving audiences the rare opportunity to see these historic films, probably last seen in Decorah between 1900 and 1908, in an hour-long screening plus commentary by noted collector and film historian Michael Zahs. FILM to page 20

HOLY TRINITY CATHOLIC Protivin Father Nicholas March Thursday: 8:45 a.m. School Mass Saturday: 3:30-3:50 p.m. Reconciliation; 4:00 p.m. Mass

ST. LUKE’S CATHOLIC St. Lucas Father Nicholas March Sunday: 10:30 a.m. Mass

MT. CARMEL CATHOLIC Lawler Father Nicholas March Friday: 8:30 a.m. Mass Saturday: 4:00 p.m. Mass OSSIAN LUTHERAN Sunday: 8:30 a.m. Worship OUR LADY OF SEVEN DOLORS CATHOLIC Festina Msgr. Cletus J. Hawes Sunday: 8:00 a.m. Mass ST. ALOYSIUS CATHOLIC Calmar Father Donald J. Hawes Saturday: 4:30 p.m. Mass Sunday: 10:30 a.m. Mass ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC Fort Atkinson Father Nicholas March Thursday: 9:00 a.m. Mass Sunday: 8:00 a.m. Mass

ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC Waucoma Father Nicholas March Sunday: 8:00 a.m. Mass ST. WENCESLAUS CATHOLIC Spillville Father Donald J. Hawes Saturday: 7:00 p.m. Mass Sunday: 8:30 a.m. Mass STAVANGER LUTHERAN Sunday: 10:00 a.m. Worship TRINITY LUTHERAN Calmar Pastor Glenn Smith Sunday: 10:30 a.m. Worship ZION LUTHERAN Castalia Pastor Dave Lenth Sunday Classes: 8:30 a.m. Adult Class 9:15 a.m. Sunday School


news & events Lutherʼs Active Minds sponsor Lifetime movie screening Nov. 13 ʻCall Me Crazyʼ tells the stories behind depression, bipolar disorder, PTSD and schizophrenia Luther’s Active Minds student group and Counseling Services are sponsoring a screening of the Lifetime movie “Call Me Crazy” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 13, in Valders 206. The event is open to the public with no charge for admission. “Call Me Crazy: A Five Film” brings together an all-star ensemble cast with five interwoven stories about how love, support and hope can help us overcome emotional health conditions like depression, bipolar disorder and PTSD. The film premiered on Lifetime Television in April 2013. Through the five shorts named after each title character—Lucy, Eddie, Allison, Grace and Maggie— powerful relationships built on hope and triumph raise a new understanding of what happens when a loved one struggles with mental illness. “Call Me Crazy: A Five Film” stars Academy Award® and Golden Globe® winners Jennifer Hudson, Melissa Leo and Octavia Spencer, Sarah Hyland, Sofia Vassilieva, Ernie Hudson, Jason Ritter, three-time Emmy Award®winner Jean Smart, Lea Thompson, Oscar®-nominee Melanie Griffith and Chelsea Handler, as well as Love is Louder (a project of the Jed Foundation and MTV) co-founder Brittany Snow. Laura Dern, Bryce Dallas Howard, Bonnie Hunt, Ashley Judd and Sharon Maguire direct the anthology, and executive producers are Jennifer Aniston, Marta Kauffman, Kristin Hahn, Kevin Chinoy and Francesca Silvestri. “Lucy” “Lucy” follows the film’s title character, a law student who finds herself amidst the horror of schizophrenia, landing her in an institution where, through the support of a new friend, meds and her psychotherapist, she begins her path to not only healing, but a promising future. “Grace” “Grace,” explores bipolar disorder through the experience of a teenage daughter whose mother grapples with the condition.

“Allison” “Allison” weaves together comedy and family drama in a story about healing when its eldest daughter “Lucy” returns home from inpatient treatment and spoils her sister “Allison’s” unveiling of her new boyfriend to their parents. “Eddie” “Eddie” delves into the world of depression as seen through the eyes of a comedian’s wife as she grapples with understanding how her husband Eddie, whom is so loved, can be so withdrawn and overcome with sadness. The short also stars Chelsea Handler and features appearances by Dave Foley, Jay Chandrasekhar, James Avery and Ross Mathews. “Maggie” In “Maggie” a female veteran returns home from war to her son and father, only to have her life shattered by the onset of posttraumatic stress disorder, through which her lawyer, “Lucy,” helps her. Preview the film’s trailer at: http://www.youtube. com/watch?feature=player_ embedded&v=5ESA_EA6AQE. “Call Me Crazy: A Five Film” is an extension of the Five franchise that started in 2011 with the Lifetime Original Movie “Five,” starring Patricia Clarkson, Jeanne Tripplehorn, Rosario Dawson, Tony Shalhoub, Jenifer Lewis, Kathy Najimy, Bob Newhart, Tracee Ellis Ross and Jeffrey Tambor. “Five” uses humor and drama to focus on the effect breast cancer and its different stages of diagnosis have on relationships and the way women perceive themselves while searching for strength, comfort, medical breakthroughs and, ultimately, a cure. Recognized by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences with its Television Academy Honors, winner of a Banff World Media Award and nominated for DGA, WGA, NAACP Image and Imagen Awards, “Five” was directed by Jennifer Aniston, Alicia Keys, Demi Moore, Patty Jenkins and Penelope Spheeris.

Luther Athletes Serving Others is sponsoring a Thanksgiving food drive through Nov. 19. The drive is designed to help those in the community that might not otherwise be able to put a big Thanksgiving dinner on the table. All donations received will go to the food pantry at First Lutheran Church in Decorah. All food donations can be dropped off at the box labeled, “LASO Food Drive” near the Circle Drive entrance of the Regents Center on the Luther College campus. The finale of the food drive is the men’s basketball team’s first home game at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 19, against UW-La Crosse. The Decorah community is invited to bring food donations directly to the basketball game. More information on the specific items the food shelf needs can be found online at: http://www.firstlutherandecorah.org/?page_id=51.

Winneshiek Co. included in quarantine for Emerald Ash Borer The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship has issued a quarantine of twenty-five counties in Eastern Iowa, including Winneshiek, to help prevent the spread of Emerald Ash Borer. Emerald ash borer (EAB) is an exotic pest from Asia and is considered one of the most destructive tree pests seen in decades, having already killed tens of millions of trees since it was first discovered in the United States in 2002 in southeast Michigan. EAB larvae burrow under the bark of ash trees to feed, which limits the ability of the tree to transport water and nutrients and may kill the tree in as little as two to four years. EAB infestations have been confirmed in four Iowa counties: Allamakee (May 2010), Des Moines (July 2013), Jefferson (August 2013), and Cedar (October 2013). The quarantine orders that regulated articles cannot be moved from a county included in the quarantine unless a permit has been issued by either the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship or USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) or if the article has been treated to exterminate any pests under the supervision of USDA and the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship. Articles regulated under the

aged students, the lecture is said to be an informative look at how to make sure the college years are not also debt yearsParents are also encouraged to come listen to Carroll’s talk and hear the key money move that will put students on the fast track to living the life they dream of. Carroll is founder of the National Financial Educators, a group

driven to educate, entertain and inspire young people to live their lives in complete control of their money. “Winning the Money Game” is sponsored by SAC Leadership Speaker Series. The committee’s goal is to bring a variety of speakers to the campus that have important messages that put an emphasis on leadership for college students.

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Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Luther athletes sponsoring Thanksgiving food drive through November 19

Luther College SAC Leadership to present ʻWinning the Money Gameʼ Nov. 20 Luther College Student Activities Council invites the community to come interact, listen and learn Adam Carroll’s financial success secret in the lecture “Winning the Money Game” at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 20, in Valders Hall of Science Room 206 on the Luther Campus. The event is open to the public with no charge for admission. Directed at teens and college-

Calmar Courier

quarantine include EAB at any living state; entire ash trees; firewood of any hardwood species; any cut or fallen material of the ash; nonheat treated ash lumber with either bark or sapwood attached; and hardwood wood or bark chips larger than one inch in two dimension. Counties included in the quarantine are Winneshiek, Allamakee, Fayette, Clayton, Buchanan, Delaware, Dubuque, Linn, Jones, Jackson, Clinton, Johnson, Cedar, Scott, Keokuk, Washington, Muscatine, Louisa, Wapello, Jefferson, Henry, Des Moines, Davis, Van Buren, and Lee. A full copy of the quarantine can be found on the IDALS website, www.IowaAgriculture.gov, under the “Hot Topics” section. All Iowans are strongly cautioned not to transport firewood across county or state lines, since the movement of firewood throughout Iowa or to other states poses the greatest threat to quickly spread EAB even further. Most EAB infestations in the United States have been started by people unknowingly moving infested firewood, nursery plants or sawmill logs. To learn more about EAB and other pests that are threatening Iowa’s tree population, please visit www.IowaTreePests.com.

Luther Jazz Band to perform Nov. 17 Enjoy an afternoon of jazz with Luther College’s Jazz Band and Vocal Jazz Ensemble at 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 17 in the Center for Faith and Life Main Hall on Luther’s Campus. The concert is open to the public with no charge for admission. The Jazz Band covers the jazz tradition of big band swing while also exploring contemporary genres and new jazz compositions. The Nov. 17 performance will include a stylistically diverse program that includes compositions by Duke Ellington, Cole Porter, Antônio Carlos Jobim, Charles Mingus, Maria Schneider and Pat Metheny. Music will range from the classics of the New Orleans and Swing-era traditions, to big band arrangements with bossa nova and Afro-Caribbean influences. Modern selections are also included that infuse rock, gospel and blues with the wide dynamic palette of the large jazz ensemble. The Vocal Jazz Ensemble will join the Jazz Band to perform pieces by Porter and Greg Jasperse. The Vocal Jazz Ensemble is under the direction of Luther senior Elizabeth Martens. The Jazz Band is under the direction of Jon Ailabouni, Luther adjunct faculty in music. Ailabouni holds the bachelor’s degree from Luther and the master’s degree from Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Mich. He has toured internationally in Brazil, Puerto Rico and France, and has performed with likes of Kurt Elling and Paquito D’Rivera. As a first year faculty member, Ailabouni says he is excited to lead outstanding ensembles that entertain and move audiences, and challenge and edify student performers.

“We specialize in TUXEDOS for Prom & Weddings”

SCHOOL LETTER JACKETS

SCHROEDER’S CLOTHING Ossian 563-532-9483 800-477-4668


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Calmar Courier

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Caregiver Support Group A Caregiver Support Group meeting will be held on November 14 at the Ossian Senior Hospice from 4:30-5:30 p.m. Caregiver Support offers individuals caring for loved ones a time to share experiences, challenges, suggestions and receive support from caregivers in similiar situations. Caregiver’s will receive information and support on coping, how to find balance, recognizing caregiver burnout and how to recognize the signs and symptoms of progressive illness and disease. For more information contact Dianne Schultz at 563-380-7838 or Eileen Courtney at 563-532-9440. RSVP is not necessary but appreciated.

turkey valley

community events South Winneshiek Middle School 1st Quarter Honor Roll The first nine weeks grade point averages have been calculated for the South Winneshiek Middle School. All students who earn straight A’s will be on the Special Honor Roll. Those who achieve a grade point of 3.7 to 3.99 will be on the A Honor Roll. Those who achieve a grade point of 3.0 to 3.69 will be on the B Honor Roll. Students who receive any grade below C- were not allowed consideration for honor rolls. 6th Grade A Honor Roll: Luke Davis, Kale Euans, Jenna Frana, Anthony Hanson, Zachry Poshusta, Gabe Sadler, Mackenzie Schirmer, Kaitlyn Theis, Liz Tieskoetter, Carter Wenthold B Honor Roll: Henry Castro, Leah Cullen, Christian Fisher, Seth Greve, Dallas Hageman, Kody Kleve, Kylie Kohrs, Brianna Sim, Rachel Uhlenhake, Montanah Zweibohmer

7th Grade A Honor Roll: Sierra Breitsprecher, Sarah Cullen, Ashley Davis, Mariah Durham, Mia French, Shira Hageman, Cole Klimesh, Allanda Kriener, Josie Lennon, Levi Lukes, Sadie McGee, Dahlyn Ott, Kaylie Rommes, Melissa Ward B Honor Roll: Jerrett Euans, Brady Hageman, Vanessa Hageman, Emma Malanaphy, Abby Manning, Carter Meyer, Brekin Tigges, Dalyn Wurzer, Cassidy Young 8th Grade Special Honor Roll: Noah Faldet, Madisen Ondrashek, Kerrigan Upton A Honor Roll: Kaelan Boe, Allison Dunlavey, Jackson Lukes, Steven Moore, Taylor Numedahl, Tiffany Riehle, Jaden Schweinefus, Felicity Taylor, Austin Tieskoetter, Andrew Wagner, Allison Walz B Honor Roll: Lexi Bohr, Taylor Buchheit, Eric Franzen, Dawson Huinker, Brody Kohrs, Faith Raustad, Brandi Schneider, Danae Taylor, Tanner Tollefsrud, Wyatt Wilson

Wreath making workshop set for November 30 A wreath on the door says “Season’s Greetings” to all who pass by. Make this message personal by making your own! Iowa State Extension–Fayette County will sponsor a wreath-making workshop at the Todd & Carla Berst residence from 1-2:30 p.m. on Saturday, November 30. Participants will learn to make a 12-inch evergreen wreath to take home. Basic materials will be

provided, but bring pruners if you have them! Cost for this workshop will be $10 and pre-registration is required. Registration deadline is Tuesday, November 26th. Contact the Fayette County Extension Office at (563) 425-3331 to sign up. The fees for service will be used to off-set direct expenses and to support the County Extension Program.

November 12 – November 19 Iowa Assessments November 18 Boys Wrestling & Basketball Practices Begin DFS Kickoff Pizza Sales 7 p.m.: 5th – 8th grade Young People’s Concert

Bar & Grill

Fort Atkinson

 

$6.00 Lunch Specials

south winneshiek November 12 4 p.m.: Middle School Girls Basketball @ SW Middle School November 14 4 p.m.: Middle School Girls Basketball @ Sumner Fredericksburg Middle School 4 p.m.: Middle School Wrestling Meet @ Postville 7 p.m.: Musical @ SW HS Auditorium November 15 7 p.m.: Musical @ SW HS Auditorium November 16 7 p.m.: Musical @ SW HS Auditorium November 17 7 p.m.: Musical @ SW HS Auditorium

November 13-20, 2013 Wednesday: Meatballs, Parsley, Potatoes, Green Beans Thursday: Baked Ziti Casserole, Garlic Bread, Side Friday: Swiss Chicken, Au Gratin Potatoes, Apple Salad Monday: Tater Tot Casserole, Pears, Roll Tuesday: Brats & Kraut, Baked Beans, Side Wednesday: Pork Chops, Mashed Potatoes & Gravy, Corn

Free, confidential, one-on-one counseling for new and existing businesses Nov. 19 Steve Horman, a professional business consultant who specializes in helping small-business owners or prospective owners, will be available for one-on-one sessions in Decorah on November 19. The free and confidential sessions will be at the Chamber/Development/Tourism Building at 507 W. Water Street. Although the sessions

are free, reservations must be made. Horman’s background includes small business ownership and managing manufacturing and service industries. In addition to private consulting, he serves as a business consultant/counselor for the Northeast Iowa Small Business Development Center (SBDC.) Horman served 13 years as presiCOUNSELING to page 9

Let the Games Begin!!! Hey all you Kindergarten thru 5th grade girls... You are invited to GSEIWI Troop 702’s 3rd Annual Girl Scout Lock-in!!! Please join us on Friday, December, 6th to Saturday, December, 7th for our...

