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CELEBRATING OUR ONE-HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM Friday, September 18, 2015

Ann Arbor, Michigan

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Schlissel to receive 3-percent pay raise Regents approve salary increase to $772,500 By MICHAEL SUGERMAN Daily News Editor

Now a year into his tenure, University President Mark Schlissel will receive a pay raise. The University’s Board of Regents unanimously voted at their September meeting Thursday to bump Schlissel’s salary by approximately 3 percent — effectively increasing his yearly earnings from $750,000 to $772,500. Schlissel’s five-year contract, which he signed in 2014, provided for annual salary increases at the regents’ discretion. Regent Andrew Richner (R–Grosse Pointe) proposed the salary increase, which was recommended by the board’s Personnel, Compensation and Governance Committee’s annual review of the president. Richner thanked Schlissel for getting to know the Michigan community as well as assessing its strengths and making moves to improve it. He touted Schlissel’s forthcoming diversity plan, efforts to “enhance campus climate and safety,” the sexual assault survey, new initiatives to increase the University’s affordability and his ability to “operate the business of the University with best-in-class efficiency.” “We very much appreciate the job President Schlissel has performed in his first year,” Richner See SCHLISSEL, Page 3A

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LSA sophomore Sydnee Koshar stops to read a memory of a lost loved one at the Send Silence Packing exhibit on the Diag on Thursday. The 1,100 backpacks placed on the lawn were part of an educational presentation by Active Minds intended to bring awareness to the high rate of mental illness and suicide on college campuses.

1,100 bags placed on Diag to promote mental health Active Minds seeks to raise awareness of suicide rates among college students By CHARLOTTE JENKINS Daily Staff Reporter

Thousands of backpacks — 1,100 in total — covered the Diag Thursday afternoon, representing the average number of college students who commit suicide every year in the United States. The display, titled Send Silence Packing, was organized by the University’s chapter of Active Minds, a

national organization that aims to raise mental health awareness on college campuses. The backpacks were collected in honor of students who have committed suicide. Many of the bags were dedicated to individual students and included fliers sharing memories about those lost. One flier included a message from a mother about her son, Zachary Brunt, who committed suicide three years ago during his freshman year at Yale University. “(Zach) was the last person anyone would ever associate with suicide because he was confident, engaged, curious, brilliant, handsome — the TOTAL package,” she wrote. “Please help us create a worthy legacy for

Zach by getting help if you need it and by helping out friends in need.” LSA junior Alexandria Kolenda, Active Minds active members chair, said the stigma attached to suicide and mental health issues make it more difficult for students to get help. “I hope people learn to not be as afraid to talk about mental health issues and I hope people find their own voices,” Kolenda said. “I want them to know that they’re not alone. We have so many resources to help with this.” Throughout the event, information was distributed by representatives from Counseling and Psychological Services, Pulse, Wolverine Support Network, the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Services for Students

New dean of med. school appointed

GOVERNMENT

Bill would alter how consent is explained

Marschall Runge to assume role, continue as Health System CEO, executive VP

If passed, K-12 public schools in Mich. would teach affirmative consent

By ALLANA AKHTAR Daily Staff Reporter

University President Mark Schlissel recommended Wednesday that Marschall Runge, the current executive vice president for medical affairs and CEO of the University of Michigan Health System, be additionally appointed dean of the Medical School, effective Jan. 1. Schlissel said he hopes the appointment will facilitate joint research between the Medical School and UMHS, sparking new collaborations between medical research, education and patient care. “I know he shares my enthusiasm for this shared alignment of all aspects of our mission and he looks forward to carrying it forward through the health system organization,” Schlissel said. Runge’s new position as dean is part of an effort to restructure leadership at UMHS. According to Runge, UMHS has not seen the same innovation or excellence in past decade as it has in prior years. “In many areas we continue to do well, but in others we have missed opportunities to build upon our success and on our potential,” he said. He said for UMHS to regain its position of excellence among top medical centers, the University must hire leaders willing to take risks, make better decisions and strengthen performance in the health system and medical school. See DEAN, Page 3A

with Disabilities, the Spectrum Center and the Depression Center. In addition to posters with facts about student suicide, Send Silence Packing featured memory boards for students to sign in solidarity with those suffering from mental illness and to share memories of friends lost to suicide. Kinesiology sophomore Serena Saake said she found the visual nature of the display extremely powerful. “The way it is spread across the Diag is really beautiful because of all the people coming through here all day every day,” Saake said. “You can really visualize how much suicide affects students.” See HEALTH, Page 3A

GRANT HARDY/Daily

Vice President Joe Biden announces additional funding for the Detroit Department of Transportation at DDOT headquarters on Thursday.

For Biden, Detroit embodies personal story, political future Vice president talks transit, economic recovery during brief Michigan stop By SAM GRINGLAS Managing News Editor

DETROIT — When Joe Biden arrived at the Detroit Department of Transportation headquarters Thursday, the group of shift workers and local dignitaries who came to see him offered the kind of welcome you’d extend to an old friend.

“I want to introduce the man who I keep saying is Detroit’s best friend: Vice President Joe Biden,” said Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan, joking that the vice president has probably spent more time in the city than any place besides Washington, D.C. Biden is no stranger to Detroit. Thursday marked his fifth trip to the city since Duggan assumed office a year and a half ago. This time, the vice president stopped to herald the addition of 80 new buses to the city’s fleet, secured with the help of federal dollars. Biden loves Detroit, and should he decide to launch a bid for the presidency as several media reports insist

he is considering, he may look to the city and the state to love him back. “Detroit isn’t just an important city,” he told the crowd, a shining city bus behind him. “It’s an iconic city.” In his speech, Biden touted the city’s resurgence and the Obama administration’s efforts to assist in that process, such as securing funds to restore street lighting and locating a lightweight metals manufacturing research institute in the city. “We would never abandon the people of Detroit,” he said. “It’s like abandoning the heart of America.” Throughout the speech, Biden See BIDEN, Page 3A

By EMMA KINERY Daily Staff Reporter

Michigan Democrats are trying to change the way consent is discussed in the state — starting with how the concept is taught in schools. Though a bill jointly introduced Wednesday by state Sen. Curtis Hertel Jr. (D–Meridian Twp.) and state Rep. Tom Cochran (D–Mason) will not change the definition of consent in the state of Michigan as a whole, it will require Michigan public K-12 schools to focus on a conscious, affirmative “yes” as consent to having sex. The bill doesn’t impact University policies, but Hertel and Cochran said they hoped the bill would address the issue of sexual assault in college by educating Michigan students before they arrive on campus. Several universities in the state of Michigan have been or are currently under investigation by the See CONSENT, Page 3A

Football Saturday A look at what it’s like to be a Michigan football walk-on

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INDEX

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NEWS........................2A OPINION.....................4A ARTS.........................5A

SUDOKU.....................2A CL ASSIFIEDS...............6A S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 B


News

2A — Friday, September 18, 2015

MONDAY: This Week in History

TUESDAY: Professor Profiles

WEDNESDAY: In Other Ivory Towers

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THURSDAY: Student Voice

FRIDAY: Photos of the Week

LEFT: Michigan fans tailgate before Saturday’s defeat of Oregon State. (Ruby Wallau/ Daily)

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CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Protein disease Symposium

Nursing School Environment Art musuem grand opening law lecture after hours

WHAT: Three guest keynote speakers from Harvard, Stanford and Max Planke Institute will discuss molecules and machines. WHO: Center for the Discovery of New Medicines WHEN: Today from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. WHERE: Kahn Auditorium

WHAT: Open-house tours, ribbon cutting ceremony, reception and remarks to celebrate the grand opening of the School of Nursing. WHO: School of Nursing WHEN: Today at 11 a.m. WHERE: 426 North Ingalls Street

UM3D lab fall open house

Landslides lecture

War in 17th Discussion century China on Detroit

WHAT: Demonstrations of what the lab can do, including virtual reality, rapid prototyping, motion capture and animation. WHO: University Library WHEN: Today from 12 p.m to 6 p.m. WHERE: Duderstadt Center first floor, Digital Media Commons

WHAT: Jonathan Godt, coordinator of the U.S. Geographical Survey Landslide Hazard Program, will discuss landslide science. WHO: Earth and Environmental Sciences WHEN: Today at 3:30 p.m. WHERE: Room 1528, Clarence Cook Little Bldg.

WHAT: Ken Swope, University of Southern Mississippi professor, will discuss conflicts during the transition between the Ming and Qing dynasties. WHO: Confucius Institute WHEN: Today from 4 p.m to 5 p.m. WHERE: Koessler Room, Michigan League

WHAT: Avi Garbow, Environmental Protection Agency general counsel, will discuss his work with the EPA. WHO: Michigan Law WHEN: Today at 11:50 a.m. WHERE: Room 0225, South Hall

THREE THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW TODAY

WHAT: The University of Michigan Museum of Art offers extended hours, featuring a special exhibit from Tyree Guyton, creator of the Heidelberg Project. WHO: UMMA WHEN: Today from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. WHERE: UMMA

1

Wednesday’s GOP debate, hosted by CNN, drew a record-breaking 22.9 million viewers for the channel, CNN reported Thursday. The debate is the second of 12 during the primary season for the Republican candidates.

2

The Michigan football team will host UNLV at noon Saturday. The Wolverines beat Oregon State, 35-7, last week, while the Rebels lost to No. 10 UCLA, 37-3.

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BUSINESS STAFF

WHAT: Robert Fishman, professor of architecture and urban planning, will talk about Detroit history. WHO: Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning WHEN: Today from 6 p.m to 8 p.m. WHERE: Auditorium, Art and Architecture Building

3

New Orleans annouced this week that an unnamed donor will pay for four Confederate statues to be removed from the city, the Times-Picayune reported Thursday. The cost to remove the statues is estimated to be at $126,000.

Hussein Hakim Finance and Operations Manager Claire Ulak Production Manager Jordan Yob Marketing Manager Matt Pfenning UAccounts Manager Chris Wang Classifieds Manager Asja Kepes Local Accounts Colin Cheesman National Accounts Anna He Special Guides and Online Manager The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter terms by students at the University of Michigan. One copy is available free of charge to all readers. Additional copies may be picked up at the Daily’s office for $2. Subscriptions for fall term, starting in September, via U.S. mail are $110. Winter term (January through April) is $115, yearlong (September through April) is $195. University affiliates are subject to a reduced subscription rate. On-campus subscriptions for fall term are $35. Subscriptions must be prepaid. The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and The Associated Collegiate Press.

EarthFest encourages students Board of Regents approve new to embrace sustainable lifestyle undergrad public health major Annual event draws hundreds of students to Diag BY ALYSSA BRANDON Daily Staff Reporter

The University’s annual EarthFest celebrated waste reduction, healthy environments and climate action with a Diag event on Thursday. Geared toward educating students about sustainability, the festival featured games and free food from local eateries. Attendees were also encouraged to visit tables and booths manned by more than 50 sustainability groups. The event, which has been held on campus for almost 20 years, drew hundreds of students over the course of its fourhour duration. Barbara Hagan, sustainability representative in the University’s Office of Campus

Sustainability, said EarthFest primarily focused on sparking student engagement by showcasing the work of sustainability-based organizations on campus. “It highlights some of the work that all of the student groups as well as the internal departments and external nonprofits do to protect the environment,” she said. “We encourage new students to come and talk to the student groups to see which one they might want to get engaged in.” Circle K, Planet Blue and Michigan Dining were among the 50 participating organizations. Members of the University’s Solar Car team were also present with their award-winning solar car. Members of the LSA Student Government staffed tables where attendees could pick up small wildflower planters to take home. LSA senior Tanner Korponay, chair of the LSA Student Gov-

ernment subcommitte, Taking Responsibility for the Earth and Environment, said EarthFest demonstrates the importance of sustainability on campus. “(EarthFest makes) students realize that they can be sustainable in very simple ways around their homes and around campus by doing very simple things,” he said. LSA sophomore Uriel Lee, an LSA student government representative, said she EarthFest is way of celebrating and giving back to the planet. “It tells students how to be sustainable, but more so, it also shows a little appreciation for Mother Earth,” Lee said. “It’s raising awareness about the different things students can to do to help the environment and be sustainable at the same time.” Hagan said, she hoped the event helped students find organizations through which they can join the cause. “It would be awesome if it was an opportunity for students to connect with a student group that is aligned with their own ideas of what they want to work on, and then dive in and become involved and make a difference,” she said. “They can achieve that and have fun in the process and meet people they’ve never met before.”

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LSA Dean Andrew Martin addresses the Board of Regents in the Michigan Union on Thursday.

Two-year program to begin in the fall 2016 semester BY ALLANA AKHTAR Daily Staff Reporter

The University’s Board of Regents approved a two-year undergraduate major program through the School of Public Health at their monthly meeting Thursday. The program — through which students will be able to declare a public health major beginning in the fall 2016 semester — will focus on “the importance of critical thinking applied to important health problems of the 21st century,” according to an action request written by University Provost Martha Pollack and Martin Philbert, dean of the School of Public Health. “What I think is important to note is that this isn’t a preprofessional degree, it’s a liberal arts degree focused on the kinds of problems that public health researchers study,” Pollack said in an interview with The Michigan Daily on Tuesday. “And I think it’s going to be a really wonderful addition to the selection of opportunities for undergraduates.” Gary Harper, a professor in the Public Health School’s Department of Health Behav-

ior and Health Education who helped develop the major, said public health is an important area to study due to its strong presence at the intersection of health and policy. Everything from secondhand smoking, the effects of natural disasters and personal wellness, Harper noted, fall under the umbrella of “public health.” “Public health is so pervasive and it is so around us in everyday life,” Harper said. “It is really important that students have a good understanding of what public health is, what it does and how to think about world issues from a public health perspective.” Though a new major to the University, faculty and students have been expressing interest in the major and working toward developing the concentration. LSA junior Aditi Rao, an LSA Student Government representative, helped lead student efforts to create a minor in public health — and also consulted with faculty about the new major — after many students voiced interest in a public health degree through an LSASG survey. Like Harper, Rao touted the forthcoming public health degree as an interdisciplinary program that will encompass a combination of medicine, the environment and public policy.

