Page 1

School Catalog  

  2019-2020  “For the Generations to Come”     


1

Table of Contents  

GENERAL INFORMATION

Access Administration Accreditation Campus History Important Policies and Procedures Location Mission and Purpose

4 4  4  5  6  9  10  10 

A Shared Cost Admissions Requirements Admitting and Dismissing Application for Admission Delinquent Accounts Financial Aid Financial Matters in Detail Good Standing Graduation Grants High School Placement Test International Students Non-Discriminatory Policy Payment Pre-registration Tuition, Room, and Board Fees Travel Aid Grants

12 12  13  13  13  14  17  17  18  18  19  19  19  20  20  21 

Academic Counseling Academic Schedule Academic Standing Academic Transcripts Attendance Policy

21 22  24  24  25 

ENROLLMENT

ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

Return to the Table of Contents


2

Course Description - Freshman Course Description - Sophomore Course Description - Junior Course Descriptions - Senior Course Description - Junior/Senior Electives Course Description - Courses for International Students Courses in Piano and Organ Curriculum Rationale Summary of Enrollment and Graduation Requirements MLS Curriculum Map MLS Course Sequence Expulsion from Class Focus on the Public Ministry Grade Reports Make-up Work Period Ten Academic Detention Promptness Study Halls Chromebook and Technology Textbooks Unexcused Absences Extracurricular Appeals

27 28  30  31  33  35  35  36  37  38  43  50  50  51  52  54  54  56  56  57  68  69  69 

Athletic Competition Broad-based Learning Extracurricular Code Performance Opportunities Project Titus Publications Student Leadership

71 71  72  74  75  75  76 

Announcements Boy/Girl Relations Campus Life Care of School Property

76 76  77  77 

COCURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

STUDENT LIFE

Return to the Table of Contents


3

Controlled Substances Dining Hall Dormitory Living Dress Code Drills and Security Employment Free Time Guests Health Services MLS Directory Motor Vehicles Taking Care The Seminary Family Things Forbidden Worship

78 78  79  80  81  82  82  82  83  83  83  84  84  86  86 

Faculty and Instructors Governing Board Professors Emeriti                    

87 89  89 

ADMINISTRATION

Return to the Table of Contents


4

GENERAL INFORMATION

Access  

Saginaw is  easily  reached  by  Interstate 75 and its urban spur I-675, or by way  of  the  MBS  International  Airport  which  is  located  twelve  miles  northwest  of  MLS  and  is  served  by  several  major  airlines.  MLS  can  be  reached  from  any  part of the U.S. by plane, train, bus, or private car.    Rev. 07/2018 

Administration  

Michigan Lutheran  Seminary  is  one  of  four  schools  that  the  Wisconsin  Evangelical  Lutheran  Synod  (WELS)  operates  and  supports  in  its  ministerial  education system.    School  policy  is  established  by  a  governing  board,  eight  men  elected  by  the  synod  and  its  districts.  The  MLS  president  administers  the  school.  MLS  coordinates  its  work  with  the  other  three  synod  schools  through  the  ​WELS  Board  for  Ministerial  Education  (BME).  The  presidents  of  MLS,  of  the  Michigan  District,  and  of  the  synod  at  large,  together  with  the  administrator  of  the  BME, serve as advisory members of the MLS board.    Rev. 06/2017 

Accreditation  

Michigan Lutheran  Seminary  is  accredited  by  two  organizations.  One  is  the  Wisconsin  Evangelical  Lutheran  Synod  School  Accreditation  program  (WELSSA)  in  conjunction  with  the  National  Council  for  Private  School  Accreditation  (NCPSA).  The  second  is  the  Middle  States  Association  -  Commissions  on  Elementary  and  Secondary  Schools  (MSA-CESS).  The  school  is  licensed  by  the  Michigan  Department  of  Education  to  operate  as  a  boarding school.   

Return to the Table of Contents


5

Campus  

Rev. 08/2017

The MLS  campus  occupies  a  triangle  of  land  bordered  by  Bay  Street  on  the  east,  Hardin Street on the north and Court Street, which runs diagonally from  northwest  to  southeast.  Six  main  units  comprise  the  Seminary  complex.  The  units  are  interconnected  by  corridors  so  students  do  not  need  to  venture  outside in inclement weather.    The  school’s  main  entrance  at  2777  Hardin  Street,  enters  upon  a  sky-lit,  vaulted  foyer  that  displays  the  hand-carved  seals of Martin Luther and of the  Wisconsin  Synod  at  either  end.  On  the  east  wall  of  the  foyer  is  a  brick  mural  featuring  the  MLS  seal  and  the  words  of  the  Seminary  hymn,  “God's  Word  Is  Our  Great  Heritage.”  Facing  the  mural  is  the  student  commons,  a  general  gathering area that also serves as lunch area for commuting students.    Beyond  the  mural  wall  lies  a  1400-seat  gymnasium,  along with locker rooms,  weight  room,  trainer’s  room,  and  a  mezzanine  practice  area.  South  of  the  gymnasium  and  nearly  at  the  heart  of  the  Seminary  complex  is  the  400-seat  chapel/auditorium.  This  space  is  used  for  campus  worship  each  school  day.  Its  seating  is  reconfigured  to  face  the  adjoining  stage  for  special  programs,  dramatic productions, and smaller concerts.    Two  classroom  wings  flank  Court Street. Four floors are arranged around the  chapel/  auditorium.  To  the  east  are  rooms for the sciences, languages, math,  technology,  and  the  humanities.  To  the  south  and  west  are  rooms for piano,  band  and  choral  work.  The  lower  level houses the library, girls' locker rooms,  technology office and the Board Room and offices.    Inside  the  Court  Street  entrance  between  the  two  classroom  wings  are  the  offices  of  the  MLS  Foundation  which  supports  that  mission  of MLS.  school’s  Business Office.    At  the  corner  of  Court  and  Hardin  Streets  a  five-level  T-shaped  dormitory  houses  250  students  in  separate  residence  halls  for  boys  and  girls.  Students  and  dorm  supervisors  live  chiefly  on  the  top  three  floors.  The  ground  floor  Return to the Table of Contents 


6

entrances open  into  a  lobby  and  dorm  office  shared  by both residence halls.  Also  on  the  ground  floor  are  rooms  for  supervised  study,  game  rooms,  lounges,  a  fitness  room,  laundry  facilities,  and  the  school  nurse's  office.  Meals  are  served  in  the  dining  hall on the lowest level. Space is also set aside  on that level for the recruitment program and a movie theater.    Completing  the  circuit  of  the  campus  are  the  business  and  administrative  offices and a faculty lounge area.     Tucked  inside  the  circle  of  buildings  is  the  sunken  garden,  an  attractively  landscaped  outdoor  gathering  place  for students. North of Hardin Street, the  maintenance  shop  stands  beside  the  main  parking  lot.  The  football  field and  softball diamond lie south of Hardin, just east of the gymnasium.    MLS  Cardinal Field is located 1.2 miles northwest of the main campus at 4300  N.  Mackinaw.  The MLS baseball diamond, track, and athletic practice area are  found there.     The  members  of  the  Wisconsin  Synod  have  provided  MLS  with  outstanding  facilities  to  carry  out  the  school’s  purpose.  We  thank  God  for  his  grace  that  inspires the generosity of his people, as we seek to be faithful in the use of all  that God’s goodness supplies.    Rev. 08/2019 

History  

Michigan Lutheran  Seminary  began  in  1885  when  one  teacher  and  six  students  assembled  in  Manchester,  Michigan.  Lutherans  in  Michigan  felt  a  need  to  train  pastors  to  serve  a  growing  number  of  immigrant  congregations.  In  1887  Pastor  Christoph  Eberhardt  of St. Paul's congregation  in  Saginaw  donated  two  near-by  acres  of  land  on  Court  Street.  This  led  the  Michigan  Lutheran  Synod  to  move  MLS  to  its  present  location  and  to  dedicate Old Main, the school's first building, later that year.    

Return to the Table of Contents


7

When the  Michigan,  Wisconsin, and Minnesota Synods federated in 1892, the  new  confederation  decided  to  convert  MLS  into  a  preparatory  school.  Disagreement  over  this  change  split  the  Michigan Synod. MLS continued as a  pastor-training  seminary  until  dwindling  enrollments  forced  it  to  close  its  doors  in  1907.  Pastors  Lange,  Huber,  Hoyer,  Linsemann,  and  Beer  led  the  school from 1887-1907.    By  1910,  the  Michigan  Synod  had  re-established  its  ties  with  Wisconsin  and  Minnesota.  The  confederation  called  Pastor  Otto  J.  R.  Hoenecke  to  open  MLS  as  a  preparatory  school.  Five  students  enrolled  on  September  13,  1910.  In  1913,  the  school  added  a  dormitory  to  house  fifty  students.  By  the  end of the  1920s,  four  teachers  served  an  enrollment  of  seventy-five.  The  MLS  Club,  a  forerunner  of  today's  Booster  Club  appeared.  The  campus  added  two  professors' homes in 1920 and 1924 and a dining hall in 1925.    Growth  slowed  during  the  1930s  but  picked  up  after  World  War  II.  Pastor  Conrad  Frey  succeeded  Director  Hoenecke  in  1950.  To  accommodate  the  growing  student  body,  MLS  built  a  combination  classroom  building/gymnasium  next  to  Old  Main.  The  dining  area  was  expanded  twice,  in  1948  and  1954.  In  1963  Old  Main  was  finally  torn  down  and  a  science/music wing with a student union was added.    In  1966,  Pastor  Martin  Toepel  succeeded  President  Frey.  Ten  years  later  a  dormitory  structure  made  it  possible  for  all  students  to  live  on  campus.  Previously,  some  girls  lived  in  off-campus  dormitories  and  some  upper-class  boys and girls lived in nearby private homes.     In  1978,  Pastor  John  Lawrenz  succeeded  President  Toepel.  Two  years  later,  MLS  added  an  expanded  cafeteria  on  the  lower  level  of  the  dormitory.  In  1985  the  three  existing  campus  buildings  were  melded  into  a  single  unit.  New  construction  provided  a  gymnasium  large  enough  for  girls'  and  boys'  athletics,  a  student  commons  off  the  main  entrance,  additional  office  space,  a  computer  classroom,  expanded  parking,  and  a  new  maintenance  building.  On  a new section of property a mile and a quarter from its main campus MLS  developed  a  ball  diamond,  a  400-meter  oval  track,  and  athletic  practice  space.  Return to the Table of Contents 


8

In  1994,  Pastor  Paul  Prange  succeeded  President  Lawrenz.  Shortly  after  the  campus  population  reached  its largest enrollment in the school's history, just  over  380 students. In recent years, MLS has continued to upgrade its facilities  by  reconfiguring all dormitory study space, refurbishing most of its dormitory  rooms, equipping its library and all classrooms and offices with infrastructure  to allow ready access to developing technologies, and installing in its chapel a  22-rank  pipe  organ.  A  new  two-story  science  wing,  new  music  rooms,  and  a  renovated  commons  and  dining  hall  were  dedicated  to  the  glory  of  God  in  2003.    In  2009  President  Paul  Prange  became  the  administrator  for  the  synod’s  Board  for  Ministerial  Education.  He  was  succeeded  by  Pastor  Aaron  Frey  in  February of 2010.      In  connection  with  the  100​th  Anniversary  of  MLS  in  2010,  the  chapel  was  remodeled  and  refurbished  including  the  re-upholstering  of  the  chapel  seating.    After  the  resignation  of  President  Frey,  President  Joel  Petermann  was  installed in 2012.      The  summer  of  2014  brought  more  changes  and  upgrades  to  the  MLS  campus.  Thanks  to  the  efforts  of  the  MLS  Foundation,  the  MLS  dormitories  received  an  overhaul  at  the  cost  of  about  $600,000.  This  included  new  paint  in  all  the  rooms  and  hallways,  new furniture built and installed by RT London  of  Grand  Rapids,  MI,  new  carpet  squares,  new  electric  heaters  and  new  window  treatments.  In  addition,  the  dormitories  were  the  last  areas  to  have  WiFi  installed  so  that  the  entire  MLS  campus  now  has  WiFi  available  to  students,  faculty  and  guests  throughout  the  campus.  The  other  major  addition  is  the  fact  that  all  students  received  laptop  computers  on  registration  day  to  be  used  for classes in place of some textbooks and also in  place of the old computer labs.     In  the  summer  of  2016  a new landmark was added to the MLS campus. A gift  from  a  group  of  donors,  a  statue  of  Martin  Luther  on  a  granite  base  now  Return to the Table of Contents 


9

greets alumni,  friends  and  visitors  as  they  enter  the  campus  from  Hardin  Street.  This  statue  is  a  reminder  that  this  school  remains  to  train  those who,  like Martin Luther, are servants of the gospel of Jesus Christ.     In  the  summer  of  2017  MLS  embarked  on  a  remodeling  project  that  would  consolidate  administration  personnel  in  one  area  in  the  school.  New  offices  were  created  in  the  area  on  the  Hardin  street  side  of  the  school  that  once  served  as  a  computer  lab.  In  this  area  a  room  was  also  developed  for  the  Cardinal’s  Nest,  the  campus  store.  In  the  area  that  used  to  be  the  faculty  room,  additional  offices  for  support  personnel  were  also created as well as a  faculty  workroom,  restrooms  and  a  lounge  for  faculty  and  staff.  This  project  therefore  also  included  the  creation  of  a faculty lounge in the Academic wing  (50’s  building)  and  moving  the  faculty  meeting  room  to  the  area  in  the lower  level  of the 60’s addition. The MLS foundation offices were then moved to the  previous  Business  Office  location.  Some  smaller  changes  were  also  made  to  the  location  of  technology  and  faculty  study  areas.  It  is  proven  to  greatly  streamline  the administration of MLS through better communication and use  of support personnel.     In  2018,  Pastor  Mark  Luetzow  of  Bethel  Lutheran  Church  in  Bay  City,  MI  accepted  the  call  to  succeed  President  Petermann  as  the  8th  President  of  MLS.      While  outward  changes  must  continue  in  order  to  meet  the  needs  of  a  growing  Seminary  Family, what is most important at MLS—our great heritage  of  God’s  Word  and  the  vital  work  of  preparing young people to proclaim that  Word to others—remains unchanged.    Rev. 08/2019 

Important Policies and Procedures  

Policies and  procedures  are  set  up  for  the  good  of  all.  They  guide  us  in  our  expression  of  Christian  love  and  concern  for  each  other  and  for  our  Savior.  Sensible  regulations  are  also  to  keep  our  sinful  nature  in  check.  When  in  doubt,  ask.  When  unable  to  ask,  do  what  is  God-pleasing  and  courteous. 

Return to the Table of Contents


10

Should you  believe  that  a policy needs review or modification, speak with the  president,  the  dean,  or  a  member of the faculty. Students who have difficulty  keeping  the  rules  of  the  Seminary  family  may  be  suspended  or  expelled.  Suspension  means  that  a student's continued enrollment at MLS is "up in the  air"  until  the  matter  can  be  resolved  by  parents,  the  student,  and  the  president.  Suspended  students  do  not  participate  in  any  school  functions  or  classes.  Expelled  students  must  go  through  the  admission  process  to  be  considered for readmission.    Rev. 08/2018 

Location  

The Seminary  campus  is  located  in  a  pleasant  residential  neighborhood  on  the  west  side  of  Saginaw,  Michigan.  The  city  is  part  of  a  metropolitan  area  with  a  population  of  approximately  90,000  (2017).  Saginaw  is  a  regional  center  for  Michigan’s  automotive  industry.  The  region  offers  opportunities  for  employment as well as for cultural and recreational activities. Its hospitals  and  clinics  serve  all  of northern Michigan. The Saginaw area is served by four  WELS  churches  and  one  ELS  congregation,  as  well  as  by  two  WELS  elementary schools and one pre-school.    Rev. 08/2019 

Mission and Purpose  

The special  purpose  of  Michigan  Lutheran  Seminary  is  to  prepare  high  school  students  for  the  public  ministry  of  the  gospel,  encouraging  them  to  enroll in the WELS College of Ministry, Martin Luther College.    Philosophy  Michigan  Lutheran  Seminary  (MLS)  serves  the  Wisconsin  Evangelical  Lutheran Synod (WELS) as it  ● Sustains  a  campus  life centered in the Word of God as it is professed in  the Lutheran Confessions.  ● Uses  the  means  of  grace  so  that  the  Holy  Spirit  encourages  all  students  to consider full-time service in the public ministry.  Return to the Table of Contents 


11

● Promotes the  high calling of the public ministry of the gospel through the  recruitment  and  retention  of  qualified  students  and  through  positive  modeling of the ministry by faculty members.  ● Prepares  students  for  admission  to  MLC  through  a  balanced  and  challenging  curriculum  in  religion,  languages,  sciences,  math,  history  and  the  arts,  with  special  emphasis  on  vocal  and  instrumental  music  skills.  ● Deals  evangelically  with  every  member  of  the  campus  family  as  a  redeemed  child  of God, using law and gospel while offering counseling,  encouragement, and loving Christian discipline.  ● Assists  international  students  in  developing  skills  to  continue  the  pursuit  of  gospel  ministry  in  the  United States and in their country of  origin.  ● Encourages  all  students  to  use  their God-given talents in the areas  of  academics,  performance,  competition,  social  life  and  Christian  service.  ● Regards  seriously  the  great  trust  that  parents  and  guardians  place  in  MLS,  dealing  with  students  in  a  manner  reflecting  our  role  as  caretakers and parental representatives.    Objectives  ● To  nurture  the  Christian  faith  through  regular  and  varied  worship  opportunities.  ● To provide age-appropriate ministry experiences for students.  ● To  offer  students  guided  extracurricular  activities  as  an  important  supplement to the academic program.  ● To give students experience with various forms of modern technology.  ● To  help  international  students  adjust  to  the  cultural  and  spiritual  realities of living on an American campus.  ● To maintain a faculty and staff dedicated to the school’s purpose.  ● To promote and facilitate the professional development of the faculty.  ● To provide a quality facility that meets the needs of MLS.  ● To practice faithful stewardship of financial resources.  ● To provide and administer adequate sources of financial aid.      Return to the Table of Contents 


12

Vision ● To be a solid voice for Lutheran doctrine and practice.  ● To  adopt  best  practices  in  education  that  keep  methodology  in  tune  with the times, while maintaining the school’s purpose.  ● To strive for a greater percentage of graduates who enroll at MLC.  ● To  strive  for  a  greater  percentage  of  student  enrollment  from  outside  the Michigan District.  ● To  proactively  monitor  and  address  the  adequacy,  maintenance,  and  safety of the facilities.   ● To be aware of opportunities to expand the footprint of the campus. 