Olympic Games Our Opening Ceremony will begin at 5:30 p.m. on Friday and our Olympic celebration will conclude at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday morning with a Closing Ceremony!!! You will get a team shirt!!! What to Bring: water bottle, sleeping bag, pillow, pjs, personal items, new or gently used book or books to be donated, sweat pants or sports shorts, tennis shoes, healthy snack to share with all girls! Please RSVP by November 22nd: Send $20 ($35 non-members) & registration to: Hanna Schmitt 30336 S Avenue Waucoma, IA 52171 Questions? Call: 563-778-2323 E-mail: hahaschmitt@iowatelecom.net (Register early...limited to 60 girls!)

The Calmar Commercial Club is hosting the annual Turkey Giveaway.

Sign up Today! One Winner will be picked from each business.

Also giving away $100 in Calmar Bucks!

Sign up at these Businesses: Buchheit Appliance; Bullwacker Logistics; Calmar Courier; Drillings All Season Sports; Heying Lumber; Klimesh Motor Sales; Lentz Financial; NICC; Security State Bank; South Winn Insurance; Train Station; Whiskey Grove; Whistlestop Antiques; Wiltgen Construction; WINCO


community events

Celebrate the Seasons at “Deck the Tables” Celebrate the seasons with “Deck the Tables” Open Houses on Friday, November 22, from 5 - 9 p.m. and Saturday, November 23, from 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. at the Hotel Winneshiek. Bring your friends and family to view the many tables adorned in wonderful holiday décor and enjoy complimentary refreshments and treats. Admission is $10. There will be live jazz music on Friday evening and free carriage rides (weather permitting) on Saturday. “Deck the Tables” showcases the talents of area residents who will create 29 beautiful table settings to spark your holiday decorating ideas. The Open House includes a Holiday Home Décor

Showcase featuring goods and services to help make your holiday celebration festive and joyful. All guests will be eligible to win great door prizes. They will also have the opportunity to bid on one-of-a-kind auction packages and purchase tickets to win one of three fabulous raffle items—a complete table setting for eight including the centerpiece; a Civia Twin City 8 step-through bicycle; or a new iPad! Proceeds from “Deck the Tables” will benefit Vesterheim Norwegian-American Museum. “Deck the Tables” is part of Decorah Holiday Open House— All Decked Out, a communitywide kick-off to the holiday season. The weekend will include many exciting activities, including kettle corn, carolers, Hedgie Tales at Vesterheim, and lots of great specials and discounts at local businesses. Check decorahareachamber.com for more information about “Decorah—All Decked Out.” Also, Saturday will feature free trolley rides (weather permitting) to Open Houses at several Bed and Breakfasts in Decorah from 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Visit the Winneshiek County Convention and Visitors Bureau website, visitdecorah.com, for more information. “Deck the Tables” is organized by a volunteer committee—Melanie Anundsen, Karla Erdman, Llew Jenkins and Syd Stephenson. For more information contact Stephanie Johnson at snjohnson@ vesterheim.org or 563-382-9681, check vesterheim.org or on Facebook at “Deck the Tables.

Top: “Deck the Tables” showcases the talents of area residents who will create 29 beautiful table settings to spark your holiday decorating ideas. Above: Purchase tickets to win one of three fabulous raffle items, including this complete table setting for eight including the centerpiece. Left: Volunteer, Jerry Aulwes, greets visitors to “Deck the Tables.”

Adult medical care at Winneshiek Medical Center As we move through our adult years, many people have hopes for quality time with their children as they grow, the opportunity to enjoy grandchildren, or maybe do some traveling, volunteering, or carve out time to just sit down and read a book. For many of us, though, those same years are woven with unplanned health issues. Ashlee Holst, D.O., Mayo Clinic Health System internal medicine physician at Winneshiek Medical Center says, “As we age, managing health conditions can become more complex and it’s important to have an established relationship with a health care provider so any developing conditions can be addressed early to avoid unnecessary complications.” Internal medicine physicians are experts in caring for adults with complex or multiple medical needs and/or medications. At Winneshiek Medical Center, Dr. Holst and Brian Dougan, M.D., specialize in comprehensive primary care for adults, and chronic disease management for diseases such as type 2 diabetes, blood disorders, asthma, and heart disease. “Heart disease is a condition that affects men and women alike,” says Dr. Holst. According to the American Heart Association, 1 in 3 adults have high blood pressure (hypertension) and many don’t even know they have it. She adds, “Conditions such as high blood pressure increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, so it is vitally important people are working with their doctor to manage their high COUNSELING from page 8 dent and chief executive officer of the Dubuque Area Chamber of Commerce; five years as the executive vice president of the Clinton Area Chamber of Commerce; and 10 years in various staff management positions with the Sioux Falls, S.D. Chamber of Commerce. He has served numerous professional state, regional and national associations including the National Board of Trustees of the Institute for Organization Management, chairman of the University of Colorado Institute for Organization Management, and the board of directors of the American Chamber of Commerce Executives Association. Horman is a certified Chamber of Commerce Executive (CCE) – the highest professional designation that can be awarded a chamber executive. His honors include a Presidential Commendation, the Iowa Statesman Award presented by the Iowa Department of Eco-

blood pressure early on.” In addition to full-time internal medicine specialists at Winneshiek Medical Center, Mayo Clinic cardiologists provide outreach care for patients recovering from heart surgeries or managing heart conditions at WMC on a regular basis. Dr. Holst says, “The opportunity to have heart specialists in our clinic is a big advantage for patients. I am able to easily consult with them to discuss a diagnosis or medication without causing any extra hassle for my patients.” Winneshiek Medical Center provides services to care for most of your adult medical needs in Decorah. Alongside clinical care, Mayo Clinic Health System surgeons in the specialties of general surgery, ear, nose, throat (ENT); orthopedics, podiatry, urology and gynecology; as well as Gundersen Health System general surgeons, perform surgery in Winneshiek Medical Center’s accredited surgical suite. Following surgery or injury, skilled therapists and home care nurses work closely with your doctor or surgeon for rehabilitation, and if an emergency arises, the 24/7 Emergency Room and Ambulance service is just a phone call away. For more information on the services available at Winneshiek Medical Center to care for your adult medical needs, visit www. winmedical.org/our-services. For an appointment with Mayo Clinic Health System internal medicine physicians Dr. Holst or Dr. Dougan, call 563-382-2911.

nomic Development for outstanding leadership, and he was named Iowa Chamber of Commerce Executive of the Year by the Iowa Association of Chamber of Commerce Executives Association. In addition to working with small businesses, Horman also provides consulting services for government and nonprofit organizations. His consulting service is sponsored by the Northeast Iowa Business Network (NIBN), Northeast Iowa Community College and Winneshiek County Development, Inc. through a Rural Business Opportunity Grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. To make an appointment to meet with Horman, please contact Winneshiek County Development, Inc. Director Randy Uhl at 382-6061 or wcdi@thinkdecorah.com. Sessions can be scheduled from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Calmar Courier

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Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Calmar Lions look for new members Look around when you come to Calmar from Decorah. Do you see the park with its shelter, playground, baseball field? Those of us who live here can tell you that it is the Lions Park, established by the Calmar Lions. A few times a year you will see the gold vests with the purple letters that indicate the wearer is a member of the Calmar Lions Club. Those vests are around during the chicken dinner we serve in the summer, or while running the kid favorite Lions Train at NICC Fall Fest and other times, or when testing the sight of preschool children at NICC, CFS and DeSales. The Lions have supported various South Winneshiek school activities such as post prom and the new football/track complex. There are currently only fifteen members of the club that was formed in 1955. We come from various backgrounds and occupations, but share a common goal of helping our town to be a great place in which to live. We are looking for some new members. The Lions meet on the fourth Monday of the month at the Lions Park from April through September and at the Train Station from October through March. We hope to be asking people to join us. Please consider the invitation.

Calmar Lion, Chuck Frana (r), receives a pin and congratulations from Larry Crow, Iowa Lions Foundation. Chuck has been in the Calmar Lions for 25 years.


sports

10Calmar Courier Tuesday, November 12, 2013

By John Jensen DIKE – During the regular season, South Winneshiek junior Jordan Rommes led his team to the playoffs as the top receiver in the state. Monday he led the Warriors to a playoff victory over DikeNew Hartford with his arm and legs. The versatile Rommes threw a game-changing 61-yard touchdown pass and ran for the goahead touchdown as South Winn rallied from a 17-6 halftime deficit to top the previously-undefeated Wolverines 36-17 in the second round of the Class 1A playoffs. “You’re going to get something different every week with him and we knew (the Wolverines) were going to do something different than what they’ve been doing all year,” South Winneshiek coach Jason Ohrt said. The Warriors (9-2) will face rival North Fayette Valley in a playoff quarterfinal Friday in West Union, bidding to become only the second team in school history to reach the playoff semifinals. The Tigerhawks won an earlier matchup between the teams, 4434. Dike-New Hartford (10-1) built a 17-6 halftime lead by scoring on three straight first-half possessions. Byron Fritch capped a 16-play, 74-yard drive with a 29yard field goal for the first points of the night, and Carson Parker broke a quarterback sneak for a 35-yard scoring run, capping an 85-yard drive that came less than three minutes after South Winn scored its only points of the first half on a 15-yard Ryan Hageman run. The Wolverines extended their lead to 17-6 with a 10-play, 87-yard drive capped by Gabe Eiklenborg's 24yard scoring catch less than two minutes before halftime. South Winneshiek began its comeback with a defensive stop

that led to a short D-NH punt. On the first play from scrimmage, quarterback Logan Schweinefus handed off to Rommes and flung the ball downfield as the D-NH defense converged on him. Senior receiver Alex Shatek stumbled as he tracked the ball through the air but kept his balance well enough to run untouched into the end zone. Rommes then ran in the two-point conversion to close the Warrior gap to three, and the fun was only starting. “That’s a play we ran a few weeks ago up at North Fayette,” Ohrt said. “We needed to do something to get the kids going and we executed.” “They hit that halfback pass and, boy, the momentum switched and we could never get on the top side of it again,” Dike-New Hartford coach Don Betts said. “We were shooting ourselves in the foot that whole second half.” One possession later, the Warriors drove deep into Dike-New Hartford territory before fumbling the ball away. They didn’t let their next chance slip away so easily, as Rommes took a direct snap from center in the wildcat formation, faked a handoff and ran 32 yards to give the Warriors their first lead since midway through the second quarter. Ohrt said his team never panicked, even after being outgained by more than 200 yards in the first half. “We told them to keep their composure,” he said. “We can score 40 points in a half like nothing. We told them, just, to execute, we made a couple of adjustments in the run game.” Dike-New Hartford, meanwhile, struggled while facing its first fourth-quarter deficit of the season. Quarterback Carson Parker, who had thrown just five interceptions on 139 pass attempts entering

the game, saw South Winneshiek pick off back-to-back pass attempts to set up game-clinching scores. South Winneshiek senior defensive lineman Darrik Poshusta reached up and snatched Parker’s attempted screen pass at the line of scrimmage and returned it to the 15, setting up a six-yard Christian Kleve scoring run that extended the Warrior lead to double digits. Parker’s next pass attempt deflected off the hands of South Winn’s Treyton Jacobsen and into those of Rommes, who found the end zone 10 plays later at the receiving end of a 15-yard Schweinefus pass. “They got that momentum and rode the emotion of that momentum,” Betts said. “Hats off to them. They’re a great team and they handed it to us tonight.” The Wolverines ran for 202 yards, including a game-high 109 from Cuvelier, while Parker threw for 109 yards and a touchdown. Ryan Hageman led South Winneshiek’s 229-yard rushing effort with 102 yards and a score while Kleve ran for 69 yards and Rommes had 46. Schweinfus, playing in place of the injured Garrett Bohach, threw for 46 yards and a touchdown. Monday's loss ends the run of a Wolverine senior class that has gone 22-2 over the past two years, including back-to-back district titles and undefeated regular seasons. “It’s one of those things that I hope when they get some distance in between now and the end of the season that they look back at the season and careers that they’ve had,” Betts said. “It’s an outstanding group of seniors. They won a lot of football games here and did a lot of great things. It’s a group that we’re going to miss a lot.”

Score By Quarter South Winneshiek Dike-New Hartford

1 2 3 4 Final 0 6 8 22 36 0 17 0 0 17

Game Stats SW DNH Rushing Yards 229 202 Rushing Attempts 340 37 Passing Yards 107 107 Passing Attempts 5-8-1 13-25-3 Total Offensive Yards 336 309 Scoring Sequence: DNH- 28yd FG Hageman- 15yd run (2pt failed) DNH- 34yd run (PAT) DNH- 24yd pass (PAT) Shatek- 61yd pass from Rommes (Rommes- 2pt run) Rommes- 32yd run (Hageman- 2pt run) Kleve- 7yd run (2pt failed) Rommes- 15yd pass from Schweinefus (Hageman- 2pt run) Warrior Individual Stats: Rushing: Hageman- 13-102, 1 TD; Kleve18-69, 1 TD; Rommes- 7-46, 1 TD; Schroeder- 2-12 Passing: Schweinefus- 4-6-1, 46 yds, 1 TD; Rommes- 1-2, 61 yds, 1 TD Receiving: Shatek- 1-61, 1 TD; Rommes1-15, 1 TD; Kleve- 3-31 Interceptions: A. Lensing, Poshusta1-15; Rommes- 1 Fumble Recoveries: Brincks- 1 Kickoffs: Rommes- 6-264 Kickoff Returns: Jacobsen- 2-46; Hageman- 1-10 Punting: Rommes- 2-78 Punt Returns: Rommes- 2-78 Sacks: Kuennen, Meyer- 1 Warrior Tackles (TFLs): Hageman- 13; Poshusta- 7 (1); Brincks, Numedahl, 7; A. Lensing, Meyer- 6 (2); Jacobsen- 6; Shatek- 5; Rommes- 4; Kuennen- 3 (1); Kuboushek- 3; Imoehl2; Emanuel- 1

Far Left: Tanner Kuennen (c) focuses on a DNH ball carrier as he goes in to assist a teammate on the tackle. Other teammates, including #15 Tyler Numedahl, get ready to aid their fellow Warriors. (Photo by John Jensen)

Tigerhawks Oust Warriors From Playoff Bracket, 49-14. By Leah Kruse After playing 11 games already this season, the South Winn Warriors were hungry to play another three games before closing out their 2013 stat book. This year’s team had already marked their place in South Winn’s football history, but they wanted to make that mark bigger than it already was. Before SW could play games 13 and 14, they had to face off against their only district loss of the regular season, the North Fayette Valley Tigerhawks in last Friday’s quarterfinal game in West Union. Despite temperatures in the low 40s and strong winds pushing the “feels like” temp down closer to 30 degrees, the Warriors took the field with both sides of the bleachers full, leaving standing room only. Anticipation flowed through the crowds like electricity as the ball was set for opening kickoff. SW received the ball giving them first shot at the scoreboard. The offense worked their way toward midfield then finished the drive with a 53-yard pass from Trevor Schweinefus to Jordan Rommes for the first touchdown of the night. NFV shut down the two-point conversion leaving the spread at 6-0 SW with over nine minutes left to play in the first. The Tigerhawks offense marched down the field with a to page 11 Left: Senior Adam Lensing wraps up a NFV ball carrier at last Friday’s game. Lensing had four tackles in the game. Below: Ryan Hageman (l) and Chris Brincks (#65) work to take down a Tigerhawk rusher. Both Hageman and Brincks tallied 10 tackles in the game. Next page top right: The 2013 Warriors hold up their quarterfinalist trophy, marking their spot in the South Winneshiek football history book as the 2nd best finish in school history. Next page right bottom: Coach Jason Ohrt holds up his hand to gather the team for Warrior Pride after telling them that he was proud of everyone and the effort they gave over the season and proud of the quarterfinalist finish.