“Allowing undergraduates to obtain a degree in public health will open many opportunities and provide a more interdisciplinary education,” she said in an e-mail interview. “Being knowledgeable about a field like public health is so important today, as the field is so relevant whether it’s regarding environmental issues or the next vaccine at a local or global level.” Harper said he and other faculty developed the degree program with student interest in mind. He said the coursework will teach students about the impact public health can have on local and global communities, and will incorporate active learning and field work. “We have really been developing a program that provides a liberal education approach to public health,” he said. “I think students will enjoy both the depth and the breadth of information that will be provided.” The program will feature three concentration areas: public health sciences, global public health and community public health. These areas will “encourage study abroad,” according to the action request. Students will apply during their sophomore year and begin public health studies as a junior, similar to applicationonly undergraduate programs such as the Ford School of Public Policy.


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NEWS BRIEFS

Expelled Michigan representative to run for seat again State Rep. Cindy Gamrat (R-Plainwell) was expelled from her seat in the state House. She was accused of being involved in a sex and cover-up scandal with state Rep. Todd Courser (R-Lapeer). Last Friday, just after 4 a.m., Gamrat was expelled by a 91-12 vote. Despite this, she told the Detroit Free Press that she was not concerned about going back. Five other people have filed for the seat in Lapeer County. They include Republicans Chris Tuski, Jake Davison, Ian Kempf, Gary Howell and James Dewilde. Courser, on the other hand, has not filed for the seat that he resigned from last week.

Ann Arbor crepe eatery appears to have closed doors The popular downtown Ann Arbor restaurant, What Crepe, is suspected to have closed. According to MLive, the restaurant was closed on Tuesday during normal business hours. They also reported equipment was being loaded into trucks on Monday. This is the fourth eatery in Liberty and State Street area to have closed.

Flint, Detroit named among top poorest cities in America According to a U.S. Census Bureau report released on Wednesday, Flint and Detroit rank among the most impoverished cities in the country. Flint has 40.1 percent of its population living below the poverty line. Based on the city’s size, this makes Flint the second-poorest city in the country. According to the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, 130,095 people in Genessee County, where Flint is located, are using food stamp assistance. This is about a 48% increase since 2005. Detroit has an improverished population of 39.3 percent. This means that Detroit is the poorest major city in America.

HEALTH From Page 1A Rackham student Geneva Langeland said though she was initially confused by the backpacks covering the Diag,

SCHLISSEL From Page 1A said. “He has hit the ground running … on the completion of President Schlissel’s first year in office, the Board of Regents would like to recognize and acknowledge a job well done. Regent Shauna Ryder-Diggs (D–Grosse Pointe) emphasized

DEAN From Page 1A Runge was appointed by the regents to lead UMHS in 2014. He previously served as the executive dean for the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Michael Johns, former Emory chancellor and executive vice president for health affairs, had filled the role in an interim capacity after the departure of former UMHS CEO Ora Pescovitz. She announced she her departure from the University after five years in the position. James Woolliscroft, the school’s current dean, said in an e-mail to the Medical School Community, obtained by The Michigan Daily, that he has long advocated for combining the two roles. He said he would step down in January after serving as dean since 2007. “By explicitly and visibly linking these pieces in our … mission of research, education and patient care in one person, we enable the seamless connec-

News the display’s deeper meaning quickly dawned on her. “I didn’t realize what was going on today so when I walked up and saw backpacks scattered I thought there had been some sort of student rapture, all these stu-

dents doing homework out on the lawn and then they just disappeared,” she said. “And then, I kind of realized – that’s exactly what happened. There all these students that should have been here, and aren’t.”

her appreciation for the work Schlissel has done in the realm of campus diversity, and spoke specifically about the recent diversity summit he hosted. “It was wonderful to see representation from all over this campus, including students, staff, faculty and administration,” she said. “The engagement was palpable,” she added, noting that the board will look forward to

the strategies that will follow further community insight and internal reviews. In her first year at the University, President Emerita Mary Sue Coleman netted $475,000 per year. By her third year in office, her salary had risen by roughly 4.5 percent to $484,500. By the end of her tenure at the University, Coleman was earning just over $603,000 per year.

tion between the people and resources of the medical school and the hospitals and health centers, while creating a transparent structure for both timely action and accountability,” Schlissel said. Regent Shauna RyderDiggs (D) said the integration of patient care, research and education will make UMHS a national leader in these realms. “This merging of our responsibilities we are discussing today is the next logical step in this process,” Ryder-Diggs said. The first new leadership position is the executive vice dean for clinical affairs at the Medical School and president of the University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers and University of Michigan Medical Group. Internal Medicine Prof. David Spahlinger, currently the senior associate dean for clinical affairs and executive director of UMMG, will take this position beginning Jan. 1. Runge said integrating the clinical enterprise with

the Medical School is part of his plan to better integrate research, patient care and education within UMHS and the Medical School. “This will drive for greater innovation, better progress and ultimately better care for patients,” he said. Before serving as senior associate dean, Spahlinger was chief medical resident at the University during his residency in the 1980s. In 1997, he became the first medical director of the University Faculty Group Practice when it was formed. A senior vice president and chief operating officer of the University Hospitals and Health Centers and the University Medical Group was also appointed. T. Anthony Denton, current CEO of University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers, will serve in the role. Denton will work to align medical school education and research with clinical enterprise operations. Denton began as an administrative fellow at UHMS in 1981 and served as CEO of UMHHC

Friday, September 18, 2015 — 3A

CONSENT From Page 1A U.S. Department of Education for their handling of sexual assault cases, including the University and Michigan State University. “There’s an epidemic of sexual assault on college campuses,” Hertel said. “One in five women will be a victim of sexual assault while in those college years. I think we need to do something to change the paradigm of what kids are learning before they get to college so we can actually give them the tools that will help alleviate this.” Affirmative consent aims to go against the common “no means no” definition, which says an individual must clearly say no for a situation to be nonconsensual. The bill would require students be taught that silence and lack of resistance does not constitute consent, nor does relationship status, and that consent can be revoked at any time. The Michigan Daily reported last year that the standard of consent in the University’s Student Sexual Misconduct Policy defines consent as “clear and unambiguous agreement, expressed in mutually understandable words or actions, to engage in a particular activity. Consent can be withdrawn by either party at any point.” The University’s Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Center promotes the affirmative consent definition in many of its educational materials, prompting SAPAC to clarify language defining consent on its website. Earlier this month, University President Mark Schlissel told the Daily that he wanted to update the University’s Student Sexual Misconduct Policy by next semester. In a September interview

with the Daily, Schlissel said he didn’t think a change in definition would effectively reduce sexual assault on campus. “I don’t think that a change in the definition of consent is adequate to result in a faster process or diminish incidences of sexual assault,” Schlissel said. “I’m open to considering it; I think time will tell whether it makes a difference.” However, Schlissel said he would be interested to see the impact of legislation passed in California that changed the definition of consent in the state to require explicit verbal consent, including for the state’s universities. “The states that are pushing hard on this will be our laboratories,” he said. “If California all of the sudden has a huge drop in sexual assault or misconduct, then oh boy I’m ready to do that, too.” In a written statement Thursday, SAPAC Director Holly Rider-Milkovich said she would continue to watch the legislation closely. “The components of consent outlined in this proposed legislation closely reflect what the University of Michigan has been teaching students for more than a decade,” Milkovich wrote. “We are committed to creating a safe and healthy campus community that is free of sexual violence and teaching consent is a fundamental part of this effort. Efforts to educate students earlier than college about sexual violence are consistent with our own overall educational objectives.” The University has implemented several education programs of its own to address the issue of sexual assault. Relationship Remix, which is required for freshmen, aims to promote healthy relationships and informs students on the University’s definition of consent.

Man found dead near Wolverine Tower in June died of natural causes Police confirmed Thursday morning that a man found dead in June near Wolverine Tower, a University administrative building, passed away from natural causes. Diane Brown, spokesperson for the University’s Division of Public Safety and Security, said the man, identified as 22-year old Ypsilanti resident Lezester Sample, died from diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a complication of type 1 diabetes. Sample was not affiliated with the University. In June, police had indicated that the cause of death was likely non-suspicious.

Circuit Court says Mich. college does not have to offer contraceptives The U.S. 8th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a decision that a Michigan college did not have to offer contraceptive insurance coverage. Cornerstone University, a private and religious college in Grand Rapids, challenged the contraceptive mandate alongside Dordt University. According to the Detroit Free Press, they felt that the government was coercing them to violate their religious beliefs. —ISOBEL FUTTER

GRANT HARDY/Daily

LEFT: Vice President Biden laments that citizens have to worry about finding employment at the Detroit Department of Transportation on Thursday. RIGHT: Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (MI–12) discusses the 2016 elections at the Detroit Department of Transportation on Thursday.

BIDEN From Page 1A recalled his own working-class roots, describing a time when his father climbed the stairs to young Biden’s bedroom. Joe Biden Sr. told his son he’d need to seek work in another city, but assured him everything would be OK. Biden, who expressed a love for automobiles and spoke of a father who sold cars his whole life, was telling Detroit’s story by telling his own. “We’ve got a lot further to go,” he said, his shirtsleeves now rolled up. “We won’t give up until everyone in Detroit who wants to work makes a decent wage and can make that walk over and say, ‘Honey, it’s going to be all right.’” Mayor Duggan told another anecdote. When Biden met with him in 2014, not long into the new mayor’s term, he asked what the one thing was the Obama administration could do to lend a hand.

Duggan’s answer: buses. Duggan saw Detroiters braving the January snow, waiting for buses that often didn’t show up. So Biden called Duggan every week. The vice president said he’d do his best to come up with a solution. Even as Biden dealt with a foreign policy crisis in Ukraine last year, the vice president kept calling. “I want you to know, I haven’t forgotten about the buses,” Biden told him. And he didn’t. The administration created a grant competition, told Duggan to apply, and the city ultimately secured the funds to bring 80 new buses to the city of Detroit. When White House adviser Gene Sperling and Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, who served as the administration’s point people for revitalization efforts in Detroit, left office, U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell (D– Dearborn) said she told Biden Detroit needed a new champion in Washington. “He’s really been that person,”

she told The Michigan Daily. “He understands the importance of it. You’ve got to have somebody that is fighting for people, and Joe Biden cares deeply about wanting to see the city come back.” Dingell, however, wasn’t ready to commit her support to Biden, were he to declare his candidacy. She said Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of state, doesn’t have Michigan locked down. She thinks the primary would be competitive if Biden were on the ballot. “I love Joe Biden. I love Hillary. I hope I don’t have to make the decision between the two of them,” she said. “They’re both two talented, wonderful people and they would both be good presidents of the United States.” Aaron Kall, an expert on election politics and the University’s director of debate, said Biden’s base would likely focus on Rust Belt states, including Michigan. “He’s always been a defender of the working person and I think Detroit really embodies that,” he

said. “He relates to the history of the city and the work ethic of the community, and he wants to do whatever he can to support it.” Kall said he thinks Biden could carry Michigan in the primary, were he to challenge the current Democratic contenders. “If you compared visits (to Michigan) with him and Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, he’s just going to have a much higher name recognition,” he said. “I do think the race would be up for grabs. I think his past history and experience would serve him well.” As he sipped a glass of wine at the Great Lakes Coffee Roasting Company on Woodward Avenue, where Biden made a Labor Day stop last year, Detroit resident Donnie Sackey said Biden could add to the race, but he doesn’t see the vice president as a viable candidate. “Do I think that Joe Biden has a shot at becoming president? This (would be) his third time running,” he said. “I think people look at that and say, “You lost, why do you want to run for president?’ ”

George Robinson, a DDOT shift supervisor who listed to Biden’s speech on Thursday, hasn’t committed his support to a candidate yet, but said he’s followed Biden’s career for quite some time, since before he assumed the vice presidency. “I would definitely consider him,” he said. “No doubt about it. He has a history of supporting the middle class. He’s a down-toEarth type of guy, just a regular man right next door. He can really relate to me. He’s not someone who’s so high up that he (doesn’t) understand the issues that people day to day deal with.” Cindy Reese, a Detroit transportation activist who spoke at Thursday’s event, said she was impressed by the vice president’s grasp of Detroit’s transit issues. “I listened to him today, and I’ve heard some other speeches, but he really touched my heart today,” she said. “My struggle was his struggle and that’s what you want — a person in office to understand and be part of your struggle, too.”


Opinion

4A — Friday, September 18, 2015

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

Making friends with professors

Edited and managed by students at the University of Michigan since 1890. 420 Maynard St. Ann Arbor, MI 48109 tothedaily@michigandaily.com JENNIFER CALFAS EDITOR IN CHIEF

AARICA MARSH and DEREK WOLFE EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS

LEV FACHER MANAGING EDITOR

Unsigned editorials reflect the official position of the Daily’s editorial board. All other signed articles and illustrations represent solely the views of their authors.