Enrollment

Rev. 05/2017   

A Shared Cost  

The Wisconsin  Evangelical  Lutheran  Synod  pays  about  one  third  of  the  educational  costs for each student at MLS.  The members of the WELS do this  as  an  investment  in  the  future  ministry  of  the  church.  The  balance  of  costs  for  tuition,  room  and  board,  and  other  services  are  borne  by  the  student's  parents  or  guardians.  In  this  way,  the  expense  of  attending  MLS  is  truly  a  shared cost.    Rev. 07/2018 

Admissions Requirements  

Applicants are  to  be  baptized  and  confirmed  members  of  the  Wisconsin  Evangelical  Lutheran  Synod  or  of  churches  within  its fellowship.  Exceptions  are made when an applicant's membership is pending.    Incoming  freshmen  must  have  completed  the  eighth  grade  with  acceptable  marks  and  have  the  recommendation  of  their  pastor  and  their  most  recent  supervising  teacher.  A  pre-admission  test  is  administered  at  MLS,  or  individually  by  special  arrangement.  Students  wishing  to  transfer  into  the  Return to the Table of Contents 


13

10th, 11th,  or  12th  grades  are  to  submit  a  transcript  of  their  previous  high  school work with their application.    All  new  students  must  provide  a  record  of  a  physical  examination  received  during  the  same  calendar  year  as  enrollment,  as  well  as  proof  of  required  immunization.  Students  intending  to  participate  in  interscholastic  athletics  require  a  physical  exam annually.  These athletic physicals must be received  after  April  15  to  qualify  for  the  next  year  of  competition.  All  students  must  provide a record of a physical examination before their junior year begins.  MLS  requests  that  the  school  be  notified  as  soon  as  possible  if  a  student  who has applied for admission elects to attend high school elsewhere.    Rev. 07/2018 

Admitting and Dismissing  

The president  of  MLS  admits  and  dismisses  students.  An  admissions  committee  advises  him  on  admissions.  The  president  may  seek  advice  regarding  dismissals  from  his  colleagues,  as  well  as  from a student's parents  and  pastor.  Decisions regarding admissions and dismissals may be appealed  to the president alone.    Rev. 07/2018 

Application for Admission  

Application for  enrollment  at  MLS  may  be  made  at  any  time  during  the  year  preceding  the  start  of  school.  It  is  best  if  applications  can  be  submitted  by  the  month  of  April  prior  to  the  new  school  year.  There  is  no application fee.  A  student  need  only  apply  for  enrollment  when  coming  to  MLS  as  a  new  student;  returning  students  need  not  reapply.  Students  may  apply  online  at  www.mlsem.org​.  Applications  are  handled  by  an  online  service  called  TADS.  Click  here  to  apply​.  If  students  have  no  internet  connection,  please  contact  the MLS administration office at 989-793-1010.    Rev. 07/2018 

Return to the Table of Contents


14

Delinquent Accounts  

MLS expects  parents  experiencing  financial  difficulties  to  contact  the  President  and/or  the  MLS  Business  Office  immediately  to  discuss  special  arrangements.  Failure  to  keep  payments  current  may  jeopardize a student’s  continued enrollment at MLS.    A  student  with  a  delinquent  account  who  has  not  made  special  arrangements  with  the  Business  Office  is  subject  to  suspension  and/or  termination  of  enrollment  by  the  President.  That  student  may  not  be  readmitted  for  a  new  semester  if  an  account  is  delinquent  and  satisfactory  arrangements  with  the  school  have  not  been  made.  In  addition,  students  with  delinquent  accounts  who  have  not  made  arrangements  with  the  Business  Office  may  not  be  allowed  to  participate  in  any  preseason  athletic  camps,  and  automobile  privileges  may  be  limited  or  revoked.  Student  accounts  must  be  in  good  standing  in  order  to  charge  extracurricular  or  incidental  items  to  that  account.  No transcript of credits may be sent and no  diploma  may  be  released  to  another  school  unless  and  until  a  student’s  account is paid in full.    Rev. 08/2019 

Financial Aid

In support  of  its  mission,  MLS  has  determined  that  financial  aid  is  an  important  tool  that  allows  students  the  opportunity  to  pursue  and  benefit  from the training MLS offers.    As  financial  aid  is  a  grant,  not  a  loan,  repayment  is  not  required.  It  can  be  considered  an  investment  in  the  future of our synod. Through the support of  the  Wisconsin  Evangelical  Lutheran  Synod  (WELS)  and  generosity  of  many  benefactors  –  loyal  alumni,  current  parents,  past  parents,  and  other  supporters  –  MLS  continues  to  be  able  to  make  a  Lutheran,  college  preparatory  education  affordable  and  accessible  to  students  of  diverse  backgrounds and means.   

Return to the Table of Contents


15

MLS views  the  education  of  each  student  as  a  partnership  between  the  school,  the  WELS,  and  the  student’s  family.  MLS  believes  that  all  families,  regardless  of  their  individual  situation,  must  contribute  some  amount  financially  to  support  their  child’s  education.  Even  if  a  modest  amount,  making  regular  tuition  payments  signals  a  family’s  commitment  to  participating  in  the  mission  of  MLS.  While  a  financial  aid  award  may  make  it  possible  for  a  child  to  attend  MLS,  it  will  also  require  each  family  to carefully  plan,  budget,  and  sacrifice  in  order  to  demonstrate  that  MLS’s  tuition  is  a  financial priority.    Financial  aid  is awarded on an annual basis, and families requesting aid must  reapply  each  year.  Students  need  not  be  enrolled  at  MLS  to  apply  for  financial  aid;  however,  an  award  is  not  a  guarantee  of  acceptance  to  the  school.  In  addition  to  receiving  an  award,  the  student  must  meet  all  admissions  and  enrollment  requirements.  The  MLS  financial  aid  award  process  does  not  discriminate  based  on  race,  color,  or  national  and  ethnic  origin.    Financial  aid  awards  are  based  primarily  on  the  applicant’s  demonstrated  financial  need  and  an  evaluation  of  each individual situation. MLS recognizes  that  each  family’s  situation  is  unique  and  must  be  subject  to  both  objective  and subjective analysis when reaching a decision as to any amount awarded.    MLS  partners  with  a  third-party online service (TADS) to manage the financial  aid  applications  and  calculate  the  level  of  demonstrated  need  of  each  applicant.  Other  factors  considered  may  include  the  occurrence  of  siblings  also  enrolled  at  another  WELS  ministerial  education  school,  travel  distance  from  school,  and  the  student’s  demonstrated  ministry  intent.  MLS  has  established  a  Financial  Aid  Committee  which  carefully  considers  the  analysis  provided  by  TADS;  however,  all  award  decisions  are  made  solely  by  the  Financial Aid Committee.    Depending  on  factors  such  as  the  number  of  applicants  and  overall  budgetary  constraints,  MLS  may  not  have  the  capacity  to  meet  the  full  demonstrated  need  of  all  financial  aid  applicants  in  a  given  year.  In  such  a 

Return to the Table of Contents


16

case, MLS  will  provide  an  award  that  equals  the  highest  percentage  of  the  demonstrated financial need as school resources allow.    Financial  information  submitted  by  families  in  support  of  aid  applications  is  held  in  confidence  by  MLS  and  the  Financial  Aid  Committee.  Likewise,  information  regarding  individual  awardees  and  award  amounts  does  not  become  public  information.  Parents  are  expected  to  keep  their  financial  aid  awards confidential and not discuss them with other families.    The  Wisconsin Synod wants no young person to be denied the opportunity to  prepare  for  the  public  ministry  solely  for  financial  reasons.  For  this  reason,  every  student  at  MLS  receives  more  than  $6000  in  financial  aid  annually  in  the  sense  that  the  education  costs  of  each  student  are  subsidized  to  that  degree  by  the  WELS.  In addition, MLS distributes individual tuition aid grants  from  the  WELS  Student  Aid  Fund  and  from  various private funds.  More than  half  of  MLS  students  apply  for  financial  aid  each  year;  about  80  percent  of  those who apply for financial aid will receive a grant.      Grant  amounts  are  based  on  financial  need  but  are  also  related  to  a  student's  expressed  commitment  to  attend  Martin  Luther  College.  Students  who  apply  are  asked  to  write  an  essay  relating  their  life  goals.  As  students  move  closer  to  graduation,  whether  they  intend  to  go  on  to  MLC  or  not  affects  more  significantly  the  amount  of  aid  that  they  will  be  eligible  to  receive.    Application  for  financial  aid  at  MLS  is  carried  out  through  a  third  party  company  called  TADS. In order to complete the application, TADS will ask you  to  provide  information  that  MLS  asks  them  to gather.  It is completely secure  and  confidential.  Only  the  financial  aid  committee  at  MLS  has  access  to  this  information.     One-tenth  of  each  financial  aid  grant  is  credited  toward  a  student's  account  at  registration  and  an  equal  portion  toward  each  of  the  nine  monthly  installments  that  follow.  The  balance  on  any  grant  is  canceled  when  a  student  leaves  school.  The  balance  of  any  grant  may  be  canceled  when  parents  fail  to  meet  their  financial  obligations  to  MLS.  Aid  also  may  be  Return to the Table of Contents 


17

suspended when  a  student  loses  good  academic  standing.  Suspended  credits  may  be  reinstated,  provided  a  student  regains  good  standing  within  the semester.    Many  congregations  offer  direct  financial  aid  to  members.  Families  are  urged  to  check  with  their  pastors  for  information.  The  federal  tax  law  of  1986  stipulates  that  financial  aid  monies  received  from  a  school  in  excess  of  tuition be reported by the recipient's parents as taxable income.    Questions  regarding  financial  aid  may  be  directed  to  the  MLS  financial  aid  counselor, Denys Eurich (​dee@mlsem.org​ - 989-793-1010, ext 264).    Rev. 08/2019 

Financial Matters in Detail  

Each year  the  MLS  Business  Office  publishes  “MLS  Financial  Policies,”  a  brochure  detailing  financial  practices  and  explaining  all  current  fees  at  MLS.  Additional  printed  materials  outlining  school  costs  and  explaining  financial  aid  options  are  also  available  upon  request  from  the  MLS  administration  or  Business  Offices.  ​Click  here  to  view  the  brochure  online.  MLS,  WELS,  and  their  responsible  boards  reserve  the  right  to  amend  fees and policies at any  time.   

Rev. 08/2019

Good Standing  

Continued enrollment  assumes  that  a  student  maintains  good  academic  standing.  Students  are  expected  to  have  at  least  a  C-  average  (1.66  GPA)  each  academic  term.  College  admission  usually  requires  a  cumulative  B-  average  (2.66  GPA);  therefore,  students  will  be  counseled and encouraged to  work  toward  that  goal  if  their  term  or  cumulative  grade  averages  do  not  meet this mark.      Good  standing  also  includes  good  campus  citizenship.  This  means  leading  an  active  Christian  life  under  the  rule  of  God's  Word  and  the  guidance  of  Return to the Table of Contents 


18

God's representatives.  Under  God,  such  a  life  grows  in  faith,  learns  from  mistakes, and avoids public offense.    The  final  requirement  for  good  standing  is  support  for  the  school's purpose.  Students  are  to  welcome  the  efforts  of  MLS  to  recruit  them  for  the  public  ministry.  Enrolled  students  are  expected  to  take  part  in  activities  which  the  school  offers  to  promote  public  ministry.  Each student is to actively consider  such  a  ministry  for  himself  or  herself  and  encourage  fellow  students  toward  that  end.  At  the  same  time  MLS  recognizes  that  the  Holy  Spirit  will  lead  some,  not  all,  on  the  path  to  the  public  ministry  of  the  church.  MLS  will  respect those who are led to pursue careers other than public ministry.   

Graduation Grants  

Rev. 08/2018

Each year,  monies  are  distributed  to  deserving  ​MLS  graduates  who  have  enrolled  at  Martin  Luther  College.  Scholarships  and  grants  are  awarded  on  the  basis  of  academic  excellence  and  financial  need.  These  awards  must  be  applied  for  by  those  students  who  are  interested  in  being  considered.  Questions  may  be  directed  to  Denys  Eurich  in  the  Business  Office  at  dee@mlsem.org​ or 989-793-1010 ext 264.    Rev. 08/2018 

High School Placement Test  

Students entering  the  9th  or  10th  grades  take  a  nationally  normed  placement  test  that  measures  verbal  and  quantitative  ability,  plus  skill  in  language,  reading,  and  mathematics.  The  results  give  the  MLS  Admissions  Committee  a  single  standard  by  which  to  measure  all  students.  When  great  distance  makes  attendance  for  testing  impossible,  MLS  arranges  for  individual pre-admission testing with a student's pastor or teacher.   

 

Rev. 08/2018

Return to the Table of Contents


19

International Students  

MLS is  authorized  under  federal  law  to  issue  the  I-20  F-1  visa  document  which  enables  foreign  nationals  to  study  in  the  United  States.  The  U.S.  government  requires  proof  that  international  students  have  resources  to  cover the costs of schooling and travel to and from their home countries.    International  students  are to be recommended by a church in our fellowship.  A  transcript  (with  English  translation,  if  necessary)  of  a student's most recent  schooling should accompany an application.    If  English  is  not  an  international  student's  first  language,  MLS  will  supply  an  English  proficiency  exam  to  determine  the  applicant's  English-speaking  ability.  To  be  admitted,  a  student's  competency  should  be  at  the  advanced  level.  Special  tutoring,  including  English  as  a  Second  Language  (ESL)  classes,  may be required as a condition of admission.    Rev. 08/2018 

Non-Discriminatory Policy  

Michigan Lutheran  Seminary  does  not  discriminate  on  the  basis  of  race,  color,  nationality,  and  ethnic  origin  in  the  administration  of  its  educational  policies,  admissions,  financial  assistance,  athletics,  or  other  programs.  MLS  holds  to  this  policy  because  it  is  the  purpose  of  the  Wisconsin  Evangelical  Lutheran  Synod  to  share  the  gospel  of  Jesus  Christ  with  all  people  of  the  world.    Rev. 08/2018 

Payment  

MLS asks  that  families  pay  at least 10 percent of the year's tuition, room, and  board  prior  to  registration.  On  the  selected  due  date  each  month,  September  through  May,  an  additional  10  percent  of  tuition,  room,  and  board  will  be  due.  Interest  and/or  late  charges  will  be  assessed  on  overdue  accounts.  There  is  a  three  percent  discount  for  tuition,  room,  and  board  if  Return to the Table of Contents 


20

paid in  full  at  registration.  The  discount  is  two  percent  if  paid  in  two  equal  payments  prior  to  each  semester.  Incidental  fees  will  vary  from  student  to  student and are to be paid as they are incurred.  Rev. 06/2017 

Pre-registration

In the  spring  of  each school year, MLS’ returning students are presented with  course  options  for  the  following  school  year  and  they  are  sent  course  selection forms to make these curricular choices. MLS asks parents to discuss  these  course  choices  with  their students before students submit their course  selection  forms,  since  scheduling  conflicts may not permit students to add or  drop  courses  when  they  return  to  school  in  the  fall.  Questions  regarding  course  options  and  schedules  may  be addressed to the academic dean, Prof.  Brian Kopp (​ ​mbk@mlsem.org​) 989-793-1010, ext 293).    Rev. 08/2019 

Tuition, Room and Board Fees  

The MLS Governing Board annually sets tuition, room, board and other fees.      Incidental  fees  are  various  fees  for  special  activities.  These  fees  are charged  to  a  student’s  account  at  the  time  of  incurring  the  debt  and  are  payable  by  the end of the next billing period.    MLS  assumes  students  are  covered  by  medical  insurance  through  their  family.  Parents  without  medical  insurance  must  submit  a  letter  accepting  financial  responsibility  for  medical  treatment  while  their  child  is  at  MLS.  They  are  asked  to  make  provisions  for  medical  insurance  of  some  kind,  especially  if  their  child  will  participate  in  sports  or  other  extracurricular  activities.    “MLS  Financial  Policies,”  a  brochure  detailing  these  fees,  is  available  upon  request.   

Return to the Table of Contents


21

2019-2020 Tuition  First Child  $7145  Younger Child  $6645  Room and Board 

$4505

Rev. 07/2019 

Travel Aid Grants  

Travel grants  are  available  for  students  who  live  more  than  250  miles  from  the  MLS  campus.  Travel  grants  are  distributed  ​after  ​tuition  agreements  have  been  created,  and  will  be  applied  as  a  credit  to  the  student’s  account  according  to  their  selected  payment  plan.  Generally,  you  can  expect  to  see  travel  grant  credits  in  the  September  billing  period.  For  questions  related  to  financial  and/or  travel  aid,  contact  our  Student  Accounts  Coordinator,  ​Denys  Eurich, via email:​dee@mlsem.org​ or by telephone: (989) 793-1010, ext 264.   

Rev. 07/2018

Academic Program

Academic Counseling  

Students having  difficulty  with  school  work  are  expected  to  seek  immediate  help  from  their  teachers.  Accountability  for  academic  performance  begins  with  the  student.  There  are  a  number  of  tools  to  help  parents,  guardians  and  faculty  monitor  student  grades,  however.  Parents/guardians  and  students  have  round-the-clock  access  to  course  grades  through  PowerSchool, MLS’ student information system.     