sports from page 10 strong ground attack finding the endzone on a 12-yard carry knotting the score at 6-6 with 5:05 showing on the clock. SW struggled to gain yards on their next offensive possession turning over the ball to NFV. The Tigerhawks broke through several tackle attempts to complete an 87yard rushing TD to take the lead 6-12 with more than three minutes left to play in the first quarter. NFV posted the first score of the second set on a 15-yard run for the TD and added a rushing two-point conversion to push their lead to 6-12. SW responded quickly finding the endzone on their next possession. Jared Schroeder crossed the goal line with the ball from 11 yards out to give SW a six point boost then ran for the conversion to tack on two more points for a 14-20 score, which held until halftime. The second half was a different ball game. The Tigerhawks continued to move the ball on the field with a forceful rushing game, converting several 3rd downs into 1st downs to keep moving the line of scrimmage closer to their endzone. SW struggled on both sides of the ball and couldn’t get to the endzone or keep the Tigerhawks out of it. NFV added 29 unanswered points in the second half to take the win 20-49 and move on to the semifinal round. “This quarterfinalist finish, is the 2nd best finish in school history and our seniors leave us with being part of three straight 9-win seasons at the varsity level,” Coach

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Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Ohrt stated. “Our seven seniors, Darrik Poshusta, Garrett Bohach, Adam Lensing, Andre Walz, Jared Schroeder, Chris Brincks and Alex Shatek, provided great leadership for our young football team throughout the entire season.” “NFV played a great game and made the plays on 3rd and 4th downs to keep all the momentum. We had to rely on the passing attack more than what we would have liked as we struggled to run the football,” said Ohrt. “This was a tough way for us to end a great season, but I am proud of how our kids were able to grow as a team and battle adversity all year long,” finished Ohrt. As the second half wore on for South Winn and the Tigerhawks continuously made progress toward the win, the Warriors continued to play. They played because there was still hope. They played because the game wasn’t over. They played for their fans, even though the number of them dropped with every passing minute. They played for their school. They played for their friends and for their families. They played for each other and for their coaches. They played like the score didn’t matter. They played like the winner was determined by who played the hardest for the longest period of time. They played because the game doesn’t end until 48 minutes has ticked off the clock. They played for the love of the game. They played like Warriors.

Trojans End Season In 2nd Round Playoffs By Leah Kruse With hopes of playing at least twice in November, Turkey Valley traveled to Gladbrook-Reinbeck last Monday, November 4 for their second round playoff game against the Rebels. The Trojans took the field with a lot of determination but fell behind 0-7 when the Rebels put away a 53-yard run to the endzone with a PAT. TV’s offense took the field and made their way down the field finishing with Riley Meirick crossing the goal line on a six-yard run for six followed by Luke Kuennen carrying the ball for the twopoint conversion to put TV in the lead 8-7. The Trojans continued to control the field with their defense on the line forcing GR to punt to finish their drive. TV moved down the field with various rush plays ending their next scoring drive with Kuennen scoring on an eightyard run. The two-point conversion run failed leaving TV up 14-7 with time left in the first. “We had three take aways. Riley Meirick fell on a fumble early in the game to give us momen-

tum. Blake Busta and Justin Kime both had interceptions to halt GR drives,” said Coach Scott. “Eric Buckendahl did an amazing job of getting punts off without getting them blocked. He also had a big kickoff return to set up our first TD.” The Rebels weren’t ready to be done and answered TV with rushing touchdown from 18 yards out. TV blocked the PAT to keep the score separated at 14-13 at the end of the first quarter. The second quarter was a defensive fight with neither team scoring in the allotted 12 minutes leaving TV with a onepoint lead at the half 14-13. “Our offense faced a stout defense. We were able to move the ball sporadically. A couple of penalties on offense took away big runs and put us in a hole,” continued Scott. “We only had a couple of break downs on defense that allowed big plays.” TV returned from halftime and struggled to move the ball toward their end of the field. The defense held on for most of the quarter allowing the Rebels a four-yard rushing TD with a PAT to add sev-

en points to their tally. GR led the game 14-20 with just one quarter to go. “We started the third quarter in bad field position and did not overcome it allowing GR good field position. An interception return allowed them to have a very short field for the go ahead score.” GR struck quickly in the fourth adding another rushing TD to their side of the board, this one on a 10-yard carry with a PAT to increase their lead over the Trojans to 14-27. TV rebounded and brought their offense back to life with a completed 17-yard pass from Ryan Busta to Eric Buckendahl, good for six points for the Trojans. Buckendahl caught a pass from Ry. Busta to complete the two-point conversion to bring TV within five points of the Rebels at 22-27 but time was running out. The rebels sealed the win with one last scoring drive, a two-yard rush with PAT, to move on to the quarterfinal round with a final score of 22-34. “It was a hard fought high school football game that could have went either way. Unfortunately, GR was able to make enough plays to come away with the victory,” Scott stated. “This team played hard every time they took the field. We had a good year and something they should be proud of,” Scott finished.

STATS on page 12

Above: Justin Kime lands in the endzone to complete one of two TDs he scored in the first round playoff game against BCLUW. Below: What looks like a mess of players is the offensive line and the defensive line doing their job during the first round playoff game. In the mix for the Trojans are l-r: Riley Busta (l), Riley Buchheit (#77), Charles Hadacek (#76), Jacob Hackman, Jacob Buss (helmet #32) and Tyler Sawyer (#54). (Photos by Leah Kruse)

Score By Quarter 1 2 3 4 Final Turkey Valley 14 0 0 8 22 Gladbrook-Reinbeck 13 0 7 14 34 Game Stats TV GR Rushing Yards 160 284 Rushing Attempts 47 50 Passing Yards 71 18 Passing Attempts 5-9-2 2-11-2 Total Offensive Yards 231 302 Scoring Sequence: GR- 53yd run (PAT) Meirick- 6yd run (Kuennen- 2pt run) Kuennen- 8yd run (Run failed) GR- 18yd run (PAT blocked) GR- 4yd run (PAT) GR- 10yd run (PAT) Buckendahl- 17yd pass from Ry. Busta (Buckendahl- 2pt pass from Ry. Busta) Trojan Individual Stats: Rushing: Kuennen- 20-88, 1 TD; Meirick8-23, 1 TD; Buckendahl- 6-23; Kime7-39; Ry. Busta- 6-(-13) Passing: Ry. Busta- 5-8-1, 71 yds, 1 TD; Buckendahl- 0-1-1 Receiving: Buckendahl- 2-40, 1 TD; Reicks- 1-15; Kuennen, Kime- 1-8 Interceptions: B. Busta- 1-13; Kime- 1-10 Fumble Recoveries: Meirick- 1 Kickoffs: Kuennen- 4-171 Kickoff Returns: Buckendahl- 2-84; Meirick- 2-11; Buchheit- 1-5 Punting: Buckendahl- 7-201 Trojan Tackles (TFLs): Kuennen- 11; Klimesh- 10; Sawyer- 9; Ri. Busta- 7; Reicks- 6; Buckendahl, B. Busta, Kime- 5; Buchheit- 4; Meirick- 3; Hadacek- 2; Blazek, C. Hackman- 1


news

12Calmar Courier Tuesday, November 12, 2013

South Winneshiek High School First Quarter Honor Roll

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Freshman A Honor Roll: Sawyer Breitsprecher, Amber Brincks, Josephine Kriener, Kelly Langreck, Christina Nesvik, Cole Phillips, Jaden Severson B Honor Roll: Lane Budde, Tiana Bullerman, Elizabeth Cullen, Janilee Flores, Colton Goza, Abby Hageman, Joel Hanson, Alex Holthaus, Matthew Holthaus, Alejandro Koenig, Michaela Kuennen, Anna Langreck, Blaine Lennon, Skyler Luzum, Morgan Martin, Brennan McDermitt,Hannah McGee, Madelyn Monroe, Kelley Schroeder Sophomore: Special Honor Roll: RaeAnn Klimesh A Honor Roll: Hattie Frana, Treyton Jacobsen, Benjamin Meyer Logan Schweinefus, B Honor Roll: Sabrina Claman, Noah Cullen, Amber Ellis, Jenna Elsbernd, Justin Elsbernd, Amber Hageman, Kelsey Hageman, Miriah Hageman, Samantha Headington, Rebecca Hertges, Landers Kuboushek, Libby Manning, Michael Meyer,Payton Moore, Alec Quandahl, Cole Schmitt, Michael Tieskoetter, Nathan Winter

SW STATS from page 11 Score By Quarter 1 2 3 4 Final South Winneshiek 6 8 0 0 14 North Fayette Valley12 8 14 15 49 Game Stats SW NFV Rushing Yards 128 493 Rushing Attempts 27 77 Passing Yards 168 0 Passing Attempts 9-24-1 0-2 Total Offensive Yards 296 493 Scoring Sequence: Rommes- 53yd pass from Schweinefus (2pt failed) NFV- 12yd run (PAT failed) NFV- 87yd run (2pt failed) NFV-15yd run (2pt run) Schroeder- 11yd run (Schroeder- 2pt run) NFV- 6yd run (2pt run) NFV- 10yd run (2pt failed) NFV- 7yd run (2pt run) NFV 4yd run (PAT Warrior Individual Stats: Rushing: Schroeder- 3-43, 1 TD; Bohach1-3; Kleve- 6-12; Hageman- 7-22; Rommes- 5-19; Schweinefus- 5-29 Passing: Schweinefus- 9-23-1, 168yds; Rommes- 0-1 Receiving: Rommes- 4-100, 1 TD; Kleve2-35; C. Lensing- 3-33 Kickoffs: Rommes- 3-137 Kickoff Returns: Schroeder- 3-23; Rommes- 2-54; Jacobsen- 1-27; Hageman- 1-2 Punting: Rommes- 1-36 Warrior Tackles (TFLs): Numedahl- 18; Jacobsen- 10 (1); Brincks, Hageman- 10; Shatek- 7; Kuboushek6 (2); Meyer- 6 (1); Rommes- 5; A. Lensing- 4; Kuennen, Poshusta- 3; Schmitt- 2; Walz- 1

New displays for Fort City Museum The Fort Atkinson Museum has recently added some new displays in the basement room for the public to view. The City Museum is a non-profit organization and accepts free-will donations or memorials to keep on growing. In the upstairs room, you will find a number of very interesting material to read or several other cases of historical items to view. The City Museum is open during normal business hours or by private showing by contacting board members Marie Riha: 563.534.7141; Al Becker: 563.534.7502; Myles Kupka: 563.534.7397; or Mary Moser: 563.534.7449.

Junior : Special Honor Roll: Brandi Hageman A Honor Roll: Josiah Baker, Anna Cullen, Mackenzie Faldet, Rebecca Franzen, Jerod Hey-

ing, Kelly Kuboushek, Matthew Kuboushek, Nicole Kuboushek, Maggie Kuennen, Tanner Kuennen, Jessica Lechtenberg, B Honor Roll:Megan Andera, Lee Balik, Mahogani Boe, Dallas Bohr, Carter Broszeit, Kaitlin Gerleman, Matthew Hertges, Marissa Holthaus, Jeremy Imoehl, Kaitlyn Imoehl, Christian Kleve, Ambriehl Klimesh, Tyler Numedahl, Payton Poshusta, Jordan Rommes, Monica Schwartzhoff, Brittany Shindelar, Andrea Stenseth, Lexie Warth Seniors: Special Honor Roll: Logan Brincks, Kennidee DeVilbiss, Caitlin Holien, Courtney Humpal, Micole Lansing, A Honor Roll Garrett Bohach, Christopher Brincks, Megan Bushman, Leah Elsbernd, Devin Franzen, Brendan Hageman, Benjamin Hanson, Kendal Kuboushek, Nicole Langreck, Mikayla Lien Trevor Schweinefus, Bailey Timp, Christina Wagner B Honor Roll: Jonathan Barness, Lucas Brincks, Taylor Claman, Megan Elsbernd, Danon Hageman, Megan Hageman, Elizabeth Hemesath, Brian Kleppe, Carlee Knutson, Adam Lensing Brennan Malanaphy, Nathanael Meyer, Sarah Meyer, Caleb Monroe, Abigail Phillips, Darrik Poshusta, Jordan Reisner, Isaac Schmitt, Jared Schroeder, Alex Shatek, Kayla Stammeyer, Matthew Tekippe, Brittney Timm, Benjamin Unzeitig, Andre Walz, Andrea Zweibahmer

Winneshiek Co. Community Foundationʼs online grant training session to be held November 13 Approximately $100,000 will be available for the 2014 grant cycle of the Winneshiek County Community Foundation (WCCF), an affiliate of the Community Foundation of Northeast Iowa. A public training session will be held Wednesday, November 13, at 6:00 p.m. at T-Bock’s Underground (lower level meeting room) located at 206 W. Water St. in Decorah. Training session attendees will hear from Angie Shaffer, Program Associate for the Community Foundation of Northeast Iowa. Shaffer will lead a step-by-step training of the entire process. Question and answer time will also be allotted. “Last year our organization transitioned from paper to electronic application submissions,” said Dave Riha, Grant Distribution Committee Chair. “It was a smooth transition and definitely streamlined the entire process for everyone involved; however there is still a learning curve so it is important for anyone who wishes to apply to attend the training session.” WCCF grant deadline is Friday, January 10, 2014. The Distribution Committee will look favorably upon programs, projects and organizations that contribute, in a significant way, to improve the quality of life for residents of Winneshiek County. Grant requests should fit into one of the following categories: health, human services, education, environment, arts and culture, community affairs & development, and historic preservation. Grant applications and guidelines will be available online at www.winneshiekccf.org (click “Grants”) or information may be obtained at the Visitor’s Center located at 507 W. Water St. in Decorah. For additional information please contact the WCCF Administrative Assistant, Brenda Luzum at 563-382-2023 or email brenda@visitdecorah.com. Questions can also be directed to CFNEIA’s Angie Shaffer at 319-287-9106 ext. 18 or ashaffer@cfneia.org