FROM THE DAILY

Banish binge drinking

Increasing the number of Friday classes is a good first step

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t their meeting Monday, members of the Senate Advisory Committee on University Affairs proposed an initiative that would add more Friday classes in an effort to curb “Thirsty Thursdays.” During the meeting, University Provost Martha Pollack said she was in favor of this proposal because it would help to limit excessive drinking, which she cites as major issue on campus. This isn’t the first time Pollack has suggested Friday classes, but when she’s done so in the past, it’s been for logistical and budgetary reasons. This suggestion comes on the heels of the University announcing a new alcohol policy and just days after President Mark Schlissel’s remarks at the University’s first-ever all-Greek life meeting, during which he addressed alcohol consumption and party culture in the Greek community. While the proposal has the potential to help curb binge drinking, holding more Friday classes is just a start toward changing an over-arching culture. The University needs to continue to work toward other approaches that combat root issues associated with binge drinking and the Millennial party culture. Holding more Friday morning classes could be a step toward changing the drinking culture at the University. Since the proposed Friday classes would likely be unpopular, underclassmen who schedule their classes last among University students — especially freshmen — would be more likely to take a large number of Friday classes. If Thursdaynight drinking is out of the question for freshmen from the start of their college career because of an early-Friday-morning class, traditional two-day weekends will become the norm for them. Furthermore, if students don’t develop excessive drinking early in their college careers, then they could be less likely to ever develop such habits. This increases the likelihood for lasting change at the University. A 2007 study from University of Missouri’s Midwest Alcoholism Research Center suggests this likelihood is valid. “Approximately two-thirds of students who consumed some alcohol Thursday consumed a binge amount if they had late or no Friday classes,” said Philip Wood, a professor of quantitative psychology who contributed to the study. Pollack reiterated this similar sentiment during SACUA’s Monday meeting. Though Friday classes may make a dent in the effort to reduce binge drinking, it’s not that simple. Excessive drinking is an issue on many college campuses across the nation. Critically thinking about how to address these issues calls into question how much responsibility the University should be taking when it comes to helping students with general life skills: drinking habits as well as time management and health and wellness. On one hand, it’s the responsibility of the students to control their actions when it comes to consuming alcohol and making it to class or not. On the other hand, bingedrinking culture at the University poses real threats to students’ health and wellness,

I

and should very much be a concern of the administration. At a town hall meeting last week, E. Royster Harper, vice president of student life, emphasized this as an administrative priority. Surely, the University has a relevant stake in students’ health and how others perceive our campus. During the Sept. 14 meeting, SACUA members also encouraged faculty to address drinking habits in their classes by warning against the dangers of excessive drinking and suggesting dry events students could attend. Faculty wouldn’t be doing any harm by speaking to students about drinking habits, but these suggestions do not seem to tackle the root of the problem. A change in drinking culture must come from the students themselves, especially student organizations. If students starting their freshman year are invested in student organizations that involve them in activities not centered around alcohol, they may develop weekly routines that don’t include excessive drinking on every weekend or “free” night. One concern about offering Friday classes is logistical issue, as many students have internships and jobs that require them to work Fridays. Therefore, packing Fridays with more classes could hinder students’ abilities to participate in these activities that help students pay for tuition or gain valuable professional experience. The University is trying to reduce students’ alcohol consumption, make a safer campus and prevent the University from developing a reputation as a “party school.” Increasing the number of Friday classes, though unlikely to make drastic changes in students’ lives, is another attempt by the University to nudge students toward adopting healthier drinking habits. The University has the right to and should initiate structural changes to the academic week to try to change our drinking culture.

Preparing for post-grad

t isn’t rare to hear my sorority sisters, classmates and co-workers talk about “recruiting” season — wondering aloud how they’re going to balance their Summer 2016 internship search with classes and extracurriculars. As it’s only September and most of these internships won’t start for eight or 10 more months, some of their worry might seem misguided. VICTORIA But for many students — especially those taking out NOBLE loans to help pay for college — stress surrounding their post-college career begins the first day of the semester. Findings from a new study released by the U.S. Department of Education show that while college graduates continue to make significantly more than non-collegians, the earnings of students 10 years after enrollment are bleak, justifying students’ job search stress. The study, called the College Scorecard, is designed to shed light on the monetary value of a degree from any given school and the likelihood that graduates from that school will be able to pay back student loans. Using IRS data, the study measures the average income for students who received federal student aid and the percentage of students earn-

ing more than the average worker with only a college diploma. According to the study, graduates from the University generally fared above average. Ten years after college, 78 percent of graduates earned more than those without a college education, and their average annual income was $57,900. More than 90 percent of graduates were able to pay back their student loans. Still, studies like this one come as an unwelcome reminder of many students’ need to find a job that will maximize the return on their investment in their education — whether or not they took out loans. With that in mind, students’ willingness to spend countless hours searching for a summer internship that might lead to a job after school doesn’t seem all that irrational. Likewise, the University’s resources for helping students find good jobs after graduation now seem much more essential to the value of a student’s education. There is certainly an intrinsic value to the time students spend at college — I think that goes without saying. But most students also expect that their hard work and time spent at college will materialize into higher lifetime wages. Many students also hope that the degree they spent so much time working on will be somehow relevant to their career. I’m about to state the obvious here, so bear with me. The professional skills that contribute to students’ ability to find well-paying jobs

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s I sometimes tell people, I like everything — I’ve only had a couple of classes in my two years so far at Michigan that I truly didn’t enjoy. I think this comes out of my wide-reaching interests. Each semester I’m looking to learn SUSAN as much as I can, LAMOREAUX both inside and outside of the classroom, and I want to let my professors know that I’m engaged on this deep and sincere level. I’m truly paying attention during their lectures because I’m coming to class in order to take away something I didn’t know before. So a normal day for me means that, as class ends and everyone rushes out the door en masse, I instead make my way down the aisle to the front of the room. “Hi,” I’ll tell the professor when I get up to the podium. “I really enjoyed your lecture. And I wanted to let you know, it reminded me of something I heard on the radio the other day…” It can be that simple. A few words are all it takes to begin to build a friendship that can last long after the final exam. For me, these relationships have meant spending time in

a professor’s office to practice German or meeting for coffee to talk about academic goals. A couple of my professors have also approached me about working for them over the summer, and hired me to compile materials that would be integrated into an existing syllabus. Such possibilities are out there, but in each new class and semester, I have to once again make the effort to build a relationship. I want to be someone my professors will get to know by name, not because I’m trying to kiss up, but because I’m truly interested in and drawn to the subject matter that they’re teaching. University President Mark Schlissel spoke about getting to know your professors in a recent interview with WEMU’s Lisa Barry. “Even though this is a big school, one of the pleasant things about the culture here is the faculty truly love to teach,” Schlissel said. “Part of the reason they come to the University of Michigan is because of the caliber of students we attract.” Outside of such a context, it can be scary to go up and talk to a professor — I’ll be the first one to say that — but it pays to build a relationship that can last. After the

semester comes to a close, Elizabeth Goodenough, a lecturer in the Arts and Ideas in the Humanities program, sometimes hires students as research assistants or writes letters of recommendation, and finds that students often come back into their teachers’ lives, sometimes a decade later. Ann Arbor is a fairly small town, and I’ve run into former professors at the grocery store or walking their dog in the neighborhood. It’s a good feeling when both of us can remember the other’s name. And that starts now, when you go to office hours, when you send an e-mail asking for clarification of the materials, when you linger for a minute after class and chat about the weather as you pack your things. Let them know what you liked and where you lost interest or, as the case may be, found yourself offended. And see where the conversation goes from there. Your professors come here to teach and you come to learn; you might have more in common than you realize.

A few words are all it takes to begin to build a friendship that can last long after the final exam.

— Susan LaMoreaux can be reached at susanpl@umich.edu.

EDITORIAL BOARD MEMBERS

Claire Bryan, Regan Detwiler, Ben Keller, Payton Luokkala, Aarica Marsh, Victoria Noble, Michael Paul, Anna Polumbo-Levy, Allison Raeck, Melissa Scholke, Michael Schramm, Mary Kate Winn, Jenny Wang, Derek Wolfe

L

Is Greek life the only culprit?

ast Thursday, University eral student orgs often fall into the President Mark Schlissel latter category. called for a mandatory When considering the safety stanmeeting of dards put in place during fraternity all Greek life parties versus general house parties, DANIEL chapters in which it would be easy to say that fraternity he reprimanded parties are actually safer. Frats utilize DIXON the community sober monitors, hire security guards, for its problems track who is entering the house by with sexual assault and alcohol people’s Mcards and have other IFC abuse. Though a call to reform safety enforcements to answer to Greek life was clearly necessary, when throwing parties. These parconsidering the Treetops Resort ski ties meet all the standards to ensure trip incident and the community’s a safe and fun night — right? disproportionate problems with Apparently, wrong. Recent stasexual assault, is Greek life truly tistics have shown that members in the only group to blame for the Greek life are 2.5 times more likely “party image” to be sexually Schlissel claims assaulted than the University all non-Greek While Greek life is is beginning students on to embody? campus. This is to blame for a higher Schlissel’s likely due to the record of sexual comments to the nature of Greek Greek commu- assaults, it isn’t the only parties comnity made me pared to house population to blame. consider party parties. While life on campus, Greek life parand whether ties do set regufraternity parlations in place ties are truly as dangerous, rac- that may appear for these organizaist and homophobic as E. Royster tions to harbor “safe fun,” mixing Harper, vice president for student large quantities of students with life, claimed their perception to dark lighting and hard liquor is a be. I should start by explaining recipe for disaster. to the (freshman) population that However, there’s a surprising there are two types of parties at the statistic the student body should University: fraternity parties and be aware of. While those involved house parties. Club sports, profes- in Greek life are 2.5 times more at sional fraternities and other gen- risk than non-Greek life students,

in their field after graduation don’t come naturally. If students want to write great cover letters or resumes or give persuasive answers when employers ask why they should hire them, they have to learn how, just like they’d have to learn calculus if they want to take a derivative. But even though all of what I said is so totally obvious, the University could still be doing so much more to impart those skills to its LSA students. The Career Center — the primary place for LSA students to receive career services — has undergone improvements within the past year that will likely help students connect with resources that could help them find meaningful employment — whatever that means to them — upon graduation, or sooner. Part of this improvement involved replacing its old, clunky Career Center Connector website with a site called Handshake, which more effectively connects students with job postings, professional and career development events and resources to help them write better resumes and cover letters. Giving students some of these tools at home through an improved

those involved with club sports were twice as likely to experience unwanted sexual penetrations — nearly as much as Greek life. And while those involved in the Greek community represent nearly 17 percent of the University, those involved with club sports only represent about 5 percent of the population. If I, an average sophomore, know these statistics, there’s no doubt Schlissel knows them, too. Where is the big mass meeting for all club sports? Is Greek life deemed the scapegoat of the unsafe party life on campus solely because it’s more visible? While Greek life is to blame for a higher record of sexual assaults and alcohol abuse on campus, it isn’t the only population to blame. At house parties, there are less resources put in place for the students’ safety, which could lead to an environment just as unsafe — maybe even more so — as fraternity parties. My final words: Punish the Greek community, but also be mindful of other culprits. Chastising the Greek community for its inappropriate behavior was good, but this is not the only community deserving of a critical look. Be aware when you go to a house party that’s not at Theta Chi or SAE — it doesn’t mean you’re being completely safe. — Daniel Dixon can be reached at djdx@umich.edu.

website may be helpful for students Incentivizing internship experiwho feel unprepared to meet with ences will help students maximize an adviser or are unsure of which their education by confirming or resources are available through the rejecting a particular career interCareer Center. est while they’re still in school and But despite these changes, many can take classes related to that field. students still don’t use Career Cen- Some departments offer options to ter services. Whether it’s because receive course credit for internships. they’d rather not think about life Other schools encourage and require after college or because they don’t professional experience to graduate. know what resources are available, It goes without saying that a colit’s clear that there’s a large seg- lege education is worth much more ment of campus that isn’t connect- than the jobs or salaries it helps stuing with these resources. dents eventually obtain. But as the In part, this costs of college could be due continue to rise, to the way that it’s important It goes without saying that the Unicareer services are deliv- that a college education versity recogered. Most nizes that it will is worth much more skills related to become increasstudents’ coldifficult than the salaries it helps ingly lege education for students to are delivered recoup the value students attain. directly — often of their investthrough classes ment in their that motivate education. The students to practice the skills. How- University has a responsibility to ever, professional development is continually develop and provide the totally elective, and the Career best resources to help them do so. Center resources are so under-promoted that it’s easy to forget they — Victoria Noble can be even exist. reached at vjnoble@umich.edu.


Sports & Arts

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

ICE HOCKEY

Culture shift bolsters Michigan in offseason Compher traded from Buffalo to Colorado in offseason deal By JASON RUBINSTEIN Daily Sports Editor

The college hockey season is longer than most other sports. Spanning from the beginning of October to the end of April, there is plenty of time for players to get fed up with one another. But that’s what the Michigan hockey team can’t afford if it is going to end its three-year drought without an NCAA Tournament appearance. Last season, and the two years before, multiple players said the team culture wasn’t strong enough. Cliques formed, and not everyone had each other’s back. But this summer, when junior forward JT Compher and senior forwards Boo Nieves and Justin Selman earned roles as the team’s captains, they immediately set out to create a new team culture. “In my first few years, there were some cliques and some guys weren’t friendly enough, I believe,” Nieves said. “What Selman, JT and I have tried to do is take some guys you normally wouldn’t to lunch, that kind of thing.” And according to sophomore defenseman Cutler Martin, the new culture is noticeable. “Guys are getting along really well,” Martin said. “I could call any one of my teammates to go have breakfast, and that’s a good feeling. You can’t always

do that. You can talk to anyone about anything. “The season is super long, and it’s important from a dayto-day perspective to be friends, because you want to have a good relationship together and (be) united in the same cause.” But how exactly does off-ice chemistry translate to on-ice results? According to Nieves, a stronger friendship leads to greater trust, so when Michigan is down late in the third period, each player knows he can lean on another. “When you’re struggling, you can always look to a friend, not just a teammate,” Nieves said. Junior forward Tyler Motte agreed with Nieves, and added that the pace of practice has been outstanding. Michigan just hopes that it will translate into wins. COLORADO COMPHER: JT Compher had a strange offseason. He was traded from the Buffalo Sabres to the Colorado Avalanche before he even suited up for an NHL game. The junior captain was part of the Ryan O’Reilly blockbuster trade. When Buffalo drafted Compher in 2013, he was expected to be a centerpiece of the future. That’s why it was a strange feeling for Compher when he heard the news. “It was a weird experience,” Compher said. “It’s much different and easier when you’re

20 years old and in college. It’s not like I was living (in Buffalo) with a family or anything like that. “It does change my future a little, but right now it doesn’t change too much. I just went to Colorado for prospects camp and just tried to get the know the staff there.” As an added bonus, Compher said, the Avalanche’s director of player development is a Michigan alum. That familiarity helped him ease into Denver. NHL CAMPS: Last summer, just a few Wolverines attended the team’s NHL prospect development camps. According to Motte, players wanted to stay in Ann Arbor and work with each other in Michigan instead of travel to camps. This past summer, though, the game plan changed, and 15 Wolverines attended NHL development camps. “Last summer, most guys thought it was best for them to stick around and focus on what was going on in Ann Arbor,” Motte said. “But this summer, guys are getting closer to making the jump and want to become comfortable with their team.” Not only that, Motte reiterated, but there are “huge positives” to attending these camps. “You compete against bigger, stronger, older guys,” he said. “That never hurts.”