Return to the Table of Contents


22

Each year,  students  are  also  assigned  one  faculty  member  who  serves  as  their  academic  adviser.  Advisers  typically  serve  15  to  20  students.  Each Day  5,  the  Academic  Dean  will  send  a  report  to  all  MLS  advisers  of  students  with  below  a  C-  average  in  any  class.  Advisers then contact the student to discuss  what  may  be  done  to  improve  their  performance.  Parents  with  questions  about  their  student’s academic work do well to seek out the student’s adviser  first.  Student  adviser  assignments  can  be  found  on  a  student’s  class  schedule.    At  the  end  of  each  term,  all  academic  performance  is reviewed first by grade  level  advisers  (as  a group) and then by the Academic Committee.  Grade level  advisers  will  send  formal  letters  to  the  student’s  home  address  notifying  parents  of  excessive  absences,  serious  academic  performance  deficiencies,  or  extracurricular  eligibility  issues.  The  Academic  Committee  (comprised  of  head  grade  level  advisers,  deans,  president,  vice-president,  and  an  ASC  coordinator)  reviews  the  progress  of  each  struggling  student  and  discusses  how  best  to  help  him/her.  Students  with  poor  study  or  time  management  skills  are  often  referred  to  the  ASC  coordinator  for  additional  help.  The  ASC  coordinator  then  schedules  regular  after  school  meetings  to  help  them  improve their performance.    Lastly,  the  entire  faculty  reviews  academic  work at the end of each semester.  These  reviews  help  MLS  to  offer  added  support  and  guidance  to  students  who  may  need  it  and  to  provide  a  clear  and  complete  picture  of  each  student’s performance for families.    **For  more  information  on  the  MLS  6  Day  Cycle,  please  refer  to  ​Academic  Schedule​ elsewhere in this catalog.   

 

Rev. 08/2019

Academic Schedule  

The academic  day  begins  at  7:50  A.M.  and  closes  at  3:05  or  3:40  P.M.  depending  upon  whether  a  student  is  scheduled  for  counseling.  There  are  nine  45-minute  periods  with  three  minutes  passing  between  periods.  The 

Return to the Table of Contents


23

midday periods,  5th  and  6th, overlap and are used for both lunch and a class  period.     Teachers  are  available for counseling at different times during the school day  and  occasionally  after  school.  There  are  also  counseling  periods  from  3:10-3:40  P.M.  on  Days  1  (with  academic  adviser),  3  and  6  (Latin  1  or algebra  counseling).  Period  10  is  used  for  students  to make up quizzes or tests from  school  absences  (for  more  information,  see  ​Period  10  elsewhere  in  this  catalog).    The  normal  academic  week  begins  on Monday and ends on Friday.  The daily  schedule,  however,  is  laid  out  on  a  6-day  repeating  cycle.  For  example,  the  Monday  of  the  first  week  is  a  ​Day  1​;  the  following  Monday  is  a  ​Day  6  and  Tuesday  is  ​Day  1​.  There  are  approximately twenty-seven cycles in the school  year. Four days of exams close each semester.    DAILY ACADEMIC SCHEDULE  Period 1 

7:50-8:35

Period 2

8:38-9:23  

Chapel

9:26-9:46

Period 3

9:51-10:36

Period 4

10:39-11:24

Period 5

11:27-12:12 (class) ​OR​ 11:27-11:55 (lunch)

Period 6

12:13-12:41 (lunch) ​OR​ 11:56-12:41 (class)

Period 7

12:44-1:29

Period 8

1:32-2:17

Period 9

2:20-3:05

Advising

3:10-3:40 (Days 1, 3, 6)

Activity

3:10-3:40 (Days 2, 4, 5)

Return to the Table of Contents


24

Period 10

3:15-4:00

Rev. 08/2019

Academic Standing  

An end  of  term  GPA  of  3.50-3.74  places  a  student  on  the  Honor  Roll,  a  3.75-3.99  places  them  on  High  Honor  Roll,  and  a  4.00-4.33  places  them  on  Highest  Honor  Roll.  Those  who  finish  four  years  with  a  3.50  or  better  cumulative GPA are recognized at graduation.    All  students  maintain  good  academic  standing  with  a  2.50  (B-) or better term  grade  point  average.  The  term  GPA  for  limited  extracurricular  eligibility  is  1.70-1.89;  students  with  limited  extracurricular  eligibility  may  practice  but  may  not  represent  the  school.  Extracurricular  ineligibility  is  1.69  GPA  or  below for all grades. Ineligible students must drop extracurricular activities.     Students  may  improve  their  academic  standing  and  eligibility  upon  completion  of  the  Academic  Committee’s  assigned  tasks  (for  more  information,  refer  to  ​Extracurricular  Appeals  Process  elsewhere  in  this  catalog).  Students  should  attempt  to  keep  each  term  and  semester  GPA  above  2.50.  Seniors  will  not  receive  positive  college  recommendations  if  their  cumulative  GPA  is  under  2.50.  Cheating  warrants  an  immediate  failing  grade,  notification  of  administration,  possible  loss  of  credit  for  a  course  and  possible reporting to parents.   

Rev. 08/2019

Academic Transcripts  

A student's  first  transcript  following  graduation  is  free.  Additional copies are  issued  for  a  fee  currently  set  at  $3.75  for  electronic  transfer  or  $6.25  for  printed  copies.  Transcripts  are  issued  for  graduates  and  students  who  withdraw from MLS only when their accounts are paid in full.     

Return to the Table of Contents


25

MLS has  partnered  with  Parchment  to  order  and  send  transcripts  and  other  credentials  securely.  To  request  a  copy  of  a  transcript,  ​click  here  for  the  Parchment link.    Rev. 07/2018 

Attendance Policy

Attendance/Absences   Class  attendance  is  expected,  except  in  the  case  of  illness  (including  preventive  medicine)  or  emergency.  When  your  child  is  (will  be)  absent,  you  must do one of the following:    1. Email  ​attendance@mlsem.org  and  include  your  name,  your  student’s  name,  the  date  of  the  absence,  whether  the  absence  will  be  for  the  whole day or part of the day, and the reason for the absence.    OR    2. Call  989-793-1010  and  when  the  auto  attendant  picks  up,  press  the  #  key.  Then,  say  your  name,  your  student’s  name,  the  date  of  the  absence,  whether  the  absence  is  for  part  of  the  day  or  the  whole  day,  and the reason for the absence.     You  may  call  or  email  at  anytime,  day  or  night.  This  should  be  done  by  the  time  the  student  returns from an absence at home. When an excuse involves  a  visit  to  a  doctor,  ​a  slip  from  the  doctor’s  office  must  also  be  submitted  to  the  administration  office  or  Inter  Dorm  Office  (IDO).  For  dorm  students  ill  at  school,  excuses  are  submitted  by  the  dormitory  staff.  ​Students  who  are  absent  from  any portion of the academic day because of illness may not  participate  in  or  attend  extracurricular  activities  on  that  day.  ​Rare  exceptions  to  this  policy may be granted by the administration at the request  of  an  adviser,  coach,  or  director. Sick students are expected to be at home or  in  their  dorm  room  recovering.  Long-term  illness  may  affect  participation  in  an  extracurricular  activity.  Commuting  students  who  wish  to  leave  school  early  because  of  illness  are  to  notify  the  administration  office  or  IDO  before 

Return to the Table of Contents


26

leaving campus.  Requests  for  planned  absences  are  to  be  submitted  in  writing to Prof. Justin Danell ​at least two weeks​ in advance at j​ jd@mlsem.org​.     Excessive Absences  Rationale: In order to give full credit for a course during a semester, it is  expected that a student would need to be in attendance when the course  meets in order to understand and master the skills being taught. An  excessive number of absences does not allow for such mastery and forfeits  the credit for a course.    Policy:  For MLS, 25% of classes missed shall be considered excessive. A student who  is absent for 25% of a course’s classes in a semester will be considered to not  have attended enough classes to legitimately be given credit for the course.  The following number of absences will elicit a NO CREDIT GIVEN designation  for any course and an “F” grade for the semester in that course. School  absences do not count against this number -- for example, recruitment trips,  sports activities, etc. (Initial numbers indicate the number of times the course  meets per six day cycle.)    1st Semester Courses  3/6 classes would be 10 absences for the semester for any reason  (excused or unexcused except for extended illness).    4/6 classes would be 13 absences for the semester for any reason  (excused or unexcused except for extended illness).    5/6 classes would be 16 absences for the semester for any reason  (excused or unexcused except for extended illness).    6/6 classes would be 20 absences for the semester for any reason  (excused or unexcused except for extended illness).    2nd Semester Courses  3/6 classes would be 11 absences for the semester for any reason  (excused or unexcused except for extended illness).  Return to the Table of Contents 


27

4/6 classes would be 15 absences for the semester for any reason (excused or unexcused except for extended illness).    5/6 classes would be 19 absences for the semester for any reason  (excused or unexcused except for extended illness).    6/6 classes would be 23 absences for the semester for any reason  (excused or unexcused except for extended illness).    Exceptions:​ As indicated above, absences due to an extended illness will be  considered an exception to the above policy when these absences are  verified with a signed doctor’s excuse form. These types of situations will be  worked out with the vice president.    Appeals:​ Appeals may be made to an Appeals Committee consisting of the  Academic Dean, Vice President and the student’s professors. Appeals will  normally only be granted for long-term illnesses and/or an extenuating  circumstance. If an appeal is granted, the student will need to make up the  missed learning with the professor in order to erase the absences and be  given credit for the class.  Approved by GB 08/2014  Rev. 07/2019 

Course Description - Freshman

ENG1001 English  9  -  A  review  of  English  grammar,  usage,  and  literature,  emphasizing the strengthening of reading and writing skills     ENG3012  Academic  Skills  -  Study  skills,  typing,  essay  writing,  note-taking,  time and task management, and general research skills    FOR1005  Latin  1  -  Elements  of  Latin  form  and  syntax,  vocabulary  building,  and an introduction to sentence structure    MAT1002 Pre-Algebra ​ - An introduction to modern algebra ; or 

Return to the Table of Contents


28

MAT1003 Algebra  1  -  (Prerequisite:  MAT1002  Pre-Algebra  or test placement)  The  language,  symbols,  axioms,  and  fundamental  operations  of  modern  algebra; o ​ r  MAT1005  Geometry  -  (Prerequisite:  MAT1003  Algebra  1  or  test  placement)  The theorems, postulates, and fundamentals of plane geometry    MUS3006_152  Band  ​(elective)  -  Instrumental  performance  in  small  and  large  groups    MUS3042  Chorus  1  -  Sight  singing  and  ear  training;  music  theory;  includes  both sacred and secular choral work    MUS3044  Music  Fundamentals  (or  MUS3034  Piano  9  or  MUS3038  Organ  9)  -  Elementary  music  theory  and  an  introduction  to  keyboard  music  in  a  piano lab setting or private lessons     PHY3010  Physical  Education 9 - Instruction in physical development, health,  nutrition,  and  first  aid,  along with skills for participation in selected individual  and team sports    REL1009  Religion  9  -  A  survey  of  the  Bible  from  Creation  to  the  age  of  King  David    SCI1001  General  Science  -  An  introduction  to  sound  laboratory  practices  and skills with emphasis on the scientific method    SOC1001  Ancient  History  -  A  survey  of  history  from  the  beginning  of  time  through the Lutheran Reformation     Rev. 08/2019 

Course Description - Sophomore  

  ENG1006  Composition/ENG1005  Speech  -  English  communication  skills,  including writing with word processing and public speaking   Return to the Table of Contents 


29

FOR1006  Latin  2  (Prerequisite:  FOR1005  Latin  1 or equivalent required) - A  review  of  Latin  structure  and  vocabulary;  readings  from  the  works of Julius  Caesar; and/or  FOR1001  Spanish  1  -  Basic  Spanish  vocabulary  and  structure  with  an  emphasis on speaking and comprehension; or  FOR1009  German  1  -  Basic  German  grammar,  vocabulary,  and  syntax  with  simple translation and the use of spoken German in the classroom    MAT1003  Algebra  1  -  (Prerequisite:  MAT1002  Pre-Algebra  or test placement)  The  language,  symbols,  axioms,  and  fundamental  operations  of  modern  algebra; o ​ r  MAT1005  Geometry  -  (Prerequisite:  MAT1003  Algebra  1  or  test  placement)  The theorems, postulates, and fundamentals of plane geometry; or    MAT1004  Algebra  2  (Prerequisite:  MAT1005  Geometry  or  equivalent)  -  Advanced operations of modern algebra    MUS3006_152  Band  (elective)  -  Instrumental  performance  in  small  and  large  groups    MUS3035  Piano  10  or MUS3039 Organ 10 ​(required of all sophomores) - For  more  information  please  see  ​Courses  in  Piano  and  Organ  elsewhere  in  this  catalog   MUS3043  Chorus  2  -  Sight  singing  and  ear  training;  music  theory;  includes  both sacred and secular choral work    PHY3011  Physical  Education  10  -  Physical  development,  health,  nutrition,  and first aid with continued instruction in life sports    REL1010  Religion  10    -  A  survey  of  the  Bible  from  King  Solomon  to  the  ascension of Christ, including the Intertestamental Period     SCI1005  Biology  -  The  study  of  living  things  and  their  relationship  to  man  according to God's revelation in Nature   

Return to the Table of Contents


30

SOC1010 World  History  -  A  survey  of  world  history  from  the  Lutheran  Reformation to the present    Rev. 08/2019 

Course Description - Junior

ENG1007 American  Literature  -  A  chronological  overview  of  American  fiction  from  the  Colonial  Period  to  the  modern  era;  development  of  writing,  speaking, and critical thinking skills     FOR1041  Latin  Poetry  or  FOR1040  Latin  Prose  ​(these  courses  alternate  every  other  year;  Prerequisite:  FOR1006  Latin  2  or  equivalent required) - The  works of Caesar and Cicero, or Virgil read and translated ; and/or  FOR1002 Spanish 2 (Prerequisite: FOR1001 Spanish 1 or equivalent required)  -  Continued  development  of  Spanish  listening,  speaking, reading, and writing  skills ; or  FOR1010  German  2  (Prerequisite:  FOR1009  German  1  or  equivalent  required)  -  A  review  of  grammar,  syntax  and  vocabulary;  continued  development of German listening, speaking, and reading skills ; or  FOR1006  Latin  2  (Prerequisite:  FOR1005  Latin  1 or equivalent required) - A  review  of  Latin  structure  and  vocabulary;  readings  from  the  works of Julius  Caesar; or  FOR1001  Spanish  1  -  Basic  Spanish  vocabulary  and  structure  with  an  emphasis on speaking and comprehension; or  FOR1009  German  1  -  Basic  German  grammar,  vocabulary,  and  syntax  with  simple translation and the use of spoken German in the classroom    MAT1005  Geometry  ​-  (Prerequisite:  MAT1003  Algebra  1  or  test  placement)  The theorems, postulates, and fundamentals of plane geometry; or    MAT1004  Algebra  2  ​-  ​(Prerequisite:  MAT1005  Geometry  or  equivalent)  -  Advanced operations of modern algebra; or   MAT1009  Pre-Calculus  -  (Prerequisite:  MAT1004  Algebra  2  or  equivalent)  Trigonometry and advanced mathematics     

Return to the Table of Contents


31

MUS3008 Concert  Choir  or  MUS3027  Chapel  Choir  -  ​Sight  singing  and  ear  training; includes both sacred and secular choral works     REL1011  Religion  11  -  ​A  study  of  Acts,  the  NT Epistles, and the growth of the  Christian  Church  following  Jesus'  Ascension.  The  course  provides  background  information  for  each  book  -  author,  date,  theme,  and  outline  -  and a major doctrine outlined in each book.      SCI1009  Chemistry  -  The  study  of  the  structure,  composition,  and  transformation of matter including laboratory work     SOC1003  American  History  -  A  survey  of  American  history  from  the  Age  of  Discovery to World War II; American geography and economics     Junior  electives  can  be  found  in  ​Course  Description-  Junior-Senior  Electives  elsewhere in this catalog. 

 

Rev. 08/2019

Course Description - Senior

ENG1008 British  Literature  -  An  overview  of  the  writings  of  selected  British  authors;  selective  review  of  skills  in  English  grammar,  usage,  and  composition; introduction to literary theory      FOR1041  Latin  Poetry  or  FOR1040  Latin  Prose  ​(these  courses  alternate  every  other  year;  Prerequisite:  FOR1006  Latin  2  or  equivalent required) - The  works of Caesar and Cicero, or Virgil read and translated ; and/or  FOR1002 Spanish 2 (Prerequisite: FOR1001 Spanish 1 or equivalent required)  -  Continued  development  of  Spanish  listening,  speaking, reading, and writing  skills; or  FOR1010  German  2  (Prerequisite:  FOR1009  German  1  or  equivalent  required)  -  A  review  of  grammar,  syntax  and  vocabulary;  continued  development of German listening, speaking, and reading skills ; or 

Return to the Table of Contents


32

FOR1006 Latin  2  (Prerequisite:  FOR1005  Latin  1 or equivalent required) - A  review  of  Latin  structure  and  vocabulary;  readings  from  the  works of Julius  Caesar; or  FOR1003 Spanish 3 (Prerequisite: FOR1002 Spanish 2 or equivalent required)  Continued  enhancement  of  all  facets  of  language  proficiency;  exploration  of  Spanish literature; or  FOR1004 Spanish 4 (Prerequisite: FOR1003 Spanish 3 or equivalent required)  Continued  enhancement  of  all  facets  of  language  proficiency;  exploration  of  Spanish literature; or  FOR1011  German  3  ​(Prerequisite:  FOR1010  German  2  or  equivalent  required)  Continued  enhancement  of  all  facets  of  language  proficiency;  exploration of German literature ; or  FOR1012  German  4  Online  ​(Requires  Foreign  Languages  department  chair  approval;  Prerequisite:  FOR1011  German  3  or  equivalent  required)  Continued  enhancement  of  all  facets  of  language  proficiency;  exploration  of  German literature     MAT1004  Algebra  2  ​-  ​(Prerequisite:  MAT1005  Geometry  or  equivalent)  -  Advanced operations of modern algebra; or   MAT1009  Pre-Calculus  -  (Prerequisite:  MAT1004  Algebra  2  or  equivalent)  Trigonometry and advanced mathematics; or   MAT2004475  AP​®  Calculus  AB  -  (Prerequisites:  ​MAT1009  Pre-Calculus  or  equivalent) Limits, derivatives, integrals and their applications       MUS3008  Concert  Choir  or  MUS3027  Chapel  Choir  -  ​Sight  singing  and  ear  training; includes both sacred and secular choral works     REL1005  Christian  Doctrine  -  A survey of the chief doctrines of the Christian  faith     SCI1008  Physics  -  The  study  of  physical  laws  by  which  God  operates  his  creation; includes laboratory work     SOC1004  American  Government  -  An  overview  of  the  structure  and  workings of the American political system; personal citizenship     Return to the Table of Contents 


33

SOC1005 Economics  -  An  overview  of  basic  economic  theory  including  supply  and  demand,  micro  and  macro  economics,  the  stock  market,  credit,  debt,  savings  and  taxation  with  personal  finance  and  stewardship  applications       Senior  electives  can  be  found  in  ​Course  Description-  Junior-Senior  Electives  elsewhere in this catalog.   