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opinion

Calmar Courier

13

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

neighbor to neighbor Thanksgiving is coming soon, although the stores and the ads make it seem more like Christmas. Thanksgiving is a wonderful holiday. It’s a time to give thanks and time to spend with family and friends. Turkey is not just for Thanksgiving, now is the time to take advantage of sales. The sales are already coming out in the ads. Buy an extra turkey and freeze it to cook later. There are many easy and great ways to use leftover turkey. I have never tried this, but I have heard that it is very good. Try leftover turkey sandwiches, made with stuffing, cranberry sauce and mayo. From McCormick, here is a delicious pumpkin pie. Pumpkin Pie with Vanilla Whipped Cream 1 frozen, unbaked deep dish pie crust (9-inch) 1 can (15 ounces) pumpkin 1 can (14 ounces) sweetened condensed milk 2 eggs 1 tablespoon McCormick® Pumpkin Pie Spice Preheat oven to 425°F. Place pie crust on large foil-lined baking sheet. Mix pumpkin, milk, eggs and pumpkin pie spice in large bowl until smooth. Pour into crust. Bake 15 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350°F. Bake 40 minutes longer or until knife inserted 1 inch from crust comes out clean. Cool completely on wire rack. Serve with Vanilla Whipped Cream, if desired. Vanilla Whipped Cream Recipe 1 cup heavy cream 1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar 1 teaspoon McCormick® Pure Vanilla Extract Beat cream, confectioners’ sugar and vanilla in medium bowl with electric mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form. Cover. Refrigerate until ready to serve. The following are a couple of delicious soup recipes to use with leftover turkey. The first soup is a comfort type soup where the other soup is more flavorful and a definite contrast to the first soup. Both are easy and make a great meal. Fiesta Turkey Tortilla Soup By Amy McFadden 4 cans (14-1/2 ounces each) chicken broth 3 cups shredded cooked turkey or rotisserie chicken 1 can (15 ounces) black beans, rinsed and drained 1 can (15-1/4 ounces) whole

kernel corn, drained 1/2 cup medium salsa 5 corn tortillas (6 inches), cut into 1/4-inch strips 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro Additional salsa, optional In a Dutch oven, combine the first five ingredients; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile, spread tortilla strips in a single layer on a baking sheet. Bake at 400° 4-6 minutes or until golden brown and crisp. Stir cilantro into soup. Top the servings with tortilla strips. If desired, serve with additional salsa. Yield: 8 servings. Turkey Stew with Dumplings By Stephanie Rabbitt-Schapp 3 cups shredded cooked turkey 1 large sweet onion, chopped 1 large potato, peeled and cubed 2 large carrots, chopped 2 celery ribs, chopped 2 bay leaves 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon poultry seasoning 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1 carton (32 ounces) chicken broth 1/3 cup cold water 3 tablespoons cornstarch 1/2 cup frozen corn, thawed 1/2 cup frozen peas, thawed 1 cup Bisquick® mix 1/3 cup 2% milk In a 6-qt. slow cooker, combine the first 10 ingredients; stir in broth. Cover and cook on low for 6-7 hours. Remove bay leaves. In a small bowl, mix water and cornstarch until smooth; stir into turkey mixture. Add corn and peas. Cover and cook on high until mixture reaches a simmer. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, mix baking mix and milk just until moistened. Drop by rounded tablespoonful on top of simmering liquid. Reduce heat to low; cover and cook for 20-25 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in a dumpling comes out clean. Yield: 6 servings. Till next time...Hints for leftover Halloween Candy: Use some of your leftover Halloween candy to make some treats for family gatherings during Thanksgiving. (1) Use leftover candy bars with a cheesecake. (2) Take melted almond bark and add a variety of leftover candy and maybe toss in some pretzels. (3) Use a sugar cookie base for a base crust for a pizza. Melt chocolate chips and spread melted chocolate over the baked cookie crust. While the chocolate is soft, press candy pieces into the chocolate. When set or chilled, cut into pieces and enjoy.

Yesterday’s News By Mary Welch Railroading was difficult in the winter of 1926. One morning in January, the Switch Engine went off the track in the railroad yards in Calmar, and later that same morning the early passenger train headed north went off the rails at the crossing near the Foss place. Ice and snow forced the trains off the tracks in both cases. A windstorm near Waukon was so strong that winter that it overturned two school buses. Ted Kelly’s bus with all the children within was overturned at the O. K. Olson corner, but luckily no one was hurt. Clifton Reese’s bus, containing only Clarence Larson and himself was blown over on a perfectly level stretch of road in the Dahl brothers’ field. No one was hurt. At the L. Neuman farm near Waucoma, John Craft had his leg ripped open when he fell against a buzz saw. He was saved from a horrible head wound and possible death by Henry Wichmann who pulled the young man away from the whirling teeth of the saw after it had cut his cap. Mr. Craft lay for five hours without medical treatment before a doctor could be secured from West Union. A terrific blizzard was raging that day. Gus Zirjacka and Leo Wuest volunteered to make the trip for the doctor and both froze their faces during the bitter ride for help. Miss Mary Kovarik from Spillville left for Chicago in early 1926 to purchase her spring and summer millinery goods. In the spring of 1926, on a Monday afternoon, someone entered John Sanders home in Calmar by cutting the screen in the rear door and lifting the hook. No one was

home except Floyd Sanders, who was asleep due to working nights. The intruder stole the pants Floyd had taken off, that contained a gold watch and some money. It was announced that Weselmann & Becvar were installing a new refrigeration system in their Calmar meat market. In addition to the cold storage rooms on the first floor, they also would have a large cold storage room in the basement. Fourteen years ago, in 1912, this business had the latest in iceless refrigeration systems installed, but now this will be upgraded. “Troublesome Practices” was the title of an article in an April 2016 Courier issue. “Attention is called to the following practices which should be discontinued. Whenever there is a fire in Calmar, many people jump into their autos, boys on their bicycles, and ride to the fire, making traffic congested on the street the fire department must follow, and making it necessary for the members of the fire department to be continually on the alert to prevent accidents, and hindering them in reaching the fire and getting their apparatus to the place where it is needed. Another practice is that people phone the telephone office to inquire as to the location of the fire. The telephone operator is flooded in a few minutes with hundreds of calls, and this hinders her regular routine of work, and sending out calls to members of the fire department or other emergency services, if needed. The June 25, 1926 Courier had the following article: “Up around Hesper, there was a boy fifteen years old, whose name we withheld, who became so obdurate his

parents were unable to exercise any control over him. He refused to attend high school, and would not do his chores around the farm. Matters became so bad that his parents finally appealed to Judge Taylor. The Judge took the case under consideration and after learning the facts, sentenced the boy to the reform school at Eldora. The sheriff left with the boy the following day and it is unknown how long he will have to remain incarcerated.” Preparations were under way for Farmer’s Day in Calmar, which was held on Wednesday, September 15, 1926. This featured many street sports and contests, and farm boys and girls were the only ones allowed to compete for the prizes. There would be prizes for: the biggest man, the one who brings the biggest load of people, the one who comes the furthest, the one who comes in the oldest car, etc. There were also prizes offered by local merchants for exhibits of corn, grain, potatoes, pumpkins, and other farm products. All farm products were to be brought to the Meyer & Co. Offices in Calmar. There were many amusements scheduled for everyone, whether from the country or the town. One of the features was a big baseball game between Calmar and Clermont. Immediately after the ball game, there was an exhibition of fancy and trick shooting y one of the best men in the United States, and this was also to be held on the ball field. One of the other features advertised was the chicken grabbing contest. One dozen chickens with dollar bills tied to their legs were released from the tops of the store buildings in Calmar, and will go to the persons who grab YESTERDAY to page 20


public notices

14Calmar Courier Tuesday, November 12, 2013

lawler city council meeting minutes November 4, 2013 Mayor Mueterthies presided. Council members present: Izer, King, Njus, Scheidel and Zubrod. Others present: Jay Uhlenhake and George TeKippe. Moved by King, seconded by Scheidel to approve the Agenda. All Ayes. Moved by Scheidel, seconded by Zubrod to approve the minutes of the previous meeting and approve the bills presented to be paid. All Ayes. General Fund Hawkeye REC (service).............................16,880.97 Treasurer State of Iowa (sales tax)..................904.00 United States Treasury (FICA, with).............1,426.14 IPERS (September).........................................935.72 Salaries(salaries).........................................5,288.54 Jendro Sanitation (garbage-October).........2,082.33 Post Office (postage)......................................204.00 United Parcel Service (shipping)....................126.68 Windstream (October)......................................86.79 Black Hills Energy (natural gas).......................63.00 Marshall & Swift (rental)....................................37.12 Hawkins, Inc. (water supplies)........................539.89 Calmar Courier (proceedings).........................44.50 TestAmerica (water testing)...............................53.50 Croell Redi-Mix (sand)....................................389.19 Stanton Electric (electric services)..............2,804.60 Roger Dreckman Const. (move shed).........6,398.00 Uline (supplies).................................................70.22 Iowa DOT (rock salt)....................................1,036.60 MARC (lagoon supplies)................................642.90 Bodensteiner Imp. (supplies)...........................36.52 Pollard (pest control)........................................52.50 Terry-Durin Co. (street lights)......................1,800.00 Emily Arens (deposit refund)............................75.00 Bank Iowa (street note)..............................14,465.11 Five Star Coop (fuel).......................................211.00 Date Technologies (support agreement)....1,085.54 Brown Supply Co. (street supplies)................195.30 Fencl Oil Co. (bury electric lines).....................122.50 Schueth Hardware (supplies)...........................47.96 Total...........................................................58,568.12 Library Bills IPERS (October).............................................169.08 Cathy Humpal (wages).................................1,136.28 Petty Cash (postage)......................................135.00 Domain Registry (website)................................60.00 HGTV Magazine (subscription).........................18.00 The Oprah Magazine (subscription).................35.28 Windstream (October)......................................83.33 Time Magazine (subscription)..........................72.24 Reader’s Digest (subscription).........................17.98 Family Fun (subscription).................................14.95 IMGRAM (books)............................................126.47 New Hampton Tribune (subscription)...............46.00 The Courier (subscription)................................66.69 Robert Patrick Sheridan (reimb.Kindle)..........119.00 Quill (office supplies)........................................80.44 Cathy Humpal (reimbursement story hour).......33.63 Library Total.................................................2,214.37 October Receipts General..........................................................227.37 Property Tax..............................................26,552.77 Road Use Tax..............................................5,905.51 Local Option Tax..........................................3,139.42 Library.........................................................1,188.89 Charges for Services................................45,695.13 Total...........................................................82,709.09

George TeKippe from Fehr Graham Engineering was present to discuss the proposed design services for upgrades to well #2 including iron sequestration as described in the preliminary report. Moved by Zubrod, seconded by King to approve the proposal from Fehr Graham Engineering for design services for upgrades to well #2 including iron sequestration as described in the preliminary report. All Ayes. Mayor Mueterthies opened the public hearing on the consideration of the submission of an application for a Community Development Block Grant for water system upgrades including well and water main improvements at 7:15 PM. There were no oral or written comments of objections at this time. The following announcements were made: The City of Lawler is proposing to submit a Community Development Block Grant Application to the Iowa Economic Development Authority. The grant funds will be used to help finance improvements to the City’s water system. Total project costs are estimated at $550,000. The grant application will be submitted to the Iowa Economic Development Authority on November 13, 2013. The City is requesting $300,000 in CDBG funds for the proposed project. If the grant is approved by the State, the City intends to commit $250,000 in local matching funds to the project. The City will be applying to the SRF loan program for financing assistance with the local match. The project will result in City-wide benefit and based on the recent survey, 61% of the residents living in the community are of low-and-moderate income. It will not be necessary to displace or relocate any homeowners as a result of the proposed program. Moved by Scheidel, seconded by Zubrod to close the public hearing on the consideration of the submission of an application for a Community Development Block Grant for water system upgrades including well and water main improvements. All Ayes. Moved by Scheidel, seconded by King to accept the estimate from Don Mueterthies of $935.00 for tree removal in the fence line of the lagoon property. All Ayes. Moved by Njus, seconded by King to adjourn the meeting at 7:35 PM. All Ayes. ATTEST Sue Cutsforth, City Clerk Published in the Calmar Courier on November 12, 2013.

fort atkinson council meeting minutes November 6, 2013 Present: Glass, Karnik, Schmitt, Schneiter. Absent: Elsbernd. Mayor Paul Herold called the meeting to order at 7:30 p.m. Al Becker passed on information regarding the Winneshiek County Community Foundation’s Online Grant Training Session that will be held on November 13th in Decorah. On behalf of Greg Barta, the city clerk reported on testing issues concerning the City’s sewage lagoon. Per DNR requirements the extra testing will continue. Barta also was given permission to sell a snow blower that no longer gets used. Motion by Schmitt to approve the following consent items: October 2, 2013 council minutes, clerk’s reports, and monthly bills, seconded by Karnik, carried, one absent. The City Clerk told the Mayor and Council that she, along with Barta, Casey Mai (who is assisting the City in preparing the grant application) and the City’s engineer met with two representatives from Homeland Security to discuss the application for FEMA funding to up-grade the city’s sewage lift station. If eligible, the City will submit the application after which it could take up to eight to twelve months before being notified if the funding was approved or not. Schneiter made a motion approving an addendum to the January 13, 2013 agreement between the City of Fort Atkinson and Erdman Engineering for additional services necessary for the sewage lift station improvements project, seconded by Glass, carried, one absent. Glass made a motion approving a building permit for Christie Schmitt, seconded by Schneiter, carried, one absent. Schneiter made a motion introducing Resolution #254, a resolution for the purpose of flood insurance rating, seconded by Karnik. The Mayor put the question on the motion and the following named Council members voted: Ayes: Glass, Karnik, Schneiter, Schmitt. Nays: None. Absent: Elsbernd. Whereupon the Mayor declared said motion approved. Due to New Year’s Day, the meeting for January will be held Wednesday January 8, 2014. The Council had a general discussion which included; water problems for some residents when the sewer lines were jet cleaned; increased water usage for a resident and the possible cause. Schneiter made a motion to adjourn, seconded by Schmitt, carried, one absent. Meeting adjourned at 8:25 p.m. OCTOBER 2013 EXPENSES ACE-PHONE

calmar public notice ORDINANCE NO. 359 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF CALMAR, IOWA, 2002, BY AMENDING PROVISIONS PERTAINING TO PARKING REGULATIONS DURING SNOW REMOVAL AND SNOW EMERGENCY. BE IT ENANCED by the City Council of the City of Calmar, Iowa: SECTION 1. SECTION MODIFIED. Section 69.11, 1B of the Code of Ordinances of the City of Calmar, Iowa, 2002 changed as follows: 69:11 SNOW REMOVAL/SNOW EMERGENCY. B. No uptown parking, this includes Maryville and Main Streets and the North and South parking lots from 2:00 A.M. thru 6:00 A.M. from November 1st. thru April 1st. D. No parking on the west side of Washington Street from South Street to Hancock Street from November 1st. thru April 1st. SECTION 2. SEVERABILITY CLAUSE. If any section, provision or part of this ordinance shall be adjudged invalid or inconstitutional, such adjudication shall not affect the validity of the ordinance as a whole or any section, provision or part thereof not adjudged invalid or unconstitutional. SECTION 3. WHEN EFFECTIVE. This ordinance shall be in effect from and after its final passage, approval and publication as provided by law. Passed and approved by the City Council of the City of Calmar, Iowa this 6th day of November, 2013 and approved this day of 6th day of November, 2013. First Reading: November 6, 2013; Second Reading: waived; Third Reading: waived. ATTEST Corey Meyer, Mayor Michele Elsbernd, City Clerk Published in the Calmar Courier on November 12, 2013.