“When you’re struggling, you can always look to a friend.”

Hard work earns Ellis captaincy as a senior By LELAND MITCHINSON Daily Sports Writer

Even as a fifth-year senior defender, it took Mackenzie Ellis until last Friday to score her first career goal. With the Michigan field hockey team down by a goal against Vermont, Ellis smacked in the equalizer off a corner rebound in the 10th minute, allowing the Wolverines to pull ahead for a 3-1 win. “You know, as a really important defender on our team, she doesn’t get very many opportunities to score goals,” said Michigan coach Marcia Pankratz. “When she got her opportunity, she stuck it, capitalized on it and scored an important goal for us, so that was fun. “(It) put a smile on my face. I think she enjoyed it and liked it and would like to score a few more.” But Ellis’ journey toward that goal and a starting role on the team has been a bumpy one. As a freshman, Ellis was a walk-on and redshirted her first year. She didn’t see much action as a redshirt freshman the next year, either, appearing in fewer than half the Wolverines’ games. Things began to pick up for Ellis during her third year of eligibility, when she earned a starting spot on the defense in 18 total games. Now in her fifth year on campus, she has earned the position of team captain and leads a defensive unit that has surrendered just three goals through six games. Her early struggles, however, are what allowed her to become the leader she is now. “I think it makes me a lot more

Friday, September 18, 2015 — 5A

FOOD COLUMN

The secret to Jolly Pumpkin’s success “My pizza is built on …” I’m sitting in a dim booth on the second floor of the Jolly Pumpkin Cafe & Brewery on Main Street. Maggie Long, chef and managing partner, sits across from me. She’s short and sinewy, with cropped hair and an ovenbaked face. As she starts this sentence, GIANCARLO I try to guess what she’ll BUONOMO finish with. The granite oven? Local produce? Some secret ingredient? “Community.” A community of surviving, thriving bacteria and yeasts. Jolly Pumpkin pizza is baked on a sourdough crust, made with a starter that could be 130 years old, have traveled thousands of miles and changed hands several times. How is this possible? Sourdough was the first leavened bread, developed thousands of years ago in Mesopotamia. Bakers would leave dough to sit overnight, and it would pick up ambient yeasts and bacteria. These microbes would digest the natural sugars in the dough, converting them into carbon dioxide, which made the dough rise, and acids, which flavored the dough and prevented spoilage. Today, even though yeast is commercially available, many bakers prefer the distinctive tang and chew that lactic-acid bacteria provide (this process is also what gives pickles and yogurt their flavor). Instead of letting every batch of dough sit out overnight, they have a starter — a mixture of flour and water that collects and incubates wild yeasts and bacteria, and is then added to the fresh dough before baking. As long as the microbes are fed fresh water and flour every day, they’ll survive and reproduce indefinitely, developing new, deeper flavors as time passes. Sourdough is not traditionally used for pizza crust. But one day, years ago, Long was in Berkeley, California, and she came upon The Cheeseboard Collective, a worker-owned cooperative that runs a bakery, cheese shop and pizzeria. Hungry and intrigued, she stopped for a slice. “It was the most gorgeous pizza crust I’d ever seen,” she says, still enthralled. “it had a shine to it, a chew, and this flavor that I can’t

really explain,” Long inquired about this magisterial crust, and learned that it was made using sourdough from their bakery. In early 2009, as she was planning to open The Jolly Pumpkin, she knew sourdough pizza had to be on the menu. She began frequenting the Ann Arbor Farmer’s Market, hoping to make connections with local farmers and artisans. She struck up a conversation with John Savanna of Mill Pond Bakery in nearby Chelsea, who sold his sourdough bread at the Saturday market. Long was just looking for tips on how to make her own sourdough. But Savanna took a liking to her and the nascent restaurant. One day, in late June, he handed her a mason jar of his sourdough starter, the starter he’d been using since he opened Mill Pond in the early ‘80s. But the starter was even even older than that. “(My father) acquired the sourdough starter from a colleague of his in California in the late seventies in the San Francisco area,” his son Steve Savanna wrote to me in an e-mail. “At that time the sourdough culture dated back over 100 years and originated in France.” Steve, who now helps run the bakery, recalls his father’s obsessive devotion to this delicate treasure. One time, while vacationing in Northern Michigan, John drove all the way back to Chelsea to personally feed the starter. It may sound a bit much, but the longevity of a sourdough starter is only potential — without regular feeding, it will die, and, though it can be coaxed back to life, the flavor won’t be the same. John Savanna must have seen something in Maggie Long. And he saw right. In the six years since they’ve opened, Long’s cache of starter has never perished. “This is one of the things in this restaurant that we baby to death,” Long tells me back at our booth. “It sounds really stupid to do that, but it’s a piece of us, and a piece of somebody else.” At Jolly Pumpkin, they feed the starter twice a day. Before every feeding, half of it is thrown away — otherwise, the starter would grow exponentially. Long didn’t realize this back in 2009, or was just unwilling to waste any of Savanna’s gift. After a month, the mason jar couldn’t contain the starter. Neither could a single five-gallon bucket. It took five of them for Long to realize that she

had to throw some out. Now, they have around four gallons, and mix a gallon of it every day with five times as much fresh dough, and let it ferment overnight. After years of residing in this basement, the starter has taken in the local microbes, making it unique to this location. “May I see it?” I ask Long, expecting the answer to be a firm “No.” She springs up from her seat, and leads me to the basement prep kitchen, cautioning me to mind the recently mopped stairs. The air is damp and cool and ripe-smelling, like a forest after a storm. I couldn’t tell at first what the starter was. After hearing the 25 gallon saga, I’d envisioned some captive beast, oozing through its chains and howling for more flour. Instead, the starter resides in a battered white bucket, next to containers of fermenting lemons and kimchi. It resembles thick pancake batter, with lazy bubbles pushing their way to the surface every few seconds. I lean my face closer, picking up its sour, starchy, bottom-of-a-beer-bottle smell. Long invites me to dip a finger in and have a taste. It’s no cookiedough, to be sure, but thick and appealingly tangy, like Greek yogurt. As I’m leaving, Long hands me a takeout-soup container of starter. I gingerly accept it, as if it might crumble in my hands. “Make your own bread,” she encourages. “But I’d research how to feed starter if I were you.” At home, I place the container on top of my fridge, pledging to go buy flour within the hour. But that hour stretches into two, then three, then a whole night. I stumble into the kitchen the next morning and take a peek. It’s gruesome. The starter has risen up, popped the lid off and cascaded down the sides of the container, hardening like toothpaste. There are no more bubbles, and it now just smells like flour, which I guess means it smells like death. I scrape what I can into a new container and place it in the fridge, hoping to revive it the next day. Meanwhile, in the basement kitchen, someone feeds the starter, keeping the community going. Buonomo’s pizza is built on you, the readers. To grab a slice of the Buonomo pie, email gbuonomo@umich.edu.

WOMEN’S SOCCER

Freshmen make impact By RILEY NELSON Daily Sports Writer

AMANDA ALLEN/Daily

Fifth-year senior Mackenzie Ellis has worked her way up to become a captain.

able to relate to a lot of different players,” Ellis said. “I’m not a player that came in and started their freshman year and never sat a game in their life, so I think that if players are struggling, it makes me a lot more able to sit down with them and offer them advice.” Added Pankratz: “I think Mackenzie is a wonderful role model for our team. She’s been a good captain, and I think the younger players can look up to her as she leads by example and learn that there is always a path for everybody on the team, and to see her as a wonderful example that hard work pays off.” Not only has Ellis become a proven leader on the field, she has also taken that leadership into the

“I think that as a studentathlete ... we are given so much.”

classroom and community. She earned the Rachael Townsend Community Service Award two years ago and is using her fifth year to complete a master’s degree in management through the Ross School of Business. “I think that as a studentathlete, at Michigan especially, we are given so much,” Ellis said. “We have incredible opportunities, and we’re taken care of and we’re looked up to by people. I think it’s really important to have perspective and to be able to give back to the community.” In addition to her work in the community, Ellis remains dedicated to improving her game for the remainder of her final year. Ellis may be a defensiveminded captain, and it may have taken her five years to hit the back of the net, but she has finally shown she is capable of doing whatever it takes to lead her team to victory.

For most teams, the beginning of a new season comes with a mixture of expectation and uncertainty. But for the Michigan women’s soccer team, excitement seems to be the dominant feeling. After falling just shy of making the NCAA Tournament last season, the team graduated five seniors, but only one of those players consistently started, and 100 percent of the team’s goal scoring returned. While veteran players are stepping up and taking on bigger roles, another contributing factor to the team’s current 5-3 record is its six freshmen, who have already made their presence felt. All of the first-years, save for forward Kelly Sweeney – who tore her anterior cruciate ligament over the summer – have seen playing time. Midfielder Abby Kastroll, defender Sura Yekka and forward Reilly Martin have started. “As a class, they’re a fantastic group,” Ryan said. “For those three, the sky’s the limit in potential. It’s very likely you’re going to see all three of them in the starting lineup as they continue to grow and develop.” Yekka, an outside back on the Canadian National Team,

has steadily filled that defensive position, something Ryan struggled to do last year. Despite being sidelined, Sweeney also played on the international circuit this summer. A member of the U.S. U-20 National Team, she was predicted to be one of the top freshmen in this class. Sweeney’s absence has left an offensive void, but it has allowed other players, like Kastroll and Martin, to step up. “(Kastroll) has been the real surprise,” Ryan said. “I mean she’s just relentless out there. (She’s) leading the group in goals … (and) has made a huge, huge impact on her team already. (She’s) going to be a handful for opponents for four years.” A native of Naples, Fla., Kastroll is excited to be in such a competitive environment. “I’ve never been around so many people that love the game as much as I do,” Kastroll said. “As a freshman class, I feel like we came in ready to play.” Martin has also proven herself on the field, starting in six of the eight games. She has netted two goals on the season, but Ryan is

certain it won’t take long before the floodgates open. “We’re really challenging her to do more in terms of goalscoring production,” Ryan said. “We need to get her scoring more goals because she’s a fantastic goal scorer.” Martin is focusing on earning her playing time and taking every opportunity that comes her way. “I think my biggest worry was just trying to get out there on the field and earn playing time,” Martin said. “Each day at practice, we try to work as hard as we can (for a spot). It’s just such an honor being able to step onto the field and play for Michigan.” Ryan has spoken highly of the final two freshmen, midfielders Jackie White and Ashley Calcagno, saying they have a bright future ahead of them. As the Wolverines get ready to begin competing in Big Ten matches, the freshmen are focusing on the season ahead and continuing to integrate themselves into the team. “Our connection to the team has come a long way,” Martin said. “We are such a talented team.”

“As a class, they’re a fantastic group.”


Arts

6A — Friday, September 18, 2015

HIP HOP COLUMN

College Hip Hop: From Kant to Kanye

I

spend a lot of time listening to hip hop, and I also spend a lot of time studying neo-Hegelian philosophy. If you peruse my Twitter, you’ll see that the majority of my tweets are about the dialectics of the Based God, which is what happens when you gradually mold your subconscious ADAM into a trendy DEPOLLO melange of Slavoj Žižek one-liners and Young Thug noises. On my about.me page, I describe myself as a “SoundCloud philosopher,” which, depending on your politics, makes me either the worst kind of pretentious asshole imaginable or a “cool” guy. I prefer the latter approach, but I’m also someone who prides himself on being the only person at this University who has ever made it necessary for someone to actually say the words “Shut the fuck up about commodity fetishism, we’re trying to play 2K.” So, more often than not, I find myself desperately clinging to an absurd middle ground between cultures and vocabularies that, at first glance, seem diametrically opposed to one another. When hearing Chief Keef’s song “3Hunna,” for example, my first inclination after muttering “bang bang” to myself is to read the track as a radical nihilist anthem exploring the impossible subject position of a person trapped on the horizonless fringe of global capital, as a cry for help from a young man who realizes that even if he manages to upgrade from “three hunna” to “six hunna” he’ll never find his way out of O block, a realization so pessimistic that he ends the song with the self-negating gesture of shouting “Fuck my birthday, bitch, I need more cake.” On the other hand, I realize that a sentence combining the phrases “horizonless fringe

of global capital” and “Fuck my birthday bitch” looks a lot like a dadaist word salad, which gives you a sense of what it’s like to be inside my head on any given Thursday. But as ridiculous as it might seem — and I hope you can excuse my obscene narcissism here — I think the inner workings of my mind say something important about hip hop’s cultural status today. Like rock music in the 1950s and ’60s, hip hop has become the music of modern youth, which is to say that it provides the cultural vocabulary through which we narrate our experience of the world. It serves as the soundtrack for our parties, our relationships, our ever-changing personalities and our developing political consciousness, and it does so in a way that’s considerably more accommodating of racial diversity and technological innovation than rock music ever was. Importantly, however, through its celebration of African American culture and the Black experience, hip hop also creates an intriguing challenge for the western philosophical tradition: how to develop a vocabulary capable of articulating the struggle of a community whose historical marginalization has been conducted on a linguistic and philosophical level as much as on a physical one.