 

Rev. 08/2019

Course Description - Junior/Senior Electives

COM1019 Introduction  to  Multimedia  Online  -  ​(Requires  Science  department  chair  approval)  Provides  an  overview  of  theory  and  concepts  of  audio  and  visual  communication  used  to  present  information  or  promote  a  message.  Students  will  be  able  to  apply  an  understanding of the elements of  design  to  develop  web-based  media for presentational and instructional use.  Students  will  also  apply  ethical  and  legal  responsibilities  in  creation  of  multimedia  content.  Offered  through  ALHSO.org  and  proctored  by  MLS  faculty.    ENG1019 Creative Writing Online - ​(Requires English department chair approval) ​This  course  explores  the  craft,  process,  and practicality of imaginative  writing.  Students  will  review  the  characteristics  of  a  variety  of  genres  and  learn  how  to  become  aware  of  their  own  experiences  as  material  for  stories,  poems,  or plays. ​Offered through ALHSO.org and proctored by MLS faculty.  FIN1028  Art  and  Art  History  1  -  Historical  survey  of artists, their works, and  art  movements  from  Ancient  Greece  to  the  early  Renaissance;  theory  and  practice of visual arts   FIN1029  Art  and  Art  History  2  -  Historical  survey  of artists, their works, and  art  movements  from  middle  Renaissance  to  modern  times;  theory  and  practice of visual arts    Return to the Table of Contents 


34

FOR1017 Chinese  1  Online  -  (Requires  Foreign  Languages  department  chair  approval)  An  introduction  to  the  Mandarin  Chinese  language  and  culture  that  includes  listening,  reading,  writing,  and  speaking.  Offered  through  ALHSO.org  and proctored by MLS faculty     FOR1018  Chinese  2  Online  -  (Prerequisite:  FOR1017  Chinese  2  or  equivalent;  requires  Foreign  Languages  department  chair  approval)  Advancement  in  Mandarin  Chinese  language  and  culture  that  includes  listening,  reading,  writing,  and  speaking.  Offered  through  ALHSO.org  and  proctored  by  MLS  faculty  MUS3006_152 Band -​ Instrumental performance in small and large groups REL1003  Church  History  -  ​(Required  Elective-  must  be  taken  either  Junior  or  Senior  year)  -  ​A  study  of  church  history  from  Early  Church  (100  AD)  to modern  WELS  history.  The  formation  and  spread  of  the  Early  Church,  background  of  the  Reformation,  the  life  of  Martin  Luther,  the  history  of  the  Lutheran  Confessions,  Lutheranism  in  America,  the  formation  of the WELS, the Michigan  Synod, and MLS history are the main focus.     SCI1006  Earth/Space  Science  ​-  Study  of  God's  creation  as  shown  in  the  physical  world  around  us.  Includes  elements  of  geology,  meteorology,  and  astronomy.     SCI1013  Anatomy/Physiology  ​-  Advanced  study  of  the  human  body  in  motion     SOC1035  U.S.  History  Modern  Era​-  A  study  of  American  history  that  begins  with  World  War  II and examines the Korean conflict, Civil Rights movement, the  Vietnam War and other significant events.     SOC3020  World  Regional  Geography  -  (Dual  Credit-  students  receive  credit  both  at  MLS  and  Martin  Luther  College  and  potentially  other  colleges/universities  after  successful  completion of this course). An overview of  the  world's  major  realms  from  a  spatial  perspective.  The  physiographic  and 

Return to the Table of Contents


35

cultural landscapes  of  regions  are  explored  using  systematic  geographic  concepts. O ​ ffered through ALHSO.org and proctored by MLS faculty​.    SOC2006  AP​®  Psychology  Online  - (Requires Social Studies department chair  approval)  A  college-level  course  designed  to  introduce  students  to  the  systematic  and  scientific  study  of  the  behavior  and  mental  processes  of  human  beings  and  other  animals.  Students  are  exposed  to  the  psychological  facts,  principles,  and  phenomena  associated  with  each  of  the  major  subfields  within  psychology.  They  also  learn  about  the  ethics  and  methods  psychologists  use  in  their  science  and  practice.  Offered  through  ALHSO.org  and proctored by MLS faculty.   

Rev. 08/2019

Course Description - Courses for International Students   

ENG1009 English  as  a  Second  Language  -  Development  of  intermediate  speaking,  listening,  reading,  grammar,  vocabulary  and  writing  for  English  language learners     ENG1022 English as a Second Language 2 - Development of more advanced  speaking,  listening,  reading,  grammar,  vocabulary  and  writing  for  English  language learners.   

Rev. 08/2019

Courses in Piano and Organ  

To graduate  from  MLS,  students  must  meet  the  piano  or  organ  requirements  set  by  the  Music  department  for  its  graduates.  Normally  this  can  be  done  through one to two years of instruction.    Individual  piano  or  organ  lessons  may  take  the  place  of  the  freshman  music  course  (​MUS3044  Music  Fundamentals​)  when  a  student  is  sufficiently  advanced  in  music.  All  sophomores  are  required  to  take  piano  or  organ.  Return to the Table of Contents 


36

Juniors and  seniors  may  take  piano  or  organ  as  an  elective.  Organ  may  only  be  substituted  for  piano  when  a  student  has  achieved  advanced  proficiency in  piano.  Students  may  choose  to  arrange  lessons  off  campus  from  a  private  teacher and request credit.    Piano  lessons  are  a  half  period  long  (22  minutes)  and  organ  lessons  are  30  minutes  long  and  are  scheduled  once  every  six  school  days.  For  sophomores,  juniors  and  seniors  there  are  four  and  a  half  practice  periods  (45  minutes)  scheduled  between  lessons.  Freshmen  have  three  and  a  half  practices  between  each  piano  or  organ  lesson.  For  those  in  grades  10-12,  each  year  closes  with  an  evaluation  by  a  jury  comprised  of  members  of  the  music department.    

Rev. 08/2019

Curriculum Rationale  

MLS has  a  single  academic  focus:  to  equip  students  with  the  knowledge  and  skills  to  succeed  at  Martin  Luther  College,  the  Wisconsin  Evangelical  Lutheran  Synod’s  ministerial  education  institution  of  higher  learning.  Each  course  in  our  curriculum  is  carefully  chosen  to  prepare  students  for  study  there and for lives in the public ministry.     There  are  no  secular  subjects  at  MLS.  Every  course  is  taught  in  the  light  of  God’s  Word.  Each  class  offers  opportunities  for  teachers,  ministers  of  the  gospel,  to  apply  both  law  and  gospel  to  students  in  ways  that  will  build  up  their faith in the Lord Jesus Christ.    Though  the  purpose of MLS is clear, we recognize that not all students will be  led  by  the  Holy  Spirit  to pursue careers in our parishes or classrooms.  These  students  can  take  comfort  in  the  knowledge  that  MLS’  expectations  also  exceed  the  standards  set  for  admission  to  public  colleges  in  the  state  of  Michigan and many other states. 

 

Rev. 08/2019

Return to the Table of Contents 


37

Summary of Enrollment and Graduation Requirements   

Enrollment Requirements 

Department

State of Michigan   Graduation  Requirements 

English

4.4 credits

4 credits

Foreign Language

4 credits

2 credits

Math

4 credits

4 credits

Music

3.6 credits

1 credit

Religion

4.5 credits*

0 credits

Physical Education

1 credit

1 credit

Social Studies

4 credits

3 credits

Science

4 credits

3 credits

Electives

2.1 credits

2 credits

TOTAL

31.6 credits

20 credits

NOTE: To be enrolled at MLS, a student must satisfy the minimum  requirements for each grade level as outlined on the MLS Curriculum Map.  To be issued a diploma, a student must satisfy the State of Michigan  Graduation requirements AND enrollment requirements for their entry  grade and each grade level thereafter.    FOREIGN LANGUAGES  If students choose to take 2 foreign languages, they must take at least 2  years of German or Spanish. Also, at least one foreign language must be  taken to a terminal level (Latin IV, Spanish III, or German III).    Return to the Table of Contents 


38

TRANSFER STUDENTS Transfer students must satisfy State of Michigan Graduation Requirements to  be issued a diploma. Some credits from a previous school may not transfer  and, consequently, the transfer student may be required to make up credits  from earlier grade levels.    INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS  International students follow the MLS Course Map with the following  exceptions:    1) Depending upon the international student’s English proficiency, he/she  may be exempted from the school’s foreign language requirements  since they already speak a foreign language. This effectively lowers  their enrollment requirement to 27.2 credits.  2) If deemed academically prudent, international students will be allowed  to substitute ​ENG1009 English as a Second Language​ or E ​ NG1022  English as a Second Language 2​ for required English classes.      *​RELIGION GRADUATION REQUIREMENT  All seniors must pass ​REL1005 Christian Doctrine​ in order to graduate from  MLS.   

 

Rev. 08/2019

MLS Curriculum Map  

Freshman Curriculum Cycle  Days of 6 

Semesters

Credits

ENG3012 Academic Skills*

2

2

0.4

ENG1001 English 9*

5

2

1.0

Foreign Language

FOR1005 Latin 1*

6

2

1.0

Math

MAT1002 Pre-Algebra* or

6

2

1.0

Department English 

Course(s)

Return to the Table of Contents


39

MAT1003 Algebra 1* or

6

2

1.0

MAT1005 Geometry*

5

2

1.0

Music

MUS3042 Chorus 1*

4

2

0.8

MUS3044 Music Fundamentals* or

4

2

0.6

MUS3034 Piano 9* or

4

2

0.6

MUS3038 Organ 9*

4

2

0.6

Physical Education PHY3010 Physical Education* 

3

2

0.5

Religion

REL1009 Religion 9*

4

2

1.0

Social Studies

SOC1001 Ancient History*

5

2

1.0

Science

SCI1001 General Science*

4

2

1.0

Electives

MUS3006_152 Band^

3

2

0.6

Lunch

1011 Lunch*

6

2

0.0

TOTAL

MINIMUM REQUIREMENT

48

8.3

Students must have a full schedule of at least 48 cycle days per semester. *required  ^elective

Sophomore Curriculum Department 

Course(s)

Cycle Days of 6 

Semesters

Credits

English

ENG1006 Composition* ENG1005 Speech* 

5 5 

1 1 

0.5 0.5 

Foreign Language

FOR1006 Latin 2* or

5

2

1.0

FOR1001 Spanish 1* or

5

2

1.0

FOR1009 German 1*  

5

2

1.0

MAT1003 Algebra 1* or

6

2

1.0

MAT1005 Geometry* or

5

2

1.0

MAT1004 Algebra 2*

5

2

1.0

Math

Return to the Table of Contents


40

Music

MUS3043 Chorus 2*

4

2

0.8

MUS3035 Piano 10* or

5

2

0.6

MUS3039 Organ 10*

5

2

0.6

Physical Education PHY3011 Physical Education 10* 

3

2

0.5

Religion

REL1010 Religion 10*

4

2

1.0

Social Studies

SOC1010 World History*

5

2

1.0

Science

SCI1005 Biology*

5

2

1.0

Electives

MUS3006_152 Band^

3

2

0.6

2nd Language: German I or Spanish I^

5

2

1.0

TOTAL

MINIMUM REQUIREMENT

47

7.9

Students must have a full schedule of at least 47 cycle days per semester. *required  ^elective   

**To avoid scheduling conflicts, students who plan to take two foreign languages must take Latin II as one of them.     

Junior Curriculum Department 

Course(s)

Cycle Days of 6 

Semesters

Credits

English

ENG1007 American Literature*

5

2

1.0

Foreign Language

FOR1040 Latin Prose or FOR1041 Latin Poetry* or 

5

2

1.0

FOR1002 Spanish 2* or

5

2

1.0

FOR1010 German 2*

5

2

1.0

MAT1005 Geometry* or

5

2

1.0

MAT1004 Algebra 2* or

5

2

1.0

MAT1009 Pre-Calculus*

5

2

1.0

Math

Return to the Table of Contents


41

Music     (MINIMUM TWO  SEMESTERS OF  ANY MUSIC) 

MUS3008 Concert Choir^

3

2

0.8

MUS3027 Chapel Choir^

3

2

0.6

MUS3036 Piano 11^

5

2

0.6

MUS3040 Organ 11^

5

2

0.6

MUS3006_152 Band^

3

2

0.6

Religion

REL1011 Religion 11*

4

2

1.0

Social Studies

SOC1003 American History*

5

2

1.0

Science

SCI1009 Chemistry*

5

2

1.0

Electives     (As many as  needed to have a  full schedule) 

REL1003 Church History***

5

1

0.5

SOC1035 U.S. History Modern Era^

5

1

0.5

FIN1028 Art and Art History 1^

5

1

0.5

FIN1029 Art and Art History 2^

5

1

0.5

SCI1006 Earth/Space Science^

5

1

0.5

SCI1013 Anatomy/Physiology 2^

5

1

0.5

Additional language/music/ALHSO^

3-5

1-2

0.4-1

MINIMUM REQUIREMENT

47

7.7

TOTAL

Students must have a full schedule of at least 47 cycle days per semester. *required  ^elective 

**To avoid scheduling conflicts, students who plan to take two foreign languages must take Latin 2 or 3 as one of them.    ***REL1003 Church History must be taken either the Junior or Senior year. If scheduling  permits, it’s at the student’s discretion which year they take it. 

Rev. 08/2019 

 

Senior Curriculum Department 

Return to the Table of Contents

Course(s)

Cycle

Semesters

Credits


42

Days of 6 English 

ENG1008 British Literature*

5

2

1.0

Foreign Language

FOR1040 Latin Prose or FOR1041 Latin Poetry* or 

5

2

1.0

FOR1003 Spanish 3 or FOR 1004 Spanish 4* or 

5

2

1.0

FOR1011 German 3 or FOR1012 German 4* 

5

2

1.0

MAT1004 Algebra 2* or

5

2

1.0

MAT1009 Pre-Calculus* or

5

2

1.0

MAT2004 A.P. Calculus AB*

5

2

1.0

MUS3008 Concert Choir^

3

2

0.8

MUS3027 Chapel Choir^

3

2

0.6

MUS3037 Piano 12^

5

2

0.6

MUS3041 Organ 12^

5

2

0.6

MUS3006_152 Band^

3

2

0.6

Religion

REL1005 Christian Doctrine*

4

2

1

Social Studies

SOC1004 American Government*

5

1

0.5

SOC1005 Economics*

5

1

0.5

Science

SCI1008 Physics*

5

2

1.0

Electives       (As many as  needed to have a  full schedule) 

REL1003 Church History***

5

1

0.5

SOC1035 U.S. History Modern Era^

5

1

0.5

FIN1028 Art and Art History 1^

5

1

0.5

FIN1029 Art and Art History 2^

5

1

0.5

SCI1006 Earth/Space Science^

5

1

0.5

SCI1013 Anatomy/Physiology^

5

1

0.5

3-5

1-2

0.4-1

Math

Music     (MINIMUM TWO  SEMESTERS OF  ANY MUSIC) 

Additional language/music/ALHSO^

Return to the Table of Contents


43

TOTAL

MINIMUM REQUIREMENT

47

7.7

Students must have a full schedule of at least 47 cycle days per semester. *required  ^elective   

**To avoid scheduling conflicts, students who plan to take two foreign languages must take Latin 2, 3 or 4 as one of them.    ***REL1003 Church History is required if not taken Junior year.  Rev. 08/2019 

MLS Course Sequence  

By Department   English Curriculum  Year  Freshman 

Course(s)

Cycle Semesters  Credits  Days of 6 

ENG1009 English as a Second Language* 

5

2

1.0

ENG3012 Academic Skills *

2

2

0.4

ENG1001 English 9*

5

2

1.0

5

2

1.0

ENG1006 Composition*

5

1

0.5

ENG1005 Speech*

5

1

0.5

Junior

ENG1007 American Literature*

5

2

1.0

Senior

ENG1008 British Literature*

5

2

1.0

Sophomore ENG1022 English as a Second  Language 2 

TOTAL REQUIRED FOR ENROLLMENT *required  ^elective   

Return to the Table of Contents

4.4


44

***English as a Second Language and English as a Second Language 2 are intended for students whose second language is English and may be taken during any of  their years at MLS, depending upon their placement testing.      Foreign Language Curriculum  Year  Freshman 

Course(s) FOR1005 Latin 1* 

6

2

1.0

5

2

1.0

FOR1001 Spanish 1* ​or

5

2

1.0

FOR1009 German 1*

5

2

1.0

FOR1040 Latin Prose or FOR1041 5  Latin Poetry* o ​ r 

2

1.0

FOR1002 Spanish 2* ​or

5

2

1.0

FOR1010 German 2*

5

2

1.0

FOR1040 Latin Prose or FOR1041 5  Latin Poetry* o ​ r 

2

1.0

FOR1003 Spanish 3 or FOR1004 Spanish 4* o ​ r  

5

2  

1.0

FOR1011 German 3 or FOR1012 German 4 Online* 

5

2

1.0

Sophomore FOR1006 Latin 2* ​or 

Junior

Senior

Cycle Semesters  Credits  Days of 6 

TOTAL REQUIRED FOR ENROLLMENT *required  ^elective 

4.0

**A second foreign language is encouraged in addition to the ones listed above.  Latin must be one of the two languages.    

Return to the Table of Contents


45

Mathematics Curriculum Year  Path A 

Path B

Path C:

Cycle Semesters  Credits  Days of 6 

Course(s) Fr: MAT1002 Pre-Algebra*  

6

2

1.0

So: MAT1003 Algebra 1*

6

2

1.0

Jr: MAT1005 Geometry *

5

2

1.0

R: MAT1004 Algebra 2*

5

2

1.0

Fr: MAT1003 Algebra 1*

6

2

1.0

So: MAT1005 Geometry*

5

2

1.0

Jr: MAT1004 Algebra 2*

5

2

1.0

Sr: MAT1009 Pre-Calculus

5

2

1.0

Fr: MAT1005 Geometry*

5

2

1.0

So: MA1004T Algebra 2*

5

2

1.0

Jr: MAT1009 Pre-Calculus*

5

2

1.0

Sr: MAT2004 A.P. Calculus AB

5

2

1.0

TOTAL REQUIRED FOR ENROLLMENT *required  ^elective   

4.0

Music Curriculum 

Year Freshman 

Course(s)

Cycle Semesters  Credits  Days of 6 

MUS3042 Chorus 1

4

2

0.8

MUS3044 Music Fundamentals* or 

4

2

0.6

Return to the Table of Contents


46

MUS3034 Piano 9* o ​ r

4

2

0.6

MUS3038 Organ 9

4

2

0.6

4

2

0.8

MUS3035 Piano 10* ​or

5

2

0.6

MUS3039 Organ 10

5

2

0.6

MUS3008 Concert Choir^

3

2

0.8

MUS3027 Chapel Choir^

3

2

0.6

MUS3036 Piano 11^

5

2

0.6

MUS3040 Organ 11^

5

2

0.6

MUS3006_152 Band^

3

2

0.6

MUS3008 Concert Choir^

3

2

0.8

MUS3027 Chapel Choir^

3

2

0.6

MUS3037 Piano 12^

5

2

0.6

MUS3041 Organ 12^

5

2

0.6

MUS3006_152 Band^

3

2

0.6

Sophomore MUS3043 Chorus 2* 

Junior     (Two  semesters of  any music) 

Senior     (Two  semesters of  any music) 

TOTAL REQUIRED FOR ENROLLMENT *required  ^elective 

3.6

Physical Education Curriculum 

Year Freshman 

Course(s) PHY3010 Physical Education 9* 

Cycle Semesters  Credits  Days of 6  3 

2

0.5

Sophomore PHY3011 Physical Education 10* 

3

2

0.5

Junior

Not required

Return to the Table of Contents


47

Senior

Not required

TOTAL REQUIRED FOR ENROLLMENT

1.0 

*required ^elective 

Religion Curriculum Year  Freshman 

Course(s)

4

2

1.0

Sophomore REL1010 Religion 10* 

4

2

1.0

Junior

REL1003 Church History^

5

1

0.5

REL1011 Religion 11*

4

2

1.0

REL1003 Church History^

4

2

1.0

REL1005 Christian Doctrine*

4

2

1.0

Senior

REL1009 Religion 9*

Cycle Semesters  Credits  Days of 6 

TOTAL REQUIRED FOR ENROLLMENT

3.6

*required ^elective   

***REL1003 Church History must be taken either the Junior or Senior year. If scheduling permits, it’s at the student’s discretion which year they take it.   