SERVICE...................................197.18 ALLIANT-ELECT UTILITY..............................2142.98 BAKER & TAYLOR-LIBRARY BOOKS............349.95 BRUENING ROCK PRODUCTS-MAINT SUPP. 116.00 BUNN SERVICES-MAINT SERVICES.............300.00 CALMAR COURIER-PUBLICATION.................49.84 CHRIS BODENSTEINER-REIMB LIBRARY SUPP..... .........................................................................39.57 IRS-OCTOBER FED DEPOSIT......................1223.30 CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK-RENTAL FEE.........17.00 COSMOPOLITAN-SUBSCRIPTION..................29.93 CROELL REDI-MIX-CONCRETE....................178.50 DARIN BARTA-RENTAL FEE............................35.00 DATA TECH-MTG FEE......................................47.50 DNR-WATER USE FEE.....................................66.00 DON RAUSCH & SONS-REPAIR....................525.00 FARMERS UNION COOP-MAINT. SUPP.........370.17 FORT ATKINSON RENTAL-MONTHLY RENT....45.00 FRANZEN SALES & SERVICE-REP/SERVICE..20.27 GRAND HARBOR RESORT-LODGING..........106.40 GREG BARTA-INSUR REIMBURSE................275.00 HAWKEYE SANITATION-GARBAGE SERV...2101.89 HAWKINS-OPERATING SUPPLIES................239.75 HD SUPPLY WATERWORKS-REPAIR&SUPP.1918.00 HEYING MFG-MAINT. SUPPLIES.....................77.92 HUBERS STORE-MAINT/OPERATING SUPP..421.85 IA WTR ENVIRONMENT ASSOC.-MTG FEE.....25.00 IAMU-QTR SAFETY SERVICE FEE.................192.42 IPERS-OCTOBER IPERS................................782.27 JOHN DEER FINANCIAL-SUPP.&REPAIR........85.28 KEYSTONE LAB-LAB FEES.............................11.00 L&R MFG-TRUCK MAINT................................886.40 LEE’S REPAIR-EQUIP. RENT..........................192.50 LIBRI FOUNDATION-BOOKS.........................350.00 LICKETY SPLIT-OPERATING SUPPLIES......1095.18 MARV SMITH ELECT.-OPERATIN SUPPLIES..152.29 MEDIACOM-INTERNET SERVICE....................55.30 MICK GAGE-RESTROOM SERVICES...............59.00 MID AMERICA BOOKS-LIBRARY BOOKS.....283.20 NAPA AUTO PARTS-OPERATING SUPPLIES...13.38 US POST OFFICE-POSTAGE..........................112.00 REILLY CONST.-TRUCK MAINT....................1022.90 THE PENWORTHY CO.-LIBRARY BOOKS.....106.10 TREAS STATE OF IA-3RD QTR SALES TAX....990.00 US CELLULAR-PHONE SERVICES................167.39 USA BLUE BOOK-OPERATING SUPPLIES.....223.20 OCTOBER PAYROLL....................................3971.26 TOTAL........................................................21670.07 OCTOBER 2013 EXPENSES BY FUND GENERAL...................................................10733.25 ROAD USE TAX............................................2522.42 WATER.........................................................6293.38 SEWER.........................................................1771.02 TOTAL........................................................21670.07 OCTOBER 2013 REVENUES GENERAL...................................................32672.81 LIBRARY TRUST...............................................25.00 MUSEUM..........................................................25.00 ROAD USE TAX............................................3247.82 EMPLOYEE BENEFITS.................................2513.05 EMERGENCY LEVY........................................715.78 LOCAL OPTION TAX....................................2743.62 DEBT SERVICE.............................................1864.71 WATER.........................................................6641.05 SEWER.........................................................7121.21 TOTAL........................................................57570.05

ATTEST City Clerk Mayor Published in the Calmar Courier on November 12, 2013.

winneshiek board of supervisors October 28, 2013 The Board of Supervisors met as per adjournment with all members present. The Board met with Lee Bjerke, county Engineer, to discuss road matters. Moved by Kuhn and seconded by Karlsbroten to enter into federal aid agreement BR OS-C O96(122)-8J-96 for bridge number 178. Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Thompson and seconded by Ashbacher to open the public hearing on the rezoning request made by Jim Sims and Dave Holthaus for a portion of property just south of Decorah to be changed from A-1 to R-1. Motion carried unanimously by roll call vote. Tony Phillips presented the request and informed the Board the Planning and Zoning Commission held a public hearing and unanimously recommended approval. No written or verbal comments were received. Moved by Ashbacher and seconded by Karlsbroten to close the public hearing. Motion carried unanimously by roll call vote. Moved by Kuhn and seconded by Thompson to hold the 1st reading of the proposed ordinance amending the zoning ordinance. Motion carried unanimously and the reading was held. Moved by Karlsbroten and seconded

by Kuhn to waive the 2nd and 3rd reading. Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Kuhn and seconded by Thompson to adopt ordinance 14-177 making the amendment to the zoning ordinance to change the subject property from A-1 to R-1. Motion carried unanimously by roll call vote. The ordinance will be published and on file in the county Recorder’s and Auditor’s offices. Harlan Satrom and Chad Bird met with the Board to discuss wellness programs in the County. They reviewed the history of the Winneshiek Wellness Coalition and the Blue Zones project. They gave an update on the new Winneshiek Wellness Committee (WinnWell) and asked the Board for their participation. The Board recommended Krista Vandenbrink, director of County Public Health, be the County’s representative to the committee. Moved by Thompson and seconded by Karlsbroten to approve the minutes for the Monday October 21, 2013 meeting. Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Kuhn and seconded by Ashbacher to approve the claims filed with the Board. Motion carried unanimously. Janet Alexander met with the Board and thanked them for their work on the Millenium Ag appeal. She also informed

them that the Community Rights Alliance of Winneshiek County was coordinating with a national group, Community Environmental League Defense Fund, to provide local leaders additional information on how to enact ordinance to protect local interests in the future. These meetings will take place on Thursday October 31st and Friday November 1st, and the Board was invited to attend. David Williams presented, on behalf of the Winneshiek County Protectors, a proposed amendment to the zoning ordinance that would address issues related to silica sand mining. The proposal could be adopted to be added to the current zoning ordinance. The Board will refer this to the Silica Sand mining study group. The Board discussed several policies in regards to the safety handbook. The safety committee is working on a proposed safety handbook to bring to the Board for adoption. Steve Belay, assistant county Attorney, met with the Board to give an update on the lawsuit filed by Deb Keefe dba Chimney Rock Campground to have the District Court overturn a decision by the Board to deny her request for rezoning from A-1 to C-1. Moved by Ashbacher and seconded by Kuhn to adopt resolution 14-34 appointing a special prosecutor in a case where the county Attorney has a conflict of interest. Motion carried unanimously by roll call vote. Moved by Kuhn and seconded by Thompson to adjourn to 9:30am Monday November 4, 2013. Motion carried unanimously. Claims General Basic Fund Alice Abbott........................................................9.00 Allamakee Co Solid Waste...............................379.47 Alliant Energy...............................................2773.16 Black Hills Energy..........................................281.75 Bruening Rock Prod.......................................193.16 Terry Buenzow..................................................68.50 Gordon Buss....................................................79.50 C & D Oil Services............................................40.00 Casper Plumbing & Heating, Inc....................105.00 CDW Gov’t...................................................3578.63 John Christopherson..........................................2.25 Creative Product Sourcing, Inc........................45.50 Decorah Ace Hardware....................................64.68 Decorah News Company..................................59.14 Donlon Healthmart.........................................144.20 Gary Dundee...................................................38.57 Fareway Stores................................................36.29 Fastenal Co......................................................30.44 Ossian Bee.....................................................508.17 Donald Fox......................................................90.00 Freeport Water District.....................................93.13 Galls/Quartermaster.......................................311.25 GECRB/Amazon..........................................1173.94 Hawkeye REC..............................................1447.51 Hawkeye Sanitation, Inc................................323.71 Headington Repair...........................................25.22 Hovey LP Gas, Inc...........................................74.80 IA St Sheriffs & Deputies Assn........................300.00 Iowa Eye PC...................................................200.00 Iowa State Assoc Of Counties.......................150.00 Chuck Ira..........................................................12.60 J.W. Beard Welding & Machine........................78.75 Brenda Johnson.................................................2.25 K & S Electric LLC........................................3570.34 Dennis Karlsbroten..........................................31.95 KDEC Radio...................................................270.00 Ian Kemp..........................................................94.50 Legislative Services Agency...........................250.00 Leon’s Auto & Truck Repair...........................1027.00 LetterWerks Sign City, LLC..........................1345.46 Linn Co. Correctional Center..........................2324.74 Dr. Kevin Locke..............................................100.00 Mail Services..................................................549.66 Marco Inc.......................................................235.44 David Mason..................................................110.00 Kathleen A. Massa...........................................22.00 Menards...........................................................33.48 Midwest Radar & Equip..................................320.00 NASP..............................................................152.00 North Iowa K-9...............................................150.00 Perry Novak Electric......................................2091.03 Pitney Bowes................................................3000.00 PJGreufe & Associates................................1500.00 Carrie Quandahl............................................150.00 Julie Quandahl.................................................73.00 Ricoh USA Inc................................................269.13 Rite Price.........................................................815.77 Schulter-Balik Funeral Home........................5000.00 Schumacher Elevator.....................................429.15 DuWayne Snitker..............................................70.00 Solutions.......................................................1000.00 Spahn & Rose Lumber.....................................133.24 Stoney Creek Inn............................................231.84 Storey Kenworthy............................................364.58 Robert Sturch...................................................20.00 Thompson Construction..................................253.58 US Cellular.....................................................332.30 US Foods.......................................................323.78 Verizon Wireless............................................1080.14 Weis Buick GMC..........................................1628.00 Francis Wenthold.............................................13.50 Diana Wilharm...............................................144.45 Windstream..................................................1484.05 Winn Co Public Health...................................150.00 Winneshiek County Engineer......................26500.00 Winneshiek County Pioneer Cemeteries.......5600.00 General Basic Public Health Ailco Equipment Finance Group....................761.00


public notices Channing Bete Company, Inc......................1970.72 Dell Marketing..............................................5379.59 GECRB/Amazon............................................243.22 GlaxoSmithKline...........................................8244.28 IA Dept of Public Health...................................60.00 McKesson Medical Surgical............................268.15 NACCHO.........................................................62.00 NE IA Area Agency on Aging.............................5.00 Racom Corp.....................................................20.00 Ricoh USA Inc................................................339.00 US Cellular.....................................................157.68 Verizon Wireless...........................................1185.36 Windstream....................................................719.71 Winneshiek Medical Center...........................880.00 General Supplemental Fund Janet Alexander................................................70.85 Collyn Bridges..................................................70.00 Betty Davie.......................................................70.00 Decorah News Company.....................................9.50 Joyce Epperly...................................................70.00 Rebecca Steines..............................................70.00 TSP Court Reporting, Inc..................................61.10 John Wendling..................................................60.00 Winneshiek County Sheriff.................................32.76 Water Testing Grant Fund Mike Kuennen.................................................400.00 MH/DD Services Fund US Cellular........................................................74.57 Windstream......................................................97.24 Rural Services Basic Fund Arden Auna......................................................45.00 Daniel Beard....................................................90.00 Roger Bergan...................................................45.00 Donald Blegen.................................................45.00 Laura Boice......................................................45.00 Ronald Borsheim..............................................45.00 Louis Courtney.................................................45.00 Craig Cutting...................................................45.00 Decorah News Company.................................50.84 Curt Gjere.........................................................45.00 Carleton Haugen...............................................45.00 Hawkeye Sanitation, Inc...............................1467.04 Dale Johnson....................................................45.00 Danny Leidahl...................................................45.00 David Lensch....................................................45.00 John Lubke.......................................................45.00 Diann Marten....................................................45.00 Tony Meyer........................................................90.00 Rick Monson.....................................................45.00 Ken Nordheim...................................................45.00 Gary Smorstad.................................................45.00 Derold Tieskoetter.............................................45.00 US Cellular......................................................160.89 Walmart Community/GECRB............................54.38 Erlin Walter.......................................................45.00 J Wayne Wicks.................................................90.00 Windstream......................................................72.34 Winn Co Landfill.............................................881.92 Secondary Road Fund Alliant Energy..................................................164.20 Bear Creek Archeology Inc..........................1112.13 Brennan Const Co....................................141011.09 City of Ridgeway................................................14.46 Croell Redi Mix...............................................310.50 Decorah Ace Hardware.......................................5.98 Decorah Auto Center Inc..............................1071.89 Decorah Mobile Glass....................................103.27 Decorah News Company.................................16.83 Fayette Co Hwy Dept Courthouse...............8080.00 Ossian Bee......................................................13.03 Freeport Water District....................................109.01 Hawkeye REC................................................799.75 Illowa Culvert and Supply..............................2116.80 IA Dept of Trans............................................6845.77 Iowa Prison Ind...............................................444.07 Iowa State University Continui.......................500.00 Iowa Transit..................................................1202.48 Mower Power...................................................66.50 Norsolv Systems............................................149.95 Perry Novak Electric......................................528.00 Racom Corp.....................................................10.00 Ricoh USA Inc..................................................18.01 River City Paving.............................................100.48 Ronco Engineering.......................................1256.24 Safety X-treme.............................................2765.52 Scott Van Keppel...........................................199.36 Shuck-Briston...............................................4292.50 US Cellular.....................................................333.20 Windstreak.....................................................341.42 Winneshiek Medical Center............................298.00 County Assessor Agency Fund Jim Alstad.........................................................37.26 Dell Marketing................................................655.98 Verizon Wireless...............................................51.57 Weis Buick GMC..............................................44.37 Windstream......................................................72.47 E911 Surcharge Fund AT&T.................................................................40.72 CenturyLink....................................................442.57 GeoComm, Inc.............................................1593.75 Iowa Prison Ind.............................................1145.00 Racom Corp.................................................1063.00 Emergency Management Comm J. Bruce Goetsch...........................................573.53 Winneshiek Co Health Ins Fund Coventry Health & Life Ins Co.....................67923.38 Midwest Group Benefits................................2822.47 Midwest Group Benefits..................................820.50 Grand Total...............................................352735.83

ATTEST Benjamin D Steines, County Auditor John Logsdon, Chairman Board of Supervisors Published in the Calmar Courier on November 12, 2013.