“Shut the fuck up about commodity fetishism.” Put another way, self-styled young assholes intellectuals like me who grew up reading Sartre and Nietzsche with Outkast and Kanye West playing in the background are reaching the point of entry into institutional academia, convinced of the moral necessity of addressing the social

Classifieds

ills hip hop illustrates with its often grim realism and working to find a vocabulary with enough intellectual rigour to go toe-to-toe with Kant and Hegel and enough social awareness to hear the pain behind the Migos flow. And, perhaps unsurprisingly, there already a number of academics studying and writing about hip hop in English and Cultural Studies departments across the country. A few notable scholars on the subject include Adam Bradley at the University of Colorado, Elaine Richardson at Ohio State and Gwendolyn Pough at Syracuse University, all of whom have spent years laying the groundwork for and developing critical studies of hip hop culture, drawing on the work of previous cultural theorists and philosophers as diverse as Amiri Baraka, Pierre Bourdieu, bell hooks and Mikhail Bakhtin. They and the myriad other musicians, critics and researchers turning their minds and talents towards the rigorous examination of hip hop’s place in modern society are doing essential work, both for hip hop itself and the academic disciplines benefiting from a radical reexamination of their theoretical models and massive expansion of their source material. An interesting development in recent years, however, is seeing hip hop’s experience in academia make its way back into the music. An intellectual approach to hip hop, in a way, predates the music itself — Gil Scott-Heron, often considered the godfather of rap, held a Master’s degree in Creative Writing from Johns Hopkins University and approached his music and poetry with a political sensibility informed by the work of Langston Hughes and Malcolm X, among others. The first hip hop artists immediately grasped onto that brand of erudite social awareness — Public Enemy frontman Chuck D describes Scott-Heron as “the manifestation of the modern world” — and reached a peak of stylistic diversity in the mid-to-late ’90s in the work

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RELEASE DATE– Friday, September 18, 2015

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The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

of a range of MCs and collectives from Queen Latifah, Mos Def (now Yasiin Bey) and Common to 2Pac, Digable Planets and The Roots. The tradition continued into the new millennium, carried on by many of the same musicians who were making political rap in the ’90s. But in the mid-2000s hip hop artists began to question the culture assembled around their music in profound ways, and encounters with academia often helped to inspire that selfcritique. Kanye West’s debut album The College Dropout is perhaps the best documentation of this phenomenon, and while just about everyone acknowledges that it was one of the biggest watershed moments in the history of hip hop, most people find it so hard to look past Kanye’s egotism that they can’t see lines like “Sittin’ in the hood like community colleges / This dope money here is Lil’ Trey’s scholarship” off of “We Don’t Care” or “The concept of school seems so securr / Sophomore, three yurrs, she ain’t picked a carurr / She like, fuck it, I’ll just stay down here and do hair” from “All Falls Down” for what they are: a stunning portrait of the Black collegiate experience at the end of the 20th century. You can trace the influence of The College Dropout — an illustration of what happens when promises about statusconferring education run up against the inescapable demands of the same socioeconomic hardship college is meant to address — straight through to the work of some of the most famous and explicitly political rappers doing it today, including Lupe Fiasco, J. Cole, Kendrick Lamar and Chance the Rapper. Equally important, however, Kanye made it possible for a hip hop artist to talk about academia and the collegiate experience, mostly to criticize the university

system and question its status as a pipeline to African American liberation (you can hear echoes of this critique every time a Black person who “acts right,” like UVA student Martese Johnson, finds themselves subjected to racial profiling and warrantless police violence). But beyond critique, this new subject area gave birth to any number of student-rappers (of various races) who began using hip hop to talk about what it’s like to be a college student — think Asher Roth (West Chester University), Das Racist (Wesleyan University) and every dude with a SoundCloud who lives on your floor in East Quad (myself included). I guarantee you that every single one of them spent years of their life debating whether to start wearing shutter shades as part of their daily ensemble.

Student-rappers began using hip hop to talk about college. And as soon as college kids started rapping about skipping class to smoke weed, the rap game only needed a short theoretical jump to get dudes like me, whose idea of a fun time involves reading Walter Benjamin essays, spitting about the finer points of continental philosophy. Which brings us to the current final form of college rap: Milo. Born Rory Ferreira in Kenosha, Wisconsin, Milo is without question the most hyperintellectual rapper to ever do it. In interviews, he weighs the pros and cons of a deontological

moral stance and throws around Schopenhauer quotes in the same way Waka Flocka throws around “Brick Squad!”s. He made an album entirely out of America samples, titles songs with things like “Gaudeamus igitur (For Kang Min-Gyu),” had one of his lyrics published by the Johns Hopkins University Press and has the distinction of being the only rapper to have ever released a track that includes an explanation of the Kantian notion of the Sublime (with reference to Kim Kardashian’s ass, no less). But beyond appealing to the pedantic philosophile living inside my head, however, I find Milo incredibly fascinating because he seems to have found a way to bridge the gap between Kant and Kanye, between the technical jargon used in American academic circles and the cultural vocabulary available to the rest of hip hop’s MC roster. He’s occupying the sort of middle ground Kanye inhabited in 2004 — the kind of fertile territory that can produce major cultural shifts, provided that an artist with the right blend of vision and stubbornness makes their way onto the field. Depending on how things go, Milo and likeminded artists (and there are a few, including Hellfyre Club labelmates Open Mike Eagle and Busdriver and Kool A.D. of Das Racist) could produce a new type of musical avant-garde: art rap with the kind of enlightened pessimism and semi-ironic pop culture reference that makes critics and people who like to think of themselves as “cultured” get googly eyes and start shelling out cash. DePollo is terribly sorry for reminding everyone about Asher Roth. To demand a personal letter of apology, email adepollo@umich.edu.

ALBUM REVIEW

Jay Rock’s ‘90059’ is solid, traditional rap By SHAYAN SHAFII Daily Arts Writer

“I be that n***a they call Jay Rock / I’m a rapper.” In a time where the phrase “I’m not a rapper, I’m an artist” is all too common, B Jay Rock is comfortable in his 90059 own skin. When Kanye West Jay Rock made the cover of Time maga- Top Dawg zine this year, Entertainment A$AP Rocky took to Twitter to announce that the cover made him “proud to be a rapper,” while his last album also distanced himself from the genre. Chance the Rapper and Kendrick Lamar have made crossover projects into funk and jazz, and Tyler, the Creator wants to be a film director … Even Drake transcends hip hop every now and then to remind us that he can also be a new-wave R&B artist. But make no mistake, Jay Rock is a “rapper” in the most traditional sense, and 90059 is a “rap album.” He’s not a technical wordsmith of the Kendrick Lamar ilk, a conspiratorial psychonaut in the form of Ab-Soul, or a bucket hatdonning party-boy like Schoolboy Q, and there’s nothing wrong with that. Most known for a verse on a song that isn’t even his, Rock is carried through 90059 by a level of honesty that makes even the most boring artists (yes you, J. Cole) worth listening to. Though the album does have its fair share of fillers and audio sandpaper, Jay Rock at least presents himself as a regular dude. More specifically, he takes pride in maintaining a level of authenticity of keep-itreal-ness that makes hip-hop as much sport as art; the video for “Parental Advisory” even includes shots of him benchpressing in his front yard. While it’s unfair to ask an artist to fit your arbitrary model of “entertaining,” the least they can do is provide some sort of transparency in answering who they are and where they’re from behind the mic. 90059 sees Jay Rock at his best when he lets his guard down to let us know the importance of keeping your guard up

TOP DAWG ENTERTAINMENT

More like Middle Dawg, amirite?

in South Central LA. He wastes no time on “Necessary” where the hook sees him murmur, “You gotta do what you got to just get over the hill / When you live in America, either kill or be killed.” The production on “Easy Bake” features the types of shrill string accompaniment that West Coast vets like Dr. Dre would be proud of, the type that could be used in an IMAX feature film. It’s a shame, however, because the song is packed with the type of played out rappity-raps you’d expect from a high-schooler: we get it, you started from the bottom and now you’re cool on the Internet. Fortunately, Rock stops himself five minutes into “Easy Bake” (perhaps a few minutes too late), mid-sentence, to cut into one of the standout tracks, “Gumbo.” It’s everything that screams contemporary West Coast rap rolled into a track that I can only imagine would knock in a ’64 Impala. While the song does have some rather generic “I’m real” bars, Rock interestingly opens up about his hood vantage point. “Keep my chin down, nose clean, and my guard up / Charged up, cause this ghetto got me scarred up.” Key word being “scarred.” The sensation of being left physically and emotionally wounded by your neighborhood is not new to rap music, and if anything, it’s something that’s been consistent with contemporary

art made by young black men in America. However, the widespread nature of gang violence and racial tension shouldn’t diminish the value of this man’s individual expression. Enter “Money Trees Deuce”: the culmination of Jay Rock’s black experience as well as his position as underdog in the Black Hippy collective. The title itself is an allusion to the song that we all know him from … is this his attempt at taking the spotlight? Is it Jay Rock’s turn? Though 90059 unfortunately has a lot of forgettable tracks, he really hits the nail on the head with this one. If you only get to listen to one song, this is the one you need to hear. He sets the stage with horns ominously bringing in the track, and at this point in the music video he’s already running from police. “Gotta get it, ain’t no options out here / Her n***a just killed my partner out here” is about as cold and explicit as you could ask for. You might be inclined to think, “Yeah, we’ve heard it before” when you hear a rapper talk about dead homies, but this isn’t Ricky from “Boyz n the Hood.” These are real tales from a real person from a real place. Yes, Jay Rock can be unimaginative and boring; he is “just a rapper” and 90059 is “just a rap album,” but it’s still important to give his stories the respect they deserve. After all, rap music has always been about giving voice to the voiceless.


Arts

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

Friday, September 18, 2015 — 7A

NEW YORK FASHION WEEK SPRING 2016 ROUNDUP DVF

JEREMY SCOTT

DVF

Diane Von Furstenberg’s NYFW show comes off the heels of the 40th anniversary of the brand’s signature wrap dress and designers of the Spring 2016 Ready To Wear collection pay homage to the timeless garment: v-shaped necklines and cinched waists were abound on Sunday’s DVF runway. The collection works to display its strengths through diverse pops of ’80s-esque colors, neutral shades of beige and ultimately a slew of sleek black and white dresses. Each aspect of DVF’s show displays the range of her talent and brand. The bolder pieces, featuring various floral prints, are extreme, yet accessible. The solids each have their own flare — a silver cheetah print around the waist, or colorful flare covering pockets — creating cohesiveness across the diverse collection. Butterflies make an appearance a few too many times. First,

they’re embroidered in gold on the collections white dresses and then again on black dresses (the second time around is decidedly better). Nonetheless, the experimentation with butterflies does well on the show’s finale garment. Gigi Hadid’s black, floor-length gown with a plunging neckline featured only two visible gold butterflies — just the right amount. Between her killer line-up of models (Kendall Jenner and Karlie Kloss preceded Hadid), expansive collection and the design house’s new E! television series, it would appear that DVF is looking to expand its clientele into the younger generation. This collection has a range that will surely net a few on-lookers. Florals for spring may not be groundbreaking, but under the prowess of Von Furstenberg, they sure are stunning.

Jeremy Scott gets it. Jeremy Scott gets us. Jeremy Scott got it right. Scott doesn’t strike me as a wise old man, but more of the fashion world’s witty uncle who inadvertently delivers cold truths in a sardonic manner. And that’s just what he did with his Spring 2016 collection. Was he sourcing inspiration from the remarkable, otherworldly production quality of his K-pop coterie? Likely. Did he just release Miley’s upcoming wardrobe? Probably. Was this the result of an acid trip gone right? Signs point to yes. Fashion’s virtuous oddball presented his newest line on Monday, one that rendered our pop-culture poisoned minds onto the bodies of models — hello, Hadid sisters — topped off with boisterous bouffants. In a mixed bag of crop tops, A-line silhouettes, a crop of menswear looks (will 2016 be the year of the speedo and loafers combo?), leotards and even a metallic cone-

GIVENCHY

bra, Scott’s line is marked by his signature, absurdist indicators of effective artistry — he mocks us as he mocks himself, and it’s completely fascinating. Punctuated by punchy hues of orange and cobalt, along with funky patchwork and scribbles (please pause to admire that pleather-accented, scribbled trench), the collection is cartoonish and animated with an overarching ‘60s sci-fi flair. It’s costume-y, yet utterly wearable. Effective fashion, however outlandish it appears to the naked eye, performs a cultural critique, and Scott’s is obvious. It’s no novel idea to hear that our lives are saturated in screen time, rampant materialism and overexposure, but to see our societal flaws in such a metapresentation, outsourced from a visionary guilty of these weaknesses himself, makes for a living, sartorial think piece worthy of a ponder. -CAROLINE FILIPS

YEEZY SEASON TWO

-CHRISTIAN KENNEDY

RALPH LAUREN Honestly, God bless Ralph Lauren. After a week of overwhelming colors, prints and shapes, one can always count on Ralph to supply a beautiful collection of elegance and classic silhouettes. That is not to say these looks are boring, overdone or stuck in the past. Rather, Ralph delivered 50 looks for the modern woman. No one does red, white and blue like this man. No one. The collection was bursting with classic summer whites and covered all the essentials — simple cocktail dresses, killer wedges, navy blazers and endless takes on the white pant. Lauren effortlessly blends caramel leath-

er and navy blue sweaters, which included six of the sickest leather jackets you’ve ever seen. Among the sea of perfect stripes, cashmere sweaters and red trench coats, the designer surprised with three looks of eye-popping print. The star of the show was the floor-length chiffon gown featuring this multi-colored geometric print. The collection was beautifully designed and constructed, the norm for Ralph Lauren. It makes for the perfect spring/summer wardrobe, whether by the lake in Northern Michigan or the mediterranean along the Côte d’Azur. -MARA MacLEAN