Social Studies Curriculum Year  Freshman 

Course(s) SOC1001 Ancient History* 

Cycle Semesters  Credits  Days of 6  5 

2

1.0

Sophomore SOC1010 World History* 

5

2

1.0

Junior

5

2

1.0

SOC1003 American History*

Return to the Table of Contents


48

Senior

SOC1004 American Government* 

5

1

0.5

SOC1005 Economics*

5

1

0.5

TOTAL REQUIRED FOR ENROLLMENT

4.0

*required ^elective 

Science Curriculum Year  Freshman 

Course(s) SCI1001 General Science* 

Cycle Semesters  Credits  Days of 6  4 

2

1.0

Sophomore SCI1005 Biology* 

5

2

1.0

Junior

SCI1009 Chemistry*

5

2

1.0

Senior

SCI1008 Physics*

5

2

1.0

TOTAL REQUIRED FOR ENROLLMENT

4.0

*required ^elective 

Electives Curriculum Year  Freshman 

Course(s)

Cycle Semesters  Credits  Days of 6 

MUS3006_152 Band

3

2

0.6

Sophomore MUS3006_152 Band 

3

2

0.6

FOR1009 German 1 or FOR1001 Spanish 1 as a second language 

5

2

1.0

SOC1035 U.S. History Modern Era 

5

1

0.5

FIN1028 Art and Art History 1

5

1

0.5

Junior

Return to the Table of Contents


49

Senior

FIN1029 Art and Art History 2

5

1

0.5

SCI1006 Earth/Space Science  

5

1

0.5

SCI1013 Anatomy/Physiology

5

1

0.5

Pick a second foreign language

3-4

2

0.4-0.8

SOC3020 World Regional Geography** 

5

2

1.0

SOC2006 A.P. Psychology**

5

2

1.0

FOR1017 Chinese 1**

5

2

1.0

FOR1018 Chinese 2**

5

2

1.0

COM1019 Introduction to Multimedia** 

5

2

1.0

ENG1019 Creative Writing**

5

2

1.0

SOC1035 U.S. History Modern Era 

5

1

0.5

FIN1028 Art and Art History 1

5

1

0.5

FIN1029 Art and Art History 2  

5

1

0.5

SCI1006 Earth/Space Science  

5

1

0.5

SCI1013 Anatomy/Physiology

5

1

0.5

Pick a second foreign language

3-4

2

0.4-0.8

SOC3020 World Regional Geography** 

5

2

1.0

SOC2006 A.P. Psychology**

5

2

1.0

FOR1017 Chinese 1**

5

2

1.0

FOR1018 Chinese 2**  

5

2

1.0

Return to the Table of Contents


50

COM1019 Introduction to Multimedia** 

5

2

1.0

ENG1019 Creative Writing**

5

2

1.0

TOTAL REQUIRED FOR ENROLLMENT

2.1

**This course is online through ALHSO

Rev. 08/2019

Expulsion from Class

Students are  to  go  directly  to  the  administration  office  if  expelled  from  a  class.  They  will  meet  with  the  vice  president,  the  president,  the  dean,  or  the  academic  dean.  Students must apologize privately to the teacher of the class  from  which  they  were  expelled  and  do  so  before  the  next  meeting  of  that  particular class. Failing to do so may result in further disciplinary action.    Rev. 07/2018   

Focus on the Public Ministry  

Every student  at  MLS  is  encouraged  to  consider  a lifetime of public service in  the church's ministry.  Every effort is made to expose students to the work of  the  public  ministry  and  to  those  who  serve  in  it.  Area  pastors  are  invited  to  conduct  morning  chapel.  Missionaries  address  the  student  body.  Representatives  from  Martin  Luther  College  talk  with  students  individually  and  in  groups.  Career  consultations  are  held  in  connection  with  pre-registration  in  spring.  An  MLS  Admissions  Counselor  is  especially  available to counsel with the students concerning the public ministry.    Each  year  all  MLS  juniors  take  the  MLS  College  Tour,  a  bus  trip  to  visit  the  campuses  of  Martin  Luther  College,  our  synod’s  college  of  ministry,  and  of  Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary, our synod’s graduate school for pastors.      Each  fall  sophomores  and  their  parents  or family representatives spend an  entertaining  and  enlightening  evening  at  MLS  Sophomore  Night.  The  Return to the Table of Contents 


51

program for  this  evening  focuses  on  ministry  with  speakers  and  entertainment  provided  by  the  WELS  schools  that  train  public  ministers  of  the gospel.    Seniors  are  offered  release  time  from  classes to permit them to participate  in  a  Taste  of  Ministry  experience.  Senior  boys  may  discover  what  it  is  like  to  be  a  pastor  by  spending  a  three-day  weekend  with  a  host  pastor.  Activities  are  as  varied  and  interesting  as  the  hosting  congregations  are  different.  Both  boys  and  girls  may  experience  the  teaching  ministry  in  the  classrooms  of  one  of  the  WELS  elementary  schools  in  central  or  southern  Michigan.    Students  may  also  choose  to  participate  in  a  variety  of  summer  evangelism  experiences  offered  through  the  programs  of  Project  Titus,  described  in  detail in the section that follows.    At  all  times,  MLS  recognizes  that  the  decision  to  prepare  for  the  work  of  the  public  ministry  is  a fruit of faith worked by the Holy Spirit.  MLS trusts that, as  the  Spirit  works  through  the  Word,  programs  like  those  mentioned  above  may  serve  to  provide  additional  information  and  encouragement  for  students that will aid them in making God-pleasing career choices.    Rev. 07/2018 

Grade Reports

Permanent grades  are  given  only  at  the  end  of  each  semester.  The  semesters  are  divided  into  three  terms  for  the  purpose  of  monitoring  academic  progress.  Live  grades  are available to parents via the PowerSchool  Portal  twenty  four  hours  per  day  and  seven  days  per  week.  Only  semester  grades become part of a student’s permanent record or transcript.    MLS uses letter grades and the standard 4-point system, as illustrated below:        Return to the Table of Contents 


52

A+ A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D DF

99-100% 4.33 95-98% 4.00  93-94% 3.66  90-92% 3.33  87-89% 3.00  85-86% 2.66  82-84% 2.33  79-81% 2.00  77-78% 1.66  74-76% 1.33  72-73% 1.00  70-71% 0.66  Below 70% 0.00  Incomplete 0.00   

 

Rev. 08/2019

Make-up Work  

Quizzes and Tests Every  student  at  MLS  must  complete  make-up  quizzes  and  tests  within  four  days  of  returning  to  school  from  an  absence.  The  day  of  their  return  is  counted  as  one  of  these  four  days.  Students should coordinate the make-up  of  these  assessments  with  their  teachers  and  may  choose  one  of  the  following methods:    -Email  your  professor  or  instructor  to  see  if  both  of  you  have  a mutual  free  period  during  the  school  day.  Be  sure  to  list  several  alternative  periods  within  the  four  days in your email.  Know that some professors  or  instructors  won’t  have  any  available  free periods during the day due  to other responsibilities.      -Arrange  to  take  the  quizzes  or  tests  in  Period  Ten  after  school.  For  more information, see P ​ eriod Ten​ elsewhere in this catalog.   

Return to the Table of Contents


53

Failure to  complete  make-up  quizzes  and  tests  within  the  four-day  window  will  result  in  an  academic  detention.  For  more  information,  see  ​Academic  Detention​ elsewhere in this catalog.    Priority  of  Academic  Detention,  Period  Ten,  Counseling  and  Extracurriculars  Academic  Detention:  Other  than  counseling,  academic  detention supersedes  or has priority over all other activities.    Overarching  Expectations:  Students  will  utilize  Period  Ten  or  mutual  free  periods  during  the  school  day  whenever  their  professors/instructors  are  available  to  make  up  quizzes or tests.  Therefore, ​it is critically important that  students  begin  scheduling  their  make  up  work  the  day  that  they  return  to  school from an absence​.    Exceptions:  ● If  students  have  scheduled  counseling  meetings  with  their  academic  advisers,  Latin  professor,  or  math  professor,  then  they  are  always  to  go  to  these  sessions.  They  are  expected  to  make  up work on one of the other three remaining days.    ● If  students  have  a  scheduled  extracurricular  event  (not  practice  or  regular  meeting)  then  they  are  expected  to  participate  in  the  event.  For  example,  if  a  student  is  an  athlete  and  they  have  an  away  game  that  evening  that  would  interfere  with  making  up  work  in  Period  Ten,  then  they  should  attend  the  game and make  up work on one of the other three days.    ● In  the  rare  instance  that  a  student  has  no  common  free  periods  with  their  professors/instructors  and had counseling meetings or  extracurricular  events  that  interfered  with  making  up  work  during  all  four  Period  Ten  sessions,  then  students  may  petition  the  attendance  secretary  who will work with the vice president to  examine  the  student’s  schedule  and  either  approve  the  request  or  place  them  in  academic  detention  if  the  four  allotted  days 

Return to the Table of Contents


54

have expired  or  the  student  failed  to  utilize  available  free  periods.    Daily Assignments  Daily  readings  and  assignments  are  due  the  day  students  return  from  absences  unless  they  receive  an  extension  from  their  teachers.  ​It  is  a  student’s  responsibility  to  contact  teachers about missed work.  Many faculty  members  post  their  assignment  lists  online  so  students  can  know  work  they’ve missed.   Rev. 07/2019   

Period Ten  

Period Ten  offers  students  who  were  absent  an  opportunity  to  make  up  quizzes  and  tests  in  Room  30  from  3:15  to  4  p.m.  each  school  day.  When  students  return  to  class  from  an  absence,  they  should  make  arrangements  with  their  teachers  to  make  up  missing  quizzes  and  tests  within  four  school  days  from  the  date  of  their  return  (the  day  of  their  return  is  one  of  these  days).  Students  should  bring  all  necessary  books  and  materials  allowed  for  these  quizzes  and  tests  with  them  to  Room  30.  Once  a  student  completes  a  quiz or test, they are free to leave.     Rev. 08/2018 

Academic Detention

Students will  be  referred  to  academic  detention  if  they  fail  to  make  up  quizzes  and  tests  within  an  allotted  four  day  window  from  their  return  to  school  from  an  absence.  Additionally,  a  student  may  be  placed  in  academic  detention  for  repeatedly  failing  to  complete  assignments  on  time.  The  attendance  secretary  will  notify  students  that  have  been  placed  into  academic  detention.  It  is  a  student’s  responsibility  to  make  arrangements  with parents for a delayed pickup from school, if applicable.    Academic  detention  is  from  3:15  to  4  p.m.  each  school  day  in  Room  30.  Students  will  not  be  allowed  to  leave  early  and  should  bring  all  necessary  Return to the Table of Contents 


55

books and  materials  with  them  to  Room  30  and  be  prepared  to  work  the  entire forty-five minutes.      Impact on Extracurricular Participation  Students  placed  in  academic  detention  forfeit  their  participation  in  extracurricular  activities  in  all but the first occurrence in a semester.  In other  words,  there  is  no  impact  on  extracurricular  participation  the  first  time  a  student  is  placed  in  academic  detention.  All  following  instances of academic  detention  in  a  semester  will  then  be  served  with  forfeiture  of  extracurricular  participation for the day and weekend, if academic detention is on a Friday.    Students  placed  in  academic  detention  must  make  up  missing quizzes, tests,  or  late  assignments  within  the  allotted  forty-five  minutes.  Failure  to  do  so  will  result  in  another  day  of  academic  detention  and  forfeiture  of  extracurricular  participation  for  that  second  and  subsequent  days,  if  applicable.  However,  if  a  student  has  so  many  make up quizzes or tests that  it  is  unreasonable  to  expect  anyone  to  complete  so  many  within  this  time,  then  students  may  petition  the  Attendance  Secretary  who  will  consult  with  the  vice  president  for  an  additional  day(s)  of  academic  detention  without  impact  on  extracurriculars.  This  additional  day  or  days  of  grace  do  not  extend  to  late  or missing assignments since students would only be placed in  academic detention for repeated negligence in completing assignments.    Consequences for Skipping Academic Detention  If  a  student  skips  academic  detention  then  they  will  face  consequences.  For  every  day  of  detention  missed  in  a  semester  the  number  of  assigned  detentions doubles.      Detentions Missed per Semester  Revised Detentions (includes  penalty)   1 

2

2

4

3

6

Return to the Table of Contents


56

4

8

5 (etc)

10 (etc)

Rev. 07/2019

Promptness

Students are  expected  to  be  seated  at  their  desks  before  the  bell  rings.  When  more  than  a  few  minutes  late,  they  are  to  present  a  readmission  slip  (pink)  from  the  administration  office  to  their  teacher.  Teachers  then  decide  whether  the  tardy  is  excused  or  unexcused.  The  school  nurse  issues  readmission  slips  for  visits  to  her office during her hours.  No class (including  those  giving  tests  or  exams)  may  dismiss  early.  Students  are  expected  to  remain at their desks until the bell rings.    Rev. 07/2017 

Study Halls

Supervised study  halls  are  scheduled  for  dormitory  students  in  the  late  afternoon  and  evening.  The  number  of  study  halls varies according to grade  level  and  grade  point  average.  Study  halls  may  be  taken  in  one  of  the  designated  study  areas  in  the  dormitory  or  library.  Students  schedule  their  own  study  periods  around  such  things  as  athletic  practices,  choir  or  drama  rehearsals, group meetings, and social events.    It  is  not  assumed  that  studying  is  done  only  in  study  halls.  Students’  study  time  needs will differ.  Opportunities are available both in and out of class for  students to complete their work.    Rev. 07/2018   

Return to the Table of Contents


57

Chromebook and Technology  

Purpose Michigan  Lutheran  Seminary  (MLS)  supplies  each  student  with  a  Chromebook.  This  device  is  property  of  MLS. The supplied Chromebooks will  provide  student  access  to  required  educational  materials  needed  for  classroom  instruction.  The  Chromebook  allows  student  access  to  Google  Apps,  educational  web-based  tools,  as  well  as  many  other  useful  sites.  The  supplied  device  is  an  educational  tool  not  intended  for  gaming,  social  networking, or high-end computing.    Acceptable Use Guidelines  MLS  has  been  blessed  with  many  computers  for  student,  faculty,  and  staff  use.  These  computers  are  a  part  of  a  network,  which  allows  the  sharing  of  many  resources.  Much  time  and  money  has  been  invested  to  make  various  technologies available to the students. A computer that is not usable because  of  some  form  of  abuse  hurts  all  students.  For  this  reason,  guidelines  have  been  established  to  govern  the  proper  use  of  this  equipment  and  the  programs that operate them.    The  Internet  gives  students  an  opportunity  to do research in support of their  courses  through  web  services  throughout  the  world.  The  Internet  provides  many  valuable  resources,  but  can  also  provide  challenges  to  our  faith  and  ethical  duties  as  Christians.  In  order  to  teach  and  guide  our  students  in  the  proper  use  of  this  research  tool,  the following policy has been established by  the  MLS  Governing  Board  and  will  be  enforced  by  the  faculty,  staff  and  administration.    Policy Statement  All  computer/Internet  use  at  MLS  will  be  within  the  boundaries  established  by  the  Federal  Electronics  Communications  Privacy  Act  (1986),  the  Child  Internet  Protection  Act  (2000),  and  their  subsequent  amendments,  or  boundaries  established  by  Michigan  Statutes  and  Administrative  Codes.  More  importantly,  our  Christian stewardship of these valuable resources, out  of love for Jesus our Savior, will lead to the proper use of these resources.    Return to the Table of Contents 


58

Students will  receive  a  secured  account  on  the  MLS  network  for the purpose  of  learning  computer  applications  and  performing  research  through  various  tools  available  on  the  MLS  network  or  through  an  Internet  connection.  The  use  of  this  account  is  a privilege, not a right, and inappropriate use will result  in  the  loss  of  access  to  the  system.  All  network  activity  is  electronically  monitored and can be viewed at any time by the network administrator.    The  use  of  an  account  on  the  MLS  computer  network  must  be  in  support  of  the  education  and  research  objectives  of  MLS.  Transmission  of  any  material  in  violation  of  any  United  States  or  state  statute,  code,  or  regulation  is  prohibited.  This  includes,  but  is  not  limited  to,  copyrighted  material,  threatening  or  obscene  material,  or  material protected as a trade secret. Use  of  the  MLS  computer  network  for  commercial  activity  or  for  product  advertisement  or  political  lobbying  is  prohibited.  MLS  maintains  nightly  backups  of  the  entire  network  file  system.  However,  MLS  makes  no  warranties  of  any  kind,  whether  expressed  or  implied,  for  the  service  it  is  providing.  Loss  of  data,  accuracy,  or  quality  of  information  is  not  the  responsibility  of  the  school.  Users  of  the  MLS  network  are  expected to abide  by  generally  accepted  rules  of  network  etiquette  and  Christian  behavior.  These include, but are not limited to, the following:    ● Use  appropriate  language.  Do  not  curse,  use  vulgarities or any other  abusive language.  ● Do  not  reveal  any  personal  information  with anyone on the Internet.  This  includes  your  name,  email  address,  phone  number,  home  address  and  even  school  address.  Doing so may put you, your family  or your fellow schoolmates in danger.  ● Do not share your password with others.  ● Do not use another person's account.  ● MLS  is  moving  towards  a  paperless  environment  which  means  printing  is  reserved  for  faculty  and  staff.  If  a  student  needs  to  print  school  related  materials  they  should  talk  with  their  teacher  or  the  dorm staff.  ● Electronic  mail  is  not  guaranteed  to  be  private.  Improper  messages  will be reported to the Dean of Students. 