Calmar Courier

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

ossian council

calmar city council meeting minutes November 6, 2013 Council members Sabelka, Kleve, Zweibahmer and Mayor Meyer met at 6:15 along with Chelsea Welsh from Upper Explorerland to review and rate submitted proposals for the water & sewer project. Proposals were requested from five firms and proposals were submitted by Fehr Graham Engineering and Erdman Engineering. Prior to the meeting George Tekippe from Fehr Graham Engineering mentioned the NICC Lift Station project and the benefits of a permanent easement versus land transfer for the lift station property. He felt and council agreed that the easement would be sufficient. The regular meeting of the Calmar City Council was called to order by Mayor Meyer at 7:00 P.M. on Wednesday, November 6, 2013 at the Calmar Fire Station. The meeting was opened with the Pledge of Allegiance. Members present were: Kleve, Sabelka, Zweibahmer and Huinker. Phillips was absent. After discussion, a motion was made by Zweibahmer, seconded by Kleve to approve the consent agenda ( Agenda, Minutes of the October 7, 2013 meeting, clerk/treasurer reports and claims for October 2013). Aye: Kleve, Huinker, Zweibahmer and Sabelka. Motion carried. Claims October 2013 Alliant (electricity).........................................8071.54 Annie Rude (reimb ILA conference)...............466.97 Aramark (uniform)..........................................149.80 Barnes & Noble (books)..................................22.40 Black Hills (gas).............................................292.83 Bodensteiner Impl (mower blades-3)..............56.40 Bushman Custom F (hauling).........................950.00 Calmar Courier (publishing)...........................131.72 Calmar Motors (oil changes)..........................150.48 Center Pt. Lg. Pnt (large print books)...............53.88 Centurylink (phone)........................................376.29 City Laundry (towels)........................................48.97 Croell (elm drain, water break).......................750.00 Data Technologies (fall user meeting)...............95.00 Dave Huinker (computer service-update)......450.00 Decorah Electric (program wastewater)......1065.00 Delta Dental (insurance)................................148.00 Drilling All Season (parts and repairs)............437.16 Economy Ag (hydraulic hose)..........................34.48 Farmers Union (fuel police)............................498.37 Grassmasters (pool deck)............................2285.71 Hach (chemical testing).................................431.82 Hacker,Nelson (audit and fees)....................2275.00 Heying Lbr (supplies).....................................153.07 Imwca (work comp installment # 5).............1308.00 Ingram (books)...............................................391.83 IRS (tax)........................................................4943.85 Ia Dept. Rev. (tax on water & pool adm)......4079.00 Iowa League budget workshop Waverly..........35.00 Iowa One Call (fees)........................................33.80 Iowa Pump Works (lift station maint.)...........1200.00 Ipers (retirement).........................................3097.94 Jared Wessler (refund overpaid final bill).........30.81 John Deere Finance (maint supplies).............146.04 Keystone Labs (testing)..................................354.70 Kwik Star (fuel police)..................................1031.10 Linda Crossland (reimb ILA, town hall & clock)........ .........................................................................61.09 Malcolm (garbage)......................................6196.79 Marv Smith Elec (compressor sewer plant, etc)....... ....................................................................1140.37 Matt Bullerman (mal Manchester)......................5.35 McDonald Sply (pvc).......................................29.46 Micromarketing (books)...................................68.78 Midwest Geograp (manhole diagram).........1645.00 Municipal (pipe & cleaning sewer,drains)....4499.12 Municipal Supply (parts)................................172.60 Natare (pool liner deposit).........................16790.66 NE Iowa Tree Serv (trees & other misc)........2500.00 Our Iowa(subscription).....................................18.98 Postmaster (postage water bills)....................146.68 Reilly Const. Co. I (PPE# 1 West St. Water project)... ...................................................................96183.41 Reilable Dumpster (fall city wide expenses)..233.04 Zahasky, Richard (house Washington St. Calm)...... ..................................................................54500.00 Zahasky, Richard (professional services)....1534.49 Rite Price (copier contract)..............................30.00 River City Paving (Henry & alley)...............69300.00 Sim’s (batteries, dvd’s etc)...............................64.96 T & W Grinding (grind house)......................4000.00 Fehr Graham (downtown project fees).........7346.00 Treas State Ia (taxes).....................................801.00 US Cellular (telephone)...................................346.19 USA Blue Book (tubing and supplies)............568.56 Utility Equipment (repair clamps)...................700.86 Utility Equipment (grates manholes)............1338.52 Walmart (supplies)..........................................117.41 Wellmark (premium).....................................3058.60 Zarnouth Brush (tube broom).........................281.50 October Payroll..........................................14445.28 Total.........................................................324571.66 Expenses by fund General....................................................115142.20 Road Use...................................................71266.70 Benefits........................................................2371.41 Water........................................................112353.72 Sewer.........................................................23437.63 Total..........................................................324571.66 Revenue by fund

General....................................................114153.06 Road Use...................................................10351.08 Benefits......................................................31744.47 Emergency...................................................2344.74 Lost..............................................................8375.25 Forfeiture.....................................................2176.40 Debt Service................................................8447.00 Water..........................................................21403.05 Sewer.........................................................31129.28 Total.........................................................230124.33

The Community & Housing needs assessment was reviewed. Motion by Sabelka, second by Huinker to approve the assessment. Aye; Kleve, Huinker, Zweibahmer and Sabelka. Motion carried. Jon Biederman from Fehr Graham Engineering presented the Preliminary and Probable cost of the water & sewer improvements in the downtown area. He displayed maps to show the area included in the water/sewer improvements. Estimates of the water portion were $ 618.888 and the sewer portion of $ 506,624 for a total $ 1,125.512.00. Not figured into this amount are street/parking replacement, sidewalk/ curb replacement and lighting. Adding these items the projects totals 4.3 million dollars of which only $ 300.000 might be covered by a CDBG grant. The DOT would also participate and cover a portion of the cost but the actual amount is undetermined at this time. After lengthily discussion with Jon Biederman of Fehr Graham and Chelsea Welsh with Upper Explorerland, a motion was made by Zweibahmer, seconded by Sabelka to postpone the submittal of the CDBG water/sewer application due to the lack in financing and need of revisions to the scope of work. Aye: Kleve, Huinker, Sabelka and Zweibahmer. Motion carried. Council plans to review the project & financing in early 2014 and hopes to submit an application in November 2014. Chelsea Welsh stated that the CDBG Housing Rehabilitation Grant would have a good chance to be approved. The grant would request $ 231,000 for rehab of six homes and would require a match of $ 1500.00 per home of which the Security State Bank has committed $ 500.00 per home. A special meeting is necessary to hold a public hearing on this grant application in order to meet the grant application deadline. Motion by Huinker, seconded by Zweibahmer to set the date/ time of the public hearing for Monday, November 18, 2013 at 6:00 P.M. at the Calmar Fire Station. Ordinance # 359 was introduced to amend the parking ordinance. The ordinance prohibits parking on Maryville and Main Streets and the North and South parking lots from 2:00 A.M. thru 6:00 P.M. from November 1st thru April 1st. It also prohibits parking on the west side of Washington Street from South Street to Hancock from November 1st. thru April 1st. Motion by Kleve, second by Sabelka to approve the first reading of Ordinance # 359. Aye: Kleve, Sabelka, Huinker and Zweibahmer. All ayes. Motion by Huinker, second by Kleve to waive the second and third reading and the ordinance will be in effect upon publication. Aye: Kleve, Huinker, Zweibahmer and Sabelka. Motion carried. The proposed lease with Ace Communications for antennas and equipment to provide internet service to the Calmar area was discussed. The proposed lease is a 15 year lease with yearly option to renew after the 15 year time frame. The lease was reviewed by the City Attorney and he stated it is a standard lease. After discussion council felt 15 years was unacceptable. Motion by Kleve, second by Huinker to approve a 3 year lease with Ace Communications. Ayes: Kleve, Huinker, Zweibahmer and Sabelka. Motion carried. The City received a request to purchase a portion of Howard Street from an adjoining property owner. After discussion it was decided that they are not interested in selling the property at this time. Chad Schissel presented the Fire Department report. He stated they appreciate the wonderful community support for their Soup supper and Fire Truck parade. He reported on their meetings, training and calls for the month. Police Chief Joe Ward reported that there were several active ongoing investigations, and a search warrant was executed resulting in arrests. He reported receipt of

15

$ 2176.40 in forfeiture as part of the money seized from a search warrant in Calmar last fall. These funds are restricted to items not normally budgeted, so they can’t be used for payroll or normal equipment purchases). The street department report was discussed. Junior Boyer reported that work on the pool was in progress and that concrete deck was due to be poured on Thursday. The parking lot at the Washington Street location was discussed, also lighting of the parking lot area. The water/wastewater report was presented. All testing met requirements in October. Matt Bullerman reported that the NICC lift station was operable with a few problems still to be worked out but he is operating the facility at this time. He reported some control problems at the sewer plant with the computerized equipment that may need updating in the future. George Tekippe, City Engineer requested approval of a Contract Change Order for the West Street water improvement project. George explained why and what was included in the increased cost of the project in the amount of $ 14,257.20. Motion by Sabelka, second by Huinker to approve the contract change order in the amount of $ 14,257.20. Aye: Sabelka, Huinker and Zweibahmer. Nay: Kleve. Motion carried. Partial Payment Estimate # 2 to Reilly Construction in the amount of $ 11,031.88 was presented for approval. Motion by Zweibahmer, second by Huinker to approve PPE# 2 in the amount of $ 11.031.88 for Reilly Construction Co. Inc. Aye: Kleve, Huinker, Zweibahmer and Sabelka. Motion carried. PPE # 3 (final) in the amount of $ 5,642.91 was presented for approval. Motion by Zweibahmer, second by Huinker to approve PPE# 3( final) in the amount of $ 5,642.91 for Reilly Construction Co. Inc. Aye: Kleve, Zweibahmer, Huinker and Sabelka. Motion carried. Mayor Meyer congratulated the election winners. Mayor elect Keith Frana and new council member T.J. Schissel, and reelected member Dennis Kleve. Mayor Meyer reminded members of the upcoming meeting regarding housing concerns in the southern Winneshiek County area. This meeting is scheduled for 7:30 on Tuesday, November 12, 2013 at the Calmar Fire Station. Tax abatement and incentives to new businesses and residences were discussed. The council agreed to pursue this option. The proposed budget amendment was discussed. Motion by Sabelka, second by Zweibahmer to set the date for the public hearing for the Budget Amendment 20132014 for 7:00 P.M. on Monday, December 2, 2013. Aye: Kleve, Sabelka, Zweibahmer and Huinker. Motion carried. The recent audit information from Hacker, Nelson & Co., P.C. was presented to council members in the form of a written report as submitted to the State Auditor’s office. Motion by Kleve, second by Huinker to adjourn at 9:46 P.M. Aye: Zweibahmer, Sabelka, Kleve and Huinker. Motion Carried. Meeting adjourned. ATTEST: Michele Elsbernd, City Clerk Corey Meyer, Mayor

The Ossian City Council received an update from John Jenkins, construction manager of the fire station/shop construction project currently underway at its regular meeting on Monday, November 4th council meeting . Jekins reviewed several aspects of the project including: 4000 PSI concrete is being used on the project, weather permitting the steel columns are ready to go up, a bad batch of concrete will have to be removed and replaced by the concrete supplier, discussed drainage of the shop side’s driveway, flaking on an area of concrete in a doorway between the shop and community area will need to be taken care of by the contractor, a small section on the north side of the building will need some landscape block to avoid washing out the ground between the sidewalk and the building. The Council discussed DCCI’s (bldg/concrete contractor) Change Order #3 for removing an area of curb and for making the repairs to the street where the water service was put in. While there was no problem with the cost to repair the street but the Council had concerns over the cost to remove the curb. Jenkins was directed by the council to contact DCCI to clarify if the cost included any concrete. The Council also directed Jenkins to see what the cost would be to put exhaust systems in both the fire department and shop sides of the building. In other business: The city clerk reported the city attorney is working on the paperwork necessary for the incentives being offered to the Winneshiek Medical Center’s clinic that will be opening in the City. The Mayor and Council discussed the importance of having incentives in place for other Main Street storefront businesses that establish their business in Ossian. The city clerk was directed to continue working with the city attorney to achieve this. The council appointed Ree Meyer to serve as the City’s representative on the Winneshiek County Community Foundation Distribution Committee. The council approved a cigarette permit for Bambinos. The council approved building permits for Arnold Kriener, Ken & Karla Buchheit and Randy and Kim Tieskoetter. The council approved an ordinance amending provisions pertaining to parking regulations for it’s third and final reading. The mayor put the question on the motion and the following named Council members voted: The council also discussed the possibility of having the speed limit placed on the W42 south entrance into Ossian like it is on the W42 north entrance into Ossian was discussed. It would be an effort to help slow traffic down coming into the city. The council will research the matter further.

www.calmarcourier.com

Published in the Calmar Courier on November 12, 2013.

lawler council meeting Lawler Council moves forward with plans, grant application After months of work, the Lawler City Council approved a contract from Fehr Graham Engineering for design services at its Monday, November 4 meeting. George TeKippe, a Senior Project Manager for Fehr Graham out of West Union, was on hand to discuss the project, which includes upgrades to well #2 including iron sequestration. Following the presentation, the city council unanimously approved the proposal. In a related matter, the council also held a public hearing to solicit grant funds from the Iowa Economic Development Authority

for a Community Development Block Grant to assist with paying for the project. The project, estimated at $550,000, will seek $300,000 in CDBG funds for the project. If the grant is approved by the state, the city, in turn, intends to commit $250,000 in local matching funds for the project. In order to finance the city’s portion of the project, the council intends to apply to the State Revolving Fund loan program for financing assistance with the local match. In other business: The council approved an estimate from Don Mueterthies to remove trees in the fence line at the lagoon.


classified

16Calmar Courier Tuesday, November 12, 2013

help wanted Plumber needed at Becker Hardware, Ossian. 563-532-9120. 45-48d

help wanted Contact the Calmar Courier to place your ad: (563) 562-3488 or calmarcourier@hotmail.com

Shop Tech/Mechanic Pay varies by experience. Apply in person at: 301 S. Lincoln, Lawler. Questions, call: 563-238-3000.

card of thanks

card of thanks

My family and I would like to thank everyone who has delivered food, cards, and flowers to my Grandmother Alice Puffer’s home in rememberance of my Grandfather, Frank Puffer, who past away this past weekend. You kindness and generousity is greatly appreciated.

THANK YOU to everyone who contributed to the huge success of the Inwood Floor Replacement Fundraiser on Nov. 1. Donations are still welcome and can be made to Inwood Floor Replacement Fund and mailed to P.O. Box 26, Spillville, IA 52168. Thank you for helping preserve one of Winneshiek County’s treasures!

~ Carmen Broadbent & Family

tfn

For all your automotive needs!

Card Shower Honoring

notice

99 11th Avenue, Fort Atkinson (563) 534-7147

This is the LAST year for the government stimulus program for high efficienty furnaces. (Ends 12/31/13) Replace your old one, even if it is high efficiency, with a higher efficiency furnace with a 10 year parts warranty. For a free quote call: R&R Plumbing and Heating 563-562-3118

SEEKING VOLUNTEERS: To comply with Iowa State gender balance mandates on boards & commissions, the Winneshiek County board of Supervisors is solicitating female volunteers to serve on either the Planning and Zoning Commission or the Board of Adjustment. Interested parties may contact the County Zoning Administrator at: 201 West Main St., Decorah, IA 52101 or 563387-4080. thru 46

Donald & Catherine Huinker On Their 60th Wedding Anniversary November 17, 2013

Please send greetings to them at:

1023 172nd Ave. Ossian, Iowa 52161

unt ry To A CCou s tom F ra m in g u c h 563-380-3361

Janet Bodensteiner

New Location: 15598 Nature Rd., West Union

SOUTH WINN INSURANCE SERVICES LIMITED

105 S. Maryville, Calmar, IA Ph/Fax: (563) 562-3142

One of a kind property located along the Little Turkey River. Three bedrooms, three bathrooms, two-story solarium and attached garage For inspection of this property or more information, please contact Tom or Katie at Bushman Insurance & Real Estate, 563-532-9207.

Insuring Your Future...

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This property will be offered through sealed bids. All bidders are invited to a bid-off which will be held on Tuesday December 10th. (Time and location to be determined). All bids need to be turned in to the office of Bushman Insurance & Real Estate located in Ossian no later than Monday December 2nd.

Chris Holthaus 563-380-5460 | holthauselectric@hotmail.com Licensed & Insured Master Electrician Serving ALL of NE Iowa! New Homes |Remodels | Repair/Service Work | Phone/TV | Smoke Detector Systems | Light Fixture Sales Recessed Lighting | Energy Efficient Systems

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Address:

205 Jessie Street Ossian, IA

Maintenance Free Steel-Vinyl & Aluminum Siding

This one story home has 956 sq. ft. with two bedrooms, one bathroom and an attached onestall garage. For inspection of this property or more information, please contact Tom or Katie at Bushman Insurance & Real Estate, 563-532-9207.

t Complete Trim t I ns ulation t Seamless Alum. Gutter t S iding Alum/S teel Vinyl t S torm Windows & t Thermal Replacement Doors Windows

We challenge anyone, anywhere to match our Workmans hip and Prices ! R eferral Li s t Avai l abl e - Free Es ti mates

Adult Literacy

Don’t Start Over! The GED test expires December 13. You must complete all five tests by this date or be required to start over in 2014 with a new High School Equivalency Diploma (HSED) format.