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

KANYE WEST

At some point in time a lucky few received camouflage shirts in the mail — this fall’s invite to Kanye West’s second collaboration with Adidas. As of yesterday afternoon, Yeezy Season 2 has commenced. Season 2’s NYFW debut stays consistent with the rigidity of the line’s debut this past February, but takes it one step further. Instead of models lined up in rows and moving forward to unveil a new set of garments, a drill sergeant calls out groups of models and gives them the order to walk. With each new group, on-lookers notice a slight change in the color of the clothing, which also corresponds with the complexion of the models. As the show goes on, both models and clothing move from light shades of beige to black. The collection itself stays true to Kanye’s aptitude toward the simple. Throughout the show a pattern is nowhere to be seen: only solids, tears and the texture of knit. The collection consists of pieces across the spectrum: tights, excessively baggy hoodies, knit leggings and high heels are just a glimpse into the offer-

ings of Season 2. Diversity aside, the beauty of West’s new line isn’t displayed on the monochromatic models (while they all do look stunning). The beauty lies within the possibilities — the possibilities of mixing and matching across the tones of the collection, or the possibilities of simply incorporating key pieces into a wardrobe. Ultimately, as with Season One, the most stunning pieces of the show are the shoes and the music. The Adidas Yeezy Boosts, the Yeezy Duck boot and its high-heeled counterpart are the crème de la crème, furthering Kanye’s already strong standing reputation as a shoe designer. West also opted to use the show to premiere a new track from his forthcoming album, Swish, titled “Fade” featuring Post Malone and Ty Dolla $ign. Who knows if Yeezus 2020 will be a reality, but one thing is for certain: Kanye West and his commitment to creation and artistry won’t be going anywhere anytime soon. -CAROLINE FILIPS

VICTORIA BECKHAM the label’s rich design tradition and the constant desire for modernity in the ever-evolving fashion world. Whatever that je ne sais quoi is, it’s working — with his Spring 2016 line, Copping delivers the late de la Renta’s refined romance and amplified femininity with a thematic twist. The collection radiates a rich Hispanic flair with recurring motifs of carnations and crimson, continuous ruching and requisite espadrilles; and of course, no ODLR would be complete without eveningwear that leaves you breathless (I will take personal offense if the stunning lilac ball gown isn’t worn during awards season). The sartorial sphere will forever miss the beloved tastemaker they found in Oscar de la Renta, and though the void is irreplaceable, Copping continues to eschew any doubts of his succession. -CAROLINE FILIPS

Riccardo Tisci dissects what it means to be a woman in today’s world with his latest Spring 2016 collection for Givenchy and, well, it’s complicated. Each piece — in white, black, gold or silver — seems simple at first glance. However just like every modern day woman, the designs are complex and intricate. Beginning with the more soft, and some would say traditional, side of things, we saw a lot of silks embroidered with lace coming down the runway. Camisoles in neutral tones and slip dresses paired with sleek black pants for work — it embraced the elegance of traditional women’s fashion and coupled it with the edginess of the working woman. The soft tones and fabrics seen at the start of the collection soon began to evolve; paired with structured and hard-looking lace-up military-esque heels, showcasing Tisci’s societal transition. To be a woman today also brings with it ideas of strength and power. Women are soft and

strong, domineering and exquisite. Models strutted down in tuxedo jackets, pinstriped suits equipped with flared pants (yes, pinstripes are back), portraying the ultimate badass woman, a force to be reckoned with both at home and in the world. On the one hand, we have been brought up to associate women with classic femininity, oftentimes being contrasted to the likes of ethereal goddesses and otherworldly phenomenon. Tisci’s couture collection was featured intermittently throughout the show and provided a contrast between dark and light. With some pieces emanating golden tones, a crowd favorite being a structured white jacket covered with metallic gold embellishments, equipped with a (badass) matching headpiece. Then darker looks featuring black ruffles, feathers, net and mesh, oftentimes all at once, still managed to work in nicely with the rest of the collection. -MARIAM SHEIKH

ALEXANDER WANG Alexander Wang’s 10th anniversary collection debuted at NYFW and came equipped with lavish performers and an impressive front row audience. The atmosphere of the show was contrasted with what some would call the old school collection. Wang held true to his downtown girl aesthetic featuring staple pieces such as a shrunken bomber and biker-esque leather jackets. Stripes appear to be the hottest thing to (attempt) to make a comeback this Fashion Week, and this collection was no exception. Showcasing combinations of various patterns, materials, styles and colors, Wang perfected casual looks by giving them his signature grungy edge. And no urban look of 2015 can be complete without the introduction of rugged mesh tops, because, let’s remember, it’s still

considered a shirt even if the material doesn’t actually cover everything underneath. What struck me most about this particular collection was how androgynous many of the looks were. In a society where gender lines are becoming blurred, it was as if most of the pieces could work for men or women. Hooded jackets hid models’ hair, coupled with their minimal makeup and the clothes’ baggy appearance in general was very gender neutral. Wang’s anniversary collection managed to stay true to his original roots, displaying simplistic and urban pieces, while still giving the star-studded crowd something to talk about — other than the stripes of course. -MARIAM SHEIKH

ARTS. WE KNOW HOW TO PARTY.

COME WRITE FOR US. WE HAVE A KEURIG MACHINE.

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

Though the beloved, quippy Erika Bearman (@OscarPRgirl) is soon to switch over to motherhood and the consulting side of the fashion house, she continued to release collection teasers by Fabien Constant on her Instagram, showcasing “The Story of a Dress” — which is essentially the tale of ODLR, a label that prides itself on a quasi-couture mastery of outfitting women. Unsurprisingly, the brilliant cinematography didn’t disappoint, and once again, the house of Oscar de la Renta created fashion of fantasy. Peter Copping’s sophomore collection — the senior installment of his work if you include the sublime resort and bridal shows under his creative direction — for the house of Oscar de la Renta proves he’s mastered the reins of the label, yet continues to seamlessly imbue a personal panache that we’re still trying to grasp. He’s somehow struck a balance between

GIVENCHY

(BRING K-CUPS). E-mail arts@michigandaily.com for information on applying.

FILM. TV. MUSIC. COMMUNITY CULTURE. STYLE. NO FILTER. VICTORIA BECKHAM

From the first appearance of Gingham, it was clear that this collection was going to be different for Victoria Beckham. For spring/summer, VB landed far outside her comfort zone, somewhere in the land of urban surf prints and crinkled duchesse satin. Midi swing dresses, printed separates and flats were constant throughout the show to showcase VB’s attempt at a fun and carefree collection. A standout look featured a white above-the-ankle

swing dress with primary red and blue details and chunky white flats. The collection played with primary colors as overlays to all-white ensembles or as color-blocked separates. These looks beautifully emulate the fun and carefree spirit VB was hoping to achieve with this collection. Then came the urban surf prints and multi-print looks. When used sparingly, the prints looked fantastic, rocking the LA-London duality that is

synonymous with the Beckham fam. For some of the looks, though, the emphasis on prints took away from the overall craftsmanship of the striking culottes and jackets. Kudos to VB for trying and succeeding in taking a large step toward the carefree and fun. Aside from the typical buzz about Brooklyn and David sitting front row, the Victoria Beckham show created a significant discussion in the fashion world. British news struck

out against Beckham for her skinny and miserable looking models. The show has ignited a discussion about models’ looks, but also about British news’ obsession with Victoria’s body image. This has been an ongoing problem for her since her Spice Girls days. Some argue that her models look no different than those of other designers, while others state this is the trademark VB. -MARA MacLEAN


8A — Friday, September 18, 2015

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The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com


WALK-ON WOLVERINES September 19, UNLV


2015 Schedule

Jim Harbaugh’s first win as coach came last week against Oregon State. Now, against an inferior foe, his Wolverines look to defend Michigan Stadium once again in Saturday’s game against UNLV. The Rebels, led by first-year coach Tony Sanchez, have struggled in the early going. Saturday will be a chance for Michigan to prove its days of struggling against lesser opponents are over.

Max Cohen, Jake Lourim, Max Bultman and Zach Shaw

TABLE OF CONTENTS

3 4 6

UNLV first-year coach Tony Sanchez comes from a much different past than Michigan’s Jim Harbaugh. Behind the scenes of the Michigan football team are the walk-ons who form the scout team. Read their perspective. The Daily breaks down Michigan’s advantage in Saturday’s matchup.

Utah (Sept. 3): Well, at least the mountains were cool?

Michigan State (Oct. 17): These teams play a week earlier than last year, which Mark Dantonio will take as a sign of blatant disrespect.

Oregon State (Sept. 12): Imagine how Jim Harbaugh would have freaked out if Michigan lost.

Minnesota (Oct. 31): Plot twist: Michigan plays Minnesota for the Little Orange Pumpkin.

UNLV (Sept. 19): Did you mean the University of Nevada-Loss Vegas?

Rutgers (Nov. 7): Will Michigan fans storm the field if the Wolverines avenge last year’s loss in Piscataway? We hope not.

BYU (Sept. 26): We don’t know who will score more points, but we do know who will leave the game with more wives.

Indiana (Nov. 14): Boring state. Hopefully not a boring game.

Maryland (Oct. 3): Rumor has it, if you stare at Maryland’s state flag for too long, you become absorbed into the pattern.

Penn State (Nov. 21): Christian Hackenberg could be a first-round pi — aaand, he just got sacked again.

Northwestern (Oct. 10): Are you ready for M00N pt. 2: N00M?

Ohio State (Nov. 28): We wanted to make a joke, but the only one we could think of was, “Haha, your backup QB might win the Heisman.”

Cover by Scott Hardin and Emily Schumer

STAFF PICKS The Daily football writers pick against the spread to predict scores for the top 25 and Big Ten in the 2015 football season.

2

Jake Lourim

Max Cohen

Max Bultman

Jen Calfas, Editor in Chief

Zach Shaw

UNLV (+34) at Michigan

UNLV

Michigan

Michigan

Michigan

Michigan

Northern Illinois (+34.5) at No. 1 Ohio State

Ohio State

Ohio State

Ohio State

Ohio State

Ohio State

No. 15 Ole Miss (+7) at No. 2 Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Ole Miss

Alabama

SMU (+37.5) at No. 3 TCU

TCU

SMU

TCU

SMU

TCU

Air Force (+26) at No. 4 Michigan State

Air Force

Michigan State

Air Force

Air Force

Michigan State

Stanford (+10) at No. 6 USC

USC

USC

Stanford

USC

Stanford

South Carolina (+16.5) at No. 7 Georgia

Georgia

South Carolina

South Carolina

Georgia

Georgia

No. 14 Ga. Tech (-2.5) at No. 8 Notre Dame

Georgia Tech

Notre Dame

Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech

No. 9 Florida State (-9) at Boston College

Florida State

Boston College

Boston College

Boston College

Boston College

No. 19 BYU (+17) at No. 10 UCLA

UCLA

BYU

UCLA

BYU

UCLA

No. 11 Clemson (-6) at Louisville

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Georgia State (+43.5) at No 12 Oregon

Oregon

Georgia State

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

No. 18 Auburn (+7) at No. 13 LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

Tulsa (+31) at No. 16 Oklahoma

Oklahoma

Tulsa

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

Nevada (+34) at No. 17 Texas A&M

Texas A&M

Texas A&M

Texas A&M

Texas A&M

Texas A&M

Northern Arizona at No. 20 Arizona

Arizona

Arizona

Arizona

Arizona

Arizona

No. 21 Utah (-14) at Fresno State

Utah

Utah

Utah

Utah

Utah

Connecticut (+21.5) at No. 22 Missouri

Missouri

Missouri

Missouri

Missouri

Missouri

No. 23 Northwestern (+3.5) at Duke

Duke

Northwestern

Northwestern

Duke

Northwestern

Troy (+34.5) at No. 24 Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

UTSA (+24.5) at No. 25 Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Illinois (+9) at North Carolina

Illinois

Illinois

North Carolina

Illinois

Illinois

South Florida (+7) at Maryland

South Florida

South Florida

South Florida

South Florida

South Florida

Kent State (+24) at Minnesota

Minnesota

Minnesota

Minnesota

Minnesota

Minnesota

Nebraska (+3) at Miami (FL)

Miami

Nebraska

Miami

Miami

Miami

Virginia Tech (-6) at Purdue

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Pittsburgh (+9) at Iowa

Iowa

Iowa

Iowa

Iowa

Iowa

Rutgers (+9) at Penn State

Penn State

Penn State

Penn State

Penn State

Penn State

Last week

18-9-1

12-15-1

19-8-1

13-14-1

0-0

Overall

18-9-1

12-15-1

19-8-1

13-14-1

0-0

FootballSaturday — September 19, 2015


UNLV coach Sanchez creates mystery in matchup with ‘M’ Sanchez, Harbaugh match wits in battle of first-year coaches By MAX COHEN Managing Sports Editor