Return to the Table of Contents


59

● Do not  use  the  network  in  any  way,  which  will  disrupt  the  use  of the  network  by  others,  such  as  downloading  excessively  large  files,  or  sending bulk junk e-mail.  ● Do  not  load  or  attempt  to  load any program, game, or virus onto the  computer.  ● Students  with  their  own  laptops  connected  to  the  MLS  wireless  network are expected to maintain their own virus protection.  ● Do  not  touch,  disassemble,  or  in  any way alter the access points that  are mounted in the dormitory or classroom building.    Violations  of  this  policy  will  have  consequences  for  the  student.  A  student  who  fails  to  follow  his  or  her  responsibilities  as  listed  in  this  agreement  will  be disciplined according to the Dean of Students’ discretion.    At  any  time,  the  option  for  disciplinary  action  to  progress  to  a  more  serious  consequence  shall  be  reserved  by  the  Administration.  All  discipline  will  be  done in conjunction with the Dean of Students and/or the President.    Users  must  notify  the  technology  director  or  network  administrator  of  any  security  problems.  Any  user  trying  to  login  as  an  administrator  or  who  is  identified as a security risk will lose the privilege of using the network.    Vandalism  will  result  in  the  loss  of  privileges  and  appropriate  fines  for  restitution.  Vandalism is defined as any malicious attempt to harm or destroy  hardware,  software,  wiring,  data  of  another  user,  server,  or  device,  or  the  uploading or creation of computer viruses.    1. Receiving the Chromebook:  Chromebooks  and  chargers  will  be  distributed  during  student  orientation  of  each school year. This Chromebook Policy Handbook outlines the procedures  and  policies  for  families  to  protect  the  Chromebook  investment  for  MLS.  Chromebooks  will  be  collected  at  the  end  of  each  school  year  and  students  will retain their assigned Chromebook each year while enrolled at MLS​.       2. Returning the Chromebook:  Return to the Table of Contents 


60

Students leaving  MLS  must  return  the  Chromebooks  to  the  Information  Technology Office. The Chromebook must be returned in good working order  along  with  its  power  adapter.  The  Chromebook  will  be  inspected  and  any  damage  will  be  billed  according  to  the  costs  listed  in  section  7  below.  Any  Chromebook not returned will be grounds for not releasing a transcript.    3. Taking Care of the Chromebook:  Students  are  responsible  for  the  general  care  of  the  Chromebook  they  have  been  issued  by  the  school.  Chromebooks  that  are  broken  or  fail  to  work  properly,  must  be  taken  to  the  Information  Technology  Office  as  soon  as  possible  for  diagnosis  and  repair..  Do  not  take  MLS  owned  Chromebooks  to  an outside computer service for any type of repairs or maintenance.    3a: General Precautions  ● No  food  or  drink  is  allowed  next  to  your  Chromebook  while  it  is  in  use.  ● Cords,  cables,  and  removable  storage  devices  must  be  inserted  carefully into the Chromebook.  ● Any  markings  or  stickers  added  to the Chromebook which cannot be  cleanly  removed  will  be  considered  cosmetic  damage  and  will  result  in  a  $25  repair  if  the  Chromebook  is  not  purchased  when  leaving  MLS.  ● Vents CANNOT be covered.  ● Chromebook  power  adapters  should  be  plugged  into  surge  protectors.     3b: Carrying Chromebooks  ● It  is  recommended  that  a  protective  case  be  purchased  for  the  Chromebook.  ● Chromebooks should be transported in a case at all times.  ● Never transport your Chromebook with the power cord plugged in.  ● Chromebook lids should always be closed when moving.  ● Never lift a Chromebook using the screen.   ● Always support a Chromebook from its bottom with lid closed.    3c: Screen Care   Return to the Table of Contents 


61

The Chromebook  screens  can  be  easily  damaged.  The  screens  are  particularly sensitive to damage from excessive pressure on the screen.  ● Do  not  lean  or put pressure on the top of the Chromebook when it is  closed.  ● Do not store the Chromebook with the screen in the open position.  ● Do  not  place  anything  near  the Chromebook that could put pressure  on the screen.  ● Do  not  place  anything  in  the  carrying  case  that  will  press against the  cover.  ● Do  not  poke  the  screen  with  anything  that  will  mark  or  scratch  the  screen surface.  ● Do  not  place  anything  on  the  keyboard  before  closing  the  lid  (e.g.  pens, pencils).  ● Clean the screen with a soft, dry microfiber cloth or anti-static cloth.  ● Be  cautious  when  using  any  cleaning  solvents.  Some  solvents  can  damage the screen.     3d: Storing the Chromebook  ● Never  store  your  Chromebook  in  its  case  or  backpack  while  it  is  plugged in.  ● When  students  are  not  using  their  Chromebook,  they  should  store  them in their locker or locked dorm room.   ● Nothing should be placed on top of the Chromebook when stored.   ● Dorm  students  are  encouraged  to  take  their  Chromebooks home on  weekends, regardless of whether or not they are needed.   ● Chromebooks  should  not  be  stored  in  a  vehicle  due  to  security  and  temperature control concerns.    3e: Chromebooks left in Unsupervised Areas  ● Under  no  circumstances  should  Chromebooks  be  left  in  an  unsupervised  area  including:  school  grounds  and  campus,  the  cafeteria,  gymnasium,  locker  rooms,  student  commons,  unlocked  classrooms, and hallways.   ● If  an  unsupervised  Chromebook  is  found,  notify  a  staff  member  immediately. 

Return to the Table of Contents


62

● Unsupervised Chromebooks may be confiscated by staff. Disciplinary  action  may  be  taken  for  leaving  the Chromebook in an unsupervised  location.    4. Using the Chromebook at School  In  addition  to  individual  faculty  expectations  for  Chromebook  use,  school  messages,  announcements,  calendars,  and schedules may be accessed using  the  Chromebook.  Therefore,  students  are  responsible  to  bring  their  Chromebook  to  all  classes,  unless  specifically  advised  not  to  do  so  by  their  teacher.    4a: Chromebooks left at home  ● If  a  Chromebook  is  left  at  home,  the  student  will  have  the  opportunity  to  use  a  rental  Chromebook  from  the  Administration  Office, if one is available.  ● The  rental  cost  will  be  $5/day  which  will  be  billed  to  the  student’s  account.  ● A  student  renting  a  Chromebook  will  be  responsible  for  any  damages  incurred  while  it  is  in  the  possession  of  the  student.  The  student will pay full replacement cost if it is lost or stolen.    4b: Chromebooks under repair   ● Loaner  Chromebooks  may  be  issued  to  students  when  they  leave  their  Chromebook  for  repair  at  the  Information  Technology  Office.  There will be no daily rental charge for this type of loaner.  ● A  student  using  a  loaner  Chromebook  will  be  responsible  for  any  damages  incurred  while  it  is  in  the  possession  of  the  student.  The  student will pay full replacement cost if it is lost or stolen.    4c: Charging the Chromebook   ● Chromebooks must be brought to school each day fully charged.   ● If  a  student  fails  to  charge  their  Chromebook,  the  student  will  have  the  opportunity  to  use  a  rental  Chromebook  from  the  Information  Technology Office.      Return to the Table of Contents 


63

4d: Backgrounds and Password ● Inappropriate  media  may  not  be  used  as  a  screensaver  or  background.  ● Pictures  of  guns,  weapons,  pornographic  materials,  inappropriate  language,  alcohol,  drugs,  or  gang  related  symbols  are  strictly  prohibited.  ● Take  care  to  protect  your  login  and  password.  Do  not  share  your  password.    4e: Sound  Sound  must  be  muted  at  all  times  unless  permission  is  obtained  from  the  teacher for instructional purposes.     5. Managing & Saving Digital Work With a Chromebook  Google  Suite  is  a  package  of  products  which  includes  mail,  calendars,  word  processing,  presentations,  spreadsheets,  etc.  that  lets  students create online  documents,  collaborate  in  real  time  with  other  people,  and  store documents  and  other  files  in  Google  Drive.  With  wifi,  students  can  access  their  documents  and  files  from  anywhere,  at  any  time.  Prior  to  leaving  MLS  or  graduating,  students  who  want  to  save  any  work  need  to  create  a  personal  Google account and share their work with that account.    6. Operating System on the Chromebook  6a: Updating the Chromebook  A  Chromebook  updates  itself  automatically  when  it  starts  up,  so  it  has  the  most  recent  version  of  the  Chrome  operating  system.  On  occasion,  students  will have to restart the Chromebook rather than just close the lid.    6b: Virus Protection  With  defense-in-depth  technology,  the  Chromebook  is  built  with  layers  of  protection  against  malware  and  security  attacks.  Files  are  stored  on  Google  Drive, so there is no need to worry about lost homework.    6c: Procedures for Restoring the Chromebook  If  a  Chromebook  needs  technical  support  for  the  operating  system,  all  support will be handled by the Information Technology Office.  Return to the Table of Contents 


64

7. Repairing/Replacing the Chromebook 7a: Vendor Warranty:  The  equipment  vendor  has  a  one  year  hardware  warranty  on  the  Chromebook.  The  vendor  warrants  the  Chromebooks  from  defects  in  materials  and  workmanship.  This  limited  warranty  covers  normal  use,  mechanical  breakdown, or faulty construction. The vendor warranty does not  warrant  against damage caused by misuse, abuse, accidents, or Chromebook  viruses.  There  is  a  deductible  that  will  be  charged  for  all  needed  repairs.  All  Chromebook  problems  should  be  reported  to  the  Information  Technology  Office.    7b: Chromebook Repair or Replacement Costs  The  devices  will  be  insured  by  MLS.  Students  will  have  a  deductible  for  each  repair or replacement billed to their account.  ● In  the  case  of  repairable  damage  or  hardware  failure not covered by  the vendor warranty, the deductible will be $25 for each claim.  ● In  the  case  of  loss,  theft,  irreparable damage or hardware failure not  covered  by  the  vendor  warranty,  the  replacement  deductible  will  be  $100  for  the  first  claim,  $175  for  the  second  claim,  and  $250  for  all  subsequent claims.  ● Replacement of power adapters will be $25.  ● MLS  reserves  the  right  to  charge  for  the  entire  replacement  cost  if  negligence  is  determined  on  the  handling  of  the  device  -  by  the  owner or another party.  ● If  the  device  is  stolen,  students are responsible for obtaining a police  report.    8. Chromebook Technical Support  Technical  Support  will  be  available  in  the  Information  Technology  Office.  Services provided include the following:  ● Hardware maintenance and repairs  ● User account support  ● Coordination and completion of warranty repairs  ● Distribution of rental and loaner Chromebooks  ● All repairs must be submitted to the Information Technology Office    Return to the Table of Contents 


65

9. Chromebook FAQ’s Q. What is a Chromebook?  ● “Chromebooks  are  mobile  devices  designed  specifically  for  people  who  live  on  the  web.  With  a  comfortable,  full-sized  keyboard,  large  display  and  clickable  trackpad,  all-day  battery  life,  lightweight  and  built-in ability to connect to wifi and mobile broadband networks, the  Chromebook  is  ideal  for  anytime,  anywhere  access  to  the  web.  They  provide  a  faster,  safer,  more  secure  online  experience  for  people  who  live  on  the  web,  without  all  the  time-consuming,  often  confusing,  high  level  of  maintenance  required by typical computers.”  (“Google”)  Q. What kind of software does a Chromebook run?  ● “Chromebooks  run  millions  of  web-based  applications,  or  web  apps,  that  open  right  in  the  browser.  You  can  access  web  apps  by  typing  their  URL  into  the  address  bar  or  by  installing  them  instantly  from  the Chrome Web Store.” (“Google”)  Q. What devices can I connect to a Chromebook?  ● Chromebooks can connect to:  ○ USB storage, mice, and keyboards   ○ SIM and SD cards  ○ External monitors and projectors  ○ Headsets, earsets, microphones  Q. Can the Chromebook be used anywhere at anytime?  ● Yes,  as  long  as  you  have  a  wifi  signal  to  access  the  web.  Chrome  offers the ability through Apps to work in an "offline" mode.  Q. Do Chromebooks come with Internet Filtering Software?  ● While  on  campus,  MLS  Chromebooks  will  use  the  school’s  wifi  to  access  the  internet  which  is  filtered.  While  at  home  or  off  campus,  the Chromebooks will not be filtered.   Q. Is there antivirus built into it?  ● It  is  not  necessary  to  have  antivirus  software  on  Chromebooks  because there are no running programs for viruses to infect.    Return to the Table of Contents 


66

Q. Battery life? ● Chromebooks  have  a rated battery life of 10+ hours. However, we do  expect  that  students  will  charge  them  each  evening  to  ensure  maximum performance during the school day.  Q. Do I need to buy a Chromebook for my student?  ● All  students  will  be  given  a  Chromebook  at  the  beginning  of  the  school year. These Chromebooks will be owned by MLS and provided  to  the  students  for  use  during  the  school  year.  At  the  end  of  their  time  at  MLS,  students  will  have  the  option  to  purchase  the  Chromebook according to the schedule below.  Q. Will students be able to keep the Chromebook when they leave MLS?  ● Yes,  there  will  be  a  buyout  cost  based  on  the  amount  of  time  that  a  student has used the Chromebook being purchased:   After 1 year - $150  After 2 years - $100  After 3 years - $50  After 4 years - $0  Q. Do I need to buy a case?  ● Purchasing  a  protective  Chromebook  case  is highly recommended. If  a  student  wishes  to  buy  a  case,  it  should  be  one  that  fits  a  12iinch  Chromebook and has a pocket for the charger.   Q. Do I need to buy anything for use with the Chromebook?  ● Chromebook  power  adapters  should  be  plugged  into  a  surge  protector. Students will have to provide their own surge protectors in  their dorm rooms and at home.  ● If  a  student  wishes  to  use  a  mouse  instead  of  the  Chromebook  trackpad,  they  will  have  to  provide  their  own  USB  wired  or  wireless  mouse.  The  students  will  also  have  to  provide  their  own  earbuds  to  use with the Chromebook when listening to audio.  Q. Can I use my own laptop?  ● A  student  may  bring  their  own  laptop  to  school,  but  only  the  Chromebook will be allowed for use in class. The Chromebook will be 

Return to the Table of Contents


67

preconfigured to  connect  to  the  MLS  wifi  and  be  downloaded  with  the apps preselected by the faculty.  Q. Can I take the Chromebook home?  ● The  Chromebook  is  for  the  student  to  use  for  the  school  year.  They  may  take  it  home  on  weekends  and  breaks.  However,  if  ​a  ​s​t​ud ​ e ​ ​n​t  r​e​pe ​ ​at​ ​ed ​ ​ly ​   ​l​os​ ​e​s  ​o​r  ​da ​ ​ma ​ ​ge ​ ​s  ​t​h​e​ir​   ​Ch ​ r​ ​o​me ​ ​bo ​ ​o​k  ​wh ​ ​il​ ​e  ​at​   ​h​o​me ​ ​,  ​t​he ​ ​y  m​ay ​   ​lo ​ ​se ​   ​t​h​e  ​privilege  ​o​f  ​t​ak ​ i​ ​ng ​   ​t​h​e  ​Ch ​ r​ ​o​me ​ ​bo ​ ​o​k  ​o​f​f-​ ​ca ​ ​mp ​ u ​ s​   ​f​or​   w​ee ​ ​ke ​ n ​ ​ds​   ​o​r  ​b​re ​ ​ak ​ ​s.​   At  the  end  of  the  school  year,  students  turn  in  their  chromebooks  and  will  receive  the  same  device  at  the  start  of  the next school year.  Q. What happens if I break my Chromebook?  ● Students  will  have  a  deductible  for  each  repair or replacement billed  to their account.  ○ In  the case of repairable damage or hardware failure not covered  by the vendor warranty, the deductible will be $25 for each claim.  ○ In  the  case  of  loss,  theft,  irreparable  damage  or hardware failure  not  covered  by  the  vendor  warranty,  the  replacement deductible  will  be  $100  for  the  first  claim,  $175  for  the  second  claim,  and  $250 for all subsequent claims.  ○ Replacement of power adapters will be $25.  ○ MLS  reserves  the  right  to  charge  for  the  entire  replacement  cost  if negligence is determined on the handling of the device.  ○ If  the  device  is  stolen,  students  are  responsible  for  obtaining  a  police report.  10. Schoology  MLS  uses  Schoology  as  a  Learning  Management  System  which  will  organize  digital  content  for  each  teacher’s  class.  Each student will use their mlsem.org  email address to create a Schoology account.    11. Internet Usage  11a: While at MLS  ● MLS offers Wi-Fi throughout the campus.  ● The network is available to students according to posted schedules.  ● All internet activity is monitored by the network administrator.  Return to the Table of Contents 


68

● Students are to follow the guidelines in the Acceptable Use Policy.   11b: While not connected to the MLS network  ● Parents  are  responsible  for  monitoring  internet  activity  and  device  usage while the device is not connected to our network.  ● A useful resource for proper internet usage is:  http://www.connectsafely.org    12. Personal Electronic Devices  ● Personal  electronic  devices  include  but  are  not  limited  to  the  following:  cell  phones,  smart  phones,  tablets,  e-readers,  laptops,  netbooks, and MP3 players.  ● Personal electronic devices may be used outside of classrooms.  ● Each  teacher  or  supervisor  has  the  option  to  allow  or  not  allow  personal  electronic  devices  in  their  classroom  or  area  of  responsibility.  If  the teacher or supervisor chooses not to allow these  devices, students are to follow the directions that are given.   