The seller reserves the right to reject any and all bids.

Call today to complete the GED! This property will be offered through sealed bids. All bidders are invited to a bid-off which will be held on Tuesday, December 3rd. (Time and location to be determined). All bids need to be turned in to the office of Bushman Insurance & Real Estate located in Ossian no later than Monday, November 25th.

Property Owner:

Larry Tieskoetter

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solutions

Property Owner: Richard & Cynthia Davis Address: 207 1st Ave. NE Waucoma, IA


agriculture

Calmar Courier

17

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Iowa State University Extension Information for Northeast Iowa By Brian Lang, ISU Extension Agronomist 325 Washington St., Suite B, Decorah, IA 52101 563-382-2949 WEATHER Soil Temperatures at 40 F You can monitor soil temperatures at: http://extension. agron.iastate.edu/NPKnowledge/ CORN Field Dry Down & Drying Costs The following link connects you to a Wallace’s Farmer quoting mostly Iowa State University Agronomist Paul Kassel regarding field dry down rates of corn and grain drying costs versus potential field losses when delaying the harvest. With typical November weather, further dry down of grain in the field will be minimal. http://farmprogress.com/story-howmuch-more-iowa-corn-dry-downfield-9-104020 INSECTS Newest Version of the “Handy Bt Trait Table” Drs. Chris DiFonzo (Michigan State University) and Eileen Cullen (University of Wisconsin) recently updated and published their “Handy Bt Trait Table.” This easy-to-use reference provides information for transgenic hybrids on the types of Bt proteins expressed, insects controlled, herbicide tolerance, and refuge requirements for selected traits. For a copy, go to: http:// labs.russell.wisc.edu/cullenlab/ files/2013/11/Handy_Bt_Trait_Table. pdf SOIL FERTILITY Nitrogen Crediting for Fields with Cover Crops The following article from the University of Minnesota discusses potential N credits, or not, from cover crops towards next year’s crop. http://blog.lib.umn.edu/efans/ cropnews/2013/11/n-crediting-forfields-with-co.html Soil Fertility Considerations and Fallow Syndrome If your field was fallow this year, or grew a 100% brassica crop, you might have to deal with fallow syndrome next year. This article explains the issues and management options. http://blog.lib.umn.edu/ efans/cropnews/2013/10/soil-fertilityconsiderations.html COVER CROPS Termination Guidelines Recently, at an Iowa Crop Insurance Agents Conference, the agents were provided with the NRCS Cover Crop Termination Guidelines, available at: http://www.nrcs.usda. gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/ stelprdb1142986.pdf Conservation Compliance programs on HEL fields may also have an effect on when to terminate prevented planting acres. 2013 VARIETY TRIALS Iowa & Surrounding States Iowa State University

Most of the soybean trials and some of the corn trials are completed. Go to: http://www. croptesting.iastate.edu/ An oat variety trial report from the ISU Research Farm, Nashua is waiting final review, and will be available soon. South Dakota State University All crops posted at: http:// igrow.org/agronomy/other-crops/oatvariety-trial-results/ University of Illinois All crops posted at: http:// vt.cropsci.illinois.edu/ University of Minnesota All crops will be posted at this web site in Jan. 2014: http:// www.maes.umn.edu/Research/Crop_ Variety_Trials/ Early postings of some trials have just been released and are attached as a pdf file. University of Wisconsin Corn grain and corn silage: http://corn.agronomy.wisc.edu/ Soybeans: http://www. coolbean.info/soybean_research/ variety_trial_results_soybean.php Oats, barley and wheat: http:// www.coolbean.info/small_grains/ variety_trial_results_small_grains. php Alfalfa and other forages: http://www.uwex.edu/ces/forage/ alf13.htm EVENTS Nov. 6-20, Ag Outlook and Management Seminars (Pro-Ag), 10 locations statewide Nov. 14 at Waterloo and Mason City. The Ag Outlook and Management Seminars are designed to provide agribusiness leaders with a concise evaluation of current market conditions, expected trends in crop and livestock income potential and management implications. Highlights include: Corn & Soybean Market Outlook Information & Management Considerations by Chad Hart, Extension Grain Marketing Specialist; Swine & Beef Outlook Information & Management Considerations by Lee Schulz, Extension Livestock Economist or Shane Ellis, Extension Field Specialist. Dates, locations, registration and other information is available at: http://www.extension. iastate.edu/agdm/info/meetings.html Nov. 12, Cover Crop Field Day near Plainfield 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM. The Rick Juchems’ Farm near Plainfield along with Iowa Learning Farms and Practical Farmers of Iowa are hosting a cover crops field day. This is a free event with lunch provided. The field day includes discussion with Rick Juchems and Floyd County farmer Jon Gisleson about their experiences with cover crops. Rick Cruse, ISU Agronomy Professor, will review the benefits of cover crops. Terry

Basol, ISU Extension Agronomist will also be available for question and answer and to tour the cover crop demonstration site (includes oats, tillage radish, hairy vetch). The Rick Juchems farm is located at 33635 110th St., Plainfield, Iowa. From Plainfield, go 3 miles north on IA-27/US-218 N (Badger Avenue). Take a left on C13 (110th St.) and travel 0.7 miles to the farm (first homestead on the north side of the road). Parking is available on the west side of the house and the field day will be held in the heated shop. Nov. 13, Cover Crop Field Day near Postville 10:00 AM to Noon, hosted at the Don Elsbernd Farm, 809 Pole Line Road, Postville. This is a free event and free lunch to follow. Sponsored by Iowa Learning Farms, Practical Farmers of Iowa, and Iowa State University. The event will focus on cover crops for soil health and erosion reduction as part of the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy. The field day begins at the Elsbernd farmstead and attendees will then carpool to 3 nearby sites of cover crops. Upon return to the farm, Jacob Groth with Allamakee Co. NRCS will talk about the county’s aerial seeding program, financial assistance available from NRCS and state funds, and general cover crop observations from fields in the northeast Iowa area. The Don Elsbernd farm is located at 809 Pole Line Road, Postville, Iowa. From Postville, go north on Highway 51, approximately 5 miles to Co. Rd. W4B. Travel northwest on W4B about 1 mile to the first gravel road, which will be Pole Line Road. Take this north about 1.5 miles. The farmstead will be on the east side of the road. Nov. 14, Pro Ag Outlook & Management Seminar, Waterloo 9:00 AM - 11:00 AM at Tama Hall, Hawkeye Community College. The seminar is designed to provide agribusiness professionals and producers with an evaluation of current and outlook market conditions and expected trends in crop and livestock income potential. Registration fee is $20. Contact: Sheila Waltishek, 319-2346811, sheilaw@mail.iastate.edu Nov. 14-15, The 21st Annual Swine Disease Conference for Swine Practitioners, Ames Early registration ends Oct. 31. For conference details, go to: http://www.extension.iastate. edu/registration/events/conferences/ swine/register.html Nov. 15, Free Farm Income Tax Webinar from Your Computer or the Black Hawk County Extension Office, Waterloo 1:00 to 3:00 pm, log in on the internet or attend at the Black Hawk County Extension Office. No registration fee and no pre-

registration required. Program information and log in directions are available at: http://www.extension. iastate.edu/blackhawk/news/2013iowa-farm-income-tax-webinar Nov. 17-18, The 13th Annual Iowa Organic Conference, Iowa City National and local experts to provide the latest in organic agriculture production research at the University of Iowa, Memorial Union, 125 North Madison Street, Iowa City. Organic producers, consumers, conventional farmers, and others interested in science-based research in organic agriculture and practical applications for farming systems will find a wide variety of topics and speakers. Registration options are available on the conference website at https://www.signmeup. com/95221 Additional details about the conference are available at http://extension.agron.iastate.edu/ organicag/organicconference2013. html or by contacting Delate at 515294-7069 or kdelate@iastate.edu Nov. 19, Cover Crop Field Day near Holland 1:00 to 3:00 PM at the Fred Abel Farm, 20902 J Ave, Holland, Iowa. Come at noon for a chili lunch. Fred and others will discuss cover crops and cattle grazing. Sponsored by Iowa Learning Farms, Practical Farmers of Iowa, and Iowa State University. Dec. 2 & 11, Ag Chemical Dealer Update, Iowa City & Ames Dec. 2 at the Clarion Highlander Hotel and Conference Center, Iowa City. Dec. 11 at the Quality Inn and Suites/Starlight Village, Ames. Both run 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM. Meeting reviews the 2013 growing season and prepares seed, chemical and fertilizer dealers, crop consultants, farm managers and agronomists for the challenges of the 2014 crop production year. For registration and more information go to: http://www.aep.iastate.edu/acu/ Dec. 4. Advanced Swine Reproduction Seminar, Waverly 10:00 AM to 3:30 PM, $30 registration. More information to come...Dr. Don Levis, Dr. Jason Ross. Please e-mail mstorlie@ iastate.edu or phone 563-425-3331. Dec. 4-5, Integrated Crop Management Conference, Ames Get the latest information on crop production and protection technology. Choose from 30 conference workshops. Current topics of interest added to traditional conference topics include presentations on pest resistance to herbicides, fungicides and insecticides, and sustainable biofuel production using perennial plants. The conference is limited to 1,000 attendees and has filled to capacity the last several years. Early registration is encouraged to guarantee enrollment. Certified

Crop Adviser credits as well as recertification for Commercial Pesticide Applicators in categories 1A, 1B, 1C, 4 and 10 are available. Online registration can be made on the conference website at www.aep. iastate.edu/icm Dec. 10, Pasture Walk Grazing Event, Decorah 10:30 AM – Noon, hosted at the Dan Beard farm, 2954 Middle Sattre Rd., about 7 miles northeast of Decorah. Highlights include overwintering dairy cows, grazing turnips and other kales. Sponsored by Great River Graziers, Southwest WI. Dec. 10. PQA Plus, Fayette Co. Extension Office, Fayette 3:00 to 5:30 PM. $25 registration. Pre-registration is requested, with 5 participants needed to justify the session. Please e-mail mstorlie@iastate.edu or phone 563425-3331. Dec. & Jan., Evaluating Your Estate Plan Workshops, 10 locations statewide Dec. 13, Charles City. Jan. 27, Grundy Center. Jan. 29, Independence. This workshop will answer estate planning questions and prepare you for your future farm transitions and estate planning. Topics include: Language of Estate Planning, Property Ownership, Use of Business Entities, Transferring Decision Making Control, Gift, Estate & Inheritance Taxes, Calculating Retirement Costs, Setting Goals for Retirement or Farm Transition, and Steps for Implementing Your Estate Plan. All programs run from 9:30 AM to 4:00 PM, lunch is included. $50/person, payable to Extension Office at each site. Dates below are tentative and subject to change. For registration and additional information, go to: http://www. extension.iastate.edu/agdm/info/ meetings.html Commercial Pesticide Applicator Recertification Courses For a complete list of commercial programs for the various certification categories and participating locations around the state, visit the Commercial Applicator Training & Certification homepage at: http:// www.extension.iastate.edu/PME/ ComAp.html Nov. 13, Ag Weed, Ag Insect, and Ag Crop Disease, Cat. 1A, 1B, 1C and 10. Nov. 19, Fumigation, Cat 7C and 10. Dec. 4, General Household Pest, Termite, Public Health, 7A, 7B, 8 and 10 TBA Greenhouse, Ornamental Pest, Cat. 3G, 3O and 10. TBA Aerial Applicators, Cat. 11 and 10.


agriculture

18Calmar Courier Tuesday, November 12, 2013

December 1 is new seeding deadline Deadline fast Registration open for the 2013 Iowa Forage and Grassland Council approaching for for winter hardy cover crops Due to field conditions and re- tance was not received, NRCS still FSA programs Conference on Nov. 25 & 26 quests from Iowa farmers, USDA’s does not recommend tillage to deRegistration is now open for the Iowa Forage and Grassland Council’s (IFGC) Annual Conference. The event will be held on Monday, November 25 and Tuesday, November 26, 2013 at the Des Moines Airport Holiday Inn. Individuals interested in forage and grassland issues will gain knowledge on a variety of industry topics and techniques through presentations and discussions. IFGC strives to provide timely information to Iowa’s forage and grassland producers. This year’s conference sessions will feature presentations by Dr. Keith Summerville of Drake University, Stan Potrantz of Premier 1 Supplies, Ltd., David Otte of Green Valley Seed, Iowa producers and other industry experts. The speakers’ presentations will focus on livestock outlooks for beef and sheep, grazing to enhance native plant and animal communities, baleage, forage usage of cover crops, grazing

cover crops with cattle, and corn stalk grazing and feeding. On Monday evening, attendees are invited to a dinner and listening session sponsored by the Iowa Beef Center. Attendees will learn about recent Iowa Beef Center projects, discuss current beef and forage issues and identify priority programs for the future. Dinner is included for attendees who preregister by November 21st with the IFGC office at 515-262-8323 or Joe Sellers at the Iowa Beef Center at 641-203-1270. In addition to the educational sessions on Tuesday, the IFGC annual meeting will be held and awards will be presented to the 2013 IFGC Hay Producer and the 2013 IFGC Livestock/Grazing Producer following a banquet lunch. Conference registration and additional details are available at www.iowaforage.org or by calling the IFGC office at 515-262-8323.

Iowa physicians learn about beef and heart health Iowa family physicians needing Continuing Medical Education credits (CMEs) learned about a program to get FREE CME credits at the Iowa Academy of Family Physicians annual Clinical Education Conference held in Altoona on November 1. The beef checkoff shared the new BOLD (Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet) study at the meeting. Two one-hour web-based presentations are available for viewing online so physicians can get needed credits. The webinars, presented by The Pennsylvania State University researcher Michael Roussell, Ph.D., show the science behind how 4 ounces of lean beef a day (in a heart-healthy diet) can reduce LDL cholesterol by 10%. The second webinar covers practical information for doctors to help patients make dietary changes aimed at reducing cardiovascular disease. The checkoff-funded BOLD study was published last year in the January issue of the Ameri-

can Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Supporting resources for health professionals to counsel patients are available on BeefNutrition.org. “We are especially thankful to the Oklahoma Beef Council and the Oklahoma Academy of Family Physicians for creating the webinars and offering the CME program to Iowa physicians for no cost,” said Scott Niess, Osage, chair of the Iowa Beef Industry Council (IBIC). “We hope cattle producers will encourage their family physicians to take advantage of the free sessions to learn about beef’s nutrition package and its role in a heart-healthy diet,” adds Nancy Degner, IBIC Executive Director. The CME credits are offered through February 2015. Contact the IBIC for a flyer and “Dear Physicians” letter to give to physicians that explains the program. Call 515-2962305 or email beef@iabeef.org.

Winneshiek County USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) Executive Director, Julie A. Vulk, announced that producers who file accurate and timely reports for all crops and land uses, including failed acreage, can prevent the potential loss of FSA program benefits. Please pay close attention to the acreage reporting dates below, as some dates have changed for 2014. “In order to comply with FSA program eligibility requirements, all producers are encouraged to visit the Winneshiek County FSA office to file an accurate crop certification report by the applicable deadline,” said Vulk. Producers are encouraged to call and make an appointment at 563-382-8777. The following acreage reporting dates are applicable for Winneshiek County: December 15, 2013: Fall seeded small grains & perennial forage July 15, 2014: All other crops The following exceptions apply to the above acreage reporting dates: If the crop has not been planted by the above acreage reporting date, then the acreage must be reported no later than 15 calendar days after planting is completed. If a producer acquires additional acreage after the above acreage reporting date, then the acreage must be reported no later than 30 calendars days after purchase or acquiring the lease. Appropriate documentation must be provided to the county office. If a perennial forage crop is reported with the intended use of “cover only,” “green manure,” “left standing,” or “seed” then the acreage must be reported by July 15th (cover crops only). According to Vulk, Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) policy holders should note that the acreage reporting date for NAP covered crops is the earlier of the dates listed above or 15 calendar days before grazing or harvesting of the crop begins. For questions regarding crop certification and crop loss reports, please contact the Winneshiek County FSA office at 563.382.8777.

Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is further extending its deadline for seeding winter hardy cover crops to Dec. 1. “The extension applies to winter hardy cover crops, like winter rye, winter triticale and winter wheat, where the primary purpose for the practice is erosion control,” said Barb Stewart, NRCS state agronomist. “To be eligible for federal financial assistance, the cover crop needs to be no-till drilled into the existing crop residue.” This extension also applies to state-funded cover crops, such as those funded through the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy. Along with erosion control benefits, Jim Gillespie, division director for the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship-Division of Soil Conservation, says winter hardy cover crops will help keep phosphorus that may be attached to the soil out of nearby water bodies. “We can benefit by keeping the soil protected and also protecting the water,” said Gillespie. Farmers have also asked about using fall tillage to terminate prevented planted cover crops. “If the prevented planting cover crop was planted using state or federal funding, tillage is not allowed this fall,” said Stewart. “If financial assis-

stroy cover crops this fall because of the increased erosion risk.” For more information about cover crops, erosion control and other conservation issues, contact your local NRCS office.

Northeast Iowa Sales Commission Waukon, Iowa | (563) 568-4501 Wednesday, November 6, 2013 Fed Cattle

358 Head

High Yielding Choice Beef Strs & Hfrs

134-137

Choice Beef Steer & Heifers

130-134

Select & Choice Beef Steers & Heifers

130 & down

High Yielding Choice Holstein Steers

118-120.6

Choice Holstein Steers

115-118

Select & Choice Holstein Steers

115 & down

Cull Cows

226 Head

20% sold from

78-87

60% sold from

60-78

20% sold below

60 & down

Cull Bulls

20 Head

Most Bulls

94-102.5

(Thin, full, and bulls over 1 ton discounted)

94 & down

Calves

71 Calves

80% of Holstein Bull Calves brought from

100-230

Quality Holstein Heifer Calves Quality Beef Calves Light and Poor Quality Calves

November 6, 2013

26 consignors | 28 loads

100 & down

Feeder Cattle

816 Head

Beef Steers under 300 lbs.

NO TEST

Beef Steers 300 to 400 lbs.

195-220

Beef Steers 400 to 500 lbs

180-193

Beef Steers 500 to 600 lbs.

178-186

Beef Steers 600 to 700 lbs

163-173

Beef Steers 700 to 800 lbs

157-165

Beef Steers over 800 lbs.

161 & down

Beef Heifers under 300 lbs.

NO TEST

Description

$/ton

# loads sold

Beef Heifers 300 to 400 lbs.

180-190

1st Crop Small Squares

$185-200

2

Beef Heifers 400 to 500 lbs.

173-181

2nd Crop Small Squares

$275

1

Beef Heifers 500 to 600 lbs.

152-165

3rd Crop Small Squares

$215

1

Beef Heifers 600 to 700 lbs.

150-160

Grass Small Squares

$220

1

Beef Heifers 700 to 800 lbs.

145-157

2nd Crop Big Squares

$210-230

4

Beef Heifers over 800 lbs.

153 & down

3rd Crop Big Squares

$220-280

3

Holstein Steers 300 to 400 lbs.

125-140

Holstein Steers 400 to 500 lbs.

120-130

Holstein Steers 500 to 600 lbs.

115-126

Holstein Steers 600-700 lbs

117-124

Holstein Steers 700-800 lbs

117-123.5

Holstein Steers 800-1000 lbs

112-121.25 POT LD 920@121.25

Holstein Steers 1000 & Up

115 & down

4th Crop Big Squares

$155-230

2

1st Crop Rounds

$150-200

2

2nd Crop Rounds

$165-200

3

Grass Rounds

$120-150

4

Oat Hay Rounds

$130-150

2

New Seeding Rounds Conr Stalk Rounds Utility $85-175

Fair $175-220

$125

1

$50-80 Good $220-310

2

Premium $330-380


news

Calmar Courier

19

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

The Day “All Hell Broke Loose” Armistice Day—1940 Blizzard

By Joyce Meyer Since the anniversary of the Armistice Day Blizzard is upon us, it’s time to remind folks of that fateful day. Fewer people are here to tell us firsthand what happened in our community on November 11, 1940, when one of the deadliest blizzards the heartland has ever seen struck. The Armistice Day Storm killed 150 people. One of the most tragic chapters of the storm occurred on the rivers, lakes and wetlands of the Midwest. Hundreds of duck hunters, trapped by the storm, found themselves in a life-and-death struggle. There was practically no warning the blizzard was on its way. It is a Midwest moment forever frozen in time, certainly for us in Northeast Iowa. The fall of 1940 was a warm one. The war in Europe was frontpage news. Calmar native, Bea Frana, told me her story a few years ago when she was in her 90’s. She said she remembered that day clearly. Her and her late husband Ed were farming and Bea was excited to go to the Armistice dance in Ossian that night when she awoke to a beautiful Indian summer day. “It was just awful,” explains Bea. “The snow came so fast and the flakes were huge, bigger than I have ever seen.” In no time Iowa was blanketed with 20 inches of snow with a fierce wind causing a deathly blizzard. “We gathered up the animals and put them away. We managed to milk our cows, but not sure how we found our way to the barn and back that night.” Some people tied a rope to the house all the way to the barn to find their way back that night. “We were okay. The snow plow wasn’t able to get us plowed out for many days, but we hooked the horses up to the sleigh and were able to get to town after the storm was over. We even were able to go over fences since the snow was that high,” remembered Bea. Bea pulled out her scrapbook of days gone by and found some photos of her late husband Ed standing on a car and the snow on each side of the road that was as tall as him. The date on that particular photo was in 1935, but it was a prime example of another blizzard that they survived. Bea explained, “In the 1940 blizzard there was not time to take photos, we were busy caring for the animals and ourselves in the terrible cold and blizzard conditions.” Dick Frana of Calmar said he was farming in Ridgeway at the time. The day was beautiful and he was surprised to learn the school children were left out at 11 that

morning. It wasn’t long before the weather changed and Dick was out chasing chickens into the chicken coop. He milked his cows that night but he said the cream was what he sold, not the milk. The cream was safe from danger and he gave the milk to the hogs to eat. The late Louise Kapler of Fort Atkinson passed on her memories of that fateful day when she was teaching school at the time. The students walked to school on that mild fall day that changed in a hurry. First she recalls there was rain, then wind and when the temperature dropped the rain became sleet and then snow. Within a short time, a raging blizzard had taken hold of the Midwest. All the parents soon arrived to pick up their children and Louise went out to her car to go home and found the doors froze and even the wheels were frozen to the ground. Luckily, her brother-in-law Edward (Gladys) Wagner had the foresight to realize that Louise was in trouble and came and rescued her with his truck. Ruth Elsbernd, of Fort Atkinson remembers her late husband, Linus, being a bachelor at the time, farming by Calmar. Linus rounded up his chickens to put them in the hen house and a few got away and they flew up to roost in the tree branches and froze to death by morning. Cornelia Bina of Spillville remembers that day like it was yesterday. She was worried, wondering if she would ever see her husband again! Her late husband, Jim, and another man headed out early to do some carpentering work for people either in Burr Oak or Bluffton. She held her first child as she watched the weather increase in fury, but by late afternoon she was grateful that the men arrived home safely. They say that many duck hunters had taken time off from work and school to take advantage of the ideal hunting conditions and headed to the Mississippi River. Weather forecasters had not predicted the severity of the oncoming storm, and as a result many of the hunters were not dressed for cold weather. When the storm began many hunters took shelter on small islands in the Mississippi River, and the 50 mph winds and five foot waves overcame them. Some became stranded on the islands and then froze to death in the single-digit temperatures that moved in over night. Others tried to make it to shore and drowned. Duck hunters made up about half of the deaths. It was recorded that by the time the storm ended, it had

dropped more than two feet of snow, buried vehicles and roadways beneath 20-foot drifts, killed thousands of Iowa cattle, and destroyed incalculable amounts of poultry, including more than a million Thanksgiving turkeys. All told, the storm claimed 150 human lives. I heard the story about one survivor on an island near Harper’s Ferry who is still here to tell his story. Then sixteen-year-old Jack Meggers was one of the hunters who fought for his life that fateful day. As a retired Iowa game warden currently living in Mason City Meggers, has spent his fair share of time on the water. Yet today, no outdoor event remains more deeply imprinted on his mind than the morning of Nov. 11, 1940, and no wonder! This is his story: “It was Armistice Day (now called Veteran’s Day) and we were out of school. “Me, my Dad, and two brothers headed out to an island at Harper’s Ferry. One of the things I remem-

ber most is that, just before the storm hit, the sky turned all orange. It’s hard to explain, but I remember that it was really strange. The big winds arrived suddenly recalls Meggers, and with the wind came ducks. Not just a flock here or a flock there, but rather hundreds, then thousands, then tens of thousands. It was a scene seldom witnessed,” explained Meggers. “We’d never seen anything like it,” says Meggers. “When the ducks arrived, they came in unending waves and they came in all species. They lost no time in taking advantage of the astonishing flight. But although waterfowl continued to pour down in unending supply, connecting with the wind driven birds presented a major challenge, recalls Meggers. The boys concentrated so hard on the task at hand, that none of them seemed to notice as the winds began to attain hurricane force.” “All of a sudden, Dad said, ‘Grab the decoys --- We’re getting out of here.’ But we were throw-

ing an awful lot of ammunition into the air, and none of us wanted to quit. Then we began to see how bad the weather was getting.” Meggers’ Dad had made the right call. In addition to raging winds and unfathomable legions of ducks, the storm had also begun to deliver pelting rain which quickly turned to sleet, then heavy snow. Visibility dropped to near zero as hunters all up and down the Mississippi River struggled, sadly, many unsuccessfully, to return back to the shore. “It was really rough. By the time we finally made it to the shoreline, you couldn’t even see the shoreline,” Meggers recalls. “By then, the combination of snow and wind was just incredible. Our group made it back. But not everyone did.” Have the older members of your family tell their story, so you can pass the stories down to the next generation of that fateful day in history.

Dover No. 6 one room school house (Photo by Joyce Meyer)

It’s the time of year again when farmers roll out the combines and tractors to prepare for harvesting the precious grains of their labor. This harvest season, the South Winneshiek FFA has partnered with Farmers Union Cooperative to start a program designed to connect farmers to the largest organization supporting youth active in agriculture. The program is called “Bushels for Scholars”. This program invites farmers to donate a few bushels of corn at the time of delivery to Farmers Union Cooperative. Farmers in the Calmar, Ossian, or Castalia area may also make an appointment for a pickup time for a FFA member to collect the donation and transport it to the cooperative. The corn will then be transferred to a South Winneshiek FFA account. The AG marketing class will then watch the markets and make a decision as to when to sell the corn. The resulting proceeds would be distributed in the form of scholarships for students who have been active in the FFA program. Donations will be accepted through December 31. If you would like to donate or are have any questions call 563-419-6140. ~Logan Brincks, FFA President


news

20Calmar Courier Tuesday, November 12, 2013

The sunrise gave the Decorah’s Winneshiek County Courthouse foliage fabulous color in the early morning of Sunday, November 3. (Photo by Joyce Meyer) YESTERDAY from page 13 them as they come down. There was also a big sand pile with hidden pennies for children. At 7:30 in the evening, there would be fiddle and accordian playing contests. The Calmar Band provided music throughout the day. There was free sauerkraut, wieners and coffee served to everyone at noon hour. A later article listed winners of the farm exhibits at this Farmer’s Day. County Agent Dack of the Winneshiek Co. Farm Bureau, acted as judge for this activity. A partial listing of winners follows. 1st Prize Exhibit of Corn, Truman Brookner; 1st Prize Single Ear Corn, Eline Sandager; 1st Prize Yellow Corn, Ed Fristad; 1st Prize Mixed Corn, Frank Schneberger. 1st Prize Display of Apples, Louis Meyer; 1st Prize Peach Melon, Pearl Brookner; 1st Prize Mexican Gourd, Donald Krysan; 1st Prize Display Pumpkin, W. J. Timp; 1st Prize, largest pumpkin, Edward Hosting; 1st Prize Best Pumpkin, L. G. Gehling. Next time, we venture into 1927, for more interesting news of that time.

On Thursday, November 7th, the bipartisan committee completed two days of discussions on the state of emergency medical services in Iowa, and possible improvements. Legislators are interested in ways to ensuring that all Iowans have access to high quality, life-saving emergency medical services, regardless of where they live. A key goal is to better support the volunteers who make up the majority of Iowa’s EMTs. Senator Mary Jo Wilhelm, D-Cresco, herself a former FILM from page 6 Admission is free to the 7 p.m. event in downtown Decorah on the second floor of T-Bocks, who is helping sponsor the screening. All attendees will get free popcorn. There will be a cash bar. Short films predating 1908, as well as “magic lantern slides,” will be shown as Zahs shares anecdotes and history. Zahs bought the entire collection in 1981. He is now working with the University of Iowa on restoring and digitizing the films. Decorah attendees will be the only people in the world watching these films, as these are the only copies in existence. “These films predate what most people think of as old films,” said

EMT, pushed to create the Emergency Medical Services Study Committee after Governor Branstad vetoed legislation she sponsored that would have created a task force with a similar mission. Right: Committee Co-Chair and State Senator Mary Jo Wilhelm, D-Cresco, listens to testimony from Orville Randolph, President of the allvolunteer Bennett Ambulance Service during a meeting of the Emergency Medical Services Study Committee at the Iowa Statehouse.

Zahs in a recent interview with the Cedar Rapids Museum of Art. “Some are as old as 1894.” “Those who attend this showing will enjoy Michael’s commentary and marvel at these films, not only because of their age and quality, but because they still grip our imaginations and allow us to witness actual events from over 100 years ago,” said Nancy Sojka, Oneota Film Festival president. “This may be the most significant collection of pre-1900 movies in the world. That the Brinton collection survived is a wonder.” Frank Brinton died in 1917. The younger Indiana lived in Washington, Iowa, until her death in 1955.

Three pickup truck loads from the couple’s early touring days lay untouched and forgotten in the basement of the estate’s executor in Washington. When the executor died, his son discovered the films, film catalogs, and trove of magic lantern slides, posters, photos and financial records detailing every engagement the couple had. This event is part of an Oneota Film Festival membership drive and precursor to the full festival, Feb. 28-Mar. 2, 2014. Membership in the 2014 Oneota Film Festival will be offered at the November 17 screening. All memberships are $25, though donations of greater amounts are welcome.

Members receive exclusive invitations to festival events, discounted meal tickets at the Festival, and more! Membership dollars help to bring working filmmakers and more new films to Decorah. Oneota Film Festival (www. oneotafilmfestival.org) is a nonprofit corporation formed by local film enthusiasts. OFF is made possible by the generous support of sponsors and donors across the regional community, including Luther College, Oneota Food Coop, Decorah Bank & Trust, and in-kind support from the Decorah Public Library.


Calmar nov12