On paper, the Michigan football team’s third foe of the season is its least daunting so far. UNLV enters UNLV at Saturday’s game Michigan at Michigan Stadium lacking Matchup: UNLV 0-2; three things: a Michigan 1-1 win, a Power Five conference When: Saturday affiliation and 12 P.M. an established college football Where: Michigan coach. Stadium But it is the third of those TV/Radio: Big Ten shortcomings Network that could have made the Wolverines’ preparation for Saturday’s contest difficult. The Rebels are led by coach Tony Sanchez who — like Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh — is in his first year at the school. However, Sanchez’s résumé looks very different from Harbaugh’s: Prior to this season, he had never held a position higher than an undergraduate assistant at the collegiate level. Now, Sanchez is faced with a thorough rebuilding job. His team won just two games last season. Sanchez arrived at UNLV this offseason from Bishop Gorman High School in Las Vegas, where he compiled an 85-5 record in six seasons to go along with six straight state titles. Sanchez sent 25 players to Football Bowl Subdivision schools during his tenure at Bishop Gorman. Prior to his time at Bishop Gorman,

Sanchez had held various different coaching positions at high schools in California, New Mexico and Texas. Michigan was forced to get a little creative in preparing for the Rebels this week because of Sanchez’s limited body of work at the collegiate level. Harbaugh said Monday that the Wolverines would study film of the teams Sanchez’s assistants have worked with in the past. But making judgments and preparations solely based off of Sanchez’s high school games could be difficult. Harbaugh did not seem overly concerned with the proposition, confident that his staff would get the job done and “dive in and start attacking” the preparation. Harbaugh, though he has never met Sanchez in person, has been impressed with UNLV’s coach. “I like that he’s come from a non-traditional way of doing it,” Harbaugh said. “I like following him. I like watching what his career’s going to be like. He’s had success. Looks good. I like the way he coaches his team. I like the way they’re playing. But at the same time, we’ve got to guard against it and make sure we play well.” The matchup could present another opportunity for Michigan’s run game to gel. The Wolverines rushed for 225 yards last weekend against Oregon State, providing the team with something to build off of against UNLV’s rush defense, which has struggled so far this year. The Rebels allowed 273 yards on the ground last weekend against UCLA and 185 in their season opener against Northern Illinois. If Michigan can pound the run game, it could open things up and render some of the question marks about UNLV’s game plan irrelevant. The Rebels’ pass defense,

RUBY WALLAU/Daily

though, should enter the game with some level of confidence. UNLV intercepted three passes against the Bruins last weekend, and even though two of them came late in the game when UCLA’s backup quarterback was under center, the Rebels did manage to pick off Bruins freshman sensation Josh Rosen once. Michigan fifth-year senior quarterback Jake Rudock will look to avoid the same fate after starting off his Wolverine career with four interceptions in two games. If he’s able to control the turnovers, Sanchez’s first win at the collegiate level will be much harder to come by. But no matter what happens Saturday, Harbaugh believes Sanchez’s wins will come, despite his unorthodox coaching background. “More than one way to skin a cat,” Harbaugh said.

FOLLOW OUR BEAT WRITERS DURING THE GAME FOR UPDATES: @MAXACOHEN, @_ZACHSHAW, @M_BULTMAN, @JAKELOURIM

LUNA ANNA ARCHEY/Daily

Junior running back De’Veon Smith (bottom) and fifth-year senior Jake Rudock (top) lead the Michigan football team’s offense Saturday against UNLV.

TheMichiganDaily, www.michigandaily.com

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Walk-ons savor opportunity on Michigan football team By ZACH SHAW Daily Sports Editor

The road to glory is paved with AstroTurf and illuminated by early-morning streetlights. If you want to walk onto the Michigan football team, you’ll find that out quickly. You’ll also find out that practice starts at 4:45 a.m., not the listed 5:00 start time. You’ll only make that mistake once. You’ll soon realize that the road to glory is also paved with pain. Maybe it’s getting blown up on the scout team by a future NFL linebacker, maybe it’s holding a 45-pound plate over your head just because coach said so, or maybe it’s sitting in your room at home while your teammates enjoy a trip to Salt Lake City. Regardless, without a scholarship, the coaches don’t owe you anything, and they aren’t afraid to remind you. Walk-on football players are buried in pads, buried in student loans and buried on the depth chart. Free time and energy are as scarce as playing time and recognition. But the largely anonymous Wolverines lace up their cleats and savor it anyways, and Michigan simply wouldn’t be the same without them. *** JAMES COLLER/Daily There’s no way to offer someone a walk-on Fifth-year senior fullback Joe Kerridge walked onto the team and eventually earned a scholarship. Two years and one day later, he was named a team captain. opportunity without it being awkward. You can try to tell a linebacker that he’s “For me it was pretty easy — I always knew to 95 in 1978 and 85 in 1992, a cap that remains scholarship benefits — except the free tuition. undersized, or assure a cornerback that you just I wanted to come here,” Allen said. “It’s my in place today. Despite the distinction, the preferred walkwant to see how he recovers from injury, or tell dream school. I’ve always wanted to play for Suddenly the walk-ons were players ons are welcomed by the rest of the team, on a fullback that fullbacks don’t get scholarships Michigan. previously offered scholarships, and the days one condition: effort. anymore. “It’s always in the back of everyone’s mind when an athlete could literally walk on to the “Once you’re on the team, they don’t care You can tell them whatever you want, but who’s still paying tuition, but Michigan football team about your title,” Allen said. “They care about if every walk-on can read between your lines: I don’t think it was my first were effectively over. you are going to put in effort. You could be from Your team has a limit to how many scholarships priority. I’m fine paying my Today, players have to Alaska, you could be a negative-five-star recruit it can give out, and you didn’t make the cut. student loans. I just want to hustle their way through for all they care. But if you come in and you give “When you go in as a walk-on, you don’t play football and contribute.” discussions with coaches everything you’ve got, they respect you.” expect anything,” said ex-linebacker Mark Fueled by pride with and recruiters, run through Added senior Antonio Whitfield, who played Lawson, who walked onto the 2012 team after an opportunity in tow, drills at camps and jump for the team from January 2014 until last week: being an all-state linebacker in high school. Allen, Lawson and dozens through hoops just to get “As a walk-on, your opportunities might not “You really start from the bottom. You’re on more make the trek to noticed enough for a spot at be as as frequent as guys with a scholarship, the team, but you have the extra motive that, Schembechler Hall. They practice. but you’re going to get opportunities. … If you technically, you weren’t good enough for them know they’re the underdogs “I felt like I really had to look at scout team as an opportunity to prove to give you a scholarship, and you have to prove yearning for playing time, sell myself,” said one former yourself, they’ll notice that, and they’ll find a to everyone that you deserve to be there.” but they’re prepared to go after the starters’ player who spoke to the Daily on the condition way to get you onto the field.” Even with the slight, it was tough for Lawson jobs anyway. of anonymity. “I was a three-star recruit, and Respect is earned in football. But what if you to consider anywhere but Michigan. Few (Michigan) State was ready to welcome me with never get that chance? schools can offer a top-flight education, are *** open arms, but I had to heckle Michigan with close to his Grand Rapids home and happen to my highlight video before they even noticed.” *** boast a football team he grew up rooting for. The term ‘walk-on’ is an overstatement these The vast majority of walk-ons at Michigan Lawson is hardly alone, either. Of the 38 days. could have taken a scholarship elsewhere, For the non-preferred walk-ons, life isn’t as walk-ons on Michigan’s latest roster, 25 are Generations ago, Michigan would carry as but instead took the uphill option with the easy. from the state of Michigan. Many of them many scholarship football players as it could Wolverines. The “regular” walk-ons aren’t allowed in turned down financial aid elsewhere to don the afford, often over 150, so any player on the If they’re talented enough to play but not training camp and preseason, so they have to winged helmet. team who didn’t earn a scholarship joined only talented enough to earn a scholarship, they join wait for the roster limit to be removed at the Among those to make such a decision was by walking to practice one day and making a 20 or so others — known as preferred walk-ons start of the school year to formally try out. Even kicker Kenny Allen, a senior from Fenton. The tryout — literally walking on. — who make the initial 105-man roster. then, gaining acceptance is no picnic. kicker had scholarship offers to Oregon State But with many schools facing budget crises Preferred walk-ons join the team in “They make you go through the worst and Central Michigan and was in talks with after the advent of Title IX and smaller schools June, and are able to train with the team all workouts, both physically and mentally,” other Big Ten schools, but he was drawn to Ann struggling to make it in a sport dominated by summer and attend training camp with the Lawson said. “Like seeing how long you can Arbor after years of spring games and football dynasties, the NCAA limited scholarships to scholarship players. They receive access to hold up a 40-pound plate.” Saturdays. 105 in 1973. They ruled to bring that total down facilities, training tables, tutors and most other And that’s just on the first day.

“Once you’re on the team, they don’t care about your title.”

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FootballSaturday — September 19, 2015

“They kind of try to kill you to see what your motivation is,” Whitfield said. “You have to do 5 a.m. workouts for a full year and kind of get your butt kicked just to show that this is something that you want to do, instead of just going out there and saying ‘I’m on the football team, look at my jersey.’ ” Most actually do quit. But, already behind in conditioning and game planning, even those who stay have virtually no shot at becoming champions that season. Instead, they’re automatically delegated to the scout team. It’s still Michigan football, but the agency is lost. Rather than having a jersey number, they wear their opponents’. “I hated scout team. I openly hated it,” Whitfield said. “But you have to channel that, and I tried to channel that into basically kicking the ass of anyone who lined up against me or trying to make the defense look as bad as possible whenever I got the ball.” Earning respect is equally hard. Players are skeptical of newcomers without a full summer of practicing and do their best to test out the new guys. Whitfield remembered this clearly. During practice, he broke through a hole in the line with plenty of daylight. That daylight was sealed quickly by linebacker Jake Ryan, now a linebacker for the Green Bay Packers. The 6-foot-3 Ryan crushed the 5-foot-4 Whitfield’s body, but not his spirit. “A lot of people were looking at me seeing how I would handle being popped like that,” Whitfield said. “I got right back up, and after that, people kind of joked about it, but I think they saw then that I wasn’t going to quit — I was a part of the team.” Getting hit by Ryan is tough, but the mental perseverance of pushing yourself even though you won’t see the field all season, maybe ever, is the tougher challenge. If you can’t find the motivation yourself, you don’t have to look far at Michigan.

“I thought this (game) was won with the week of practice,” Harbaugh said. “Everybody contributed. The look team, the scout team, had its best week. Guys really challenging (the starters) made those practices extremely good. “Hopefully this shows our team that these games can be won during the week. ... Our look squad was playing inspired. They were challenging, not just out there.” Harbaugh’s boss, interim Athletic Director Jim Hackett, stood off to the side, beaming. Schembechler once called him “the best demo team center in the whole country.” Never mind that it had been decades since Hackett’s playing days. The effort bubbled through to the surface for Schembechler, and Harbaugh was having similar sentiments with his 2015 team. Some may dismiss the words as coach talk, but Whitfield, who went through the coach’s famous ‘submarine’ training camp, insists Harbaugh practices what he preaches, and that walk-ons and future NFL draft picks have a chance to shine.

“During this fall camp, it was the only time I’ve seen or heard of a scout team that had so many moving parts and so many starters taking reps on the scout team,” Whitfield said. “Literally any day, anyone could be on scout team, so we were constantly competing and constantly rolling that depth chart.” *** The dream for every walk-on is to shed that title. With players retiring, graduating or not making it to campus, occasional scholarship openings come up. Just before the Oregon State game, Allen and senior linebacker Dan Liesman were the fortunate ones to live that dream. Through gimmicks, surprises and viral videos, other programs make a fuss about walk-ons getting scholarships. Under Harbaugh, who avoids gimmicks like the plague, it’s nothing more than a brief meeting and a handshake. It may seem callous or unappreciative, but on

“I hated scout team. I openly hated it.”

the inside, it’s simply the recognition that walkons were a part of the team all along. Fifth-year senior fullback Joe Kerridge, who earned his scholarship two years and one day before being named team captain for this season, thinks this is the way to go. Kerridge nearly ended his career in high school due to a knee injury, but he earned an opportunity at Michigan. From then on, he was a nameless face sweating it all out in training camp, finding motivation in the quotes his father sent him every day. Among them: Lead with silence, let your success do the talking. For Kerridge, the light turned on. Suddenly the seemingly futile scout-team reps, the Friday workouts while the team traveled and the lack of scholarship meant something: The success doesn’t come from being noticed, it comes from contributing every day. “It’s been a climb for me over these years,” Kerridge said. “Starting out as a walk-on, I tore my ACL in high school, I came in and had to fight through everything, finally was awarded that scholarship.” It may seem like a lot of effort to be on the team, but that’s just how the walk-ons like it.

Senior Kenny Allen kicks off in Michigan’s opener at Utah. Allen earned a scholarship this season after three years as a walk-on.

*** Michigan has been among the premier collegiate football programs in the country for some time, and its walk-on players are no exception. Former Michigan coach Bo Schembechler famously pushed his scout team and walk-ons harder than other schools, even chasing down scout team quarterback John Paciorek in 1985 when he heard Paciorek planned on quitting. He eventually gave the gunslinger his blessing to leave the program, but the message was clear. “That Bo would even take the time out for a guy like me means more than you could ever imagine,” Paciorek told The Michigan Today in 2011. Astute Michigan fans will know that the starting quarterback the year Paciorek quit was current Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh. Though a scholarship player, Harbaugh himself spent 1982 on the scout team and never lost track of the importance of the walk-ons. This came to fruition after Harbaugh’s first win as a coach at Michigan. After defeating Oregon State, 35-7, Harbaugh took all of 30 seconds in his press conference before mentioning the key to success.