 

Rev. 08/2019

Textbooks  

MLS provides  textbooks  for  classes  through  its  book  rental  program,  thus  sparing  students  the  expense  of  purchasing  books  and  the  inconvenience of  trying  to  resell them.  The fee for this rental service is part of the tuition cost.  Texts  are  issued  during  the  opening  days  of  each  school  year  or  the  beginning  of  the  second  semester.  Students  are  expected  to  care  for  the  books  they  are  using.  The  cost  of  repairing  or  replacing  damaged  or  lost  books  is  charged  to  the  student.  Piano  and  organ  music  books  are  purchased by students as needed.    Some  classes  will  be  taught  with  e-texts.  These electronic textbooks are also  covered  in  the  cost  of  tuition.  Students  will  need  to  follow  the  directions  of  their  professors  in  regard  to  proper  use  of  these  e-texts  both  in  and outside  of  the  classroom.  Directions  on  how  to  download  and  use  these  e-texts  will  be provided in the classes where this is applicable. 

Return to the Table of Contents


69

Religion  classes  will  use  the  Bible  as  their  textbook.  Students  may  use  any  reliable  version  of  the  Bible  that  is  available  either  through  hard  copy  or  online.  However,  all  memorization  will  be  done  using  the  NIV  1984  text  so  that  there  is  uniformity  in  what  is  memorized.  Students  will be provided the  memory  work  in  this  version  to  use  for  their  class  memorization  by  their  religion professors.    Rev. 08/2019 

Unexcused Absences

Unexcused absences  are  recorded  for  feigned  illness,  expulsion  from  class,  being  absent  without  an  acceptable  excuse,  persistent  skipping  of  required  consultations,  or  for  persistent  tardiness.  Three  unexcused  tardies  equal  one  unexcused  absence.  Students  who  are  not  practicing  piano  or  organ  as  scheduled—including  unauthorized  use  of  cell  phones,  iPods,  or  other  electronic  devices--receive  unexcused  absences  and  may  also  be  given  an  additional  practice  during  Academic  Detention.  Unexcused  absences  are  reported  to  parents  and  may  result  in  discipline.  Students  who  are  tardy  or  absent  without  an  acceptable  excuse  may  be  required  to  attend  Academic  Detention.  For  more  information  see  ​Academic  Detention  elsewhere  in  this  Catalog.    Rev. 08/2018   

Extracurricular Appeals  

Students who  have  been  placed  on  ineligible  or  limited  eligibility  for  extracurriculars  should  work  to  raise  their  grades and can petition to change  their eligibility status provided that each of the following conditions are met:    1. Number  of  Appeals  per  Term:  a  student  may  appeal  only  once  per  term. 

Return to the Table of Contents


70

2. Timing of  Appeal:  A  student  may  not  appeal  any  sooner  than  the  completion  of  two  6-Day  cycles  following  the  end  of  a  term  in  which  they became limited eligible or ineligible.  3. Written  Petition:  a  student  must  write  a  letter  arguing  their  case  for  eligibility.  No  letter is required if students wait to become eligible at the  start of the next term following their term of limited or ineligibility.  4. Counseling:  a  student  must  attend  all  Academic  Success  Center  counseling  sessions  as  scheduled  unless  he/she  is  excused  by  the  ASC  Coordinator.  5. Academic  Conference:  a  student  must  meet  regularly  with  the  professors/instructors  of  the  classes  in  which  they  have  below  a  77%  average.  The  timing  and  frequency  of  these  meetings  are  at  the  discretion  of  the  professor/instructor;  however,  it  is  the  student's  responsibility to initiate these meetings.  6. G.P.A.:  a  student  must  raise  and  maintain  his/her  rolling  semester  G.P.A. to 1.7 (limited eligibility) or 1.9 (full eligibility).    Once  a  student  has  raised  their  overall  grade  percentage for all classes, then  he/she  will  write  an  appeals  letter  making  their  case  for  eligibility.  These  letters  are  to  be  e-mailed  to  their  academic  adviser.  The  academic  adviser  will  then  contact  professors/instructors,  members  of  the  Academic  Committee,  and  the  Academic  Success  Center  Coordinator  to  let  them  know  that  an  appeal  has  been  filed.  The chairman of the Academic Committee will  then  schedule  an  Appeals  Hearing  within  5  days  of  receipt  of  this  letter.  A  decision will be given approving or denying the appeals request. The granting  of an appeal is at the sole discretion of the Academic Committee.    Rev. 07/2018   

Return to the Table of Contents


71

Cocurricular Activities

Athletic Competition  

MLS carries  on  an  active  program  of  both  intramural  and  interscholastic  sports.  Intramural  teams  are  made  up  of  students  from  within  the  MLS  student  body  and  compete  against  each  other  purely  for  enjoyment.  Intramural competition occurs in sports of interest to the student body.    For  interscholastic  competition  MLS is a member of the Tri-Valley Conference  of  eighteen  schools.  Seminary  competes  in  the  TVC  West  Division.  Through  membership  in  the  Michigan  High School Athletic Association, MLS competes  against schools across the state in post-season tournament play.  Programs are offered for boys and girls in the following sports:    FALL    Boys Football, Cross Country    Girls Volleyball, Cross Country, Pom Pon*  WINTER    Boys Basketball, Wrestling  Girls Basketball, Pom Pon  SPRING  Boys Baseball, Track  Girls Softball, Track    *not interscholastic   

 

Rev. 08/2019

Broad-based Learning  

At MLS,  learning  occurs  in  and  out  of  the  classroom.  As  students  consider  a  life  of  service  in  the  public  ministry,  they  value  the  chance  to  let  the  light  of  God’s  Word  help  them  to  see  more  clearly  the  world  in  which  they  live  and  the  people  who  inhabit  it.  Cocurricular  activities  at  MLS  support  the  same  Return to the Table of Contents 


72

aims as  classroom  instruction,  but  allow  lessons  to  take  shape  in  non-traditional settings.    Rev. 07/2018   

Extracurricular Code  

MLS offers  a  broad  and  active  extracurricular  program  for  a  number  of  reasons.  These activities provide healthy outlets for youthful energy.  They  strengthen  young  bodies  and  minds  and  develop  skills  not  used  in  the  classroom.  They  offer  service  to  others.  Thus  extracurricular  activity  becomes a training ground for future public service.    Students  who  participate  in  extracurriculars  are  ambassadors  of  Michigan  Lutheran  Seminary  in  a  special  way.  By  virtue  of  participation  they  are  publicly  identified  with  the  school  and  everything  for  which  it  stands.  The  coaches,  advisors,  directors,  and  the  administration  of  MLS  give  careful  thought  to  that  public  identity  as  they  make decisions guiding the conduct of  all participants.     Academics    Extracurricular  participants  are  to  achieve  and  maintain  good  academic  standing  as  established  by  the  school.  Those  with  ​limited  eligibility  may  practice  but  may  not  represent  the  school​.  ​In  cases  where  "represent  the  school"  is  not  clearly  defined,  the  chairman of the Extracurricular Council will  decide how to apply limited eligibility status.    Those  ​ineligible  must  drop  practice  as  well.  Any  change  in  eligibility  takes  place  after  the  Academic  Committee  completes  its  grade  review  after  the  first,  second,  fourth  and  fifth  terms,  or  when  a  new  semester  begins.  Academic  considerations  take  precedence  over  extracurricular  considerations.           Return to the Table of Contents 


73

Attendance   Extracurricular  participants  attend  all  practices,  meetings,  and performances  unless  excused  in  advance  by  the  person  in  charge  of  the  activity,  or  unless  detained for academic reasons, such as Period Ten.     Conduct    In  general,  the  rules  of  the  school  that  apply  to  all  students  enrolled  at  MLS  are the rules that govern the conduct of students involved in extracurriculars.  In  addition,  the  following  rules  of  conduct  apply  to  participants  in  extracurriculars:  1. The  status  of students for practicing and performing in extracurriculars  while  they  are  under  school discipline shall be determined by the Dean  of  Students  in  consultation  with  the  adult  in  charge  of  that activity and  the  Extracurricular  Chairman.  It  is  possible  for  such  discipline  to  carry  over into the following school year.    2. The  use  of  tobacco  in  any  form,  alcoholic  beverages  of  any  kind,  non-prescribed  controlled  drugs,  and  illegal  performance  enhancing  substances  in  any  way  will  result  in  some  degree  of  forfeiture  of  participation  in  an  extracurricular  activity.  For  example,  in  athletics,  violation  of  these  training  rules  will  result  in  forfeiture  of  all  participation  for  the  remainder  of  that  team's current season and for a  minimum  of  one  month's  time.  Two  violations  in  one  school  year  will  result in forfeiture of participation for all athletics that year.    3. Other  rules  of  conduct  may  include  items  such  as  curfew,  dress,  personal appearance, and the like.     Notification     The  extracurricular  code  will  be  distributed  to  all  students  and  parents  at  registration  time  each  school  year. The adult in charge of each activity, under  the  guidance  of  the  school's  Extracurricular  Council,  will  share  all  rules  of  conduct with all participants at the beginning of each activity.    Adopted 2012 

Rev. 07/2018

Return to the Table of Contents


74

Performance Opportunities  

Music    The  voices  of  the  MLS  Concert  Choir  practice  four  times  each  week  and  sing  in  WELS  congregations  around  Michigan  as  often  as  twice  a  month.  Juniors  and  seniors  audition  for  membership.  In  even-numbered  years,  a  five-day  tour  takes  place.  In  odd-numbered  years  the  choir  makes  an  extended  tour  outside Michigan during spring break.       “The  Shadows”  is  a  group  of  twelve  student  singers  who  are  selected  from  the  ranks  of  the  Concert Choir to rehearse and perform at grade schools and  other public relations functions to promote the purpose of MLS.      The ​MLS Cardinal Band practices three times weekly.  There is a band concert  each  fall  and  spring,  along  with  performances  at  the  Christmas  and  Commencement  Concerts.  The  Pep  Band,  drawn  from  the  band  membership, plays at athletic events.      As  time  and  talent  permit,  MLS  also  assembles  small  musical  groups  to  perform at various school functions.    Drama      The  MLS  Court  Street  Players  (CSP)  present  an  annual  major  stage  production,  alternating  musicals  with  non-musical  plays.  In  the  spring  a  Children’s  Theater  production  is  presented  to  entertain  the  youth  of  our  congregations  and  schools.  CSP  also  arranges  periodic  theater  outings  and  workshops in stagecraft.    An  annual  Talent  Show  offers  all  students  a  chance  to  perform  before  an  appreciative audience.    Rev. 08/2019   

Return to the Table of Contents


75

Project Titus  

In Scripture, Titus was a student of the apostle Paul and accompanied him on  several  of  his  missionary  journeys.  Today  Titus  lends his name to a program  that allows current MLS students to have similar mission experiences.    Since  1981,  MLS  students  have  traveled  during  the  summer  months  to  cities  and  countries  both  in  the  U.S.  and  abroad.  These  trips  allow  them  to  be  exposed  to  cross-cultural  outreach,  to  gain  experience  in  the  work  of  a  mission,  and  to  be  encouraged  to  continue  their  training  for  the  public  Gospel  ministry.  In  keeping  with  its  purpose  of  ministry  training,  MLS,  along  with  the  WELS,  covers  the  majority  of  a  trip’s  cost.  Students  pay  a  $200  fee  which is applied to an account after the committee finalizes trip participants.     Beginning  in  2014,  our  students  also  have  new  opportunities  to  serve  their  Lord  right  in  the  Saginaw  area.  This  is  due  to  a  new  program  called  Project  Titus  -  Saginaw.  Opportunities  such  as  helping  at  nursing  homes,  serving  at  the  local  pregnancy  counseling  center,  helping  with  a  local  congregation’s  outreach  might  all  be  possible  opportunities  for  students  who  want  to  let  their light shine in Christian action.    Rev. 07/2019   

Publications  

A staff  of  students  publishes  ​The  Red  'n'  White​,  Seminary’s  school  periodical.  Articles  are  posted  periodically  on  Facebook  and  via  the  Cardinal  App,  an  internet  portal  for  members  of  the  MLS  family.  Each  year,  student  editors  and  staff  also  assemble  the  Cardinal​,  the  MLS  yearbook.  Each  student  enrolled at MLS receives a copy of the yearbook.      Rev. 08/2019   

Return to the Table of Contents


76

Student Leadership  

To encourage  involvement  and  foster  leadership  skills,  membership  in  the  Student Council is open to any student who is willing and able to serve.     The  chief  work  of  the  Student  Council  is  to  plan  and  carry  out  the  various  school-wide  activities  that  occur  throughout  the  year.  These  activities  include  MLS  Homecoming,  the  Christmas  Party,  the  Winter  Carnival,  and  the MLS Talent Show, as well as blood drives.    Rev. 08/2019   

STUDENT LIFE Announcements   

Only on  special  occasions  will  announcements  be  made  after  chapel  by  a  faculty  member.  Normally,  announcements  will  be  found  on  the  Cardinal  App  home  page  for  students  and  faculty  to  read.  Faculty  and  group  advisers  can  submit  announcements  either  for  campus  wide  notification  or  for  individuals  via  the  Cardinal  App  announcements  form.  Students  who wish to  make  announcements should consult with the faculty adviser for their group.  The  faculty  member  will  then  submit  the  announcement  via  the  Cardinal  App.  Students  are  expected  to  read  posted  announcements  that  apply  to  them on a daily basis.    Rev. 07/2018 

Boy/Girl Relations

Displays of  affection  between  boys  and  girls  should  be  decent  and  God  pleasing. Care should be taken to avoid offense to bystanders and passersby.  No  kissing  or  massages,  especially  in  the  commons.  Students  who  behave in 

Return to the Table of Contents


77

poor taste  will  be  disciplined.  Counseling  will  be  given  to  those  who  have  caused offense.    Rev. 07/2018 

Campus Life  

In all  areas  of  life  at  MLS,  God's  Word  rules  supreme.  Rules  and  regulations  are  set  up  for  the  orderly  operation  of  the  school.  When  enrolled,  students  consent  to  place  themselves  under  the  policies  of  the  school,  whether  they  are on or off campus.    The  dean  of  students  is  the  campus  pastor  of  the  student  body.  He  is  assisted  in  his  duties  by  the  tutors  (dormitory  supervisors)  and  the  dean  of  girls,  and  is  supported  by  the  president  and  faculty.  The  dean  endeavors  to  work  in  harmony  with  parents  and  with  a  student's  home  pastor.  The  dean  guides student life through encouragement and correction, law and gospel. 

 

Rev. 08/2019

Care of School Property  

The repair  or replacement cost of any damaged items provided by the school  will  be  charged  to  any  student  whose  use  of  the  campus  or  its  furnishings  is  reckless  or  whose  conduct  causes  avoidable  damage.  When  the  responsibility  for  damage  cannot  be  pinpointed,  the  cost  of  repair  or  replacement  is  distributed  to  all  roommates, to all living on a particular floor,  to  all  using  a  specific  area,  or  even to the student body at large. Students are  always  given  an  opportunity  to  accept  responsibility  for  accidental  damage  and step forward to make restitution.    For reasons of campus security, students are not to prop open exterior doors  and  are  forbidden  the  use  of  master  keys.  A  student  possessing  an  unauthorized master key faces automatic expulsion.    Rev. 07/2018 

Return to the Table of Contents


78

Controlled Substances  

Use of  alcohol  or  any  type  of  regulated  drug  without a proper prescription is  forbidden.  The  consumption  of  either  is  a  violation  of  the  law in the state of  Michigan  and  is  considered  a  breach  of  the  confidence  established  when  a  student enrolls. Offenders may be suspended and expelled.    Parents  are  expected  to  provide  firm  supervision  of  social  gatherings  that  they  or  their  children  host  for  other  MLS  students.  A  student  who  hosts  a  party  at  which  controlled  substances  are  served  forfeits  enrollment.  Possession  or use of tobacco or nicotine in any form is not permitted and will  result in discipline.    Rev. 07/2018 

Dining Hall

The MLS  Dining  Hall  provides  meals  for  dormitory  students,  seven  days  a  week.  As  a  staff,  the  Food  Service  Department  aims  to  provide  diners  with  tasty,  nutritious  meals  that  enable  them  to  reach  their  full  potential  in  the  classroom,  on  the  athletic  field,  or  in  support  of  God’s  ministry.  The  Dining  Hall  is  designed  as  an  all-you-care-to-eat  experience  with  multiple  entrées,  seasonal  fruits  and  vegetables,  a  20+  item  salad  bar,  scratch-made soups, as  well as freshly-baked desserts.     With  students  from  all  over  the  globe,  we  continuously  strive  to  prepare  foods  from  various  ethnicities  to  give  these  students  a  little  taste  of  home,  while  also  offering  domestic  students  the  chance  to  try  some  international  flavor.  We  actively  encourage  students  to  try  food  items  that  they  may  not  have  seen  or  tasted  before,  in  the  hopes  that  they  may  find  a  new  favorite.  Suggestions  or  recipes  from  home  are  always  appreciated  and  have  shown  to help alleviate homesickness.    The  past  decade  has  seen  a  dramatic  rise  in  food  allergies  and  sensitivities  among  Americans.  Please  bring  any  medically-based  food  concerns  to  the  attention  of  our  Food  Service  Director,  Rob  DeVore,  at  ​rjd@mlsem.org​.  We  Return to the Table of Contents 


79

will work  with  parents  and  our  medical  staff  to  provide  meal  alternatives  when  necessary,  such  as  nut-free  desserts,  lactose-free  milk,  or  gluten-free  pastas and breads.    In  addition  to  providing  meals  for  the  dormitory  students,  the  MLS  Dining  Hall  offers  the  option  to  purchase meals to commuting students, faculty, and  staff  members.  These  meals  are  billed  at  a  cost  of  $4.00  per  meal  for  the  same all-you-care-to-eat plan as the dormitory students.     Families  with  multiple  students  attending  MLS  may  choose  to  have  their  accounts  combined  into  a  single  family  plan,  rather  than  maintaining  separate  accounts  for  each  student.  An  additional  benefit  to  this  family  plan  is  that  parents  or  other  family  members  are  able  to use the same plan when  they visit campus.    Funds  remaining  in  meal  accounts  at  the  conclusion  of  enrollment  can  be  held  for  future  family  members,  transferred  to  the  tuition  account,  or  refunded to families at their request.     If you have any questions about the MLS Dining Hall or meal accounts, please  contact our Food Service Director, Rob DeVore, at ​rjd@mlsem.org​.  Rev. 08/2019 

Dormitory Living

Each dormitory  resident  is  supplied  with  a  bed,  a  chest  of  drawers,  a  study  desk  and  chair.  Dormitory  students  most  often  will  have  their  study  halls  in  the  library.  However,  scheduled  study  periods  may  be  conducted  in  other  rooms.     Each  student  is  expected  to  provide  a  mattress  pad,  bed  linens,  towels,  pillow,  and  blankets.  If  fitted  sheets  are  preferred,  all  dormitory  mattresses  are  twin  extra  long.  Dorm  students  may  have  electronics  (computers,  game  systems,  televisions,  etc.)  in  their  rooms.  However,  freshmen  may  not  have  televisions  in  their  rooms  until  the  second  semester.  No  additional  furniture  Return to the Table of Contents 


80

may be  added  to  the  room  without  the  Dean  of  Students’  permission.  Fire  codes  prohibit  the  use  of  microwaves,  hot  pots,  irons,  and  refrigerators  in  dorm  rooms.  Microwaves  are  available  for  student use in the IDO and in the  Commons.  No  tape  of  any  kind  is  to  be  used  on  the  walls.  The  IDO  will  provide adhesives to dorm students free of charge.    Beds  must  be  made  daily  and rooms kept in good order.  Each residence hall  has  no  charge  laundry  equipment  for  use  by  students.  Storage  space  is  available for bicycles.    Rev. 07/2019 

Dress Code

How to Dress for School:   Being  a  student  at  MLS  is  a  high  calling.   It  is  your  current  God-given  vocation,  a  step  towards  another  high  calling  later  on.   The  school  therefore  asks  you  to  dress  the  part,  especially  during  the  academic  day  and  also  outside  the  academic  day.  ​ As  you  consider  what  to  wear  each  day,  give  thought  to  how  it  will  enable  you  to  be  a  good  student,  whether  it  is  appropriate  for the classroom setting, how you along with  everyone  else  can  instill  pride  in  the  student  body,  and  whether  it  is  modest,  neat,  and  in  keeping  with  the  important  business  of  the  day  that is before you.    A  faculty  committee  will  work  with  you  so  you  can  better  understand  what  the  school  considers proper attire as you make decisions on what  to  wear.   This  committee  will  also  counsel  you  when  they  feel  it  is  necessary  and  ask  you  to  change  your  attire  if  it  is  considered  inappropriate.      To show respect for classroom decorum…  ● hats or head coverings are not to be worn in the classroom.  ● all clothing should be clean and in good condition. 

Return to the Table of Contents


81

● shorts of sufficient length are only allowed in August, September and May.  ● clothing should not display anything that might be inconsistent with  our Christian values.  ● items primarily meant for sleepwear are not allowed (such as slippers).  ● items primarily meant for athletic and recreational purposes are not  allowed in class (such as sweatpants).    To strive at all times for the decent and wholesome appearance that  Scripture encourages….    ● skirts and tops should not be distasteful or provocative, covering the  midriff and chest areas.  ● tight-fitting leggings and the like must be covered by a dress or skirt.  ● tank tops of any kind are not allowed in class.   ● undergarments should never be visible.    To help instill pride among the MLS family…  ● MLS attire is strongly encouraged.  ● clothing or personal grooming that is considered outside the  mainstream should only be done if approval is given in advance (such  as hair styles or color, jewelry, or tattoos).  ● students should wear clothing that is of higher standard in class than  what is used for lounging.   

Rev. 07/2019

Drills and Security  

Periodic fire,  tornado  or  intruder  drills  will  be  conducted.  Please  follow  posted  guidelines. Do not compromise the security of the school by propping  outside doors that are locked.    Rev. 04/2019 

Return to the Table of Contents


82

Employment  

The MLS  Board  discourages  employment that erodes scholastic achievement  or  that  lessens  participation  in  the  MLS  extracurricular  program.  State  of  Michigan work permits are available in the administration office.

 

Rev. 07/2018

Free Time  

Hallways are  not  for  holding  meetings  or  socializing.  Students  may  use  the  locker  hallways  quietly  to  get  or  return  books  while  classes  are  in  session  or  students  are  practicing  piano.  Shouting  and  disorderly  conduct  inside  the  building  is  not  permitted.  Running  indoors,  except  for  the  gymnasium,  is  forbidden  because  it  is dangerous. Music is to be played at moderate volume  on  campus--especially  in  the  commons  and  dormitory.  Commuting  students  are  not  to  be  in  the  upper  three  floors  of  the dormitory during the academic  day except with the permission of the dorm staff.    Rev. 07/2018 

Guests  

Guests include  anyone  who  is  not  a  member  of  the  MLS  student  body  or  its  faculty  and  staff.  Guests and alumni who wish to visit any part of the building  at  times  other  than  public  events  must  sign  in  at  the school office during the  day  or  the  interdorm  office  at  night.  They  will  be  given  a  badge  to  identify  them  as  visitors  or  alumni  so  that  current  students and faculty will recognize  them  as  having  registered  in  either  the  Interdorm  office  or  the  administration  office.  Guests  are  expected  to  leave  the  campus  within  an  hour  following  a  public  event,  after  which  permission  for  a  longer  stay  is  necessary.  There  is  a  fee  for  guests  or  commuting  students  to  stay  in  the  dormitory. 

 

Rev. 07/2018

Return to the Table of Contents 


83

Health Services  

A nurse  is  on  duty  during  morning  hours  each  school  day.  She  keeps  each  student's  health  history  record.  An  athletic  trainer  is  present  at  many  interscholastic  athletic  events  and  most  practices,  and  is  available  on  a  regular  basis  to assist any student, including non-athletes. The cost of visiting  a physician or the hospital is billed directly to parents.   

Rev. 07/2018

MLS Directory  

Each year  MLS  publishes  a  directory  of  all  members  of the Seminary student  body,  faculty,  and  staff.  Names  of  students,  home  addresses,  and  phone  numbers  are  considered  directory  information.  Families  are  able  to indicate  to  MLS  through  the  enrollment  process  if  they  wish  to  have  any  such  information  excluded  from  the  campus  directory.  Please  treat  this  information  with great care and do not share the link to our directory outside  the MLS family.    

Rev. 07/2018

Motor Vehicles  

Car use  assumes  good  habits  and  responsibility. All students are expected to  follow  school  policies  regarding  the  use  of  cars  and  other  vehicles  because  car  use  is  a  privilege  rather  than  a  right.  Dormitory  students  must  have  permission  from  the  dorm  staff  to  use  their  cars  and  to  ride  in  the  cars  of  others  in  accordance  with  the  wishes  of  each  student’s  parents.  Parents  inform the dorm staff of their wishes during the enrollment process.    Both  commuting  and  dormitory  students  who  want  to  drive  and  park  vehicles  while  at  MLS  must  obtain  an  operating  permit  from the school. Cars  brought  to  the  environs  of  the  school  are  to  be  parked  in  the school parking  lot  in  the  assigned  space.  Drivers  of  cars  parked  in  front  of  the  gate  face  a 

Return to the Table of Contents


84

fine. Students  should  never  park  in  the  dormitory  staff  parking  area  by  the  dumpster. ​Please drive slowly in the parking lot and on Hardin Street​.    The privilege to park or operate a vehicle is suspended when a student is  behind in financial obligations to the school. Drinking and driving results in  automatic termination of enrollment whether a student lives in the dorm or  commutes. 

 

Rev. 07/2018

Taking Care  

We are  caretakers  of  the  campus our synod has given us to use; help to keep  all  areas  neat  and  clean.  Pick  up  after  yourself  and  others,  and use the trash  containers.  Food,  beverages  (except  for  water)  and  gum  are  not  to  be  consumed  in  classrooms  or  piano  rooms.  Sports  equipment  is  for  outdoors  only.  Do  not  pass  through  the  door  leading  from  the  bulletin  board  hallway  to  the  music  hallway  when  the  light  above  the  door  is  lit.  For  the  security  of  all,  do  not  prop  doors  open.  Walking  on  the  roofs  of  the  school  is  strictly  forbidden.  The  City  of  Saginaw  charges  a  fee  for  false  alarms  that  bring  fire  department  vehicles  to  our  campus.  The  full  replacement  cost  of  any  vandalized  item,  the  cost  of  repair  for  damage  above  normal  wear,  or  the  charges  for  a  false  fire  alarm  will  be  charged  to  those  responsible.  When  no  one  accepts  responsibility,  charges  are  made  to  the  damage  deposit  of  all  who  customarily  use  the  item  or  the  area.  Please  keep  your  personal  items  secure so that others are not tempted. Do not take anything that isn’t yours. 

 

Rev. 07/2018

The Seminary Family  

The expression  ​Seminary  Family  is  often  heard  on  campus.  It  is  used  by  students  and  faculty  to  describe  the  close  and  friendly  bond  that  exists  at  MLS.  Our  common  Christian  faith  ties  people  together  in  love  and  concern  for  one  another.  Students  worship,  study,  practice,  compete  and  eat  meals  together.  Friendships  can  grow  so  strong  that  classmates  consider  each  other brothers and sisters for life.   Return to the Table of Contents 


85

Each  year  students  review  the  “Seminary  Family  Code,”  a  document  that  emphasizes  the  positive  relationships  that  exist  between  members  of  a  Christian family.    Students  are  to  observe  the  scriptural  principles  reflected  in  the  MLS  Family  Code.  New  students  are  encouraged  to  look  to  responsible  students  in  the  upper  classes  for  help  and  guidance  and  to  respect  their  efforts  to  promote  the  policies  and  procedures  of  the  school.  Ordering  students  to run errands,  clean,  make  beds,  carry  books  or  trays,  give  up  food,  money  or  other  personal  items,  or  do  other  tasks  for  the  personal  benefit  of  upperclass  students breaks the Seminary Family Code.    MLS Family Code    As a student at MLS and child of God, I am committed to…     ● Standing  up  for  what  is  God-pleasing,  not let the school suffer because  of peer pressure  ● Holding a higher standard for myself than others, not be a hypocrite  ● Treating others with dignity, not embarrass or humiliate  ● Earning respect, not demand it  ● Showing respect, not create disorder by undermining authority  ● Dealing  privately  before  publicly,  neither  run  to  authorities  nor  gossip  as a first step  ● Remembering  that  I, too, am a sinner loved by my Lord, not conform to  the ways of the world but seek and apply guidance from God’s Word     As a student at MLS, I have a right to expect…     ● Respect for my person, my possessions and my feelings  ● Discipline  when  I  am  wrong  that  is  fair  and  for  my  good,  and  that  is  done out of Christian love  ● Full  use  of  my  time  and  opportunities  for  worship,  study,  meals,  recreation and sleep  ● Nothing for myself that is not right for others  Return to the Table of Contents 


86

As an upperclassman at MLS I have a special responsibility to…    ● Set a positive example as a leader on campus, not lead others astray  ● Use  authority  only  when  other  responsible  people will support me, not  go off on my own  ● Discipline in Christian love, not intimidate or use physical force  ● Be  able  to  explain  and  defend  my  actions  to  anyone,  not  act  before  I  think 

 

Rev. 07/2018

Things Forbidden  

The use  or  possession  of  tobacco  or  nicotine  products,  alcoholic  beverages,  or  non-prescribed  controlled  drugs  is  forbidden.  Violators  face  discipline  up  to  expulsion  and  lose  eligibility  according  to  the  provisions  of  the  MLS  Extracurricular  Code.  A  student  may  not  possess  weapons  on  campus.  Any  knives,  bows  or  guns  brought  onto  campus  for  hunting  must  be  checked  in  immediately  with  a  member  of  the  dorm  staff.  ​Expulsion  from  school  is  automatic  for  the  following  reasons:  driving  under  the  influence,  hosting  a  gathering  of  students  at  which  the  host  permits  controlled  substances  to  be  consumed,  having  an  unauthorized  school  key,  and  being  in  the  wrong  dormitory without an acceptable reason.    Rev. 07/2018 

Worship

Regular contact  with  God’s  Word  and  the  shared  blessings  of  joint  worship  are  central  to  life  at  MLS  Students  are expected to be regular in their church  attendance  when  at  home  and  to  attend  services  at  a  Saginaw  area  WELS or  ELS  congregation  when  at school on the weekends. All students are expected  in  morning  chapel.  All  students  on  campus  at  the  time  are  expected  at  evening chapel.         Return to the Table of Contents 


87

Morning Chapel     Because  of  the  importance  of  this  activity,  please  maintain  a  worshipful  atmosphere  at  all  times.  Leave  classroom  materials  at  the  door  of  your  next  class,  not  at  the  chapel  doors.  Enter  chapel  immediately  through  the  closest  door  and  sit  in  your  assigned  seat.  Remain  quiet  and  prepare  for  worship.  Keep  feet  off  the  chapel  chairs.  Leave  the  chairs  in  formation.  Exit  chapel  by  your  class  door  when  directed  by  the  student  usher.  Never  schedule  a  meeting immediately after morning chapel.    Rev. 07/2018 

Administration Faculty and Instructors   

Administration    President Vice President Dean of Students Dean of Girls Academic Dean Admissions Director, Domestic Admissions Director, International Athletic Director Assistant Athletic Director Music Director Registrar Business Manager

Mark T. Luetzow Justin J. Danell  David E. Koehler  Melissa J. LaBair  M. Brian Kopp  Andrew T. Naumann    Karl M. Schmugge  Andrew T. Naumann  Leonard A. Proeber  Andrew T. Naumann  Chris M. Eubank 

Permanent Faculty    Ash, Allen, B.A. (2018)

Return to the Table of Contents

Science


88

Bode, Marcus, B.A., M.Div. (1987) German, Latin Chartrand, Ross, B.A., M.Div (2017) Admissions  Danell, Justin, B.S. (2018) History  Koehler, David, B.A., M.Div. (2010) Religion  Kopp, Brian, B.A., M.Ed. (2015) English  Kopp, Cheryl, B.S. (2016) Art, English  LaBair, Melissa, B.S. (2012) English, Phy Ed  LaBair, Seth, B.S. (2013) Mathematics, History  Luetzow, Mark, B.A., M.Div. (2018) Religion  Naumann, Andrew, B.A., M.Div., M.Ed. (2010) Religion  Proeber, Leonard, B.S., M.A. (1995) Music  Scheuerlein, Eric, B.S. (2017) Mathematics  Schmitzer, Jordan, B.S. (2018) Phy Ed, Science  Schmugge, Karl, B.A., M.Div (1999) Phy Ed, Religion  Vasold, Terrance, B.S., M.A. (1981) (Ret.) History    Instructors    Chartrand, Charissa, B.S. (2017) Spanish  Jacobs, Haven, B.S., M.A. (2018) Spanish  Luetzow, Bethel, B.S. (2018) Piano  Proeber, Laurel, B.S. (2001) Piano  Siegler, Arianna, B.S. (2017) Music  Valus, Courtney, B.S. (2019) Music, Piano        Dormitory Supervisors    Jensen, Nathanael, B.A., M.Div (2019) Latin, History  Plocher, Megan, B.S. (2019) Mathematics, Phy Ed  Plocher, Micah, B.A., M.Div (2018) German  Van Alstine, Katherine, B.S. (2018) Mathematics    Rev. 07/2019 

Return to the Table of Contents 


89

Governing Board  

Rev. Greg Gibbons, Livonia, MI, C ​ hairman​ (2019) Mr. Keith Kriewall, Puyallup, WA S ​ ecretary ​(2020)  Mr. Stephen Schultz, Antioch, IL (2023)  Rev. Adam Bode, Cleveland, WI (2024)  Rev. Craig Engel, Wilmar, MN (2024)  Mr. Mark Eubank, Saginaw, MI (2018)  Rev. Andrew Retberg, The Woodlands, TX (2020)  Mr. Brent Diehm, Onalaska, WI (2022)    Advisory Members  Rev. Mark Schroeder, Milwaukee, WI  President of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod  Rev. Snowden Sims, Columbus, OH  President of the Michigan District  Rev. Paul Prange, Milwaukee, WI  Administrator for the WELS Board for Ministerial Education  Rev. Mark T. Luetzow, Saginaw, MI  President of Michigan Lutheran Seminary    The  MLS  Governing  Board  meets  annually  in  September/October,  and  February/March.  Additional  meetings  and  phone  conferences  are  scheduled  as  needed.  Board  members  may  be  contacted  through  the  MLS  Administration Office.    Rev. 08/2019 

Professors Emeriti  

Spaude, Milton P. Spaude, Jerome E. Dietrich, Loren C.  Hosbach, Harold A.  Westphal, Steven C.  Schroer, Robert M.  Return to the Table of Contents 

(1958-1991) (1970-1993)  (1969-1994)  (1977-1995)  (1992-2009)  (1973-2013) 


90

Zeiger, Dr. William E. Vasold, Terrance R. Wooster, James K.  Kohler, Joanne R  Weihrauch, Carl J. 

(1976-2014) (1981-2015)  (1996-2017)  (1995-2018)  (2001-2018) 

Rev. 07/2018 

Return to the Table of Contents

Profile for Michigan Lutheran Seminary

MLS School Catalog  

MLS School Catalog  

Advertisement