ALLISON FARRAND/Daily

TheMichiganDaily — www.michigandaily.com

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FootballSaturday —September 19, 2015


TheMichiganDaily — www.michigandaily.com

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Breakdown: Michigan vs. UNLV By MAX BULTMAN Daily Sports Editor

Michigan and UNLV enter their Week 3 matchup riding completely opposite waves of momentum. The Wolverines cruised to a 35-7 win over Oregon State in coach Jim Harbaugh’s home debut, while the Rebels were the victims of a 37-3 pounding at the hands of No. 10 UCLA. And while Michigan fans should have learned by now not to take an opponent for granted, this one feels lopsided coming in. UNLV runs the ball a lot, but that just happens to be the strength of the Wolverines’ defense. The Rebels also aren’t great at stopping the run, which is exactly what Michigan will try to make them do. Here’s the Daily’s breakdown of the upcoming matchup: Michigan pass offense vs. UNLV pass defense

De’Veon Smith will have another chance to run wild against the Rebels. UNLV allowed 5.8 yards per carry to UCLA last week, and Michigan has a good chance to exploit the defense for similar numbers on Saturday. Beyond Smith, Harbaugh indicated Monday that redshirt junior running back Drake Johnson would have a larger role in the offense this week. Johnson is coming off his second torn anterior cruciate ligament, but if he can emerge with a productive game this weekend, it would be great news for the Wolverines. Johnson was able to pick up chunks of yards toward the end of last season, and he could be extremely valuable as a change of pace. Michigan should be able to outmuscle UNLV at the line, and with Smith’s penchant for breaking tackles, it could be a long day for the Rebels. Edge: Michigan

Michigan passing game coordinator Jedd Fisch said Wednesday he would love for his quarterback to have 70 percent completions, two touchdowns and no interceptions in any game. For fifth-year senior Jake Rudock, achieving those goals may be a little tricky against the Rebels. UNLV limited UCLA’s true freshman quarterback Josh Rosen to just 223 yards on 22-for-42 passing with one touchdown and an interception. Some of those incompletions were unforced errors by Rosen, to be sure, but Rosen is also a more talented quarterback than Rudock. The Bruins didn’t complete a pass longer than 29 yards, but that shouldn’t be much of a concern for Michigan, which will do most of its damage in the short- and midrange passing game. Michigan has the edge in the passing game, but it likely won’t need it. The Wolverines should be up big by halftime, and if last week was any indication, they’ll roll with the ground game the rest of the way. Edge: Michigan Michigan rush offense vs. UNLV rush defense A week after pounding Oregon State for 126 yards and three touchdowns, junior running back

6

UNLV pass offense vs. Michigan pass defense Even when their starting quarterback is at full health, this isn’t an area of strength for the Rebels. UNLV averages 192.5 pass yards per game, 88th-most in the country. Things could be even worse against Michigan, as starting quarterback Blake Decker is questionable with a strained leg muscle. If Decker can’t go, or is limited, sophomore Kurt Palandech will be under center for the Rebels. Palandech is inexperienced, so it’s unclear how much they’ll throw if he’s in the game. Against UCLA, he was 4-for-15 for four yards passing. One thing UNLV does have in the passing game is a target who can challenge junior cornerback Jourdan Lewis. Devonte Boyd has eight receptions for 162 yards, including a 64-yard touchdown catch against Northern Illinois. Still, there’s not much chance of the Rebels consistently making big plays through the air. Decker is a capable signal-caller, but he’s at the mercy of a relatively small offensive line and a Michigan pass rush that includes behemoth redshirt junior Willie Henry.

UNLV rush offense Michigan rush defense

vs.

Neither aspect of UNLV’s offense is very good, but if you were forced to pick one, its run game is slightly more threatening. Junior Keith Whitely is the go-to back when the Rebels run the ball, and he has been solid thus far in 2015. Whitely averages 4.3 yards per carry, and while that’s buoyed by one 41-yard rush, his 33 carries this season mean the Wolverines can expect to see a steady dose of him Saturday. Fortunately for Michigan, its run defense is plenty equipped to handle Whitely and any other back the Rebels roll out. Redshirt junior Chris Wormley has been a monster on the defensive line, and there’s no reason to believe that will change against UNLV. The Rebels lean toward a more power-running style, but, oddly, they do so primarily out of the shotgun. That means the ball carrier is starting behind the line of scrimmage, and with an offensive line that’s far from intimidating, that means trouble for UNLV. Edge: Michigan Special teams Freshman receiver Brian Cole

came close to blocking numerous punts last week against Oregon State, something that will be fun to watch as the season goes on. Redshirt freshman Jabrill Peppers is always a threat to take one to the house, and he has proven to be sure-handed fielding punts as well. Fifth-year senior punter Blake O’Neill has been as good as advertised — if not better — and senior Kenny Allen has displayed a pair of quality placekicking performances. For the Rebels, Nolan Kohorst is an asset at placekicker. He’s 4-for-4 on the year with an impressive long of 51, but even that depends on the Rebels’ ability to get him to the 34-yard line. Logan Yunker averages 42.8 yards per punt — the exact same as O’Neill — and will be the first non-Australian punter Michigan has faced this year. Neither team has been especially good in the return game, but Peppers is the most dangerous returner by far.

momentum from its drubbing of Oregon State. Both teams have new coaches, but the Rebels’ Tony Sanchez was a high school coach from 1998 before this season, while Harbaugh is straight out of the NFL. Look for Harbaugh to keep his team grounded, not for Sanchez to seize the moment. Edge: Michigan Prediction: UNLV 6

UNLV will be fired up to earn its first win of the season, but must attempt to do so in front of more than 100,000 fans. Michigan will be riding a wave of

Michigan vs. UNLV

29

UNLV wins since 2005, a span of 10 seasons

36,800

Capacity at UNLV’s Sam Boyd Stadium (34 percent of Michigan Stadium’s)

191

Rushing yards until Michigan’s De’Veon Smith reaches 1,000 for his career

2010

The last time UNLV played in the Eastern time zone

Edge: Michigan

FootballSaturday, September 19, 2015

38,

BY THE NUMBERS

Edge: Push Intangibles

Michigan

ALLISON FARRAND/Daily

Redshirt junior defensive tackle Chris Wormley has six tackles for loss in two games this season.


What to watch for on Saturday Wolverines seek fast start, backup running backs vie for playing time By JAKE LOURIM Managing Sports Editor

The Michigan football team may play its easiest game of the season Saturday, barring further collapse by a Big Ten team such as Rutgers or Maryland. This week, the UNLV Rebels (0-2) visit Michigan Stadium to give the Wolverines a nonconference tune-up. Brigham Young comes to town next week before the conference season starts, so Michigan would be wise to tighten up each of its units now. Here’s what to watch for in Saturday’s game. 1. How does Michigan start? The Wolverines have started the game on defense in both games this season and have surrendered long drives both times — a long field goal at Utah and an easy touchdown drive against Oregon State. Michigan has settled in both times but could use a better start this week. UNLV, meanwhile, was overmatched against UCLA last week but did take a 17-3 lead early against Northern Illinois in the season opener. The Rebels’ slim chances of an upset would stay alive a little longer if they can get off to a strong start. But the first quarter seems to point Michigan’s way. Sam Boyd Stadium in Las Vegas seats 36,800, about one third of the capacity of the Big House, so that could be an adjustment for the Rebels. UNLV also hasn’t played in the Eastern time zone since 2010, and Saturday’s game kicks off at noon Eastern — 9 a.m. in Las Vegas. The Wolverines could let their fans relax a bit if they can take advantage of the time difference. 2. Will a backup quarterback (or quarterbacks) see substantial playing time? Junior quarterback Shane Morris lost the starting competition to fifth-year senior Jake Rudock, but common

LUNA ANNA ARCHEY/Daily

Junior running back Derrick Green had eight carries for 35 yards and a touchdown against Oregon State, and he could have another chance to prove himself against UNLV.

wisdom — as well as the depth chart — implies he is still the No. 2 quarterback. Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh confirmed that fact after the Oregon State win Saturday, even though redshirt freshman Wilton Speight, not Morris, came in to take a knee at the end of the game. Harbaugh said Morris, a junior who has seen game action, had come too far to be the quarterback who cleans up at the end of the game. Morris could redshirt this season if Rudock remains the starter all season, so the Wolverines will use him only if they need him in a close game. Speight played just a few snaps against the Beavers, but if this week’s game turns into a blowout sooner, he could get a little extra playing time. We could even see a third quarterback, depending on the score.

3. What will Michigan’s defense throw at UNLV? The Wolverines admitted they were partially caught off-guard by Utah’s up-tempo offense in the first game. But they returned to form by dominating Oregon State last week, allowing just 59 total yards after the first drive of the game. The Beavers also took one sack from Michigan’s Chris Wormley and completed just one pass in the second half. They eventually switched quarterbacks in search of a spark, but to no avail. So what do Wormley and Co. have in store for the Rebels? Blake Decker started UNLV’s first two games at quarterback, but he is questionable for Saturday with a groin injury. If he can’t go, sophomore Kurt Palandech will get the nod in a loud environment.

The Wolverines and defensive coordinator D.J. Durkin could dial up the pressure early on to try to get to the quarterback. Michigan has also made it a goal to force more turnovers. Its only takeaway at Utah was an interception on a Hail Mary at the end of the half, and it forced one more last week. The players and coaches insist their performances have been better in practice and that it’s just a matter of time before it shows up in games. This week would be a good week to start. 4. Does anyone besides De’Veon Smith have a chance at running back? Smith, junior Ty Isaac, junior Derrick Green and redshirt junior Drake Johnson were all competing for the starting job in

fall camp. Though the coaches were open to playing more than one initially, they said before the season they were looking to establish one as the workhorse. It appears after two games that Smith has become that guy. In two games, Smith has 40 carries, compared to 10 each for Isaac and Green and one for Drake Johnson, who is still regaining full speed after a torn ACL last November. More notably, Smith has had success in those carries, breaking out for 126 yards and three touchdowns last week. After that performance, the window for the other backs may be closing. If Saturday’s game is lopsided and one of the other three gets an opportunity, it might be one of their last chances to seize playing time before the De’Veon Smith Show keeps rolling into the Big Ten season.

TheMichiganDaily, www.michigandaily.com

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Show me the money? Not what Harbaugh’s about, ex-agent says Leigh Steinberg discusses experience with coach, stays optimistic for future By MAX COHEN Managing Sports Editor

When Jim Harbaugh spurned lucrative NFL offers to return to college and coach the Michigan football team this offseason, the overwhelming reaction nationally was one of surprise — surprise that Harbaugh would leave the sport’s highest level, and surprise that he would forsake the financial benefits that come with that challenge. Harbaugh’s first agent during his NFL playing career, Leigh Steinberg, had no such reaction. He has seen Harbaugh’s love for Michigan, ever since the first time he met Harbaugh in Ann Arbor soon after Harbaugh’s college career at Michigan ended. Harbaugh was ill that day, answering the door wrapped in blankets, but the two still met and forged a player-agent relationship that lasted much of Harbaugh’s playing career. Steinberg, once an NFL superagent, is widely considered the inspiration for the movie Jerry Maguire, in which the agent’s primary client frequently yelled at the agent, “Show me the money.” Harbaugh, Steinberg said Thursday, was never that kind of client. “He might be, of the 300 to 400 athletes I’ve worked with, the least concerned with what the economics were of his contract,” Steinberg said in a phone interview. In Steinberg’s experience, most players use contract negotiations to prove their value compared to other players. Once, when Steinberg negotiated an expensive deal for Buffalo Bills running back Thurman Thomas, Dallas Cowboys running back Emmitt Smith insisted that his next deal be worth one dollar more than Thomas’. Harbaugh had no such request

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RUBY WALLAU/Daily

Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh has never been concerned with financial comparisons between contract offers, as a player or as a coach.

during his contract negotiations. “Even though all of the figures were explained to him and he had all of the information, his only question was, ‘Do you think it’s fair?’ ” Steinberg said. If Steinberg answered in the affirmative, Harbaugh would agree to the deal. Steinberg visited Ann Arbor this week to speak in front of the University of Michigan Sports Law Society. Steinberg’s book, The Agent, My 40-Year Career Making Deals and Changing the Game, was recently released in paperback. Steinberg will also lead the Leigh Steinberg Agent Academy on Sept. 26 for aspiring agents. Steinberg has struggled at times

FootballSaturday, September 19, 2015

in recent years, battling alcoholism and financial difficulties. His life has experienced drastic changes since the peak of his career. Steinberg is no longer the premier agent he once was. But in Harbaugh, Steinberg sees a rock, a coach who acts very similarly to the way he did during his playing days. Steinberg stopped in to visit Harbaugh during his trip to Ann Arbor, and it was just like old times. They joked about their memories — especially the time during Harbaugh’s rookie year when they fired squirt guns at a Bears executive to ease the tension during contract negotiations — and talked about

“He might be ... the least concerned with what the economics were.”

the present. In Steinberg’s eyes, Harbaugh is as happy as he has ever been. He’s at the school he loves with a family he loves and a coaching staff that will work hard with him. None of Harbaugh’s coaching success surprises Steinberg. He claims that he could see a coaching career in Harbaugh’s future even in the early days of his playing career. He points to the way Harbaugh dealt with adversity, particularly in how he earned the nickname “Captain Comeback” when he quarterbacked the Indianapolis Colts. “He had a unique ability to tune out all the discord and notes that might come with adversity and to elevate his level of play in critical situations,” Steinberg said. Like everyone else, he sees the quirkiness in Harbaugh. He remembers a Super Bowl party in the San Diego Zoo when Harbaugh disappeared for a couple of hours, only to be

found “ensconced back in a cage somewhere, having a good time.” That quirkiness, Steinberg believes — combined with Harbaugh’s sense of humor — helps him stay composed and keep perspective in stressful times. “He’d like to see the irony in things,” Steinberg said. “So whenever things are going wrong, it’s like, ‘What’s next? Locusts? A river of blood? Darkness?’ He had a great perspective about things. It was not that he was oblivious to adversity, it’s just that he accepted it and could joke about it.” Steinberg has no doubt that Harbaugh will turn Michigan into a power in the next few years. He has seen the coach’s values remain strong and unbending, his mettle tested time and time again. More than anything else, Steinberg knows that Harbaugh is not involved in the game of football just to see the money.


2015-09-18